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Sample records for 33rd dallas tx

  1. 78 FR 54795 - Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Dallas, Addison Airport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... to air traffic flows in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area has made it necessary to lower the... 71 by amending Class D airspace at Addison Airport, Dallas, TX. Adjustments to air traffic flows in... accessed through the FAA's Web page at...

  2. 76 FR 318 - Designation for the Columbus, OH; Dallas, TX; and Decatur, IN Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ...)). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the May 25, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 29310), GIPSA requested applications for... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation for the Columbus, OH; Dallas, TX; and Decatur, IN Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, USDA....

  3. 75 FR 17851 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Dallas-Fort Worth, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace for the Dallas- Fort Worth, TX area (74 FR 57617) Docket No... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of... follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963...

  4. 75 FR 16514 - Maxim Integrated Products, Formerly Known as Dallas Semiconductor, Dallas, TX; Amended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... certification for workers of the subject firm. The workers produced integrated circuits (analog and mixed signal... shift in production of integrated circuits (analog and mixed ] signal) to Japan, Thailand and the... Employment and Training Administration Maxim Integrated Products, Formerly Known as Dallas...

  5. 78 FR 34121 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Dallas Water Utilities, Dallas, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... site. Dallas Water Utilities contracted with AR Consultants, Inc. to complete the recovery of all bone fragments from the discovery site and insure that no further burials were in the immediate vicinity. AR.... indicates that the remains are of Native American ancestry. Radiocarbon dating of the bone attributes...

  6. 76 FR 33333 - Use of Small Area Fair Market Rents for Project Base Vouchers in the Dallas TX Metropolitan Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Use of Small Area Fair Market Rents for Project Base Vouchers in the Dallas TX...-8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background On August 4, 2010 (75 FR 46958), HUD published for... FR 27808) Federal Register notice. Specifically, HUD noted that the methodology for calculating...

  7. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, 33rd, Dallas, TX, Apr. 13-15, 1992, Technical Papers. Pt. 1 - Structures I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The present conference on structures encompasses damage tolerance in composites, buckling in shells and cylinders, computational structural mechanics, the analysis of composite panels with cutouts, postbuckling in plates, adaptive structures, and structural risk. Specific issues addressed include the analysis of delamination in postbuckled dropped-ply laminates, the nonlinear bending response of thin-walled laminated composite cylinders, the global/local finite-element analysis of geometrically nonlinear structures, a Rayleigh-Ritz design methodology for cutouts in composite structures, and general plate stability using high-order techniques. Also addressed are an adaptive S-method in linear elastostatics, adaptive structures programs for the Strategic Defense Initiative organization, the damping of large space structures with large-stroke adaptive stiffness cables, system reliability and risk assessment, and the application of the variational-asymptotical method to composite plates.

  8. 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Litty, Edward C. (Compiler); Sevilla, Donald R. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held at the Pasadena Conference and Exhibition Center, Pasadena, California, on May 19-21, 1999. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  9. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  10. Impacts of cool cities on air quality: A preliminary modeling assessment for Nashville TN, Dallas TX and Atlanta GA

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Haider

    1998-06-15

    Previous atmospheric modeling efforts that concentrated on the Los Angeles Basin suggested beneficial and significant air quality impacts from cool cities strategies. This paper discusses an extension of similar modeling efforts to three regions, Atlanta GA, Dallas - Ft. Worth TX, and Nashville TN, that experience smog and air quality problems. According to the older ozone air quality standard (120 ppb), these regions were classified as serious, moderate, and marginal, respectively, but may be out of compliance with respect to the newer, 80-ppb/8-hours standard. Results from this exploratory modeling work suggest a range of possible impacts on meteorological and air quality conditions. For example, peak ozone concentrations during each region's respective episode could be decreased by 1-6 ppb (conservative and optimistic scenarios, respectively) in Nashville, 5-15 ppb in Dallas - Fort Worth, and 5-12 ppb in Atlanta following implementation of cool cities. The reductions are generally smaller than those obtained from simulating the Los Angeles Basin but are still significant. In all regions, the simulations suggest, the net, domain-wide effects of cool cities are reductions in ozone mass and improvements in air quality. In Atlanta, Nashville, and Dallas, urban areas benefiting from reduced smog reach up to 8460, 7350, and 12870 km{sup 2} in area, respectively. Results presented in this paper should be taken as exploratory and preliminary. These will most likely change during a more comprehensive modeling study to be started soon with the support of the US Environmental Protection Agency. The main purpose of the present project was to obtain the initial data (emission inventories) for these regions, simulate meteorological conditions, and perform preliminary sensitivity analysis. In the future, additional regions will be simulated to assess the potential of cool cities in improving urban air quality.

  11. 77 FR 65360 - Foreign-Trade Zone 168-Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... Production Activity, Richemont North America, Inc. dba Cartier (Eyewear Assembly/Kitting), Grand Prairie, TX...), located in Grand Prairie, Texas. The notification conforming to the requirements of the regulations of...

  12. 78 FR 11816 - Foreign-Trade Zone 168-Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Richemont...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 65360, 10/26/2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no... Activity, Richemont North America, Inc. dba Cartier (Eyewear Assembly/Kitting), Grand Prairie, TX On... North America, Inc. dba Cartier, within FTZ 168--Site 4, in Grand Prairie, Texas. ] The notification...

  13. 77 FR 25229 - Dallas, Garland & Northeastern Railroad Company-Discontinuance of Trackage Rights Exemption-in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... Surface Transportation Board Dallas, Garland & Northeastern Railroad Company--Discontinuance of Trackage Rights Exemption--in Dallas County, TX Dallas, Garland & Northeastern Railroad Company (DGNO) has filed a... from Union Pacific Railroad Company exclusive trackage rights over the Line. See Dallas,...

  14. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha; Prudell, Joseph H.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe

    2013-07-29

    Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

  15. 78 FR 20167 - 33rd Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 206, Aeronautical Information and Meteorological Data Link...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ...-first meeting of the RTCA Special Committee 206, Aeronautical Information and Meteorological Data Link... Federal Aviation Administration 33rd Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 206, Aeronautical Information and Meteorological Data Link Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department...

  16. The 33rd Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Lowell C.; Gallup, Alec M.

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of the 33rd Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll on the public's attitudes toward the public schools. Includes a summary of key findings and tables showing percentage distributions of responses to each question. (PKP)

  17. 77 FR 24756 - Texas Disaster #TX-00387

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00387 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 04/17/2012... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Dallas, Kaufman, Tarrant. Contiguous Counties:...

  18. Attracting Success in Dallas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, Carlton C.; Cogswell, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the concept and development of "magnet" high schools in Dallas, Texas, as part of their compliance with the desegration court order and also to provide specialized and intensified career training. Each magnet school includes job-oriented instruction in an occupational cluster, planned with business and industry input. (MF)

  19. 33rd Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act," 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, US Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This is the 33rd Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act," 2011. Section 664(d) of the "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act" ("IDEA"), as reauthorized in 2004, requires that the Department of Education report annually on the progress made toward the…

  20. Synthesis of Research Symposium at CLD's 33rd International Conference on Learning Disabilities: "Must Reads for 2011"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiser, Beverly L.; Reed, Deborah K.; Kethley, Caroline I.; Mathes, Patricia G.

    2012-01-01

    In October 2011, Council for Learning Disabilities' (CLD's) research committee members (i.e., authors of this article) presented their "Must Reads" at the organization's 33rd Annual International Conference on Learning Disabilities. In this article, the presenters summarize a few of their selected articles and state why each article is a "Must…

  1. Service with Style: Corinne Hill--Denton Public Library, TX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Although a librarian for only eight years, Corinne Hill is already known in Dallas and Denton, TX, for turning dull, little-used branches into vibrant community centers. A stylish woman with a zest for shopping, Hill loves developing new collections and showing them off. She sees no reason why a library should not be as attractive as any good…

  2. The 33rd IGC, Oslo, Norway 2008; Geoscience World Congress 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, A.; Bjoerlykke, A.

    2007-12-01

    The International Geological Congress (IGC) has been arranged every four years since 1878. During the previous Congress in Florence, Italy, 2004, the Nordic countries were awarded the organisation of the 33rd IGC, which will be held in Oslo, Norway, August 6-14, 2008. We expect between 6000 and 9000 participants to the Congress, which also includes workshops, short-courses, and business meetings, as well as more than 50 pre -and post Congress excursions. The Congress is organised under the umbrella of IUGS and the patronage of UNESCO. The Congress will run with 40 parallel sessions and cover the whole width of the geosciences. About 500 symposia will run in 40 parallel sessions. There will be a major poster session, as well as a large exhibition (Geoexpo 2008), in which industry and other organisations will be able to exhibit their products and services. A number of international affiliations have announced their interest in organising annual business meetings during the Congress. In addition, a number of workshops and short-courses will be arranged. More than 50 excursions are planned for the two weeks before the Congress and one week after. These run in all the Nordic Countries, as well as in NW Russia, Ukraine, Greenland, Svalbard, and the Faeroes Islands. These excursions will give the participants a first-hand insight into Nordic Geosciences, as well as the Nordic natural and cultural heritage. Two major international events are important for the Congress. The "International Polar Year" (IPY) and the United Nations' "International Year of Planet Earth" (IYPE) are both running in the period 2007-2009. The Congress focuses on many of the main themes of IYPE, with major emphasis on "Geoscience and Society". Seven major themes will be treated in full-day plenary sessions of lectures given by invited lecturers. These plenary sessions will have a scientific part in the morning, a key-note lecture at lunch-time, and a societal part in the afternoon, followed by a

  3. PREFACE: 33rd UIT (Italian Union of Thermo-fluid dynamics) Heat Transfer Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, Domenica; Ambrosini, Dario; Sfarra, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    The 33rd UIT (Italian Union of Thermo-Fluid Dynamics) Heat Transfer Conference was organized by the Dept. of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics, University of L'Aquila (Italy) and was held at the Engineering Campus of Monteluco di Roio, L'Aquila, June 22-24, 2015. The annual UIT conference, which has grown over time, came back to L'Aquila after 21 years. The scope of the conference covers a range of major topics in theoretical, numerical and experimental heat transfer and related areas, ranging from energy efficiency to nuclear plants. This year, there was an emphasis on IR thermography, which is growing in importance both in scientific research and industrial applications. 2015 is also the International Year of Light. The Organizing Committee honored this event by introducing a new section, Technical Seminars, which in this edition was mainly devoted to optical flow visualization (also the subject of three different national workshops organized in L'Aquila by UIT in 2003, 2005 and 2008). The conference was held in the recently repaired Engineering buildings, six years after the 2009 earthquake and 50 years after the beginning of the Engineering courses in L'Aquila. Despite some logistical difficulties, 92 papers were submitted by about 270 authors, on eight different topics: heat transfer and efficiency in energy systems, environmental technologies and buildings (32 papers); micro and nano scale thermo-fluid dynamics (5 papers); multi-phase fluid dynamics, heat transfer and interface phenomena (16 papers); computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer (15 papers); heat transfer in nuclear plants (6 papers); natural, forced and mixed convection (6 papers); IR thermography (4 papers); conduction and radiation (3 papers). The conference program scheduled plenary, oral and poster sessions. The three invited plenary Keynote Lectures were given by Prof. Antonio Barletta (University of Bologna, Italy), Prof. Jean-Christophe Batsale (Arts et Metiers

  4. 78 FR 9105 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, DFW Airport, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Request of Release for Permanent Easement of Airport Property. SUMMARY: The...

  5. 75 FR 55401 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, DFW Airport, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request of release for permanent easement of airport property. SUMMARY: The...

  6. Dallas Freeway/HOV system planning study: Year 2015. Interim research report, September 1992-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, C.H.; Lomax, T.J.; Poe, C.M.; Henk, R.H.; Skowronek, D.A.

    1995-06-01

    This study was sponsored by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) as part of an effort to identify a balanced transportation system for the future in the Dallas area. The system should accommodate the projected travel demand at the lowest public cost. The mission of the study is to provide an intermediate planning step between the macroscopic planning analyses performed by NCTCOG and TxDOT`s Regional Planning Office and the detailed corridor analysis performed during the design phase of a roadway improvement project. The proposed system is a set of recommendations to be considered and evaluated as part of the development of the Mobility 2010 Plan Update, the long-range transportation plan for the Dallas area. The Dallas System Planning Study was developed using a methodology that focuses on peak-hour passenger travel demand for the freeways in Dallas and surrounding counties. The study analysis differs from other planning efforts in the region by its focus on peak-hour passenger travel demands and roadway operating conditions, the use of 2015 as the design year for the facilities, and the acceptance of congestion for some alternatives to induce travel in higher-occupancy modes. The intent of the effort was to provide a system that served the travel needs with a reasonable and balanced level of congestion. The study methodology uses an iterative process to examine congestion and the consequent shift in mode so that these two factors are consistent for an alternative.

  7. 76 FR 13083 - Amendment to VOR Federal Airway V-358; TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Federal Register amending thirteen Federal airways in the vicinity of Dallas/ Fort Worth, TX (65 FR 61087... (66 FR 50101). The realignment around P-49 was necessary to assist the United States Secret Service in... in the Federal Register amending the V-358 airway description (74 FR 54896). That rule renamed...

  8. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (25th, Dallas, Texas, 2002). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    For the twenty-fifth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Dallas, TX. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two volumes.…

  9. Dallas Freeway/HOV system planning study: Year 2015. A summary of recommended hov improvements. Interim research report, September 1992-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, C.H.; Lomax, T.J.; Poe, C.M.; Henk, R.H.; Skowronek, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    The Dallas Freeway/High-Occupany Vehicle Lane System Planning Study is a joint project in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART), the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG), and the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI). The intent of this effort is to assist in the development of an area-wide freeway/HOV system that recognizes implementation constraints (right-of-way and construction costs) and provides reasonable peak-hour operating conditions on all freeway facilities, while incorporating the long-range plans developed by TxDOT, DART, and NCTCOG. The proposed system is a set of recommendations to be considered and evaluated as part of the development of the NCTCOG Mobility 2010 Plan Update, the long-range transportation plan for the Dallas area. HOV facilities are a significant part of the recommended system in the Dallas System Planning Study, and their implementation is important to the successful operation of the Dallas area transportation system in the future. The report, therefore, focuses on the recommended HOV improvements from the methodology.

  10. Needs Assessment of Hurricane Katrina Evacuees Residing Temporarily in Dallas.

    PubMed

    King, Richard V; Polatin, Peter B; Hogan, David; Downs, Dana L; North, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the psychosocial needs of Hurricane Katrina evacuees temporarily residing in Dallas, TX, after sheltering but prior to their permanent resettlement. Common trauma exposures were physical exposure to flood water, seeing corpses, witnessing death, and loss of family, friends, or home. Fewer than 10 % met symptom criteria for disaster-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). More than one-fourth met major depressive disorder (MDD) symptom criteria post-disaster but only 15 % had a new (incident) MDD episode after the disaster. Specific trauma exposures and some hurricane-related stressors contributed to risk for both Katrina-related PTSD symptom criteria and incident MDD, but other hurricane-related stressors were uniquely associated with incident MDD. Referral to mental health services was associated with meeting symptom criteria for PTSD and with incident MDD, but only about one-third of these individuals received a referral. Understanding the needs of disaster-exposed population requires assessing trauma exposures and identifying pre-disaster and post-disaster psychopathology.

  11. Needs Assessment of Hurricane Katrina Evacuees Residing Temporarily in Dallas.

    PubMed

    King, Richard V; Polatin, Peter B; Hogan, David; Downs, Dana L; North, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the psychosocial needs of Hurricane Katrina evacuees temporarily residing in Dallas, TX, after sheltering but prior to their permanent resettlement. Common trauma exposures were physical exposure to flood water, seeing corpses, witnessing death, and loss of family, friends, or home. Fewer than 10 % met symptom criteria for disaster-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). More than one-fourth met major depressive disorder (MDD) symptom criteria post-disaster but only 15 % had a new (incident) MDD episode after the disaster. Specific trauma exposures and some hurricane-related stressors contributed to risk for both Katrina-related PTSD symptom criteria and incident MDD, but other hurricane-related stressors were uniquely associated with incident MDD. Referral to mental health services was associated with meeting symptom criteria for PTSD and with incident MDD, but only about one-third of these individuals received a referral. Understanding the needs of disaster-exposed population requires assessing trauma exposures and identifying pre-disaster and post-disaster psychopathology. PMID:26507550

  12. Solar-Heated Office Building -- Dallas, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Solar heating system designed to supply 87 percent of space heating and 100 percent of potable hot-water needs of large office building in Dallas, Texas. Unique feature of array serves as roofing over office lobby and gives building attractive triangular appearance. Report includes basic system drawings, test data, operating procedures, and maintenance instructions.

  13. A brief overview of the 33rd Annual STP Symposium on the translational pathology: relevance of toxicologic pathology to human health.

    PubMed

    Hoenerhoff, Mark J; Silverman, Lee; Francke, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The 33rd Society of Toxicologic Pathology's Annual Symposium focused on translational science and the relevance of toxicologic pathology to human health. Toxicologic pathologists work in diverse settings studying changes elicited by pharmacological, chemical, and environmental agents and factors that modify these responses. Regardless of the work setting, society members are dedicated to the integration of toxicologic pathology into hazard identification, risk assessment, and risk communication regarding human and animal exposure to potentially toxic substances. Toxicologic pathologists routinely face not only questions regarding pathological changes related to compound exposure but also questions concerning what translational relevance those lesions and exposures have to a human population or organ system. This symposium provided a basis for the membership to understand the variety of roles the toxicologic pathologist plays in translational science, where our gaps in translational science are, and how we can move forward to better address the challenges in the field translational science in order to continue to positively impact human health.

  14. Highway planning and operations for the Dallas district: Implementation and evaluation of concurrent flow HOV lanes in Texas. Research report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Skowronek, D.A.; Stoddard, A.M.; Ranft, S.E.; Walters, C.H.

    1997-11-01

    Limited capital investment for major transportation improvements and growth in metropolitan areas require the most efficient use of the existing transportation system. One means to achieve this is high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes. While an extensive system of permanent HOV lanes is planned for the Dallas-Fort Worth urbanized area, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) and Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) have pursued and continue short-term or interim HOV lane projects that would enhance public transportation and overall mobility. There are currently 57 km (35.4 mi) of interim HOV lanes operational in the Dallas area, including a barrier-separated contraflow lane on I-30 (East R.L. Thornton Freeway) and buffer-separated concurrent flow HOV lanes on I-35E North (Stemmons Freeway) and I-635 (Lyndon B. Johnson Freeway). The objective of this research is to investigate the operational effectiveness of the new concurrent flow HOV lanes in the Dallas area, as well as to assess the effectiveness of concurrent flow (buffer-separated) versus contraflow (barrier-separated) HOV lanes. Issues such as person movement, carpool formation, travel time savings, violation rates, and project cost effectiveness are addressed. By understanding the operational performance and issues of both concurrent flow (buffer-separated) HOV lanes and contraflow (barrier-separated) HOV lanes, recommendations can be made on suggested HOV lane polices, including the type of permanent HOV lanes to be implemented in the Dallas area.

  15. Highlights of the Dallas ACS Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeman, Thomas R.; Freilich, Mark; Kelter, Paul B.

    1998-06-01

    Without a doubt, a primary feature of the 1998 Spring National Meeting in Dallas was the High School Program, which was organized by George Hague, and the impact that the Texas teachers had on other participants. Over 150 teachers registered for the meeting and participated in the program. Their organizational skills were used to reinstitute the High School/College Interface Luncheon. (The High School/College Interface Luncheon will also be held at the Fall ACS Meeting in Boston.)

  16. Annual Proceedings of Selected Papers on the Practice of Educational Communications and Technology Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (33rd, Anaheim, California, 2010). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    For the thirty-third year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. This is Volume #2 of the 33rd "Annual Proceedings of Selected Papers on the Practice of Educational Communications and Technology." This volume includes papers…

  17. Space, our next frontier; Proceedings of the conference, Dallas, TX, June 7, 8, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrave, G.

    1985-01-01

    The present conference on space development encompasses space commercialization, legislative, legal, and insurance-related factors in current space programs, political aspects of space militarization and governmental control, the military future uses of space and their consequences, command and control issues arising in space, economic influences on space policy, and recent developments in space solar power generation concepts. Attention is given to public opinion surveys concerning the scientific, military, and economic uses of space, the Leasecraft orbital industrial infrastructure concept, capitalism and democracy in space development, the current status of space law on commercialization topics, the nature of Ballistic Missile Defense, the Soviet Space threat, the High Frontier concept for space defense, lunar solar power systems, solar power satellites, and the utilization of lunar resources for the reduction of lunar base construction costs. Such specific technical issues as microgravity crystal growth and directional solidification, electrophoresis operations for pharmaceuticals, and technical barriers to commercial access to space, are also noted.

  18. 78 FR 57545 - Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Dallas, Addison Airport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... September 6, 2013, at 78 FR 54795, is withdrawn. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Scott Enander, Central... airspace ceiling (78 FR 54795). Subsequent to that publication, the FAA found that references addressing... on September 6, 2013 (78 FR 54795) (FR Doc. 2013-21751), is hereby withdrawn. Authority: 49...

  19. 78 FR 4356 - Proposed Modification of the Dallas/Fort Worth Class B Airspace Area; TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... describes the application procedure. Background In 1973, the FAA issued a final rule (38 FR 13635) which.... In 1993, the FAA issued the Airspace Reclassification final rule (56 FR 65638), which replaced the..., the FAA issued final rules (43 FR 17937, 49 FR 25424, and 51 FR 19749) to fully contain large...

  20. AIAA Dynamics Specialists Conference, Dallas, TX, Apr. 16, 17, 1992, Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This conference presents papers in the fields of spacecraft dynamics, the control of structures, the active flexible wing, flutter characteristics, and rotary-wing aeroelasticity. Also considered are control-structure interaction, unsteady aerodynamics, fixed-wing aeroelasticity, structural dynamics systems, and CSI-sensors and actuators.

  1. Dysfunction of mechanical mitral prosthesis at 33rd week of pregnancy: ECMO support as a complex strategy for the mother and the fetus.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Gaspare; Martucci, Gennaro; Sciacca, Sergio; Longo, Rosalia; Pilato, Michele; Arcadipane, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves have an increased risk of thrombosis and valve malfunctioning. Surgery carries a high risk of mortality for the mother and the fetus. A strategy for effective anticoagulation is crucial for these patients because both oral anticoagulants and heparin are associated with high risks for the mother and the fetus. The treatment of a pregnant woman with thrombosis and valve malfunction is a challenge, even for multidisciplinary teams, as cardiac surgery carries considerable risks. We present a woman at her 33rd week of pregnancy affected by congestive cardiac decompensation due to mechanical mitral prosthesis dysfunction. Given the expanded indication for ECMO and the recent evidence of the procedure's increased safety, even in the peri-partum period, we centered the treatment on VA-ECMO initiation before a Cesarean section (C-section) to guarantee support during surgery and avoid excessive anticoagulation or hypoperfusion to the fetus and as a bridge to cardiac surgery two days later. The strategy resulted in a good outcome with no complications for the mother and the fetus and a reasonable length of stay.

  2. Dysfunction of mechanical mitral prosthesis at 33rd week of pregnancy: ECMO support as a complex strategy for the mother and the fetus.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Gaspare; Martucci, Gennaro; Sciacca, Sergio; Longo, Rosalia; Pilato, Michele; Arcadipane, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves have an increased risk of thrombosis and valve malfunctioning. Surgery carries a high risk of mortality for the mother and the fetus. A strategy for effective anticoagulation is crucial for these patients because both oral anticoagulants and heparin are associated with high risks for the mother and the fetus. The treatment of a pregnant woman with thrombosis and valve malfunction is a challenge, even for multidisciplinary teams, as cardiac surgery carries considerable risks. We present a woman at her 33rd week of pregnancy affected by congestive cardiac decompensation due to mechanical mitral prosthesis dysfunction. Given the expanded indication for ECMO and the recent evidence of the procedure's increased safety, even in the peri-partum period, we centered the treatment on VA-ECMO initiation before a Cesarean section (C-section) to guarantee support during surgery and avoid excessive anticoagulation or hypoperfusion to the fetus and as a bridge to cardiac surgery two days later. The strategy resulted in a good outcome with no complications for the mother and the fetus and a reasonable length of stay. PMID:27056763

  3. In Dallas, School Desegregation is a Business Affair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willie, Charles V.

    The business community in Dallas, Texas, has had considerable influence in developing a school desegregation plan for the Dallas Independent School District. Business leaders' interest in school desegregation stemmed from a desire to maintain a good business climate in a community whose tranquility, they felt, was being threatened by emerging…

  4. "Dallas": The Mythology of Crime and the Moral Occult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mander, Mary S.

    The mythic structure of the popular television melodrama, "Dallas," may be analyzed in order to shed light on the reasons underlying the program's wide appeal. First of all, "Dallas" combines the conventions of the crime formula in such a way as to create a new mythology of crime for television, one similar to that found in the movie, "The…

  5. 60-day waste compatibility safety issue and final results for 244-TX DCRT, grab samples TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Three grab samples (TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3) were taken from tank 241- TX-244 riser 8 on November 7, 1995 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on that same day. Samples TX-95-1 and TX-95-2 were designated as supernate liquids, and sample TX-95-3 was designated as a supernate/sludge. These samples were analyzed to support the waste compatibility safety program. Accuracy and precision criteria were met for all analyses. No notifications were required based on sample results. This document provides the analysis to support the waste compatibility safety program.

  6. President Kennedy in Dallas: Dealey Plaza memorialized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.

    2007-07-01

    The assassination of US President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 transformed the US political landscape as well as the trajectory of subsequent world history. The venue of that tragic event in Dallas was Dealey Plaza, encompassing the "grassy knoll" and the adjacent book-depository and courthouse buildings. For the past forty years the site has undergone a series of conservation/preservation projects in order to make it more suitable for those visiting either in homage or out of curiosity. One such project concerned the deterioration of ironwork within the "Old Red Courthouse". The building architect noted that both stairway railings and floor-support trusses were corroding and deteriorating at accelerating rates. In most situations of this sort the iron would be sandblasted and repainted. However, in this instance sandblasting was inappropriate due to environmental concerns and logistical limitations. Furthermore, historical authenticity criteria dictated that the metal be preserved with its original unpainted finish. In order to avoid excessive floor loading (in this fragile old building) and the generation significant environmental air pollution (within urban Dallas) the general contractor (Avery Mays, Inc.) opted to evaluate photonic divestment. Both laser cleaning and laser glazing were assessed for efficacy and cost effectiveness. Xenon-flashlamp irradiation was evaluated both with and without citric acid augmentation. Citric acid matrix-assisted flashlamp treatment was selected for the preservation of the courthouse ironwork. This decision was based on three advantages over laser treatments: higher speed and cost effectiveness, preservation of the historic "Oliver Foundry" logo markings, and the chemical passivation and rust resistance of the final surface patina.

  7. Iterated transportation simulations for Dallas and Portland

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Simon, P.; Rickert, M.; Esser, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) is to combine the most important aspects of human decision-making related to transportation, from activities planning (sleep, work, eat, shop,...) via modal and route planning to driving, into a single, consistent methodological and software framework. This is meant to combine the functionalities of activities-based travel demand generation, modal choice and route assignment, and micro-simulation. TRANSIMS attempts to employ advanced methodologies in all these modules. Yet, it is probably the overall framework that is the most important part of this attempt. It is, for example, possible to replace the TRANSIMS microsimulation by another micro-simulation that uses the same input and generates the same output. TRANSIMS uses specific regions as examples in order to ensure that the technology is rooted in the real world. Until about the middle of 1997, an approximately five miles by five miles area in Dallas/Texas was used. Since then, TRANSIMS has moved to using data from Portland/Oregon; a case study for this region is planned to be completed by the end of the year 2000. In this paper the authors give short descriptions of these projects and give references to related publications.

  8. 33 CFR 80.840 - Sabine Pass, TX to Galveston, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine Pass, TX to Galveston, TX... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.840 Sabine Pass, TX to Galveston, TX. (a) A line drawn from the Sabine Pass East Jetty Light to the seaward end of the Sabine Pass...

  9. Highway planning and operations for the Dallas district: Implementation and evaluation of concurrent flow HOV lanes in Texas. Project summary report 1994-14S, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Skowronek, D.A.; Stoddard, A.M.; Ranft, S.E.; Walters, C.H.

    1997-11-01

    Limited capital investment for major transportation improvements and growth in metropolitan areas require the most efficient use of the existing transportation system. One means to achieve this is high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes. While an extensive system of permanent HOV lanes is planned for the Dallas-Fort Worth urbanized area, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) and Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) have pursued and continue to pursue short-term or interim HOV lane projects that would enhance public transportation and overall mobility. There are currently 57 km (35.4 mi) of interim HOV lanes operational in the Dallas area, including a barrier-separated contraflow lane on I-30 (East R.L. Thornton Freeway) and buffer-separated concurrent flow HOV lanes on I-35E North (Stemmons Freeway) and I-635 (Lyndon B. Johnson Freeway). The objective of this research is to investigate the operational effectiveness of concurrent flow (buffer-separated) versus contraflow (barrier-separated) HOV lanes. Issues such as person movement, carpool formation, travel time savings, violation rates, and project cost effectiveness are addressed. By understanding the operational performance and issues of both concurrent flow (buffer-separated) HOV lanes and contraflow (barrier-separated) HOV lanes, recommendations can be made on suggested HOV lane policies, including the type of permanent HOV lanes to be implemented in the Dallas area.

  10. Dazzling Physics Gallery Opens in Dallas Art Deco Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifted Child Today (GCT), 1989

    1989-01-01

    The Dallas Science Place contains 55 interactive displays on observable phenomena, organized into 7 topic areas: motion, waves, matter, electromagnetism, energy, change, and entropy. Attempts were made to keep the exhibits' forms elemental, so that the underlying physical phenomena could be readily observed and experienced. (JDD)

  11. Staffing Levels in the Dallas Independent School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Board of Trustees of the Dallas Independent School District (DISD) asked the Council of the Great City Schools, the nation's primary coalition of large urban school systems, to examine the staffing levels of the school system and determine whether the numbers of staff members employed were appropriate for a district serving as many students as…

  12. Marketing Proposal for a Dallas Based MBA Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garin, Robert H.

    Universities offering the Masters of Business Administration (MBA) degree in Texas were compared, and students presently enrolled in graduate business courses at East Texas State University (ETSU), Dallas, were surveyed. In addition, a marketing proposal to increase student enrollment is proposed. The following seven universities that offer MBA…

  13. 33 CFR 80.850 - Brazos River, TX to the Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brazos River, TX to the Rio Grande, TX. 80.850 Section 80.850 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to the Rio Grande, TX. (a) Except as otherwise described in this section lines drawn continuing...

  14. 33 CFR 80.850 - Brazos River, TX to the Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brazos River, TX to the Rio Grande, TX. 80.850 Section 80.850 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to the Rio Grande, TX. (a) Except as otherwise described in this section lines drawn continuing...

  15. 77 FR 19521 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Austin, TX and Waco, TX, Appropriated Fund Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... (OPM) issued a proposed rule (76 FR 70365) to redefine Burleson and Lampasas Counties, TX, from the... 3206-AM50 Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Austin, TX and Waco, TX, Appropriated Fund... of the Austin, TX, and Waco, TX, appropriated fund Federal Wage System (FWS) wage areas. The...

  16. Analysis of Recent Earthquakes in the Ft. Worth Basin near Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, C. A.; Potter, E.; Hayward, C.; Stump, B.

    2009-12-01

    Between 31 October 2008 and 16 May 2009, the USGS National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) reported 14 earthquakes with magnitudes between 2.5 and 3.3 and epicenters between Dallas and Fort Worth (DFW), Texas. Local residents felt nine of these earthquakes, and news stories expressed locals' concern and speculation that the earthquakes might be related to recent natural gas drilling in the Barnett Shale. We report on analysis of data collected by continuously operating regional stations and by a five-station temporary local network operated in the DFW area between 9 November 2008 and 2 January 2009. We also discuss preliminary results from temporary networks operated since June 2009 near DFW and Cleburne, TX. Both portable deployments were supported by PASSCAL. Among the observations at regional distances, the station WMOK (Wichita Mountain, Oklahoma; Δ = 2.36°) has clear recordings of DFW quakes and initial data processing showed that waveforms from the reported DFW quakes were all highly correlated. Cross correlation of the continuous signal at WMOK with known DFW quake signals found no DFW quakes occurring prior to 30 October 2008, and then ~180 similar events occurring between 30 October and 17 May 2009. These earthquakes had magnitudes of 1.5 and greater, and most occurred in four time periods; 100 occurred from 30 Oct to 1 Nov; 11 on 20 Nov; 18 on 26 December, and 28 on 15-17 May. Eleven of these earthquakes were exceptionally well recorded by the 2008 temporary network, allowing us to determine accurate relative locations using velocities measured in a nearby deep well. Our preferred hypocentral locations have focal depths of ~4.5 km and lie along a 1.1 km SW-NE line on the DFW airport property, south of the main terminal area. The mean epicenter determined for these 11 events is less than 0.5 km from a 4.2 km deep saltwater disposal (SWD) drilled to dispose of brines associated with natural gas production. Injection of brines in this well commenced

  17. 76 FR 53019 - Texas Disaster #TX-00380

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00380 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  18. Aerospace avionics equipment and integration; Proceedings of the Second Conference, Dallas, TX, Nov. 2-4, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference presents papers on hybrid MIL-STD-1553B/1773 electrical/optical buses, the use of interrupts on the IBM PC to generate major and minor frame times, and the use of the IBM PC for MIL-STD-1553 testing. Other topics include single-chip solution of MIL-STD-1553A and MIL-STD-1553B data communications, a simulation model of the SAE AE-9B high speed ring bus, and a high performance dual mode synchronous/asynchronous parallel bus controller utilizing the PI bus standard protocol. Consideration is also given to token rotation timer implementation and global positioning system receiver initialization methods for MIL-STD-1760A.

  19. 75 FR 29310 - Opportunity for Designation in the Columbus, OH; Dallas, TX; and Decatur, IN Areas; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Opportunity for Designation in the Columbus, OH... AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... services provided by the following designated agencies: Columbus Grain Inspection, Inc. (Columbus);...

  20. 78 FR 7429 - Adequacy Status of the Dallas-Fort Worth, TX Reasonable Further Progress 8-Hour Ozone Motor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ...: Response to Court Decision and Additional Rule Changes'' (69 FR 40004). Please note that an adequacy review..., pursuant to 40 CFR 93.104(e). See, 73 FR 4419 (January 24, 2008). Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq. Dated... Vehicle Emission Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection...

  1. 75 FR 4355 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 39 Under Alternative Site Framework Dallas/Fort Worth, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ..., the Board adopted the alternative site framework (ASF) in December 2008 (74 FR 1170, 01/12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/09) as an option for the establishment or reorganization of general-purpose... comment was given in the Federal Register (74 FR 36165-36166, 7/22/09) and the application has...

  2. Airborne study of ozone formation over Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luria, Menachem; Valente, Ralph J.; Bairai, Solomon; Parkhurst, William J.; Tanner, Roger L.

    Twelve research fights were performed during August 2005 over the Dallas (Texas) metropolitan area. The primary objective was to estimate the relative contribution of primary emissions from large point sources, i.e., major power plants, compared with mobile sources in terms of O 3 production. The distinction between the source types was derived from concurrent measurements of SO 2 (tracer for point sources) and CO (tracer for mobile sources) relative to levels of O 3 and NO x (the O 3 precursor). The flights also examined the vertical structure of the atmosphere and its effect on the dispersion/dilution of the trace gases. During the first half of the study the O 3 levels in the Dallas area were relatively low and only during the second half were significantly elevated O 3 levels observed. For the latter period the relationship between maximum O 3 levels, the air mass chemical age and the O 3 yield are evaluated. The results also revealed that mobile sources are the main contributors to the elevated O 3 levels in the Dallas area.

  3. Dallas, police surveillance and the NHF. National Hemophilia Foundation.

    PubMed

    Dubin, C S

    1995-04-01

    In 1995, the National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) held its annual meeting in Dallas amid ongoing controversies over AIDS and viral contamination of the U.S. blood supply. Principal topics were the class action lawsuit, delivering justice to those infected with HIV, and the legislative campaign for government compensation. The Dallas meeting was marked by controversy: the NHF failed to endorse the class action suit against blood supply producers; the NHF Board elections produced a leadership dominated by people without hemophilia and ignored persons who represented change; and a large number of police were present, authorized by the NHF, and seen by many to be a result of the NHF members' concern about potentially unruly demonstrations or possibly as a way of squashing dissent and diversity. The NHF has also discouraged those infected with HIV from taking legal action, and they have openly obstructed the pursuit of legal justice by disseminating misinformation regarding individuals' legal rights. It is felt that the NHF cannot be characterized as a consumer advocacy group and that the Dallas meeting served only to reinforce the view of NHF's role in obstructing the real empowerment of the hemophiliac community.

  4. 76 FR 70365 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Austin, TX and Waco, TX, Appropriated Fund Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Austin, TX and Waco, TX, Appropriated Fund Federal Wage System Wage Areas AGENCY: U.S. Office of... Management is issuing a proposed rule that would redefine the geographic boundaries of the Austin, TX, and... Burleson and Lampasas Counties, TX, from the Austin wage area to the Waco wage area. These changes...

  5. STS-51-L Debris Aboard the USGS Cutter Dallas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    On January 28, 1986, the Space Shuttle Challenger and her seven-member crew were lost when a ruptured O-ring in the right Solid Rocket Booster caused an explosion soon after launch. With the help of the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy, search and recovery teams began retrieving pieces of the Shuttle from the Atlantic Ocean soon after the accident. Vessels brought the debris to the Trident Basin at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where they waited to be shipped to Kennedy Space Center for investigation. The USCG Cutter Dallas transported this fragment of exterior tiling.

  6. TX-100 manufacturing final project report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S.

    2007-11-01

    This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three

  7. Putting College and Career Readiness at the Forefront of District Priorities in Dallas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Shane

    2013-01-01

    Dallas Independent School District's (ISD) efforts to develop a system of college readiness indicators began in 2008, when they received a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant under the foundation's College-Ready Education initiative. With this grant, Dallas ISD's Performance Management and Analytics department developed a…

  8. 75 FR 30852 - Hydroelectric Power Development at Ridgway Dam, Dallas Creek Project, Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Hydroelectric Power Development at Ridgway Dam, Dallas Creek Project, Colorado... contract for hydroelectric power development at Ridgway Dam. SUMMARY: Current Federal policy encourages non... power at Ridgway Dam, a feature of the Dallas Creek Project. Reclamation is considering...

  9. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas is discussed. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  10. Alternative Fuel Transit Buses: DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    2000-11-07

    In 1998, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, a public transit agency in Dallas, Texas, began operating a large fleet of heavy-duty buses powered by liquefied natural gas. As part of a $16 million commitment to alternative fuels, DART operates 139 LNG buses serviced by two new LNG fueling stations.

  11. Characterization of the 2015 Dallas-Irving Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinones, L. A.; DeShon, H. R.; Scales, M. M.; Hayward, C.

    2015-12-01

    In January 2015, a pair of M3.6 earthquakes and numerous M3+ occurred along the border of Irving and Dallas, Texas, in a heavily populated portion of the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area. The Irving-Dallas swarm occurs at the eastern edge of the Fort Worth (Barnett Shale) Basin, an active shale gas production area associated with induced earthquakes. However, the nearest injection well is over 10 km to the northwest and the only nearby production well shutdown in 2012. The cause of the current swarm remains unknown. A temporary seismic network was deployed in early January 2015 to acquire data to improve earthquake location estimates and better characterize the earthquake sequence. Twenty-four stations were deployed, including 13 short-term Texans and 2 USGS NetQuakes instruments. Here, we present high-resolution relative earthquake locations derived using waveform cross-correlation and double difference techniques using both P and S-waves. Waveform data shows a high degree of similarity for both phases throughout the sequence. The P-wave data exhibit power at frequencies ranging from 10 to 40 Hz, while the S-wave data typically exhibit power in the range of 2 to 10 Hz. Initial catalog locations (January-July, 2015) reveal a spatially concentrated sequence of over 480 events, ranging from M0.0 to M3.6, migrating along a NE-SW striking fault. The sequence migrated from southwest to northeast over 4 km in January, but has since migrated back to the southwest. Events occur between 4-8 km in depth, consistent with faulting in the Precambrian basement. Fault plane solutions and event locations suggest a ~70° SE dipping normal fault. Event locations within or near the granitic basement, a series of M3.3+ events, a fault area of ~16 km2, and a NE-SW trending normal fault are consistent with the characteristics of previous North Texas earthquake sequences.

  12. DFW (Dallas-Ft. Worth) microburst on August 2, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1986-01-01

    The features of the microburst on August 2, 1985, related to the Delta 191 accident during the approach to Runway 17L of the Dallas-Ft. Worth Airport is described. Both radar and satellite data, along with ground-based measurements, were used in determining the characteristics of the parent cloud which spawned the most complicated microburst winds ever analyzed by the author. The detailed reconstruction of the airflow and the aircraft's maneuver were made possible by a series of computer analyses of the Digital Flight Data Recorder (DFDR) readout. Both measured and computed values in color diagrams that can be evaluated readily by meteorologists, pilots, structural engineers, and other interested persons in preventing microburst-related accidents in future years are presented.

  13. Solar energy facility at North Hampton Recreation Center, Dallas, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy facility located at the North Hampton Park Recreation and Health Center, Dallas, Texas is presented. The solar energy system is installed in a single story (two heights), 16,000 sq ft building enclosing a gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic surrounded by a recreational area and athletic field. The solar energy system is designed to provide 80 percent of the annual space heating, 48 percent of the annual space cooling, and 90 percent of the domestic hot water requirements. The system's operation modes and performance data acquisition system are described. The system's performance during the months of June, July, August, September, and October of 1979 are presented and show a negative savings of energy. Experience to date indicates however that the system concept has promise of acceptable performance. It is concluded that if proper control and sequencing components was maintained, then the system performance would improve to an acceptable level.

  14. Solar energy facility at North Hampton Recreation Center, Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The solar energy facility located at the North Hampton Park Recreation and Health Center, Dallas, Texas is presented. The solar energy system is installed in a single story (two heights), 16,000 sq ft building enclosing a gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic surrounded by a recreational area and athletic field. The solar energy system is designed to provide 80 percent of the annual space heating, 48 percent of the annual space cooling, and 90 percent of the domestic hot water requirements. The system's operation modes and performance data acquisition system are described. The system's performance during the months of June, July, August, September, and October of 1979 are presented and show a negative savings of energy. Experience to date indicates however that the system concept has promise of acceptable performance. It is concluded that if proper control and sequencing components was maintained, then the system performance would improve to an acceptable level.

  15. C-Band Radar Imagery, Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area in Texas is shown on this image collected by the C-band radar of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On this radar image, smooth areas, such as lakes, roads and airport runways appear dark. Rougher features, such as buildings and trees, appear bright. Downtown Dallas is the bright area at the center of the image, alongside the dark linear floodway of the Trinity River. Dark linear runways of two airports are also seen: Love Field near downtown Dallas in the image center, and Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in the upper left corner. The semi-circular terminal buildings of the international airport can also be seen in the area between the runways. Several large lakes, including Lake Ray Hubbard (upper right) and Joe Pool Lake (lower left) are also seen. Images like these, along with the SRTM topographic data, will be used by urban planners to study and monitor land use, and update maps and geographic information systems for the area. This image represents just 4 seconds of data collection time by the SRTM instrument. The overall diagonal linear pattern is a data processing artifact due to the quick turn-around browse nature of this image. These artifacts will be removed with further data processing.

    This radar image was obtained by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission as part of its mission to map the Earth's topography. The image was acquired by just one of SRTM's two antennas, and consequently does not show topographic data but only the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground. This signal, known as radar backscatter, provides insight into the nature of the surface, including its roughness, vegetation cover, and urbanization.

    This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR

  16. 76 FR 52563 - Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...) entitled Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX in the Federal Register (76 FR 103). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX... Events; Sabine River, Orange, TX. (a) Definitions. As used in this section ``Participant Vessel''...

  17. 78 FR 36631 - Texas Disaster #TX-00408

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00408 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... Deadline Date: 03/12/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  18. 78 FR 48764 - Texas Disaster # TX-00413

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00413 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport...

  19. 76 FR 35260 - Texas Disaster # TX-00375

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00375 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of TEXAS dated 04/26... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  20. 78 FR 39822 - Texas Disaster #TX-00409

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00409 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 06/25/2013... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  1. 75 FR 70763 - Texas Disaster #TX-00363

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00363 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 11/09/2010... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  2. 76 FR 60959 - Texas Disaster # TX-00382

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00382 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small...

  3. 75 FR 48384 - Texas Disaster #TX-00362

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00362 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... State of TEXAS (FEMA-1931- DR), dated 08/03/2010. Incident: Hurricane Alex. Incident Period:...

  4. 76 FR 15358 - Texas Disaster #TX-00371

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00371 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 03/14/2011. Incident: Texas Panhandle Wildfires. Incident Period: 02/27/2011 through 02/28/2011. Effective Date:...

  5. 75 FR 48384 - Texas Disaster #TX-00361

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00361 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas (FEMA-1931-DR... Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Texas: Brooks, Crockett, Dimmit Duval, Edwards, Kenedy, Kinney...

  6. 77 FR 6620 - Texas Disaster #TX-00385

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00385 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 01/30/2012... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Harris. Contiguous Counties: Texas: Brazoria,...

  7. 78 FR 33464 - Texas Disaster #TX-00405

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00405 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 05/29/2013... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Ellis, Hood, Johnson. Contiguous Counties:...

  8. 75 FR 62437 - Texas Disaster #TX-00364

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00364 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 09/29/2010... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Nueces, Contiguous Counties:...

  9. 76 FR 28841 - Texas Disaster # TX-00376

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Disaster Declaration 12564 and 12565 Texas Disaster TX-00376 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... State of Texas dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Wichita County Complex Wildfires. Incident Period: 04/15/2011.... Contiguous Counties: Texas: Archer, Baylor, Clay, Wilbarger, Oklahoma: Cotton, Tillman. The Interest...

  10. 75 FR 1421 - Texas Disaster # TX-00354

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00354 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 01/04/2010... the disaster: Primary Counties: Angelina. Contiguous Counties: Texas: Cherokee, Houston,...

  11. 76 FR 40765 - Texas Disaster #TX-00378

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00378 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 07/05/2011... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Grimes. Contiguous Counties: Texas: Brazos,...

  12. 76 FR 58329 - Texas Disaster #TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12815 and 12816 Texas Disaster TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... the State of Texas (FEMA-4029-DR), dated 09/09/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/30/2011... Loans Only): Texas: Caldwell, Fayette, Lee, Travis, Williamson. The Interest Rates are: ] Percent...

  13. 76 FR 24555 - Texas Disaster #TX-00375

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00375 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas. Dated 04/26/2011. Incident... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Jeff Davis. Contiguous Counties: Texas,...

  14. 78 FR 27468 - Texas Disaster # TX-00401

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00401 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated May 2, 2013... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Mclennan. Contiguous Counties: Texas: Bell;...

  15. 78 FR 72140 - Texas Disaster # TX-00417

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00417 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 11/22/2013... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Caldwell, Hays, Travis. Contiguous Counties:...

  16. Diversions from Red River to Lake Dallas, Texas; and related channel losses, February and March 1954

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, Pat H.

    1954-01-01

    During the period Feb. 10 to Mar. 3, 19541 the City of Dallas pumped 1,363 acre-feet of water from its Red River plant into Pecan Creek (a tributary of Elm Fork Trinity River) 3.5 miles above Gainesville; 1,272 acre-feet of this diversion reached the head of Lake Dallas. Discharge records were obtained at four points along the channels. This water was transported down the channels of Pecan Creek and Elm Fork Trinity River to Lake Dallas, a distance of about 31 miles.

  17. Prometheus unbound: A study of the Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport. [Socio-economic considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starling, J. D.; Brown, J.; Dominus, M. I.

    1975-01-01

    The history of the controversies in the development of the Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport is detailed. Present technological and organizational management problems are outlined. Maps and illustrations are included.

  18. Hydrologic data for urban studies in the Dallas, Texas, metropolitan area, 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, C.M.; Butler, H.S.; Benton, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains rainfall and runoff data collected during the 1979 water year for drainage basins of Joes Creek, Bachman Branch, Turtle Creek, Coombs Creek, Cedar Creek, White Rock Creek, Elam Creek, Fivemile Creek, Whites Branch, Prairie Creek, Tenmile Creek, Buck Creek, and South Mesquite Creek in the Dallas metropolitan area. The information will be useful in determining the extent to which progressive urbanization will affect the yield and mode of occurrence of storm runoff. Rainfall-runoff computations are presented for eight storm periods during the 1979 water year. The report for the 1979 water year completes the Dallas urban project. Hydrologic data contained in this report and in all previous reports of the Dallas and Fort Worth metropolitan areas are being used to prepare an interpretive report entitled ' Effects of urbanization on floods in the Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas, metropolitan areas, ' which will be released in 1981. (USGS)

  19. Big Bend National Park, TX, USA, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Sierra del Carmen of Mexico, across the Rio Grande River from Big Bend National Park, TX, (28.5N, 104.0W) is centered in this photo. The Rio Grande River bisects the scene; Mexico to the east, USA to the west. The thousand ft. Boquillas limestone cliff on the Mexican side of the river changes colors from white to pink to lavender at sunset. This severely eroded sedimentary landscape was once an ancient seabed later overlaid with volcanic activity.

  20. 78 FR 18314 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 39-Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Production Activity; CSI Calendering, Inc. (Rubber Coated Textile Fabric); Arlington, Texas The Dallas/Fort... for the calendering, slitting, and laminating of RFL (resorcinol formaldehyde latex) textile...

  1. Hanford Single Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-TX Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Girardot, C. L.; Harlow, D> G.

    2014-07-22

    This document identifies 241-TX Tank Farm (TX Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-TX-107 and 241-TX-114) identified in RPP-RPT-50870, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-TX Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the TX Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  2. Impacts of aircraft deicer and anti-icer runoff on receiving waters from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Texas, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Steven R; Harwell, Glenn R; Geis, Steven W; Bergman, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    From October 2002 to April 2004, data were collected from Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport (TX, U.S.A.) outfalls and receiving waters (Trigg Lake and Big Bear Creek) to document the magnitude and potential effects of aircraft deicer and anti-icer fluid (ADAF) runoff on water quality. Glycol concentrations at outfalls ranged from less than 18 to 23,800 mg/L, whereas concentrations in Big Bear Creek were less because of dilution, dispersion, and degradation, ranging from less than 18 to 230 mg/L. Annual loading results indicate that 10 and 35% of what was applied to aircraft was discharged to Big Bear Creek in 2003 and 2004, respectively. Glycol that entered Trigg Lake was diluted and degraded before reaching the lake outlet. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations at airport outfalls sometimes were low (<2.0 mg/L) but typical of what was measured in an urban reference stream. In comparison, the DO concentration at Trigg Lake monitoring sites was consistently greater than 5.5 mg/L during the monitoring period, probably because of the installation of aerators in the lake by DFW personnel. The DO concentration in Big Bear Creek was very similar at sites upstream and downstream of airport influence (>5.0 mg/L). Results of toxicity tests indicate that effects on Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, and Selanastrum capricornutum are influenced by type IV ADAF (anti-icer), not just type I ADAF (deicer) as is more commonly assumed.

  3. Impacts of aircraft deicer and anti-icer runoff on receiving waters from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, S.R.; Harwell, G.R.; Geis, S.W.; Bergman, D.

    2006-01-01

    From October 2002 to April 2004, data were collected from Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport (TX, USA) outfalls and receiving waters (Trigg Lake and Big Bear Creek) to document the magnitude and potential effects of aircraft deicer and anti-icer fluid (ADAF) runoff on water quality. Glycol concentrations at outfalls ranged from less than 18 to 23,800 mg/L, whereas concentrations in Big Bear Creek were less because of dilution, dispersion, and degradation, ranging from less than 18 to 230 mg/L. Annual loading results indicate that 10 and 35% of what was applied to aircraft was discharged to Big Bear Creek in 2003 and 2004, respectively. Glycol that entered Trigg Lake was diluted and degraded before reaching the lake outlet. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations at airport outfalls sometimes were low (5.0 mg/L). Results of toxicity tests indicate that effects on Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, and Selanastrum capricornutum are influenced by type IV ADAF (anti-icer), not just type I ADAF (deicer) as is more commonly assumed. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  4. 78 FR 67296 - Establishment of Class D Airspace; Mesquite, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... Meacham Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76137; telephone 817-321- 7716. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History On August... establish Class D airspace for Mesquite Metro Airport, Mesquite, TX (78 FR 48842) Docket No. FAA-2012- 0580...) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February...

  5. 78 FR 48298 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Commerce, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Commerce, TX AGENCY: Federal... Commerce, TX, area, creating additional controlled airspace at Commerce Municipal Airport (78 FR 33019... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec....

  6. 75 FR 8491 - Security Zones; Brazos River, Freeport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ...; Brazos River, Freeport, TX in the Federal Register (74 FR 61305). We received no comments on the proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Brazos River, Freeport, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard has established four permanent security...

  7. Registration of sorghum germplasm Tx3408 and Tx3409 with tolerance to sugarcane aphid [Melanaphis saccari (Zehntner)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) germplasm lines Tx3408 and Tx3409 were developed and released from Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the USDA-ARS in 2015. Both of these lines were developed from intentional crosses using the pedigree method of plant breeding. The breeding crosses for these l...

  8. Attitudes toward Videodisc Technology in the Dallas County Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Margot A.; And Others

    A study was conducted in the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) in Texas to investigate the attitudes of students and professors toward the use of interactive videodisc technology in the classroom. In contrast to a videotape which must be wound and rewound to find a particular segment, videodisc technology allows the instructor to…

  9. Transformational Leaders Wanted: Dallas Independent School District's Aspiring Principals Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parvin, Jennifer Lee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore and describe the development, implementation, and impact of the Dallas Independent School District's (ISD) Aspiring Principals Program. This study of principal preparation has relevance as a K-16 issue for two primary reasons. First, K-12 schools are focused on graduating students who are college…

  10. Experiences with a simplified microsimulation for the Dallas/Fort-Worth area

    SciTech Connect

    Rickert, M. |; Nagel, K. |

    1997-06-01

    We describe a simple framework for microsimulation of city traffic. A medium-sized excerpt of Dallas was used to examine different levels of simulation fidelity of a cellular automaton method for the traffic flow simulation and a simple intersection model. We point out problems arising with the granular structure of the underlying rules of motion.

  11. Muncie Remembers that Day in Dallas, November 22, 1963. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    "Muncie Remembers That Day in Dallas" is an oral history project report of a study conducted by two academic U.S. history classes of 21 students at Muncie Southside High School (Indiana) during the 1993-94 school year. The occasion of the 30th anniversary of the assassination of President Kennedy, along with the movie "JFK," had sparked the…

  12. Disciplinary Practices in Dallas Contrasted with School Systems with Rules Against Violence Against Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagebak, Robert

    Corporal punishment and its implications are discussed in this speech in Dallas, where corporal punishment is officially sanctioned as a method of school discipline, and in many other parts of the country, the prevailing opinion is that corporal punishment is necessary, effective and harmless. But the effectiveness of such punishment is dubious…

  13. Modeling Fear of Crime in Dallas Neighborhoods: A Test of Social Capital Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Mindel, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    This study tested a model of the effects of different predictors on individuals' levels of fear of crime in Dallas neighborhoods. Given its dual focus on individual perceptions and community-level interactions, social capital theory was selected as the most appropriate framework to explore fear of crime within the neighborhood milieu. A structural…

  14. GLOBECOM '89 - IEEE Global Telecommunications Conference and Exhibition, Dallas, TX, Nov. 27-30, 1989, Conference Record. Volumes 1, 2, & 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The present conference discusses topics in multiwavelength network technology and its applications, advanced digital radio systems in their propagation environment, mobile radio communications, switching programmability, advancements in computer communications, integrated-network management and security, HDTV and image processing in communications, basic exchange communications radio advancements in digital switching, intelligent network evolution, speech coding for telecommunications, and multiple access communications. Also discussed are network designs for quality assurance, recent progress in coherent optical systems, digital radio applications, advanced communications technologies for mobile users, communication software for switching systems, AI and expert systems in network management, intelligent multiplexing nodes, video and image coding, network protocols and performance, system methods in quality and reliability, the design and simulation of lightwave systems, local radio networks, mobile satellite communications systems, fiber networks restoration, packet video networks, human interfaces for future networks, and lightwave networking.

  15. Selected Proceedings from the International Conference on the Career Development of Handicapped Individuals: Program Implementation. Volume 2 (3rd, Dallas, TX, November 19-21, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokaska, Charles J., Ed.

    The document contains 16 papers on program implementation in the career development of the handicapped, and is one of three volumes of selected papers presented at a November, 1981, international conference on the career development of handicapped individuals. Papers have the following titles and authors: "A Career Education Materials Development…

  16. Recent developments in composite materials structures; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX, Nov. 25-30, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, David; Sun, C. T.

    The present conference discusses the parametric design of composite ducts and pressure vessels, enhanced material damping through the use of thermoelasticity, a performance simulation of structural composite rods, a stress analysis of anisotropic laminated circular cylindrical shells, the stresses in rotating (orthotropic, circular) composite disks and plates, and the effects of wear tip behavior on particulate composites. Also treated are a model for compression failure in fiber composite laminates, the effect of fiber interaction on matrix and interfacial microcracking in ceramic matrix composites, the dynamic response of an external circular crack to normal stresses in a transversely isotropic material, and the pinned joint behavior of laminated holes reinforced with braided composite.

  17. Advances in dynamics and control of flexible spacecraft and space-based manipulations; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX, Nov. 25-30, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Alberts, Thomas E.; Kakad, Yogendra P.

    Consideration is given to control formulations for vibration suppression of an active structure in slewing motions, the use if distributed sensing in control of large flexible spacecraft, an improved shooting method for solving minimum-time maneuver problems, and nonlinear slew maneuver dynamics of large flexible spacecrafts. Attention is also given to initial experiments in trusterless locomotion control of a free-flying robot, dynamic analysis to evaluate viscoelastic passive damping augmentation for the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, initial experiments in cooperative manipulation from a moving platform, and intelligent pipelined control architecture for remote robotic applications.

  18. The relationship between seismicity and wastewater injection in Johnson County, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. S.; Walter, J. I.; Frohlich, C.; DeShon, H. R.

    2015-12-01

    In light of recent research that suggests some high-rate wastewater injection wells from commercial oil and gas operations are casually linked to recent earthquakes in North Texas and Oklahoma, we apply a waveform cross-correlation technique to continuous waveform data from 38 seismic stations across Texas and Oklahoma using templates from 96 cataloged events from 2010-2015. We focus on an area near Venus TX, 40 km south of the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area in Johnson County where a M4.0 earthquake was reported by the USGS on 7 May 2015. The epicenter was within several km of 4 high rate wells with max injection rates ranging between 684,000-833,000 barrels/month. Templates were chosen from the USGS and locally derived Venus aftershock sequence, events in the ANSS catalog with a minimum magnitude of 2 between 2009-2015, and previously located earthquakes recorded by USArray stations between 2009-2011. In Johnson County, there are 27 wastewater injection wells, each with a reported maximum injection rate of 104,000 barrels/month and greater. We detected 494 events within Johnson and adjacent counties, with approximately 36% of the detections occurring within 10 km of the Venus earthquake, spanning March 2010 to June 2015. Most of the seismicity occurs adjacent to higher rate injection wells, suggesting a link between monthly injection rate and earthquake occurrence. Template matching allows us to detect earthquakes otherwise too small to be picked up by routine earthquake identification methods and informs our research concerning the presence and spatial distribution of possibly induced, small magnitude earthquakes. We plan to apply this technique to detect seismicity that may have occurred prior to the start of wastewater injection or felt earthquakes.

  19. 76 FR 5120 - Television Broadcasting Services; El Paso, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; El Paso, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications... 73 Television, Television broadcasting. For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the...

  20. 78 FR 41911 - Foreign-Trade Zone 39-Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; CSI Calendering, Inc. (Rubber Coated Textile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 18314, March 26, 2013). Pursuant to Section 400.37, the... Coated Textile Fabric); Arlington, Texas On March 4, 2013, the Dallas/Fort Worth International...

  1. Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark A

    2013-03-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

  2. Heat-related deaths -- Dallas, Wichita, and Cooke counties, Texas, and United States, 1996.

    PubMed

    1997-06-13

    During July 2-8, 1996, high maximum daily temperatures in Dallas County, Texas, ranged from 101 F (38.3 C) to 106 F (41.1 C), and high maximum daily heat indexes (a measure of the effect of combined elements [e.g., heat and humidity] on the body) ranged from 105 F (40.6 C) to 112 F (44.4 C). Although guidelines for issuing heat advisories or warnings vary by geographic location and climate, the National Weather Service generally suggests issuing a heat advisory when a daytime heat index reaches > or =105 F (> or =40.6 C), and a night time minimum ambient temperature of 80 F (26.7 C) persists for at least 48 hours. In Dallas County, the criterion used by the medical examiner's (ME's) office to designate a heat wave is > or =3 consecutive days of temperatures > or =100 F (37.8 C). This report describes four cases of heat-related death in Dallas, Wichita, and Cooke counties, Texas, in 1996; summarizes risk factors for this problem; and reviews measures to prevent heat-related morbidity and mortality. The findings in this report indicate that, although a large proportion of heat-related deaths occur during the summer and during heat waves, such deaths occur year-round. PMID:9191034

  3. Impact of Urbanization on Storm Response of White Rock Creek, Dallas, Texas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H.; Groening-Vicars, J.

    2005-12-01

    This study documents hydrological changes resulting from urbanization of the upper sub-basin of White Rock Creek watershed in Collin and Dallas counties, Texas. The 66.4 square mile watershed was transformed from 87% rural in 1961 to 95% urban in 2002, following construction of the Dallas suburbs of Richardson, Addison, Plano and Frisco. The objective of the study was to investigate changes in the storm response of White Rock Creek in terms of peak storm flow, storm flow volume and lag time. The approach employed to compare pre- and post-urbanization hydrology was to develop average unit hydrographs for each time period and use them to generate the creek's storm flow response to a set of six hypothetical precipitation events. The results suggest that substantial hydrological changes have occurred. The average infiltration capacity of the watershed was reduced by about 60%, so that storm flow was generated at lower precipitation intensities in the post-urbanization period. Storm flow peak discharge and volume were more than doubled for a hypothetical 10-year precipitation event. Average lag time was about 45 minutes faster in the post-urbanization period. It was concluded that urbanization has significantly impacted the storm response of the creek and increased the potential for flooding. It is anticipated that similar hydrological changes will occur in other rapidly urbanizing watersheds in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan region.

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Ti₃C₂Tx MXene.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Helal, Mohamed; Ali, Adnan; Ren, Chang E; Gogotsi, Yury; Mahmoud, Khaled A

    2016-03-22

    MXenes are a family of atomically thin, two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and carbonitrides with many attractive properties. Two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx (MXene) has been recently explored for applications in water desalination/purification membranes. A major success indicator for any water treatment membrane is the resistance to biofouling. To validate this and to understand better the health and environmental impacts of the new 2D carbides, we investigated the antibacterial properties of single- and few-layer Ti3C2Tx MXene flakes in colloidal solution. The antibacterial properties of Ti3C2Tx were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) by using bacterial growth curves based on optical densities (OD) and colonies growth on agar nutritive plates. Ti3C2Tx shows a higher antibacterial efficiency toward both Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive B. subtilis compared with graphene oxide (GO), which has been widely reported as an antibacterial agent. Concentration dependent antibacterial activity was observed and more than 98% bacterial cell viability loss was found at 200 μg/mL Ti3C2Tx for both bacterial cells within 4 h of exposure, as confirmed by colony forming unit (CFU) and regrowth curve. Antibacterial mechanism investigation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay indicated the damage to the cell membrane, which resulted in release of cytoplasmic materials from the bacterial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent and independent stress induction by Ti3C2Tx was investigated in two separate abiotic assays. MXenes are expected to be resistant to biofouling and offer bactericidal properties.

  5. 77 FR 40406 - Cancellation of Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS); Travis County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... County, TX AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration, DOT. ACTION: Cancellation of Notice of Intent to... (TxDOT) are issuing this notice to advise the public that the Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare a.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On August 15, 2008, TxDOT, in cooperation with the FHWA, announced its intent...

  6. 75 FR 52016 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Austin, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Austin, TX... Department, Austin, TX. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from El Paso County... Road, Austin, TX 78744, telephone (512) 389-4876, before September 23, 2010. Repatriation of the...

  7. Impervious cover mapping and runoff predictions in a Dallas watershed using Landsat TM

    SciTech Connect

    Singletary, K.L.; Morgan, K.M.; Busbey, A.B.; Newland, L.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-02-01

    As urban development increases in metropolitan areas, the amount of impervious cover also increases and directly affects stormwater runoff volume. Techniques are needed by planning agencies to monitor urban changes and update flood maps. In this study, the six 30 meter resolution bands of Landsat TM were analyzed to determine which wavelength(s) could be used to map impervious cover in a watershed near Dallas. The resulting information was utilized in a runoff equation and compared to actual stormwater flow recorded at a U.S.G.S. gauge station. Accuracies of the image mapping and predicted runoff are presented.

  8. NASA Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) Dallas-Fort Worth Demonstration Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Evers, Carl; Esche, Jeff; Sleep, Benjamin; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Aviation Safety Program Synthetic Vision System project conducted a Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) flight test at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in October 2000. The RIPS research system includes advanced displays, airport surveillance system, data links, positioning system, and alerting algorithms to provide pilots with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warnings of runway incursions. This report describes the aircraft and ground based runway incursion alerting systems and traffic positioning systems (Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) and Traffic Information Service - Broadcast (TIS-B)). A performance analysis of these systems is also presented.

  9. Hydrologic data for urban studies in the Dallas, Texas, metropolitan area, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, B.B.; Wood, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    This report contains rainfall and runoff data collected during the 1978 water year for drainage basins of Joes Creek, Bachman Branch, Turtle Creek, Coombs Creek, Cedar Creek, White Rock Creek, Elam Creek, Fivemile Creek, Newton Creek, Whites Branch, Prairie Creek, Tenmile Creek, Duck Creek, and South Mesquite Creek in the Dallas, Texas metropolitan area. The information will be useful in determining the extent to which progressive urbanization will affect the yield and mode of occurrence of storm runoff. Detailed rainfall-runoff computations are presented for ten storm periods during the 1978 water year. (USGS)

  10. Flood of October 8, 1962, on Bachman Branch and Joes Creek at Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggles, Frederick H.

    1966-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic data that enable the user to define areas susceptible to flooding and to evaluate the flood hazard along Bachman Branch and Joes Creek. The data provide a technical basis for making sound decisions concerning the use of flood-plain lands. The report will be useful for preparing building and zoning regulations, locating waste disposal facilities, purchasing unoccupied land, developing recreational areas, and managing surface water in relation to ground-water resources. This is one of the series of reports delineating the flood hazard on streams in the Dallas area.

  11. 77 FR 32900 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Llano, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Llano, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Congressional Review Act, see U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting...: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 0 1. The authority citation for part 73 continues to read as...

  12. 77 FR 58800 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Knox City, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Knox City, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications....415 and 1.420. ] List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications... preamble, the Federal Communications Commission proposes to amend 47 CFR part 73 as follows: PART...

  13. 76 FR 36384 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Brackettville, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Making proposed the deletion of vacant Channel 234A at Brackettville. See 75 FR 4037, published January... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Brackettville, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications..., see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting....

  14. 78 FR 21337 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Matagorda, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Matagorda, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications....415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications... preamble, the Federal Communications Commission proposes to amend 47 CFR Part 73 as follows: PART...

  15. 77 FR 25112 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Centerville and Midway, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Centerville and Midway, TX AGENCY: Federal... filing procedures for comments, see 47 CFR 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant Chief, Audio...

  16. 78 FR 4078 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Hebbronville, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Hebbronville, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications... Review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting...: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 0 1. The authority citation for part 73 continues to read as...

  17. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-15tx as a CV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersier, D.; Copperwheat, C.

    2015-12-01

    We report a spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-15tx (ATel #8400) obtained with the 2m robotic Liverpool Telescope (+SPRAT low-resolution spectrograph) on 2015 Dec 11.9078 UT. The spectrum, covering the 400-800 nm range, is blue and nearly featureless.

  18. 76 FR 58556 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00380

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00380 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement...

  19. 75 FR 65227 - Revocation of Class E Airspace; Franklin, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... rulemaking to remove Class E airspace for Franklin, TX (75 FR 36586) Docket No. FAA-2010-0603. Interested... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not...

  20. 75 FR 13668 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Georgetown, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71... Airport, Georgetown, TX (74 ] FR 67142) Docket No. FAA-2009-0934. Interested parties were invited to... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  1. 75 FR 18776 - Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX AGENCY... a regulated navigation area across the entire width of the Galveston Channel in the vicinity...

  2. 78 FR 41839 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Presidio, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ..., 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. ] Sec. 71.1 0 2. The... the Presidio, TX, area, creating controlled airspace at Presidio Lely International Airport (78 FR... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3)...

  3. 78 FR 61179 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Comanche, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Comanche, TX...

  4. 78 FR 18801 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Beeville, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp... Airport, Beeville, TX (77 FR 71365) Docket No. FAA- 2012-0821. Interested parties were invited to... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...

  5. 75 FR 13669 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Dumas, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ..., Dumas, TX (74 FR 68747) Docket No. FAA-2009-1151. Interested parties were invited to participate in this... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565,...

  6. 76 FR 28060 - Regional Habitat Conservation Plan, Hays County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... of the RHCP and to evaluate alternatives, along with the draft RHCP (74 FR 56655). We included public... Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Habitat Conservation Plan, Hays County, TX AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... statement, final Hays County regional habitat conservation plan, and draft record of decision. SUMMARY:...

  7. 75 FR 63533 - Environmental Impact Statement: Cameron County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Cameron County, TX AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Rescind Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare an EIS. SUMMARY: FHWA is...

  8. 76 FR 44280 - Television Broadcasting Services; El Paso, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; El Paso, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications... 12, 2009 digital transition deadline, after which the Video Division granted KVIA-TV Special... channel substitution will serve the public interest by significantly improving the public's digital...

  9. 75 FR 19907 - Television Broadcasting Services; Beaumont, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Beaumont, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications... Broadcasting of Texas, the licensee of KFDM(TV), channel 21, Beaumont, Texas, requesting the substitution of... broadcasting. 0 For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal Communications Commission amends 47...

  10. 75 FR 9859 - Television Broadcasting Services; Beaumont, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Beaumont, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications... Freedom Broadcasting of Texas (``Freedom Broadcasting''), the licensee of KFDM(TV), channel 21, Beaumont, Texas. Freedom Broadcasting requests ] the substitution of channel 25 for channel 21 at Beaumont....

  11. 75 FR 11000 - Security Zone; Freeport LNG Basin, Freeport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... Federal Register (33 FR 19926). We received no comments on the proposed rule. Background and Purpose... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Freeport LNG Basin, Freeport, TX AGENCY... in the Freeport LNG Basin. This security zone is needed to protect vessels, waterfront...

  12. 76 FR 19276 - Television Broadcasting Services; El Paso, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; El Paso, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications... U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television. Federal...

  13. 76 FR 28946 - Television Broadcasting Services; El Paso, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; El Paso, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications... CFR 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television Federal Communications...

  14. 76 FR 62131 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00382

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00382 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 4029-DR), dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period: 08... organizations in the State of TEXAS, dated 09/21/2011, is hereby amended to include the following areas...

  15. 76 FR 79750 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00380

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00380 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 1999-DR), dated 08/15/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period: 04... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Texas, dated 08/15/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  16. 75 FR 57997 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00361

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00361 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas... disaster declaration for the State of Texas, dated 08/03/2010 is hereby amended to include the...

  17. 76 FR 59766 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas... disaster declaration for the State of Texas, dated 09/09/2011 is hereby amended to include the...

  18. 76 FR 70528 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00382

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00382 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 4029-DR), dated 09/21/2011 . Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Texas, dated 09/21/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  19. 76 FR 77298 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 8. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas... major disaster declaration for the State of Texas, dated 09/09/2011 is hereby amended to extend...

  20. 76 FR 61775 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12815 and 12816 Texas Disaster Number TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... disaster for the State of Texas (FEMA-4029-DR), dated 09/09/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period: 08... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Texas, dated 09/09/2011...

  1. 75 FR 52789 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00362

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00362 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the State of TEXAS (FEMA- 1931-DR), dated 08/03/2010. Incident: Hurricane Alex. Incident... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Texas, dated 08/03/2010, is hereby amended to include...

  2. 76 FR 54521 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00380

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00380 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 1999-DR), dated 08/15/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period: 04... Non-Profit organizations in the State of TEXAS, dated 08/15/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  3. 76 FR 64420 - TEXAS Disaster Number TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION TEXAS Disaster Number TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 6. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of TEXAS... disaster declaration for the State of TEXAS, dated 09/09/2011 is hereby amended to include the...

  4. 76 FR 63699 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00382

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00382 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 4029-DR), dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period: 08... organizations in the State of Texas, dated 09/21/2011, is hereby amended to include the following areas...

  5. 76 FR 68804 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00382

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00382 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 4029-DR), dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Wildfires. >Incident Period... organizations in the State of Texas, dated 09/21/2011, is hereby amended to include the following areas...

  6. 75 FR 55618 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00362

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00362 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 1931-DR), dated 08/03/2010. Incident: Hurricane Alex. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Texas, dated 08/03/2010, is hereby amended to include...

  7. 76 FR 79751 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00380

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00380 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 1999-DR), dated 08/15/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period: 04... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Texas, dated 08/15/2011, is hereby amended to...

  8. 77 FR 1546 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 9. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas... major disaster ] declaration for the State of Texas, dated 09/09/2011 is hereby amended to establish...

  9. 76 FR 67244 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas... major disaster declaration for the State of Texas, dated 09/09/2011 is hereby amended to extend...

  10. 75 FR 52788 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00362

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00362 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 1931-DR), dated 08/03/2010. Incident: Hurricane Alex. Incident... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of TEXAS, dated 08/03/2010, is hereby amended to...

  11. 76 FR 59480 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas... disaster declaration for the State of Texas, dated 09/09/2011 is hereby amended to include the...

  12. 76 FR 66109 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00382

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00382 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA--4029--DR), dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period... organizations in the State of Texas, dated 09/21/2011, is hereby amended to include the following areas...

  13. 77 FR 1547 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00382

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00382 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 6... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 4029-DR), dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period: 08... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Texas, dated 09/21/2011, is hereby amended to establish...

  14. 75 FR 51293 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00362

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00362 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 1931-DR), dated 08/03/2010 . Incident: Hurricane Alex. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of TEXAS, dated 08/03/2010, is hereby amended to include...

  15. 76 FR 62130 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas... disaster declaration for the State of Texas, dated 09/09/2011 is hereby amended to include the...

  16. 77 FR 7228 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00382

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00382 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7... Only for the State of Texas (FEMA- 4029-DR), dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Wildfires. ] Incident Period... Non-Profit organizations in the State of TEXAS, dated 09/21/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  17. 75 FR 52789 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00361

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster Number TX-00361 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas... the President's major disaster declaration for the State of TEXAS, dated 08/03/2010 is hereby...

  18. 75 FR 18941 - Environmental Impact Statement: Bexar County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ...), Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) and Alamo Regional Mobility Authority (Alamo RMA) issued a... proposed improvements to Loop 1604 in San Antonio, Texas, within Bexar County limits to enhance mobility... Antonio- Bexar County Metropolitan Planning Organization Mobility 2035 Plan (December 2009) and...

  19. 75 FR 31677 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Austin, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ..., TX area, reconfiguring controlled airspace at Austin Executive Airport (75 FR 15360) Docket No. FAA... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2....

  20. 75 FR 8489 - Security Zone; Freeport Channel Entrance, Freeport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Security Zone; Freeport Channel Entrance, Freeport, TX in the Federal Register (33 FR 19923). We received... rule as it was proposed in the notice of proposed rulemaking (33 FR 19923). Regulatory Analyses We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Freeport Channel Entrance, Freeport,...

  1. 75 FR 67806 - Environmental Impact Statement; Nueces County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement; Nueces County, TX AGENCY: Federal Highway... this notice to advise the public that the NOI to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) for... were defined as the limits of potential impacts from the proposed action. The study limits were...

  2. 75 FR 8483 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Llano, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3... Airport, Llano, TX (74 FR 52702) Docket No. FAA-2009-0858. Interested parties were invited to participate... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and...

  3. 75 FR 41119 - Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX... River, Orange, Texas. This Special Local Regulation is intended to restrict vessels from portions of...

  4. 76 FR 30890 - Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX... River, Orange, Texas on September 24-25, 2011. This Special Local Regulation is intended to...

  5. 75 FR 55968 - Special Local Regulations, Sabine River; Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... (NPRM) entitled Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX in the Federal Register (75 FR 41119... published in 75 FR 41119. Regulatory Analyses We developed this rule after considering numerous statutes and... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations, Sabine River; Orange,...

  6. Hydrologic data for urban stormwater studies in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, Texas, 1992-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldys, Stanley; Raines, T.H.; Mansfield, B.L.; Sandlin, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents precipitation and waterquality data from analyses of 210 samples collected at 30 storm-sewer outfall stations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, Texas, during February 1992-November 1994. The data were collected to fulfill requirements mandated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to the cities of Arlington, Dallas, Fort Worth, Garland, Irving, Mesquite, and Piano and to the Dallas and Fort Worth Districts of the Texas Department of Transportation to obtain a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit. Data were collected at storm-sewer outfall stations in drainage basins classified as singular land use, either residential, commercial, industrial, or highway. Also included are qualityassurance/quality-control data for samples collected in conjunction with the stormwater samples.

  7. MmTX1 and MmTX2 from coral snake venom potently modulate GABAA receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Jean-Pierre; Schwarz, Jürgen R; Diaz-Bustamante, Marcelo; Céard, Brigitte; Gutiérrez, José M; Kneussel, Matthias; Pongs, Olaf; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2015-02-24

    GABAA receptors shape synaptic transmission by modulating Cl(-) conductance across the cell membrane. Remarkably, animal toxins that specifically target GABAA receptors have not been identified. Here, we report the discovery of micrurotoxin1 (MmTX1) and MmTX2, two toxins present in Costa Rican coral snake venom that tightly bind to GABAA receptors at subnanomolar concentrations. Studies with recombinant and synthetic toxin variants on hippocampal neurons and cells expressing common receptor compositions suggest that MmTX1 and MmTX2 allosterically increase GABAA receptor susceptibility to agonist, thereby potentiating receptor opening as well as desensitization, possibly by interacting with the α(+)/β(-) interface. Moreover, hippocampal neuron excitability measurements reveal toxin-induced transitory network inhibition, followed by an increase in spontaneous activity. In concert, toxin injections into mouse brain result in reduced basal activity between intense seizures. Altogether, we characterized two animal toxins that enhance GABAA receptor sensitivity to agonist, thereby establishing a previously unidentified class of tools to study this receptor family.

  8. MmTX1 and MmTX2 from coral snake venom potently modulate GABAA receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Jean-Pierre; Schwarz, Jürgen R.; Diaz-Bustamante, Marcelo; Céard, Brigitte; Gutiérrez, José M.; Kneussel, Matthias; Pongs, Olaf; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors shape synaptic transmission by modulating Cl− conductance across the cell membrane. Remarkably, animal toxins that specifically target GABAA receptors have not been identified. Here, we report the discovery of micrurotoxin1 (MmTX1) and MmTX2, two toxins present in Costa Rican coral snake venom that tightly bind to GABAA receptors at subnanomolar concentrations. Studies with recombinant and synthetic toxin variants on hippocampal neurons and cells expressing common receptor compositions suggest that MmTX1 and MmTX2 allosterically increase GABAA receptor susceptibility to agonist, thereby potentiating receptor opening as well as desensitization, possibly by interacting with the α+/β− interface. Moreover, hippocampal neuron excitability measurements reveal toxin-induced transitory network inhibition, followed by an increase in spontaneous activity. In concert, toxin injections into mouse brain result in reduced basal activity between intense seizures. Altogether, we characterized two animal toxins that enhance GABAA receptor sensitivity to agonist, thereby establishing a previously unidentified class of tools to study this receptor family. PMID:25675485

  9. Evaluation of the Dallas Thompson Riverscreen Site on the Touchet River.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Mickie

    2007-07-25

    Riverscreen irrigation pumps are a relatively new design in which the pump intake floats on the river surface, pulling water in only from the bottom side and surrounded by a self-cleaning screen. The Walla Walla County Conservation District recently started replacing old pump screens with the Riverscreen and was interested in whether the screens are protective of juvenile salmonids. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated approach velocities and operations at the Riverscreen installation on the Dallas Thompson property, approximately 3 mi. north of Touchet, Washington and 300 ft north of Hofer Dam, on June 18, 2007. Evaluation of this site consisted of underwater videography and water velocity measurements. The Dallas Thompson Riverscreen was pumping approximately 930 gpm during our evaluation, which is close to the maximum pumping rate for this model. Underwater videography showed only slow movement of water-borne particulates toward the pump intake, and the screen material was clean. All water velocity measurements were taken below the pump intake opening and between 3 to 6 in. from the screen face. All approach velocities (flow toward the screen and pump) were below National Marine Fisheries Service draft guidelines for juvenile fish screens.

  10. Dallas area rapid transit LRT starter line assessment study design. Final research report

    SciTech Connect

    Shunk, G.A.; Turnbull, K.F.; Lindquist, N.F.

    1995-03-01

    Light rail transit (LRT) systems have recently been implemented in a number of urban areas throughout the United States and additional projects are in various stages of planning and development. Questions have been raised concerning the impact of these systems on ridership levels, transit operating costs, regional mobility, land use, economic development, energy, air quality, congestion levels, and other factors. The implementation of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) LRT starter line provides the opportunity to assess the impact of an LRT system in a Southwestern city in the United States. This research project was undertaken to assist with the development of a comprehensive study design for assessing the effects of the DART LRT starter line. To accomplish this objective, a review was conducted of before-and-after studies of recent LRT, heavy rail, and high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) projects. The goals and objectives of the DART system were also reviewed and existing transportation-related data collection activities in the Dallas area were examined. This information was used to develop a preliminary study design for assessing the effects of the DART LRT starter line. This report documents the review of recent before-and-after studies and presents the preliminary study design for assessing the effects of the DART LRT starter line.

  11. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This Document is the Final Technical Report of the Solar Energy System located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. The building was air conditioned with an electric drive 300-ton chilled water central system in 1973. The building contains 126,000 square feet and the solar energy system will preheat 100 percent of domestic hot water and supply 47.5 percent of annual building heating requirements. During the building cooling seasons, the solar energy system will supply 100 percent of domestic hot water. The solar energy system consists of 4800 square feet (320 panels) Lennox/Honeywell flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 10,000 gallon steel tank storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 686.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/year (specified) building heating and domestic hot water heating. The start up date is December 4, 1979. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are presented.

  12. The symbiotic star TX CVn has entered an active state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Castellani, F.; Valisa, P.; Dallaporta, S.; Cherini, G.; Vagnozzi, A.; Righetti, G. L.; Belligoli, R.

    2014-01-01

    After the last active phase that begun in 2003, the symbiotic star TX CVn has now entered a new active phase. In 2003, TX CVn rose to B=10.5 and there it remained until the end of 2007 (Skopal 2007, AN 328, 909), when we started monitoring the variable with various ANS Collaboration telescopes in BVRI bands. Our observations show that the star has spent the following 6 years on a steady decline at a rate of 0.084 mag per year in the B band, that took it from B=10.55 on December 2007 to B=11.02 on September 2013, when the star begun a rapid brightening, reaching B=10.65 by early December 2013.

  13. 78 FR 58380 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, DFW Airport, Texas AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release for permanent easement of airport property SUMMARY: The...

  14. Rearranging Deck Chairs in Dallas: Contextual Constraints and Within-District Resource Allocation in Urban Texas School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to simultaneously explore resource allocation across schools within large urban school districts and across all schools within major metropolitan areas that include those urban districts in the state of Texas. This study uses a three-year panel, from 2005 to 2007, for Texas elementary schools in the Houston, Dallas,…

  15. 78 FR 57618 - Foreign-Trade Zone 39-Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas; Application for Reorganization (Expansion of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... approved by the FTZ Board on August 17, 1978 (Board Order 133, 43 FR 37478, 8/23/78) and reorganized under the ASF on January 15, 2010 (Board Order 1660, 75 FR 4355, 1/27/10). The zone project currently has a service area that includes Dallas, Tarrant, Kaufman, Collin, Grayson and Denton Counties, Texas....

  16. A Partnership between the Dallas County Community College District and Texas Instruments: Using Total Quality Management to Reinvent Workforce Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, J. William

    1994-01-01

    Describes elements of a partnership between Dallas County Community College District and Texas Instruments that draws on the concepts and processes of Total Quality Management (TQM). Suggests that such partnerships have the net effect of significantly improving and reinventing cooperative efforts to prepare students for the workforce. (MAB)

  17. Iridoids and phenylethanoid from Pedicularis kerneri Dalla Torre growing in Dolomites, Italy.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Alessandro; Frezza, Claudio; Serafini, Mauro; Bianco, Armandodoriano

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the first phytochemical analysis of polar fraction of Pedicularis kerneri Dalla Torre growing in Dolomites, Italy. Several iridoid glucosides were isolated, namely aucubin (1), monomelittoside (2), plantarenaloside (3), euphroside (4), mussaenosidic acid (5) and 8-epiloganic acid (6), showing a composition in accordance with previous study on this genus. The studied samples, collected from Dolomites, presented a chemotype already recognised in species from North America, characterised by euphroside (4) and aucubin (1) as main components, but the main character was the presence of monomelittoside (2) never reported in this genus. The identification of verbascoside (7), leucosceptoside A (9) and echinacoside (10) complete the systematic framing of this species since is ascertained the co-occurrence of phenylethanoid glycosides with iridoids in Lamiales species.

  18. Effect of diet on male reproductive tract of Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Lemos, W P; Serráo, J E; Ramalho, F S; Cola Zanuincio, J C; Lacerda, M C

    2005-02-01

    The morphology and histology of the reproductive tract of males of the predator Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas) fed on different diets were studied. P. nigrispinus was fed on diets of: larvae of Alabama argillacea (Hübner), Tenebrio molitor L., Musca domestica L., and an artificial diet. The male reproductive tract, independent of diet, showed testes with intense red coloration in a compact, circular, or slightly oval structure. The vasa deferentia were similar in color to the testes and formed long filaments, which joined with the yellow-cream colored ejaculatory duct. The morphological characteristics of the male reproductive tract were similar under all diets, except for the artificial one. The histological studies demonstrated that independent of the diet the testes of P. nigrispinus were composed of four to six follicles. The testes with six follicles generally had four developed and two atrophied follicles. The morphological and histological differences of the testes of P. nigrispinus when fed with different prey are presented and discussed.

  19. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2013, Dallas.

    PubMed

    Ishimori, Naoki; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Yamada, Satoshi; Yokoshiki, Hisashi; Mitsuyama, Hirofumi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions were held in Dallas on November 16-20, 2013. The meeting is one of the most leading conferences of cardiology in the world, with over 18,000 professional attendees from more than 105 countries. There were 315 invited sessions and 443 abstract sessions, comprising more than 5,000 presentations. The sessions were expanded to 26 program tracks, which included and integrated basic, translational, clinical, and population science. In the series of late-breaking sessions, updates of results from 20 clinical trials were disclosed. Japanese scientists submitted the second most abstracts to the Scientific Sessions in 2013. We appreciate the significant contribution to the sessions by Japanese cardiologists as well as the Japanese Circulation Society.

  20. Runway Incursion Prevention System: Demonstration and Testing at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Quach, Cuong C.; Young, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted using NASA s Boeing 757 research aircraft and a test van equipped to emulate an incurring aircraft. The system was also demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, DFW flight test activities, and quantitative and qualitative results of the testing.

  1. Quaternary geologic map of the Dallas 4° x 6° quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Luza, Kenneth V.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Fishman, W.D.; Wermund, E.G.; Richmond, Gerald Martin; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin; Christiansen, Ann Coe; Digital edition by Bush, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Dallas 4° x 6° Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the ground on which we walk, the dirt in which we dig foundations, and the soil in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  2. Demonstration of Land and Hold Short Technology at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Paul V.; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A guidance system for assisting in Land and Hold Short operations was developed and then tested at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. This system displays deceleration advisory information on a head-up display (HUD) in front of the airline pilot during landing. The display includes runway edges, a trend vector, deceleration advisory, locations of the hold line and of the selected exit, and alphanumeric information about the progress of the aircraft. Deceleration guidance is provided to the hold short line or to a pilot selected exit prior to this line. Logic is provided to switch the display automatically to the next available exit. The report includes descriptions of the algorithms utilized in the displays, and a report on the techniques of HUD alignment, and results.

  3. Implementation of the first wellness-fitness evaluation for the Dallas Fire-Rescue Department

    PubMed Central

    Seals, Norman; Martin, JoAnn; Russell, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    More than 100 firefighters lose their lives in the line of duty each year; many of these deaths are caused by cardiovascular events and underlying coronary heart disease. In addition, firefighters are at higher-than-normal risk of developing certain types of cancer. To improve health and fitness among its firefighters, the Dallas Fire-Rescue Department developed and implemented an annual wellness-fitness program in 2008. The program detected and addressed medical issues including coronary disease, hypertension, high triglyceride levels, high cholesterol, high blood glucose levels, and hematuria. Prostate, thyroid, breast, kidney, and bladder cancers were also detected. By identifying these issues, engaging the firefighters' personal physicians, and recommending individualized treatment plans, this program may have extended lives and improved the quality of life for the firefighters. PMID:20671818

  4. Holocene Paleoglacier History of Glaciar Dalla Vedova, Cordillera DARWIN, Tierra del Fuego, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynhout, S.

    2015-12-01

    Southernmost South America is unique in its position immediately north of the present-day Antarctic Convergence, making it ideally suited for the evaluation of Antarctic influences on terrestrial paleoclimate. Here we present a glacial geomorphic interpretation of the paleoglacial history of Glaciar Dalla Vedova in Bahía Blanca, Cordillera Darwin, Chile (53°S). This interpretation is further constrained by radiocarbon dating, cosmogenic dating, dendrochronology, and historical photogrammetry. Preliminary field work suggests that Holocene glacier fluctuations have been constrained to within 3 km of the present glacier boundary, punctuated by rapid recent glacier retreat over the past century. By comparing the observed chronology with the record contained further north in Patagonia, we will evaluate possible mechanisms of regional climate variability over the Holocene across southernmost South America.

  5. Hydrologic data for urban studies in the Dallas, Texas metropolitan area, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, B.B.; Wood, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    This report contains rainfall and runoff data collected during the 1976 water year for drainage basins of Joes Creek, Bachman Branch, Turtle Creek, Coombs Creek, Cedar Creek, White Rock Creek, Elam Creek, Fivemile Creek, Newton Creek, Whites Branch, Prairie Creek, Tenmile Creek, Duck Creek, and South Mesquite Creek in the Dallas metropolitan area. The information will be useful in determining the extent to which progressive urbanization will affect the yield and mode of occurrence of storm runoff. Detailed rainfall-runoff computations, including hydrographs and mass curves, are presented for six storm periods during the 1976 water year. During the 1976 water year, one continuous stream-gaging station and two flood-hydrograph partial-record stations were added to the study area. These stations are located in the Prairie Creek basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Tank 241-TX-302C grab samples 302C-TX-97-1A through 302C-TX-97-3B analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1998-03-12

    This document is the final report for tank 241-TX-302C grab samples. Six grabs samples (302C-TX-97-1A, 302C-TX-97-1B, 302C-TX-97-2A, 302C-TX-97-2B, 302C-TX-97-3A, and 302C-TX-97-3B) were collected from the catch tank level gauge riser on December 19, 1997. The ``A`` and ``B`` portions from each sample location were composited and analyses were performed on the composites in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1997) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Rev. 1: Fowler, 1995; Rev. 2: Mulkey and Miller, 1997). The analytical results are presented in Table 1. No notification limits were exceeded. Appearance and Sample Handling Attachment 1 is provided as a cross-reference for relating the tank farm customer identification numbers with the 222-S Laboratory sample numbers and the portion of sample analyzed. Table 2 provides the appearance information.

  7. The CASA Dallas Fort Worth Remote Sensing Network ICT for Urban Disaster Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Venkatachalam; Chen, Haonan; Philips, Brenda; Seo, Dong-jun; Junyent, Francesc; Bajaj, Apoorva; Zink, Mike; Mcenery, John; Sukheswalla, Zubin; Cannon, Amy; Lyons, Eric; Westbrook, David

    2013-04-01

    The dual-polarization X-band radar network developed by the U.S. National Science Foundation Engineering Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) has shown great advantages for observing and prediction of hazardous weather events in the lower atmosphere (1-3 km above ground level). The network is operating though a scanning methodology called DCAS, distributed collaborative adaptive sensing, which is designed to focus on particular interesting regions of the atmosphere and disseminate information for decision-making to multiple end-users, such as emergency managers and policy analysts. Since spring 2012, CASA and the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) have embarked the development of Dallas Fort Worth (DFW) urban remote sensing network, including 8-node of dual-polarization X-band radars, in the populous DFW Metroplex (pop. 6.3 million in 2010). The main goal of CASA DFW urban demonstration network is to protect the safety and prosperity of humans and ecosystems through research activities that include: 1) to demonstrate the DCAS operation paradigm developed by CASA; 2) to create high-resolution, three-dimensional mapping of the meteorological conditions; 3) to help the local emergency managers issue impacts-based warnings and forecasts for severe wind, tornado, hail, and flash flood hazards. The products of this radar network will include single and multi-radar data, vector wind retrieval, quantitative precipitation estimation and nowcasting, and numerical weather predictions. In addition, the high spatial and temporal resolution rainfall products from CASA can serve as a reliable data input for distributed hydrological models in urban area. This paper presents the information and communication link between radars, rainfall product generation, hydrologic model link and end user community in the Dallas Fort Worth Urban Network. Specific details of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) between the various

  8. Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Janet L.; Hess, Jeremy J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To investigate relationships between ambient temperatures and violent crimes to determine whether those relationships are consistent across different crime categories and whether they are best described as increasing linear functions, or as curvilinear functions that decrease beyond some temperature threshold. A secondary objective was to consider the implications of the observed relationships for injuries and deaths from violent crimes in the context of a warming climate. To address these questions, we examined the relationship between daily ambient temperatures and daily incidents of violent crime in Dallas, Texas from 1993–1999. Methods We analyzed the relationships between daily fluctuations in ambient temperature, other meteorological and temporal variables, and rates of daily violent crime using time series piece-wise regression and plots of daily data. Violent crimes, including aggravated assault, homicide, and sexual assault, were analyzed. Results We found that daily mean ambient temperature is related in a curvilinear fashion to daily rates of violent crime with a positive and increasing relationship between temperature and aggravated crime that moderates beyond temperatures of 80°F and then turns negative beyond 90°F. Conclusion While some have characterized the relationship between temperature and violent crime as a continually increasing linear function, leaving open the possibility that aggravated crime will increase in a warmer climate, we conclude that the relationship in Dallas is not linear, but moderates and turns negative at high ambient temperatures. We posit that higher temperatures may encourage people to seek shelter in cooler indoor spaces, and that street crime and other crimes of opportunity are subsequently decreased. This finding suggests that the higher ambient temperatures expected with climate change may result in marginal shifts in violent crime in the short term, but are not likely to be accompanied by markedly

  9. 77 FR 74170 - Foreign-Trade Zone 84-Houston, TX; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Mitsubishi...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ...; Mitsubishi Caterpillar Forklift America Inc.; (Forklift Trucks); Houston, TX The Port of Houston Authority... Caterpillar Forklift America Inc. (MCFA), located in Houston, Texas. The notification conforming to...

  10. 60-day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for TX-244 grab samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-05

    Three grab samples (244-TX-96-1, 244-TX-96-2, and 244-TX-96-3) were taken from Riser 8 of Tank 241-TX-244 on October 18, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 18, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support ofthe Waste Compatibility Program. Notifications were made in accordance with TSAP for pH and OH- analyses. Upon further review, the pH notification was deemed unnecessary, as the notification limit did not apply to this tank.

  11. Variability of ultraviolet emission in the carbon star TX Piscium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hollis R.; Baumert, John H.; Querci, Francois; Querci, Monique

    1986-01-01

    Multiple low-resolution IUE observations of the cool carbon star TX Psc (N0; C6, 2) permit an analysis of the variations in strength of the strongest emission lines - the Mg II line at 2800 A, the C II line at 2330 A, and certain Fe II lines. The integrated flux of the Mg II line varied by at least a factor of eight, while that of the C II line varies by at least a factor of five. The variations in Fe II may be considerably larger. The lines appear to vary together. The continuous flux in the best observed range from 2800 to 3200 A does not vary noticeably.

  12. Staubli TX-90XL robot qualification at the LLIHE.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2010-10-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive (LIHE) Facility uses a robotic arm to spray explosive material onto test items for impulse tests. In 2007, the decision was made to replace the existing PUMA 760 robot with the Staubli TX-90XL. A qualification plan was developed and implemented to verify the safe operating conditions and failure modes of the new system. The robot satisfied the safety requirements established in the qualification plan. A performance issue described in this report remains unresolved at the time of this publication. The final readiness review concluded the qualification of this robot at the LIHE facility.

  13. Floods on White Rock Creek above White Rock Lake at Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, Clarence R.

    1963-01-01

    The White Rock Creek watershed within the city limits of Dallas , Texas, presents problems not unique in the rapid residential and industrial development encountered by many cities throughout the United States. The advantages of full development of the existing area within a city before expanding city boundaries, are related to both economics and civic pride. The expansion of city boundaries usually results in higher per capital costs for the operation of city governments. Certainly no responsible city official would oppose reasonable development of watersheds and flood plains and thus sacrifice an increase in tax revenue. Within the words "reasonable development" lies the problem faced by these officials. They are aware that the natural function of a stream channel, and its associated flood plain is to carry away excess water in time of flood. They are also aware that failure to recognize this has often led to haphazard development on flood plains with a consequent increase in flood damages. In the absence of factual data defining the risk involved in occupying flood plains, stringent corrective and preventative measures must be taken to regulate man's activities on flood plains to a point beyond normal precaution. Flood-flow characteristics in the reach of White Rock Creek that lies between the northern city boundary of Dallas and Northwest Highway (Loop 12) at the upper end of White Rock Lake, are presented in this report. Hydrologic data shown include history and magnitude of floods, flood profiles, outlines of areas inundated by three floods, and estimates of mean velocities of flow at selected points. Approximate areas inundated by floods of April 1942 and July 1962 along White Rock Creek and by the flood of October 1962 along Cottonwood Creek, Floyd Branch, and Jackson Branch, are delineated on maps. Greater floods have undoubtedly occurred in the past but no attempt is made to show their probable overflow limits because basic data on such floods could not

  14. Characterization of stormwater runoff from the Naval Air Station and Naval Wepons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas, 1994-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, T.H.; Baldys, Stanley; Lizarraga, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Median event-mean concentrations computed for 12 selected constituents in samples from NAS and NWIRP fixed sites were compared to median event-mean concentrations for residential, commercial, industrial, and highway land uses within the Dallas-Fort Worth area computed from data collected for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program. NAS and NWIRP median event-mean concentrations also were compared to those for residential and commercial land uses from the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program.

  15. Economic Analysis of Promotion of Hepatitis B Vaccinations Among Vietnamese-American Children and Adolescents in Houston and Dallas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangjun; Euler, Gary L.; McPhee, Stephen J.; Nguyen, Thoa; Lam, Tram; Wong, Ching; Mock, Jeremiah

    2006-01-01

    Objective To ascertain the cost-effectiveness and benefit-cost ratios of 2 public health campaigns conducted in Dallas and Houston in 1998–2000 for “catch-up” hepatitis B vaccination of Vietnamese-Americans born 1984–1993. Design Program evaluation. Setting Houston and Dallas, Texas. Participants A total of 14 349 Vietnamese-American children and adolescents. Interventions Media-led information and education campaign in Houston, and community mobilization strategy in Dallas. Outcomes were compared with a control site: Washington, DC. Main outcome measures Receipt of 1, 2, or 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine before and after the interventions, costs of interventions, cost-effectiveness ratios for intermediate outcomes, intervention cost per discounted year of life saved, and benefit-cost ratio of the interventions. Results The number of children who completed the series of 3 hepatitis B vaccine doses increased by 1176 at a total cost of $313 904 for media intervention, and by 390 and at $169 561 for community mobilization. Costs per child receiving any dose, per dose, and per completed series were $363, $101, and $267 for media intervention and $387, $136, and $434 for community mobilization, respectively. For media intervention, the intervention cost per discounted year of life saved was $9954 and 131 years of life were saved; for community mobilization, estimates were $11 759 and 60 years of life. The benefit-cost ratio was 5.26:1 for media intervention and 4.47:1 for community mobilization. Conclusion Although the increases in the number of children who completed series of 3 doses were modest for both the Houston and Dallas areas, both media education and, to a lesser degree, community mobilization interventions proved cost-effective and cost-beneficial. PMID:12777543

  16. Observations of HCN associated with TX Cam and IK Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K. B.

    1999-12-01

    I present observations of HCN associated with the oxygen-rich stars TX Cam and IK Tau. These observations were obtained with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory millimeter array telescope, funded in part by the National Science Foundation. The distribution of HCN near these evolved stars is generally spherical in nature although mildly asymmetric. The emission is optically thick and therefore quantitative interpretation is difficult. It is clear from the images that the HCN is centrally peaked in every channel and clearly does not exist in a shell-like distribution. The overall diameter of the emission is about 750 AU for IK Tau and 940 AU for TX Cam, assuming distances of 260 pc (Loup et al. 1993) and 280 pc (Knapp et al. 1998) respectively. How oxygen-rich stars can exhibit emission from carbon-based molecules has long challenged chemical models for these sources. Charnley et al. (1995) proposed a chemical model, which also predicted the presence of C2H and CH3OH in detectable quantities. Charnley et al. (1997) subsequently used the NRAO 12-m to show that these molecules do not exist in detectable quantities near these stars. I confirm this result using interferometric observations, which are more sensitive to compact distributions of gas.

  17. Modal testing of the TX-100 wind turbine blade.

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Sarah; Griffith, Daniel Todd; Casias, Miguel; Simmermacher, Todd William; Smith, Gregory A.

    2006-05-01

    This test report covers the SNL modal test results for two nominally identical TX-100 wind turbine blades. The TX-100 blade design is unique in that it features a passive braking, force-shedding mechanism where bending and torsion are coupled to produce desirable aerodynamic characteristics. A specific aim of this test is to characterize the coupling between bending and torsional dynamics. The results of the modal tests and the subsequent analysis characterize the natural frequencies, damping, and mode shapes of the individual blades. The results of this report are expected to be used for model validation--the frequencies and mode shapes from the experimental analysis can be compared with those of a finite-element analysis. Damping values are included in the results of these tests to potentially improve the fidelity of numerical simulations, although numerical finite element models typically have no means of predicting structural damping characteristics. Thereafter, an additional objective of the test is achieved in evaluating the test to test and unit variation in the modal parameters of the two blades.

  18. 49 CFR 372.237 - Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS, COMMERCIAL ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.237 Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX. (a) Transportation within a zone comprised of Cameron, Hidalgo,...

  19. 49 CFR 372.237 - Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS, COMMERCIAL ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.237 Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX. (a) Transportation within a zone comprised of Cameron, Hidalgo,...

  20. 49 CFR 372.237 - Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS, COMMERCIAL ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.237 Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX. (a) Transportation within a zone comprised of Cameron, Hidalgo,...

  1. 49 CFR 372.237 - Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS, COMMERCIAL ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.237 Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX. (a) Transportation within a zone comprised of Cameron, Hidalgo,...

  2. 78 FR 33019 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Commerce, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Commerce, TX AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Commerce, TX. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR,...

  3. 78 FR 55214 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast.... Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Port Arthur, TX; telephone 409-719-5086, email...

  4. 77 FR 47519 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast..., call or email Mr. Scott Whalen. U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Port Arthur, TX; telephone...

  5. 78 FR 31839 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Beeville-Chase Field, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... page 18801, column 2, line 14, the title as published in the Federal Register of March 28, 2013 (78 FR 18801) FR Doc. 2013-06913, is corrected to read `` . . . Beeville-Chase Field, TX''; and on page 18802... Industrial Airport, Beeville, TX (78 FR 18801, March 28, 2013). Subsequent to publication, the FAA found...

  6. 75 FR 45557 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX, to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Counties, TX. Santa Clara, CA On March 9, 2009, we published a final rule (74 FR 9951) that abolished the... County, OK, and Angelina County, TX, to Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage System Wage Areas AGENCY... area of application to the Oklahoma, OK, nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal Wage System (FWS) wage...

  7. 75 FR 39149 - Establishment of Low Altitude Area Navigation Route (T-284); Houston, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Federal Register a final rule to establish RNAV route T-284 for the Houston, TX, terminal area (75 FR... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 RIN 2120-AA66 Establishment of Low Altitude Area Navigation... area navigation (RNAV) route T-284 for the Houston, TX, terminal area, is being withdrawn. As a...

  8. Registration of perennial Sorghum bicolor x S. propinquum line 'PSH12TX09'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel sorghum x Sorghum propinquum recombinant inbred line, named PSSH12TX09, was identified that successfully overwintered across plant hardiness zones 8a, 8b, and 9a between 2013 and 2015. Overwintering perenniality of PSSH12TX09 exceeded 90% at all locations across both evaluation years, with ...

  9. 78 FR 28801 - Foreign-Trade Zone 117-Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 4383, 1-22-2013). The FTZ Board has... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 117--Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Shipbuilding), Orange, TX On January 10, 2013, the Foreign Trade Zone of...

  10. The quantitative precipitation estimation system for Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) urban remote sensing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haonan; Chandrasekar, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) urban radar network consists of a combination of high resolution X band radars and a standard National Weather Service (NWS) Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) system operating at S band frequency. High spatiotemporal-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is one of the important applications of such a network. This paper presents a real-time QPE system developed by the Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) Engineering Research Center for the DFW urban region using both the high resolution X band radar network and the NWS S band radar observations. The specific dual-polarization radar rainfall algorithms at different frequencies (i.e., S- and X-band) and the fusion methodology combining observations at different temporal resolution are described. Radar and rain gauge observations from four rainfall events in 2013 that are characterized by different meteorological phenomena are used to compare the rainfall estimation products of the CASA DFW QPE system to conventional radar products from the national radar network provided by NWS. This high-resolution QPE system is used for urban flash flood mitigations when coupled with hydrological models.

  11. Level One Validation Concept for GPM over Dallas - Fort Worth Urban Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Chen, H.; Le, M.; Biswas, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory was launched on February 27, 2014. The two advanced instruments onboard GPM, namely, Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), can provide measurement of rainfall, snowfall, ice and other precipitation over most of the globe. As an integral part of all satellite precipitation missions, ground validation helps to quantify precipitation measurement uncertainty and provide insight into the physical and statistical basis of retrieval algorithms. Among various validation instruments, ground-based dual-polarization radar (at S, C and X band frequencies) has been shown to be a powerful tool to estimate surface rainfall. This paper will present the concept of level one validation of GPM using high resolution precipitation observations from DFW network. The area of interest in this study is Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex, which hosts a network of six high-resolution dual-polarization X-band radars operated by the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) and the NWS WSR-88DP radar (i.e., KFWS radar). The DFW network QPE product has been shown to be of excellent quality, in terms of accuracy as well as space time resolution (Chen and Chandrasekar, Journal of Hydrology, May (2015)). Detailed comparisons will be conducted between GPM based rainfall estimates and ground radar observations collected during the GPM satellite overpasses over DFW region. Dual-polarization based raindrop size distribution (DSD) retrieval, quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), and hydrometeor classifications will be presented in detail.

  12. A review of genus Nysius Dallas in Argentina (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Orsillidae).

    PubMed

    Pall, José Luis; Kihn, Romina Gisela; Diez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The orsillid genus Nysius Dallas is a complex and large genus with more than 100 described species worldwide, and includes many species of agricultural importance, one such example is N. simulans (Stål) from Argentina. Three species of Nysius are found in this country: N. simulans (Stål), N. irroratus (Spinola) and N. puberulus Berg. The material available for the present study, consisting of over 610 specimens, was collected by sweep-net, G-Vac and light trap in the provinces of Chubut (42° to 46°S; 63.5° to 72° W), La Pampa (35º to 39º south; 63º to 68º West), Neuquén (36° to 41° S; 68° to 71°W) and Río Negro (37° to 42°S; 62° to 71°W), in the central region of Argentina, during the years 2010-2014. Although the species N. simulans is frequently recorded as a pest of soybean crop, there exist no detailed description but only a brief general diagnosis. In the present contribution, therefore, we provide a detailed redescription as well as an updated distribution of N. simulans and N. irroratus, and a key for species of genus Nysius present in Argentina. PMID:27395663

  13. A review of genus Nysius Dallas in Argentina (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Orsillidae).

    PubMed

    Pall, José Luis; Kihn, Romina Gisela; Diez, Fernando

    2016-06-29

    The orsillid genus Nysius Dallas is a complex and large genus with more than 100 described species worldwide, and includes many species of agricultural importance, one such example is N. simulans (Stål) from Argentina. Three species of Nysius are found in this country: N. simulans (Stål), N. irroratus (Spinola) and N. puberulus Berg. The material available for the present study, consisting of over 610 specimens, was collected by sweep-net, G-Vac and light trap in the provinces of Chubut (42° to 46°S; 63.5° to 72° W), La Pampa (35º to 39º south; 63º to 68º West), Neuquén (36° to 41° S; 68° to 71°W) and Río Negro (37° to 42°S; 62° to 71°W), in the central region of Argentina, during the years 2010-2014. Although the species N. simulans is frequently recorded as a pest of soybean crop, there exist no detailed description but only a brief general diagnosis. In the present contribution, therefore, we provide a detailed redescription as well as an updated distribution of N. simulans and N. irroratus, and a key for species of genus Nysius present in Argentina.

  14. Condom use and sexual identity among men who have sex with men--Dallas, 1991.

    PubMed

    1993-01-15

    Safer sex practices intended to reduce the risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have been vigorously promoted among men who are homosexual or bisexual (i.e., men who have sex with men). Such efforts have emphasized personal responsibility and protection of partners, and many of these men appear to have adopted risk-reducing behaviors (1). However, it is unknown whether these safer sex practices and norms have been adopted by men who have sex with men but conceal their sexual orientations or do not self-identify as homosexual or bisexual (2-7). To characterize the relation between the adoption of safer sex practices among men who have sex with men and sexual self-identity, as well as HIV information-seeking, exposure to the homosexual or bisexual community culture, and comfort in disclosing sexual identity, the Dallas County (Texas) Health Department (DCHD) conducted a survey among men who have sex with men. This report summarizes survey findings for men who reported having had sex with men and who visited DCHD clinics for anonymous HIV counseling and testing from January through June 1991.

  15. Flight Test Comparison of Synthetic Vision Display Concepts at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Trey; Parrish, Russell V.; Barry, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Limited visibility is the single most critical factor affecting the safety and capacity of worldwide aviation operations. Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) technology can solve this visibility problem with a visibility solution. These displays employ computer-generated terrain imagery to present 3D, perspective out-the-window scenes with sufficient information and realism to enable operations equivalent to those of a bright, clear day, regardless of weather conditions. To introduce SVS display technology into as many existing aircraft as possible, a retrofit approach was defined that employs existing HDD display capabilities for glass cockpits and HUD capabilities for the other aircraft. This retrofit approach was evaluated for typical nighttime airline operations at a major international airport. Overall, 6 evaluation pilots performed 75 research approaches, accumulating 18 hours flight time evaluating SVS display concepts that used the NASA LaRC's Boeing B-757-200 aircraft at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Results from this flight test establish the SVS retrofit concept, regardless of display size, as viable for tested conditions. Future assessments need to extend evaluation of the approach to operations in an appropriate, terrain-challenged environment with daytime test conditions.

  16. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  17. Chemical Contamination of the Lower Rio Grande near Laredo, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, B.; Ren, J.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Belzer, W.

    2006-12-01

    The Rio Grande River stretches over 2000 miles from the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado to the tip of Texas where the Rio Grande meets the Gulf of Mexico. It is the natural boundary between U.S. and Mexico from El Paso, TX, to Brownsville, TX. The communities along the border heavily rely upon the Rio Grande as a primary source of water for consumption, agricultural uses, supporting wildlife and recreation. For many years the Rio Grande has been polluted with municipal, industrial, agricultural and farming contaminants from both sides of the border. This pollution has led to the extinction or reduction of certain wildlife species as well as affecting the health of the residences along the border. Even though great strides have been made in monitoring the Rio Grande, there has been a lack of intense monitoring data collection for pollutants such as pesticides. Three sampling sites including Manadas Creek, the Rio Grande River at International Bridge I, and USGS monitoring site 08459200 off of Highway 83 were chosen. The water quality parameters focused include temperature, pH, conductivity, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total dissolved solids, nutrients, metals and pesticides. Preliminary results have shown elevated concentration of total phosphorus and ortho-phosphorus in the Manadas Creek site. Organochlorinated pesticides such as heptachlor and 4, 4 DDE were detected at various concentrations at all sites and endrin aldehyde was found at Manadas Creek site. This research has provided more information on the current chemical contamination level of the Rio Grande in the Laredo area.

  18. Chemical quality of water, sediment, and fish in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1994-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Jones, S.A.; Moring, J. Bruce; Mahler, B.J.; Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence, trends, and sources of numerous inorganic and organic contaminants were evaluated in Mountain Creek Lake, a reservoir in Dallas, Texas. The study, done in cooperation with the Southern Division Naval Facilities Engineering Command, was prompted by the Navy?s concern for potential off-site migration of contaminants from two facilities on the shore of Mountain Creek Lake, the Naval Air Station Dallas and the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant. Sampling of stormwater (including suspended sediment), lake water, bottom sediment (including streambed sediment), and fish was primarily in Mountain Creek Lake but also was in stormwater outfalls from the Navy facilities, nearby urban streams, and small streams draining the Air Station. Volatile organic compounds, predominantly solvents from the Reserve Plant and fuel-related compounds from the Air Station, were detected in stormwater from both Navy facilities. Fuel-related compounds also were detected in Mountain Creek Lake at two locations, one near the Air Station inlet where stormwater from a part of the Air Station enters the lake and one at the center of the lake. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds at the two lake sites were small, all less than 5 micrograms per liter. Elevated concentrations of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, silver, and zinc, from 2 to 4 times concentrations at background sites and urban reference sites, were detected in surficial bottom sediments in Cottonwood Bay, near stormwater outfalls from the Reserve Plant. Elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls, compared to background and urban reference sites, were detected in surficial sediments in Cottonwood Bay. Elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, indicative of urban sources, also were detected in Cottonwood Creek, which drains an urbanized area apart from the Navy facilities. Elevated concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls were

  19. Modeling of potential power plant plume impacts on Dallas-Fort Worth visibility.

    PubMed

    Seigneur, C; Pai, P; Tombach, I; McDade, C; Saxena, P; Mueller, P

    2000-05-01

    During wintertime, haze episodes occur in the Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) urban area. Such episodes are characterized by substantial light scattering by particles and relatively low absorption, leading to so-called "white haze." The objective of this work was to assess whether reductions in the emissions of SO2 from specific coal-fired power plants located over 100 km from DFW could lead to a discernible change in the DFW white haze. To that end, the transport, dispersion, deposition, and chemistry of the plume of a major power plant were simulated using a reactive plume model (ROME). The realism of the plume model simulations was tested by comparing model calculations of plume concentrations with aircraft data of SF6 tracer concentrations and ozone concentrations. A second-order closure dispersion algorithm was shown to perform better than a first-order closure algorithm and the empirical Pasquill-Gifford-Turner algorithm. For plume impact assessment, three actual scenarios were simulated, two with clear-sky conditions and one with the presence of fog prior to the haze. The largest amount of sulfate formation was obtained for the fog episode. Therefore, a hypothetical scenario was constructed using the meteorological conditions of the fog episode with input data values adjusted to be more conducive to sulfate formation. The results of the simulations suggest that reductions in the power plant emissions lead to less than proportional reductions in sulfate concentrations in DFW for the fog scenario. Calculations of the associated effects on light scattering using Mie theory suggest that reduction in total (plume + ambient) light extinction of less than 13% would be obtained with a 44% reduction in emissions of SO2 from the modeled power plant.

  20. Oxidation-reduction processes in ground water at Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Braun, Christopher L.; Lee, Roger W.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of trichloroethene in ground water at the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant in Dallas, Texas, indicate three source areas of chlorinated solvents?building 1, building 6, and an off-site source west of the facility. The presence of daughter products of reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene, which were not used at the facility, south and southwest of the source areas are evidence that reductive dechlorination is occurring. In places south of the source areas, dissolved oxygen concentrations indicated that reduction of oxygen could be the dominant process, particularly south of building 6; but elevated dissolved oxygen concentrations south of building 6 might be caused by a leaking water or sewer pipe. The nitrite data indicate that denitrification is occurring in places; however, dissolved hydrogen concentrations indicate that iron reduction is the dominant process south of building 6. The distributions of ferrous iron indicate that iron reduction is occurring in places south-southwest of buildings 6 and 1; dissolved hydrogen concentrations generally support the interpretation that iron reduction is the dominant process in those places. The generally low concentrations of sulfide indicate that sulfate reduction is not a key process in most sampled areas, an interpretation that is supported by dissolved hydrogen concentrations. Ferrous iron and dissolved hydrogen concentrations indicate that ferric iron reduction is the primary oxidation-reduction process. Application of mean first-order decay rates in iron-reducing conditions for trichloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride yielded half-lives for those solvents of 231, 347, and 2.67 days, respectively. Decay rates, and thus half-lives, at the facility are expected to be similar to those computed. A weighted scoring method to indicate sites where reductive dechlorination might be likely to occur indicated strong evidence for anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents at six sites

  1. Independent associations between metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Karen; Lindsey, Jason B; Khera, Amit; De Lemos, James A; Ayers, Colby R; Goyal, Abhinav; Vega, Gloria L; Murphy, Sabina A; Grundy, Scott M; McGuire, Darren K

    2008-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been termed a "coronary disease equivalent", yet data suggest that only those DM subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) are at increased coronary risk. Using data from the Dallas Heart Study, a large, probability-based population study, we assessed the individual and joint associations between MetS, DM and atherosclerosis, defined as coronary artery calcium (CAC) detected by electron-beam computerised tomography (EBCT) and abdominal aortic plaque (AAP) detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Among 2,735 participants, the median age was 44 years; 1,863 (68%) were non-white; 1,509 (55%) were women; 697 (25.5%) had MetS without DM; 53 (1.9%) had DM without MetS; and 246 (9.0%) had both DM and MetS. The prevalence of CAC increased from those with neither MetS nor DM (16.6%) to MetS only (24.0%) to DM only (30.2%) to both MetS and DM (44.7%) (ptrend <0.0001). The prevalence of CAC was higher in those with both DM and MetS versus either alone (p<0.0001). After adjustment, MetS and DM were each independently associated with CAC (odds ratio [OR] 1.4, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.1-1.8; OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.5, respectively). Compared with the group without DM or MetS, those with both MetS and DM had the most CAC (adjusted OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.6-3.2). All analyses of AAP yielded qualitatively similar results. In conclusion, both MetS and DM are independently associated with an increased prevalence of atherosclerosis, with the highest observed prevalence in subjects with both DM and MetS. PMID:18537096

  2. Determinants of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cardiorespiratory Fitness (from the Dallas Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ambarish; Park, Bryan D; Ayers, Colby; Das, Sandeep R; Lakoski, Susan; Matulevicius, Susan; de Lemos, James A; Berry, Jarett D

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated ethnic/racial differences in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). However, the relative contributions of body mass index (BMI), lifestyle behaviors, socioeconomic status (SES), cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, and cardiac function to these differences in CRF are unclear. In this study, we included 2,617 Dallas Heart Study participants (58.6% women, 48.6% black; 15.7% Hispanic) without CV disease who underwent estimation of CRF using a submaximal exercise test. We constructed multivariable-adjusted linear regression models to determine the association between race/ethnicity and CRF, which was defined as peak oxygen uptake (ml/kg/min). Black participants had the lowest CRF (blacks: 26.3 ± 10.2; whites: 29.0 ± 9.8; Hispanics: 29.1 ± 10.0 ml/kg/min). In multivariate analysis, both black and Hispanic participants had lower CRF after adjustment for age and gender (blacks: Std β = -0.15; p value ≤0.0001, Hispanics: Std β = -0.05, p value = 0.01; ref group: whites). However, this association was considerably attenuated for black (Std β = -0.04, p value = 0.03) and no longer significant for Hispanic ethnicity (p value = 0.56) after additional adjustment for BMI, lifestyle factors, SES, and CV risk factors. Additional adjustment for stroke volume did not substantially change the association between black race/ethnicity and CRF (Std β = -0.06, p value = 0.01). In conclusion, BMI, lifestyle, SES, and traditional risk factor burden are important determinants of ethnicity-based differences in CRF. PMID:27349903

  3. Long-term sodium and chloride surface water exports from the Dallas/Fort Worth region.

    PubMed

    Steele, M K; Aitkenhead-Peterson, J A

    2011-07-15

    Sodium and chloride in surface water are typically related to urbanization and population density and can have a significant impact on drinking water sources and the subsequent salinity of aquatic ecosystems. While the majority of research has focused on the impact of deicing salts on urban surface waters in colder climates, the effect of urbanization on sodium and chloride concentrations has been found to occur in warmer climates. This study investigated long-term exports of sodium and chloride from watersheds with increasing urbanization in the humid subtropical Dallas-Fort Worth region. We compared exports to characteristics of urbanization: urban land cover, impervious surface area, and calculated contributions from wastewater discharges. Long-term data (1980-2008) were obtained from five USGS gages located in and around the cities. Exports were calculated by regression analysis between concentrations and discharge and normalized for time and the watershed area. Grab samples were collected from June 2009 to May 2010 and sodium and chloride concentrations quantified. Our results show a strong positive relationship between the mean annual sodium and chloride exports from each watershed and the percent urban land cover and impervious surface area. Long-term increases in sodium and chloride fluxes were found for the three watersheds with the highest percentage of urban land cover. The single largest contributor was wastewater effluent that was estimated to contribute approximately half of the total loads in the three urbanized watersheds. Atmospheric deposition and deicing salts accounted for small amounts of the total export for urbanized watersheds. The source of the remaining salt load is still unknown and may be a combination of non-point sources. Estimates of urban salt exports were similar to estimates from northern watersheds affected by deicing salts.

  4. Perfluorinated Compounds, Polychlorinated Biphenyls, and Organochlorine Pesticide Contamination in Composite Food Samples from Dallas, Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, Arnold; Colacino, Justin; Haffner, Darrah; Patel, Keyur; Opel, Matthias; Päpke, Olaf; Birnbaum, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this article is to extend our previous studies of persistent organic pollutant (POP) contamination of U.S. food by measuring perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in composite food samples. This study is part of a larger study reported in two articles, the other of which reports levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane brominated flame retardants in these composite foods [Schecter et al. 2010. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclodecane (HBCD) in composite U.S. food samples, Environ Health Perspect 118:357–362]. Methods In this study we measured concentrations of 32 organochlorine pesticides, 7 PCBs, and 11 PFCs in composite samples of 31 different types of food (310 individual food samples) purchased from supermarkets in Dallas, Texas (USA), in 2009. Dietary intake of these chemicals was calculated for an average American. Results Contamination varied greatly among chemical and food types. The highest level of pesticide contamination was from the dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) metabolite p,p′- dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, which ranged from 0.028 ng/g wet weight (ww) in whole milk yogurt to 2.3 ng/g ww in catfish fillets. We found PCB congeners (28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153, and 180) primarily in fish, with highest levels in salmon (PCB-153, 1.2 ng/g ww; PCB-138, 0.93 ng/g ww). For PFCs, we detected perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in 17 of 31 samples, ranging from 0.07 ng/g in potatoes to 1.80 ng/g in olive oil. In terms of dietary intake, DDT and DDT metabolites, endosulfans, aldrin, PCBs, and PFOA were consumed at the highest levels. Conclusion Despite product bans, we found POPs in U.S. food, and mixtures of these chemicals are consumed by the American public at varying levels. This suggests the need to expand testing of food for chemical contaminants. PMID:20146964

  5. Plasma Leptin Levels and Risk of Incident Cancer: Results from the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Yehuda; Ayers, Colby; Beg, Muhammad S.; Lakoski, Susan G.; Abdullah, Shuaib M.; Johnson, David H.; Neeland, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Leptin dysregulation has been postulated to affect cancer risk through its effects on obesity and inflammation. Epidemiological data evaluating this relationship are conflicting and studies in non-white cohorts is lacking. Therefore, we examined the association of leptin with the risk of incident cancer in the multiethnic Dallas Heart Study (DHS). Methods Participants enrolled in the DHS without prevalent cancer and with baseline leptin measurements were included. Incident cancer cases were identified through a systematic linkage of the DHS and the Texas Cancer Registry. Leptin was evaluated both as a continuous variable and in sex-specific quartiles. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was performed to examine the association between leptin levels with incident cancer after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, alcohol use, family history of malignancy, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus and C-reactive protein. Results Among 2,919 participants (median age 44 years; 54% women; 70% nonwhite; median BMI 29.4 kg/m2), 190 (6.5%) developed cancer after median follow- up of 12 years. Median leptin levels were 12.9 (interquartile range [IQR] 5.8–29.5) ng/ml in the incident cancer group vs. 12.3 (IQR 5.4–26.4) ng/ml those without an incident cancer (p = 0.34). Leptin was not associated with cancer incidence in multivariable analysis (unit standard deviation increase in log-transformed leptin, hazard ratio 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.16; p = 0.60). No association was observed in analyses stratified by sex, race/ethnicity, diabetes, or obesity status. Conclusions In this study of a predominantly minority population, no association between premorbid leptin levels and cancer incidence was demonstrated. Despite preclinical rationale and positive findings in other studies, this association may not replicate across all racial/ethnic populations. PMID:27636369

  6. 33 CFR 165.809 - Security Zones; Port of Port Lavaca-Point Comfort, Point Comfort, TX and Port of Corpus Christi...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; Port of Port Lavaca-Point Comfort, Point Comfort, TX and Port of Corpus Christi Inner Harbor, Corpus Christi, TX. 165... Lavaca-Point Comfort, Point Comfort, TX and Port of Corpus Christi Inner Harbor, Corpus Christi, TX....

  7. 76 FR 9639 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the Shreveport, LA; Texarkana, TX; Milwaukee, WI; and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    .... Office of Personnel Management (OPM) issued a proposed rule (75 FR 58339) to redefine Upshur County, TX... Forest Jackson Juneau Langlade Lincoln Marathon Marinette Menominee Oneida Pepin Portage Price...

  8. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-107

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, L.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-10

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-TX-107. This report supports the requirements of Tri-party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  9. Kinetics of Crystal Violet Fading in the Presence of TX-100, DTAB and SDS.

    PubMed

    Samiey, Babak; Ashoori, Fatemeh

    2011-06-01

    The rate constant of alkaline fading of crystal violet (CV+) was measured in the presence of non ionic (TX-100), cationic (DTAB) and anionic (SDS) surfactants. This reaction was studied at 283-303 K. The rate of reaction showed remarkable dependence on the electrical charge of the used surfactants. It was observed that the reaction rate constant increased in the presence of TX-100 and DTAB and decreased in the presence of SDS. Binding constants of CV+ with TX-100 and DTAB and the related thermodynamic parameters were obtained by classical (or stoichiometric) model. The results show that binding of CV+ to TX-100 is endothermic and binding of CV+ to DTAB and SDS is exothermic in the used concentration range of surfactants.

  10. The CASA Dallas-Fort Worth Urban Remote Sensing Network: Recent Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Venkatachalam; Seo, Dong-jun; Philips, Brenda; Chen, Haonan; Junyent, Francesc; Lyons, Eric; Bajaj, Apoorva; Brotzge, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    Since spring 2012, the U.S. National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center (NSF-ERC) for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) has been transformed from a research to operational demonstration emphasis, and has started the development of Dallas-Fort worth (DFW) urban remote sensing network. The main goal of this network is to demonstrate the operational feasibility of the dense radar network in a metropolitan environment. The DFW network consists of 8 dual-polarization X-band weather radars covering the greater DFW metropolitan area, the 4th largest Metroplex in the nation. The major issued to be addressed include urban flash flood mitigation, severe weather warning and demonstration of network-of-network concept. It is also expected to be an ideal development platform for multi-Doppler wind retrieval, quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF), and accurate hydrologic response. The real-time weather information will then be disseminated to public and private stakeholders for decision-making and evaluation as severe weather events occur in the Metroplex. In addition, multi-sensor products will be generated as well from combining the existing remote sensors such as KFWS radar (a WSR-88DP radar), TDWR, and local rainfall gauges. This paper will first present a brief overview of the current development of CASA DFW urban radar network. Then, the Kdp-based QPE methodology for CASA X-band radars will be described and evaluated in depth. The composite rainfall products produced by combining the S-band WSR-88DP and X-band radar observations will also be presented. To demonstrate and evaluate the QPE products, local rainfall gauges are used for cross comparison between the radar rainfall measurements and gauge observations. In addition, the prototype flash flood forecasting system under development for the City of Fort Worth will also be described in this paper, which utilizes the high spatial and

  11. Regional Fat Distribution and Blood Pressure Level and Variability: The Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yuichiro; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Ayers, Colby; Turer, Aslan; Chandra, Alvin; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Greenland, Philip; de Lemos, James A; Neeland, Ian J

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the associations of regional fat distribution with home and office blood pressure (BP) levels and variability. Participants in the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic cohort, underwent 5 BP measurements on 3 occasions during 5 months (2 in home and 1 in office) and quantification of visceral adipose tissue, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, and liver fat by magnetic resonance imaging, and lower body subcutaneous fat by dual x-ray absorptiometry. The relation of regional adiposity with short-term (within-visit) and long-term (overall visits) mean BP and average real variability was assessed with multivariable linear regression. We have included 2595 participants with a mean age of 44 years (54% women; 48% black), and mean body mass index was 29 kg/m(2) Mean systolic BP/diastolic BP was 127/79 mm Hg and average real variability systolic BP was 9.8 mm Hg during 3 visits. In multivariable-adjusted models, higher amount of visceral adipose tissue was associated with higher short-term (both home and office) and long-term mean systolic BP (β[SE]: 1.9[0.5], 2.7[0.5], and 2.1[0.5], respectively; all P<0.001) and with lower long-term average real variability systolic BP (β[SE]: -0.5[0.2]; P<0.05). In contrast, lower body fat was associated with lower short-term home and long-term mean BP (β[SE]: -0.30[0.13] and -0.24[0.1], respectively; both P<0.05). Neither subcutaneous adipose tissue or liver fat was associated with BP levels or variability. In conclusion, excess visceral fat was associated with persistently higher short- and long-term mean BP levels and with lower long-term BP variability, whereas lower body fat was associated with lower short- and long-term mean BP. Persistently elevated BP, coupled with lower variability, may partially explain increased risk for cardiac hypertrophy and failure related to visceral adiposity.

  12. Fate of the Biological Control Agent Pseudomonas aureofaciens TX-1 after Application to Turfgrass†

    PubMed Central

    Sigler, William V.; Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Reicher, Zachary J.; Turco, Ronald F.

    2001-01-01

    The fate and impact of Pseudomonas aureofaciens TX-1 following application as a biocontrol agent for fungi in turfgrass were studied. The organism was applied with a modified irrigation system by using a preparation containing 1 × 106 P. aureofaciens TX-1 CFU ml−1 about 100 times between May and August. We examined the impact of this repeated introduction of P. aureofaciens TX-1 (which is known to produce the antimicrobial compound phenazine-1-carboxylic acid) on the indigenous microbial community of the turfgrass system and on establishment of introduced bacteria in the soil system. A PCR primer-DNA hybridization probe combination was developed to accurately monitor the fate of P. aureofaciens TX-1 following application in irrigation water. To assess the impact of frequent P. aureofaciens TX-1 applications on the indigenous bacterial community, turfgrass canopy, thatch, and rhizosphere samples were obtained during the growing season from control and treated plots and subjected to DNA extraction procedures and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). PCR amplification and hybridization of extracted DNA with the P. aureofaciens TX-1-specific primer-probe combination revealed that P. aureofaciens TX-1 not only became established in the rhizosphere and thatch but also was capable of overwintering. Separation of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes by DGGE showed that the repeated application of P. aureofaciens TX-1 in irrigation water resulted in transient displacement of a leaf surface bacterial community member. There was no obvious alteration of any dominant members of the thatch and rhizosphere microbial communities. PMID:11472930

  13. 46 CFR 7.105 - Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the seaward limits of the territorial sea (as defined in 33 CFR 2.22(a)(1)) to Rio Grande, Texas at... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. 7.105 Section 7... LINES Gulf Coast § 7.105 Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. A line drawn from Marquesas Keys,...

  14. 46 CFR 7.105 - Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the seaward limits of the territorial sea (as defined in 33 CFR 2.22(a)(1)) to Rio Grande, Texas at... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. 7.105 Section 7... LINES Gulf Coast § 7.105 Marquesas Keys, FL to Rio Grande, TX. A line drawn from Marquesas Keys,...

  15. Characterization of in vitro oxidative and conjugative metabolic pathways for brevetoxin (PbTx-2).

    PubMed

    Radwan, Faisal F Y; Ramsdell, John S

    2006-01-01

    Brevetoxins are potent marine toxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, the causative organism of Florida red tides. An in vitro metabolism of PbTx-2 was performed using purified cDNA-expressed rat liver cytochrome P-450 (CYP) enzymes and freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. The metabolic activities of six CYP enzymes, CYP1A2, CYP2A2, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A1, were examined by incubation with PbTx-2 for up to 4 h in the presence of a NADPH-generating system. Further identification of the metabolites produced by CYP1A2 and CYP3A1 was preformed using high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Both CYP1A2 and CYP3A1 metabolized PbTx-2 to PbTx-3 (MH+: m/z 897), PbTx-9 (MH+: m/z 899), and a newly recorded diol brevetoxin-2 metabolite (MH+: m/z 929). CYP3A1 also produced a considerably higher amount of BTX-B5 (MH+: m/z 911). Subsequent incubation of PbTx-2 with rat hepatocytes produced additional phase 1 metabolites of MH+: m/z 911, 913, 915, 917, and 931, indicating a CYP-catalyzed epoxidation at H-ring (C27,C28-double bond) and a subsequent A-ring hydrolysis of PbTx-2 metabolic products. A conjugation metabolism was identified by the production of a glutathione-brevetoxin conjugate (MH+: m/z 1222) and a cysteine-brevetoxin conjugate (MH+: m/z 1018). Structures of the new metabolites are postulated, and a likely CYP-catalyzed metabolism pathway of PbTx-2 metabolism are discussed. PMID:16221966

  16. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of Ti3C2Tx with hydrothermal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Bo; Shen, Changjie; Zhang, Chuanxiang; Hu, Qianku; Zhou, Aiguo; Liu, Baozhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a simple hydrothermal method has been developed to prepare Ti3C2Tx from Ti3AlC2 as a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. This method is environmentally friendly and has a low level of danger. The morphology and structure of the Ti3C2Tx can be controlled by hydrothermal reaction time, temperature and NH4F amounts. The prepared Ti3C2Tx was characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller. The results show that the prepared Ti3C2Tx is terminated by O, OH, and F groups. The electrochemical properties of the Ti3C2Tx sample exhibit specific capacitance up to 141 Fcm-3 in 3 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, and even after 1000 cycles, no significant degradation of the volumetric capacitance was observed. These results indicate that the Ti3C2Tx material prepared by this hydrothermal method can be used in high performance supercapacitors.

  17. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of Ti3C2Tx with hydrothermal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Bo; Shen, Changjie; Zhang, Chuanxiang; Hu, Qianku; Zhou, Aiguo; Liu, Baozhong

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a simple hydrothermal method has been developed to prepare Ti3C2Tx from Ti3AlC2 as a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. This method is environmentally friendly and has a low level of danger. The morphology and structure of the Ti3C2Tx can be controlled by hydrothermal reaction time, temperature and NH4F amounts. The prepared Ti3C2Tx was characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller. The results show that the prepared Ti3C2Tx is terminated by O, OH, and F groups. The electrochemical properties of the Ti3C2Tx sample exhibit specific capacitance up to 141 Fcm-3 in 3 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, and even after 1000 cycles, no significant degradation of the volumetric capacitance was observed. These results indicate that the Ti3C2Tx material prepared by this hydrothermal method can be used in high performance supercapacitors. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Backwater Flooding in San Marcos, TX from the Blanco River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, Richard; Gaenzle, Kyle G.; Hollier, Andi B.

    2016-01-01

    Large sections of San Marcos, TX were flooded in Oct. 1998, May 2015, and Oct. 2015. Much of the flooding in Oct. 1998 and Oct. 2015 was produced by overbank flooding of San Marcos River and its tributaries by spills from upstream dams. The May 2015 flooding was almost entirely produced by backwater flooding from the Blanco River whose confluence is approximately 2.2 miles southeast of downtown. We use the stage height of the Blanco River to generate maps of the areas of San Marcos that are lower than the flood peaks and compare those results with data for the observed extent of flooding in San Marcos. Our preliminary results suggest that the flooding occurred at locations more than 20 feet lower than the maximum stage height of the Blanco River at San Marcos gage (08171350). This suggest that the datum for either gage 08171350 or 08170500 (San Marcos River at San Marcos) or both are incorrect. There are plans for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to construct a Blanco River bypass that will divert Blanco River floodwaters approximately 2 miles farther downstream, but the $60 million price makes its implementation problematic.

  19. A new coccidian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Galápagos tortoise, Chelonoidis sp. (Testudines: Testudinidae), from the Dallas Zoo.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; Roberts, David T

    2014-02-01

    During January 1994, feces from a captive juvenile Galápagos tortoise, Chelonoidis sp., from the Dallas Zoo, Dallas County, Texas was examined for coccidia. The tortoise was found to harbor an eimerian which is described as new. Sporulated oocysts of Eimeria iversoni n. sp. were ovoidal with a smooth, single-layered wall (∼ 0.5-0.8) that measured (L × W) 13.5 × 10.3 μm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule(s) were all absent; 2 conical projections were present on 1 end of oocyst and measured 1.0-1.5. Sporocysts were elongate-ellipsoidal and measured 8.3 × 4.5 μm, with L/W of 1.8; a Stieda body (∼ 0.5 high) was present, but substieda and parastieda bodies were absent; a sporocyst residuum was composed of 2-5 granules in a compact mass between sporozoites; sporozoites were banana-shaped and measured 9.5 × 2.5 in situ, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. This is only the second time an eimerian has been reported from Galápagos tortoises.

  20. 77 FR 47816 - Foreign-Trade Zone 12-McAllen, TX Application for Subzone TST NA TRIM, LLC Hidalgo, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 12--McAllen, TX Application for Subzone TST NA TRIM, LLC... TST NA TRIM, LLC, located in Hidalgo, Texas. The application was submitted pursuant to the...

  1. Presynaptic Proteins as Markers of the Neurotoxic Activity of BmjeTX-I and BmjeTX-II Toxins from Bothrops marajoensis (Marajó Lancehead) Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    Lisboa, Antonio; Melaré, Rodolfo; Franco, Junia R. B.; Bis, Carolina V.; Gracia, Marta; Ponce-Soto, Luis A.; Marangoni, Sérgio; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular preparations exposed to B. marajoensis venom show increases in the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials and twitch tension facilitation followed by presynaptic neuromuscular paralysis, without evidences of muscle damage. Considering that presynaptic toxins interfere into the machinery involved in neurotransmitter release (synaptophysin, synaptobrevin, and SNAP25 proteins), the main objective of this communication is to analyze, by immunofluorescence and western blotting, the expression of the synaptic proteins, synaptophysin, synaptobrevin, and SNAP25 and by myography, light, and transmission electron microscopy the pathology of motor nerve terminals and skeletal muscle fibres of chick biventer cervicis preparations (CBC) exposed in vitro to BmjeTX-I and BmjeTX-II toxins from B. marajoensis venom. CBC incubated with toxins showed irreversible twitch tension blockade and unaffected KCl- and ACh-evoked contractures, and the positive colabelling of acetylcholine receptors confirmed that their action was primarily at the motor nerve terminal. Hypercontraction and loose myofilaments and synaptic vesicle depletion and motor nerve damage indicated that the toxins displayed both myotoxic and neurotoxic effect. The blockade resulted from interference on synaptophysin, synaptobrevin, and SNAP25 proteins leading to the conclusion that BmjeTX-I and BmjeTX-II affected neurotransmitter release machinery by preventing the docking of synaptic vesicles to the axolemma of the nerve terminal.

  2. Presynaptic Proteins as Markers of the Neurotoxic Activity of BmjeTX-I and BmjeTX-II Toxins from Bothrops marajoensis (Marajó Lancehead) Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    Lisboa, Antonio; Melaré, Rodolfo; Franco, Junia R. B.; Bis, Carolina V.; Gracia, Marta; Ponce-Soto, Luis A.; Marangoni, Sérgio; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular preparations exposed to B. marajoensis venom show increases in the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials and twitch tension facilitation followed by presynaptic neuromuscular paralysis, without evidences of muscle damage. Considering that presynaptic toxins interfere into the machinery involved in neurotransmitter release (synaptophysin, synaptobrevin, and SNAP25 proteins), the main objective of this communication is to analyze, by immunofluorescence and western blotting, the expression of the synaptic proteins, synaptophysin, synaptobrevin, and SNAP25 and by myography, light, and transmission electron microscopy the pathology of motor nerve terminals and skeletal muscle fibres of chick biventer cervicis preparations (CBC) exposed in vitro to BmjeTX-I and BmjeTX-II toxins from B. marajoensis venom. CBC incubated with toxins showed irreversible twitch tension blockade and unaffected KCl- and ACh-evoked contractures, and the positive colabelling of acetylcholine receptors confirmed that their action was primarily at the motor nerve terminal. Hypercontraction and loose myofilaments and synaptic vesicle depletion and motor nerve damage indicated that the toxins displayed both myotoxic and neurotoxic effect. The blockade resulted from interference on synaptophysin, synaptobrevin, and SNAP25 proteins leading to the conclusion that BmjeTX-I and BmjeTX-II affected neurotransmitter release machinery by preventing the docking of synaptic vesicles to the axolemma of the nerve terminal. PMID:27635261

  3. Presynaptic Proteins as Markers of the Neurotoxic Activity of BmjeTX-I and BmjeTX-II Toxins from Bothrops marajoensis (Marajó Lancehead) Snake Venom.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Antonio; Melaré, Rodolfo; Franco, Junia R B; Bis, Carolina V; Gracia, Marta; Ponce-Soto, Luis A; Marangoni, Sérgio; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Rocha, Thalita

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular preparations exposed to B. marajoensis venom show increases in the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials and twitch tension facilitation followed by presynaptic neuromuscular paralysis, without evidences of muscle damage. Considering that presynaptic toxins interfere into the machinery involved in neurotransmitter release (synaptophysin, synaptobrevin, and SNAP25 proteins), the main objective of this communication is to analyze, by immunofluorescence and western blotting, the expression of the synaptic proteins, synaptophysin, synaptobrevin, and SNAP25 and by myography, light, and transmission electron microscopy the pathology of motor nerve terminals and skeletal muscle fibres of chick biventer cervicis preparations (CBC) exposed in vitro to BmjeTX-I and BmjeTX-II toxins from B. marajoensis venom. CBC incubated with toxins showed irreversible twitch tension blockade and unaffected KCl- and ACh-evoked contractures, and the positive colabelling of acetylcholine receptors confirmed that their action was primarily at the motor nerve terminal. Hypercontraction and loose myofilaments and synaptic vesicle depletion and motor nerve damage indicated that the toxins displayed both myotoxic and neurotoxic effect. The blockade resulted from interference on synaptophysin, synaptobrevin, and SNAP25 proteins leading to the conclusion that BmjeTX-I and BmjeTX-II affected neurotransmitter release machinery by preventing the docking of synaptic vesicles to the axolemma of the nerve terminal. PMID:27635261

  4. Effect of Surface Traffic Count on Taxi Time at Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, Matthew Stephen; Gupta, Gautam

    2008-01-01

    As the amount of air traffic increases over the years, most airports simply do not have the means of expanding to handle the intensified traffic on the surface that will ensue. Precise surveillance equipment and automation concepts, as well as advanced surface traffic algorithms are being developed to improve airport efficiency. These surface algorithms require inputs unique to each airport to ensure maximum efficiency, and minimal taxi delay. This study analyzes surface traffic at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) to determine the effect of the number of aircraft on the surface and the amount of stop and go situations they experience to the amount of additional taxi time encountered. If the surface capacity of an airport is known, minimal delay can be accomplished by limiting the number of taxiing aircraft to that capacity. This concept is related to highways, where traffic flow drastically decreases as more cars occupy the road. An attempt to minimize this effect on highways is seen with the use of metering lights at freeway on-ramps. Since the surface traffic at airports is highly regulated, and aircraft are less mobile on the ground, limiting the surface count to a certain number can greatly reduce the amount of additional taxi time encountered, as well as reduce hazardous emissions. This study will also find the regions of an airport that encounter the most additional taxi time when the number of aircraft in that area is increased. This could help surface traffic algorithms avoid congesting that area, or re-route aircraft to different runways when that area reaches its capacity. The relationship between the amount of stop and go situations an aircraft encounters and their effect on the taxi time of that aircraft will also be investigated. This will help to determine the effect of holding an aircraft on the taxiway as opposed to re-routing it. The lesser of the two should be used when developing surface traffic algorithms to further minimize the

  5. Aerospace medicine at Brooks AFB, TX: hail and farewell.

    PubMed

    Nunneley, Sarah A; Webb, James T

    2011-05-01

    With the impending termination of USAF operations at Brooks Air Force Base (AFB) in San Antonio, TX, it is time to consider its historic role in Aerospace Medicine. The base was established in 1917 as a flight training center for the U.S. Army Air Service and in 1926 became home to its School of Aviation Medicine. The school moved to San Antonio's Randolph Field in 1931, but in 1959 it returned to Brooks where it occupied new facilities to support its role as a national center for U.S. Air Force aerospace medicine, including teaching, clinical medicine, and research. The mission was then expanded to encompass support of U.S. military and civilian space programs. With the abrupt termination of the military space program in 1969, research at Brooks focused on clinical aviation medicine and support of advanced military aircraft while continuing close cooperation with NASA in support of orbital spaceflight and the journey to the Moon. Reorganization in the 1990s assigned all research functions at Brooks to the Human Systems Division and its successors, leaving to USAFSAM the missions related to clinical work and teaching. In 2002 the USAF and the city of San Antonio implemented shared operation of Brooks as a "City-Base" in the hope of deflecting threatened closure. Nevertheless, under continuing pressure to consolidate military facilities in the United States, the 2005 Base Closure and Realignment Commission ordered Brooks closed by 2011, with its aerospace medicine functions relocated to new facilities at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, OH.

  6. Magnet Schools: Legal and Practical Implications. Magnet School Conference Series Number 1. Annual International Conference on Magnet Schools (1st, Dallas, Texas, March 9-12, 1977)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Nolan, Ed.; Waldrip, Donald R., Ed.

    This book consists of nine papers that were originally delivered at the First Annual International Conference on Magnet Schools, which was held in Dallas in March 1977. In addition to discussing the rationale for magnet schools and the history of their development, the various papers examine how to initiate and plan a magnet schools program, how…

  7. Report on a Comparative Study of Two Years' Operation of the Dallas Teacher Center Professional Semester Program. Research on Elementary Teacher Preparation Monograph No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earp, N. Wesley; Tanner, Fred W.

    This report presents comparative data collected from 122 North Texas State University elementary education students enrolled in the Dallas Teacher Center Professional Semester (DTCPS) program during the 1972-73 and 1973-74 academic years. Three instruments--One Word Sentence Completion, Self Report Inventory, and Directed Imagination Test--were…

  8. The Lifetime Value of a Loyal Customer: What Can a Child Care Director Learn from Domino's Pizza and a Cadillac Dealer in Dallas?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Margaret Leitch; Gimilaro, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In "The Service Profit Chain," Harvard Business School professors James Heskett, Earl Sasser, and Leonard Schlesinger (1997) offer two anecdotes--from Domino's Pizza and a Dallas Cadillac dealership--that illuminate the concept of valuing a lifetime customer. Experts estimate that the lifetime value of a loyal Domino's Pizza customer is $4,000 and…

  9. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-26

    WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

  10. Capacitance of Ti3C2Tx MXene in ionic liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zifeng; Barbara, Daffos; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Van Aken, Katherine L.; Anasori, Babak; Gogotsi, Yury; Simon, Patrice

    2016-09-01

    Ti3C2Tx MXene, a two-dimensional (2D) early transition metal carbide, has shown an extremely high volumetric capacitance in aqueous electrolytes, but in a narrow voltage window (less than 1.23 V). The utilization of MXene materials in ionic liquid electrolytes with a large voltage window has never been addressed. Here, we report the preparation of the Ti3C2Tx MXene ionogel film by vacuum filtration for use as supercapacitor electrodes operating in 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI) neat ionic liquid electrolyte. Due to the disordered structure of the Ti3C2Tx hydrogel film and a stable spacing after vacuum drying, achieved through ionic liquid electrolyte immersion of the Ti3C2Tx hydrogel film, the Ti3C2Tx surface became accessible to EMI+ and TFSI- ions. A capacitance of 70 F g-1 together with a large voltage window of 3 V was obtained at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in neat EMI-TFSI electrolyte. The electrochemical signature indicates a capacitive behavior even at a high scan rate (500 mV s-1) and a high power performance. This work opens up the possibilities of using MXene materials with various ionic liquid electrolytes.

  11. LyeTx I, a potent antimicrobial peptide from the venom of the spider Lycosa erythrognatha.

    PubMed

    Santos, D M; Verly, R M; Piló-Veloso, D; de Maria, M; de Carvalho, M A R; Cisalpino, P S; Soares, B M; Diniz, C G; Farias, L M; Moreira, D F F; Frézard, F; Bemquerer, M P; Pimenta, A M C; de Lima, M E

    2010-06-01

    LyeTx I, an antimicrobial peptide isolated from the venom of Lycosa erythrognatha, known as wolf spider, has been synthesised and its structural profile studied by using the CD and NMR techniques. LyeTx I has shown to be active against bacteria (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and fungi (Candida krusei and Cryptococcus neoformans) and able to alter the permeabilisation of L: -alpha-phosphatidylcholine-liposomes (POPC) in a dose-dependent manner. In POPC containing cholesterol or ergosterol, permeabilisation has either decreased about five times or remained unchanged, respectively. These results, along with the observed low haemolytic activity, indicated that antimicrobial membranes, rather than vertebrate membranes seem to be the preferential targets. However, the complexity of biological membranes compared to liposomes must be taken in account. Besides, other membrane components, such as proteins and even specific lipids, cannot be discarded to be important to the preferential action of the LyeTx I to the tested microorganisms. The secondary structure of LyeTx I shows a small random-coil region at the N-terminus followed by an alpha-helix that reached the amidated C-terminus, which might favour the peptide-membrane interaction. The high activity against bacteria together with the moderate activity against fungi and the low haemolytic activity have indicated LyeTx I as a good prototype for developing new antibiotic peptides.

  12. The development of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire. An assessment of the impact of spinal pain on behavior.

    PubMed

    Lawlis, G F; Cuencas, R; Selby, D; McCoy, C E

    1989-05-01

    The Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ) was developed to assess the amount of chronic spinal pain that affects four aspects (daily and work-leisure activities, anxiety-depression, and social interest) of the patients' lives. Results of the DPQ's statistical properties suggest that the DPQ is an externally reliable instrument as well as internally consistent. Two factors emerged from factor structure analysis. Factor 1 represents functional activities and Factor 2 represents emotional capacities. A correlation analysis suggests the concurrent validity of the psychological functional factors of the DPQ. A t test demonstrated that chronic pain patients have significantly higher DPQ scores than normals. Because these findings support its statistical properties, the DPQ appears to have utility for clinical and research purposes. The findings, limitations, and implications of this study are detailed, as are suggestions for future research.

  13. Quality assurance and quality control data validation procedures used for the Love Canal and Dallas lead soil monitoring programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, K W; Black, S C

    1983-06-01

    Public awareness of soils contamination has increased in recent years due in part to the notoriety associated with the indiscriminate release, packaging, transporting and disposal of hazardous materials. In 1980, and again in 1982, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was responsible for designing, implementing and conducting environmental monitoring programs at Love Canal in Niagara Falls, New York, and in Dallas, Texas, that dealt with suspected contaminated soils. Both of these monitoring programs were conducted over a relatively short time with the collection and analysis of over 4000 soil samples. The methods employed by the Environmental Protection Agency for providing soil data that was scientifically valid and of defensible quality for each of these monitoring programs are presented. Also, methods for identifying data bias, its precision and its uncertainty are identified. PMID:24258929

  14. Positioning System Accuracy Assessment for the Runway Incursion Prevention System Flight Test at the Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA/Langley Research Center collaborated with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to test a Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) at the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The RIPS combines airborne and ground sensor data with various cockpit displays to improve pilots' awareness of traffic conditions on the airport surface. The systems tested at DFW involved surface radar and data systems that gather and send surface traffic information to a research aircraft outfitted with the RIPS software, cockpit displays, and data link transceivers. The data sent to the airborne systems contained identification and GPS location of traffic. This information was compared with the own-ship location from airborne GPS receivers to generate incursion alerts. A total of 93 test tracks were flown while operating RIPS. This report compares the accuracy of the airborne GPS systems that gave the own-ship position of the research aircraft for the 93 test tracks.

  15. Runway Incursion Prevention System ADS-B and DGPS Data Link Analysis Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, J.; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas - Ft. Worth International Airport in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. Rockwell Collins provided and supported a prototype Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) system using 1090 MHz and a prototype Differential GPS (DGPS) system onboard the NASA Boeing 757 research aircraft. This report describes the Rockwell Collins contributions to the RIPS flight test, summarizes the development process, and analyzes both ADS-B and DGPS data collected during the flight test. In addition, results are report on interoperability tests conducted between the NASA Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) ADS-B flight test system and the NASA Boeing 757 ADS-B system.

  16. Hanford Tank Farms Vadose Zone, Addendum to the TX Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect

    Spatz, R.

    2000-08-01

    This addendum to the TX Tank Farm Report (GJO-97-13-TAR, GJO-HAN-11) published in September 1997 incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging data. A high-rate logging system was developed and deployed in the TX Tank Farm to measure cesium-137 concentration levels in high gamma flux zones where the spectral gamma logging system was unable to collect usable data because of high dead times and detector saturation. This report presents additional data and revised visualizations of subsurface contaminant distribution in the TX Tank Farm at the DOE Hanford Site in the state of Washington.

  17. Inhibitory effect of the recombinant Phoneutria nigriventer Tx1 toxin on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anita O; Peigneur, Steve; Diniz, Marcelo R V; Tytgat, Jan; Beirão, Paulo S L

    2012-12-01

    Phoneutria nigriventer toxin Tx1 (PnTx1, also referred to in the literature as Tx1) exerts inhibitory effect on neuronal (Na(V)1.2) sodium channels in a way dependent on the holding potential, and competes with μ-conotoxins but not with tetrodotoxin for their binding sites. In the present study we investigated the electrophysiological properties of the recombinant toxin (rPnTx1), which has the complete amino acid sequence of the natural toxin with 3 additional residues: AM on the N-terminal and G on the C-terminal. At the concentration of 1.5 μM, the recombinant toxin inhibits Na(+) currents of dorsal root ganglia neurons (38.4 ± 6.1% inhibition at -80 mV holding potential) and tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) currents (26.2 ± 4.9% at the same holding potential). At -50 mV holding potential the inhibition of the total current reached 71.3 ± 2.3% with 1.5 μM rPnTx1. The selectivity of rPnTx1 was investigated on ten different isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The order of potency for rPnTx1 was: rNa(V)1.2 > rNa(V)1.7 ≈ rNa(V)1.4 ≥ rNa(V)1.3 > mNa(V)1.6 ≥ hNa(V)1.8. No effect was seen on hNa(V)1.5 and on the arthropods isoforms (DmNa(V)1, BGNa(V)1.1a and VdNa(V)1). The IC(50) for Na(V)1.2 was 33.7 ± 2.9 nM with a maximum inhibition of 83.3 ± 1.9%. The toxin did not alter the voltage-dependence of channel gating and was effective on Na(V)1.2 channels devoid of inactivation. It was ineffective on neuronal calcium channels. We conclude that rPnTx1 has a promising selectivity, and that it may be a valuable model to achieve pharmacological activities of interest for the treatment of channelopathies and neuropathic pain. PMID:22968173

  18. Tank 241-TX-118 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    Tank 241-TX-118 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-TX-118 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

  19. Tank 241-TX-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    Tank 241-TX-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-TX-105 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

  20. A venom-derived neurotoxin, CsTx-1, from the spider Cupiennius salei exhibits cytolytic activities.

    PubMed

    Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Fedorova, Irina M; Lüscher, Benjamin P; Kopp, Lukas S; Trachsel, Christian; Schaller, Johann; Vu, Xuan Lan; Seebeck, Thomas; Streitberger, Kathrin; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Sigel, Erwin; Magazanik, Lev G

    2012-07-20

    CsTx-1, the main neurotoxic acting peptide in the venom of the spider Cupiennius salei, is composed of 74 amino acid residues, exhibits an inhibitory cysteine knot motif, and is further characterized by its highly cationic charged C terminus. Venom gland cDNA library analysis predicted a prepropeptide structure for CsTx-1 precursor. In the presence of trifluoroethanol, CsTx-1 and the long C-terminal part alone (CT1-long; Gly-45-Lys-74) exhibit an α-helical structure, as determined by CD measurements. CsTx-1 and CT1-long are insecticidal toward Drosophila flies and destroys Escherichia coli SBS 363 cells. CsTx-1 causes a stable and irreversible depolarization of insect larvae muscle cells and frog neuromuscular preparations, which seem to be receptor-independent. Furthermore, this membranolytic activity could be measured for Xenopus oocytes, in which CsTx-1 and CT1-long increase ion permeability non-specifically. These results support our assumption that the membranolytic activities of CsTx-1 are caused by its C-terminal tail, CT1-long. Together, CsTx-1 exhibits two different functions; as a neurotoxin it inhibits L-type Ca(2+) channels, and as a membranolytic peptide it destroys a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell membranes. Such a dualism is discussed as an important new mechanism for the evolution of spider venomous peptides.

  1. rBmαTX14 Increases the Life Span and Promotes the Locomotion of Caenorhabditis Elegans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lan; Zhang, Ju; Xu, Jie; Wan, Lu; Teng, Kaixuan; Xiang, Jin; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Zebo; Liu, Yongmei; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The scorpion has been extensively used in various pharmacological profiles or as food supplies. The exploration of scorpion venom has been reported due to the presence of recombinant peptides. rBmαTX14 is an α-neurotoxin extracted from the venom gland of the East Asian scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch and can affect ion channel conductance. Here, we investigated the functions of rBmαTX14 using the Caenorhabditis elegans model. Using western blot analysis, rBmαTX14 was shown to be expressed both in the cytoplasm and inclusion bodies in the E.coli Rosetta (DE3) strain. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that purified rBmαTX14 retained its biological structures. Next, feeding nematodes with E.coli Rosetta (DE3) expressing rBmαTX14 caused extension of the life span and promoted the locomotion of the nematodes. In addition, we identified several genes that play various roles in the life span and locomotion of C. elegans through microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, if the amino acid site H15 of rBmαTX14 was mutated, rBmαTX14 no longer promoted the C. elegans life span. In conclusion, the results not only demonstrated the functions and mechanism of rBmαTX14 in C. elegans, but also provided the new sight in the utility of recombinant peptides from scorpion venom. PMID:27611314

  2. 78 FR 9907 - TGP Development Company, LLC; TGP Flying Cloud Holdings, LLC; WEC TX Company, LLC v. Arizona...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission TGP Development Company, LLC; TGP Flying Cloud Holdings, LLC; WEC TX Company... Development Company, LLC, TGP Flying Cloud Holdings, LLC, and WEC TX Company, LLC (collectively,...

  3. rBmαTX14 Increases the Life Span and Promotes the Locomotion of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Wan, Lu; Teng, Kaixuan; Xiang, Jin; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Zebo; Liu, Yongmei; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The scorpion has been extensively used in various pharmacological profiles or as food supplies. The exploration of scorpion venom has been reported due to the presence of recombinant peptides. rBmαTX14 is an α-neurotoxin extracted from the venom gland of the East Asian scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch and can affect ion channel conductance. Here, we investigated the functions of rBmαTX14 using the Caenorhabditis elegans model. Using western blot analysis, rBmαTX14 was shown to be expressed both in the cytoplasm and inclusion bodies in the E.coli Rosetta (DE3) strain. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that purified rBmαTX14 retained its biological structures. Next, feeding nematodes with E.coli Rosetta (DE3) expressing rBmαTX14 caused extension of the life span and promoted the locomotion of the nematodes. In addition, we identified several genes that play various roles in the life span and locomotion of C. elegans through microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, if the amino acid site H15 of rBmαTX14 was mutated, rBmαTX14 no longer promoted the C. elegans life span. In conclusion, the results not only demonstrated the functions and mechanism of rBmαTX14 in C. elegans, but also provided the new sight in the utility of recombinant peptides from scorpion venom. PMID:27611314

  4. 78 FR 1935 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment and Discontinuance Exemption-in Cameron County, TX...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Cameron County, TX; Brownsville and Matamoras Bridge Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Cameron County, TX... distance of 7.98 miles in Cameron County, Tex. (collectively, the Line). The Line traverses United States...'s Brownsville Subdivision will be transferred to Cameron County, Tex., and/or the City...

  5. 33 CFR 165.819 - Security Zone; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX. (a) Location. (1) The following LNG facility mooring basins are designated as fixed security zones whenever LNG carriers are moored within them: (i) Golden Pass LNG, Sabine TX: All...°45′50″ N, 093°55′17″ W. (ii) Sabine Pass LNG, Cameron Parish, LA: All mooring basin waters north of...

  6. 33 CFR 165.819 - Security Zone; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX. (a) Location. (1) The following LNG facility mooring basins are designated as fixed security zones whenever LNG carriers are moored within them: (i) Golden Pass LNG, Sabine TX: All...°45′50″ N, 093°55′17″ W. (ii) Sabine Pass LNG, Cameron Parish, LA: All mooring basin waters north of...

  7. 78 FR 33015 - Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Waco, TX, and Establishment of Class D Airspace; Waco...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Waco, TX, and Establishment of Class D Airspace; Waco, TSTC-Waco Airport, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to amend Class...

  8. Chemical synthesis and 1H-NMR 3D structure determination of AgTx2-MTX chimera, a new potential blocker for Kv1.2 channel, derived from MTX and AgTx2 scorpion toxins.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Cyril; M'Barek, Sarrah; Visan, Violetta; Grissmer, Stephan; Sampieri, François; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Darbon, Hervé; Fajloun, Ziad

    2008-01-01

    Agitoxin 2 (AgTx2) is a 38-residue scorpion toxin, cross-linked by three disulfide bridges, which acts on voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels. Maurotoxin (MTX) is a 34-residue scorpion toxin with an uncommon four-disulfide bridge reticulation, acting on both Ca(2+)-activated and Kv channels. A 39-mer chimeric peptide, named AgTx2-MTX, was designed from the sequence of the two toxins and chemically synthesized. It encompasses residues 1-5 of AgTx2, followed by the complete sequence of MTX. As established by enzyme cleavage, the new AgTx2-MTX molecule displays half-cystine pairings of the type C1-C5, C2-C6, C3-C7, and C4-C8, which is different from that of MTX. The 3D structure of AgTx2-MTX solved by (1)H-NMR, revealed both alpha-helical and beta-sheet structures, consistent with a common alpha/beta scaffold of scorpion toxins. Pharmacological assays of AgTx2-MTX revealed that this new molecule is more potent than both original toxins in blocking rat Kv1.2 channel. Docking simulations, performed with the 3D structure of AgTx2-MTX, confirmed this result and demonstrated the participation of the N-terminal domain of AgTx2 in its increased affinity for Kv1.2 through additional molecular contacts. Altogether, the data indicated that replacement of the N-terminal domain of MTX by the one of AgTx2 in the AgTx2-MTX chimera results in a reorganization of the disulfide bridge arrangement and an increase of affinity to the Kv1.2 channel.

  9. Chemical synthesis and 1H-NMR 3D structure determination of AgTx2-MTX chimera, a new potential blocker for Kv1.2 channel, derived from MTX and AgTx2 scorpion toxins

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Cyril; M'Barek, Sarrah; Visan, Violetta; Grissmer, Stephan; Sampieri, François; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Darbon, Hervé; Fajloun, Ziad

    2008-01-01

    Agitoxin 2 (AgTx2) is a 38-residue scorpion toxin, cross-linked by three disulfide bridges, which acts on voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels. Maurotoxin (MTX) is a 34-residue scorpion toxin with an uncommon four-disulfide bridge reticulation, acting on both Ca2+-activated and Kv channels. A 39-mer chimeric peptide, named AgTx2-MTX, was designed from the sequence of the two toxins and chemically synthesized. It encompasses residues 1–5 of AgTx2, followed by the complete sequence of MTX. As established by enzyme cleavage, the new AgTx2-MTX molecule displays half-cystine pairings of the type C1–C5, C2–C6, C3–C7, and C4–C8, which is different from that of MTX. The 3D structure of AgTx2-MTX solved by 1H-NMR, revealed both α-helical and β-sheet structures, consistent with a common α/β scaffold of scorpion toxins. Pharmacological assays of AgTx2-MTX revealed that this new molecule is more potent than both original toxins in blocking rat Kv1.2 channel. Docking simulations, performed with the 3D structure of AgTx2-MTX, confirmed this result and demonstrated the participation of the N-terminal domain of AgTx2 in its increased affinity for Kv1.2 through additional molecular contacts. Altogether, the data indicated that replacement of the N-terminal domain of MTX by the one of AgTx2 in the AgTx2-MTX chimera results in a reorganization of the disulfide bridge arrangement and an increase of affinity to the Kv1.2 channel. PMID:18042681

  10. Daytime HONO vertical gradients during SHARP 2009 in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. W.; Tsai, C.; Lefer, B.; Haman, C.; Grossberg, N.; Brune, W. H.; Ren, X.; Luke, W.; Stutz, J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous Acid (HONO) plays an important role in tropospheric chemistry as a precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the most important oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of HONO are still not completely understood. Recent field observations found unexpectedly high daytime HONO concentrations in both urban and rural areas, which point to unrecognized, most likely photolytically enhanced HONO sources. Several gas-phase, aerosol, and ground surface chemistry mechanisms have been proposed to explain elevated daytime HONO, but atmospheric evidence to favor one over the others is still weak. New information on whether HONO formation occurs in the gas-phase, on aerosol, or at the ground may be derived from observations of the vertical distribution of HONO and its precursor nitrogen dioxide, NO2, as well as from its dependence on solar irradiance or actinic flux. Here we present field observations of HONO, NO2 and other trace gases in three altitude intervals (30-70 m, 70-130 m and 130-300 m) using UCLA's long path DOAS instrument, as well as in situ measurements of OH, NO, photolysis frequencies and solar irradiance, made in Houston, TX, during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursor (SHARP) experiment from 20 April to 30 May 2009. The observed HONO mixing ratios were often ten times larger than the expected photostationary state with OH and NO. Larger HONO mixing ratios observed near the ground than aloft imply, but do not clearly prove, that the daytime source of HONO was located at or near the ground. Using a pseudo steady-state (PSS) approach, we calculated the missing daytime HONO formation rates, Punknown, on four sunny days. The NO2-normalized Punknown, Pnorm, showed a clear symmetrical diurnal variation with a maximum around noontime, which was well correlated with actinic flux (NO2 photolysis frequency) and solar irradiance. This behavior, which was found on all clear days in Houston, is a strong indication of a

  11. 76 FR 49285 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Cabaniss NOLF, Corpus Christi, TX (76 FR 31821, Docket No. FAA-2010-1171). Subsequent to publication, an... published in the Federal Register June 2, 2010 (76 FR 31821), (FR Doc. 2011-13559), are corrected as follows... the geographic coordinates in the regulatory text of a final rule that was published in the...

  12. 76 FR 31821 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The... amends Class D airspace within the Corpus Christi, TX, area by updating the geographic coordinates...

  13. 78 FR 74008 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Del Rio, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Del Rio, TX, area, creating additional controlled airspace at Laughlin AFB (78 FR 52716) Docket No... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. ] Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  14. 76 FR 15857 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Early and Lake Brownwood, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Early and Lake Brownwood, TX AGENCY: Federal... the Congressional Review Act, see U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List Of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio... CFR part 73 as follows: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 0 1. The authority citation for Part...

  15. 77 FR 66743 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Crowell, Knox City, Quanah, and Rule, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... MM Docket No. 00-148 are considered final. See Quanah, Texas, et al, 76 FR 42573, published July 19... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Crowell, Knox City, Quanah, and Rule, TX AGENCY... in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa...

  16. 77 FR 60103 - Approval of Subzone Status; TST NA TRIM, LLC; Hidalgo, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... (77 FR 47816, 08/10/2012). The FTZ staff examiner reviewed the application and determined that it... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval of Subzone Status; TST NA TRIM, LLC; Hidalgo, TX On August 3, 2012, the... limit of FTZ 12, on behalf of TST NA TRIM, LLC, in Hidalgo, Texas. The application was processed...

  17. Ti3C2Tx Filler Effect on the Proton Conduction Property of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahua; Zhang, Jiakui; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Yifan; Wang, Jingtao

    2016-08-10

    Conductive polymer electrolyte membranes are increasingly attractive for a wide range of applications in hydrogen-relevant devices, for instance hydrogen fuel cells. In this study, two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx, a typical representative of the recently developed MXene family, is synthesized and employed as a universal filler for its features of large specific surface area, high aspect ratio, and sufficient terminated -OH groups. The Ti3C2Tx is incorporated into polymer matrix to explore its function on membrane microstructure and proton conduction property. Both phase-separated (acidic Nafion and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)) and non-phase-separated (basic chitosan) polymers are utilized as membrane matrixes. The microstructures, physicochemical properties, and proton conduction properties of the membranes are extensively investigated. It is demonstrated that Ti3C2Tx generates significant promotion effect on proton conduction of the composite membrane by facilitating both vehicle-type and Grotthuss-type proton transfer, yielding several times increased proton conductivity for every polymer-based composite membrane under various conditions, and the composite membrane achieves elevated hydrogen fuel cell performance. The stable Ti3C2Tx also reinforces the thermal and mechanical stabilities of these composite membranes. Since the MXene family includes more than 70 members, this exploration is expected to open up new perspectives for expanding their applications, especially as membrane modifiers and proton conductors. PMID:27430190

  18. 76 FR 53352 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Alice, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3... instrument approach procedures at Old Hoppe Place Airport, Agua Dulce, TX, has made this action necessary...

  19. 76 FR 5303 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carrizo Springs, Glass Ranch Airport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ...; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February.... 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The..., Glass Ranch Airport, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...

  20. 75 FR 6319 - Proposed Amendment of Low Altitude Area Navigation Route T-254; Houston, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ...) Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3... altitude Area Navigation (RNAV) route T-254 in the Houston, TX, terminal area by eliminating the...

  1. 78 FR 26799 - Waterway Suitability Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Beaumont, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public meeting: We do not now plan... SECURITY Coast Guard Waterway Suitability Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Beaumont, TX... construction to expand or modify marine terminal operations in an existing facility handling Liquefied...

  2. 75 FR 81442 - Revocation of Class E Airspace; Lone Star, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... rulemaking to remove Class E airspace for Lone Star, TX. (75 FR 64972) Docket No. FAA-2010-0772. Interested...) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26..., 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The...

  3. 33 CFR 165.827 - Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX. 165.827 Section 165.827 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED...

  4. 33 CFR 165.827 - Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Galveston Channel, TX. 165.827 Section 165.827 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED...

  5. Ti3C2Tx Filler Effect on the Proton Conduction Property of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahua; Zhang, Jiakui; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Yifan; Wang, Jingtao

    2016-08-10

    Conductive polymer electrolyte membranes are increasingly attractive for a wide range of applications in hydrogen-relevant devices, for instance hydrogen fuel cells. In this study, two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx, a typical representative of the recently developed MXene family, is synthesized and employed as a universal filler for its features of large specific surface area, high aspect ratio, and sufficient terminated -OH groups. The Ti3C2Tx is incorporated into polymer matrix to explore its function on membrane microstructure and proton conduction property. Both phase-separated (acidic Nafion and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)) and non-phase-separated (basic chitosan) polymers are utilized as membrane matrixes. The microstructures, physicochemical properties, and proton conduction properties of the membranes are extensively investigated. It is demonstrated that Ti3C2Tx generates significant promotion effect on proton conduction of the composite membrane by facilitating both vehicle-type and Grotthuss-type proton transfer, yielding several times increased proton conductivity for every polymer-based composite membrane under various conditions, and the composite membrane achieves elevated hydrogen fuel cell performance. The stable Ti3C2Tx also reinforces the thermal and mechanical stabilities of these composite membranes. Since the MXene family includes more than 70 members, this exploration is expected to open up new perspectives for expanding their applications, especially as membrane modifiers and proton conductors.

  6. 75 FR 70945 - Caddo National Wildlife Refuge, Harrison County, TX; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    .... Ecoregional Issues Potential impacts of climate change Habitat Issues Bottomland Hardwood habitat maintenance... County, TX, and encompasses approximately 7,500 acres of Piney Woods, mature Baldcyprus Forests, and... bayous twist through forests teeming with a great diversity of aquatic and terrestrial plant...

  7. 75 FR 31463 - Comal County Regional Habitat Conservation Plan, Comal County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... Federal Register on October 16, 2008 (73 FR 61433). A public scoping meeting was held on December 4, 2008... Fish and Wildlife Service Comal County Regional Habitat Conservation Plan, Comal County, TX AGENCY... statement, draft habitat conservation plan, and permit application; announcement of a public...

  8. 75 FR 66013 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Horseshoe Bay, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959... Bay Resort non-directional beacon (NDB) at Horseshoe Bay Resort Airport, Horseshoe Bay, TX, has...

  9. 49 CFR 372.237 - Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties, TX. 372.237 Section 372.237 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS, COMMERCIAL ZONES,...

  10. 78 FR 19097 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Round Mountain, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... the West Ranch Airport, Round Mountain, TX (77 FR 71367) Docket No. FAA-2012-0771. Interested parties... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  11. 77 FR 71367 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Round Mountain, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ...; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February.... 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The... Mountain, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  12. 76 FR 14052 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Sabine River Authority of Texas, Quitman, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Texas, Denton, TX, for forensic evaluation. The human remains and non-human bone fragments, which are... 6, 2006. No known individual was identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are non-human bone fragments. Dr. Harrell Gill-King, Anthropologist, University of North Texas, performed an examination of...

  13. 76 FR 30396 - Deloitte Financial Advisory Services LLP, Real Estate Consulting, Houston, TX; Amended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Deloitte Financial Advisory Services LLP, Real Estate Consulting, Houston, TX; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance In accordance with Section 223 of the Trade Act...

  14. Encounters with Wisdom: A Case Study of Community Worker Reflection Circles in San Antonio, TX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arispe, Don D.

    2013-01-01

    This case study focuses upon the transformational experiences of 28 social service and pastoral workers engaged in a Reflection Circle Process (RCP) in San Antonio, TX. The RCP involves the writing of a holistic journal entry, known as a process note, coupled with an in-depth exploration of the note with the help of a group of trusted peers, known…

  15. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-116: best-basis inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Place, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    An effort is underway to provide waste inventory estimates that will serve as standard characterization source terms for the various waste management activities. As part of this effort, an evaluation of available information for single-shell tank 241-TX-116 was performed, and a bost-basis inventory was established. This work follows the methodology that was established by the standard inventory task.

  16. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-117: best-basis inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Place, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    An effort is underway to provide waste inventory estimates that will serve as standard characterization source terms for the various waste management activities. As part of this effort, an evaluation of available information for single-shell tank 241-TX-117 was performed, and a best-basis inventory was established. This work follows the methodology that was established by the standard inventory task.

  17. 78 FR 48293 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; San Marcos, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... new Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures at San Marcos Municipal Airport and... incorporation by reference action under 1 CFR Part 51, subject to the annual revision of FAA Order 7400.9 and... airspace for the San Marcos, TX, area, creating additional controlled airspace at San Marcos...

  18. 75 FR 12726 - Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 149; Port Freeport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... comment has been given in the Federal Register (73 FR 78289, 12/22/2008 and 74 FR 42050, 8/20/2009) and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 149; Port Freeport, TX...

  19. 75 FR 15992 - Revision of Prohibited Area P-49; Crawford, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... that while the security requirements for establishing P-49 Crawford, TX (66 FR 16391) remain valid... ``significant rule'' under Department of Transportation (DOT) Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 73.89 0 2. Sec....

  20. Fugitive greenhouse gas emissions from shale gas activities - a case study of Dish, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A.; Roscoe, B.; Lary, D.; Schaefer, D.; Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Brian, A.; DiGangi, J.; Miller, D. J.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    We evaluate new findings on aerial (horizontal and vertical) mapping of methane emissions in the atmospheric boundary layer region to help study fugitive methane emissions from extraction, transmission, and storage of natural gas and oil in Dish, Texas. Dish is located in the Barnett Shale which has seen explosive development of hydraulic fracking activities in recent years. The aerial measurements were performed with a new laser-based methane sensor developed specifically for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) methane sensor, with a mass of 2.5 kg and a precision of < 20 ppbv methane at 1 Hz, was flown on the UT-Dallas ARC Payload Master electronic aircraft at two sites in Texas: one representative of urban emissions of the Dallas-Fort Worth area in Richardson, Texas and another in Dish, Texas, closer to gas and oil activities. Methane mixing ratios at Dish were ubiquitously in the 3.5 - 4 ppmv range which was 1.5 - 2 ppmv higher than methane levels immediately downwind of Dallas. During the flight measurements at Dish, narrow methane plumes exceeding 20 ppmv were frequently observed at altitudes from the surface to 130 m above the ground. Based on the wind speed at the sampling location, the horizontal widths of large methane plumes were of the order of 100 m. The locations of the large methane plumes were variable in space and time over a ~ 1 km2 area sampled from the UAV. Spatial mapping over larger scales (10 km) by ground-based measurements showed similar methane levels as the UAV measurements. To corroborate our measurements, alkane and other hydrocarbon mixing ratios from an on-site TCEQ environmental monitoring station were analyzed and correlated with methane measurements to fingerprint the methane source. We show that fugitive methane emissions at Dish are a significant cause of the large and ubiquitous methane levels on the 1-10 km scale.

  1. Fatty acids and TxA2 generation, in the absence of platelet-COX-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    DeFilippis, A.P.; Rai, S.N.; Cambon, A.; Miles, R.J.; Jaffe, A.S.; Moser, A.B.; Jones, R.O.; Bolli, R.; Schulman, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Omega-3 fatty acids suppress Thromboxane A2 (TxA2) generation via mechanisms independent to that of aspirin therapy. We sought to evaluate whether baseline omega-3 fatty acid levels influence arachidonic acid proven platelet-cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) independent TxA2 generation (TxA2 generation despite adequate aspirin use). Methods and results Subjects with acute myocardial infarction, stable CVD or at high risk for CVD, on adequate aspirin therapy were included in this study. Adequate aspirin action was defined as complete inhibition of platelet-COX-1 activity as assessed by <10% change in light transmission aggregometry to ≥1 mmol/L arachidonic acid. TxA2 production was measured via liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry for the stable TxA2 metabolite 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 (UTxB2) in urine. The relationship between baseline fatty acids, demographics and UTxB2 were evaluated. Baseline omega-3 fatty acid levels were not associated with UTxB2 concentration. However, smoking was associated with UTxB2 in this study. Conclusion Baseline omega-3 fatty acid levels do not influence TxA2 generation inpatients with or at high risk for CVD receiving adequate aspirin therapy. The association of smoking and TxA2 generation, in the absence of platelet COX-1 activity, among aspirin treated patients warrants further study. PMID:24370448

  2. Calcium-dependent contractile response of arterial smooth muscle to a jellyfish toxin (pCrTX: Carybdea rastonii).

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, H.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakajima, T.; Satoh, A.; Sekizaki, S.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiments was to investigate the pharmacological mechanisms of the vasoconstriction caused by the toxin (pCrTX) which had been partially purified from the tentacles of the jellyfish Carybdea rastonii ('Andonkurage'). pCrTX (0.1 to 10 micrograms ml-1) produced a tonic contraction of rabbit aortic strips, which was nearly abolished in Ca2+-free medium and was significantly reduced by verapamil or diltiazem. pCrTX stimulated 45Ca2+-influx and this effect was markedly attenuated by verapamil. pCrTX-induced vasoconstriction was significantly attenuated by phentolamine, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and in low Na+-medium, but not by bretylium, guanethidine, reserpinization or tetrodotoxin (TTX). pCrTX continuously and significantly increased the 3H-efflux from [3H]-noradrenaline preloaded aortic strips and this effect was completely inhibited by pretreatment with 6-OHDA and in Ca2+-free medium, but not by phentolamine, bretylium, guanethidine or TTX. A single exposure to pCrTX for 30 min greatly reduced the contractile responses to tyramine, nicotine and transmural electrical stimulation, but not those to noradrenaline or KC1. In addition, incorporation of [3H]-noradrenaline was reduced. Pretreatments with chlorphenylamine or indomethacin failed to modify the contractile response to pCrTX. These results suggest that the pCrTX-induced vasoconstriction is caused by a presynaptic action, releasing noradrenaline from the intramural adrenergic nerve terminals, and by a postsynaptic action, which consists at least in part of stimulation of the transmembrane calcium influx. Both pre- and postsynaptic actions depend on the external calcium concentration. The data further suggest that pCrTX damages the noradrenaline uptake and/or storage mechanisms without damaging postsynaptic contractile systems. PMID:2874856

  3. Use of radar rainfall data for high-resolution flash flood forecasting in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, D. J.; Habibi, H.; Rafieei Nasab, A.; Norouzi, A.; Nazari, B.; Lee, H. S.; Cosgrove, B.; Cui, Z.

    2015-12-01

    For monitoring and prediction of water-related hazards such as flash flooding in urban areas, high-resolution hydrologic and hydraulic modeling is necessary. Because of large sensitivity and scale dependence of rainfall-runoff models to errors in quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE), it is important that the accuracy of QPE be improved to the greatest extent possible. In this presentation, we describe the ongoing efforts in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex area to provide location- and time-specific flash flooding warnings in real-time. The hydrologic modeling system used is the National Weather Service (NWS) Hydrology Laboratory's Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (HLRDHM) applied at spatiotemporal resolutions ranging from 250 m to 2 km and from 1 min to 1 hour. The high-resolution precipitation input is from the DFW Demonstration Network of the Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) radars, the Next Generation QPE (Q2), and the NWS Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE). Also described are the assessment of sensitivity of streamflow simulation to the spatiotemporal resolution of precipitation input and hydrologic modeling, the needs for high-quality high-resolution precipitation data sets for hydro-meteorological and -climatological applications particularly in large urban areas, and possible approaches to realize them.

  4. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System Installed at the First Solar Heated Office Building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. The Solar System was designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 Solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glycol-water solution through the collectors into a hot water system heat exchanger. The hot water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make-up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described. The system became operational July 11, 1979.

  5. A Terminal Area Analysis of Continuous Ascent Departure Fuel Use at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Keenan; Robinson, John E., III

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft departing from the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) encounter vertical restrictions that prevent continuous ascent operations. The result of these restrictions are temporary level-offs at 10,000 feet. A combination of flow direction, specific Area Navigation (RNAV) route geometry, and arrival streams have been found to be the biggest factors in the duration and frequency of a temporary level-offs. In total, 20% of DFW departures are affected by these level-offs, which have an average duration of just over 100 seconds. The use of continuous descent approaches at DFW are shown to lessen the impact arrivals have on the departures and allow more continuous ascents. The fuel used in a continuous ascent and an ascent with a temporary level-off have been calculated using a fuel burn rate model created from a combination of actual aircraft track data, aircraft manufacturer flight operations manuals, and Eurocontrol's Base of Aircraft Data (BADA) simulation tool. This model represents the average aggregate burn rates for the current fleet mix at DFW. Continuous ascents would save approximately seven gallons of fuel out of 450 gallons used to climb to a cruise altitude of 31,000ft per departure.

  6. Selection of prey to improve biological parameters of the predator Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Bortoli, S A De; Vacari, A M; Laurentis, V L; Bortoli, C P De; Santos, R F; Otuka, A K

    2016-06-01

    Mass production of predatory stinkbugs in the laboratory is prioritized to release them into the field as part of IPM programs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the best prey for rearing the predator Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) among five different species of insect (three of Lepidoptera, one of Coleoptera, and one of Diptera). Second-instar P. nigrispinus nymphs were conditioned in transparent 1000-mL plastic pots, adults were placed in Petri dishes for mating, and both stages were maintained under controlled conditions (25 ± 1°C, 12 hours of photophase, 70 ± 10% RH). Nymphs and adults of P. nigrispinus consumed more Musca domestica (Linnaeus, 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae) larvae than the other tested prey. The consumption of fly larvae was 1.5 larvae/day/nymph and adults 1.7 larvae/day/adult. However, the number of eggs per female was less when the predator consumed M. domestica larvae (407.8 eggs/female) and most when consumed the Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, 1794) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae (797.7 eggs/female). Furthermore, the percentage of hatched eggs was greater when the predator females consumed D. saccharalis larvae (90.0%). D. saccharalis larvae is the best prey to rearing P. nigrispinus.

  7. A land-use and water-quality history of White Rock Lake Reservoir, Dallas, Texas, based on paleolimnological analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Platt, Bradbury J.; Van Metre, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    White Rock Lake reservoir in Dallas, Texas contains a 150-cm sediment record of silty clay that documents land-use changes since its construction in 1912. Pollen analysis corroborates historical evidence that between 1912 and 1950 the watershed was primarily agricultural. Land disturbance by plowing coupled with strong and variable spring precipitation caused large amounts of sediment to enter the lake during this period. Diatoms were not preserved at this time probably because of low productivity compared to diatom dissolution by warm, alkaline water prior to burial in the sediments. After 1956, the watershed became progressively urbanized. Erosion decreased, land stabilized, and pollen of riparian trees increased as the lake water became somewhat less turbid. By 1986 the sediment record indicates that diatom productivity had increased beyond rates of diatom destruction. Neither increased nutrients nor reduced pesticides can account for increased diatom productivity, but grain size studies imply that before 1986 diatoms were light limited by high levels of turbidity. This study documents how reservoirs may relate to land-use practices and how watershed management could extend reservoir life and improve water quality.

  8. Turbulence Climatology at Dallas/Ft.Worth (DFW) Airport: Implications for a Departure Wake Vortex Spacing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perras, G. H.; Dasey, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    Potential adaptive wake vortex spacing systems may need to rely on wake vortex decay rather than wake vortex transport in reducing wake separations. A wake vortex takeoff-spacing system in particular will need to rely on wake decay. Ambient turbulence is the primary influence on wake decay away from the ground. This study evaluated 18 months of ambient turbulence measurements at Dallas/Ft. Worth (DFW) Airport. The measurements show minor variation in the turbulence levels at various times of the year or times of the day for time periods when a departure system could be used. Arrival system operation was also examined, and a slightly lower overall turbulence level was found as compared to departure system benefit periods. The Sarpkaya model, a validated model of wake vortex behavior, was applied to various turbulence levels and compared to the DFW turbulence statistics. The results show that wake vortices from heavy aircraft on takeoff should dissipate within one minute for the majority of the time and will rarely last two minutes. These results will need to be verified by wake vortex measurements on departure.

  9. Inhibition of the myotoxic activity of Bothrops jararacussu venom and its two major myotoxins, BthTX-I and BthTX-II, by the aqueous extract of Tabernaemontana catharinensis A. DC. (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Veronese, E L G; Esmeraldino, L E; Trombone, A P F; Santana, A E; Bechara, G H; Kettelhut, I; Cintra, A C O; Giglio, J R; Sampaio, S V

    2005-01-01

    Partial neutralization of the myotoxic effect of Bothrops jararacussu venom (BV) and two of its myotoxins [bothropstoxin-I (BthTX-I), catalytically inactive, and II (BthTX-II), showing low PLA2 activity], by the lyophilized aqueous extract of Tabernaemontana catharinensis (AE), was studied in rat isolated soleus muscle preparations (in vitro) and through i.m. injection in the gastrocnemius muscle (in vivo) by determination of creatine kinase (CK) activity and histopathological analysis. Incubation of soleus muscle for 1 h with BV or toxins (20 microg/ml) plus AE (400 microg/ml) added immediately after BV, BthTX-I or BthTX-II reduced CK levels by 53%, 37% and 56%, respectively. The myonecrotic effects of BV (20 microg/ml) upon soleus muscle was reduced 24%, 35% and 36% when AE (400 microg/ml) was added 1 h after BV and CK was evaluated 30 min, 1 and 2 h later, respectively. For BthTX-I these values were 46%, 48% and 47%, while for BthTX-II no inhibitory effect was detected. Histological analysis of soleus muscle after incubation with AE (400 microg/ml, 1 h) did not reveal any change in muscle fibers, but severe necrosis induced by BV or toxins (20 microg/ml) was clearly in evidence, and decreased significantly when soleus muscle was protected by AE. This protection was also observed when AE was administered 1 h after BV or BthTX-I, but not after BthTX-II. AE did not inhibit the catalytic PLA2 activity of BthTX-II or BV and did not change the PAGE pattern of BV, BthTX-I or BthTX-II. In vivo assays were performed in 100-g rats and maximal CK release was attained at a dose of 100 microg of BV, 3 h after injection. AE was not effective when injected 20 s after BV or toxins. However, injecting BV or toxins (100 microg), which were pre-incubated with AE (2 mg) caused an inhibition of 57%, 59% and 51%, respectively, with zero time pre-incubation, but was less effective with 1 h pre-incubation. This plant represents a potential source of promising myotoxin inhibitors.

  10. 78 FR 4125 - Foreign-Trade Zone 265-Conroe, TX; Authorization of Production Activity; Bauer Manufacturing, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 58354, 9-20-2012). The FTZ Board has... Manufacturing, Inc. (Pile Drivers and Boring Machinery), Conroe, TX On September 12, 2012, the City of...

  11. The cytotoxic mechanism of karlotoxin 2 (KmTx 2) from Karlodinium veneficum (Dinophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Deeds, Jonathan R.; Hoesch, Robert E.; Place, Allen R.; Kao, Joseph P.Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the polyketide toxin karlotoxin 2 (KmTx 2) produced by Karlodinium veneficum, a dinoflagellate associated with fish kills in temperate estuaries worldwide, alters vertebrate cell membrane permeability. Microfluorimetric and electrophysiological measurements were used to determine that vertebrate cellular toxicity occurs through non-selective permeabilization of plasma membranes, leading to osmotic cell lysis. Previous studies showed that KmTx 2 is lethal to fish at naturally-occurring concentrations measured during fish kills, while sub-lethal doses severely damage gill epithelia. This study provides a mechanistic explanation for the association between K. veneficum blooms and fish kills that has long been observed in temperate estuaries worldwide. PMID:25546005

  12. Disposal of hazardous materials from TxDOT activities. Final report, September 1992-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, M.; Corapcioglu, M.Y.; Beavers, T.; Beck, B.; Mehevec, A.

    1994-11-01

    The process of purchasing, storing, handling and disposal of hazardous waste is demanding. The Texas Department of Transportation deals with many such compounds every day in performing its duty of maintaining over 70,000 miles of Texas roadway. With the new demands being placed on all users of hazardous materials by the new EPA guidelines, procedures must be enacted to ensure TxDOT`s compliance with these ever-changing regulations. The placement of full-time safety and hazardous materials coordinators in each district office will help to ensure that employees follow reporting procedures and use disposal guidelines. The report will discuss these actions and others that might help TxDOT in this task.

  13. Cardiovascular Lifetime Risk Predicts Incidence of Coronary Calcification in Individuals With Low Short‐Term Risk: The Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Paixao, Andre R. M.; Ayers, Colby R.; Rohatgi, Anand; Das, Sandeep R.; de Lemos, James A.; Khera, Amit; Lloyd‐Jones, Donald; Berry, Jarett D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The absence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in middle age is associated with very low short‐term risk for coronary events. However, the long‐term implications of a CAC score of 0 are uncertain, particularly among individuals with high cardiovascular lifetime risk. We sought to characterize the association between predicted lifetime risk and incident CAC among individuals with low short‐term risk. Methods and Results We included 754 Dallas Heart Study participants with serial CAC scans (6.9 years apart) and both low short‐term risk and baseline CAC=0. Lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease was estimated according to risk factor burden. Among this group, 365 individuals (48.4%) were at low lifetime risk and 389 (51.6%) at high lifetime risk. High lifetime risk was associated with higher annualized CAC incidence (4.2% versus 2.7%; P < 0.001). Similarly, mean follow‐up CAC scores were higher among participants with high lifetime risk (7.8 versus 2.4 Agatston units). After adjustment for age, sex, and race, high lifetime risk remained independently associated with incident CAC (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.12 to 2.27; P=0.01). When assessing risk factor burden at the follow‐up visit, 66.7% of CAC incidence observed in the low lifetime risk group occurred among individuals reclassified to a higher short‐ or long‐term risk category. Conclusion Among individuals with low short‐term risk and CAC scores of 0, high lifetime risk is associated with a higher incidence of CAC. These findings highlight the importance of lifetime risk even among individuals with very low short‐term risk. PMID:25424574

  14. Use of Borehole Geophysical Logs for Improved Site Characterization at Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anaya, Roberto; Braun, Christopher L.; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2000-01-01

    A shallow alluvial aquifer at the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant near Dallas, Texas, has been contaminated by organic solvents used in the fabrication and assembly of aircraft and aircraft parts. Natural gamma-ray and electromagnetic-induction log data collected during 1997 from 162 wells were integrated with existing lithologic and cone-penetrometer test log data to improve characterization of the subsurface alluvium at the site. The alluvium, consisting of mostly fine-grained, low-permeability sediments, was classified into low, intermediate, and high clay-content sediments on the basis of the gamma-ray logs. Low clay-content sediments were interpreted as being relatively permeable, whereas high clay-content sediments were interpreted as being relatively impermeable. Gamma-ray logs, cone-penetrometer test logs, and electromagnetic-induction logs were used to develop a series of intersecting sections to delineate the spatial distribution of low, intermediate, and high clay-content sediments and to delineate zones of potentially contaminated sediments. The sections indicate three major sedimentary units in the shallow alluvial aquifer at NWIRP. The lower unit consists of relatively permeable, low clay-content sediments and is absent over the southeastern and northwestern part of the site. Permeable zones in the complex, discontinuous middle unit are present mostly in the western part of the site. In the eastern and southeastern part of the site, the upper unit has been eroded away and replaced by fill material. Zones of potentially contaminated sediments are generally within the uppermost clay layer or fill material. In addition, the zones tend to be local occurrences.

  15. PhTx3-4, a Spider Toxin Calcium Channel Blocker, Reduces NMDA-Induced Injury of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Binda, Nancy Scardua; Porto Petruceli Carayon, Charles; Agostini, Rafael Mourão; do Nascimento Pinheiro, Ana Cristina; Nascimento Cordeiro, Marta; Romano Silva, Marco Aurélio; Figueira Silva, Juliana; Rita Pereira, Elizete Maria; da Silva Junior, Claudio Antonio; de Castro Junior, Célio José; Sena Guimarães, Andre Luiz; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo neuroprotective effect of PhTx3-4, a spider toxin N-P/Q calcium channel blocker, was studied in a rat model of NMDA-induced injury of the retina. NMDA (N-Methyl-d-Aspartate)-induced retinal injury in rats reduced the b-wave amplitude by 62% ± 3.6%, indicating the severity of the insult. PhTx3-4 treatment increased the amplitude of the b-wave, which was almost equivalent to the control retinas that were not submitted to injury. The PhTx3-4 functional protection of the retinas recorded on the ERG also was observed in the neuroprotection of retinal cells. NMDA-induced injury reduced live cells in the retina layers and the highest reduction, 84%, was in the ganglion cell layer. Notably, PhTx3-4 treatment caused a remarkable reduction of dead cells in the retina layers, and the highest neuroprotective effect was in the ganglion cells layer. NMDA-induced cytotoxicity of the retina increased the release of glutamate, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress. PhTx3-4 treatment reduced glutamate release, ROS production and oxidative stress measured by malondialdehyde. Thus, we presented for the first time evidence of in vivo neuroprotection from NMDA-induced retinal injury by PhTx3-4 (-ctenitoxin-Pn3a), a spider toxin that blocks N-P/Q calcium channels. PMID:26978403

  16. Optimal Cleavage and Oxidative Folding of α-Conotoxin TxIB as a Therapeutic Candidate Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaosa; Wu, Yong; Zhu, Furong; Yang, Qiuyuan; Wu, Qianqian; Zhangsun, Dongting; Luo, Sulan

    2013-01-01

    Alpha6beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric diseases, including addiction and Parkinson’s disease. Alpha-conotoxin (α-CTx) TxIB is a uniquely selective ligand, which blocks α6/α3β2β3 nAChRs only, but does not block the other subtypes. Therefore, α-CTx TxIB is a valuable therapeutic candidate peptide. Synthesizing enough α-CTx TxIB with high yield production is required for conducting wide-range testing of its potential medicinal applications. The current study optimized the cleavage of synthesized α-CTx TxIB resin-bounded peptide and folding of the cleaved linear peptide. Key parameters influencing cleavage and oxidative folding of α-CTx TxIB were examined, such as buffer, redox agents, pH, salt, co-solvent and temperature. Twelve conditions were used for cleavage optimization. Fifty-four kinds of one-step oxidative solution were used to assess their effects on each α-CTx TxIB isomers’ yield. The result indicated that co-solvent choices were particularly important. Completely oxidative folding of globular isomer was achieved when the NH4HCO3 or Tris-HCl folding buffer at 4 °C contained 40% of co-solvent DMSO, and GSH:GSSG (2:1) or GSH only with pH 8~8.7. PMID:24048271

  17. Recombinant conotoxin, TxVIA, produced in yeast has insecticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bruce, C; Fitches, E C; Chougule, N; Bell, H A; Gatehouse, J A

    2011-07-01

    Conotoxins are a diverse collection of more than 50,000 peptides produced by predatory marine snails of the genus Conus in order to immobilize their prey. Many conotoxins modulate the activity of ion channels, and show high specificity to their targets; as a result, some have valuable pharmaceutical applications. However, obtaining active peptide is difficult and to date has only been achieved though natural collection, chemical synthesis, or the use of prokaryotic expression systems, which often have the disadvantage of requiring subsequent steps to correctly fold the peptide. This paper reports the production of a conotoxin, TxVIA from Conus textile, as a biologically active recombinant protein, using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. The presence of the pro-peptide was found to be necessary for the expression of biologically active conotoxin. We also show that TxVIA is not, as previously reported, mollusc-specific, but also shows insecticidal activity when injected into lepidopteran (cabbage moth) and dipteran (house fly) larvae. In contrast, recombinant TxVIA was not found to be molluscicidal to the grey field slug Deroceras reticulatum. PMID:21640131

  18. Enhanced soil washing of phenanthrene by mixed solutions of TX100 and SDBS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Zhu, Lizhong; Xing, Baoshan

    2006-07-01

    Increased desorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) from soils and sediments is a key to the remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. In this study, phenanthrene desorption from a contaminated soil by mixed solutions of a nonionic surfactant(octylphenol polyethoxylate, TX100) and an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, SDBS) was investigated. Phenanthrene desorption depended on not only aqueous surfactant concentrations and phenanthrene solubility enhancement but also the soil-sorbed surfactant amount and the corresponding sorption capacity of sorbed surfactants. The added surfactant critical desorption concentrations (CDCs) for phenanthrene from soil depended on both sorbed concentrations of surfactants and their critical micelle concentrations (CMCs). Phenanthrene desorption by mixed solutions was more efficient than individual surfactants due to the low sorption loss of mixed surfactants to soil. Among the tested surfactant systems, mixed TX100 and SDBS with a 1:9 mass ratio exhibited the highest phenanthrene desorption. Mixed micelle formation, showing negative deviation of CMCs from the ones predicted by the ideal mixing theory, was primarily responsible for the significant reduction of soil-sorbed amounts of TX100 and SDBS in their mixed systems. Therefore, mixed anionic-nonionic surfactants had great potential in the area of enhanced soil and groundwater remediation.

  19. Interrelationships of breed type, USDA quality grade, cooking method, and degree of doneness on consumer evaluations of beef in Dallas and San Antonio, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    McKenna, D R; Lorenzen, C L; Pollok, K D; Morgan, W W; Mies, W L; Harris, J J; Murphy, R; McAdams, M; Hale, D S; Savell, J W

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the consumer controlled factors of cooking method and degree of doneness on top loin steaks from different USDA quality grades (Low Choice, High Select or Low Select) and breed-types (English, Continental European Cross or Brahman Cross). In addition, cities within the same region were evaluated for differences in consumer controlled factors and palatability responses. The in-home product test was conducted in Dallas and San Antonio, Texas, USA. Consumers (n=173) evaluated steaks for overall like (OSAT), tenderness (TEND), juiciness (JUIC), and flavor (FLAV) using 23-point hedonic scales. Respondents in Dallas cooked their steaks to higher degrees of doneness than did those in San Antonio. Outdoor grilling was the most frequently used method of cookery for steaks in both cities. Generally, consumers in San Antonio gave higher palatability ratings to Choice steaks and Dallas consumers gave higher ratings to Select steaks. The interactions of city×cooking method, breed-type×cooking method, and degree of doneness×cooking method were significant for all palatability attributes. In addition, the interaction of cooking method×quality grade was significant for TEND, JUIC, and FLAV. Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force was determined on a steak from each strip loin. Steaks from Continental European Cross cattle and Low Choice carcasses had the lowest WBS values. Differences in consumer preparation of beef top loin steaks present very unique challenges for the beef industry. Consumer information programs may serve a valuable role in connecting consumer perceptions with the preparation techniques needed to consistently achieve satisfaction.

  20. Interrelationships of breed type, USDA quality grade, cooking method, and degree of doneness on consumer evaluations of beef in Dallas and San Antonio, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    McKenna, D R; Lorenzen, C L; Pollok, K D; Morgan, W W; Mies, W L; Harris, J J; Murphy, R; McAdams, M; Hale, D S; Savell, J W

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the consumer controlled factors of cooking method and degree of doneness on top loin steaks from different USDA quality grades (Low Choice, High Select or Low Select) and breed-types (English, Continental European Cross or Brahman Cross). In addition, cities within the same region were evaluated for differences in consumer controlled factors and palatability responses. The in-home product test was conducted in Dallas and San Antonio, Texas, USA. Consumers (n=173) evaluated steaks for overall like (OSAT), tenderness (TEND), juiciness (JUIC), and flavor (FLAV) using 23-point hedonic scales. Respondents in Dallas cooked their steaks to higher degrees of doneness than did those in San Antonio. Outdoor grilling was the most frequently used method of cookery for steaks in both cities. Generally, consumers in San Antonio gave higher palatability ratings to Choice steaks and Dallas consumers gave higher ratings to Select steaks. The interactions of city×cooking method, breed-type×cooking method, and degree of doneness×cooking method were significant for all palatability attributes. In addition, the interaction of cooking method×quality grade was significant for TEND, JUIC, and FLAV. Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force was determined on a steak from each strip loin. Steaks from Continental European Cross cattle and Low Choice carcasses had the lowest WBS values. Differences in consumer preparation of beef top loin steaks present very unique challenges for the beef industry. Consumer information programs may serve a valuable role in connecting consumer perceptions with the preparation techniques needed to consistently achieve satisfaction. PMID:22064143

  1. Effects of deletion and insertion of amino acids on the activity of HelaTx1, a scorpion toxin on potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Esaki, Nao; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-03-01

    Four analogs of HelaTx1, a 25-mer peptide from scorpion venom, were synthesized by deleting its C-terminal hexapeptide fragment and N-terminal Ser residue and by inserting an amino acid in the middle part of the molecule. CD spectrum of HelaTx1(1-19) was almost superimposable to that of native HelaTx1. Functional characterization showed that HelaTx1(1-19) retained its inhibitory activity on Kv1.1 channel although 3 times less potent than HelaTx1, indicating that C-terminal part of HelaTx1 was not essential for its conformation and activity. Further deletion of N-terminal Ser residue and insertion of Ala in the middle part of the molecule affected the CD spectra and resulted in the decrease of activity.

  2. [First occurrence of Alcaeorrhynchus grandis (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) preying on defoliating caterpillars of oil palm in the State of Pará, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rafael C; Lemos, Walkymário P; Bernardino, Aline S; Buecke, Joel; Müller, Antonio A

    2010-01-01

    The oil palm Elaeis guineensis is usually attacked by pests, particularly, defoliating caterpillars. Between 2004 and 2006 a stinkbug predator (Asopinae) was registered preying on caterpillars of Brassolis sophorae L., Opsiphanes invirae Hübner (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) and Sibine spp. (Lepidoptera: Limacodidae), reducing their populations in commercial oil palm plantations in the State of Pará, Brazil. Specimens of the natural enemy were collected, mounted, and identified as Alcaeorrhynchus grandis (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), corresponding to the first report of the occurrence of this stinkbug attacking defoliating caterpillars of oil palm in Brazil.

  3. Video enforcement for HOV lanes: Field test results for the I-30 HOV lane in Dallas. Summary report, August 1993--February 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.M.

    1998-07-01

    The report documents a study conducted to assess and test promising technologies for HOV land enforcement. After a qualitative assessment of video, automatic vehicle identification, and infrared machine vision technologies, the study was suspended because no preferred infrared technology was available for testing. The study was resumed when a vendor demonstrated promising video technology. The high-occupancy vehicle enforcement and review (HOVER) system was then developed for an operational test on the East R.L. Thorton (I-30) contraflow HOV lane in Dallas, Texas.

  4. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban streams as assessed using semipermeable membrane devices, Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this fact sheet are to summarize the occurrence of water-borne PAHs in three urban streams in the Dallas- Fort Worth metropolitan area and to assess the use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as PAH samplers. One site on each of three streams was selected for monitoring the occurrence of PAHs (fig. 1). The sites were chosen to reflect varied urban land uses and the influences of point- and nonpointsource pollution. The monitoring was done using SPMDs during a 30-day period in late May and June 1994.

  5. Chemical data for bottom sediment, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1994-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Van Metre, P.C.; Moring, J.B.; Braun, C.L.; Wilson, J.T.; Mahler, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Mountain Creek Lake is a reservoir adjacent to two U.S. Department of the Navy facilities, the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant and the Naval Air Station in Dallas, Texas. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation found ground-water plumes containing chlorinated solvents on both facilities. These findings led to a U.S. Geological Survey study of Mountain Creek Lake adjacent to both facilities between June 1994 and August 1996. Bottom sediments, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish were collected for chemical analysis.

  6. An analysis of input errors in precipitation- runoff models using regression with errors in the independent variables ( Turtle Creek, Dallas, Texas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Errors in runoff prediction caused by input data errors are analyzed by treating precipitation-runoff models as regression (conditional expectation) models. Independent variables of the regression consist of precipitation and other input measurements; the dependent variable is runoff. In models using erroneous input data, prediction errors are inflated and estimates of expected storm runoff for given observed input variables are biased. A case study using a set of data from Turtle Creek near Dallas, Texas illustrates the problems of model input errors. -from Author

  7. High-resolution Rainfall Mapping in Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Urban Network of Radars at Multiple Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Chandrasekar V.; Chen*, Haonan

    2015-04-01

    Urban flash flood is one of the most commonly encountered hazardous weather phenomena. Unfortunately, the rapid urbanization has made the densely populated areas even more vulnerable to flood risks. Hence, accurate and timely monitoring of rainfall at high spatiotemporal resolution is critical to severe weather warning and civil defense, especially in urban areas. However, it is still challenging to produce high-resolution products based on the large S-band National Weather Service (NWS) Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD), due to the sampling limitations and Earth curvature effect. Since 2012, the U.S. National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center (NSF-ERC) for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) has initiated the development of Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) radar remote sensing network for urban weather hazards mitigation. The DFW urban radar network consists of a combination of high-resolution X-band radars and a standard NWS NEXRAD radar operating at S-band frequency. High-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is one of the major research goals in the deployment of this urban radar network. It has been shown in the literature that the dual-polarization radar techniques can improve the QPE accuracy over traditional single-polarization radars by rendering more measurements to enhance the data quality, providing more information about rain drop size distribution (DSD), and implying more characteristics of different hydrometeor types. This paper will present the real-time dual-polarization CASA DFW QPE system, which is developed via fusion of observations from both the high-resolution X band radar network and the S-band NWS radar. The specific dual-polarization rainfall algorithms at different frequencies (i.e., S- and X-band) will be described in details. In addition, the fusion methodology combining observations at different temporal resolution will be presented. In order to demonstrate the capability of rainfall

  8. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-TX-118 (in situ): Results from samples collected on 9/7/94

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from in situ samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TX-118 (referred to as Tank TX-118). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen cyanide (CHN), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 13 analytes. Hexane, normally included in the additional analytes, was removed because a calibration standard was not available during analysis of Tank TX-118 SUMMA{trademark} canisters. Of these, 12 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Fourteen tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 86% of the total organic components in Tank TX-118. Permanent gas analysis was not conducted on the tank-headspace samples. Tank TX-118 is on both the Ferrocyanide and Organic Watch List.

  9. Functional expression of a recombinant toxin - rPnTx2-6 - active in erectile function in rat.

    PubMed

    Torres, F S; Silva, C N; Lanza, L F; Santos, Agenor V; Pimenta, A M C; De Lima, M E; Diniz, M R V

    2010-12-15

    In the current study, the putative cDNA for PnTx2-6 toxin of the Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom was cloned and expressed as tioredoxin fusion protein in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. The fusion protein was purified from the bacterial extracts by combination of immobilized Ni-ion affinity and gel filtration chromatographies. Then, it was cleaved by enterokinase and the generated recombinant PnTx2-6 (rPnTx2-6) was further purified by reverse-phase HPLC. Likewise the native toxin purified from the spider venom, rPnTx2-6 potentiates the erectile function when injected in rats. This result indicates that the production of functional recombinant PnTx2-6 might be an alternative to provide this basic and valuable tool for study, as well as for further understanding such complex physiological system, including its correlation with the central nervous system and local tissue factors. PMID:20417652

  10. Neighborhood-Level Socioeconomic Deprivation Predicts Weight Gain in a Multi-Ethnic Population: Longitudinal Data from the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M.; Ayers, Colby; Agyemang, Priscilla; Leonard, Tammy; Berrigan, David; Barbash, Rachel Ballard; Lian, Min; Das, Sandeep R.; Hoehner, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine relationship between neighborhood-level socioeconomic deprivation and weight change in a multi-ethnic cohort from Dallas County, Texas and whether behavioral/psychosocial factors attenuate the relationship. Methods Non-movers (those in the same neighborhood throughout the study period) aged 18–65 (N=939) in Dallas Heart Study (DHS) underwent weight measurements between 2000–2009 (median 7-year follow-up). Geocoded home addresses defined block groups; a neighborhood deprivation index (NDI) was created (higher NDI=greater deprivation). Multi-level modeling determined weight change relative to NDI. Model fit improvement was examined with adding physical activity and neighborhood environment perceptions (higher score=more unfavorable perceptions) as covariates. A significant interaction between residence length and NDI was found (p-interaction=0.04); results were stratified by median residence length (11 years). Results Adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, education/income, those who lived in neighborhood>11 years gained 1.0 kilograms (kg) per one-unit increment of NDI (p=0.03), or 6 kg for those in highest NDI tertile compared with those in the lowest tertile. Physical activity improved model fit; NDI remained associated with weight gain after adjustment for physical activity and neighborhood environment perceptions. There was no significant relationship between NDI and weight change for those in their neighborhood≤11 years. Conclusions Living in more socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods over a longer time period was associated with weight gain in DHS. PMID:24875231

  11. Catching the fish - Constraining stellar parameters for TX Piscium using spectro-interferometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, D.; Paladini, C.; Hron, J.; Aringer, B.; Sacuto, S.; Marigo, P.; Verhoelst, T.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Stellar parameter determination is a challenging task when dealing with galactic giant stars. The combination of different investigation techniques has proven to be a promising approach. Aims: We analyse archive spectra obtained with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) onboard ISO, and new interferometric observations from the Very Large Telescope MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (VLTI/MIDI) of a very well studied carbon-rich giant: TX Psc. The aim of this work is to determine stellar parameters using spectroscopy and interferometry. Methods: The observations are used to constrain the model atmosphere, and eventually the stellar evolutionary model in the region where the tracks map the beginning of the carbon star sequence. Two different approaches are used to determine stellar parameters: (i) the "classic" interferometric approach where the effective temperature is fixed by using the angular diameter in the N-band (from interferometry) and the apparent bolometric magnitude; (ii) parameters are obtained by fitting a grid of state-of-the-art hydrostatic models to spectroscopic and interferometric observations. Results: We find good agreement between the parameters of the two methods. The effective temperature and luminosity clearly place TX Psc in the carbon-rich AGB star domain in the H-R-diagram. Current evolutionary tracks suggest that TX Psc became a C-star just recently, which means that the star is still in a "quiet" phase compared to the subsequent strong-wind regime. This agrees with the C/O ratio being only slightly greater than one. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory under program IDs 74.D-0601, 60.A-9224, 77.C-0440, 60.A-9006, 78.D-0112, 84.D-0805.

  12. Tank 241-TX-104, cores 230 and 231 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, L.A.

    1998-07-07

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-104 push mode core segments collected between February 18, 1998 and February 23, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-104 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (McCain, 1997), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al., 1995) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et.al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Alpha Activity (AT) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Attachment 1 is a cross reference to relate the tank farm identification numbers to the 222-S Laboratory LabCore/LIMS sample numbers. The subsamples generated in the laboratory for analyses are identified in these diagrams with their sources shown. Core 230: Three push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-TX-104 riser 9A on February 18, 1998. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory on February 19, 1998. Two segments were expected for this core. However, due to poor sample recovery, an additional segment was taken and identified as 2A. Core 231: Four push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-TX-104 riser 13A between February 19, 1998 and February 23, 1998. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory on February 24, 1998. Two segments were expected for this core. However, due to poor sample recovery, additional segments were taken and identified as 2A and 2B. The TSAP states the core samples should be transported to the laboratory within three

  13. Evidence for large superhumps in TX Col and V4742 Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retter, Alon; Liu, Alexander; Bos, Marc

    Since the discovery of the largest positive superhump period in TV Col (6.4 h), we have started a program to search for superhumps in cataclysmic variables (CVs) with large orbital periods. In this work, we summarize preliminary results of our observations of TX Col and V4742 Sgr. TX Col is an intermediate polar with a 5.7-h orbital period. V4742 Sgr is a recent (2002) nova with no known periods. CCD unfiltered continuous photometry of these two objects was carried out during 56 nights (350 hours) in 2002-2003. The time series analysis reveals the presence of several periods in both power spectra. In TX Col, in addition to the orbital period of 5.7 h, we found peaks at 7.1 h and 5.0 h. These are interpreted as positive and negative superhumps correspondingly, although the effects of the quasi-periodic oscillations at ~2 h (which may cause spurious signals) were not taken into consideration. In the light curve of V4742 Sgr two long periods are detected - 6.1 and 5.4 h as well as a short-term period at 1.6 h. This result suggests that V4742 Sgr is an intermediate polar candidate and a permanent superhump system with a large orbital period (5.4 h) and a superhump period excess of 13%. If these results are confirmed, TX Col and V4742 Sgr join TV Col to form a group of intermediate polars with extremely large superhump periods. There seems to be now growing evidence that superhumps can occur in intermediate polars with long orbital periods, which is very likely inconsistent with the theoretical prediction that superhumps can only occur in systems with mass ratios below 0.33. Alternatively, if the mass ratio in these systems is nevertheless below the theoretical limit, they should harbour undermassive secondaries and very massive white dwarfs, near the Chandrasekhar limit, which would make them excellent candidates for progenitors of supernovae type Ia.

  14. Proceedings of the 33rd national heat transfer conference NHTC'99

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.K.; Di Marzo, M.

    1999-07-01

    The papers in this conference were divided into the following sections: Radiation Heat Transfer in Fires; Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods in Two-Phase Flow; Heat Transfer in Microchannels; Thin Film Heat Transfer; Thermal Design of Electronics; Enhanced Heat Transfer I; Porous Media Convection; Contact Resistance Heat Transfer; Materials Processing in Solidification and Crystal Growth; Fundamentals of Combustion; Challenging Modeling Aspects of Radiative Transfer; Fundamentals of Microscale Transport; Laser Processing and Diagnostics for Manufacturing and Materials Processing; Experimental Studies of Multiphase Flow; Enhanced Heat Transfer II; Heat and Mass Transfer in Porous Media; Heat Transfer in Turbomachinery and Gas Turbine Systems; Conduction Heat Transfer; General Papers; Open Forum on Combustion; Combustion and Instrumentation and Diagnostics I; Radiative Heat Transfer and Interactions in Participating and Nonparticipating Media; Applications of Computational Heat Transfer; Heat Transfer and Fluid Aspects of Heat Exchangers; Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer Phenomena; Fundamentals of Natural and Mixed Convection Heat Transfer I; Fundamental of Natural and Mixed Convection Heat Transfer II; Combustion and Instrumentation and Diagnostics II; Computational Methods for Multidimensional Radiative Transfer; Process Heat Transfer; Advances in Computational Heat and Mass Transfer; Numerical Methods for Porous Media; Transport Phenomena in Manufacturing and Materials Processing; Practical Combustion; Melting and Solidification Heat Transfer; Transients in Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow; Basic Aspects of Two-Phase Flow; Turbulent Heat Transfer; Convective Heat Transfer in Electronics; Thermal Problems in Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management; and Transport Phenomena in Oscillatory Flows. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this conference.

  15. Effects of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom and its toxin TsTX-V on neurotransmitter uptake in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Alessandra L; Vasconcelos, Flávio; Amara, Susan G; Giglio, José Roberto; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2006-12-01

    Scorpion neurotoxins targeting the Na(v) channel can be classified into two classes: alpha- and beta-neurotoxins and are reported as highly active in mammalian brain. In this work, we evaluate the effects of Tityus serrulatus venom (Ts venom) and its alpha-neurotoxin TsTX-V on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA) and glutamate (Glu) uptake in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. TsTX-V was isolated from Ts venom by ion exchange chromatography followed by reverse-phase (C18) high-performance liquid chromatography. Neither Ts venom nor TsTX-V was able to affect (3)H-Glu uptake. On the other hand, Ts venom (0.13 microg/mg) significantly inhibited both (3)H-GABA and (3)H-DA uptake ( approximately 50%). TsTX-V showed IC(50) values of 9.37 microM and 22.2 microM for the inhibition of (3)H-GABA and (3)H-DA uptake, respectively. These effects were abolished by pre-treatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM), indicating the involvement of voltage-gated Na(+) channels in this process. In the absence of Ca(2+), and at low Ts venom concentrations, the reduction of (3)H-GABA uptake was not as marked as in the presence of Ca(2+). TsTX-V did not reduce (3)H-GABA uptake in COS-7 cells expressing the GABA transporters GAT-1 and GAT-3, suggesting that this toxin indirectly reduces the transport. The reduced (3)H-GABA uptake by synaptosomes might be due to rapid cell depolarization as revealed by confocal microscopy of C6 glioma cells. Thus, TsTX-V causes a reduction of (3)H-GABA and (3)H-DA uptake in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, not directly affecting GABA transporters, but, in consequence of depolarization, involving voltage-gated Na(+) channels.

  16. The type B brevetoxin (PbTx-3) adversely affects development, cardiovascular function, and survival in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Jamie R; Ramsdell, John S

    2003-01-01

    Brevetoxins are produced by the red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. The toxins are lipophilic polyether toxins that elicit a myriad of effects depending on the route of exposure and the target organism. Brevetoxins are therefore broadly toxic to marine and estuarine animals. By mimicking the maternal route of exposure to the oocytes in finfish, we characterized the adverse effects of the type B brevetoxin brevetoxin-3 (PbTx-3) on embryonic fish development and survival. The Japanese rice fish, medaka (Oryzias latipes), was used as the experimental model in which individual eggs were exposed via microinjection to various known concentrations of PbTx-3 dissolved in an oil vehicle. Embryos injected with doses exceeding 1.0 ng/egg displayed tachycardia, hyperkinetic twitches in the form of sustained convulsions, spinal curvature, clumping of the erythrocytes, and decreased hatching success. Furthermore, fish dosed with toxin were often unable to hatch in the classic tail-first fashion and emerged head first, which resulted in partial hatches and death. We determined that the LD(50) (dose that is lethal to 50% of the fish) for an injected dose of PbTx-3 is 4.0 ng/egg. The results of this study complement previous studies of the developmental toxicity of the type A brevetoxin brevetoxin-1 (PbTx-1), by illustrating in vivo the differing affinities of the two congeners for cardiac sodium channels. Consequently, we observed differing cardiovascular responses in the embryos, wherein embryos exposed to PbTx-3 exhibited persistent tachycardia, whereas embryos exposed to PbTx-1 displayed bradycardia, the onset of which was delayed. PMID:14644667

  17. Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    ESCH, R.A.

    1998-11-19

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4{micro}Ci/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report.

  18. Texture enhanced optimization-based image reconstruction (TxE-OBIR) from sparse projection views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huiqiao; Niu, Tianye; Yang, Yi; Ren, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang

    2016-03-01

    The optimization-based image reconstruction (OBIR) has been proposed and investigated in recent years to reduce radiation dose in X-ray computed tomography (CT) through acquiring sparse projection views. However, the OBIR usually generates images with a quite different noise texture compared to the clinical widely used reconstruction method (i.e. filtered back-projection - FBP). This may make the radiologists/physicians less confident while they are making clinical decisions. Recognizing the fact that the X-ray photon noise statistics is relatively uniform across the detector cells, which is enabled by beam forming devices (e.g. bowtie filters), we propose and evaluate a novel and practical texture enhancement method in this work. In the texture enhanced optimization-based image reconstruction (TxEOBIR), we first reconstruct a texture image with the FBP algorithm from a full set of synthesized projection views of noise. Then, the TxE-OBIR image is generated by adding the texture image into the OBIR reconstruction. As qualitatively confirmed by visual inspection and quantitatively by noise power spectrum (NPS) evaluation, the proposed method can produce images with textures that are visually identical to those of the gold standard FBP images.

  19. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-104

    SciTech Connect

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-05-12

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-TX-104. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-TX-104 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15c, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for FY 1999'' (Adams et al. 1998).

  20. PhTX-II a Basic Myotoxic Phospholipase A2 from Porthidium hyoprora Snake Venom, Pharmacological Characterization and Amino Acid Sequence by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huancahuire-Vega, Salomón; Ponce-Soto, Luis Alberto; Marangoni, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    A monomeric basic PLA2 (PhTX-II) of 14149.08 Da molecular weight was purified to homogeneity from Porthidium hyoprora venom. Amino acid sequence by in tandem mass spectrometry revealed that PhTX-II belongs to Asp49 PLA2 enzyme class and displays conserved domains as the catalytic network, Ca2+-binding loop and the hydrophobic channel of access to the catalytic site, reflected in the high catalytic activity displayed by the enzyme. Moreover, PhTX-II PLA2 showed an allosteric behavior and its enzymatic activity was dependent on Ca2+. Examination of PhTX-II PLA2 by CD spectroscopy indicated a high content of alpha-helical structures, similar to the known structure of secreted phospholipase IIA group suggesting a similar folding. PhTX-II PLA2 causes neuromuscular blockade in avian neuromuscular preparations with a significant direct action on skeletal muscle function, as well as, induced local edema and myotoxicity, in mice. The treatment of PhTX-II by BPB resulted in complete loss of their catalytic activity that was accompanied by loss of their edematogenic effect. On the other hand, enzymatic activity of PhTX-II contributes to this neuromuscular blockade and local myotoxicity is dependent not only on enzymatic activity. These results show that PhTX-II is a myotoxic Asp49 PLA2 that contributes with toxic actions caused by P. hyoprora venom. PMID:25365526

  1. Harpalycin 2 inhibits the enzymatic and platelet aggregation activities of PrTX-III, a D49 phospholipase A2 from Bothrops pirajai venom

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Harpalycin 2 (HP-2) is an isoflavone isolated from the leaves of Harpalyce brasiliana Benth., a snakeroot found in northeast region of Brazil and used in folk medicine to treat snakebite. Its leaves are said to be anti-inflammatory. Secretory phospholipases A2 are important toxins found in snake venom and are structurally related to those found in inflammatory conditions in mammals, as in arthritis and atherosclerosis, and for this reason can be valuable tools for searching new anti-phospholipase A2 drugs. Methods HP-2 and piratoxin-III (PrTX-III) were purified through chromatographic techniques. The effect of HP-2 in the enzymatic activity of PrTX-III was carried out using 4-nitro-3-octanoyloxy-benzoic acid as the substrate. PrTX-III induced platelet aggregation was inhibited by HP-2 when compared to aristolochic acid and p-bromophenacyl bromide (p-BPB). In an attempt to elucidate how HP-2 interacts with PrTX-III, mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence analysis were performed. Docking scores of the ligands (HP-2, aristolochic acid and p-BPB) using PrTX-III as target were also calculated. Results HP-2 inhibited the enzymatic activity of PrTX-III (IC50 11.34 ± 0.28 μg/mL) although it did not form a stable chemical complex in the active site, since mass spectrometry measurements showed no difference between native (13,837.34 Da) and HP-2 treated PrTX-III (13,856.12 Da). A structural analysis of PrTX-III after treatment with HP-2 showed a decrease in dimerization and a slight protein unfolding. In the platelet aggregation assay, HP-2 previously incubated with PrTX-III inhibited the aggregation when compared with untreated protein. PrTX-III chemical treated with aristolochic acid and p-BPB, two standard PLA2 inhibitors, showed low inhibitory effects when compared with the HP-2 treatment. Docking scores corroborated these results, showing higher affinity of HP-2 for the PrTX-III target (PDB code: 1GMZ) than aristolochic

  2. NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS - COLLABORATING FOR RESULTS, U.S. EPA ETV AND SBIR PROGRAMS REGIONAL WORKSHOP; MAY 8, 2007, U.S. EPA REGION 6, DALLAS, TEXAS, MEETING SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Envirnomental Technology Verification (ETV) and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program hosted a workshop on May 8, 2007, at the EPA Region 6 office in Dallas, Texas. One goal of the workshop was to provide information about new innovative technologies to ...

  3. Occurrence and concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in semipermeable membrane devices and clams in three urban streams of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J.B.; Rose, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and Asiatic clams, Corbicula fluminea (MuLLER), were deployed at stream sites in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area to assess the presence of bioavailable, dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twenty-four PAHs were detected in SPMDs, 20 of which occurred at all sites. Only three PAHs were detected in the co-deployed clams. Throughout all sites, non-alkylated PAHs were found at greater levels in SPMDs than alkylated forms. Nine of 16 Priority Pollutant PAHs were detected in SPMDs. Estimated concentrations of PAHs in water were generally two to three orders of magnitude less than standard minimum analytical reporting levels; however, for bent (a) anthracene, benzo (a) pyrene, and chrysene, estimated concentrations in water exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's human health criteria for these carcinogens in water and aquatic organisms.

  4. Urban stormwater quality, event-mean concentrations, and estimates of stormwater pollutant loads, Dallas-Fort Worth area, Texas, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Baldys, S.; Raines, T.H.; Mansfield, B.L.; Sandlin, J.T.

    1998-12-31

    The quality of urban stormwater is characterized with respect of 188 properties and constituents. Event-mean concentrations and loads for three land uses (residential, industrial, commercial), and annual loads for 12 selected properties and constituents for 26 gaged basins in the Dallas-Forth Worth study area are presented. Event-mean concentrations (EMCs) were computed for each land use for biochemical oxygen demand; chemical oxygen demand; suspended and dissolved solids; total nitrogen and ammonia plus organic nitrogen; total and dissolved phosphorus; total recoverable copper, lead, and zinc; and total diazinon. The EMCs of chemical oxygen demand; total nitrogen and ammonia plus organic nitrogen; total and dissolved phosphorus; and total diazinon were greatest in samples from residential land-use basins. The EMCs of biochemical oxygen demand; suspended and dissolved solids; and total copper, lead, and zinc were greatest in samples from industrial land-use basins.

  5. 78 FR 40383 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ..., Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle DP, Amdt 4 Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, Dallas/Fort Worth... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3)...

  6. 33 CFR 165.T08-0240 - Safety Zone; Kemah Boardwalk Summer Season Fireworks, Galveston Bay, Kemah, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Summer Season Fireworks, Galveston Bay, Kemah, TX. 165.T08-0240 Section 165.T08-0240 Navigation and... Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.T08-0240 Safety Zone; Kemah Boardwalk Summer Season Fireworks...' radius around a fireworks barge located at approximate Latitude 29°32′57″ N, Longitude 095°00′31″ W....

  7. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Floyd N.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2001-02-23

    A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared to investigate the rate and extent of aquifer contamination beneath Waste Management Area TX-TY on the Hanford Site in Washington State. This plan is an update of a draft plan issued in February 1999, which guided work performed in fiscal year 2000.

  8. 78 FR 45909 - Designation for the Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; Baton Rouge, LA; Raleigh, NC; and Belmond, IA Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ...)). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the December 28, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 76453), GIPSA requested applications... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation for the Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; Baton Rouge, LA; Raleigh, NC; and Belmond, IA Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and...

  9. 78 FR 73109 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Benjamin and Cisco, TX; De Beque, CO; Port Lions, AK; Rule and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Benjamin and Cisco, TX; De Beque, CO; Port Lions, AK... at De Beque, Colorado; Channel 237C3 at Benjamin, Texas; Channel 261C3 at Cisco, Texas; Channel 288C2..., Channel 237C3; by removing Cisco, Channel 261C3; by removing Channel 288C2 at Rule; and by...

  10. 76 FR 1519 - Security Zones; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX in the Federal Register (75 FR 29695). We received one comment on the... recommendation from that one comment and requesting further comments (75 FR 65232). No public meeting was... preamble, the Coast Guard adopts the interim rule amending 33 CFR part 165 that was published at 75...

  11. 75 FR 65232 - Security Zones; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do...-Neches Waterway, TX'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 29695). We received one comment on the proposed rule... facility located in Cameron Parish, LA. DATES: This interim rule is effective in the CFR on October...

  12. 75 FR 39662 - Foreign-Trade Subzone 116A-Port Arthur, TX; Expansion of Manufacturing Authority; Motiva...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Subzone 116A--Port Arthur, TX; Expansion of Manufacturing..., requesting an expansion of the scope of manufacturing authority approved within Subzone 116A, on behalf of... petrochemical feedstocks (Board Order 668, 59 FR 61, 12-3-1994, as amended by Board Order 740, 60 FR...

  13. Dielectric spectroscopy study on ionic liquid microemulsion composed of water, TX-100, and BmimPF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Nozaki, Ryusuke

    2012-06-01

    We report here a broadband dielectric spectroscopy study on an ionic liquid microemulsion (ILM) composed of water, Triton X-100 (TX-100), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (bmimPF6). It is found that the phase behavior of this ILM can be easily identified by its dielectric response. The dielectric behavior of the ILM in the GHz range is consistent with that of TX-100/water mixtures with comparable water-to-TX-100 weight ratio. It consists of the relaxations due to ethylene oxide (EO) unit relaxation, hydration water dynamics, and/or free water dynamics. The water content dependence of the EO unit relaxation suggests that this relaxation involves dynamics of hydration water molecules. In the IL-in-water microemulsion phase, it is found that bmimPF6 molecules are preferentially dissolved in water when their concentration in water is lower than the solubility. An additional dielectric relaxation that is absent in the TX-100/water mixtures is observed in the frequency range of 107-108 Hz for this ILM. This low-frequency relaxation is found closely related to the bmimPF6 molecule and could be attributed to the hopping of its cations/anions between the anionic/cationic sites.

  14. Dielectric spectroscopy study on ionic liquid microemulsion composed of water, TX-100, and BmimPF6.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Nozaki, Ryusuke

    2012-06-28

    We report here a broadband dielectric spectroscopy study on an ionic liquid microemulsion (ILM) composed of water, Triton X-100 (TX-100), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (bmimPF(6)). It is found that the phase behavior of this ILM can be easily identified by its dielectric response. The dielectric behavior of the ILM in the GHz range is consistent with that of TX-100∕water mixtures with comparable water-to-TX-100 weight ratio. It consists of the relaxations due to ethylene oxide (EO) unit relaxation, hydration water dynamics, and∕or free water dynamics. The water content dependence of the EO unit relaxation suggests that this relaxation involves dynamics of hydration water molecules. In the IL-in-water microemulsion phase, it is found that bmimPF(6) molecules are preferentially dissolved in water when their concentration in water is lower than the solubility. An additional dielectric relaxation that is absent in the TX-100∕water mixtures is observed in the frequency range of 10(7)-10(8) Hz for this ILM. This low-frequency relaxation is found closely related to the bmimPF(6) molecule and could be attributed to the hopping of its cations∕anions between the anionic∕cationic sites. PMID:22755585

  15. Neutron diffraction analysis of Nd3Fe29 - xTx (T=Ti, Cr, Mn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelon, W. B.; Hu, Z.

    1996-02-01

    Rietveld analysis of neutron-diffraction data from Nd3Fe29-xTx (T=Ti, Cr, and Mn) has been used to determine the location of the substitutional atoms and the magnetic moments. Reanalysis of the T=Ti data confirms that the space group A2/m is a better choice than P21/c, which had previously been used to describe the structure. The Ti atom locations and concentrations remain unaffected in the two space groups, but for the other substituents the refined concentrations are well behaved in A2/m, whereas in P21/c the refinements were unstable due to the symmetry relations between certain substituted sites. The site occupancies are analyzed in terms of steric and environment effects. A possible explanation for the high Curie temperature of the Cr compound is proposed.

  16. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-108: best-basis inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J.

    1997-08-26

    This document is a preliminary Tank Characterization Report (TCR). It only contains the current best-basis inventory (Appendix D) for single-shell tank 241-TX-108. No TCR has been previously issued for this tank, and current core sample analyses are not available. The best-basis inventory, therefore, is based on an engineering assessment of waste type, process flowsheet data, and/or other available information. The Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes describes standard methodology used to derive the tank-by-tank best-basis inventories. This preliminary TCR will be updated using this same methodology when additional data on tank contents become available.

  17. 76 FR 35098 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of...-Jun-11 TX Dallas--Fort Worth.. Dallas/Fort Worth 1/0977 5/9/11 RNAV (RNP) Z RWY 13R, Orig-B Intl. 30-Jun-11 TX Dallas--Fort Worth.. Dallas/Fort Worth 1/0979 5/9/11 RNAV (RNP) Z RWY 31L, Orig-B Intl....

  18. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of BthTX-II, a myotoxic Asp49-phospholipase A{sub 2} with low catalytic activity from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    SciTech Connect

    Corrêa, L. C.; Marchi-Salvador, D. P.; Cintra, A. C. O.; Soares, A. M.

    2006-08-01

    A myotoxic Asp49-PLA{sub 2} with low catalytic activity from B. jararacussu (BthTX-II) was crystallized in the monoclinic crystal system; a complete X-ray diffraction data set was collected and a molecular-replacement solution was obtained. The oligomeric structure of BthTX-II resembles those of the Asp49-PLA{sub 2} PrTX-III and all bothropic Lys49-PLA{sub 2}s. For the first time, a complete X-ray diffraction data set has been collected from a myotoxic Asp49-phospholipase A{sub 2} (Asp49-PLA{sub 2}) with low catalytic activity (BthTX-II from Bothrops jararacussu venom) and a molecular-replacement solution has been obtained with a dimer in the asymmetric unit. The quaternary structure of BthTX-II resembles the myotoxin Asp49-PLA{sub 2} PrTX-III (piratoxin III from B. pirajai venom) and all non-catalytic and myotoxic dimeric Lys49-PLA{sub 2}s. In contrast, the oligomeric structure of BthTX-II is different from the highly catalytic and non-myotoxic BthA-I (acidic PLA{sub 2} from B. jararacussu). Thus, comparison between these structures should add insight into the catalytic and myotoxic activities of bothropic PLA{sub 2}s.

  19. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Kotaro; Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098

  20. Effects of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom and its toxin TsTX-V on neurotransmitter uptake in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchini, Alessandra L.; Vasconcelos, Flavio; Giglio, Jose Roberto; Arantes, Eliane Candiani . E-mail: ecabraga@fcfrp.usp.br

    2006-12-01

    Scorpion neurotoxins targeting the Na{sub v} channel can be classified into two classes: {alpha}- and {beta}-neurotoxins and are reported as highly active in mammalian brain. In this work, we evaluate the effects of Tityus serrulatus venom (Ts venom) and its {alpha}-neurotoxin TsTX-V on {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA) and glutamate (Glu) uptake in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. TsTX-V was isolated from Ts venom by ion exchange chromatography followed by reverse-phase (C18) high-performance liquid chromatography. Neither Ts venom nor TsTX-V was able to affect {sup 3}H-Glu uptake. On the other hand, Ts venom (0.13 {mu}g/mg) significantly inhibited both {sup 3}H-GABA and {sup 3}H-DA uptake ({approx} 50%). TsTX-V showed IC{sub 5} values of 9.37 {mu}M and 22.2 {mu}M for the inhibition of {sup 3}H-GABA and {sup 3}H-DA uptake, respectively. These effects were abolished by pre-treatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 {mu}M), indicating the involvement of voltage-gated Na{sup +} channels in this process. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+}, and at low Ts venom concentrations, the reduction of {sup 3}H-GABA uptake was not as marked as in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. TsTX-V did not reduce {sup 3}H-GABA uptake in COS-7 cells expressing the GABA transporters GAT-1 and GAT-3, suggesting that this toxin indirectly reduces the transport. The reduced {sup 3}H-GABA uptake by synaptosomes might be due to rapid cell depolarization as revealed by confocal microscopy of C6 glioma cells. Thus, TsTX-V causes a reduction of {sup 3}H-GABA and {sup 3}H-DA uptake in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner, not directly affecting GABA transporters, but, in consequence of depolarization, involving voltage-gated Na{sup +} channels.

  1. Borehole Data Package for 1998 Wells Installed at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect

    DG Horton; FN Hodges

    1999-03-23

    Four new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the single-shell tank farm Waste Management Area (WMA) TX-TY during August through November of 1998 in fi,dfillment of Tri-Party Agreement (Eoology 1996) milestone M-24-38. The wells are 299-W1O-26, 299-W14-13, 299-W14-14, and 299-W15-40. Well 299-W1O-26 is located outside the east fence of the TY tank farm and replaces downgradient well299-W1O-18; well 299-W14-13 is located along the east fence near the northeast corner of the TX tank f- and replaces downgradient well 299-W14-12; well 299-W14-14 is located outside the east fence in the south ha.lfof the TX tank fiirm and is anew downgradient well; and well 299-W15-40 is located on the west side of the TX tank farm and is anew upgradient well. The locations of all wells in the monitoring network are shown on Figure 1. The groundwater monitoring plan for WMA TX-TY (Caggiano and Goodwin 1991) describes the hydrogeology of the 200 West Area and WMA TX-TY. An Interim Change Notice to the groundwater monitoring plan provides justification for the new wells. The new wells were constructed to the speciii- cations and requirements described in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-160 and WAC 173-303. This document compiles &fiormation on the drilling and construction, well development pump instal- latio~ groundwater sampling, and sediment testing applicable to wells 299-W1O-26, 299-W14-13, 299-W14-14, and 299-W15-40. Appendix A contains the geologist's log, the Well Construction Sum- mary Repo~ and Well Summary Sheet (as-built diagram); Appendix B contains results of laboratory analyses of particle size distribution, p~ conductivity, calcium carbonate conten~ major cation and anion concentrations from 1:1 water: sediment extracts, and moisture conten~ Appendix C contains geophysical logs; and Appendix D contains the analytical results from groundwater samples obtained during well construction. Aqutier tests (slug tests

  2. 77 FR 48960 - Foreign-Trade Zone 12-McAllen, TX Notification of Proposed Export Production Activity TST NA Trim...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... Activity TST NA Trim, LLC (Fabric/Leather Lamination and Cutting) Hidalgo, TX The McAllen Foreign Trade... coated) polyester knit, polyester warp knit (pile), polyester and nylon warp knit, and leather (duty...

  3. TxDOT Goes Beyond Compliance by Purchasing 100% AFVs. EPAct Fleet Information and Regulations, State& Alternative Fuel Provider Program Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-01-01

    Fact sheet features the challenges the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) faced and overcame in complying to a Texas legislation that calls for the acquisition of only alternative fuel vehicles.

  4. Relation of Black Race between High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Content, High Density Lipoprotein Particles and Coronary Events (From the Dallas Heart Study)

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Alvin; Neeland, Ian J.; Das, Sandeep R.; Khera, Amit; Turer, Aslan T.; Ayers, Colby R.; McGuire, Darren K.; Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Therapies targeting high density lipoprotein cholesterol content (HDL-C) have not improved coronary heart disease (CHD) outcomes. HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) may better predict CHD. However, the impact of race/ethnicity on the relations between HDL-P and subclinical atherosclerosis/ incident CHD events has not been described. Participants from the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic, probability-based, population cohort of Dallas County adults had the following baseline measurements: HDL-C, HDL-P by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR), and coronary artery calcium (CAC) by electron beam computed tomography. Participants were followed for a median of 9.3 years for incident CHD events (composite of first myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, or cardiovascular death). The study comprised 1977 participants free from CHD (51% women, 46% Black). In adjusted models, HDL-C was not associated with prevalent CAC (p=0.13) or incident CHD overall (HR per 1SD: 0.89, 95% CI 0.76–1.05). However, HDL-C was inversely associated with incident CHD among non-Black (adjusted HR per 1SD 0.67, 95% CI 0.46–0.97) but not Black participants (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78–1.13, pinteraction = 0.05). Conversely, HDL-P, adjusted for risk factors and HDL-C, was inversely associated with prevalent CAC (p=0.009) and with incident CHD overall (adjusted HR per 1SD: 0.73, 95% CI 0.62–0.86) with no interaction by Black race/ethnicity (pinteraction = 0.57). In conclusion, in contrast to HDL-C, the inverse relationship between HDL-P and incident CHD events is consistent across ethnicities. These findings suggest that HDL-P is superior to HDL-C in predicting both prevalent atherosclerosis as well as incident CHD events across a diverse population and should be considered as a therapeutic target. PMID:25661572

  5. The complex environment of the bright carbon star TX Piscium as probed by spectro-astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hron, J.; Uttenthaler, S.; Aringer, B.; Klotz, D.; Lebzelter, T.; Paladini, C.; Wiedemann, G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) show broad evidence of inhomogeneous atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes. These have been studied by a variety of methods on various angular scales. In this paper we explore the envelope of the well-studied carbon star TX Psc by the technique of spectro-astrometry. Aims: We explore the potential of this method for detecting asymmetries around AGB stars. Methods: We obtained CRIRES observations of several CO Δv = 1 lines near 4.6 μm and HCN lines near 3 μm in 2010 and 2013. These were then searched for spectro-astrometric signatures. For the interpretation of the results, we used simple simulated observations. Results: Several lines show significant photocentre shifts with a clear dependence on position angle. In all cases, tilde-shaped signatures are found where the positive and negative shifts (at PA 0°) are associated with blue and weaker red components of the lines. The shifts can be modelled with a bright blob 70 mas to 210 mas south of the star with a flux of several percent of the photospheric flux. We estimate a lower limit of the blob temperature of 1000 K. The blob may be related to a mass ejection as found for AGB stars or red supergiants. We also consider the scenario of a companion object. Conclusions: Although there is clear spectro-astrometric evidence of a rather prominent structure near TX Psc, it does not seem to relate to the other evidence of asymmetries, so no definite explanation can be given. Our data thus underline the very complex structure of the environment of this star, but further observations that sample the angular scales out to a few hundred milli-arcseconds are needed to get a clearer picture. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 386.D-0091 and 091.D-0094.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Emissions of Fine Particulate Matter From Motor Vehicles: A Tunnel study in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P.; Chellam, S.; Fraser, M. P.

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this research is to identify individual organic compounds and trace metals emitted as PM2.5 from motor vehicles that can serve as tracers in order to quantify the relative contributions of diesel and gasoline engines to PM2.5 emissions in the Houston, TX area. We report results from a systematic analysis of PM2.5 emitted from vehicles in a highway tunnel in Houston, TX, viz. Washburn tunnel. PM2.5 emissions were speciated in terms of individual organic compounds including 14 n-alkanes, 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 9 petroleum biomarkers using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry as well as 16 metals using Inductively Coupled-Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). PM2.5 samples were digested using a technique developed by us that eliminates direct handling of hydrofluoric acid. HF was first generated in situ at high temperature and pressure in closed Teflon liners by heating a mixture of NaF, HNO3, and sample and then complexing any remaining HF using H3BO3. We have recently reported that this method is capable of completely extracting trace elements from airborne particulate matter prior to analysis using ICP-MS. Potential tracers were first identified using an exploratory multivariate dimensionality reduction technique called Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA results were also physically interpreted by calculating emission indices. Among the possible marker compounds identified by PCA for use in separating diesel and gasoline fine particulate matter, emission indices of 5 n-alkanes, (n-heneicosane, n-docosane, n-tricosane, n-tetracosane, and n-pentacosane), and 2 PAHs, (fluoranthene and pyrene) were strongly and positively correlated with the amount of carbon emanating from diesel vehicles. This suggests that these compounds can be used as molecular markers for diesel engine emissions. PCA of trace metal concentrations showed that Zn, Cu, and Ba can be attributed to direct vehicle emissions. However, emission index

  7. Evaluation of integrated respiratory gating systems on a Novalis Tx system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Liu, Tonghai; Cai, Jing; Chen, Qing; Wang, Zhiheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-04-04

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of motion tracking and radiation delivery control of integrated gating systems on a Novalis Tx system. The study was performed on a Novalis Tx system, which is equipped with Varian Real-time Position Management (RPM) system, and BrainLAB ExacTrac gating systems. In this study, the two systems were assessed on accuracy of both motion tracking and radiation delivery control. To evaluate motion tracking, two artificial motion profiles and five patients' respiratory profiles were used. The motion trajectories acquired by the two gating systems were compared against the references. To assess radiation delivery control, time delays were measured using a single-exposure method. More specifically, radiation is delivered with a 4 mm diameter cone within the phase range of 10%-45% for the BrainLAB ExacTrac system, and within the phase range of 0%-25% for the Varian RPM system during expiration, each for three times. Radiochromic films were used to record the radiation exposures and to calculate the time delays. In the work, the discrepancies were quantified using the parameters of mean and standard deviation (SD). Pearson's product-moment correlational analysis was used to test correlation of the data, which is quantified using a parameter of r. The trajectory profiles acquired by the gating systems show good agreement with those reference profiles. A quantitative analysis shows that the average mean discrepancies between BrainLAB ExacTrac system and known references are 1.5 mm and 1.9 mm for artificial and patient profiles, with the maximum motion amplitude of 28.0 mm. As for the Varian RPM system, the corresponding average mean discrepancies are 1.1 mm and 1.7 mm for artificial and patient profiles. With the proposed single-exposure method, the time delays are found to be 0.20 ± 0.03 seconds and 0.09 ± 0.01 seconds for BrainLAB ExacTrac and Varian RPM systems, respectively. The results indicate the systems can

  8. Rapidly characterizing the fast dynamics of RNA genetic circuitry with cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) systems.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Chappell, James; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Sun, Zachary Z; Kim, Jongmin; Singhal, Vipul; Spring, Kevin J; Al-Khabouri, Shaima; Fall, Christopher P; Noireaux, Vincent; Murray, Richard M; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-05-15

    RNA regulators are emerging as powerful tools to engineer synthetic genetic networks or rewire existing ones. A potential strength of RNA networks is that they may be able to propagate signals on time scales that are set by the fast degradation rates of RNAs. However, a current bottleneck to verifying this potential is the slow design-build-test cycle of evaluating these networks in vivo. Here, we adapt an Escherichia coli-based cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) system for rapidly prototyping RNA networks. We used this system to measure the response time of an RNA transcription cascade to be approximately five minutes per step of the cascade. We also show that this response time can be adjusted with temperature and regulator threshold tuning. Finally, we use TX-TL to prototype a new RNA network, an RNA single input module, and show that this network temporally stages the expression of two genes in vivo.

  9. Photoinduced electron and energy transfer from coumarin 153 to perylenetetracarboxylic diimide in bmimPF6/TX-100/water microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haixia; Wang, Haixia; Xue, Lin; Li, Xiyou

    2011-01-15

    A perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) compound with an attached hydrophilic polyoxyethylene group at the imide nitrogen position was designed and synthesized. Photoinduced electron and energy transfer between coumarin 153 (C-153) and PDI in a ternary microemulsion with an ionic liquid (bmimPF(6)/TX-100/H(2)O) were investigated by steady state electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results revealed that both PDI and C-153 resided at the interface between the surfactant TX-100 and the ionic liquid bmimPF(6) in the ternary microemulsions. The absorption spectra suggested no interactions between C-153 and PDI in the ground states, but the fluorescence spectra revealed the presence of an efficient electron transfer and a less efficient energy transfer from C-153 to PDI. Moreover, the electron transfer was much more efficient in microemulsions than that in homogeneous conventional organic solvents due to the unique micro-environment of the microemulsion. PMID:20965513

  10. PcTx1 affords neuroprotection in a conscious model of stroke in hypertensive rats via selective inhibition of ASIC1a.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Claudia A; Rash, Lachlan D; Chassagnon, Irène R; King, Glenn F; Widdop, Robert E

    2015-12-01

    Acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is the primary acid sensor in mammalian brain and plays a major role in neuronal injury following cerebral ischemia. Evidence that inhibition of ASIC1a might be neuroprotective following stroke was previously obtained using "PcTx1 venom" from the tarantula Psalmopeous cambridgei. We show here that the ASIC1a-selective blocker PcTx1 is present at only 0.4% abundance in this venom, leading to uncertainty as to whether the observed neuroprotective effects were due to PcTx1 blockade of ASIC1a or inhibition of other ion channels and receptors by the hundreds of peptides and small molecules present in the venom. We therefore examined whether pure PcTx1 is neuroprotective in a conscious model of stroke via direct inhibition of ASIC1a. A focal reperfusion model of stroke was induced in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) by administering endothelin-1 to the middle cerebral artery via a surgically implanted cannula. Two hours later, SHR were treated with a single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) dose of PcTx1 (1 ng/kg), an ASIC1a-inactive mutant of PcTx1 (1 ng/kg), or saline, and ledged beam and neurological tests were used to assess the severity of symptomatic changes. PcTx1 markedly reduced cortical and striatal infarct volumes measured 72 h post-stroke, which correlated with improvements in neurological score, motor function and preservation of neuronal architecture. In contrast, the inactive PcTx1 analogue had no effect on stroke outcome. This is the first demonstration that selective pharmacological inhibition of ASIC1a is neuroprotective in conscious SHRs, thus validating inhibition of ASIC1a as a potential treatment for stroke. PMID:26320544

  11. The receptor site of the spider toxin PcTx1 on the proton-gated cation channel ASIC1a

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Miguel; Rash, Lachlan D; Baron, Anne; Lambeau, Gérard; Escoubas, Pierre; Lazdunski, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are excitatory neuronal cation channels, involved in physiopathological processes related to extracellular pH fluctuation such as nociception, ischaemia, perception of sour taste and synaptic transmission. The spider peptide toxin psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1) has previously been shown to inhibit specifically the proton-gated cation channel ASIC1a. To identify the binding site of PcTx1, we produced an iodinated form of the toxin (125I-PcTx1YN) and developed a set of binding and electrophysiological experiments on several chimeras of ASIC1a and the PcTx1-insensitive channels ASIC1b and ASIC2a. We show that 125I-PcTx1YN binds specifically to ASIC1a at a single site, with an IC50 of 128 pm, distinct from the amiloride blocking site. Results obtained from chimeras indicate that PcTx1 does not bind to ASIC1a transmembrane domains (M1 and M2), involved in formation of the ion pore, but binds principally on both cysteine-rich domains I and II (CRDI and CRDII) of the extracellular loop. The post-M1 and pre-M2 regions, although not involved in the binding site, are crucial for the ability of PcTx1 to inhibit ASIC1a current. The linker domain between CRDI and CRDII is important for their correct spatial positioning to form the PcTx1 binding site. These results will be useful for the future identification or design of new molecules acting on ASICs. PMID:16284080

  12. VdTX-1, a reversible nicotinic receptor antagonist isolated from venom of the spider Vitalius dubius (Theraphosidae).

    PubMed

    Rocha-E-Silva, Thomaz A A; Rostelato-Ferreira, Sandro; Leite, Gildo B; da Silva, Pedro Ismael; Hyslop, Stephen; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa

    2013-08-01

    Theraphosid spider venoms can block neurotransmission in vertebrate nerve-muscle preparations in vitro, but few of the components involved have been characterized. In this work, we describe the neuromuscular activity of venom from the Brazilian theraphosid Vitalius dubius and report the purification and pharmacological characterization of VdTX-1, a 728 Da toxin that blocks nicotinic receptors. Neuromuscular activity was assayed in chick biventer cervicis preparations and muscle responses to exogenous ACh and KCl were determined before and after incubation with venom or toxin. Changes in membrane resting potential were studied in mouse diaphragm muscle. The toxin was purified by a combination of filtration through Amicon® filters, cation exchange HPLC and RP-HPLC; toxin purity and mass were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Venom caused progressive neuromuscular blockade and muscle contracture; the blockade but not the contracture was reversible by washing. Venom attenuated contractures to exogenous ACh and KCl. Filtration yielded low (LM, <5 kDa) and high (HM, >5 kDa) fractions, with the latter reproducing the contracture seen in venom but with a slight and progressive twitch blockade. The LM fraction caused reversible blockade and attenuated contractures to ACh, but had no effect on contractures to KCl. VdTX-1 (728 Da) purified from the LM fraction was photosensitive and reduced the E(max) to ACh in biventer cervicis muscle without affecting the EC₅₀; VdTX-1 also abolished carbachol-induced depolarizations. V. dubius venom contains at least two components that affect vertebrate neurotransmission. One component, VdTX-1, blocks nicotinic receptors non-competitively to produce reversible blockade without muscle contracture.

  13. Reduced subcommissural organ glycoprotein immunoreactivity precedes aqueduct closure and ventricular dilatation in H-Tx rat hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Somera, K C; Jones, H C

    2004-03-01

    The H-Tx rat has fetal-onset hydrocephalus associated with closure of the cerebral aqueduct and a reduction in the secretory cells of the subcommissural organ (SCO), a circumventricular organ situated in the dorsal wall of the cerebral aqueduct. The objective of this study was to determine the role of the SCO in hydrocephalus pathogenesis. Serial brain sections through aqueduct regions containing the SCO from H-Tx rats, together with non-hydrocephalic Fischer F344 rats, were studied at E16, before hydrocephalus onset, at E17, the beginning of onset, and at P0 when the hydrocephalus was overt. Tissues were immunostained by AFRU, an antibody against the SCO glycoprotein, and for the intermediate filament nestin. The area of SCO cells with AFRU immunostaining and the severity of lateral ventricle dilatation were quantified by image analysis. At E16 all fetuses had distinct SCO ependymal cells, open aqueducts and normal lateral ventricles. The H-Tx fetuses fell into two groups with large areas and small areas of AFRU immunoreactivity, all with a full complement of SCO cells. By E17, fetuses with small areas of immunoreactivity had reduced numbers of tall SCO secretory cells, and most had aqueducts closed posteriorly and dilated ventricles. Three additional fetuses with small areas of immunoreactivity had narrow but patent aqueducts and normal ventricles, and another had an open aqueduct and dilated ventricles. At P0, pups previously identified as hydrocephalic had small areas of AFRU immunoreactivity, an aqueduct that was closed anteriorly but open posteriorly, ventricular dilatation, and an absence of SCO secretory cells. The aqueduct even when closed was lined by typical ependymal cells throughout. Decreased nestin immunostaining accompanied the SCO changes. It is concluded that reduced SCO glycoprotein immunoreactivity precedes both aqueduct closure and expansion of the lateral ventricles in the H-Tx rat.

  14. 76 FR 2382 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    .... Officers: Gilbert Khoury, President/Secretary/ Director, (Qualifying Individual), George Romanos, Vice... Westfair West Drive, Houston, TX 77041. Officers: Gilbert Khoury, President/Director, (Qualifying.... (OFF), 535 Regal Row, Dallas, TX 75247. Officer: Gilbert R. Khoury, President, (Qualifying...

  15. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-TX-118: Results from samples collected on 12/16/94

    SciTech Connect

    Lucke, R.B.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TX-118 (referred to as Tank TX-118). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 3 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Twenty three organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 84% of the total organic components in Tank TX-118. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected.

  16. Structural studies of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate/TX-100/ p-xylene ionic liquid microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan'an; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Hongyan; Zhao, Xueyan; Zheng, Liqiang; Li, Xinwei; Yu, Li

    2006-07-17

    The ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF4) forms nonaqueous microemulsions with p-xylene, with the aid of the nonionic surfactant TX-100. The phase behavior of the ternary system is investigated, and three microregions of the microemulsions-ionic liquid-in-oil (IL/O), bicontinuous, and oil-in-ionic liquid (O/IL)-are identified by conductivity measurements, according to percolation theory. On the basis of a phase diagram, a series of IL/O microemulsions are chosen and characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The size of aggregates increases on increasing the amount of added polar component (bmimBF(4)), which is a similar phenomenon to that observed for typical water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions, suggesting the formation of IL/O microemulsions. The microstructural characteristics of the microemulsions are investigated by FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the interaction between the electronegative oxygen atoms of the oxyethylene (OE) units in TX-100 and the electropositive imidazolium ring may be the driving force for the solubilization of bmimBF4 into the core of the TX-100 aggregates. In addition, the micropolarity of the microemulsions is investigated by using methyl orange (MO) as a UV/Vis spectroscopic probe. A relatively constant polarity of the microemulsion droplets is obtained in the IL microemulsion. Finally, a plausible structure for the IL/O microemulsion is presented. PMID:16789041

  17. Simulation-optimization approach to assess groundwater availability in Refugio County, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddameri, V.; Kuchanur, M.

    2007-01-01

    Sustainable management of groundwater resources is critical for viable development of semi-arid regions. Refugio County, TX, is predominantly a rural community that is in close proximity to two large urban areas of Corpus Christi and San Antonio. Large-scale water supply projects are being planned to export surplus water available in Refugio County to nearby growing cities. Being a coastal county with several sensitive bays and estuaries, these projects have caused concerns with regard to decreases in freshwater inflows to coastal bodies and raised the possibility of saltwater intrusion. A simulation model characterizing groundwater flow in the shallower unconfined and the deeper semi-confined formations of the Gulf coast aquifer was calibrated and evaluated. The model results were used in conjunction with a mathematical programming scheme to estimate maximum available groundwater in the county. Stakeholder concerns were incorporated as constraints, which included prevention of saltwater intrusion in the aquifer, limiting the amount of allowable drawdown in shallow aquifers, as well as maintaining current flow gradients especially near baseflow-dependent streams and rivers. For the conditions assumed in this study, the model results indicate that roughly 4.93 × 107 m3 of water can be extracted in a typical year. The management model was noted to be very sensitive to the imposed saltwater intrusion constraint.

  18. Reservoir fracture mapping using microearthquakes: Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and 76 field, Clinton Co., KY

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.S.; Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Patterns of microearthquakes detected downhole defined fracture orientation and extent in the Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and the 76 field, Clinton Co., KY. We collected over 480 and 770 microearthquakes during hydraulic stimulation at two sites in the Austin chalk, and over 3200 during primary production in Clinton Co. Data were of high enough quality that 20%, 31% and 53% of the events could be located, respectively. Reflected waves constrained microearthquakes to the stimulated depths at the base of the Austin chalk. In plan view, microearthquakes defined elongate fracture zones extending from the stimulation wells parallel to the regional fracture trend. However, widths of the stimulated zones differed by a factor of live between the two Austin chalk sites, indicating a large difference in the population of ancillary fractures. Post-stimulation production was much higher from the wider zone. At Clinton Co., microearthquakes defined low-angle, reverse-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated the mapped fractures had been previously drained. Drilling showed that the fractures currently contain brine. The seismic behavior was consistent with poroelastic models that predicted slight increases in compressive stress above and below the drained volume.

  19. Reservoir fracture mapping using microearthquakes: Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and 76 field, Clinton Co., KY

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.S.; Rutledge, J.T.; Gardner, T.L.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Miller, M.E.; Schuessler, B.K.

    1996-11-01

    Patterns of microearthquakes detected downhole defined fracture orientation and extent in the Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and the 76 field, Clinton Co., KY. We collected over 480 and 770 microearthquakes during hydraulic stimulation at two sites in the Austin chalk, and over 3200 during primary production in Clinton Co. Data were of high enough quality that 20%, 31% and 53% of the events could be located, respectively. Reflected waves constrained microearthquakes to the stimulated depths at the base of the Austin chalk. In plan view, microearthquakes defined elongate fracture zones extending from the stimulation wells parallel to the regional fracture trend. However, widths of the stimulated zones differed by a factor of five between the two Austin chalk sites, indicating a large difference in the population of ancillary fractures. Post-stimulation production was much higher from the wider zone. At Clinton Co., microearthquakes defined low-angle, reverse-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated the mapped fractures had been previously drained. Drilling showed that the fractures currently contain brine. The seismic behavior was consistent with poroelastic models that predicted slight increases in compressive stress above and below the drained volume.

  20. Impacts of Hurricane Ike on the beaches of the Bolivar Peninsula, TX, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Douglas J.; Hales, Billy U.; Potts, Michael K.; Ellis, Jean T.; Liu, Hongxing; Houser, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Hurricane Ike caused substantial beach erosion along the coast of the Bolivar Peninsula, TX. Much of the erosion was caused by the offshore (ebb) flow of the ca. 5 m storm surge that formed spatially discrete scour features. Using aerial photography and repeat LiDAR data, we identify five types of scour features and describe the alongshore distribution in four flow environments. Type 1 scours are relatively small and compact features associated mainly with flow off a wide, vegetated (grasses, shrubs, trees) surface across a wide beach. Type 2 scours are large and branching forms associated mainly with flow that was channeled by streets or gaps between structures. Type 3 scours are large and blocky features associated with flow off a marsh surface, across a highway, which removed almost all beach sands from the surface. Type 4 scours are elongated, shore perpendicular channels associated with the same flow characteristics as Type 3 scours. Type 5 scours are elongated, shore-perpendicular features, sometimes branching, associated with flow through gaps in a destroyed shore protection structure. Repeat imagery indicates that many of the features persisted for at least seven months. Recent aerial photography indicates that aspects of some features remained evident more than three years after Ike's landfall.

  1. Radical Budget and Ozone Production in Houston, TX during SHARP 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; van Duin, D.; Cazorla, M.; Chen, S.; Brune, W. H.; Flynn, J. H.; Lefer, B. L.; Dibb, J. E.; Wong, K.; Tsai, C.; Stutz, J.

    2010-12-01

    The chemistry of atmospheric radicals, especially the hydroxyl radical (OH) and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), together called HOx, is deeply involved in the formation of the secondary pollutants ozone and fine particles. Radical precursors such as nitrous acid (HONO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) significantly affects HOx budget in urban environments like Houston. These chemical processes connect surface emissions, both human and natural, to local and regional pollution, and climate change. Using the data collected during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP) in Houston, TX in spring 2009, we test our understanding of photochemistry through the analysis of the radical budget and ozone production. A numerical box model was used to simulate the oxidation processes and observed OH and HO2 during this study. Using the model results, we calculate the radical budget and analyze the sensitivity of ozone production to nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The radical budget shows that the photolysis of HONO and the photolysis of HCHO were significant HOx sources in this urban environment. We also compare the observed OH reactivity and ozone production rate to the model calculations. In general, ozone production rate was VOC limited in the morning and NOx limited in the afternoon. This relationship results from the ratio of VOCs to NOx in Houston. Results from this study provide additional support for regulatory actions to reduce reactive VOCs in Houston in order to reduce ozone and other secondary pollutants.

  2. Nanoscale elastic changes in 2D Ti3C2Tx (MXene) pseudocapacitive electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Come, Jeremy; Xie, Yu; Naguib, Michael; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Gogotsi, Yury; Kent, Paul R. C.; Balke, Nina

    2016-02-01

    Designing sustainable electrodes for next generation energy storage devices relies on the understanding of their fundamental properties at the nanoscale, including the comprehension of ions insertion into the electrode and their interactions with the active material. One consequence of ion storage is the change in the electrode volume resulting in mechanical strain and stress that can strongly affect the cycle life. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes of dimensions and mechanical properties occurring during electrochemical reactions. While the characterization of mechanical properties via macroscopic measurements is well documented, in-situ characterization of their evolution has never been achieved atmore » the nanoscale. Two dimensional (2D) carbides, known as MXenes, are promising materials for supercapacitors and various kinds of batteries, and understating the coupling between their mechanical and electrochemical properties is therefore necessary. Here we report on in-situ imaging, combined with density functional theory of the elastic changes, of a 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) electrode in direction normal to the basal plane during cation intercalation. The results show a strong correlation between the Li+ ions content and the elastic modulus, whereas little effects of K+ ions are observed. Moreover, this strategy enables identifying the preferential intercalation pathways within a single particle.« less

  3. Vertical spin Hall magnetoresistance in T a1 -xP tx/YIG bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. H.; Shi, G. Y.; Zhou, X. J.; Yang, Q. H.; Rao, Y. H.; Li, G.; Zhang, H. W.; Pan, F.; Song, C.

    2016-10-01

    The spin Hall effect and the magnetic proximity effect are two main sources of the magnetoresistance (MR) effects in heavy metal/ferromagnet bilayers, where they play isolated roles but are usually contaminated by each other. In T a1-xP tx/YIG (=Y3F e5O12) bilayers consisting of Ta and Pt nanograins, these effects are intrinsically coupled to generate new MR with 360° direction sensitivity to the magnetic field and proportionality to the out-of-plane magnetization of YIG. Due to the opposite spin Hall angle of Ta and Pt, vertical spin accumulation is generated via the spin Hall effect at the transverse boundaries between Ta and Pt grains. The spin-dependent scattering by the proximity-induced Pt magnetization finally leads to the MR, which is named as vertical spin Hall MR taking the role of spin Hall angle into account. Besides fundamental insight to spin transport physics, our work provides an approach to detecting perpendicular magnetization in a variety of magnets.

  4. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Data During the Period January 1, 1998 Through January 31, 1999 at the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport. Volume 1; Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The quality of the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) is critically dependent on representative wind profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer. These winds observed from a number of sensor systems around the Dallas-Fort Worth airport were combined into single vertical wind profiles by an algorithm developed and implemented by MIT Lincoln Laboratory. This process, called the AVOSS Winds Analysis System (AWAS), is used by AVOSS for wake corridor predictions. During times when AWAS solutions were available, the quality of the resultant wind profiles and variance was judged from a series of plots combining all sensor observations and AWAS profiles during the period 1200 to 0400 UTC daily. First, input data was evaluated for continuity and consistency from criteria established. Next, the degree of agreement among all wind sensor systems was noted and cases of disagreement identified. Finally, the resultant AWAS solution was compared to the quality-assessed input data. When profiles differed by a specified amount from valid sensor consensus winds, times and altitudes were flagged. Volume one documents the process and quality of input sensor data. Volume two documents the data processing/sorting process and provides the resultant flagged files.

  5. A phospholipase C from the Dallas 1E strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 5: purification and characterization of conditions for optimal activity with an artificial substrate.

    PubMed

    Baine, W B

    1988-02-01

    Phospholipase C from the Dallas 1E strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 5 was purified from buffered yeast extract culture supernate by ion-exchange chromatography followed by fractionation by manganous chloride and ammonium sulphate precipitation steps. Enzyme activity was assayed by hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine and confirmed by release of radioactivity from tritiated L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine labelled in the methyl groups of choline. After SDS-PAGE, the purified preparation yielded a single band upon Coomassie-blue staining. This protein migrated with an apparent Mr of 50,000-54,000. Phospholipase C activity was maximal at pH greater than or equal to 8.4 and was enhanced in the presence of sorbitol and of several nonionic detergents but was eliminated by SDS. EDTA, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Zn2+ inhibited enzyme activity, whereas Ba2+, Ca2+, Co2+, Mg2+ and Mn2+ restored activity to EDTA-treated material. No haemolytic activity was demonstrated with the purified enzyme. PMID:3171547

  6. Isolation and characterization of SsmTx-I, a Specific Kv2.1 blocker from the venom of the centipede Scolopendra Subspinipes Mutilans L. Koch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minzhi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-03-01

    Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, also known as Chinese red-headed centipede, is a venomous centipede from East Asia and Australasia. Venom from this animal has not been researched as thoroughly as venom from snakes, snails, scorpions, and spiders. In this study, we isolated and characterized SsmTx-I, a novel neurotoxin from the venom of S. subspinipes mutilans. SsmTx-I contains 36 residues with four cysteines forming two disulfide bonds. It had low sequence similarity (<10%) with other identified peptide toxins. By whole-cell recording, SsmTx-I significantly blocked voltage-gated K⁺ channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons with an IC₅₀ value of 200 nM, but it had no effect on voltage-gated Na⁺ channels. Among the nine K⁺ channel subtypes expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, SsmTx-I selectively blocked the Kv2.1 current with an IC₅₀ value of 41.7 nM, but it had little effect on currents mediated by other K⁺ channel subtypes. Blockage of Kv2.1 by SsmTx-I was not associated with significant alteration of steady-state activation, suggesting that SsmTx-I might act as a simple inhibitor or channel blocker rather than a gating modifier. Our study reported a specific Kv2.1-blocker from centipede venom and provided a basis for future investigations of SsmTx-I, for example on structure-function relationships, mechanism of action, and pharmacological potential.

  7. Increased cavernosal relaxation by Phoneutria nigriventer toxin, PnTx2-6, via activation at NO/cGMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, K.P.; Wynne, B.M.; Cordeiro, M.N.; Borges, M.H.; Richardson, M; Leite, R.; DeLima, M.E.; Webb, R. C

    2011-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction mechanisms in diabetic patients are multifactorial and often lead to resistance to current therapy. Animal toxins have been used as pharmacological tools to study penile erection. Human accidents involving the venom of Phoneutria nigriventer spider are characterized by priapism. We hypothesize that PnTx2-6 potentiates cavernosal relaxation in diabetic mice by increasing cGMP. This effect is nNOS dependent. Cavernosal strips were contracted with phenylephrine (10−5 M) and relaxed by electrical field stimulation (EFS, 20V, 1–32 Hz) in the presence or absence of PnTx2-6 (10−8 M).Cavernosal strips from nNOS and eNOS knocaut (KO) mice, besides nNOS inhibitor (10−5M), were used to evaluate the role of this enzyme in the potentiation effect evoked by PnTx2-6. Tissue cGMP levels were determined after stimulation with PnTx2-6 in presence or absence of L-NAME (10−4M) and ω-conotoxin GVIA (10−6M), an N-type calcium channel inhibitor. Results showed PnTx2-6 enhanced cavernosal relaxation in diabetic mice (65%) and eNOS KO mice, but not in nNOS KO mice. The toxin effect in the cavernosal relaxation was abolished by nNOS inhibitor. cGMP levels are increased by PnTx2-6, however L-NAME abolished this enhancement as well as ω-conotoxin GVIA. We conclude PnTx2-6 facilitates penile relaxation in diabetic mice through a mechanism dependent on nNOS, probably via increasing NO/cGMP production. PMID:21975567

  8. Maternal choline modifies fetal liver copper, gene expression, DNA methylation, and neonatal growth in the tx-j mouse model of Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Shibata, Noreene M; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Islam, Mohammad S; Keen, Carl L; Kim, Kyoungmi; Tillman, Brittany; French, Samuel W; Halsted, Charles H; LaSalle, Janine M

    2014-01-01

    Maternal diet can affect fetal gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. Wilson disease (WD), which is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in ATP7B encoding a biliary copper transporter, is characterized by excessive hepatic copper accumulation, but variability in disease severity. We tested the hypothesis that gestational supply of dietary methyl groups modifies fetal DNA methylation and expression of genes involved in methionine and lipid metabolism that are impaired prior to hepatic steatosis in the toxic milk (tx-j) mouse model of WD. Female C3H control and tx-j mice were fed control (choline 8 mmol/Kg of diet) or choline-supplemented (choline 36 mmol/Kg of diet) diets for 2 weeks throughout mating and pregnancy to gestation day 17. A second group of C3H females, half of which were used to cross foster tx-j pups, received the same diet treatments that extended during lactation to 21 d postpartum. Compared with C3H, fetal tx-j livers had significantly lower copper concentrations and significantly lower transcript levels of Cyclin D1 and genes related to methionine and lipid metabolism. Maternal choline supplementation prevented the transcriptional deficits in fetal tx-j liver for multiple genes related to cell growth and metabolism. Global DNA methylation was increased by 17% in tx-j fetal livers after maternal choline treatment (P < 0.05). Maternal dietary choline rescued the lower body weight of 21 d tx-j mice. Our results suggest that WD pathogenesis is modified by maternal in utero factors, including dietary choline. PMID:24220304

  9. Isolation and characterization of SsmTx-I, a Specific Kv2.1 blocker from the venom of the centipede Scolopendra Subspinipes Mutilans L. Koch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minzhi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-03-01

    Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, also known as Chinese red-headed centipede, is a venomous centipede from East Asia and Australasia. Venom from this animal has not been researched as thoroughly as venom from snakes, snails, scorpions, and spiders. In this study, we isolated and characterized SsmTx-I, a novel neurotoxin from the venom of S. subspinipes mutilans. SsmTx-I contains 36 residues with four cysteines forming two disulfide bonds. It had low sequence similarity (<10%) with other identified peptide toxins. By whole-cell recording, SsmTx-I significantly blocked voltage-gated K⁺ channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons with an IC₅₀ value of 200 nM, but it had no effect on voltage-gated Na⁺ channels. Among the nine K⁺ channel subtypes expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, SsmTx-I selectively blocked the Kv2.1 current with an IC₅₀ value of 41.7 nM, but it had little effect on currents mediated by other K⁺ channel subtypes. Blockage of Kv2.1 by SsmTx-I was not associated with significant alteration of steady-state activation, suggesting that SsmTx-I might act as a simple inhibitor or channel blocker rather than a gating modifier. Our study reported a specific Kv2.1-blocker from centipede venom and provided a basis for future investigations of SsmTx-I, for example on structure-function relationships, mechanism of action, and pharmacological potential. PMID:24464516

  10. Structural and functional consequences of the presence of a fourth disulfide bridge in the scorpion short toxins: solution structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1.

    PubMed Central

    Savarin, P.; Romi-Lebrun, R.; Zinn-Justin, S.; Lebrun, B.; Nakajima, T.; Gilquin, B.; Menez, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1, using nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling. This protein belongs to the scorpion short toxin family, which essentially contains potassium channel blockers of 29 to 39 amino acids and three disulfide bridges. It is highly active on voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channels. Furthermore, it has the particularity to possess a fourth disulfide bridge. We show that HsTX1 has a fold similar to that of the three-disulfide-bridged toxins and conserves the hydrophobic core found in the scorpion short toxins. Thus, the fourth bridge has no influence on the global conformation of HsTX1. Most residues spatially analogous to those interacting with voltage-gated potassium channels in the three-disulfide-bridged toxins are conserved in HsTX1. Thus, we propose that Tyr21, Lys23, Met25, and Asn26 are involved in the biological activity of HsTX1. As an additional positively charged residue is always spatially close to the aromatic residue in toxins blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels, and as previous mutagenesis experiments have shown the critical role played by the C-terminus in HsTX1, we suggest that Arg33 is also important for the activity of the four disulfide-bridged toxin. Docking calculations confirm that, if Lys23 and Met25 interact with the GYGDMH motif of Kv1.3, Arg33 can contact Asp386 and, thus, play the role of the additional positively charged residue of the toxin functional site. This original configuration of the binding site of HsTX1 for Kv1.3, if confirmed experimentally, offers new structural possibilities for the construction of a molecule blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels. PMID:10631983

  11. Modeling regional salinization of the Ogallala aquifer, Southern High Plains, TX, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehta, S.; Fryar, A.E.; Brady, R.M.; Morin, R.H.

    2000-01-01

    Two extensive plumes (combined area > 1000 km2) have been delineated within the Ogallala aquifer in the Southern High Plains, TX, USA. Salinity varies within the plumes spatially and increases with depth; Cl ranges from 50 to >500 mg 1-1. Variable-density flow modeling using SUTRA has identified three broad regions of upward cross-formational flow from the underlying evaporite units. The upward discharge within the modeled plume area is in the range of 10-4-10-5 m3 day-1, and the TDS concentrations are typically >3000 mg 1-1. Regions of increased salinity, identified within the Whitehorse Group (evaporite unit) underlying the Ogallala aquifer, are controlled by the structure and thickness variations relative to the recharge areas. Distinct flow paths, on the order of tens of km to >100 km in length, and varying flow velocities indicate that the salinization of the Ogallala aquifer has been a slow, ongoing process and may represent circulation of waters recharged during Pleistocene or earlier times. On-going pumping has had negligible impact on the salinity distribution in the Ogallala aquifer, although simulations indicate that the velocity distribution in the underlying units may have been affected to depths of 150 m after 30 years of pumping. Because the distribution of saline ground water in this region of the Ogallala aquifer is heterogeneous, careful areal and vertical characterization is warranted prior to any well-field development. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.Two extensive plumes (combined area >1000 km2) have been delineated within the Ogallala aquifer in the Southern High Plains, TX, USA. Salinity varies within the plumes spatially and increases with depth; Cl ranges from 50 to >500 mg l-1. Variable-density flow modeling using SUTRA has identified three broad regions of upward cross-formational flow from the underlying evaporite units. The upward discharge within the modeled plume area is in the range of 10-4-10-5 m3 day-1, and the TDS concentrations

  12. Occupational exposure to benzene at the ExxonMobil refinery in Baytown, TX (1978-2006).

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Shannon H; Panko, Julie M; Unice, Ken M; Burns, Amanda M; Kreider, Marisa L; Gelatt, Richard H; Booher, Lindsay E; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2011-01-01

    Although occupational benzene exposure of refinery workers has been studied for decades, no extensive analysis of historical industrial hygiene data has been performed focusing on airborne concentrations at specific refineries and tasks. This study characterizes benzene exposures at the ExxonMobil Baytown, TX, refinery from 1978 to 2006 to understand the variability in workers' exposures over time and during different job tasks. Exposures were grouped by operational status, job title, and tasks. More than 9000 industrial hygiene air samples were evaluated; approximately 4000 non-task (> 3 h) and 1000 task-related (< 3 h) personal samples were considered. Each sample was assigned to one of 27 job titles, 29 work areas, and 16 task bins (when applicable). Process technicians were sampled most frequently, resulting in the following mean benzene concentrations by area: hydrofiner (n=245, mean=1.3 p.p.m.), oil movements (n=286, mean=0.23 p.p.m.), reformer (n=575, mean=0.10 p.p.m.), tank farm (n=9, mean=0.65 p.p.m.), waste treatment (n=446, mean=0.13 p.p.m.), and other areas (n=460, mean=0.062 p.p.m.). The most frequently sampled task was sample collection (n=218, mean=0.40 p.p.m.). Job title and area did not significantly impact task-related exposures. Airborne concentrations were significantly lower after 1990 than before 1990. Results of this task-focused study may be useful when analyzing benzene exposures at other refineries.

  13. Linear B-cell epitopes in BthTX-1, BthTX-II and BthA-1, phospholipase A₂'s from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom, recognized by therapeutically neutralizing commercial horse antivenom.

    PubMed

    De-Simone, Salvatore G; Napoleão-Pego, Paloma; Teixeira-Pinto, Luiz A L; Santos, Jonathas D L; De-Simone, Thatiane S; Melgarejo, Anibal R; Aguiar, Aniesse S; Marchi-Salvador, Daniela P

    2013-09-01

    The benefits from treatment with antivenom sera are indubitable. However, the mechanism for toxin neutralization has not been completely elucidated. A mixture of anti-bothropic and anti-crotalic horse antivenom has been reported to be more effective in neutralizing the effects of Bothrops jararacussu snake venom than anti-bothropic antivenom alone. This study determined which regions in the three PLA₂s from B. jararacussu snake venom are bound by antibodies in tetravalent anti-bothropic and monovalent anti-crotalic commercial horse antivenom. Mapping experiments of BthTX-I, BthTX-II and BthA-I using two small libraries of 69 peptides each revealed six major IgG-binding epitopes that were recognized by both anti-bothropic and anti-crotalic horse antivenom. Two epitopes in BthTX-I were only recognized by the anti-bothropic horse antivenom, while anti-crotalic horse antivenom recognized four unique epitopes across the three PLA₂s. Our studies suggest that the harmful activities of the PLA₂s present in the venom of B. jararacussu are neutralized by the combinatorial treatment with both antivenom sera through their complementary binding sites, which provides a wide coverage on the PLA₂s. This is the first peptide microarray of PLA₂s from B. jararacussu snake venom to survey the performance of commercial horse antiophidic antivenom. Regions recognized by the protective antivenom sera are prime candidates for improved venom cocktails or a chimeric protein encoding the multiple epitopes to immunize animals as well as for designing future synthetic vaccines. PMID:23792452

  14. The Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Urban Radar Network: Enhancing Resilience in the Presence of Floods, Tornadoes, Hail and High Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra*, Chandrasekar V.; the full DFW Team

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the National Weather Service (NWS) Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) provides observations updated every five-six minutes across the United States. However, at the maximum NEXRAD operating range of 230 km, the 0.5 degree radar beam (lowest tilt) height is about 5.4 km above ground level (AGL) because of the effect of Earth curvature. Consequently, much of the lower atmosphere (1-3 km AGL) cannot be observed by the NEXRAD. To overcome the fundamental coverage limitations of today's weather surveillance radars, and improve the spatial and temporal resolution issues, at urban scale, the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center (NSF-ERC) for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) has embarked the development of Dallas-Fort worth (DFW) urban remote sensing network to conduct high-resolution sensing in the lower atmosphere for a metropolitan environment, communicate high resolution observations and nowcasting of severe weather including flash floods, hail storms and high wind events. Being one of the largest inland metropolitan areas in the U.S., the DFW Metroplex is home to over 6.5 million people by 2012 according to the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG). It experiences a wide range of natural weather hazards, including urban flash flood, high wind, tornado, and hail, etc. Successful monitoring of the rapid changing meteorological conditions in such a region is necessary for emergency management and decision making. Therefore, it is an ideal location to investigate the impacts of hazardous weather phenomena, to enhance resilience in an urban setting and demonstrate the CASA concept in a densely populated urban environment. The DFW radar network consists of 8 dual-polarization X-band weather radars and standard NEXRAD S-band radar, covering the greater DFW metropolitan region. This paper will present high resolution observation of tornado, urban flood, hail storm and damaging wind event all within the

  15. Comparison of visceral fat mass measurement by dual-X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging in a multiethnic cohort: the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Neeland, I J; Grundy, S M; Li, X; Adams-Huet, B; Vega, G L

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass, a risk factor for cardiometabolic complications of obesity, is usually measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but this method is not practical in a clinical setting. In contrast, measurement of VAT by dual-x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) appears to circumvent the limitations of MRI. In this study, we compared measurements of VAT mass by MRI and DXA in the large, multiethnic cohort of the Dallas Heart Study (DHS). Subjects/Methods: About 2689 DHS participants underwent paired measurement of VAT by MRI and DXA. Sex-stratified analyses were performed to evaluate the correlation and agreement between DXA and MRI. Model validation was performed using bootstrapping and inter-reader variability was assessed. Results: Mean age of the cohort was 44 years, with 55% female, 48% Black and 75% overweight/obese participants. Regression analysis showed a linear relationship between DXA and MRI with R2=0.82 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81–0.84) for females and R2=0.86 (95% CI 0.85–0.88) for males. Mean difference between methods was 0.01 kg for females and 0.09 kg for males. Bland–Altman analysis showed that DXA tended to modestly underestimate VAT compared with MRI at lower VAT levels and overestimate it compared with MRI at higher VAT levels. Results were consistent in analyses stratified by race, body mass index status, waist girth and body fat. Inter-individual reader correlation among 50 randomly selected scans was excellent (inter-class correlation coefficient=0.997). Conclusions: VAT mass quantification by DXA was both accurate and valid among a large, multiethnic cohort within a wide range of body fatness. Further studies including repeat assessments over time will help determine its long-term applicability. PMID:27428873

  16. Associations of four circulating chemokines with multiple atherosclerosis phenotypes in a large population-based sample: results from the dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Leticia; Rohatgi, Anand; Ayers, Colby R; Owens, Andrew W; Das, Sandeep R; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A

    2010-05-01

    Specific chemokines contribute to vascular inflammation and may be useful biomarkers to detect atherosclerosis. The chemokines CXCL1 and CCL11 have previously been studied in animal or human models of atherosclerosis, while CXCL2 and CCL23 have not. Among 2,454 subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study, a multi-ethnic population-based sample, we measured plasma CCL11, CCL23, CXCL1, and CXCL2, and associated levels with coronary artery calcium (CAC) by computed tomography, and aortic wall thickness, plaque burden, and compliance by magnetic resonance imaging. Elevated chemokine levels were defined as greater than or equal to the median for CCL11 and CCL23 and greater than or equal to the upper detection limit for CXCL1 and CXCL2. Elevated CCL23 (P < 0.01) and CXCL1 (P = 0.01), but not CCL11 and CXCL2, associated with CAC in univariable analyses. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, elevated CCL23 remained associated with CAC (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.7; P = 0.02), while the association with CXCL1 was modestly attenuated (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-2.1; P = 0.06). CCL23 also associated with aortic wall thickness, plaque, and compliance in univariable analyses (P < 0.05 for each), but these associations were attenuated after multivariable adjustment. The novel chemotactic protein, CCL23, which has not been previously studied in atherosclerosis, is independently associated with coronary atherosclerosis, suggesting that this chemokine merits further study in animal and human models.

  17. Data Package for Calendar Year 2002 RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.

    2003-04-15

    Two new RCRA groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the single-shell tank farm at Waste Management Area TX-TY in October and November 2002. This document provides the information on drilling and construction of these wells. Two new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the single-shell tank farm Waste Management Area (WMA) TX-TY in October and November 2002 in fulfillment of Tri-Party Agreement (Ecology et al. 1998) Milestone M-24-00N. The well names are 299-W14-19 and 299-W15-44; the corresponding well numbers are C3957 and C3956, respectively. Well 299-W14-19 is located east of the central part of the TX Tank Farm and is a downgradient well filling a gap in the monitoring network between wells 299-W14-14 and 299-W14-6. Well 299-W15-44 is located at the southwest corner of the TX Tank Farm in an area where groundwater flow has been artificially altered toward the southwest by the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit pump-and-treat system. The well is in the cone of depression of the 200-ZP-1 extraction wells and is downgradient of WMA TX-TY. The locations of all wells in the WMA TX-TY monitoring network are shown on Figure 1. The original assessment monitoring plan for WMA TX-TY was issued in 1993 (Caggiano and Chou 1993). That plan was updated for the continued assessment at WMA TX-TY in 2001 (Hodges and Chou 2001). The updated plan provides justification for the new wells. The new wells were constructed to the specifications and requirements described in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-160 and WAC 173-303, the updated assessment plan for WMA TX-TY (Hodges and Chou 2001), and the description of work for well drilling and construction. This document compiles information on the drilling and construction, geophysical logging, and sediment and groundwater sampling applicable to the installation of wells 299-W14-19 and 299-W15-44. The information on drilling and construction, well development, and pump

  18. Characterization of a Novel Alpha-Conotoxin TxID from Conus textile that Potently Blocks rat Alpha3beta4 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Sulan; Zhangsun, Dongting; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yong; Hu, Yuanyan; Christensen, Sean; Harvey, Peta J.; Akcan, Muharrem; Craik, David J.; McIntosh, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The α3β4 nAChRs are implicated in pain sensation in the PNS and addiction to nicotine in the CNS. We identified an α-4/6-conotoxin (CTx) TxID from Conus textile. The new toxin consists of 15 amino acid residues with two disulfide bonds. TxID was synthesized using solid phase methods and the synthetic peptide was functionally tested on nAChRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. TxID blocked rat α3β4 nAChRs with a 12.5 nM IC50, which places it amongst the most potent α3β4 nAChR antagonists. TxID also blocked the closely related α6/α3β4 with a 94 nM IC50 but showed little activity on other nAChR subtypes. NMR analysis showed that two major structural isomers exist in solution, one of which adopts a regular α-CTx fold but with different surface charge distribution to other 4/6 family members. α-CTx TxID is a novel tool with which to probe the structure and function of α3β4 nAChRs. PMID:24200193

  19. Sustained inhibition of the NaV1.7 sodium channel by engineered dimers of the domain II binding peptide GpTx-1.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Biswas, Kaustav; Holder, J Ryan; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Poppe, Leszek; Andrews, Kristin L; Lin, Fen-Fen; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2015-11-01

    Many efforts are underway to develop selective inhibitors of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as new analgesics. Thus far, however, in vitro selectivity has proved difficult for small molecules, and peptides generally lack appropriate pharmacokinetic properties. We previously identified the NaV1.7 inhibitory peptide GpTx-1 from tarantula venom and optimized its potency and selectivity via structure-guided analoging. To further understand GpTx-1 binding to NaV1.7, we have mapped the binding site to transmembrane segments 1-4 of the second pseudosubunit internal repeat (commonly referred to as Site 4) using NaV1.5/NaV1.7 chimeric protein constructs. We also report that select GpTx-1 amino acid residues apparently not contacting NaV1.7 can be derivatized with a hydrophilic polymer without adversely affecting peptide potency. Homodimerization of GpTx-1 with a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker resulted in a compound with increased potency and a significantly reduced off-rate, demonstrating the ability to modulate the function and properties of GpTx-1 by linking to additional molecules. PMID:26112439

  20. Solution structure of hpTX2, a toxin from Heteropoda venatoria spider that blocks Kv4.2 potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, C.; Legros, C.; Ferrat, G.; Bischoff, U.; Marquardt, A.; Pongs, O.; Darbon, H.

    2000-01-01

    HpTX2 is a toxin from the venom of Heteropoda venatoria spider that has been demonstrated to bind on Kv4.2 potassium channel. We have determined the solution structure of recombinant HpTX2 by use of conventional two-dimensional NMR techniques followed by distance-geometry and molecular dynamics. The calculated structure belongs to the Inhibitory Cystin Knot structural family that consists in a compact disulfide-bonded core, from which four loops emerge. A poorly defined two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet (residues 20-23 and 25-28) is detected. Analysis of the electrostatic charge anisotropy allows us to propose a functional map of HpTX2 different from the one described for kappa-conotoxin PVIIA, but strongly related to the one of charybdotoxin. The orientation of the dipole moment of HpTX2 emerges through K27 which could therefore be the critical lysine residue. Close to this lysine are a second basic residue, R23, an aromatic cluster (F7, W25, W30) and an hydrophobic side chain (L24). The high density in aromatic side chains of the putative functional surface as well as the lack of an asparagine is proposed to be the structural basis of the specificity of HpTX2 toward Kv4.2 channel. PMID:11152117

  1. A Large-N Mixed Sensor Active + Passive Seismic Array near Sweetwater, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklage, M.; Hollis, D.; Gridley, J. M.; Woodward, R.; Spriggs, N.

    2014-12-01

    A collaborative high-density seismic survey using broadband and short period seismic sensors was conducted March 7 - April 30, 2014 near Sweetwater, TX. The objective of the survey was to use a combination of controlled source shot slices and passive seismic recordings recorded by multiple types of sensors with different bandwidths and sensitivities to image the subsurface. The broadband component of the survey consisted of 25 continuously recording seismic stations comprised of 20 Trillium Compact Posthole sensors from Nanometrics and 5 Polar Trillium 120PHQs from the IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center (PIC). The broadband stations also utilized 25 Centaur digitizers from Nanometrics as well as 25 polar quick deploy enclosures from the PIC. The broadband array was designed to maximize horizontal traveling seismic energy for surface wave analysis over the primary target area with sufficient offset for imaging objectives at depth. The short period component of the survey consisted of 2639 receiver locations using Zland nodes from NodalSeismic. The nodes are further divided into 3 sub-arrays: 1) outlier array 2) active source array 3) backbone array. The outlier array consisted of 25 continuously recording nodes distributed around the edge of the survey at a distance of ~5 km from the survey boundary, and provided valuable constraints to passive data analysis techniques at the edge of the survey boundary. The active source patch consisted of densely spaced nodes that were designed to record signals from a Vibroseis source truck for active source reflection processing and imaging. The backbone array consisted of 292 nodes that covered the entirety of the survey area to maximize the value of the passive data analysis. By utilizing continuous recording and smartly designed arrays for measuring local and regional earthquakes we can incorporate velocity information derived from passive data analysis into the active source processing workflow to produce a superior subsurface

  2. 76 FR 72615 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ... ``significant rule '' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979) ; and (3... Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, Dallas/Fort Worth Intl, RNAV (RNP) Z RWY 13R, Orig-D Lamesa, TX, Lamesa Muni, NDB..., WA, Spokane Intl, RNAV (RNP) Z RWY 21, Amdt 1 Hartford, WI, Hartford Muni, NDB OR GPS RWY 11, Amdt...

  3. CoaTx-II, a new dimeric Lys49 phospholipase A2 from Crotalus oreganus abyssus snake venom with bactericidal potential: Insights into its structure and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J R; Lancellotti, M; Soares, A M; Calderon, L A; Ramírez, D; González, W; Marangoni, S; Da Silva, S L

    2016-09-15

    Snake venoms are rich and intriguing sources of biologically-active molecules that act on target cells, modulating a diversity of physiological functions and presenting promising pharmacological applications. Lys49 phospholipase A2 is one of the multifunctional proteins present in these complex secretions and, although catalytically inactive, has a variety of biological activities, including cytotoxic, antibacterial, inflammatory, antifungal activities. Herein, a Lys49 phospholipase A2, denominated CoaTx-II from Crotalus oreganus abyssus, was purified and structurally and pharmacologically characterized. CoaTx-II was isolated with a high degree of purity by a combination of two chromatographic steps; molecular exclusion and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. This toxin is dimeric with a mass of 13868.2 Da (monomeric form), as determined by mass spectrometry. CoaTx-II is rich in Arg and Lys residues and displays high identity with other Lys49 PLA2 homologues, which have high isoelectric points. The structural model of dimeric CoaTx-II shows that the toxin is non-covalently stabilized. Despite its enzymatic inactivity, in vivo CoaTx-II caused local muscular damage, characterized by increased plasma creatine kinase and confirmed by histological alterations, in addition to an inflammatory activity, as demonstrated by mice paw edema induction and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 elevation. CoaTx-II also presents antibacterial activity against gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa 31NM, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and positive (Staphyloccocus aureus BEC9393 and Rib1) bacteria. Therefore, data show that this newly purified toxin plays a central role in mediating the degenerative events associated with envenomation, in addition to demonstrating antibacterial properties, with potential for use in the development of strategies for antivenom therapy and combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:27530662

  4. CoaTx-II, a new dimeric Lys49 phospholipase A2 from Crotalus oreganus abyssus snake venom with bactericidal potential: Insights into its structure and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J R; Lancellotti, M; Soares, A M; Calderon, L A; Ramírez, D; González, W; Marangoni, S; Da Silva, S L

    2016-09-15

    Snake venoms are rich and intriguing sources of biologically-active molecules that act on target cells, modulating a diversity of physiological functions and presenting promising pharmacological applications. Lys49 phospholipase A2 is one of the multifunctional proteins present in these complex secretions and, although catalytically inactive, has a variety of biological activities, including cytotoxic, antibacterial, inflammatory, antifungal activities. Herein, a Lys49 phospholipase A2, denominated CoaTx-II from Crotalus oreganus abyssus, was purified and structurally and pharmacologically characterized. CoaTx-II was isolated with a high degree of purity by a combination of two chromatographic steps; molecular exclusion and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. This toxin is dimeric with a mass of 13868.2 Da (monomeric form), as determined by mass spectrometry. CoaTx-II is rich in Arg and Lys residues and displays high identity with other Lys49 PLA2 homologues, which have high isoelectric points. The structural model of dimeric CoaTx-II shows that the toxin is non-covalently stabilized. Despite its enzymatic inactivity, in vivo CoaTx-II caused local muscular damage, characterized by increased plasma creatine kinase and confirmed by histological alterations, in addition to an inflammatory activity, as demonstrated by mice paw edema induction and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 elevation. CoaTx-II also presents antibacterial activity against gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa 31NM, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and positive (Staphyloccocus aureus BEC9393 and Rib1) bacteria. Therefore, data show that this newly purified toxin plays a central role in mediating the degenerative events associated with envenomation, in addition to demonstrating antibacterial properties, with potential for use in the development of strategies for antivenom therapy and combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  5. Search for dust shells in W Ser binaries and similar object: RX Cassiopeiae and TX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranova, O. G.; Shenavrin, V. I.

    1997-11-01

    The results of UBVRJHKLM photometry for a strongly interacting W Ser binary (RX Cas) and an Algol-type system (TX UMa) are analyzed. The spectral classification of the stellar components of the binaries is made, and the sources of excess emission at wavelengths lambda 3.5 and 5 m are analyzed. The weak excess at lambda 5 microns are analyzed. The weak excess at lambda 5 microns in TX UMa is shown to be associated with the emission of an ionized shell with a volume emission measure ~ 2.7 x 10^57 cm^-3. The excess at lambda 3.5 and 5 microns in RX Cas is attributable to the emission of an optically thin circumstellar dust shell with a grain temperature ~ 600-700 K. The luminosity is ~ 3 x 10^33 erg s^-1, the radius of the dust shell is ~ 4.6 x 10^14 cm, the optical depth at lambda 1.25 microns is ~10^-3, and the mass is ~10^23 g.

  6. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. TX1 on a wide range of octylphenol polyethoxylate concentrations and the formation of dicarboxylated metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hsieh, Hsiao-Cheng; Huang, Shir-Ly

    2010-04-01

    Pseudomonas sp. TX1, is able to use octylphenol polyethoxylates (OPEO(n), or Triton X-100; average n = 9.5) as a sole carbon source. It can grow on 0.05-20% of OPEO(n) with a specific growth rate of 0.34-0.44 h(-1). High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of OPEO(n) degraded metabolites revealed that strain TX1 was able to shorten the ethoxylate chain and produce octylphenol (OP). Furthermore, formation of the short carboxylate metabolites, such as carboxyoctylphenol polyethoxylates (COPEO(n), n = 2, 3) and carboxyoctylphenol polyethoxycarboxylates (COPEC(n), n = 2, 3) began at the log stage, while octylphenol polyethoxycarboxylates (OPEC(n), n = 1-3) was formed at the stationary phase. All the short-ethoxylated metabolites, OPEO(n), OPEC(n), COPEO(n), and COPEC(n), accumulated when the cells were in the stationary phase. This study is the first to demonstrate the formation of COPEO(n) and COPEC(n) from OPEO(n) by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:20044249

  7. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF TX-TY TANK FARMS AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH GROUND PENETRATING RADAR

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS DA; CUBBAGE R; BRAUCHLA R; O'BRIEN G

    2008-07-24

    Ground penetrating radar surveys of the TX and TY tank farms were performed to identify existing infrastructure in the near surface environment. These surveys were designed to provide background information supporting Surface-to-Surface and Well-to-Well resistivity surveys of Waste Management Area TX-TY. The objective of the preliminary investigation was to collect background characterization information with GPR to understand the spatial distribution of metallic objects that could potentially interfere with the results from high resolution resistivity{trademark} surveys. The results of the background characterization confirm the existence of documented infrastructure, as well as highlight locations of possible additional undocumented subsurface metallic objects.

  8. Water-quality trends in White Rock Creek Basin from 1912-1994 identified using sediment cores from White Rock Lake Reservoir, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Callender, E.

    1997-01-01

    Historical trends in selected water-quality variables from 1912 to 1994 in White Rock Creek Basin were identified by dated sediment cores from White Rock Lake. White Rock Lake is a 4.4-km2 reservoir filled in 1912 and located on the north side of Dallas, Texas, with a drainage area of 259 km2. Agriculture dominated land use in White Rock Creek Basin before about 1950. By 1990, 72% of the basin was urban. Sediment cores were dated using cesium-137 and core lithology. Major element concentrations changed, and sedimentation rates and percentage of clay-sized particles in sediments decreased beginning in about 1952 in response to the change in land use. Lead concentrations, normalized with respect to aluminum, were six times larger in sediment deposited in about 1978 than in pre-1952 sediment. Following the introduction of unleaded gasoline in the 1970s, normalized lead concentrations in sediment declined and stabilized at about two and one-half times the pre-1952 level. Normalized zinc and arsenic concentrations increased 66 and 76%, respectively, from before 1952 to 1994. No organochlorine compounds were detected in sediments deposited prior to about 1940. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and DDE (a metabolite of DDT) increased rapidly beginning in the 1940s and peaked in the 1960s at 21 and 20 ??g kg-1, respectively, which is coincident with their peak use in the United States. Concentrations of both declined about an order of magnitude from the 1960s to the 1990s to 3.0 and 2.0 ??g kg-1, respectively. Chlordane and dieldrin concentrations increased during the 1970s and 1980s. The largest chlordane concentration was 8.0 ??g kg-1 and occurred in a sediment sample deposited in about 1990. The largest dieldrin concentration was 0.7 ??g kg-1 and occurred in the most recent sample deposited in the early 1990s. Agricultural use of chlordane and dieldrin was restricted in the 1970s; however, both were used as termiticides, and urban use of chlordane

  9. Greigite (Fe3S4) as an indicator of drought - The 1912-1994 sediment magnetic record from White Rock Lake, Dallas, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.L.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Van Metre, P.; Tuttle, M.; Callender, E.; Goldin, A.

    1999-01-01

    Combined magnetic and geochemical studies were conducted on sediments from White Rock Lake, a reservoir in suburban Dallas (USA), to investigate how land use has affected sediment and water quality since the reservoir was filled in 1912. The chronology of a 167-cm-long core is constrained by the recognition of the pre-reservoir surface and by 137Cs results. In the reservoir sediments, magnetic susceptibility (MS) and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) are largely carried by detrital titanomagnetite that originally formed in igneous rocks. Titanomagnetite and associated hematite are the dominant iron oxides in a sample from the surficial deposit in the watershed but are absent in the underlying Austin Chalk. Therefore, these minerals were transported by wind into the watershed. After about 1960, systematic decreases in Ti, Fe, and Al suggest diminished input of detrital Fe-Ti oxides from the surficial deposits. MS and IRM remain constant over this interval, however, implying compensation by an increase in strongly magnetic material derived from human activity. Anthropogenic magnetite in rust and ferrite spherules (from fly ash?) are more common in sediment deposited after about 1970 than before and may account for the constant magnetization despite the implied decrease in detrital Fe-Ti oxides. An unexpected finding is the presence of authigenic greigite (Fe3S4), the abundance of which is at least partly controlled by climate. Greigite is common in sediments that predate about 1975, with zones of concentration indicated by relatively high IRM/MS. High greigite contents in sediment deposited during the early to mid-1950s and during the mid-1930s correspond to several-year periods of below-average precipitation and drought from historical records. Relatively long water-residence times in the reservoir during these periods may have led to elevated levels of sulfate available for bacterial sulfate reduction. The sulfate was probably derived via the oxidation of

  10. 78 FR 18806 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does..., TX, Dallas/Fort Worth Intl, ILS OR LOC RWY 35C, ILS RWY 35C (CAT II), ILS RWY 35C (CAT III), ILS RWY 35C (SA CAT I), Amdt 2 Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, Dallas/Fort Worth Intl, RNAV (GPS) RWY 35C, Amdt...

  11. Dispersion Modeling of Inert Particulate Matter in the El Paso, TX- Cd. Juarez, MX Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, R.; Fitzgerald, R.

    2005-05-01

    The El Paso, TX-Cd. Juarez, MX region is subject to the emission of inert particulate matter (PM) into the atmosphere, from a variety of sources. The impact of these emissions has been studied extensively in for regulatory compliance in the area of health effects, air quality and visibility. Little work has been done to study the fate and transport of the particulate matter within the region. The Environmental Physics Group at The University of Texas at El Paso has recently applied the SARMAP Air Quality Model (SAQM) to model the dispersion of inert particulate matter in the region. The meteorological data for the SAQM was created with the Penn State/NCAR meteorological modeling system, version 5 (MM5). The SAQM was used to simulate three common occurrences for large particulate emission and concentration. The first was times of heavy traffic volume at the international bridges which cause large numbers of cars to sit, with engines running, for extended periods of time. The second was moderate to high wind events that cause large amounts of coarse particulate matter to become entrained in the atmosphere and transported into and around the region. The third is a temperature inversion which traps the particulate matter at the surface during morning rush hour. The initial conditions for particulate matter, for the two cases involving mobile emissions, were derived from the 1999 version 3 national emissions inventory (NEI) mobile, on-road data from the EPA. Output from the MM5 was used to as the meteorological driver for the SAQM. The MM5 was initialized with data from the NCAR reanalysis project. Meteorological data collected in the region bye the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and the EPA was used for Four Dimensional Data Assimilation. The MM5 was nudged with gridded, surface and observational data. Statistical analysis was done on the MM5 for the variables, wind speed, wind direction, temperature and mixing ratio. The statistics performed included

  12. A Detailed Process Based Evaluation of Photochemical Air Quality Model Simulations of Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizuete, W.; Kioumourtzoglou, M.; Jeffries, H.

    2006-12-01

    This work will present a process based evaluation of several modeling attempts of the Houston, TX non- attainment area. These modeling attempts include efforts by the Texas state agency, private consultants, and several Universities, resulting in multiple simulations of the same modeling episode and domain. These simulations were performed with the Comprehensive Air quality Model with extensions (CAMx) under a variety of meteorological and emission inputs. Through an initial comparison of model and ambient data the model underpredicts ozone concentrations in nearly every modeling attempt. This observation held true even when a large artificial imputation of ozone precursors, specifically ethylene and propylene, were added to some modeling simulations. An examination of the level of agreement between model predictions and observations of ozone concentrations, however, is not a sufficient method to understand the reasons for this inaccuracy. This is especially true in a non-linear feedback system such as ozone formation where the same ozone prediction can be reached through the combination of various physical and chemical processess. A more meaningful method of model analysis that focuses on theses processes lead to the development of the pyPA (Process Analysis in python) tool. This tool provides a framework for an in-depth analysis of modeling data by quantifying radical budgets, source and fate of ozone precursors, and the physical processes that effect each species. The pyPA tool was used to analyze each simulation scenario of the Houston airshed allowing for a process based intercomparison. An analysis of the radical budget revealed a deficient source of organically derived free radicals (HO2 and OH.) in the modeling system. Atmospheric reactivity and consequently ozone formation was limited by lack of radical sources; regardless of the levels of ethylene or propylene introduced into the system. NOx overpredictions by a factor of two further depleted the limited

  13. Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Institute, 33rd, California State Univ. , Sacramento, June 3, 4, 1993, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, F.H.

    1993-01-01

    The present volume on heat transfer and fluid mechanics discusses vortex shedding and pressure oscillations in rockets and ramjets, chemically reactive turbulent flow mixing mechanisms, a computational study of atomization in a high-speed gas flow, and the development and verification of a computer model of cross-flow atomization. Attention is given to viscous liquid flow heating, a method of local corrections for high-speed viscous flows, an experimental study of the transient temperature distributions in concrete, and the thermal stability of two horizontal fluid layers with radiative heating from above. Topics addressed include the effect of molecular diffusion on the scalar field injet mixing, the effect of scattering on the total emittance from an isothermal gas-particle mixture, heat transfer to a bubble suspended in a liquid layer near a solid plate, and a finite analytic solution of Burger's equation using a node moving algorithm.

  14. Annual Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) Proceedings (33rd, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, May 15-17, 1992). Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blunt, Adrian, Ed.

    The following are included in section 1: "Purposes and Methods of Sistematizacion" (Beder); "At the Crossroads" (Bingman, White); "Relationship between Literacy and Numeracy Test Scores on the 'Survey of Literacy Skills Used in Daily Activities'" (Blunt); "Vaclav Havel, Postmodernism, and Modernity" (Briton, Plumb); "Centrality of Negotiating…

  15. Coal for the future. Proceedings of the 33rd international technical conference on coal utilization and fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sakkestad, B.A.

    2008-07-01

    Topics covered include oxy-fuel technology, modelling and simulations, low NOx technology, gasification technology, pre-utilization beneficiation of coal, advanced energy conversion systems, mercury emissions control, improving power plant efficiency and reducing emissions, biomass and wastes, coal to liquids, post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture, multi emission controls, advanced materials, advanced controls, and international highlights.

  16. Proceedings of the 2000 ASCUE Summer Conference (33rd, North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, June 11-15, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter, Ed.

    This 2000 Association of Small Computer Users in Education (ASCUE) conference proceedings first highlights keynote speakers and describes the pre-conference workshops. The conference papers and abstracts that follow discuss: strategic planning for faculty, staff, and student development; a network lab; the Blackboard course delivery system;…

  17. Antihyperalgesic effects of ProTx-II, a Nav1.7 antagonist, and A803467, a Nav1.8 antagonist, in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Sekino, Shota; Ikegami, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kamei, Junzo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of intrathecal administration of ProTx-II (tarantula venom peptide) and A803467 (5-[4-chloro-phenyl]-furan-2-carboxylic acid [3,5-dimethoxy-phenyl]-amide), selective Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 antagonists, respectively, on thermal hyperalgesia in a painful diabetic neuropathy model of mice. Intrathecal administration of ProTx-II at doses from 0.04 to 4 ng to diabetic mice dose-dependently and significantly increased the tail-flick latency. Intrathecal administration of A803467 at doses from 10 to 100 ng to diabetic mice also dose-dependently and significantly increased the tail-flick latency. However, intrathecal administration of either ProTx-II (4 ng) or A803467 (100 ng) had no effect on the tail-flick latency in nondiabetic mice. The expression of either the Nav1.7 or Nav1.8 sodium channel protein in the dorsal root ganglion in diabetic mice was not different from that in nondiabetic mice. The present results suggest that ProTx-II and A803467, highly selective blockers of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 sodium channels, respectively, in the spinal cord, can have antihyperalgesic effects in diabetic mice. PMID:27186141

  18. Antihyperalgesic effects of ProTx-II, a Nav1.7 antagonist, and A803467, a Nav1.8 antagonist, in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Sekino, Shota; Ikegami, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kamei, Junzo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of intrathecal administration of ProTx-II (tarantula venom peptide) and A803467 (5-[4-chloro-phenyl]-furan-2-carboxylic acid [3,5-dimethoxy-phenyl]-amide), selective Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 antagonists, respectively, on thermal hyperalgesia in a painful diabetic neuropathy model of mice. Intrathecal administration of ProTx-II at doses from 0.04 to 4 ng to diabetic mice dose-dependently and significantly increased the tail-flick latency. Intrathecal administration of A803467 at doses from 10 to 100 ng to diabetic mice also dose-dependently and significantly increased the tail-flick latency. However, intrathecal administration of either ProTx-II (4 ng) or A803467 (100 ng) had no effect on the tail-flick latency in nondiabetic mice. The expression of either the Nav1.7 or Nav1.8 sodium channel protein in the dorsal root ganglion in diabetic mice was not different from that in nondiabetic mice. The present results suggest that ProTx-II and A803467, highly selective blockers of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 sodium channels, respectively, in the spinal cord, can have antihyperalgesic effects in diabetic mice. PMID:27186141

  19. Discovery and characterisation of a novel toxin from Dendroaspis angusticeps, named Tx7335, that activates the potassium channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Iván O; Jin, Tony B; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T; Poget, Sébastien F

    2016-01-01

    Due to their central role in essential physiological processes, potassium channels are common targets for animal toxins. These toxins in turn are of great value as tools for studying channel function and as lead compounds for drug development. Here, we used a direct toxin pull-down assay with immobilised KcsA potassium channel to isolate a novel KcsA-binding toxin (called Tx7335) from eastern green mamba snake (Dendroaspis angusticeps) venom. Sequencing of the toxin by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry revealed a 63 amino acid residue peptide with 4 disulphide bonds that belongs to the three-finger toxin family, but with a unique modification of its disulphide-bridge scaffold. The toxin induces a dose-dependent increase in both open probabilities and mean open times on KcsA in artificial bilayers. Thus, it unexpectedly behaves as a channel activator rather than an inhibitor. A charybdotoxin-sensitive mutant of KcsA exhibits similar susceptibility to Tx7335 as wild-type, indicating that the binding site for Tx7335 is distinct from that of canonical pore-blocker toxins. Based on the extracellular location of the toxin binding site (far away from the intracellular pH gate), we propose that Tx7335 increases potassium flow through KcsA by allosterically reducing inactivation of the channel.

  20. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Webb Consolidated Independent School District in Bruni, TX - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Webb Consolidated Independent School District (Webb CISD) in Bruni, TX. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effect...

  1. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Alvin, TX, Six-Month Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Oak Manor Municipal Utility District (MUD) facility at Alvin, TX. The main objective of the project is to evaluate...

  2. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BRUNI, TX, SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Webb Consolidated Independent School District (Webb CISD) site at Bruni, TX. The main objective of the projec...

  3. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Wellman, TX, Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project in the City of Wellman, TX. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’ AD-33 media in remo...

  4. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media. U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Oak Manor Municipal Utility District at Alvin, TX. Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Oak Manor Municipal Utility District (MUD) facility in Alvin, TX. The objectives of the project were to evaluate 1) the effectiveness of a ...

  5. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Wellman, TX, Six-Month Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project in the City of Wellman, TX. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technolog...

  6. Registration of high-oleic peanut germplasm line ARSOK-S1 (TX996784) with enhanced resistance to Sclerotinia blight and pod rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high oleic Spanish peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. fastigiata var. vulgaris) germplasm line ARSOK-S1 was developed cooperatively between the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Texas AgriLife Research, and Oklahoma State University, and was released in 2013. ARSOK-S1 (tested early as TX99678...

  7. Discovery and characterisation of a novel toxin from Dendroaspis angusticeps, named Tx7335, that activates the potassium channel KcsA

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, Iván O.; Jin, Tony B.; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T.; Poget, Sébastien F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their central role in essential physiological processes, potassium channels are common targets for animal toxins. These toxins in turn are of great value as tools for studying channel function and as lead compounds for drug development. Here, we used a direct toxin pull-down assay with immobilised KcsA potassium channel to isolate a novel KcsA-binding toxin (called Tx7335) from eastern green mamba snake (Dendroaspis angusticeps) venom. Sequencing of the toxin by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry revealed a 63 amino acid residue peptide with 4 disulphide bonds that belongs to the three-finger toxin family, but with a unique modification of its disulphide-bridge scaffold. The toxin induces a dose-dependent increase in both open probabilities and mean open times on KcsA in artificial bilayers. Thus, it unexpectedly behaves as a channel activator rather than an inhibitor. A charybdotoxin-sensitive mutant of KcsA exhibits similar susceptibility to Tx7335 as wild-type, indicating that the binding site for Tx7335 is distinct from that of canonical pore-blocker toxins. Based on the extracellular location of the toxin binding site (far away from the intracellular pH gate), we propose that Tx7335 increases potassium flow through KcsA by allosterically reducing inactivation of the channel. PMID:27044983

  8. Discovery and characterisation of a novel toxin from Dendroaspis angusticeps, named Tx7335, that activates the potassium channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Iván O; Jin, Tony B; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T; Poget, Sébastien F

    2016-01-01

    Due to their central role in essential physiological processes, potassium channels are common targets for animal toxins. These toxins in turn are of great value as tools for studying channel function and as lead compounds for drug development. Here, we used a direct toxin pull-down assay with immobilised KcsA potassium channel to isolate a novel KcsA-binding toxin (called Tx7335) from eastern green mamba snake (Dendroaspis angusticeps) venom. Sequencing of the toxin by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry revealed a 63 amino acid residue peptide with 4 disulphide bonds that belongs to the three-finger toxin family, but with a unique modification of its disulphide-bridge scaffold. The toxin induces a dose-dependent increase in both open probabilities and mean open times on KcsA in artificial bilayers. Thus, it unexpectedly behaves as a channel activator rather than an inhibitor. A charybdotoxin-sensitive mutant of KcsA exhibits similar susceptibility to Tx7335 as wild-type, indicating that the binding site for Tx7335 is distinct from that of canonical pore-blocker toxins. Based on the extracellular location of the toxin binding site (far away from the intracellular pH gate), we propose that Tx7335 increases potassium flow through KcsA by allosterically reducing inactivation of the channel. PMID:27044983

  9. 75 FR 43564 - TA-W-71,483, Continental Airlines, Inc., Reservations Division, Houston, TX; TA-W-71,483A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... Register on May 20, 2010 (75 FR 28301). Workers of Continental Airlines, Inc., Reservations Division are... Employment and Training Administration TA-W-71,483, Continental Airlines, Inc., Reservations Division, Houston, TX; TA-W-71,483A, Continental Airlines, Inc., Reservations Division, Tampa, FL;...

  10. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li2(Li1–xTx)N (T = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-11

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li2(Li1–xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane→easy axis→easy plane→easy axis when progressing from T = Mn → Fe → Co → Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.more » As a result, the calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.« less

  11. Interaction of gums (guar, carboxymethylhydroxypropyl guar, diutan, and xanthan) with surfactants (DTAB, CTAB, and TX-100) in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Indrajyoti; Sarkar, Diptabhas; Moulik, Satya P

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of surfactants dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and p-tert-octylphenoxypolyoxyethylene (9.5) ether (TX-100) with guar (Gr), carboxymethylhydroxypropyl guar (CMHPG), diutan (Dn), and xanthan (Xn) gums has been studied employing conductometry, tensiometry, microcalorimetry, viscometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Both weak and strong interactions were observed. CTAB interacted stronger than DTAB with the gums. The surfactant-gum interaction process was enhanced by the presence of borate ions in the solution; the borate ion itself also manifested interaction with the surfactants comparable with that of water-soluble polymers polyvinyl alcohol, polyoxyethylene, and so forth. Viscometric results supported configurational changes of the gum molecules by interaction with surfactants. The geometry of the pure gums and their CTAB interacted products in the dried states was ascertained from AFM measurements; spherical and prolate shapes were observed for pure gums, and distorted states were observed for their surfactant complexed species. Detailed topological features of these entities were ascertained.

  12. 2004 Initial Assessments for the T and TX TY Tank Farm Field Investigation Report (FIR): Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Waichler, Scott R.

    2004-09-24

    In support of CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.’s (CHG) preparation of a Field Investigative Report (FIR) for the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) T and TX-TY, a suite of numerical simulations of flow and solute transport was executed using the STOMP code to predict the performance of surface barriers for reducing long-term risks from potential groundwater contamination at the T and TX-TY WMA. The scope and parametric data for these simulations were defined by a modeling data package provided by CHG. This report documents the simulation involving 2-D cross sections through the T Tank and the TX-TY Tank Farm. Eight cases were carried out for the cross sections to simulate the effects of interim barrier, water line leak, inventory distribution, and surface recharge on water flow and the transport of long-lived radionuclides (i.e., technecium-99 and uranium) and chemicals (i.e., nitrate and chromium For simulations with barriers, it is assumed that an interim barrier is in place by the year 2010. It was also assumed that, for all simulations, as part of tank farm closure, a closure barrier was in place by the year 2040. The modeling considers the estimated inventories of contaminants within the vadose zone and calculates the associated risk. It assumes that no tanks will leak in the future. Initial conditions for contaminant concentration are provided as part of inventory estimates for uranium, technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium. For moisture flow modeling, Neumann boundary conditions are prescribed at the surface with the flux equal to the recharge rate estimate. For transport modeling, a zero flux boundary is prescribed at the surface for uranium, technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium. The western and eastern boundaries are assigned no-flux boundaries for both flow and transport. The water table boundary is prescribed by water table elevations and the unconfined aquifer hydraulic gradient. No-flux boundaries are used for the lower boundary

  13. Results of Phase I groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank waste management areas T and TX-TY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, F.N.

    1998-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Phase I, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment for the Richland Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-RL) under the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (WMAs) T and TX-TY have impacted groundwater quality. Waste Management Areas T and TX-TY, located in the northern part of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, contain the 241-T, 241-TX, and 241-TY tank farms and ancillary waste systems. These two units are regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations (under 40 CFR 265.93) and were placed in assessment groundwater monitoring because of elevated specific conductance in downgradient wells. Anomalous concentrations of technetium-99, chromium, nitrate, iodine-129, and cobalt-60 also were observed in some downgradient wells. Phase I assessment, allowed under 40 CFR 265, provides the owner-operator of a facility with the opportunity to show that the observed contamination has a source other than the regulated unit. For this Phase I assessment, PNNL evaluated available information on groundwater chemistry and past waste management practices in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY. Background contaminant concentrations in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY are the result of several overlapping contaminant plumes resulting from past-practice waste disposal operations. This background has been used as baseline for determining potential WMA impacts on groundwater.

  14. The effect of water on the microstructure of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate/TX-100/benzene ionic liquid microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan'an; Li, Na; Zheng, Liqiang; Zhao, Xueyan; Zhang, Jin; Cao, Quan; Zhao, Mingwei; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Gaoyong

    2007-01-01

    The ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF4]) forms nonaqueous microemulsions with benzene with the aid of nonionic surfactant TX-100. The phase diagram of the ternary system was prepared, and the microstructures of the microemulsion were recognized. On the basis of the phase diagram, a series of ionic liquid-in-oil (IL/O) microemulsions were chosen and characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), which shows a similar swelling behavior to typical water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions. The existence of IL pools in the IL/O microemulsion was confirmed by UV/Vis spectroscopic analysis with CoCl2 and methylene blue (MB) as the absorption probes. A constant polarity of the IL pool is observed, even if small amounts of water are added to the microemulsion, thus suggesting that the water molecules are solubilized in the polar outer shell of the microemulsion, as confirmed by FTIR spectra. 1H NMR spectroscopic analysis shows that these water molecules interact with the electronegative oxygen atoms of the oxyethylene (OE) units of TX-100 through hydrogen-bonding interactions, and the electronegative oxygen atoms of the water molecules attract the electropositive imidazolium rings of [bmim][BF4]. Hence, the water molecules are like a glue that stick the IL and OE units more tightly together and thus make the microemulsion system more stable. Considering the unique solubilization behavior of added water molecules, the IL/O microemulsion system may be used as a medium to prepare porous or hollow nanomaterials by hydrolysis reactions. PMID:17177215

  15. Role of solubilized water in the reverse ionic liquid microemulsion of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate/TX-100/benzene.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan'an; Li, Na; Zheng, Liqiang; Bai, Xiangtao; Yu, Li; Zhao, Xueyan; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Mingwei; Li, Zhen

    2007-03-15

    The ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF4) can form nonaqueous microemulsions with benzene by the aid of nonionic surfactant TX-100. The effect of water on ionic liquid-in-oil (IL/O) microemulsions was studied, and it was shown that the addition of small amount of water to the IL microemulsion contributed to the stability of microemulsion and thus increased the amount of solubilized bmimBF4 in the microemulsion. The conductivity measurements also showed that the attractive interactions between IL microdroplets were weakened, that is, the IL/O microemulsion becomes more stable in the present of some water. Fourier transform IR was carried out to analyze the states of the added water, and the result showed that these water molecules mainly behaved as bound water and trapped water, indicating that the water molecules are located in the palisade layers of the IL/O microemulsion. Furthermore, 1H NMR and 19F NMR spectra suggested that the added water molecules built the hydrogen binding network of imidazolium cations and H2O, BF4- anion and H2O, and at the same time the electronegative oxygen atoms of the oxyethylene units of TX-100 and water in the palisade layers, which made the palisade layers more firm and thus increased the stability of the microemulsion. The study can help in further understanding the formation mechanism of microemulsions. In addition, the characteristic solubilization behavior of the added water can provide an aqueous interface film for hydrolysis reactions and therefore may be used as an ideal medium to prepare porous or hollow nanomaterials. PMID:17305388

  16. Expression of p13MTCP1 is restricted to mature T-cell proliferations with t(X;14) translocations.

    PubMed

    Madani, A; Choukroun, V; Soulier, J; Cacheux, V; Claisse, J F; Valensi, F; Daliphard, S; Cazin, B; Levy, V; Leblond, V; Daniel, M T; Sigaux, F; Stern, M H

    1996-03-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL), a rare form of mature T-cell leukemias, and ataxia telangiectasia clonal proliferation, a related condition occurring in patients suffering from ataxia telangiectasia, have been associated to translocations involving the 14q32.1 or Xq28 regions, where are located the TCL1 and MTCP1 putative oncogenes, respectively. The MTCP1 gene is involved in the t(X;14)(q28;q11) translocation associated with these T-cell proliferations. Alternative splicing generates type A and B transcripts that potentially encode two entirely distinct proteins; type A transcripts code for a small mitochondrial protein, p8MTCP1, and type B transcripts, containing an additional open reading frame, may code for 107 amino-acid protein, p13MTCP1. The recently cloned TCL1 gene, also involved in translocations and inversions associated with T-cell proliferations, codes for a 14-kD protein that displays significant homology with p13MTCP1. We have generated rabbit antisera against this putative p13MTCP1 protein and screened for expression of p13MTCP1 normal lymphoid tissues and 33 cases of immature and mature lymphoid T-cell proliferations using a sensitive Western blot assay. We also investigated the MTCP1 locus configuration by Southern blot analysis. The p13MTCP1 protein was detected in the three T-cell proliferations with MTCP1 rearrangements because of t(X;14) translocations, but neither in normal resting and activated lymphocytes nor in the other T-cell leukemias. Our data support the hypothesis that p13MTCP1 and p14TCL1 form a new protein family that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of T-PLL and related conditions.

  17. Interaction of Tarantula Venom Peptide ProTx-II with Lipid Membranes Is a Prerequisite for Its Inhibition of Human Voltage-gated Sodium Channel NaV1.7.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Deplazes, Evelyne; Lawrence, Nicole; Cheneval, Olivier; Chaousis, Stephanie; Inserra, Marco; Thongyoo, Panumart; King, Glenn F; Mark, Alan E; Vetter, Irina; Craik, David J; Schroeder, Christina I

    2016-08-12

    ProTx-II is a disulfide-rich peptide toxin from tarantula venom able to inhibit the human voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 (hNaV1.7), a channel reported to be involved in nociception, and thus it might have potential as a pain therapeutic. ProTx-II acts by binding to the membrane-embedded voltage sensor domain of hNaV1.7, but the precise peptide channel-binding site and the importance of membrane binding on the inhibitory activity of ProTx-II remain unknown. In this study, we examined the structure and membrane-binding properties of ProTx-II and several analogues using NMR spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show a direct correlation between ProTx-II membrane binding affinity and its potency as an hNaV1.7 channel inhibitor. The data support a model whereby a hydrophobic patch on the ProTx-II surface anchors the molecule at the cell surface in a position that optimizes interaction of the peptide with the binding site on the voltage sensor domain. This is the first study to demonstrate that binding of ProTx-II to the lipid membrane is directly linked to its potency as an hNaV1.7 channel inhibitor. PMID:27311819

  18. Public Forum Before the Committee on Urban Indians in L.A., Calif. (Dec. 16-17, 1968); Dallas, Tex. (Feb. 13-14, 1969); Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. (Mar. 18-19, 1969); San Francisco, Calif. (Apr. 11-12, 1968); Phoenix, Ariz. (Apr. 17-18, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Indian Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of public forums of the National Council of Indian Opportunity are recorded in these 5 documents. These forums were designed to gain information on the condition of urban American Indians living in Los Angeles, Minneapolis-St. Paul, San Francisco, Dallas, and Phoenix. Included in each of the documents are discussions on such…

  19. Differential effects of the recombinant toxin PnTx4(5-5) from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer on mammalian and insect sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Ana L B; Matavel, Alessandra; Peigneur, Steve; Cordeiro, Marta N; Tytgat, Jan; Diniz, Marcelo R V; de Lima, Maria Elena

    2016-02-01

    The toxin PnTx4(5-5) from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer is extremely toxic/lethal to insects but has no macroscopic behavioral effects observed in mice after intracerebral injection. Nevertheless, it was demonstrated that it inhibits the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) - subtype of glutamate receptors of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. PnTx4(5-5) has 63% identity to PnTx4(6-1), another insecticidal toxin from P. nigriventer, which can slow down the sodium current inactivation in insect central nervous system, but has no effect on Nav1.2 and Nav1.4 rat sodium channels. Here, we have cloned and heterologous expressed the toxin PnTx4(5-5) in Escherichia coli. The recombinant toxin rPnTx4(5-5) was tested on the sodium channel NavBg from the cockroach Blatella germanica and on mammalian sodium channels Nav1.2-1.6, all expressed in Xenopus leavis oocytes. We showed that the toxin has different affinity and mode of action on insect and mammalian sodium channels. The most remarkable effect was on NavBg, where rPnTx4(5-5) strongly slowed down channel inactivation (EC50 = 212.5 nM), and at 1 μM caused an increase on current peak amplitude of 105.2 ± 3.1%. Interestingly, the toxin also inhibited sodium current on all the mammalian channels tested, with the higher current inhibition on Nav1.3 (38.43 ± 8.04%, IC50 = 1.5 μM). Analysis of activation curves on Nav1.3 and Nav1.5 showed that the toxin shifts channel activation to more depolarized potentials, which can explain the sodium current inhibition. Furthermore, the toxin also slightly slowed down sodium inactivation on Nav1.3 and Nav1.6 channels. As far as we know, this is the first araneomorph toxin described which can shift the sodium channel activation to more depolarized potentials and also slows down channel inactivation.

  20. Successful practices in title III implementation. Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Technical Assistance Bulletin. Cameron County, Texas; Bucks County, Pennsylvania; Harford County, Maryland; Dallas County, Texas. Series 6, Number 7

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This is another in a series of bulletins EPA is issuing to provide examples of implementation programs and strategies of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, known as Title III, that are innovative or have proven effective. The purpose of these bulletins is to share information on successful practices with Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs), State Emergency Response Commissions (SERCs), fire departments, and other Title III implementing agencies throughout the country in the hope that such information will prove useful to other SERCs and LEPCs as their programs develop and evolve. The bulletin discusses Title III implementation for Cameron County in Texas, Bucks County in Pennsylvania, Harford County in Maryland, and Dallas County in Texas.

  1. Linear DNA for rapid prototyping of synthetic biological circuits in an Escherichia coli based TX-TL cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zachary Z; Yeung, Enoch; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Noireaux, Vincent; Murray, Richard M

    2014-06-20

    Accelerating the pace of synthetic biology experiments requires new approaches for rapid prototyping of circuits from individual DNA regulatory elements. However, current testing standards require days to weeks due to cloning and in vivo transformation. In this work, we first characterized methods to protect linear DNA strands from exonuclease degradation in an Escherichia coli based transcription-translation cell-free system (TX-TL), as well as mechanisms of degradation. This enabled the use of linear DNA PCR products in TX-TL. We then compared expression levels and binding dynamics of different promoters on linear DNA and plasmid DNA. We also demonstrated assembly technology to rapidly build circuits entirely in vitro from separate parts. Using this strategy, we prototyped a four component genetic switch in under 8 h entirely in vitro. Rapid in vitro assembly has future applications for prototyping multiple component circuits if combined with predictive computational models.

  2. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-TX-111: Results from samples collected on October 12, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-TX-111 (Tank TX-111) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5069. Samples were collected by WHC on October 12, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  3. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-TX-105: Results from samples collected on December 20, 1994. Waste Tank Vapor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Ligotke, M.W.; Lucke, R.B.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-TX-105. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text.

  4. Borehole Data Package for Calendar Year 2000-2001 RCRA Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Hodges, Floyd N.

    2001-08-15

    This document compiles information on the drilling and construction, well development, pump installation, and sediment and groundwater sampling applicable to the installation of five new RCRA wells in calendar year 2000 - 2001 at WMA TX-TY. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), the Well Construction Summary Reports, and the geologist's logs; Appendix B contains physical properties data; and Appendix C contains the borehole geophysical logs.

  5. t(X;14)(p11.4;q32.33) is recurrent in marginal zone lymphoma and up-regulates GPR34

    PubMed Central

    Baens, Mathijs; Finalet Ferreiro, Julio; Tousseyn, Thomas; Urbankova, Helena; Michaux, Lucienne; de Leval, Laurence; Dierickx, Daan; Wolter, Pascal; Sagaert, Xavier; Vandenberghe, Peter; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Wlodarska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    Genetic events underlying pathogenesis of nodal and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma are not completely understood. We report here a novel t(X;14)(p11.4;q32.33) identified in 4 lymphoma cases: 2 with a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, one with a nodal marginal zone lymphoma and one with gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In all cases, lymphoma evolved from a previous auto-immune disorder. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and molecular studies showed that t(X;14), which is mediated by immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, targets the GPR34 gene at Xp11.4. Upregulation of GPR34 mRNA and aberrant expression of GPR34 protein has been demonstrated in 3 presented cases by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. GPR34 belongs to the largest family of cell surface molecules involved in signal transmission that play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. Although functional consequences of t(X;14) have not been identified, our studies suggest that up-regulated GPR34 activate neither nuclear factor-κB nor ELK-related tyrosine kinase. PMID:22058210

  6. t(X;14)(p11.4;q32.33) is recurrent in marginal zone lymphoma and up-regulates GPR34.

    PubMed

    Baens, Mathijs; Finalet Ferreiro, Julio; Tousseyn, Thomas; Urbankova, Helena; Michaux, Lucienne; de Leval, Laurence; Dierickx, Daan; Wolter, Pascal; Sagaert, Xavier; Vandenberghe, Peter; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Wlodarska, Iwona

    2012-02-01

    Genetic events underlying pathogenesis of nodal and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma are not completely understood. We report here a novel t(X;14)(p11.4;q32.33) identified in 4 lymphoma cases: 2 with a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, one with a nodal marginal zone lymphoma and one with gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In all cases, lymphoma evolved from a previous auto-immune disorder. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and molecular studies showed that t(X;14), which is mediated by immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, targets the GPR34 gene at Xp11.4. Upregulation of GPR34 mRNA and aberrant expression of GPR34 protein has been demonstrated in 3 presented cases by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. GPR34 belongs to the largest family of cell surface molecules involved in signal transmission that play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. Although functional consequences of t(X;14) have not been identified, our studies suggest that up-regulated GPR34 activate neither nuclear factor-κB nor ELK-related tyrosine kinase. PMID:22058210

  7. Engineering potent and selective analogues of GpTx-1, a tarantula venom peptide antagonist of the Na(V)1.7 sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Zou, Anruo; Poppe, Leszek; Li, Hongyan; Andrews, Kristin L; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Favreau, Philippe; Stöcklin, Reto; Miranda, Les P

    2015-03-12

    NaV1.7 is a voltage-gated sodium ion channel implicated by human genetic evidence as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Screening fractionated venom from the tarantula Grammostola porteri led to the identification of a 34-residue peptide, termed GpTx-1, with potent activity on NaV1.7 (IC50 = 10 nM) and promising selectivity against key NaV subtypes (20× and 1000× over NaV1.4 and NaV1.5, respectively). NMR structural analysis of the chemically synthesized three disulfide peptide was consistent with an inhibitory cystine knot motif. Alanine scanning of GpTx-1 revealed that residues Trp(29), Lys(31), and Phe(34) near the C-terminus are critical for potent NaV1.7 antagonist activity. Substitution of Ala for Phe at position 5 conferred 300-fold selectivity against NaV1.4. A structure-guided campaign afforded additive improvements in potency and NaV subtype selectivity, culminating in the design of [Ala5,Phe6,Leu26,Arg28]GpTx-1 with a NaV1.7 IC50 value of 1.6 nM and >1000× selectivity against NaV1.4 and NaV1.5.

  8. Intermediate valence to heavy fermion through a quantum phase transition in Yb3(Rh 1 -xTx )4Ge13 (T =Co ,Ir ) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Binod K.; Oswald, Iain W. H.; Chan, Julia Y.; Morosan, E.

    2016-01-01

    Single crystals of Yb3(Rh 1 -xTx )4Ge13 (T =Co ,Ir ) have been grown using the self-flux method. Powder x-ray diffraction data on these compounds are consistent with the cubic structure with space group P m 3 ¯n . Intermediate-valence behavior is observed in Yb3(Rh 1 -xTx )4Ge13 upon T = Co doping, while T = Ir doping drives the system into a heavy-fermion state. Antiferromagnetic order is observed in the Ir-doped samples Yb3(Rh 1 -xTx )4Ge13 for 0.5

  9. Intermediate valence to heavy fermion through a quantum phase transition in Yb3(Rh1-xTx)4Ge13 (T = Co, Ir) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Binod; Morosan, Emilia

    Single crystals of Yb3(Rh1-x Tx)4Ge13 (T = Co, Ir) have been grown using the self-flux method. Powder X-ray diffraction data on these compounds are consistent with the cubic structure with space group Pm 3 n . Intermediate valence behavior is observed in Yb3(Rh1-x Tx)4Ge13 upon T = Co doping, while T = Ir doping drives the system into a heavy fermion state. Antiferromagnetic order is observed in the Ir-doped samples Yb3(Rh1-x Tx)4Ge13 for 0.5 < x <= 1 with TN = 0.96 K for Yb3Ir4Ge13. With decreasing x, the magnetic order is suppressed towards a quantum critical point around xc = 0.5, accompanied by non-Fermi liquid behavior evidenced by logarithmic divergence of the specific heat and linear temperature dependence of the resistivity. The Fermi liquid behavior is recovered with the application of large magnetic fields. Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation EPiQS initiative through Grant GBMF4417 and Welch Foundation.

  10. Engineering potent and selective analogues of GpTx-1, a tarantula venom peptide antagonist of the Na(V)1.7 sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Zou, Anruo; Poppe, Leszek; Li, Hongyan; Andrews, Kristin L; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Favreau, Philippe; Stöcklin, Reto; Miranda, Les P

    2015-03-12

    NaV1.7 is a voltage-gated sodium ion channel implicated by human genetic evidence as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Screening fractionated venom from the tarantula Grammostola porteri led to the identification of a 34-residue peptide, termed GpTx-1, with potent activity on NaV1.7 (IC50 = 10 nM) and promising selectivity against key NaV subtypes (20× and 1000× over NaV1.4 and NaV1.5, respectively). NMR structural analysis of the chemically synthesized three disulfide peptide was consistent with an inhibitory cystine knot motif. Alanine scanning of GpTx-1 revealed that residues Trp(29), Lys(31), and Phe(34) near the C-terminus are critical for potent NaV1.7 antagonist activity. Substitution of Ala for Phe at position 5 conferred 300-fold selectivity against NaV1.4. A structure-guided campaign afforded additive improvements in potency and NaV subtype selectivity, culminating in the design of [Ala5,Phe6,Leu26,Arg28]GpTx-1 with a NaV1.7 IC50 value of 1.6 nM and >1000× selectivity against NaV1.4 and NaV1.5. PMID:25658507

  11. Recombinant production and solution structure of PcTx1, the specific peptide inhibitor of ASIC1a proton-gated cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Escoubas, Pierre; Bernard, Cédric; Lambeau, Gérard; Lazdunski, Michel; Darbon, Hervé

    2003-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are thought to be important ion channels, particularly for the perception of pain. Some of them may also contribute to synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1), the first potent and specific blocker of the ASIC1a proton-sensing channel, has been successfully expressed in the Drosophila melanogaster S2 cell recombinant expression system used here for the first time to produce a spider toxin. The recombinant toxin was identical in all respects to the native peptide, and its three-dimensional structure in solution was determined by means of 1H 2D NMR spectroscopy. Surface characteristics of PcTx1 provide insights on key structural elements involved in the binding of PcTx1 to ASIC1a channels. They appear to be localized in the β-sheet and the β-turn linking the strands, as indicated by electrostatic anisotropy calculations, surface charge distribution, and the presence of residues known to be implicated in channel recognition by other inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) toxins. PMID:12824480

  12. Microemulsions with surfactant TX100, cyclohexane, and an ionic liquid investigated by conductance, DLS, FTIR measurements, and study of solvent and rotational relaxation within this microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Rajib; Sarkar, Souravi; Ghatak, Chiranjib; Rao, Vishal Govind; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2010-06-10

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propyl ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide ([N(3111)][Tf(2)N]), were substituted for polar water and formed nonaqueous microemulsions with cyclohexane by the aid of nonionic surfactant TX-100. The phase behavior of the ternary system was investigated, and microregions of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N]-in-cyclohexane (IL/O), bicontinuous, and cyclohexane-in-[N(3111)][Tf(2)N] (O/IL) were identified by traditional electrical conductivity measurements. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed the formation of the IL microemulsions. The FTIR study of O-H stretching band of TX100 also supports this finding. The dynamics of solvent and rotational relaxation have been investigated in [N(3111)][Tf(2)N]/TX100/cyclohexane microemulsions using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool and coumarin 480 (C-480) as a fluorescence probe. The size of the microemulsions increases with gradual addition of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N], which revealed from DLS measurement. This leads to the faster collective motions of cation and anions of [N(3111)][Tf(2)N], which contributes to faster solvent relaxation in microemulsions. PMID:20469906

  13. Impacts of Near-term Climate Change on Surface Water - Groundwater Availability in the Nueces River basin, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, T.; Kumar, M.

    2014-12-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, sustainability of surface water and groundwater resources is highly uncertain in the face of climate change as well as under competing demands due to urbanization, population growth and water needs to support ecosystem services. Most studies on climate change impact assessment focus on either surface water or groundwater resources alone. In this study, we utilize a fully coupled surface water and groundwater model, Penn-State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM), and recent climate change projections from Climate Models Inter-comparison Project-5 (CMIP5) to evaluate impacts of near-term climate change on water availability in the Nueces River basin, TX. After performing calibration and validation of PIHM over multiple sites, hindcast simulations will be performed over the 1981-2010 period using data from multiple General Circulation Models (GCMs) obtained from the CMIP5 Project. The results will be compared to the observed data to understand added utility of hindcasts in improving the estimation of surface water and groundwater resources. Finally, we will assess the impacts of climate change on both surface water and groundwater resources over the next 20-30 years, which is a relevant time period for water management decisions.

  14. Comparative palynology of clastics and lignites from the Manning Formation, Jackson Group, Upper Eocene, Grimes County, TX

    SciTech Connect

    Gennett, J.A.

    1996-09-01

    The 3500 lignite seam at the Gibbons Creek Mine in Grimes County, TX was sampled for pollen and spores at 10 cm intervals. The majority of samples are dominated (to 60%) by Momipites from the Juglandaceae (walnut family), as is typical of Jackson Group sediments. Other palynomorph taxa vary systematically, with a peak of pollen of the freshwater tree Nyssa (blackgum) and associated Rboipites angustus (to 17%) occurring at the base. Higher in the seam, increase (to 55%) of Cupuliferoipollenites (a chestnut-like grain) and Cyrillaceae-pollenites? ventosus (to 7%) percentages may indicate a higher salinity environment. A Chrysophyllum (satin leaf) peak (to 25%) near the top of the seam suggests relatively shallow fresh-water conditions. Core samples from an interval above the lignites represent a transgressive-regressive cycle in inner shelf clastics. These samples were taken at 40 cm or greater intervals and reveal the regional pollen flora. Although minor changes occur, palynomorph spectra are for the most part homogenous. The dominant grain is again Momipites coryloides, but in general percentages are lower (to 35%). Cupuliferoipollenites (to 17%), Chrysophyllum (to 5%), and Rhoipites angustus (to 3%) are not less important, but do not peak as they do in the lignite spectra. Palm leaf megafossils; in one sample suggest a clastic wetland; in this sample palm pollen (mostly Arecipites, representing the modern saw palmetto) reaches 73%. Another sample contains high (26%) percentages of the fern spore Lygodiumsporites adriennis. High percentages of these two taxa do not occur in the lignite samples.

  15. Spread of vaccinia virus through shaving during military training, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, TX, June 2014.

    PubMed

    Webber, Bryant J; Montgomery, Jay R; Markelz, Ana E; Allen, Kahtonna C; Hunninghake, John C; Ritchie, Simon A; Pawlak, Mary T; Johnston, Lindsay A; Oliver, Tiffany A; Winterton, Brad S

    2014-08-01

    Although naturally occurring smallpox virus was officially declared eradicated in 1980, concern for biological warfare prompted the U.S. Government in 2002 to recommend smallpox vaccination for select individuals. Vaccinia, the smallpox vaccine virus, is administered into the skin, typically on the upper arm, where the virus remains viable and infectious until the scab falls off and the epidermis is fully intact - typically 2-4 weeks. Adverse events following smallpox vaccination may occur in the vaccinee, in individuals who have contact with the vaccinee (i.e., secondary transmission), or in individuals who have contact with the vaccinee's contact (i.e., tertiary transmission). In June 2014 at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, TX, two cases of inadvertent inoculation of vaccinia and one case of a non-viral reaction following vaccination occurred in the security forces training squadron. This includes the first reported case of shaving as the likely source of autoinoculation after contact transmission. This paper describes the diagnosis and treatment of these cases, the outbreak investigation, and steps taken to prevent future transmission.

  16. Impact of Sea Level Rise on the Attenuation of Hurricane Storm Surge by Wetlands in Corpus Christi, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C.; Irish, J. L.; Olivera, F.

    2011-12-01

    Celso Ferreira1, Jennifer L. Irish2, Francisco Olivera3 1 Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, email: celsoferreira@tamu.edu. 2 Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, email: jirish@vt.edu 3 Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, email: folivera@civil.tamu.edu. Texas has historically faced severe hurricanes with Ike being the most recent major storm example. It is believed that coastal wetlands might reduce the impact of the storm surge on coastal areas, acting as a natural protection against hurricane flooding, especially for small hurricanes and tropical storms. Considering the expected rise in the mean sea level, wetland composition and spatial distribution are also expected to change as the environmental conditions change along the coast. We analyzed a range of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projections for sea level rise (SLR) to simulate wetland alterations and evaluate their impact on hurricane storm surge. The analyses was conducted for Corpus Christi Bay using a pre-validated, physically based, hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC) and a wind and pressure field model (PBL) representing the physical properties of historical hurricane Bret. The calculations were performed using an unstructured numerical grid with 3.3 million nodes covering part of the Atlantic Ocean and the entire Gulf of Mexico (resolution from 2000 km to 50 meters at the coast). Wetlands are represented in the numerical model through their influence on the frictional resistance proprieties and bathymetric changes. To characterize the wetland types and their spatial distribution along the coast, we used six different land use databases from the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) (1992, 2001), the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) (1993) and the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C

  17. Focalyx Dx, Bx, Tx et Apps: A novel contemporary fusion paradigm for the management of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bianco, F J; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2016-07-01

    FocalyxTM conceived as a response to emerging evidence data across numerous cancer lesions that questions current standard treatment approaches that too often lead to detrimental quality of life yet delivering limited survival benefit, especially in-lieu of advances in imaging technology applicable to cancer patients. The Focalyx paradigm aims to control cancer with improvement in quality of life. We initially devised 5 milestones: 1- Consistently optimize Prostate MRI imaging using the novel published protocols adopted as guidelines by societies such as the European Society of Urology and Radiology; 2- Evaluate fusion platform software solutions that existed; 3- Determine best fusión platform for Focalyx on practicality, precision, and workflow premises; 4- Evaluate commercially available FDA approved ablative technologies to implement our treatment vision; 5- Design a treatment option that can be performed in the office setting under local anesthesia, which would not impact negatively QOL outcomes of Prostate Cancer patients and seamless constant nonintrusive practical patient-physician interaction by the Focalyx app that facilitates follow up and provides early warning signals shall any change in the disease dynamics emerge. Prostate cancer was identified as the pilot disease for Focalyx to deliver a "GPS" like solution for the prostate gland that destroys identifiable disease without adverse effects such as: cancer anxiety, urinary incontinence, loss of erections and ejaculation. Since September of 2013, over 300 men have been accrued in NCT02381990- clintrials.gov evaluating the feasibility of our solutions for imaging (FocalyxDx), Biopsy (FocalyxBx) and Treatment (FocalyxTx). In this review we detail the tools available to achieve the Focalyx paradigm for men with Prostate Cancer. PMID:27416639

  18. Integrating Infrastructure-Relevant Climate Projections into City Planning: Learning from Boulder CO, Austin TX and Washington DC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, A. M. K.; Hayhoe, K.

    2015-12-01

    Over the coming century, climate change has the potential to impact infrastructure in many different ways, particularly in population-dense areas that depend on transportation and built environments. Many of these impacts may occur via changes in the frequency and magnitude of extremes: high and low temperature, heat waves, precipitation, coastal flooding, and storm events. Having a better idea of how the climate might change locally, both within the near future as well as toward the end of the century, can give city planners and engineers guidance when designing new structures and when repairing and fortifying existing components of buildings, bridges, highways, sewers, ports, etc. However, the type of event and the amount of damages that may be incurred are often highly specific to a given location. Over the last 10 years, we have worked with a broad range of cities, states, non-profit organizations, and federal agencies to integrate climate projections into ongoing resiliency, sustainability, and management processes. Drawing on that experience, we describe the broad steps in assimilating climate information into existing decision-making frameworks relevant to most applications, as well as highlighting many of the unique aspects of these analyses using examples from our most recent work with three very different cities - Austin TX, Boulder CO and Washington DC. From initial conversations with local experts to identify relevant thresholds to final integration of projected changes into the planning processes of these cities, these case studies highlight the utility of including future climate projections into infrastructure planning, the challenges to doing so, and the over-arching importance of communication and interaction between infrastructure experts, engineers, and scientists.

  19. Lanthanum and lanthanides in atmospheric fine particles and their apportionment to refinery and petrochemical operations in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Pranav; Chellam, Shankararaman; Fraser, Matthew P.

    A study was conducted in Houston, TX focusing on rare earth elements (REEs) in atmospheric fine particles and their sources. PM 2.5 samples were collected from an ambient air quality monitoring site (HRM3) located in the proximity of a large number of oil refineries and petrochemical industries to estimate the potential contributions of emissions from fluidized-bed catalytic cracking operations to ambient fine particulate matter. The elemental composition of ambient PM 2.5, several commercially available zeolite catalysts, and local soil was measured after microwave assisted acid digestion using inductively coupled plasma—mass spectrometry. Source identification and apportionment was performed by principal component factor analysis (PCFA) in combination with multiple linear regression. REE relative abundance sequence, ratios of La to light REEs (Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm), and enrichment factor analysis indicated that refining and petrochemical cat cracking operations were predominantly responsible for REE enrichment in ambient fine particles. PCFA yielded five physically meaningful PM 2.5 sources: cat cracking operations, a source predominantly comprised of crustal material, industrial high temperature operations, oil combustion, and sea spray. These five sources accounted for 82% of the total mass of atmospheric fine particles (less carbon and sulfate). Factor analysis confirmed that emissions from cat cracking operations primarily contributed to REE enrichment in PM 2.5 even though they comprised only 2.0% of the apportioned mass. Results from this study demonstrate the need to characterize catalysts employed in the vicinity of the sampling stations to accurately determine local sources of atmospheric REEs.

  20. Resolving the structure of Ti3C2Tx MXenes through multilevel structural modeling of the atomic pair distribution function

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wesolowski, David J.; Wang, Hsiu -Wen; Page, Katharine L.; Naguib, Michael; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-12-08

    MXenes are a recently discovered family of two-dimensional (2D) early transition metal carbides and carbonitrides, which have already shown many attractive properties and a great promise in energy storage and many other applications. However, a complex surface chemistry and small coherence length has been an obstacle in some applications of MXenes, also limiting accuracy of predictions of their properties. In this study, we describe and benchmark a novel way of modeling layered materials with real interfaces (diverse surface functional groups and stacking order between the adjacent monolayers) against experimental data. The structures of three kinds of Ti3C2Tx MXenes (T standsmore » for surface terminating species, including O, OH, and F) produced under different synthesis conditions were resolved for the first time using atomic pair distribution function obtained by high-quality neutron total scattering. The true nature of the material can be easily captured with the sensitivity of neutron scattering to the surface species of interest and the detailed third-generation structure model we present. The modeling approach leads to new understanding of MXene structural properties and can replace the currently used idealized models in predictions of a variety of physical, chemical and functional properties of Ti3C2-based MXenes. Furthermore, the developed models can be employed to guide the design of new MXene materials with selected surface termination and controlled contact angle, catalytic, optical, electrochemical and other properties. We suggest that the multi-level structural modeling should form the basis for a generalized methodology on modeling diffraction and pair distribution function data for 2D and layered materials.« less

  1. Focalyx Dx, Bx, Tx et Apps: A novel contemporary fusion paradigm for the management of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bianco, F J; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2016-07-01

    FocalyxTM conceived as a response to emerging evidence data across numerous cancer lesions that questions current standard treatment approaches that too often lead to detrimental quality of life yet delivering limited survival benefit, especially in-lieu of advances in imaging technology applicable to cancer patients. The Focalyx paradigm aims to control cancer with improvement in quality of life. We initially devised 5 milestones: 1- Consistently optimize Prostate MRI imaging using the novel published protocols adopted as guidelines by societies such as the European Society of Urology and Radiology; 2- Evaluate fusion platform software solutions that existed; 3- Determine best fusión platform for Focalyx on practicality, precision, and workflow premises; 4- Evaluate commercially available FDA approved ablative technologies to implement our treatment vision; 5- Design a treatment option that can be performed in the office setting under local anesthesia, which would not impact negatively QOL outcomes of Prostate Cancer patients and seamless constant nonintrusive practical patient-physician interaction by the Focalyx app that facilitates follow up and provides early warning signals shall any change in the disease dynamics emerge. Prostate cancer was identified as the pilot disease for Focalyx to deliver a "GPS" like solution for the prostate gland that destroys identifiable disease without adverse effects such as: cancer anxiety, urinary incontinence, loss of erections and ejaculation. Since September of 2013, over 300 men have been accrued in NCT02381990- clintrials.gov evaluating the feasibility of our solutions for imaging (FocalyxDx), Biopsy (FocalyxBx) and Treatment (FocalyxTx). In this review we detail the tools available to achieve the Focalyx paradigm for men with Prostate Cancer.

  2. Feasibility of using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation for IMRT dose calculations for the Novalis Tx with a HD-120 multi-leaf collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyunuk; Shin, Jungsuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Han, Youngyih; Kim, Jinsung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an independent dose verification system by using a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) conducted by using a Varian Novalis Tx (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) equipped with a highdefinition multi-leaf collimator (HD-120 MLC). The Geant4 framework was used to implement a dose calculation system that accurately predicted the delivered dose. For this purpose, the Novalis Tx Linac head was modeled according to the specifications acquired from the manufacturer. Subsequently, MC simulations were performed by varying the mean energy, energy spread, and electron spot radius to determine optimum values of irradiation with 6-MV X-ray beams by using the Novalis Tx system. Computed percentage depth dose curves (PDDs) and lateral profiles were compared to the measurements obtained by using an ionization chamber (CC13). To validate the IMRT simulation by using the MC model we developed, we calculated a simple IMRT field and compared the result with the EBT3 film measurements in a water-equivalent solid phantom. Clinical cases, such as prostate cancer treatment plans, were then selected, and MC simulations were performed. The accuracy of the simulation was assessed against the EBT3 film measurements by using a gamma-index criterion. The optimal MC model parameters to specify the beam characteristics were a 6.8-MeV mean energy, a 0.5-MeV energy spread, and a 3-mm electron radius. The accuracy of these parameters was determined by comparison of MC simulations with measurements. The PDDs and the lateral profiles of the MC simulation deviated from the measurements by 1% and 2%, respectively, on average. The computed simple MLC fields agreed with the EBT3 measurements with a 95% passing rate with 3%/3-mm gamma-index criterion. Additionally, in applying our model to clinical IMRT plans, we found that the MC calculations and the EBT3 measurements agreed well with a passing rate of greater

  3. SU-E-J-48: Imaging Origin-Radiation Isocenter Coincidence for Linac-Based SRS with Novalis Tx

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, C; Workie, D; Hasson, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To implement and evaluate an image-based Winston-Lutz (WL) test to measure the displacement between ExacTrac imaging origin and radiation isocenter on a Novalis Tx system using RIT V6.2 software analysis tools. Displacement between imaging and radiation isocenters was tracked over time. The method was applied for cone-based and MLC-based WL tests. Methods The Brainlab Winston-Lutz phantom was aligned to room lasers. The ExacTrac imaging system was then used to detect the Winston- Lutz phantom and obtain the displacement between the center of the phantom and the imaging origin. EPID images of the phantom were obtained at various gantry and couch angles and analyzed with RIT calculating the phantom center to radiation isocenter displacement. The RIT and Exactrac displacements were combined to calculate the displacement between imaging origin and radiation isocenter. Results were tracked over time. Results Mean displacements between ExacTrac origin and radiation isocenter were: VRT: −0.1mm ± 0.3mm, LNG: 0.5mm ± 0.2mm, LAT: 0.2mm ± 0.2mm (vector magnitude of 0.7 ± 0.2mm). Radiation isocenter was characterized by the mean of the standard deviations of the WL phantom displacements: σVRT: 0.2mm, σLNG: 0.4mm, σLAT: 0.6mm. The linac couch base was serviced to reduce couch walkout. This reduced σLAT to 0.2mm. These measurements established a new baseline of radiation isocenter-imaging origin coincidence. Conclusion The image-based WL test has ensured submillimeter localization accuracy using the ExacTrac imaging system. Standard deviations of ExacTrac-radiation isocenter displacements indicate that average agreement within 0.3mm is possible in each axis. This WL test is a departure from the tradiational WL in that imaging origin/radiation isocenter agreement is the end goal not lasers/radiation isocenter.

  4. Functional and pharmacological characterization of two different ASIC1a/2a heteromers reveals their sensitivity to the spider toxin PcTx1

    PubMed Central

    Joeres, Niko; Augustinowski, Katrin; Neuhof, Andreas; Assmann, Marc; Gründer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Acid Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) detect extracellular proton signals and are involved in synaptic transmission and pain sensation. ASIC subunits assemble into homo- and heteromeric channels composed of three subunits. Single molecule imaging revealed that heteromers composed of ASIC1a and ASIC2a, which are widely expressed in the central nervous system, have a flexible 2:1/1:2 stoichiometry. It was hitherto not possible, however, to functionally differentiate these two heteromers. To have a homogenous population of ASIC1a/2a heteromers with either 2:1 or 1:2 stoichiometry, we covalently linked subunits in the desired configuration and characterized their functional properties in Xenopus oocytes. We show that the two heteromers have slightly different proton affinity, with an additional ASIC1a subunit increasing apparent affinity. Moreover, we found that zinc, which potentiates ASIC2a-containing ASICs but not homomeric ASIC1a, potentiates both heteromers. Finally, we show that PcTx1, which binds at subunit-subunit interfaces of homomeric ASIC1a, inhibits both heteromers suggesting that ASIC2a can also contribute to a PcTx1 binding site. Using this functional fingerprint, we show that rat cortical neurons predominantly express the ASIC1a/2a heteromer with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Collectively, our results reveal the contribution of individual subunits to the functional properties of ASIC1a/2a heteromers. PMID:27277303

  5. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Boreholes C3830, C3831, C3832 and RCRA Borehole 299-W10-27

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28,4.43, and 4.59. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in April 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C3830, C3831, and C3832 in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27 installed northeast of the TY Tank Farm.

  6. Functional and pharmacological characterization of two different ASIC1a/2a heteromers reveals their sensitivity to the spider toxin PcTx1.

    PubMed

    Joeres, Niko; Augustinowski, Katrin; Neuhof, Andreas; Assmann, Marc; Gründer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Acid Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) detect extracellular proton signals and are involved in synaptic transmission and pain sensation. ASIC subunits assemble into homo- and heteromeric channels composed of three subunits. Single molecule imaging revealed that heteromers composed of ASIC1a and ASIC2a, which are widely expressed in the central nervous system, have a flexible 2:1/1:2 stoichiometry. It was hitherto not possible, however, to functionally differentiate these two heteromers. To have a homogenous population of ASIC1a/2a heteromers with either 2:1 or 1:2 stoichiometry, we covalently linked subunits in the desired configuration and characterized their functional properties in Xenopus oocytes. We show that the two heteromers have slightly different proton affinity, with an additional ASIC1a subunit increasing apparent affinity. Moreover, we found that zinc, which potentiates ASIC2a-containing ASICs but not homomeric ASIC1a, potentiates both heteromers. Finally, we show that PcTx1, which binds at subunit-subunit interfaces of homomeric ASIC1a, inhibits both heteromers suggesting that ASIC2a can also contribute to a PcTx1 binding site. Using this functional fingerprint, we show that rat cortical neurons predominantly express the ASIC1a/2a heteromer with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Collectively, our results reveal the contribution of individual subunits to the functional properties of ASIC1a/2a heteromers. PMID:27277303

  7. After the storm: positioning the NMA mission in the post-Katrina era.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Albert W.

    2006-01-01

    This presidential inaugural address was delivered during the installation ceremony at NMA's 107th convention and scientific assembly in Dallas, TX, by NMA President Albert W. Morris Jr., MD, August 8, 2006. Images p1568-a PMID:17052046

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the environmental sampling completed by EPA in southeastern Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina caused major catastrophic damage. Presentation also describes EPA's Environmental Unit activities in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, LA, and Dallas, TX.

  9. 75 FR 16706 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Texas; Revisions to Voiding of Permits and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ..., Chief, Air Permits Section (6PD-R), Environmental Protection Agency, 1445 Ross Avenue, Suite 1200... Protection Agency, Region 6, 1445 Ross Avenue (6PD-R), Suite 1200, Dallas, TX 75202-2733. The...

  10. 75 FR 71459 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... Business Endicott, NY....... October 7, 2008. Machines (IBM), Global Business Services, Global Supply... International Business Dallas, TX......... August 25, 2009. Machines (IBM), Global Sales Operations Organization...), Global Sales Operations Organization; Two Teleworkers, etc. 74,575C International Business Phoenix,...

  11. 77 FR 27758 - Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on April 30, 2012, Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC (KMTP), 500 Dallas Street, Suite 1000, Houston, Texas..., Regulatory, Kinder Morgan Texas Intrastate Pipeline Group, 500 Dallas Street, Suite 1000, Houston, TX...

  12. Project Zero Reject Manual: Strategies in Child Find.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Deborah F. Carpenter; And Others

    The report describes Project Zero Reject, a cooperative effort between the Dallas (TX) Independent School District and the Dallas County Mental Health Mental Retardation Center to locate handicapped children not receiving educational services and to develop a computerized information system for planning regarding these children. Awareness efforts…

  13. 76 FR 61040 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a...-Oct-11 IA Pocahontas Pocahontas Muni..... 1/7324 9/8/11 RNAV (GPS) RWY 12, Orig 20-Oct-11 IA Pocahontas Pocahontas Muni..... 1/7325 9/8/11 NDB RWY 12, Amdt 5 20-Oct-11 TX Dallas Dallas Executive.......

  14. The utility of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in systems-oriented obesity intervention projects: The selection of comparable study sites for a quasi-experimental intervention design--TX CORD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Texas Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration project (TX CORD) uses a systems-oriented approach to address obesity that includes individual and family interventions, community-level action, as well as environmental and policy initiatives. Given that randomization is seldom possible in communit...

  15. Guiding Surge Reduction Strategies via Characterization of Coastal Surge Propagation and Internal Surge Generation within a Complex Bay/Estuary System, Galveston Bay, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, B.; Torres, J.; Irza, N.; Bedient, P. B.; Dawson, C.; Proft, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, Hurricane Ike (2008) and a suite of synthetic storms are simulated in order to evaluate how different hurricane landfalls, wind intensities, and radius to maximum winds influence the surge response in complex semi-enclosed bays such as Galveston Bay, located along the Texas Gulf Coast. The Advanced CIRCulation and Simulating Waves Nearshore (ADCIRC+SWAN) models are employed to quantify surge in terms of its relative coastal contributions that propagate across barrier islands and tidal inlets and subsequently into Galveston Bay, the surge generated locally within the Bay itself, and the interaction between these coastal and local components of surge. Results from this research will further the current understanding of surge interactions in bay systems and guide coastal engineering surge reduction projects that need to consider multiple lines of defense to protect complex bay/estuary systems such as Galveston Bay, TX.

  16. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Probe Holes C3830, C3831, C3832 and 299-W10-27

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

    2004-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area T-TX-TY. This report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from three probe holes (C3830, C3831, and C3832) in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27. Sediments from borehole 299-W-10-27 are considered to be uncontaminated sediments that can be compared with contaminated sediments. This report also presents our interpretation of the sediment lithologies, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the TX Tank Farm. Sediment from the probe holes was analyzed for: moisture, radionuclide and carbon contents;, one-to-one water extracts (soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), and 8 M nitric acid extracts. Overall, our analyses showed that common ion exchange is a key mechanism that influences the distribution of contaminants within that portion of the vadose zone affected by tank liquor. We did not observe significant indications of caustic alteration of the sediment mineralogy or porosity, or significant zones of slightly elevated pH values in the probe holes. The sediments do show that sodium-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dominated fluids are present. The fluids are more dilute than tank fluids observed below tanks at the SX and BX Tank Farms. Three primary stratigraphic units were encountered in each probe hole: (1) backfill material, (2) the Hanford formation, and (3) the Cold Creek unit. Each of the probe holes contain thin fine-grained layers in the Hanford H2 stratigraphic unit that may impact the flow of leaked fluids and effect irregular and horizontal flow. The probe holes could not penetrate below the enriched calcium carbonate strata of the Cold Creek lower subunit; therefore, we did not

  17. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Repetitive Transnasal Sphenopalatine Ganglion Blockade With Tx360® as Acute Treatment for Chronic Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Roger; Saper, Joel; Dexter, Kent; Manley, Heather R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if repetitive sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) blocks with 0.5% bupivacaine delivered through the Tx360® are superior in reducing pain associated with chronic migraine (CM) compared with saline. Background The SPG is a small concentrated structure of neuronal tissue that resides within the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) in close proximity to the sphenopalatine foramen and is innervated by the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve. From an anatomical and physiological perspective, SPG blockade may be an effective acute and preventative treatment for CM. Method This was a double-blind, parallel-arm, placebo-controlled, randomized pilot study using a novel intervention for acute treatment in CM. Up to 41 subjects could be enrolled at 2 headache specialty clinics in the US. Eligible subjects were between 18 and 80 years of age and had a history of CM defined by the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders appendix definition. They were allowed a stable dose of migraine preventive medications that was maintained throughout the study. Following a 28-day baseline period, subjects were randomized by computer-generated lists of 2:1 to receive 0.5% bupivacaine or saline, respectively. The primary end-point was to compare numeric rating scale scores at pretreatment baseline vs 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 24 hours postprocedure for all 12 treatments. SPG blockade was accomplished with the Tx360®, which allows a small flexible soft plastic tube that is advanced below the middle turbinate just past the pterygopalatine fossa into the intranasal space. A 0.3 cc of anesthetic or saline was injected into the mucosa covering the SPG. The procedure is performed similarly in each nostril. The active phase of the study consisted of a series of 12 SPG blocks with 0.3 cc of 0.5% bupivacaine or saline provided 2 times per week for 6 weeks. Subjects were re-evaluated at 1 and 6 months postfinal procedure. Results The final dataset

  18. Analgesic Effects of GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 in a Mouse Model of NaV1.7-Mediated Pain

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R.; Wingerd, Joshua S.; Winter, Zoltan; Durek, Thomas; Dekan, Zoltan; Sousa, Silmara R.; Zimmermann, Katharina; Hoffmann, Tali; Weidner, Christian; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Alewood, Paul F.; Lewis, Richard J.; Vetter, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of NaV1.7 lead to congenital insensitivity to pain, a rare condition resulting in individuals who are otherwise normal except for the inability to sense pain, making pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.7 a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain. We characterized a novel mouse model of NaV1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of the scorpion toxin OD1, which is suitable for rapid in vivo profiling of NaV1.7 inhibitors. Intraplantar injection of OD1 caused spontaneous pain behaviors, which were reversed by co-injection with NaV1.7 inhibitors and significantly reduced in NaV1.7−/− mice. To validate the use of the model for profiling NaV1.7 inhibitors, we determined the NaV selectivity and tested the efficacy of the reported NaV1.7 inhibitors GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 (raxatrigine). GpTx-1 selectively inhibited NaV1.7 and was effective when co-administered with OD1, but lacked efficacy when delivered systemically. PF-04856264 state-dependently and selectively inhibited NaV1.7 and significantly reduced OD1-induced spontaneous pain when delivered locally and systemically. CNV1014802 state-dependently, but non-selectively, inhibited NaV channels and was only effective in the OD1 model when delivered systemically. Our novel model of NaV1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of OD1 is thus suitable for the rapid in vivo characterization of the analgesic efficacy of NaV1.7 inhibitors. PMID:26999206

  19. In-situ Measurements of Ozone Production Rates and Comparisons to Model-derived Production Rates During the Houston, TX and Denver, CO DISCOVER-AQ Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, B. C.; Brune, W. H.; Miller, D. O.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a secondary pollutant that has harmful effects on human and plant life. The climate and urban emissions in Houston, TX and Denver, CO can be conducive for significant ozone production and thus, high ozone events. Tighter government strategies for ozone mitigation have been proposed, which involve reducing the current EPA eight-hour ozone standard from 75 ppb to 65-70 ppb. These strategies rely on the reduction of ozone precursors in order to decrease the ozone production rate, P(O3). The changes in the ozone concentration at a certain location are dependent upon P(O3), so decreasing P(O3) can decrease ozone levels provided that it has not been transported from other areas. Air quality models test reduction strategies before they are implemented, locate ozone sources, and predict ozone episodes. Traditionally, P(O3) has been calculated by models. However, large uncertainties in model emissions inventories, chemical mechanisms, and meteorology can reduce confidence in this approach. A new instrument, the Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS) directly measures P(O3) and can provide an alternate approach to determining P(O3). An updated version of the Penn State MOPS (MOPSv2.0) was deployed to Houston, TX and Denver, CO as a part of NASA's DISCOVER-AQ field campaign in the summers of 2013 and 2014, respectively. We present MOPS directly-measured P(O3) rates from these areas, as well as comparisons to zero-dimensional and three-dimensional modeled P(O3) using the RACM2 and MCMv2.2 mechanisms. These comparisons demonstrate the potential of the MOPS to test and evaluate model-derived P(O3), to advance the understanding of model chemical mechanisms, and to improve predictions of high ozone events.

  20. Cloud and Cloud-to-ground Lightning Detection at LF and VHF: Early Results from Global Atmospherics' Dallas-Fort Worth LDAR-II and IMPACT/ESP Research Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetriades, N.; Murphy, M. J.; Cummins, K. L.

    2001-12-01

    Global Atmospherics, Inc. (GAI) recently installed a regional Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR-II) network and a regional VLFLF lightning detection network of IMPACTESP and LPATS IV sensors (configured to detect both cloud-to-ground lightning and cloud discharges) for research purposes in the vicinity of Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport. The LDAR-II and VLF/LF networks became fully operational on 1 March 2001 and 10 June 2001, respectively. The DFW LDAR-II network is made up of 7 sensors, with 20 to 30 km baselines, that can detect pulses of radiation produced by the electrical breakdown processes of lightning in a 5-MHz band within a subset of the VHF (50-120 MHz) band. This regional LDAR-II network can map lightning flashes in 3-dimensions within approximately 150 km of the center of the network, degrading in performance with increasing range. Expected lightning flash detection efficiency is greater than 99% within the interior of the DFW LDAR-II network (a range of 30 km from DFW International Airport) and greater than 90% out to a range of 150 km from DFW International Airport. Expected three-dimensional location accuracy for individual pulses of radiation is better than 100 m within the interior of the network and better than 2 km to a range of 150 km from the network center. Early analysis of the DFW LDAR-II and VLF/LF networks has involved comparisons with the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and radar base reflectivity images from the DFW National Weather Service (NWS) radar. The results of these comparisons will be summarized for representative thunderstorm cases. In addition, a specific case involving an extensive "spider lightning" discharge will be presented. This discharge originated at a distance of more than 50 km from DFW airport, traveled a total path of approximately 150 km, and initiated four isolated cloud-to-ground discharges - one of which resulted in a safety-related incident at DFW airport.