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Sample records for 3456-lb simulated vehicle

  1. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourash, F.

    1984-01-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  2. Space robot simulator vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Alexander, H.

    1985-01-01

    A Space Robot Simulator Vehicle (SRSV) was constructed to model a free-flying robot capable of doing construction, manipulation and repair work in space. The SRSV is intended as a test bed for development of dynamic and static control methods for space robots. The vehicle is built around a two-foot-diameter air-cushion vehicle that carries batteries, power supplies, gas tanks, computer, reaction jets and radio equipment. It is fitted with one or two two-link manipulators, which may be of many possible designs, including flexible-link versions. Both the vehicle body and its first arm are nearly complete. Inverse dynamic control of the robot's manipulator has been successfully simulated using equations generated by the dynamic simulation package SDEXACT. In this mode, the position of the manipulator tip is controlled not by fixing the vehicle base through thruster operation, but by controlling the manipulator joint torques to achieve the desired tip motion, while allowing for the free motion of the vehicle base. One of the primary goals is to minimize use of the thrusters in favor of intelligent control of the manipulator. Ways to reduce the computational burden of control are described.

  3. CONSTRUCTION OF SCHOOL SIMULATION VEHICLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COGSWELL, JOHN F.; AND OTHERS

    A COMPUTER PROGRAMED GENERAL SCHOOL SIMULATOR IS DESCRIBED AND RULES ARE GIVEN FOR A COMPUTER TRYOUT OF THE PILOT VERSION. ALTHOUGH THE MODEL WAS DESIGNED AS A GENERAL VEHICLE THAT WOULD PERMIT COMPUTER MODELING OF ANY SCHOOL CONFIGURATION, THE FIRST PILOT VERSION REPRESENTS A HYPOTHETICAL SCHOOL OPERATING UNDER THE "CONTINUOUS PROGRESS…

  4. Electric Vehicle Modeling and Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    simulation were used to select a viable *electric vehicle system to compete economically with conventional USAF passenger cars . This system was then...It is, however, also used by the Environment Pro- tection Agency for new car urban fuel economy tests. This 23-minute cycle is the recorded...batteries that could be conveniently installed within the body of the car while retaining four passenger capa- bility was twelve. Based on the

  5. Representation of vehicle location in networked simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuo-Chi; Goldiez, Brian; Ng, Huat

    In a networked simulation environment, it is vital to assure that all vehicles maintain a consistent representation of the geometry between themselves and between vehicles and the terrain over which they operate. Hence, all vehicles should be able to convert their position and orientation to common coordinates. Three coordinate systems, geocentric, geodetic, and topocentric, and the transformation from one system to another are analyzed.

  6. Airborne Simulation of Launch Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Orr, Jeb S.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Gilligan, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a technique for approximating the short-period dynamics of an exploration-class launch vehicle during flight test with a high-performance surrogate aircraft in relatively benign endoatmospheric flight conditions. The surrogate vehicle relies upon a nonlinear dynamic inversion scheme with proportional-integral feedback to drive a subset of the aircraft states into coincidence with the states of a time-varying reference model that simulates the unstable rigid body dynamics, servodynamics, and parasitic elastic and sloshing dynamics of the launch vehicle. The surrogate aircraft flies a constant pitch rate trajectory to approximate the boost phase gravity turn ascent, and the aircraft's closed-loop bandwidth is sufficient to simulate the launch vehicle's fundamental lateral bending and sloshing modes by exciting the rigid body dynamics of the aircraft. A novel control allocation scheme is employed to utilize the aircraft's relatively fast control effectors in inducing various failure modes for the purposes of evaluating control system performance. Sufficient dynamic similarity is achieved such that the control system under evaluation is configured for the full-scale vehicle with no changes to its parameters, and pilot-control system interaction studies can be performed to characterize the effects of guidance takeover during boost. High-fidelity simulation and flight-test results are presented that demonstrate the efficacy of the design in simulating the Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle dynamics using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Armstrong Flight Research Center Fullscale Advanced Systems Testbed (FAST), a modified F/A-18 airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois), over a range of scenarios designed to stress the SLS's Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm.

  7. Airborne Simulation of Launch Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, Eric T.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a technique for approximating the short-period dynamics of an exploration-class launch vehicle during flight test with a high-performance surrogate aircraft in relatively benign endoatmospheric flight conditions. The surrogate vehicle relies upon a nonlinear dynamic inversion scheme with proportional-integral feedback to drive a subset of the aircraft states into coincidence with the states of a time-varying reference model that simulates the unstable rigid body dynamics, servodynamics, and parasitic elastic and sloshing dynamics of the launch vehicle. The surrogate aircraft flies a constant pitch rate trajectory to approximate the boost phase gravity-turn ascent, and the aircraft's closed-loop bandwidth is sufficient to simulate the launch vehicle's fundamental lateral bending and sloshing modes by exciting the rigid body dynamics of the aircraft. A novel control allocation scheme is employed to utilize the aircraft's relatively fast control effectors in inducing various failure modes for the purposes of evaluating control system performance. Sufficient dynamic similarity is achieved such that the control system under evaluation is optimized for the full-scale vehicle with no changes to its parameters, and pilot-control system interaction studies can be performed to characterize the effects of guidance takeover during boost. High-fidelity simulation and flight test results are presented that demonstrate the efficacy of the design in simulating the Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle dynamics using NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's Full-scale Advanced Systems Testbed (FAST), a modified F/A-18 airplane, over a range of scenarios designed to stress the SLS's adaptive augmenting control (AAC) algorithm.

  8. A Computer Simulation of Braitenberg Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    and that have the ability to adapt their behavior , using a learning algorithm developed by Teuvo Kohonen. The vehicle designer is free to select...learning algorithm, adapting behavior to improve food finding-performance. The initial evaluations failed to provide convincing proof that the simple...m m m | m | l | m i Preface The purpose of this effort was to simulate simple, biological learning behavior using an artificial neural network to

  9. Program For Simulating Dynamics Of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berning, M. J.; Sagis, K. D.

    1995-01-01

    SORT (Simulation and Optimization of Rocket Trajectories) is general-purpose three-degree-of-freedom with three axis static moment balance simulation of flight dynamics of arbitrary aerospace vehicle. Modular structure facilitates application to variety of trajectory-analysis problems. Contains math model of aerodynamics completely generalized. Computes both longitudinal and lateral forces and moments. In addition to fore-body coefficients, computes longitudinal base effect aerodynamic forces and moments. Simplified ballistic-coefficient model also available for analysis of ballistic entry. Written using ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  10. Navigation simulator for the Space Tug vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, B. K.; Boland, J. S., III; Peters, E. G.

    1977-01-01

    A general simulation program (GSP) for state estimation of a nonlinear space vehicle flight navigation system is developed and used as a basis for evaluating the performance of a Space Tug navigation system. An explanation of the iterative guidance mode (IGM) guidance law, derivation of the dynamics, coordinate frames and state estimation routines are given in order to clarify the assumptions and approximations made. A number of simulation and analytical studies are used to demonstrate the operation of the Tug system. Included in the simulation studies are (1) initial offset vector parameter study; (2) propagation time vs accuracy; (3) measurement noise parametric study and (4) reduction in computational burden of an on-board implementable scheme. From the results of these studies, conclusions and recommendations concerning future areas of practical and theoretical work are presented.

  11. Battery thermal models for hybrid vehicle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    This paper summarizes battery thermal modeling capabilities for: (1) an advanced vehicle simulator (ADVISOR); and (2) battery module and pack thermal design. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) ADVISOR is developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment. There are several battery models in ADVISOR for various chemistry types. Each one of these models requires a thermal model to predict the temperature change that could affect battery performance parameters, such as resistance, capacity and state of charges. A lumped capacitance battery thermal model in the Matlab/Simulink environment was developed that included the ADVISOR battery performance models. For thermal evaluation and design of battery modules and packs, NREL has been using various computer aided engineering tools including commercial finite element analysis software. This paper will discuss the thermal ADVISOR battery model and its results, along with the results of finite element modeling that were presented at the workshop on "Development of Advanced Battery Engineering Models" in August 2001.

  12. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Water Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Lawrence, Charles; Carney, Kelly S.

    2007-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) water splashdowns were simulated in order to find maximum acceleration loads on the astronauts and spacecraft under various landing conditions. The acceleration loads were used in a Dynamic Risk Index (DRI) program to find the potential risk for injury posed on the astronauts for a range of landing conditions. The DRI results showed that greater risks for injury occurred for two landing conditions; when the vertical velocity was large and the contact angle between the spacecraft and the water impact surface was zero, and when the spacecraft was in a toe down configuration and both the vertical and horizontal landing velocities were large. Rollover was also predicted to occur for cases where there is high horizontal velocity and low contact angles in a toe up configuration, and cases where there was a high horizontal velocity with high contact angles in a toe down configuration.

  13. Distributed Heterogeneous Simulation of a Hybrid-Electric Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-29

    operate as a generator to convert mechanical energy from the diesel t~nginc 01 from regenerative braking to electrical energy. A vehicle control module...Distributed Heterogeneous Simulation of a Hybrid- Electric Vehicle Ning Wu’, Curtis Rands t , Charles E. Lucas!, Eric A. Walters§, and Maher A...Masrurit US Army RDECOM-TARDEC, Warren, MI, 48397 Hybrid- electric military vehicles provide many advantages over conventional military vehicles powered

  14. Simulation of stochastic vibration of maglev track inspection vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingchu; Guan, Xiqiang; Zhang, Jianwu

    2007-05-01

    The stochastic vibration of a maglev track inspection vehicle is the main factor that has direct influence on the accuracy of geometrical measurements of the maglev tracks on board whenever the inspection vehicle is operated at a certain speed. Based upon the principle of motions of the specified vehicle, a vibration model of 5 dof for the maglev track inspection vehicle is proposed and a numerical example is made for the analysis of dynamic responses of the vehicle in stochastic excitation of the maglev track. Effects of vibrations of the vehicle on the accuracy of measuring displacement by laser triangle method are examined. Simulation results of lateral, vertical, roll, pitch, and yaw vibrations for the maglev track inspection vehicle equipped with the measuring system of high precision are provided for the design of the similar vehicles.

  15. VEEP: A Vehicle Economy, Emissions, and Performance simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, G. J.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the VEEP simulation program was to: (1) predict vehicle fuel economy and relative emissions over any specified driving cycle; (2) calculate various measures of vehicle performance (acceleration, passing manuevers, gradeability, top speed), and (3) give information on the various categories of energy dissipation (rolling friction, aerodynamics, accessories, inertial effects, component inefficiences, etc.). The vehicle is described based on detailed subsystem information and numerical parameters characterizing the components of a wide variety of self-propelled vehicles. Conventionally arranged heat engine powered automobiles were emphasized, but with consideration in the design toward the requirement of other types of vehicles.

  16. Simulation study of plane motion of air cushion vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Qin; Shi, Xiao-Cheng; Shi, Yi-Long; Bian, Xin-Qian

    2003-12-01

    This research is on horizontal plane motion equations of Air Cushion Vehicle (ACV) and its simulation. To investigate this, a lot of simulation study including ACV’s voyage and turning performance has been done. It was found that the voyage simulation results were accorded with ACV own characteristic and turning simulation results were accorded with USA ACV’s movement characteristic basically.

  17. Sensory Evaluation of Ride on Railway Vehicle Using Motion Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Takehara, Shoichiro; Sasaki, Koichi; Suda, Yoshihiro; Koga, Takaaki

    Sensory evaluation of ride on a railway vehicle is performed based on international standards such as ISO2631. However, it is expected that this evaluation would be insufficient because of the development of technologies of a railway vehicle. The evaluation for view and sound from the viewpoint of ergonomic and psychological perspectives might be needed as well as traditional evaluations in the future. Authors focused on the relation between view and motion of the railway vehicle. The experiment in sensory evaluation of ride on a railway vehicle using a motion simulator was performed. In this paper, the way and results of the experiment and the environmental psychological analysis are described.

  18. Driver Training Simulator for Backing Up Commercial Vehicles with Trailers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Uwe; Wojke, Philipp; Zöbel, Dieter

    Backing up tractors with trailers is a difficult task since the kinematic behavior of articulated vehicles is complex and hard to control. Especially unskilled drivers are overstrained with the complicated steering process. To learn and practice the steering behavior of articulated vehicles, we developed a 3D driving simulator. The simulator can handle different types of articulated vehicles like semi-trailers, one- and two-axle trailers, or gigaliners. The use of a driving simulator offers many advantages over the use of real vehicles. One of the main advantages is the possibility to learn the steering behavior of all vehicle types. Drivers can be given more and better driving instructions like collision warnings or steering hints. Furthermore, the driver training costs can be reduced. Moreover, mistakes of the student do not lead to real damages and costly repairs. The hardware of the simulator consists of a low cost commercial driving stand with original truck parts, a projection of the windshield and two flat panel monitors for the left and right exterior mirrors. Standard PC hardware is used for controlling the driving stand and for generating the realtime 3D environment. Each aspect of the simulation like realistic vehicle movements or generation of different views, is handled by a specific software module. This flexible system can be easily extended which offers the opportunity for other uses than just driver training. Therefore, we use the simulator for the development and test of driver assistance systems.

  19. Rapid Contingency Simulation Modeling of the NASA Crew Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Kevin M.; Rutherford, R. Chad; McDuffie, James; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Crew Launch Vehicle is a two-stage orbital launcher designed to meet NASA's current as well as future needs for human space flight. In order to free the designers to explore more possibilities during the design phase, a need exists for the ability to quickly perform simulation on both the baseline vehicle as well as the vehicle after proposed changes due to mission planning, vehicle configuration and avionics changes, proposed new guidance and control algorithms, and any other contingencies the designers may wish to consider. Further, after the vehicle is designed and built, the need will remain for such analysis in the event of future mission planning. An easily reconfigurable, modular, nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom simulation matching NASA Marshall's in-house high-fidelity simulator is created with the ability to quickly perform simulation and analysis of the Crew Launch Vehicle throughout the entire launch profile. Simulation results are presented and discussed, and an example comparison fly-off between two candidate controllers is presented.

  20. Crash simulation of UNS electric vehicle under frontal front impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilo, D. D.; Lukamana, N. I.; Budiana, E. P.; Tjahjana, D. D. D. P.

    2016-03-01

    Sebelas Maret University has been developing an Electric Vehicle namely SmarT-EV UNS. The main structure of the car are chasis and body. The chasis is made from steel and the body is made from fiberglass composite. To ensure the safety of the car, both static and dynamic tests were carried out to these structures, including their materials, like: tensile test, bending test, and impact test. Another test needed by this vehicle is crashworthiness test. To perform the test, it is needed complex equipments and it is quite expensive. Another way to obtain vehicle crashworthiness behaviour is by simulate it. The purpose of this study was to simulate the response of the Smart-EV UNS electric vehicle main structure when crashing rigid barrier from the front. The crash simulation was done in according to the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) within the speed of the vehicle of 35 mph. The UNS Electric Vehicle was modelled using SolidWorks software, and the simulation process was done by finite element method using ANSYS software. The simulation result showed that the most internal impact energy was absorbed by chassis part. It absorbed 76.2% of impact energy, then the base absorbed 11.3 %, while the front body absorbed 2.5 %, and the rest was absorbed by fender, hood, and other parts.

  1. Multibody simulation of vehicles equipped with an automatic transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, B.; Kouroussis, G.

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays automotive vehicles remain as one of the most used modes of transportation. Furthermore automatic transmissions are increasingly used to provide a better driving comfort and a potential optimization of the engine performances (by placing the gear shifts at specific engine and vehicle speeds). This paper presents an effective modeling of the vehicle using the multibody methodology (numerically computed under EasyDyn, an open source and in-house library dedicated to multibody simulations). However, the transmission part of the vehicle is described by the usual equations of motion computed using a systematic matrix approach: del Castillo's methodology for planetary gear trains. By coupling the analytic equations of the transmission and the equations computed by the multibody methodology, the performances of any vehicle can be obtained if the characteristics of each element in the vehicle are known. The multibody methodology offers the possibilities to develop the vehicle modeling from 1D-motion to 3D-motion by taking into account the rotations and implementing tire models. The modeling presented in this paper remains very efficient and provides an easy and quick vehicle simulation tool which could be used in order to calibrate the automatic transmission.

  2. Simulation of demand management and grid balancing with electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druitt, James; Früh, Wolf-Gerrit

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the potential role of electric vehicles in an electricity network with a high contribution from variable generation such as wind power. Electric vehicles are modelled to provide demand management through flexible charging requirements and energy balancing for the network. Balancing applications include both demand balancing and vehicle-to-grid discharging. This study is configured to represent the UK grid with balancing requirements derived from wind generation calculated from weather station wind speeds on the supply side and National Grid data from on the demand side. The simulation models 1000 individual vehicle entities to represent the behaviour of larger numbers of vehicles. A stochastic trip generation profile is used to generate realistic journey characteristics, whilst a market pricing model allows charging and balancing decisions to be based on realistic market price conditions. The simulation has been tested with wind generation capacities representing up to 30% of UK consumption. Results show significant improvements to load following conditions with the introduction of electric vehicles, suggesting that they could substantially facilitate the uptake of intermittent renewable generation. Electric vehicle owners would benefit from flexible charging and selling tariffs, with the majority of revenue derived from vehicle-to-grid participation in balancing markets.

  3. Optimum Vehicle Component Integration with InVeST (Integrated Vehicle Simulation Testbed)

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, W; Paddack, E; Aceves, S

    2001-12-27

    We have developed an Integrated Vehicle Simulation Testbed (InVeST). InVeST is based on the concept of Co-simulation, and it allows the development of virtual vehicles that can be analyzed and optimized as an overall integrated system. The virtual vehicle is defined by selecting different vehicle components from a component library. Vehicle component models can be written in multiple programming languages running on different computer platforms. At the same time, InVeST provides full protection for proprietary models. Co-simulation is a cost-effective alternative to competing methodologies, such as developing a translator or selecting a single programming language for all vehicle components. InVeST has been recently demonstrated using a transmission model and a transmission controller model. The transmission model was written in SABER and ran on a Sun/Solaris workstation, while the transmission controller was written in MATRIXx and ran on a PC running Windows NT. The demonstration was successfully performed. Future plans include the applicability of Co-simulation and InVeST to analysis and optimization of multiple complex systems, including those of Intelligent Transportation Systems.

  4. Numerical simulation of vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Nripen K.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulation of vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection are addressed. The vehicle crashworthiness design objectives are to design the vehicle structure for optimum impact energy absorption, and to design the restraint system (seatbelts, airbags, bolsters, etc.) for optimum occupant protection. The following approaches are taken; a major part of the impact energy is to be absorbed by the vehicle structure; the restraint components will provide protection against the remaining crash energy; certain vehicle components are designed to deform under specific types and speeds of impact in a desired mode for sound energy management; structural components such as front side rails, rear rails, door structure and pillars undergo large amounts of deformation; and with properly designed geometry and material these components assist in mitigating the effects of impact.

  5. Aerothermodynamic Flight Simulation Capabilities for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles G.

    1998-01-01

    Aerothermodynamics, encompassing aerodynamics, aeroheating, and fluid dynamics and physical processes, is the genesis for the design and development of advanced space transportation vehicles and provides crucial information to other disciplines such as structures, materials, propulsion, avionics, and guidance, navigation and control. Sources of aerothermodynamic information are ground-based facilities, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) and engineering computer codes, and flight experiments. Utilization of this aerothermodynamic triad provides the optimum aerothermodynamic design to safely satisfy mission requirements while reducing design conservatism, risk and cost. The iterative aerothermodynamic process for initial screening/assessment of aerospace vehicle concepts, optimization of aerolines to achieve/exceed mission requirements, and benchmark studies for final design and establishment of the flight data book are reviewed. Aerothermodynamic methodology centered on synergism between ground-based testing and CFD predictions is discussed for various flow regimes encountered by a vehicle entering the Earth s atmosphere from low Earth orbit. An overview of the resources/infrastructure required to provide accurate/creditable aerothermodynamic information in a timely manner is presented. Impacts on Langley s aerothermodynamic capabilities due to recent programmatic changes such as Center reorganization, downsizing, outsourcing, industry (as opposed to NASA) led programs, and so forth are discussed. Sample applications of these capabilities to high Agency priority, fast-paced programs such as Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)/X-33 Phases I and 11, X-34, Hyper-X and X-38 are presented and lessons learned discussed. Lastly, enhancements in ground-based testing/CFD capabilities necessary to partially/fully satisfy future requirements are addressed.

  6. Shuttle vehicle and mission simulation requirements report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for the space shuttle vehicle and mission simulation are developed to analyze the systems, mission, operations, and interfaces. The requirements are developed according to the following subject areas: (1) mission envelope, (2) orbit flight dynamics, (3) shuttle vehicle systems, (4) external interfaces, (5) crew procedures, (6) crew station, (7) visual cues, and (8) aural cues. Line drawings and diagrams of the space shuttle are included to explain the various systems and components.

  7. Quantifying a cellular automata simulation of electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Graeme; Bell, Margaret; Blythe, Phil

    2014-12-01

    Within this work the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) cellular automata is used to simulate a basic cyclic road network. Results from SwitchEV, a real world Electric Vehicle trial which has collected more than two years of detailed electric vehicle data, are used to quantify the results of the NS automata, demonstrating similar power consumption behavior to that observed in the experimental results. In particular the efficiency of the electric vehicles reduces as the vehicle density increases, due in part to the reduced efficiency of EVs at low speeds, but also due to the energy consumption inherent in changing speeds. Further work shows the results from introducing spatially restricted speed restriction. In general it can be seen that induced congestion from spatially transient events propagates back through the road network and alters the energy and efficiency profile of the simulated vehicles, both before and after the speed restriction. Vehicles upstream from the restriction show a reduced energy usage and an increased efficiency, and vehicles downstream show an initial large increase in energy usage as they accelerate away from the speed restriction.

  8. Modeling and simulation of dust behaviors behind a moving vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingfang

    Simulation of physically realistic complex dust behaviors is a difficult and attractive problem in computer graphics. A fast, interactive and visually convincing model of dust behaviors behind moving vehicles is very useful in computer simulation, training, education, art, advertising, and entertainment. In my dissertation, an experimental interactive system has been implemented for the simulation of dust behaviors behind moving vehicles. The system includes physically-based models, particle systems, rendering engines and graphical user interface (GUI). I have employed several vehicle models including tanks, cars, and jeeps to test and simulate in different scenarios and conditions. Calm weather, winding condition, vehicle turning left or right, and vehicle simulation controlled by users from the GUI are all included. I have also tested the factors which play against the physical behaviors and graphics appearances of the dust particles through GUI or off-line scripts. The simulations are done on a Silicon Graphics Octane station. The animation of dust behaviors is achieved by physically-based modeling and simulation. The flow around a moving vehicle is modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. I implement a primitive variable and pressure-correction approach to solve the three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes equations in a volume covering the moving vehicle. An alternating- direction implicit (ADI) method is used for the solution of the momentum equations, with a successive-over- relaxation (SOR) method for the solution of the Poisson pressure equation. Boundary conditions are defined and simplified according to their dynamic properties. The dust particle dynamics is modeled using particle systems, statistics, and procedure modeling techniques. Graphics and real-time simulation techniques, such as dynamics synchronization, motion blur, blending, and clipping have been employed in the rendering to achieve realistic appearing dust

  9. A survey of electric and hybrid vehicle simulation programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevan, J.; Heimburger, D. A.; Metcalfe, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a survey conducted within the United States to determine the extent of development and capabilities of automotive performance simulation programs suitable for electric and hybrid vehicle studies are summarized. Altogether, 111 programs were identified as being in a usable state. The complexity of the existing programs spans a range from a page of simple desktop calculator instructions to 300,000 lines of a high-level programming language. The capability to simulate electric vehicles was most common, heat-engines second, and hybrid vehicles least common. Batch-operated programs are slightly more common than interactive ones, and one-third can be operated in either mode. The most commonly used language was FORTRAN, the language typically used by engineers. The higher-level simulation languages (e.g. SIMSCRIPT, GPSS, SIMULA) used by "model builders" were conspicuously lacking.

  10. Human Sensibility Ergonomics Approach to Vehicle Simulator Based on Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwon; Choi, Kyung-Hyun; Yoon, Ji-Sup

    Simulators have been used to evaluate drivers' reactions to various transportation products. Most research, however, has concentrated on their technical performance. This paper considers driver's motion perception on a vehicle simulator through the analysis of human sensibility ergonomics. A sensibility ergonomic method is proposed in order to improve the reliability of vehicle simulators. A simulator in a passenger vehicle consists of three main modules such as vehicle dynamics, virtual environment, and motion representation modules. To evaluate drivers' feedback, human perceptions are categorized into a set verbal expressions collected and investigated to find the most appropriate ones for translation and angular accelerations of the simulator. The cut-off frequency of the washout filter in the representation module is selected as one sensibility factor. Sensibility experiments were carried out to find a correlation between the expressions and the cut-off frequency of the filter. This study suggests a methodology to obtain an ergonomic database that can be applied to the sensibility evaluation of dynamic simulators.

  11. Model Validation for Simulations of Vehicle Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    a large number of replicate samples via Monte- Carlo simulation. The test data, on the other hand, is usually provided as a collection of point...can be determined by Monte Carlo simulation. Classical hypothesis testing techniques depend on a normality assumption except for the modified...criteria”, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 197:2517-2539, 2008. [14] S. Ferson, W. L. Oberkampf and L. Ginzburg , “Model

  12. Dynamics modeling and simulation of autonomous underwater vehicles with appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yumin; Zhao, Jinxin; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Guocheng

    2013-03-01

    To provide a simulation system platform for designing and debugging a small autonomous underwater vehicle's (AUV) motion controller, a six-degree of freedom (6-DOF) dynamic model for AUV controlled by thruster and fins with appendages is examined. Based on the dynamic model, a simulation system for the AUV's motion is established. The different kinds of typical motions are simulated to analyze the motion performance and the maneuverability of the AUV. In order to evaluate the influences of appendages on the motion performance of the AUV, simulations of the AUV with and without appendages are performed and compared. The results demonstrate the AUV has good maneuverability with and without appendages.

  13. Real-Time Simulation of Ares I Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick; Matras, Alex; Wilson, Heath; Alday, Nathan; Walker, David; Betts, Kevin; Hughes, Ryan; Turbe, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Ares Real-Time Environment for Modeling, Integration, and Simulation (ARTEMIS) has been developed for use by the Ares I launch vehicle System Integration Laboratory (SIL) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The primary purpose of the Ares SIL is to test the vehicle avionics hardware and software in a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) environment to certify that the integrated system is prepared for flight. ARTEMIS has been designed to be the real-time software backbone to stimulate all required Ares components through high-fidelity simulation. ARTEMIS has been designed to take full advantage of the advances in underlying computational power now available to support HWIL testing. A modular real-time design relying on a fully distributed computing architecture has been achieved. Two fundamental requirements drove ARTEMIS to pursue the use of high-fidelity simulation models in a real-time environment. First, ARTEMIS must be used to test a man-rated integrated avionics hardware and software system, thus requiring a wide variety of nominal and off-nominal simulation capabilities to certify system robustness. The second driving requirement - derived from a nationwide review of current state-of-the-art HWIL facilities - was that preserving digital model fidelity significantly reduced overall vehicle lifecycle cost by reducing testing time for certification runs and increasing flight tempo through an expanded operational envelope. These two driving requirements necessitated the use of high-fidelity models throughout the ARTEMIS simulation. The nature of the Ares mission profile imposed a variety of additional requirements on the ARTEMIS simulation. The Ares I vehicle is composed of multiple elements, including the First Stage Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), the Upper Stage powered by the J- 2X engine, the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) which houses the crew, the Launch Abort System (LAS), and various secondary elements that separate from the vehicle. At launch, the

  14. Simulating Flights of Future Launch Vehicles and Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarter, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Marshall Aerospace Vehicle Representation in C (MAVERIC) is a computer program for generic, low-to-high-fidelity simulation of the flight(s) of one or more launch vehicle(s) or spacecraft. MAVERIC is designed to accommodate multi-staged vehicles, powered serially or in parallel, with multiple engines, tanks, and cargo elements. Engines can be of jet or conventional rocket types, using either liquid or solid propellants. MAVERIC includes generic subsystem software models for propulsion systems, mass properties, reaction control systems, aerodynamic properties, guidance systems, and navigation systems. Simulations can be started at points other than liftoff. Also included are guidance-system software models that accommodate the ascent, orbit, coasting, deorbiting, entry, terminal-area-energy-management, approach, and landing phases of flight. Options to use different wind profiles and atmospheres are included. A Monte Carlo capability is provided for modeling dispersions associated with atmospheric effects (including winds), propulsion, navigation, aerodynamics, and mass properties. Failures of engines and other subsystems can be modeled. The program is written in the C programming language, which makes it possible for the program to have high degrees of modularity, reusability, and maintainability, thereby also facilitating modification for modeling new vehicles.

  15. Application of the Environmental Sensation Learning Vehicle Simulation Platform in Virtual Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Kuei-Shu; Jiang, Jinn-Feng; Wei, Hung-Yuan; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    The use of simulation technologies in learning has received considerable attention in recent years, but few studies to date have focused on vehicle driving simulation systems. In this study, a vehicle driving simulation system was developed to support novice drivers in practicing their skills. Specifically, the vehicle driving simulation system…

  16. Numerical Flow Simulation for Complete Vehicle Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. •uNOING NUMBERS Numerical Field Simulation around complete configuration F49620-90-C- 6. AUTHOR(S) 0027PO006 Bharat K. Soni...2_3 d 71 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING CRGANIZATION NSF/Engineering Research Center f•r . 5 j 5 ( F i REPORT NUMBER P...AVAILABLE. THE COPY FURNISHED TO DTIC CONTAINED A SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF PAGES WHICH DO NOT REPRODUCE LEGIBLY. TABLE OF CONTENTS A bstract

  17. Simulation of an Air Cushion Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    Entered) REP~R~T OCUENTAION AGEREAD INSTRUCTIONS REI kT OCUMNTAION AGEBEFORE COMPLETING FORMi ~AVTRAQU~p7 2 05-(~ j GOVT ACCESSION No. 3. RECIPIENT’S...techniques, simplification and remodeling of the mathematical model were made in order to make the simulation run in real-time. p ii 1/2 NAVT!AEOU PC1-L /5...XCG +CGP w G -Y p +qzCG + CG PK-r CCCG CG+ GXY-XGZC -f ~G - I LXcG +CGU CG ZCG CG XCG. CG XC ZCG XC 1 ZCG CG Ix CG CGC = G +J~ (MC G X / 1.0 m X2 +2CG

  18. Integrated development of light armored vehicles based on wargaming simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmarini, Marc; Rapanotti, John

    2004-08-01

    Vehicles are evolving into vehicle networks through improved sensors, computers and communications. Unless carefully planned, these complex systems can result in excessive crew workload and difficulty in optimizing the use of the vehicle. To overcome these problems, a war-gaming simulator is being developed as a common platform to integrate contributions from three different groups. The simulator, OneSAF, is used to integrate simplified models of technology and natural phenomena from scientists and engineers with tactics and doctrine from the military and analyzed in detail by operations analysts. This approach ensures the modelling of processes known to be important regardless of the level of information available about the system. Vehicle survivability can be improved as well with better sensors, computers and countermeasures to detect and avoid or destroy threats. To improve threat detection and reliability, Defensive Aids Suite (DAS) designs are based on three complementary sensor technologies including: acoustics, visible and infrared optics and radar. Both active armour and softkill countermeasures are considered. In a typical scenario, a search radar, providing continuous hemispherical coverage, detects and classifies the threat and cues a tracking radar. Data from the tracking radar is processed and an explosive grenade is launched to destroy or deflect the threat. The angle of attack and velocity from the search radar can be used by the soft-kill system to carry out an infrared search and track or an illuminated range-gated scan for the threat platform. Upon detection, obscuration, countermanoeuvres and counterfire can be used against the threat. The sensor suite is completed by acoustic detection of muzzle blast and shock waves. Automation and networking at the platoon level contribute to improved vehicle survivability. Sensor data fusion is essential in avoiding catastrophic failure of the DAS. The modular DAS components can be used with Light Armoured

  19. Hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (heavy) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, R. A.; Mcgehee, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program to simulate hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (HEAVY) is described. It is intended for use early in the design process: concept evaluation, alternative comparison, preliminary design, control and management strategy development, component sizing, and sensitivity studies. It allows the designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict the performance of a proposed drive train. The user defines the system to be simulated using a library of predefined component models that may be connected to represent a wide variety of propulsion systems. The development of three models are discussed as examples.

  20. Numerical simulation of armored vehicles subjected to undercarriage landmine blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdik, A.; Kilic, S. A.; Kilic, N.; Bedir, S.

    2016-07-01

    Landmine threats play a crucial role in the design of armored personnel carriers. Therefore, a reliable blast simulation methodology is valuable to the vehicle design development process. The first part of this study presents a parametric approach for the quantification of the important factors such as the incident overpressure, the reflected overpressure, the incident impulse, and the reflected impulse for the blast simulations that employ the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation. The effects of mesh resolution, mesh topology, and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) parameters are discussed. The simulation results are compared with the calculations of the more established CONventional WEaPons (CONWEP) approach based on the available experimental data. The initial findings show that the spherical topology provides advantages over the Cartesian mesh domains. Furthermore, the FSI parameters play an important role when coarse Lagrangian finite elements are coupled with fine Eulerian elements at the interface. The optimum mesh topology and the mesh resolution of the parametric study are then used in the landmine blast simulation. The second part of the study presents the experimental blast response of an armored vehicle subjected to a landmine explosion under the front left wheel in accordance with the NATO AEP-55 Standard. The results of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  1. Virtual flight simulation of a dual rotor micro air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongming

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a new computational method is developed based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) coupled with rigid body dynamics (RBD) and flight control law in an in-house programmed source code. The CFD solver is established based on momentum source method, preconditioning method, lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel iteration method, and moving overset grid method. Two-equation shear-stress transport k - ω turbulence model is employed to close the governing equations. Third-order Adams prediction-correction method is used to couple CFD and RBD in the inner iteration. The wing-rock motion of the delta wing is simulated to validate the capability of the computational method for virtual flight simulation. Finally, the developed computational method is employed to simulate the longitudinal virtual flight of a dual rotor micro air vehicle (MAV). Results show that the computational method can simulate the virtual flight of the dual rotor MAV.

  2. Simulation of Wind Profile Perturbations for Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    Ideally, a statistically representative sample of measured high-resolution wind profiles with wavelengths as small as tens of meters is required in design studies to establish aerodynamic load indicator dispersions and vehicle control system capability. At most potential launch sites, high- resolution wind profiles may not exist. Representative samples of Rawinsonde wind profiles to altitudes of 30 km are more likely to be available from the extensive network of measurement sites established for routine sampling in support of weather observing and forecasting activity. Such a sample, large enough to be statistically representative of relatively large wavelength perturbations, would be inadequate for launch vehicle design assessments because the Rawinsonde system accurately measures wind perturbations with wavelengths no smaller than 2000 m (1000 m altitude increment). The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Jimsphere wind profiles (150/month and seasonal 2 and 3.5-hr pairs) are the only adequate samples of high resolution profiles approx. 150 to 300 m effective resolution, but over-sampled at 25 m intervals) that have been used extensively for launch vehicle design assessments. Therefore, a simulation process has been developed for enhancement of measured low-resolution Rawinsonde profiles that would be applicable in preliminary launch vehicle design studies at launch sites other than KSC.

  3. In-vehicle CO ingression: validation through field measurements and mass balance simulations.

    PubMed

    Esber, Layale Abi; El-Fadel, Mutasem

    2008-05-01

    In this study a mass balance modeling approach with measured out-vehicle carbon monoxide (CO) levels and trip-specific movement record as boundary conditions were used to simulate in-vehicle CO concentration profiles. The simulation results were coupled with field measurements to demonstrate the occurrence of CO ingression into the vehicle compartment from the engine combustion and/or exhaust return of the test vehicle. Agreement between field and simulation results was obtained for variable amounts of infiltrated CO equivalent to an in-vehicle emission rate of 250 to 1250 mg/h of CO depending on the vehicle ventilation settings.

  4. Simulation Assisted Risk Assessment Applied to Launch Vehicle Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathias, Donovan L.; Go, Susie; Gee, Ken; Lawrence, Scott

    2008-01-01

    A simulation-based risk assessment approach is presented and is applied to the analysis of abort during the ascent phase of a space exploration mission. The approach utilizes groupings of launch vehicle failures, referred to as failure bins, which are mapped to corresponding failure environments. Physical models are used to characterize the failure environments in terms of the risk due to blast overpressure, resulting debris field, and the thermal radiation due to a fireball. The resulting risk to the crew is dynamically modeled by combining the likelihood of each failure, the severity of the failure environments as a function of initiator and time of the failure, the robustness of the crew module, and the warning time available due to early detection. The approach is shown to support the launch vehicle design process by characterizing the risk drivers and identifying regions where failure detection would significantly reduce the risk to the crew.

  5. Lean NOx Trap Modeling in Vehicle Systems Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K; Daw, C Stuart; Conklin, Jim

    2010-09-01

    A one-dimensional model for simulating lean NOx trap (LNT) performance is developed and validated using both steady state cycling data and transient data from FTP testing cycles. The model consists of the conservation equations for chemical species and energy in the bulk flow, energy of the solid walls, O2 storage and NOx storage (in the form of nitrites and nitrates). Nitrites and nitrates are formed by diffusion of NO and NO2, respectively, into sorbent particles (assumed to be hemi-spherical in shape) along with O2 and their formation rates are controlled by chemical kinetics as well as solid-phase diffusion rates of NOx species. The model also accounts for thermal aging and sulfation of LNTs. Empirical correlations are developed on the basis of published experimental data to capture these effects. These empirical correlations depend on total mileage for which the LNT has been in use, the mileage accumulated since the last desulfation event in addition to the freshly degreened catalyst characteristics. The model has been used in studies of vehicle systems (integration, performance etc.) including hybrid powertrain configurations. Since the engines in hybrid vehicles turn on and off multiple number of times during single drive cycles, the exhaust systems may encounter multiple cold start transients. Accurate modeling of catalyst warm-up and cooling is, therefore, very important to simulate LNT performance in such vehicles. For this purpose, the convective heat loss from the LNT to the ambient is modeled using a Nusselt number correlation that includes effects of both forced convection and natural convection (with later being important when vehicle is stationary). Using the model, the fuel penalty associated with operating LNTs on small diesel engine powered car during FTP drive cycles is estimated.

  6. Platform for Testing Robotic Vehicles on Simulated Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindemann, Randel

    2006-01-01

    The variable terrain tilt platform (VTTP) is a means of providing simulated terrain for mobility testing of engineering models of the Mars Exploration Rovers. The VTTP could also be used for testing the ability of other robotic land vehicles (and small vehicles in general) to move across terrain under diverse conditions of slope and surface texture, and in the presence of obstacles of various sizes and shapes. The VTTP consists mostly of a 16-ft-(4.88-m)-square tilt table. The tilt can be adjusted to any angle between 0 (horizontal) and 25 . The test surface of the table can be left bare; can be covered with hard, high-friction material; or can be covered with sand, gravel, and/or other ground-simulating material or combination of materials to a thickness of as much as 6 in. (approx. 15 cm). Models of rocks, trenches, and other obstacles can be placed on the simulated terrain. For example, for one of the Mars- Rover tests, a high-friction mat was attached to the platform, then a 6-in.- ( 15 cm) deep layer of dry, loose beach sand was deposited on the mat. The choice of these two driving surface materials was meant to bound the range of variability of terrain that the rover was expected to encounter on the Martian surface. At each of the different angles at which tests were performed, for some of the tests, rocklike concrete obstacles ranging in height from 10 to 25 cm were placed in the path of the rover (see figure). The development of the VTTP was accompanied by development of a methodology of testing to characterize the performance and modes of failure of a vehicle under test. In addition to variations in slope, ground material, and obstacles, testing typically includes driving up-slope, down-slope, cross-slope, and at intermediate angles relative to slope. Testing includes recording of drive-motor currents, wheel speeds, articulation of suspension mechanisms, and the actual path of the vehicle over the simulated terrain. The collected data can be used to

  7. FY2013 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-02-01

    FY 2013 annual report focuses on the following areas: vehicle modeling and simulation, component and systems evaluations, laboratory and field evaluations, codes and standards, industry projects, and vehicle systems optimization.

  8. Variable neighbourhood simulated annealing algorithm for capacitated vehicle routing problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yiyong; Zhao, Qiuhong; Kaku, Ikou; Mladenovic, Nenad

    2014-04-01

    This article presents the variable neighbourhood simulated annealing (VNSA) algorithm, a variant of the variable neighbourhood search (VNS) combined with simulated annealing (SA), for efficiently solving capacitated vehicle routing problems (CVRPs). In the new algorithm, the deterministic 'Move or not' criterion of the original VNS algorithm regarding the incumbent replacement is replaced by an SA probability, and the neighbourhood shifting of the original VNS (from near to far by k← k+1) is replaced by a neighbourhood shaking procedure following a specified rule. The geographical neighbourhood structure is introduced in constructing the neighbourhood structures for the CVRP of the string model. The proposed algorithm is tested against 39 well-known benchmark CVRP instances of different scales (small/middle, large, very large). The results show that the VNSA algorithm outperforms most existing algorithms in terms of computational effectiveness and efficiency, showing good performance in solving large and very large CVRPs.

  9. Unobtrusive vehicle motion prediction cues reduced simulator sickness during passive travel in a driving simulator.

    PubMed

    Jeng-Weei Lin, James; Parker, D E; Lahav, Michal; Furness, T A

    2005-05-15

    This study investigated cues that permit prediction of turns during passive movement through a virtual environment. Effects on simulator sickness (SS), presence and enjoyment were examined. Subjects were exposed to complex visual motion through a cartoon-like simulated environment in a driving simulator. Forward velocity remained constant and the motion path was the same across all experimental conditions. Using a within-subject design, we examined visual paths that provided different levels of cue salience - detailed, simplified and no cues - for the upcoming simulated vehicle motion. Following each trial, participants completed questionnaires on SS, presence and enjoyment. After all of the trials were completed, a debriefing determined participants' perceptions of vehicle motion attributes and their awareness of the prediction cues. The results showed that SS in the no-cue condition was significantly greater than that in the conditions that provided vehicle motion cues. Presence and enjoyment responses were not different across the conditions. No participants reported differences between prediction cue conditions or recognized that the vehicle motion followed the same path across trials. However, participants tended to report that the motion was smoother for the detailed-cue than the no-cue condition. Participants ranked turn predictability as higher in conditions with prediction cues. The results support the hypothesis that unobtrusive and unreported motion cues may alleviate SS in a virtual environment.

  10. Improving Fidelity of Launch Vehicle Liftoff Acoustic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter; West, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Launch vehicles experience high acoustic loads during ignition and liftoff affected by the interaction of rocket plume generated acoustic waves with launch pad structures. Application of highly parallelized Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis tools optimized for application on the NAS computer systems such as the Loci/CHEM program now enable simulation of time-accurate, turbulent, multi-species plume formation and interaction with launch pad geometry and capture the generation of acoustic noise at the source regions in the plume shear layers and impingement regions. These CFD solvers are robust in capturing the acoustic fluctuations, but they are too dissipative to accurately resolve the propagation of the acoustic waves throughout the launch environment domain along the vehicle. A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed to improve such liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework combines the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate discontinuous Galerkin (DG) solver, Loci/THRUST, developed in the same computational framework. Loci/THRUST employs a low dissipation, high-order, unstructured DG method to accurately propagate acoustic waves away from the source regions across large distances. The DG solver is currently capable of solving up to 4th order solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Higher order boundary conditions are implemented to accurately model the reflection and refraction of acoustic waves on launch pad components. The DG solver accepts generalized unstructured meshes, enabling efficient application of common mesh generation tools for CHEM and THRUST simulations. The DG solution is coupled with the CFD solution at interface boundaries placed near the CFD acoustic source regions. Both simulations are executed simultaneously with coordinated boundary condition data exchange.

  11. Ground Contact Modeling for the Morpheus Test Vehicle Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The Morpheus vertical test vehicle is an autonomous robotic lander being developed at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to test hazard detection technology. Because the initial ground contact simulation model was not very realistic, it was decided to improve the model without making it too computationally expensive. The first development cycle added capability to define vehicle attachment points (AP) and to keep track of their states in the lander reference frame (LFRAME). These states are used with a spring damper model to compute an AP contact force. The lateral force is then overwritten, if necessary, by the Coulomb static or kinetic friction force. The second development cycle added capability to use the PolySurface class as the contact surface. The class can load CAD data in STL (Stereo Lithography) format, and use the data to compute line of sight (LOS) intercepts. A polygon frame (PFRAME) is computed from the facet intercept normal and used to convert the AP state to PFRAME. Three flat plane tests validate the transitions from kinetic to static, static to kinetic, and vertical impact. The hazardous terrain test will be used to test for visual reasonableness. The improved model is numerically inexpensive, robust, and produces results that are reasonable.

  12. Ground Contact Modeling for the Morpheus Test Vehicle Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The Morpheus vertical test vehicle is an autonomous robotic lander being developed at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to test hazard detection technology. Because the initial ground contact simulation model was not very realistic, it was decided to improve the model without making it too computationally expensive. The first development cycle added capability to define vehicle attachment points (AP) and to keep track of their states in the lander reference frame (LFRAME). These states are used with a spring damper model to compute an AP contact force. The lateral force is then overwritten, if necessary, by the Coulomb static or kinetic friction force. The second development cycle added capability to use the PolySurface class as the contact surface. The class can load CAD data in STL (Stereo Lithography) format, and use the data to compute line of sight (LOS) intercepts. A polygon frame (PFRAME) is computed from the facet intercept normal and used to convert the AP state to PFRAME. Three flat plane tests validate the transitions from kinetic to static, static to kinetic, and vertical impact. The hazardous terrain test will be used to test for visual reasonableness. The improved model is numerically inexpensive, robust, and produces results that are reasonable.

  13. Simulation Development and Analysis of Crew Vehicle Ascent Abort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Chi S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program is an integral step in its journey to Mars as it would expedite development of space technologies and open up partnership with U.S. commercial companies. NASA reviews and independent assessment of Commercial Crew Program is fundamental to its success, and being able to model a commercial crew vehicle in a simulation rather than conduct a live test would be a safer, faster, and less expensive way to assess and certify the capabilities of the vehicle. To this end, my project was to determine the feasibility of using a simulation tool named SOMBAT version 2.0 to model a multiple parachute system for Commercial Crew Program simulation. The main tasks assigned to me were to debug and test the main parachute system model, (capable of simulating one to four main parachute bodies), and to utilize a graphical program to animate the simulation results. To begin tackling the first task, I learned how to use SOMBAT by familiarizing myself with its mechanics and by understanding the methods used to tweak its various parameters and outputs. I then used this new knowledge to set up, run, and analyze many different situations within SOMBAT in order to explore the limitations of the parachute model. Some examples of parameters that I varied include the initial velocity and orientation of the falling capsule, the number of main parachutes, and the location where the parachutes were attached to the capsule. Each parameter changed would give a different output, and in some cases, would expose a bug or limitation in the model. A major bug that I discovered was the inability of the model to handle any number of parachutes other than three. I spent quite some time trying to debug the code logically, but was unable to figure it out until my mentor taught me that digital simulation limitations can occur when some approximations are mistakenly assumed for certain in a physical system. This led me to the realization that unlike in all of the programming classes

  14. Evaluation of Driver Stress Using Motor-vehicle Driving Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Mitsuo; Wakasugi, Junichi; Ikegami, Tatsuya; Nanba, Shinji; Yamaguchi, Masaki

    This paper proposes a method for evaluating driver stress using a motor-vehicle driving simulator and a biomarker as an index of stress. Software has been developed, which can deliberately control driving tasks, in addition to analyzing driving information, such as frequency of the use of accelerator and/or brakes and the degree of deviation from the driving course. Sympathetic nervous activity was noninvasively evaluated using a hand-held monitor of salivary amylase activity, which chemically measured a biomarker every few minutes. Using healthy 20 female adults, the appropriateness of the proposed method was evaluated in vivo. The experimental results showed that the driving stress might be caused to the drivers in only 20 minutes by adding more severe driving tasks than normally experienced by the subjects without endangering them. Furthermore, the result indicate that frequent measurements of sympathetic nervous activity were possible without putting the subjects under restraint by using salivary amylase activity as the index.

  15. Modeling and Simulation for Multi-Missions Space Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Max

    2011-01-01

    Asteroids and Near-Earth Objects [NEOs] are of great interest for future space missions. The Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle [MMSEV] is being considered for future Near Earth Object missions and requires detailed planning and study of its Guidance, Navigation, and Control [GNC]. A possible mission of the MMSEV to a NEO would be to navigate the spacecraft to a stationary orbit with respect to the rotating asteroid and proceed to anchor into the surface of the asteroid with robotic arms. The Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation [DARTS] laboratory develops reusable models and simulations for the design and analysis of missions. In this paper, the development of guidance and anchoring models are presented together with their role in achieving mission objectives and relationships to other parts of the simulation. One important aspect of guidance is in developing methods to represent the evolution of kinematic frames related to the tasks to be achieved by the spacecraft and its robot arms. In this paper, we compare various types of mathematical interpolation methods for position and quaternion frames. Subsequent work will be on analyzing the spacecraft guidance system with different movements of the arms. With the analyzed data, the guidance system can be adjusted to minimize the errors in performing precision maneuvers.

  16. The Influence of Motion Cues on Driver-Vehicle Performance in a Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repa, B. S.; Leucht, P. M.; Wierwille, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    Four different motion base configurations were studied on driving simulator. Differently responding vehicles were simulated on each motion configurations and the effects of the vehicle characteristics on driver vehicle system performance, driver control activity, and driver opinion ratings of vehicle performance during driving are compared for different motion configurations. Data show that: (1)) the effects of changes in vehicle characteristics on the different objective and subjective measures of driver vehicle performance are not disguised by the lack of physical motion; (2) fixed base simulator can be used to draw inferences despite the lack of motion; (3) the presence of motion tends to reduce path keeping errors and driver control activity; (4) roll and yaw motions are recommended because of their marked influence on driver vehicle performance (5) the importance of motion increases as the driving maneuvers become more extreme.

  17. FY2014 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    The Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to advancing light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle systems to help maximize the number of electric miles driven and increase the energy efficiency of transportation vehicles.

  18. Micro-simulation of vehicle conflicts involving right-turn vehicles at signalized intersections based on cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Chai, C; Wong, Y D

    2014-02-01

    At intersection, vehicles coming from different directions conflict with each other. Improper geometric design and signal settings at signalized intersection will increase occurrence of conflicts between road users and results in a reduction of the safety level. This study established a cellular automata (CA) model to simulate vehicular interactions involving right-turn vehicles (as similar to left-turn vehicles in US). Through various simulation scenarios for four case cross-intersections, the relationships between conflict occurrences involving right-turn vehicles with traffic volume and right-turn movement control strategies are analyzed. Impacts of traffic volume, permissive right-turn compared to red-amber-green (RAG) arrow, shared straight-through and right-turn lane as well as signal setting are estimated from simulation results. The simulation model is found to be able to provide reasonable assessment of conflicts through comparison of existed simulation approach and observed accidents. Through the proposed approach, prediction models for occurrences and severity of vehicle conflicts can be developed for various geometric layouts and traffic control strategies.

  19. Real-Time and High-Fidelity Simulation Environment for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan; Myint, Steven; Kuo, Calvin; Jain, Abhi; Grip, Havard; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Overholt, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a collaborative project between U.S. Army TARDEC and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to develop a unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) simulation model using the ROAMS vehicle modeling framework. Besides modeling the physical suspension of the vehicle, the sensing and navigation of the HMMWV vehicle are simulated. Using models of urban and off-road environments, the HMMWV simulation was tested in several ways, including navigation in an urban environment with obstacle avoidance and the performance of a lane change maneuver.

  20. Trajectory Simulation Model for a Side- Thruster Guided MLRS-Type Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    TNO report Trajectory Simulation Model for a Side- PML 1998-A80 Thruster Guided MLRS- Type Vehicle TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT...MLRS- Type Vehicle TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory Lange Kleiweg 137 Date P.O. Box 45 2280 AA Rijswijk May 1999 The Netherlands Author(s) Phone +31 15 284...TNO) TNO report PML 1998-A80 2 Managementuittreksel Titel Trajectory Simulation Model for a Side-Thruster Guided MLRS- Type Vehicle Auteur(s) Dr. ir

  1. Hypersonic vehicle simulation model: Winged-cone configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaughnessy, John D.; Pinckney, S. Zane; Mcminn, John D.; Cruz, Christopher I.; Kelley, Marie-Louise

    1990-01-01

    Aerodynamic, propulsion, and mass models for a generic, horizontal-takeoff, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) configuration are presented which are suitable for use in point mass as well as batch and real-time six degree-of-freedom simulations. The simulations can be used to investigate ascent performance issues and to allow research, refinement, and evaluation of integrated guidance/flight/propulsion/thermal control systems, design concepts, and methodologies for SSTO missions. Aerodynamic force and moment coefficients are given as functions of angle of attack, Mach number, and control surface deflections. The model data were estimated by using a subsonic/supersonic panel code and a hypersonic local surface inclination code. Thrust coefficient and engine specific impulse were estimated using a two-dimensional forebody, inlet, nozzle code and a one-dimensional combustor code and are given as functions of Mach number, dynamic pressure, and fuel equivalence ratio. Rigid-body mass moments of inertia and center of gravity location are functions of vehicle weight which is in turn a function of fuel flow.

  2. Launch Vehicle Ascent Trajectory Simulation Using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugo, Rafael A.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.; Marsh, Steven M.; Hoffman, James A.; Litton, Daniel K.; Schmitt, Terri L.

    2017-01-01

    The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) has been continuously developed for over 40 years and has been used in many flight and research projects. Recently, there has been an effort to improve the POST2 architecture by promoting modularity, flexibility, and ability to support multiple simultaneous projects. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the development of trajectory simulation in POST2 by describing methods and examples of various improved models for a launch vehicle liftoff and ascent.

  3. Time-domain simulation and nonlinear analysis on ride performance of four-wheel vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; He, H.; Geng, A. L.

    2008-02-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model with eight DOFs of a four-wheel vehicle is established in this paper. After detaching the nonlinear characteristics of the leaf springs and shock absorbers, the multi-step linearizing method is used to simulate the vehicle vibration in time domain, under a correlated four-wheel road roughness model. Experimental verifications suggest that the newly built vehicle model and simulation procedure are reasonable and feasible to be used in vehicle vibration analysis. Furthermore, some nonlinear factors of the leaf springs and shock absorbers, which affect the vehicle ride performance (or comfort), are investigated under different vehicle running speeds. Some substaintial rules of the nonlinear vehicle vibrations are revealed in this paper.

  4. On-the-road performance tests of electric test vehicle for correlation with road load simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, M.O.; Slavik, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    A special purpose dynamometer (Road Load Simulator) is being used at NASA Lewis Research Center to test and evaluate electric vehicle propulsion systems developed under DOE's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program. To improve correlation between system tests on the Road Load Simulator and on the road, similar performance tests are being conducted using the same vehicle. The results of track tests on the Lewis electric propulsion system test vehicle are described in this report. The tests include range at constant speeds and over SAE J227a driving cycles, maximum accelerations, maximum gradability, and tire rolling resistance determination. Road power requirements and energy consumption were also determined from coast-down tests.

  5. Minimum fuel control of a vehicle with a continuously variable transmission. [control system simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burghart, J. H.; Donoghue, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The design and evaluation of a control system for a sedan with a heat engine and a continuously variable transmission, is considered in a effort to minimize fuel consumption and achieve satisfactory dynamic response of vehicle variables as the vehicle is driven over a standard driving cycle. Even though the vehicle system was highly nonlinear, attention was restricted to linear control algorithms which could be easily understood and implemented demonstrated by simulation. Simulation results also revealed that the vehicle could exhibit unexpected dynamic behavior which must be taken into account in any control system design.

  6. Simulation of spray dispersion in a simplified heavy vehicle wake

    SciTech Connect

    Paschkewitz, J S

    2006-01-13

    Simulations of spray dispersion in a simplified tractor-trailer wake have been completed with the goal of obtaining a better understanding of how to mitigate this safety hazard. The Generic Conventional Model (GCM) for the tractor-trailer was used. The impact of aerodynamic drag reduction devices, specifically trailer-mounted base flaps, on the transport of spray in the vehicle wake was considered using the GCM. This analysis demonstrated that base flaps including a bottom plate may actually worsen motorist visibility because of the interaction of fine spray with large vortex flows in the wake. This work suggests that to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design and evaluate spray mitigation strategies the jet or sheet breakup processes can be modeled using an array of injectors of small (< 0.1 mm) water droplets; however the choice of size distribution, injection locations, directions and velocities is largely unknown and requires further study. Possible containment strategies would include using flow structures to 'focus' particles into regions away from passing cars or surface treatments to capture small drops.

  7. A technique for simulating turbulence for aerospace vehicle flight simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1977-01-01

    An atmospheric turbulence model which accommodates variability of turbulence properties along an aerospace vehicle trajectory was developed. The technique involves the use of Dryden spectral forms in which the defining parameters are the standard deviations (sigma) and integral scales (L) of turbulence. These spectra are expressed as nondimensional functions of the nondimensional frequency Omega = omega L/V where omega is dimensional radian frequency and V is the true air speed of the aerospace vehicle. The nondimensional spectra are factored by standard techniques to obtain nondimensional linear recursive filters in the time domain whereby band-limited white-like noise can be operated upon to obtain nondimensional longitudinal, lateral, and vertical turbulence velocities, as functions of nondimensional time, tV/L, where t is time. Application of the technique to the simulation of the space shuttle orbiter entry flight phase is discussed.

  8. Simulation-Based Analysis of Reentry Dynamics for the Sharp Atmospheric Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillier, Clemens Emmanuel

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the analysis of the reentry dynamics of a high-performance lifting atmospheric entry vehicle through numerical simulation tools. The vehicle, named SHARP, is currently being developed by the Thermal Protection Materials and Systems branch of NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The goal of this project is to provide insight into trajectory tradeoffs and vehicle dynamics using simulation tools that are powerful, flexible, user-friendly and inexpensive. Implemented Using MATLAB and SIMULINK, these tools are developed with an eye towards further use in the conceptual design of the SHARP vehicle's trajectory and flight control systems. A trajectory simulator is used to quantify the entry capabilities of the vehicle subject to various operational constraints. Using an aerodynamic database computed by NASA and a model of the earth, the simulator generates the vehicle trajectory in three-dimensional space based on aerodynamic angle inputs. Requirements for entry along the SHARP aerothermal performance constraint are evaluated for different control strategies. Effect of vehicle mass on entry parameters is investigated, and the cross range capability of the vehicle is evaluated. Trajectory results are presented and interpreted. A six degree of freedom simulator builds on the trajectory simulator and provides attitude simulation for future entry controls development. A Newtonian aerodynamic model including control surfaces and a mass model are developed. A visualization tool for interpreting simulation results is described. Control surfaces are roughly sized. A simple controller is developed to fly the vehicle along its aerothermal performance constraint using aerodynamic flaps for control. This end-to-end demonstration proves the suitability of the 6-DOF simulator for future flight control system development. Finally, issues surrounding real-time simulation with hardware in the loop are discussed.

  9. The new car following model considering vehicle dynamics influence and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dihua; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Min

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the car following model is investigated by considering the vehicle dynamics in a cyber physical view. In fact, that driving is a typical cyber physical process which couples the cyber aspect of the vehicles' information and driving decision tightly with the dynamics and physics of the vehicles and traffic environment. However, the influence from the physical (vehicle) view was been ignored in the previous car following models. In order to describe the car following behavior more reasonably in real traffic, a new car following model by considering vehicle dynamics (for short, D-CFM) is proposed. In this paper, we take the full velocity difference (FVD) car following model as a case. The stability condition is given on the base of the control theory. The analytical method and numerical simulation results show that the new models can describe the evolution of traffic congestion. The simulations also show vehicles with a more actual acceleration of starting process than early models.

  10. Influence of wheel-rail contact modelling on vehicle dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgelman, Nico; Sichani, Matin Sh.; Enblom, Roger; Berg, Mats; Li, Zili; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a comparison of four models of rolling contact used for online contact force evaluation in rail vehicle dynamics. Until now only a few wheel-rail contact models have been used for online simulation in multibody software (MBS). Many more models exist and their behaviour has been studied offline, but a comparative study of the mutual influence between the calculation of the creep forces and the simulated vehicle dynamics seems to be missing. Such a comparison would help researchers with the assessment of accuracy and calculation time. The contact methods investigated in this paper are FASTSIM, Linder, Kik-Piotrowski and Stripes. They are compared through a coupling between an MBS for the vehicle simulation and Matlab for the contact models. This way the influence of the creep force calculation on the vehicle simulation is investigated. More specifically this study focuses on the influence of the contact model on the simulation of the hunting motion and on the curving behaviour.

  11. Measurements and simulations of rail vehicle dynamics with respect to overturning risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Dirk; Berg, Mats; Stichel, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Rail vehicles are exposed to strong lateral influences through curves, track imperfections and crosswind leading to large deflections of the vehicle suspension systems and carbody displacements. In turn, this increases the risk of vehicle overturning. In the present work, multibody simulations are performed in order to study the motion in the secondary suspension. Suspension deflection measurements on a fast test train were carried out and used for validation of the simulations. The simulations show good agreement with the measurements and represent a good tool to predict the motion in the secondary suspension.

  12. Simulating the Household Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Distribution and its Electric Distribution Network Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Kim, Hoe Kyoung; Liu, Cheng; Kao, Shih-Chieh; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a multi agent-based simulation framework for modeling spatial distribution of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle ownership at local residential level, discovering plug-in hybrid electric vehicle hot zones where ownership may quickly increase in the near future, and estimating the impacts of the increasing plug-in hybrid electric vehicle ownership on the local electric distribution network with different charging strategies. We use Knox County, Tennessee as a case study to highlight the simulation results of the agent-based simulation framework.

  13. Space vehicle approach velocity judgments under simulated visual space conditions.

    PubMed

    Haines, R F

    1989-02-01

    There were 35 volunteers who responded when they first perceived an increase in apparent size of a collimated, two-dimensional perspective image of an Orbiter vehicle. The variables of interest included the presence (or absence) of a fixed reticle within the field of view (FOV), background starfield velocity, initial range to the vehicle and vehicle closure velocity. It was found that: 1) increasing vehicle approach velocity yielded a very small (but significant) effect of faster detection of vehicle movement, nevertheless, response variability was relatively large; 2) including the fixed reticle in the FOV produced significantly slower detection of vehicle radial movement, however this occurred only at the largest range and the magnitude of the effect was only about 15% of the one sigma value; and 3) increasing background star velocity during this judgment led to slower detection of vehicle movement. While statistically significant, this effect was small and occurred primarily at the largest range. A possible explanation for the last two findings is that other static and dynamic objects within the visual field may compete for available attention which otherwise would be available for judging image expansion; thus, the target's retinal image has to expand more than otherwise for its movement to be detected. This study also showed that the Proximity Operations Research Mockup at NASA/Ames can be used effectively to investigate a variety of visual judgment questions related to future space operations. These findings are discussed in relation to previous research and possible underlying mechanisms.

  14. A study on optimization of hybrid drive train using Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Same, Adam; Stipe, Alex; Grossman, David; Park, Jae Wan

    This study investigates the advantages and disadvantages of three hybrid drive train configurations: series, parallel, and "through-the-ground" parallel. Power flow simulations are conducted with the MATLAB/Simulink-based software ADVISOR. These simulations are then applied in an application for the UC Davis SAE Formula Hybrid vehicle. ADVISOR performs simulation calculations for vehicle position using a combined backward/forward method. These simulations are used to study how efficiency and agility are affected by the motor, fuel converter, and hybrid configuration. Three different vehicle models are developed to optimize the drive train of a vehicle for three stages of the SAE Formula Hybrid competition: autocross, endurance, and acceleration. Input cycles are created based on rough estimates of track geometry. The output from these ADVISOR simulations is a series of plots of velocity profile and energy storage State of Charge that provide a good estimate of how the Formula Hybrid vehicle will perform on the given course. The most noticeable discrepancy between the input cycle and the actual velocity profile of the vehicle occurs during deceleration. A weighted ranking system is developed to organize the simulation results and to determine the best drive train configuration for the Formula Hybrid vehicle. Results show that the through-the-ground parallel configuration with front-mounted motors achieves an optimal balance of efficiency, simplicity, and cost. ADVISOR is proven to be a useful tool for vehicle power train design for the SAE Formula Hybrid competition. This vehicle model based on ADVISOR simulation is applicable to various studies concerning performance and efficiency of hybrid drive trains.

  15. An Abstract Multi-Rate Method for Vehicle Dynamics Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    a single macro multi-rate step from initial to final time. TODO : There are time domain multigrid approaches. This should be mentioned here with...simplified faster than real-time models such as those employed in first order design optimization tools [ TODO : citations]. Increasing in detail one...training [ TODO : citations]. Next are vehicle models of modest detail which support off-line analysis of vehicle handling, virtual kinematics and

  16. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent flow over a heavy vehicle with drag reduction devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangseung; Kim, Myeongkyun; You, Donghyun

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic drag contributes to a considerable amount of energy loss of heavy vehicles. To reduce the energy loss, drag reduction devices such as side skirts and boat tails, are often installed to the side and the rear of a heavy vehicle. In the present study, turbulent flow around a heavy vehicle with realistic geometric details is simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES), which is capable of providing unsteady flow physics responsible for aerodynamic in sufficient detail. Flow over a heavy vehicle with and without a boat tail and side skirts as drag reduction devices is simulated. The simulation results are validated against accompanying in-house experimental measurements. Effects of a boat tail and side skirts on drag reduction are discussed in detail. Supported by the Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA) Grant NTIS 1615007940.

  17. Commuter simulation of lithium-ion battery performance in hybrid electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P. A.; Henriksen, G. L.; Amine, K.

    2000-12-04

    In this study, a lithium-ion battery was designed for a hybrid electric vehicle, and the design was tested by a computer program that simulates driving of a vehicle on test cycles. The results showed that the performance goals that have been set for such batteries by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles are appropriate. The study also indicated, however, that the heat generation rate in the battery is high, and that the compact lithium-ion battery would probably require cooling by a dielectric liquid for operation under conditions of vigorous vehicle driving.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Reliability & Maintainability Parameters for Reusable Launch Vehicles using Design of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Morris, W. Douglas; White, Nancy H.; Lepsch, Roger A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a methodology for estimating reliability and maintainability distribution parameters for a reusable launch vehicle. A disciplinary analysis code and experimental designs are used to construct approximation models for performance characteristics. These models are then used in a simulation study to estimate performance characteristic distributions efficiently. The effectiveness and limitations of the developed methodology for launch vehicle operations simulations are also discussed.

  19. Simulated comparisons of emissions and fuel efficiency of diesel and gasoline hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K; Daw, C Stuart

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents details and results of hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric passenger vehicle (HEV and PHEV) simulations that account for the interaction of thermal transients from drive cycle demands and engine start/stop events with aftertreatment devices and their associated fuel penalties. The simulations were conducted using the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) combined with aftertreatment component models developed at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). A three-way catalyst model is used in simulations of gasoline powered vehicles while a lean NOx trap model in used to simulated NOx reduction in diesel powered vehicles. Both cases also use a previously reported methodology for simulating the temperature and species transients associated with the intermittent engine operation and typical drive cycle transients which are a significant departure from the usual experimental steady-state engine-map based approach adopted often in vehicle system simulations. Comparative simulations indicate a higher efficiency for diesel powered vehicles but the advantage is lowered by about a third (for both HEVs and PHEVs) when the fuel penalty associated with operating a lean NOx trap is included and may be reduced even more when fuel penalty associated with a particulate filter is included in diesel vehicle simulations. Through these preliminary studies, it is clearly demonstrated how accurate engine and exhaust systems models that can account for highly intermittent and transient engine operation in hybrid vehicles can be used to account for impact of emissions in comparative vehicle systems studies. Future plans with models for other devices such as particulate filters, diesel oxidation and selective reduction catalysts are also discussed.

  20. Simulation-based driver and vehicle crew training: applications, efficacy and future directions.

    PubMed

    Goode, Natassia; Salmon, Paul M; Lenné, Michael G

    2013-05-01

    Simulation is widely used as a training tool in many domains, and more recently the use of vehicle simulation as a tool for driver and vehicle crew training has become popular (de Winter et al., 2009; Pradhan et al., 2009). This paper presents an overview of how vehicle simulations are currently used to train driving-related procedural and higher-order cognitive skills, and team-based procedural and non-technical teamwork skills for vehicle crews, and evaluates whether there is evidence these training programs are effective. Efficacy was evaluated in terms of whether training achieves learning objectives and whether the attainment of those objectives enhances real world performance on target tasks. It was concluded that while some higher-order cognitive skills training programs have been shown to be effective, in general the adoption of simulation technology has far outstripped the pace of empirical research in this area. The paper concludes with a discussion of the issues that require consideration when developing and evaluating vehicle simulations for training purposes - based not only on what is known from the vehicle domain, but what can be inferred from other domains in which simulation is an established training approach, such as aviation (e.g. Jentsch et al., 2011) and medicine (e.g. McGaghie et al., 2010). STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Simulation has become a popular tool for driver and vehicle crew training in civilian and military settings. This review considers whether there is evidence that this training method leads to learning and the transfer of skills to real world performance. Evidence from other domains, such as aviation and medicine, is drawn upon to inform the design and evaluation of future vehicle simulation training systems.

  1. Analyzing the influence of median cross-section design on highway safety using vehicle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jason S; Hamblin, Bridget C; Brennan, Sean N; Donnell, Eric T

    2010-11-01

    Although vehicle dynamics simulations have long been used in vehicle design and crash reconstruction, their use for highway design is rare. This paper investigates the safety of highway medians through iterative simulations of off-road median encroachments. The commercially available software CarSim was used to simulate over one hundred thousand encroachments, representing the entire passenger vehicle fleet and a wide range of encroachment angles, departure speeds, steering inputs, and braking inputs. Each individual simulation output was then weighted using data from previous studies to reflect the probability of each specific accident scenario occurring in a real-life median encroachment. Results of this analysis illustrate the relative influence of median cross-section geometry on the resulting accident outcomes. The simulations indicate that the overall safety of a highway median depends on the occurrence of both vehicle rollover and median crossover events, and the cross-section shape, slope, and width are all shown to greatly affect each of these incidents. An evaluation of the simulation results was conducted with vehicle trajectories from previous experimental crash tests. Further assessment of the aggregate simulation results to actual crash data was achieved through comparison with several databases of crash statistics. Both efforts showed a strong agreement between the simulations and the real-life crash data.

  2. On the road performance tests of electric test vehicle for correlation with road load simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.; Slavik, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A dynamometer (road load simulator) is used to test and evaluate electric vehicle propulsion systems. To improve correlation between system tests on the road load simulator and on the road, similar performance tests are conducted using the same vehicle. The results of track tests on the electric propulsion system test vehicle are described. The tests include range at constant speeds and over SAE J227a driving cycles, maximum accelerations, maximum gradability, and tire rolling resistance determination. Road power requirements and energy consumption were also determined from coast down tests.

  3. The role of simulation in the development and flight test of the HiMAT vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. B.; Schilling, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Real time simulations have been essential in the flight test program of the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle at NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility. The HiMAT project makes extensive use of simulations in design, development, and qualification for flight, pilot training, and flight planning. Four distinct simulations, each with varying amounts of hardware in the loop, were developed for the HiMAT project. The use of simulations in detecting anomalous behavior of the flight software and hardware at the various stages of development, verification, and validation has been the key to flight qualification of the HiMAT vehicle.

  4. Investigating the Mobility of Light Autonomous Tracked Vehicles using a High Performance Computing Simulation Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negrut, Dan; Mazhar, Hammad; Melanz, Daniel; Lamb, David; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Letherwood, Michael; Jain, Abhinandan; Quadrelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the physics-based simulation of light tracked vehicles operating on rough deformable terrain. The focus is on small autonomous vehicles, which weigh less than 100 lb and move on deformable and rough terrain that is feature rich and no longer representable using a continuum approach. A scenario of interest is, for instance, the simulation of a reconnaissance mission for a high mobility lightweight robot where objects such as a boulder or a ditch that could otherwise be considered small for a truck or tank, become major obstacles that can impede the mobility of the light autonomous vehicle and negatively impact the success of its mission. Analyzing and gauging the mobility and performance of these light vehicles is accomplished through a modeling and simulation capability called Chrono::Engine. Chrono::Engine relies on parallel execution on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards.

  5. The General-Use Nodal Network Solver (GUNNS) Modeling Package for Space Vehicle Flow System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Jason; Moore, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The General-Use Nodal Network Solver (GUNNS) is a modeling software package that combines nodal analysis and the hydraulic-electric analogy to simulate fluid, electrical, and thermal flow systems. GUNNS is developed by L-3 Communications under the TS21 (Training Systems for the 21st Century) project for NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), primarily for use in space vehicle training simulators at JSC. It has sufficient compactness and fidelity to model the fluid, electrical, and thermal aspects of space vehicles in real-time simulations running on commodity workstations, for vehicle crew and flight controller training. It has a reusable and flexible component and system design, and a Graphical User Interface (GUI), providing capability for rapid GUI-based simulator development, ease of maintenance, and associated cost savings. GUNNS is optimized for NASA's Trick simulation environment, but can be run independently of Trick.

  6. Simulation of a solar powered electric vehicle under the constraints of the world solar challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roerig, Steven J.

    1995-03-01

    Development of an effective method for evaluation of alternative energy sources in the automotive industry has always been a necessity for cost efficient design analysis. One viable alternative energy source is electricity. In the present day environment of shrinking fossil fuel supplies and environmental awareness, electric powered vehicles are becoming a low cost, non-polluting, alternative means of transportation. The analysis of reliable electric propulsion can be expensive without a modeling tool for evaluating design strategies before vehicle construction. This thesis explores electricity as an alternative energy source for the automobile of tomorrow. Under the guidelines of the World Solar challenge, a solar powered electric vehicle, using a permanent-magnet brushless dc motor has be modeled and simulated in Simulink (Dynamic System Simulation Software). The simulations were performed with the goal of determining the optimum configuration to efficiently utilize the power supplied from the solar array, batteries, and motor. The simulated vehicle was 'driven' over various terrain's and at various speeds. The results obtained confirm this simulation as an efficient design tool and present an example of an optimum vehicle speed for one particular vehicle configuration.

  7. Development of a software platform for a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlis, Athanasios D.; Bibeau, Eric; Zanetel, Paul; Lye, Zelon

    2012-03-01

    Electricity use for transportation has had limited applications because of battery storage range issues, although many recent successful demonstrations of electric vehicles have been achieved. Renewable biofuels such as biodiesel and bioethanol also contribute only a small percentage of the overall energy mix for mobility. Recent advances in hybrid technologies have significantly increased vehicle efficiencies. More importantly, hybridization now allows a significant reduction in battery capacity requirements compared to pure electric vehicles, allowing electricity to be used in the overall energy mix in the transportation sector. This paper presents an effort made to develop a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) platform that can act as a comprehensive alternative energy vehicle simulator. Its goal is to help in solving the pressing needs of the transportation sector, both in terms of contributing data to aid policy decisions for reducing fossil fuel use, and to support research in this important area. The Simulator will allow analysing different vehicle configurations, and control strategies with regards to renewable and non-renewable fuel and electricity sources. The simulation platform models the fundamental aspects of PHEV components, that is, process control, heat transfer, chemical reactions, thermodynamics and fluid properties. The outcomes of the Simulator are: (i) determining the optimal combination of fuels and grid electricity use, (ii) performing greenhouse gas calculations based on emerging protocols being developed, and (iii) optimizing the efficient and proper use of renewable energy sources in a carbon constrained world.

  8. Assessment of Vehicle Sizing, Energy Consumption and Cost Through Large Scale Simulation of Advanced Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Moawad, Ayman; Kim, Namdoo; Shidore, Neeraj; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) has been developing more energy-efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies that will enable America to use less petroleum. The long-term aim is to develop "leapfrog" technologies that will provide Americans with greater freedom of mobility and energy security, while lowering costs and reducing impacts on the environment. This report reviews the results of the DOE VTO. It gives an assessment of the fuel and light-duty vehicle technologies that are most likely to be established, developed, and eventually commercialized during the next 30 years (up to 2045). Because of the rapid evolution of component technologies, this study is performed every two years to continuously update the results based on the latest state-of-the-art technologies.

  9. Path selection system simulation and evaluation for a Martian roving vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boheim, S. L.; Prudon, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    The simulation and evaluation of proposed path selection systems for an autonomous Martian roving vehicle was developed. The package incorporates a number of realistic features, such as the simulation of random effects due to vehicle bounce and sensor-reading uncertainty, to increase the reliability of the results. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation criteria were established. The performance of three different path selection systems was evaluated to determine the effectiveness of the simulation package, and to form some preliminary conclusions regarding the tradeoffs involved in a path selection system design.

  10. Simulation of product distribution at PT Anugrah Citra Boga by using capacitated vehicle routing problem method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamdjaya, T.; Jobiliong, E.

    2017-01-01

    PT Anugrah Citra Boga is a food processing industry that produces meatballs as their main product. The distribution system of the products must be considered, because it needs to be more efficient in order to reduce the shipment cost. The purpose of this research is to optimize the distribution time by simulating the distribution channels with capacitated vehicle routing problem method. Firstly, the distribution route is observed in order to calculate the average speed, time capacity and shipping costs. Then build the model using AIMMS software. A few things that are required to simulate the model are customer locations, distances, and the process time. Finally, compare the total distribution cost obtained by the simulation and the historical data. It concludes that the company can reduce the shipping cost around 4.1% or Rp 529,800 per month. By using this model, the utilization rate can be more optimal. The current value for the first vehicle is 104.6% and after the simulation it becomes 88.6%. Meanwhile, the utilization rate of the second vehicle is increase from 59.8% to 74.1%. The simulation model is able to produce the optimal shipping route with time restriction, vehicle capacity, and amount of vehicle.

  11. Experimental Evaluation of the Scale Model Method to Simulate Lunar Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kyle; Asnani, Vivake; Polack, Jeff; Plant, Mark

    2016-01-01

    As compared to driving on Earth, the presence of lower gravity and uneven terrain on planetary bodies makes high speed driving difficult. In order to maintain ground contact and control vehicles need to be designed with special attention to dynamic response. The challenge of maintaining control on the Moon was evident during high speed operations of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) on Apollo 16, as at one point all four tires were off the ground; this event has been referred to as the Lunar Grand Prix. Ultimately, computer simulation should be used to examine these phenomena during the vehicle design process; however, experimental techniques are required for the validation and elucidation of key issues. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the methodology for developing a scale model of a lunar vehicle using similitude relationships and to test how vehicle configuration, six or eight wheel pods, and local tire compliance, soft or stiff, affect the vehicles dynamic performance. A wheel pod consists of a drive and steering transmission and wheel. The Lunar Electric Rover (LER), a human driven vehicle with a pressurized cabin, was selected as an example for which a scale model was built. The scaled vehicle was driven over an obstacle and the dynamic response was observed and then scaled to represent the full-size vehicle in lunar gravity. Loss of ground contact, in terms of vehicle travel distance with tires off the ground, was examined. As expected, local tire compliance allowed ground contact to be maintained over a greater distance. However, switching from a six-tire configuration to an eight-tire configuration with reduced suspension stiffness had a negative effect on ground contact. It is hypothesized that this was due to the increased number or frequency of impacts. The development and testing of this scale model provided practical lessons for future low-gravity vehicle development.

  12. Simulating New Drop Test Vehicles and Test Techniques for the Orion CEV Parachute Assembly System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Aaron L.; Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Ray, Eric; Moore, Jim W.; Olson, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is engaged in a multi-year design and test campaign to qualify a parachute recovery system for human use on the Orion Spacecraft. Test and simulation techniques have evolved concurrently to keep up with the demands of a challenging and complex system. The primary simulations used for preflight predictions and post-test data reconstructions are Decelerator System Simulation (DSS), Decelerator System Simulation Application (DSSA), and Drop Test Vehicle Simulation (DTV-SIM). The goal of this paper is to provide a roadmap to future programs on the test technique challenges and obstacles involved in executing a large-scale, multi-year parachute test program. A focus on flight simulation modeling and correlation to test techniques executed to obtain parachute performance parameters are presented.

  13. 40 CFR 86.163-00 - Spot check correlation procedures for vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. 86... tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. This section is applicable for vehicles which are tested using a simulation of the environmental test...

  14. 40 CFR 86.163-00 - Spot check correlation procedures for vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. 86... tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. This section is applicable for vehicles which are tested using a simulation of the environmental test...

  15. 40 CFR 86.163-00 - Spot check correlation procedures for vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. 86... tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. This section is applicable for vehicles which are tested using a simulation of the environmental test...

  16. 40 CFR 86.163-00 - Spot check correlation procedures for vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. 86... tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. This section is applicable for vehicles which are tested using a simulation of the environmental test...

  17. 40 CFR 86.163-00 - Spot check correlation procedures for vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vehicles tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. 86... tested using a simulation of the environmental test cell for air conditioning emission testing. This section is applicable for vehicles which are tested using a simulation of the environmental test...

  18. Software Design Document Vehicle Simulation CSCI (5). Volume 4, Appendices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    findlocation in libimage.c, (null) kinematicscalcvelocity in calc-v.c, (null) kinematics-update-p in update-p.c, (null) E-55 BBN Systems and TechnoIlogies ...cig-stop in Ocig-stop.c, (null) E-255 BBN Systems and Technoilogies Vehicles CSCI cig-preparejic’.op in cig-no-op.c, (null) cig-reconfig-s=a in cig-j...network-set-commo-kill(kill-status) FUNCTION: network-set- mobility kill(kill-status) FUNCTION: network-set-firepower-kill(kilLstatus) FILE: dust

  19. Pediatric Motor Vehicle-Pedestrian Accident: a Simulation Scenario for Emergency Medicine Trainees

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Sarah; Dubrowski, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Simulation-based medical education is an evolving field that allows trainees to practice skills in a safe environment with no risk to patients. Recently, technology-enhanced simulation for emergency medicine learners has been shown to have favorable effects on learner knowledge and patient outcomes. In this report, a human patient simulator is used to familiarize emergency medicine trainees with the presentation and management of a pediatric motor vehicle-pedestrian accident is described. PMID:28367390

  20. In-vehicle group activity modeling and simulation in sensor-based virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Telagamsetti, Durga; Poshtyar, Azin; Chan, Alex; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-05-01

    Human group activity recognition is a very complex and challenging task, especially for Partially Observable Group Activities (POGA) that occur in confined spaces with limited visual observability and often under severe occultation. In this paper, we present IRIS Virtual Environment Simulation Model (VESM) for the modeling and simulation of dynamic POGA. More specifically, we address sensor-based modeling and simulation of a specific category of POGA, called In-Vehicle Group Activities (IVGA). In VESM, human-alike animated characters, called humanoids, are employed to simulate complex in-vehicle group activities within the confined space of a modeled vehicle. Each articulated humanoid is kinematically modeled with comparable physical attributes and appearances that are linkable to its human counterpart. Each humanoid exhibits harmonious full-body motion - simulating human-like gestures and postures, facial impressions, and hands motions for coordinated dexterity. VESM facilitates the creation of interactive scenarios consisting of multiple humanoids with different personalities and intentions, which are capable of performing complicated human activities within the confined space inside a typical vehicle. In this paper, we demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of VESM in terms of its capabilities to seamlessly generate time-synchronized, multi-source, and correlated imagery datasets of IVGA, which are useful for the training and testing of multi-source full-motion video processing and annotation. Furthermore, we demonstrate full-motion video processing of such simulated scenarios under different operational contextual constraints.

  1. Design and validation of a slender guideway for Maglev vehicle by simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jong-Boo; Han, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Sung-Soo; Yang, Seok-Jo; Kim, Ki-Jung

    2016-03-01

    Normally, Maglev (magnetic levitation) vehicles run on elevated guideways. The elevated guideway must satisfy various load conditions of the vehicle, and has to be designed to ensure ride quality, while ensuring that the levitation stability of the vehicle is not affected by the deflection of the guideway. However, because the elevated guideways of Maglev vehicles in South Korea and other countries fabricated so far have been based on over-conservative design criteria, the size of the structures has increased. Further, from the cost perspective, they are unfavourable when compared with other light rail transits such as monorail, rubber wheel, and steel wheel automatic guided transit. Therefore, a slender guideway that does have an adverse effect on the levitation stability of the vehicle is required through optimisation of design criteria. In this study, to predict the effect of various design parameters of the guideway on the dynamic behaviour of the vehicle, simulations were carried out using a dynamics model similar to the actual vehicle and guideway, and a limiting value of deflection ratio of the slender guideway to ensure levitation control is proposed. A guideway that meets the requirement as per the proposed limit for deflection ratio was designed and fabricated, and through a driving test of the vehicle, the validity of the slender guideway was verified. From the results, it was confirmed that although some increase in airgap and cabin acceleration was observed with the proposed slender guideway when compared with the conventional guideway, there was no notable adverse effect on the levitation stability and ride quality of the vehicle. Therefore, it can be inferred that the results of this study will become the basis for establishing design criteria for slender guideways of Maglev vehicles in future.

  2. Development and Testing of an Automatic Transmission Shift Schedule Algorithm for Vehicle Simulation (SAE Paper 2015-01-1142)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) modeling tool was created by EPA to estimate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of light-duty vehicles. ALPHA is a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulation capable of analyzing various vehicle type...

  3. Bond graph modeling, simulation, and reflex control of the Mars planetary automatic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amara, Maher; Friconneau, Jean Pierre; Micaelli, Alain

    1993-01-01

    The bond graph modeling, simulation, and reflex control study of the Planetary Automatic Vehicle are considered. A simulator derived from a complete bond graph model of the vehicle is presented. This model includes both knowledge and representation models of the mechanical structure, the floor contact, and the Mars site. The MACSYMEN (French acronym for aided design method of multi-energetic systems) is used and applied to study the input-output power transfers. The reflex control is then considered. Controller architecture and locomotion specificity are described. A numerical stage highlights some interesting results of the robot and the controller capabilities.

  4. Aerodynamic Characteristics, Database Development and Flight Simulation of the X-34 Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Ruth, Michael J.; Fuhrmann, Henri D.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of the aerodynamic characteristics, development of the preflight aerodynamic database and flight simulation of the NASA/Orbital X-34 vehicle is presented in this paper. To develop the aerodynamic database, wind tunnel tests from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers including ground effect tests at low subsonic speeds were conducted in various facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. Where wind tunnel test data was not available, engineering level analysis is used to fill the gaps in the database. Using this aerodynamic data, simulations have been performed for typical design reference missions of the X-34 vehicle.

  5. Application of CFE/POST2 for Simulation of Launch Vehicle Stage Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Toniolo, Matthew D.; Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2009-01-01

    The constraint force equation (CFE) methodology provides a framework for modeling constraint forces and moments acting at joints that connect multiple vehicles. With implementation in Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2), the CFE provides a capability to simulate end-to-end trajectories of launch vehicles, including stage separation. In this paper, the CFE/POST2 methodology is applied to the Shuttle-SRB separation problem as a test and validation case. The CFE/POST2 results are compared with STS-1 flight test data.

  6. Differences between vehicle lateral displacement on the road and in a fixed-base simulator.

    PubMed

    Blana, Evi; Golias, John

    2002-01-01

    This work investigates differences in lateral displacement when driving on curved and straight road sections in real-road and simulator conditions. We observed 100 licensed drivers on a rural road and 100 in a fixed-base simulator. Speed and lateral position on the real road were measured using videocameras. The analysis indicates that the mean vehicle lateral displacement is in general higher on the real road than in the simulator. However, these differences decrease for higher speeds at curved sections and for lower speeds at straight sections. It was also found that the standard deviation of the vehicle lateral displacement is significantly lower on the real road than the corresponding values in the simulator, at either curved or straight sections. Actual or potential applications of this research are related to a more realistic assessment of driving behavior scenarios derived on the basis of simulation experiment results.

  7. Simulation and Flight Control of an Aeroelastic Fixed Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin; Davidson, John B.; Ifju, Peter G.

    2002-01-01

    Micro aerial vehicles have been the subject of continued interest and development over the last several years. The majority of current vehicle concepts rely on rigid fixed wings or rotors. An alternate design based on an aeroelastic membrane wing has also been developed that exhibits desired characteristics in flight test demonstrations, competition, and in prior aerodynamics studies. This paper presents a simulation model and an assessment of flight control characteristics of the vehicle. Linear state space models of the vehicle associated with typical trimmed level flight conditions and which are suitable for control system design are presented as well. The simulation is used as the basis for the design of a measurement based nonlinear dynamic inversion control system and outer loop guidance system. The vehicle/controller system is the subject of ongoing investigations of autonomous and collaborative control schemes. The results indicate that the design represents a good basis for further development of the micro aerial vehicle for autonomous and collaborative controls research.

  8. Improving Energy Efficiency for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: A Discrete Event Simulation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumer, Abduaziz; Mekbib Atnaw, Samson; Kie Cheng, Jack; Singh, Lakveer

    2016-11-01

    This paper presented a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) model for investigating and improving energy efficiency in vehicle assembly line. The car manufacturing industry is one of the highest energy consuming industries. Using Rockwell Arena DES package; a detailed model was constructed for an actual vehicle assembly plant. The sources of energy considered in this research are electricity and fuel; which are the two main types of energy sources used in a typical vehicle assembly plant. The model depicts the performance measurement for process- specific energy measures of painting, welding, and assembling processes. Sound energy efficiency model within this industry has two-fold advantage: reducing CO2 emission and cost reduction associated with fuel and electricity consumption. The paper starts with an overview of challenges in energy consumption within the facilities of automotive assembly line and highlights the parameters for energy efficiency. The results of the simulation model indicated improvements for energy saving objectives and reduced costs.

  9. Pre-flight physical simulation test of HIMES reentry test vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Yonemoto, Koichi; Hosokawa, Shigeru

    ISAS is now developing a small reentry test vehicle, which is 2m long with a 1.5m wing span and weighs about 170 kg, for the purpose of exploring high angle-of-attack aerodynamic attitude control issue in supersonic and hypersonic speed. The flight test, employing 'Rockoon' launch system, is planned as a preliminary design verification for a fully reusable winged rocket named HIMES (Highly Maneuverable Experimental Space) vehicle. This paper describes the results of preflight ground test using a motion table system. This ground system test is called 'physical simulation' aimed at: (1) functional verification of side-jet system, aerodynamic surface actuators, battery and onboard avionics; and (2) guidance and control law evaluation, in total hardware-in-the-loop system. The pressure of side-jet nozzles was measured to provide exact thrust characteristics of reaction control. The dynamics of vehicle motion was calculated in real-time by the ground simulation computer.

  10. Cellular automata (CA) simulation of the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings on urban low-grade uncontrolled roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Yan

    2015-08-01

    This paper discusses the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings on uncontrolled low-grade roads or branch roads without separating barriers in cities where pedestrians may cross randomly from any location on both sides of the road. The rules governing pedestrian street crossings are analyzed, and a cellular automata (CA) model to simulate the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings is proposed. The influence of the interaction of vehicle flows and pedestrian crossings on the volume and travel time of the vehicle flow and the average wait time for pedestrians to cross is investigated through simulations. The main results of the simulation are as follows: (1) The vehicle flow volume decreases because of interruption from pedestrian crossings, but a small number of pedestrian crossings do not cause a significant delay to vehicles. (2) If there are many pedestrian crossings, slow vehicles will have little chance to accelerate, causing travel time to increase and the vehicle flow volume to decrease. (3) The average wait time for pedestrians to cross generally decreases with a decrease in vehicle flow volume and also decreases with an increase in the number of pedestrian crossings. (4) Temporal and spatial characteristics of vehicle flows and pedestrian flows and some interesting phenomena such as "crossing belt" and "vehicle belt" are found through the simulations.

  11. Real-Time Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation of Ares I Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick; Matras, Alex; Walker, David; Wilson, Heath; Fulton, Chris; Alday, Nathan; Betts, Kevin; Hughes, Ryan; Turbe, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Ares Real-Time Environment for Modeling, Integration, and Simulation (ARTEMIS) has been developed for use by the Ares I launch vehicle System Integration Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The primary purpose of the Ares System Integration Laboratory is to test the vehicle avionics hardware and software in a hardware - in-the-loop environment to certify that the integrated system is prepared for flight. ARTEMIS has been designed to be the real-time simulation backbone to stimulate all required Ares components for verification testing. ARTE_VIIS provides high -fidelity dynamics, actuator, and sensor models to simulate an accurate flight trajectory in order to ensure realistic test conditions. ARTEMIS has been designed to take advantage of the advances in underlying computational power now available to support hardware-in-the-loop testing to achieve real-time simulation with unprecedented model fidelity. A modular realtime design relying on a fully distributed computing architecture has been implemented.

  12. SIMPLEV: A simple electric vehicle simulation program, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, G.H.

    1991-06-01

    An electric vehicle simulation code which can be used with any IBM compatible personal computer was written. This general purpose simulation program is useful for performing parametric studies of electric vehicle performance on user input driving cycles. The program is run interactively and guides the user through all of the necessary inputs. Driveline components and the traction battery are described and defined by ASCII files which may be customized by the user. Scaling of these components is also possible. Detailed simulation results are plotted on the PC monitor and may also be printed on a printer attached to the PC. This report serves as a users` manual and documents the mathematical relationships used in the simulation.

  13. Simulation of hypersonic scramjet exhaust. [pressure distribution on afterbody/nozzle sections of vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, R. A.; Foreman, K. M.; Leng, J.; Hopkins, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    A plan and some preliminary analysis for the accurate simulation of pressure distributions on the afterbody/nozzle portions of a hypersonic scramjet vehicle are described. The objectives fulfilled were to establish the standards of similitude for a hydrogen/air scramjet exhaust interacting with a vehicle afterbody, determine an experimental technique for validation of the procedures that will be used in conventional wind tunnel facilities, suggest a program of experiments for proof of the concept, and explore any unresolved problems in the proposed simulation procedures. It is shown that true enthalpy, Reynolds number, and nearly exact chemistry can be provided in the exhaust flow for the flight regime from Mach 4 to 10 by a detonation tube simulation. A detailed discussion of the required similarity parameters leads to the conclusion that substitute gases can be used as the simulated exhaust gas in a wind tunnel to achieve the correct interaction forces and moments.

  14. Integrated G and C Implementation within IDOS: A Simulink Based Reusable Launch Vehicle Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Joseph E.; Bevacqua, Tim; Lawrence, Douglas A.; Zhu, J. Jim; Mahoney, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The implementation of multiple Integrated Guidance and Control (IG&C) algorithms per flight phase within a vehicle simulation poses a daunting task to coordinate algorithm interactions with the other G&C components and with vehicle subsystems. Currently being developed by Universal Space Lines LLC (USL) under contract from NASA, the Integrated Development and Operations System (IDOS) contains a high fidelity Simulink vehicle simulation, which provides a means to test cutting edge G&C technologies. Combining the modularity of this vehicle simulation and Simulink s built-in primitive blocks provide a quick way to implement algorithms. To add discrete-event functionality to the unfinished IDOS simulation, Vehicle Event Manager (VEM) and Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) subsystems were created to provide discrete-event and pseudo-health monitoring processing capabilities. Matlab's Stateflow is used to create the IVHM and Event Manager subsystems and to implement a supervisory logic controller referred to as the Auto-commander as part of the IG&C to coordinate the control system adaptation and reconfiguration and to select the control and guidance algorithms for a given flight phase. Manual creation of the Stateflow charts for all of these subsystems is a tedious and time-consuming process. The Stateflow Auto-builder was developed as a Matlab based software tool for the automatic generation of a Stateflow chart from information contained in a database. This paper describes the IG&C, VEM and IVHM implementations in IDOS. In addition, this paper describes the Stateflow Auto-builder.

  15. A survey of electric and hybrid vehicles simulation programs. Volume 2: Questionnaire responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevan, J.; Heimburger, D. A.; Metcalfe, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The data received in a survey conducted within the United States to determine the extent of development and capabilities of automotive performance simulation programs suitable for electric and hybrid vehicle studies are presented. The survey was conducted for the Department of Energy by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume 1 of this report summarizes and discusses the results contained in Volume 2.

  16. Air Cushion Vehicle Operator Training System (ACVOTS). Simulator Requirements Analysis. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    disadvantaqes associated with a model , however, remain. The laser-based system is currently underaoina extended evaluation in a helicopter simulator designed for... model . The basic system is well established, if rather ineffi- cient in its use of power and inflexible in nature. Some special design of the probe would...N-25-82 -22 . , ~it TRAINING SYSTEMS _ ANALYSIS & DESIGN L L" AIR CUSHION VEHICLE L OPERATOR TRAINING SYSTEM (ACVOTS) SIMULATOR REQUIREMENTS

  17. End-To-End Simulation of Launch Vehicle Trajectories Including Stage Separation Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Pamadi, Bandu N.

    2012-01-01

    The development of methodologies, techniques, and tools for analysis and simulation of stage separation dynamics is critically needed for successful design and operation of multistage reusable launch vehicles. As a part of this activity, the Constraint Force Equation (CFE) methodology was developed and implemented in the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2). The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of POST2/CFE to simulate a complete end-to-end mission. The vehicle configuration selected was the Two-Stage-To-Orbit (TSTO) Langley Glide Back Booster (LGBB) bimese configuration, an in-house concept consisting of a reusable booster and an orbiter having identical outer mold lines. The proximity and isolated aerodynamic databases used for the simulation were assembled using wind-tunnel test data for this vehicle. POST2/CFE simulation results are presented for the entire mission, from lift-off, through stage separation, orbiter ascent to orbit, and booster glide back to the launch site. Additionally, POST2/CFE stage separation simulation results are compared with results from industry standard commercial software used for solving dynamics problems involving multiple bodies connected by joints.

  18. Integration of Launch Vehicle Simulation/Analysis Tools and Lunar Cargo Lander Design. Part 1/2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, Yeu-Sheng Paul

    2005-01-01

    Simulation and analysis of vehicle performance is essential for design of a new launch vehicle system. It is more and more demand to have an integrated, highly efficient, robust simulation tool with graphical user interface (GUI) for vehicle performance and simulations. The objectives of this project are to integrate and develop launch vehicle simulation and analysis tools in MATLAB/Simulink under PC Platform, to develop a vehicle capable of being launched on a Delta-IV Heavy Launch Vehicle which can land on the moon with the goal of pre-implanting cargo for a new lunar mission, also with the capability of selecting other launch vehicles that are capable of inserting a payload into Trans-Lunar Injection (TLI). The vehicle flight simulation software, MAVERIC-II (Marshall Aerospace VEhicle Representation In 'C'), developed by Marshall Space Flight Center was selected as a starting point for integration of simulation/analysis tools. The goals are to convert MAVERIC-II from UNIX to PC platform and build input/output GUI s in the MATLAB environment, and then integrate them under MATLAB/Simulink with other modules. Currently, MAVERIC-II has been successfully converted from UNIX to PC using Microsoft Services for UNIX subsystem on PC. Input/Output GUI's have been done for some key input/output files. Calling MAVERIC-II from Simulink has been tested. Details regarding Lunar Cargo Lander Design are described in Part 2/2 of the paper on page X-1.

  19. Numerical simulation of inviscid supersonic flow over a launch vehicle with strap-on boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. P.; Prahlad, T. S.; Deshpande, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical simulation of an inviscid supersonic flow over a multibody configuration of a launch vehicle with strap-on booster is presented using an overlapping grid technique. In this approach, separate optimized grids with sufficient overlapping regions are employed for the core vehicle and the each strap-on boosters. The flow field information from one grid to another is transferred through the overlapping region. In each grid, Euler's equations in conservation form are integrated by the shock capturing technique. As a test case for establishing the concept of overlapping grids for the simulation of supersonic flow, a simple case of a core vehicle with the strap-on booster at a freestream Mach number of 2.5 at zero angle of attack is considered. The numerical results are presented in the form of the pressure contours, pressure and aerodynamic load distribution and the variation of the side force on the strap-on. The present results compare well with the experimental data and the other numerical results. Finally, the results are obtained for the case of core vehicle with two strap-ons and the pressure coefficient is compared with experimental values. The present numerical results show that the overlapping grid technique is stable and is capable of capturing accurately all the significant feature of an inviscid flow field over a launch vehicle with strap-ons.

  20. Handling performance control for hybrid 8-wheel-drive vehicle and simulation verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jun; Hu, Jibin

    2016-08-01

    In order to improve handling performance of a hybrid 8-Wheel-Drive vehicle, the handling performance control strategy was proposed. For armoured vehicle, besides handling stability in high speed, the minimum steer radius in low speed is also a key tactical and technical index. Based on that, the proposed handling performance control strategy includes 'Handling Stability' and 'Radius Minimization' control modes. In 'Handling Stability' control mode, 'Neutralsteer Radio' is defined to adjust the steering characteristics to satisfy different demand in different speed range. In 'Radius Minimization' control mode, the independent motors are controlled to provide an additional yaw moment to decrease the minimum steer radius. In order to verify the strategy, a simulation platform was built including engine and continuously variable transmission systems, generator and battery systems, independent motors and controllers systems, vehicle dynamic and tyre mechanical systems. The simulation results show that the handling performance of the vehicle can be enhanced significantly, and the minimum steer radius can be decreased by 20% which is significant improvement compared to the common level of main battle armoured vehicle around the world.

  1. Modeling, Simulation, and Control of a Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicle in Near-Earth Vicinity Including Solar Array Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzberger, Kevin (Inventor); Hojnicki, Jeffery (Inventor); Manzella, David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Modeling and control software that integrates the complexities of solar array models, a space environment, and an electric propulsion system into a rigid body vehicle simulation and control model is provided. A rigid body vehicle simulation of a solar electric propulsion (SEP) vehicle may be created using at least one solar array model, at least one model of a space environment, and at least one model of a SEP propulsion system. Power availability and thrust profiles may be determined based on the rigid body vehicle simulation as the SEP vehicle transitions from a low Earth orbit (LEO) to a higher orbit or trajectory. The power availability and thrust profiles may be displayed such that a user can use the displayed power availability and thrust profiles to determine design parameters for an SEP vehicle mission.

  2. Dynamical Modeling and Control Simulation of a Large Flexible Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Wei; Wie, Bong; Whorton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents dynamical models of a large flexible launch vehicle. A complete set of coupled dynamical models of propulsion, aerodynamics, guidance and control, structural dynamics, fuel sloshing, and thrust vector control dynamics are described. Such dynamical models are used to validate NASA s SAVANT Simulink-based program which is being used for the preliminary flight control systems analysis and design of NASA s Ares-1 Crew Launch Vehicle. SAVANT simulation results for validating the performance and stability of an ascent phase autopilot system of Ares-1 are also presented.

  3. Applying Monte Carlo Simulation to Launch Vehicle Design and Requirements Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, J. M.; Beard, B. B.

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Publication (TP) is meant to address a number of topics related to the application of Monte Carlo simulation to launch vehicle design and requirements analysis. Although the focus is on a launch vehicle application, the methods may be applied to other complex systems as well. The TP is organized so that all the important topics are covered in the main text, and detailed derivations are in the appendices. The TP first introduces Monte Carlo simulation and the major topics to be discussed, including discussion of the input distributions for Monte Carlo runs, testing the simulation, how many runs are necessary for verification of requirements, what to do if results are desired for events that happen only rarely, and postprocessing, including analyzing any failed runs, examples of useful output products, and statistical information for generating desired results from the output data. Topics in the appendices include some tables for requirements verification, derivation of the number of runs required and generation of output probabilistic data with consumer risk included, derivation of launch vehicle models to include possible variations of assembled vehicles, minimization of a consumable to achieve a two-dimensional statistical result, recontact probability during staging, ensuring duplicated Monte Carlo random variations, and importance sampling.

  4. Time Accurate CFD Simulations of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle in the Transonic Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Rojahn, Josh

    2011-01-01

    Significant asymmetries in the fluid dynamics were calculated for some cases in the CFD simulations of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle through its abort trajectories. The CFD simulations were performed steady state with symmetric boundary conditions and geometries. The trajectory points at issue were in the transonic regime, at 0 and 5 angles of attack with the Abort Motors with and without the Attitude Control Motors (ACM) firing. In some of the cases the asymmetric fluid dynamics resulted in aerodynamic side forces that were large enough that would overcome the control authority of the ACMs. MSFC s Fluid Dynamics Group supported the investigation into the cause of the flow asymmetries with time accurate CFD simulations, utilizing a hybrid RANS-LES turbulence model. The results show that the flow over the vehicle and the subsequent interaction with the AB and ACM motor plumes were unsteady. The resulting instantaneous aerodynamic forces were oscillatory with fairly large magnitudes. Time averaged aerodynamic forces were essentially symmetric.

  5. Influence of World and Gravity Model Selection on Surface Interacting Vehicle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2007-01-01

    A vehicle simulation is surface-interacting if the state of the vehicle (position, velocity, and acceleration) relative to the surface is important. Surface-interacting simulations perform ascent, entry, descent, landing, surface travel, or atmospheric flight. Modeling of gravity is an influential environmental factor for surface-interacting simulations. Gravity is the free-fall acceleration observed from a world-fixed frame that rotates with the world. Thus, gravity is the sum of gravitation and the centrifugal acceleration due to the world s rotation. In surface-interacting simulations, the fidelity of gravity at heights above the surface is more significant than gravity fidelity at locations in inertial space. A surface-interacting simulation cannot treat the gravity model separately from the world model, which simulates the motion and shape of the world. The world model's simulation of the world's rotation, or lack thereof, produces the centrifugal acceleration component of gravity. The world model s reproduction of the world's shape will produce different positions relative to the world center for a given height above the surface. These differences produce variations in the gravitation component of gravity. This paper examines the actual performance of world and gravity/gravitation pairs in a simulation using the Earth.

  6. Further Development of Verification Check-Cases for Six- Degree-of-Freedom Flight Vehicle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Madden, Michael M.; Shelton, Robert; Jackson, A. A.; Castro, Manuel P.; Noble, Deleena M.; Zimmerman, Curtis J.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; White, Joseph P.; Dutta, Doumyo; Queen, Eric M.; Powell, Richard W.; Sellers, WIlliam A.; Striepe, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    This follow-on paper describes the principal methods of implementing, and documents the results of exercising, a set of six-degree-of-freedom rigid-body equations of motion and planetary geodetic, gravitation and atmospheric models for simple vehicles in a variety of endo- and exo-atmospheric conditions with various NASA, and one popular open-source, engineering simulation tools. This effort is intended to provide an additional means of verification of flight simulations. The models used in this comparison, as well as the resulting time-history trajectory data, are available electronically for persons and organizations wishing to compare their flight simulation implementations of the same models.

  7. High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) longitudinal controller: Design, analyses, and simulation resultss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Proffitt, Melissa S.; Brown, Philip W.; Phillips, Michael R.; Rivers, Robert A.; Messina, Michael D.; Carzoo, Susan W.; Bacon, Barton J.; Foster, John F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the design, analysis, and nonlinear simulation results (batch and piloted) for a longitudinal controller which is scheduled to be flight-tested on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The HARV is an F-18 airplane modified for and equipped with multi-axis thrust vectoring. The paper includes a description of the facilities, a detailed review of the feedback controller design, linear analysis results of the feedback controller, a description of the feed-forward controller design, nonlinear batch simulation results, and piloted simulation results. Batch simulation results include maximum pitch stick agility responses, angle of attack alpha captures, and alpha regulation for full lateral stick rolls at several alpha's. Piloted simulation results include task descriptions for several types of maneuvers, task guidelines, the corresponding Cooper-Harper ratings from three test pilots, and some pilot comments. The ratings show that desirable criteria are achieved for almost all of the piloted simulation tasks.

  8. Simulation of catalytic oxidation and selective catalytic NOx reduction in lean-exhaust hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K

    2012-01-01

    We utilize physically-based models for diesel exhaust catalytic oxidation and urea-based selective catalytic NOx reduction to study their impact on drive cycle performance of hypothetical light-duty diesel powered hybrid vehicles. The models have been implemented as highly flexible SIMULINK block modules that can be used to study multiple engine-aftertreatment system configurations. The parameters of the NOx reduction model have been adjusted to reflect the characteristics of Cu-zeolite catalysts, which are of widespread current interest. We demonstrate application of these models using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software for vehicle simulations, along with a previously published methodology that accounts for emissions and temperature transients in the engine exhaust. Our results illustrate the potential impact of DOC and SCR interactions for lean hybrid electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  9. Simulation of Ground Winds Time Series for the NASA Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, Stanley I.

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of wind time series based on power spectrum density (PSD) and spectral coherence models for ground wind turbulence is described. The wind models, originally developed for the Shuttle program, are based on wind measurements at the NASA 150-m meteorological tower at Cape Canaveral, FL. The current application is for the design and/or protection of the CLV from wind effects during on-pad exposure during periods from as long as days prior to launch, to seconds or minutes just prior to launch and seconds after launch. The evaluation of vehicle response to wind will influence the design and operation of constraint systems for support of the on-pad vehicle. Longitudinal and lateral wind component time series are simulated at critical vehicle locations. The PSD model for wind turbulence is a function of mean wind speed, elevation and temporal frequency. Integration of the PSD equation over a selected frequency range yields the variance of the time series to be simulated. The square root of the PSD defines a low-pass filter that is applied to adjust the components of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of Gaussian white noise. The first simulated time series near the top of the launch vehicle is the inverse transform of the adjusted FFT. Simulation of the wind component time series at the nearest adjacent location (and all other succeeding next nearest locations) is based on a model for the coherence between winds at two locations as a function of frequency and separation distance, where the adjacent locations are separated vertically and/or horizontally. The coherence function is used to calculate a coherence weighted FFT of the wind at the next nearest location, given the FFT of the simulated time series at the previous location and the essentially incoherent FFT of the wind at the selected location derived a priori from the PSD model. The simulated time series at each adjacent location is the inverse Fourier transform of the coherence weighted FFT. For a selected

  10. Docking simulation analysis of range data requirements for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheal, J. D.; Vinz, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an initial study are reported assess the controllability of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) for terminal closure and docking are reported. The vehicle characteristics used in this study are those of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) baseline OMV which were published with the request for proposals for preliminary design of this vehicle. This simulation was conducted at MSFC using the Target Motion Simulator. The study focused on the OMV manual mode capability to accommodate both stabilized and tumbling target engagements with varying complements of range and range rate data displayed to the OMV operator. Four trained test subjects performed over 400 simulated orbital dockings during this study. A firm requirement for radar during the terminal closure and dock phase of the OMV mission was not established by these simulations. Fifteen pound thrusters recommended in the MSFC baseline design were found to be advantageous for initial rate matching maneuvers with unstabilized targets; however, lower thrust levels were desirable for making the final docking maneuvers.

  11. Feasibility Study of Laboratory Simulation of Single-Stage-to-Orbit Vehicle Base Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chung Sik; Sharma, Surendra; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of simulating in a laboratory the heating environment of the base region of the proposed reusable single-stage-to-orbit vehicle during its ascent is examined. The propellant is assumed to consist of hydrocarbon (RP1), liquid hydrogen (LH2), and liquid oxygen (LO2), which produces CO and H2 as the main combustible components of the exhaust effluent. Since afterburning in the recirculating region can dictate the temperature of the base flowfield and ensuing heating phenomena, laboratory simulation focuses on the thermochemistry of the afterburning. By extrapolating the Saturn V flight data, the Damkohler number, in the base region with afterburning for SSTO vehicle, is estimated to be between 30 and 140. It is shown that a flow with a Damkohler number of 1.8 to 25 can be produced in an impulse ground test facility. Even with such a reduced Damkohler number, the experiment can adequately reproduce the main features of the flight environment.

  12. Three-dimensional air quality simulation study on low-emission vehicles in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunimi, H.; Ishizawa, S.; Yoshikawa, Y.

    The effect of low-emission vehicles on improving air quality in Southern California was analyzed using a three-dimensional simulation model. Simulations were performed using 1987 emission data and meteorological data released by the California Air Resources Board. Exhaust emission data at TLEV, LEV and ZEV levels were used in the analysis. The results show that a reduction in reactive organic gases (ROG) has a large effect on reducing the ozone concentration. The ozone reduction effects of alternative fuels like methanol or compressed natural gas can also be analyzed at the same stage as exhaust emissions from conventional gasoline vehicles by applying the maximum incremental reactivity index to correct measured ROG data. The ROG/NO x ratio at the time of peak ozone concentration correlates well with the ozone level, suggesting that a reduction in NO x emissions does not always lower the ozone concentration.

  13. Direct simulation of three-dimensional flow about the AFE vehicle at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celenligil, M. Cevdet; Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional hypersonic rarefied flow about the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle was studied using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. Results are presented for the transitional flow regime encountered between 120 and 200 km altitudes with a reentry velocity of 9.92 km/s. In the simulations, a five-species reacting real-gas model that accounts for internal energies (rotational and vibrational) is used. The results indicate that the transitional effects are significant even at an altitude of 200 km and influence the overall vehicle aerodynamics. For the cases considered, the aerodynamic coefficients, surface pressures, convective heating, and flow field structure variations with rarefaction effects are presented.

  14. Modeling and simulation of a counter-rotating turbine system for underwater vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinping; Dang, Jianjun

    2016-12-01

    The structure of a counter-rotating turbine of an underwater vehicle is designed by adding the counter-rotating second-stage turbine disk after the conventional single-stage turbine. The available kinetic energy and the absorption power of the auxiliary system are calculated at different working conditions, and the results show that the power of the main engine and auxiliary system at the counter-rotating turbine system matches well with each other. The experimental simulation of the lubricating oil loop, fuel loop, and seawater loop are completed right before the technology scheme of the counter-rotating turbine system is proposed. The simulation results indicate that the hydraulic transmission system can satisfy the requirements for an underwater vehicle running at a steady sailing or variable working conditions.

  15. The hybrid bio-inspired aerial vehicle: Concept and SIMSCAPE flight simulation.

    PubMed

    Tao Zhang; Su, Steven; Nguyen, Hung T

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a Silver Gull-inspired hybrid aerial vehicle, the Super Sydney Silver Gull (SSSG), which is able to vary its structure, under different manoeuvre requirements, to implement three flight modes: the flapping wing flight, the fixed wing flight, and the quadcopter flight (the rotary wing flight of Unmanned Air Vehicle). Specifically, through proper mechanism design and flight mode transition, the SSSG can imitate the Silver Gull's flight gesture during flapping flight, save power consuming by switching to the fixed wing flight mode during long-range cruising, and hover at targeted area when transferring to quadcopter flight mode. Based on the aerodynamic models, the Simscape, a product of MathWorks, is used to simulate and analyse the performance of the SSSG's flight modes. The entity simulation results indicate that the created SSSG's 3D model is feasible and ready to be manufactured for further flight tests.

  16. Man-systems evaluation of moving base vehicle simulation motion cues. [human acceleration perception involving visual feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, M.; Brye, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A motion cue investigation program is reported that deals with human factor aspects of high fidelity vehicle simulation. General data on non-visual motion thresholds and specific threshold values are established for use as washout parameters in vehicle simulation. A general purpose similator is used to test the contradictory cue hypothesis that acceleration sensitivity is reduced during a vehicle control task involving visual feedback. The simulator provides varying acceleration levels. The method of forced choice is based on the theory of signal detect ability.

  17. Dynamic simulation of road vehicle door window regulator mechanism of cross arm type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklos, I. Zs; Miklos, C.; Alic, C.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents issues related to the dynamic simulation of a motor-drive operating mechanism of cross arm type, for the manipulation of road vehicle door windows, using Autodesk Inventor Professional software. The dynamic simulation of the mechanism involves a 3D modelling, kinematic coupling, drive motion parameters and external loads, as well as the graphically view of the kinematic and kinetostatic results for the various elements and kinematic couplings of the mechanism, under real operating conditions. Also, based on the results, the analysis of the mechanism components has been carried out using the finite element method.

  18. Integrated Vehicle Health Management Project-Modeling and Simulation for Wireless Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallett, Thomas M.; Mueller, Carl H.; Griner, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the efforts in modeling and simulating electromagnetic transmission and reception as in a wireless sensor network through a realistic wing model for the Integrated Vehicle Health Management project at the Glenn Research Center. A computer model in a standard format for an S-3 Viking aircraft was obtained, converted to a Microwave Studio software format, and scaled to proper dimensions in Microwave Studio. The left wing portion of the model was used with two antenna models, one transmitting and one receiving, to simulate radio frequency transmission through the wing. Transmission and reception results were inconclusive.

  19. Simulation study of unmanned aerial vehicle communication networks addressing bandwidth disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sixiao; Ge, Linqiang; Yu, Wei; Chen, Genshe; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Shen, Dan; Lu, Chao

    2014-06-01

    To date, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have been widely used for numerous applications. UAVs can directly connect to ground stations or satellites to transfer data. Multiple UAVs can communicate and cooperate with each other and then construct an ad-hoc network. Multi-UAV systems have the potential to provide reliable and timely services for end users in addition to satellite networks. In this paper, we conduct a simulation study for evaluating the network performance of multi-UAV systems and satellite networks using the ns-2 networking simulation tool. Our simulation results show that UAV communication networks can achieve better network performance than satellite networks and with a lower cost and increased timeliness. We also investigate security resiliency of UAV networks. As a case study, we simulate false data injection attacks against UAV communication networks in ns-2 and demonstrate the impact of false data injection attacks on network performance.

  20. Remote operation of an orbital maneuvering vehicle in simulated docking maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, Adam R.

    1990-01-01

    Simulated docking maneuvers were performed to assess the effect of initial velocity on docking failure rate, mission duration, and delta v (fuel consumption). Subjects performed simulated docking maneuvers of an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) to a space station. The effect of the removal of the range and rate displays (simulating a ranging instrumentation failure) was also examined. Naive subjects were capable of achieving a high success rate in performing simulated docking maneuvers without extensive training. Failure rate was a function of individual differences; there was no treatment effect on failure rate. The amount of time subjects reserved for final approach increased with starting velocity. Piloting of docking maneuvers was not significantly affected in any way by the removal of range and rate displays. Radial impulse was significant both by subject and by treatment. NASA's 0.1 percent rule, dictating an approach rate no greater than 0.1 percent of the range, is seen to be overly conservative for nominal docking missions.

  1. Some criteria for teleoperators and virtual environments from experiences with vehicle/operator simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, Henry R.

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of a wide range of simulations in which operator steering control of a vehicle is involved and the dominant-clues, closed-loop bandwidth, measured operator effective time-delay, and ratio of bandwidth-to-inverse delay are summarized. A correlation of kinetosis with dynamic scene field-of-view is shown. The use of moving base simulators to improve the validity of locomotion teleoperations is discussed. some rules-of-thumb for good 'feel-system' simulation, such as for control manipulanda are given. Finally, simulation tests of teleoperators and virtual environments should include three types of measures: system performance, operator (or robot) 'behavior', and mental workload evaluations.

  2. Vertical root fracture resistance of simulated immature permanent teeth filled with MTA using different vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Askerbeyli-Örs, Sevinc; Deniz-Sungur, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to evaluate the resistance vertical root fracture (VRF) of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) filled-immature permanent roots by using three different vehicles. Material and Methods Forty-extracted human single-rooted mandibular premolars were selected and the root length was standardized to the length of 9 mm. For simulation of immature tooth apices, peeso reamers were introduced into the root canals and the prepared roots were assigned into three experimental groups according the used vehicle (distilled water-DW, prophylene glycol-PG, chlorhexidine-CHX) and control group (n=10). To simulate a periodontal membrane, the apical 7 mm of all roots was covered with wax to obtain a 0.2- to 0.3-mm-thick layer before embedding the roots into acrylic cylinders. A vertical force was applied (1mm/min) using a universal testing machine and the maximum load (F-max) that fracture occurred and the fracture mode (splint or comminuted) was recorded. Data were presented as mean and standard deviations. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U Test was used for multiple comparisons. Results There were significant differences between fracture strength of experimental groups with that of control group (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were found amongst the fracture strength values of the experimental groups (p>0.05). In all groups, split fracture was the most common fracture mode. Conclusions MTA increases resistance of immature permanent teeth to VRF. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that mixing MTA with CHX or PG as the vehicle do not alter VRF resistance of simulated immature permanent roots. Key words:Immature teeth, MTA, vehicle, vertical root fracture. PMID:28210431

  3. A memory structure adapted simulated annealing algorithm for a green vehicle routing problem.

    PubMed

    Küçükoğlu, İlker; Ene, Seval; Aksoy, Aslı; Öztürk, Nursel

    2015-03-01

    Currently, reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and fuel consumption has become a critical environmental problem and has attracted the attention of both academia and the industrial sector. Government regulations and customer demands are making environmental responsibility an increasingly important factor in overall supply chain operations. Within these operations, transportation has the most hazardous effects on the environment, i.e., CO2 emissions, fuel consumption, noise and toxic effects on the ecosystem. This study aims to construct vehicle routes with time windows that minimize the total fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The green vehicle routing problem with time windows (G-VRPTW) is formulated using a mixed integer linear programming model. A memory structure adapted simulated annealing (MSA-SA) meta-heuristic algorithm is constructed due to the high complexity of the proposed problem and long solution times for practical applications. The proposed models are integrated with a fuel consumption and CO2 emissions calculation algorithm that considers the vehicle technical specifications, vehicle load, and transportation distance in a green supply chain environment. The proposed models are validated using well-known instances with different numbers of customers. The computational results indicate that the MSA-SA heuristic is capable of obtaining good G-VRPTW solutions within a reasonable amount of time by providing reductions in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

  4. Physical parameter identification method based on modal analysis for two-axis on-road vehicles: Theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Minyi; Zhang, Bangji; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Nong

    2016-07-01

    Physical parameters are very important for vehicle dynamic modeling and analysis. However, most of physical parameter identification methods are assuming some physical parameters of vehicle are known, and the other unknown parameters can be identified. In order to identify physical parameters of vehicle in the case that all physical parameters are unknown, a methodology based on the State Variable Method(SVM) for physical parameter identification of two-axis on-road vehicle is presented. The modal parameters of the vehicle are identified by the SVM, furthermore, the physical parameters of the vehicle are estimated by least squares method. In numerical simulations, physical parameters of Ford Granada are chosen as parameters of vehicle model, and half-sine bump function is chosen to simulate tire stimulated by impulse excitation. The first numerical simulation shows that the present method can identify all of the physical parameters and the largest absolute value of percentage error of the identified physical parameter is 0.205%; and the effect of the errors of additional mass, structural parameter and measurement noise are discussed in the following simulations, the results shows that when signal contains 30 dB noise, the largest absolute value of percentage error of the identification is 3.78%. These simulations verify that the presented method is effective and accurate for physical parameter identification of two-axis on-road vehicles. The proposed methodology can identify all physical parameters of 7-DOF vehicle model by using free-decay responses of vehicle without need to assume some physical parameters are known.

  5. Simulink-Based Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David m.; Bacon, Barton J.

    2006-01-01

    The Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV) is a Simulink-based approach to providing an engineering quality desktop simulation capability for finding trim solutions, extracting linear models for vehicle analysis and control law development, and generating open-loop and closed-loop time history responses for control system evaluation. It represents a useful level of maturity rather than a finished product. The layout is hierarchical and supports concurrent component development and validation, with support from the Concurrent Versions System (CVS) software management tool. Real Time Workshop (RTW) is used to generate pre-compiled code for substantial component modules, and templates permit switching seamlessly between original Simulink and code compiled for various platforms. Two previous limitations are addressed. Turn around time for incorporating tabular model components was improved through auto-generation of required Simulink diagrams based on data received in XML format. The layout was modified to exploit a Simulink "compile once, evaluate multiple times" capability for zero elapsed time for use in trimming and linearizing. Trim is achieved through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) with a narrow, script definable interface to the vehicle model which facilitates incorporating new models.

  6. Check-Cases for Verification of 6-Degree-of-Freedom Flight Vehicle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Shelton, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of innovative unmanned aeronautical systems and the emergence of commercial space activities have resulted in a number of relatively new aerospace organizations that are designing innovative systems and solutions. These organizations use a variety of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house-developed simulation and analysis tools including 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) flight simulation tools. The increased affordability of computing capability has made highfidelity flight simulation practical for all participants. Verification of the tools' equations-of-motion and environment models (e.g., atmosphere, gravitation, and geodesy) is desirable to assure accuracy of results. However, aside from simple textbook examples, minimal verification data exists in open literature for 6-DOF flight simulation problems. This assessment compared multiple solution trajectories to a set of verification check-cases that covered atmospheric and exo-atmospheric (i.e., orbital) flight. Each scenario consisted of predefined flight vehicles, initial conditions, and maneuvers. These scenarios were implemented and executed in a variety of analytical and real-time simulation tools. This tool-set included simulation tools in a variety of programming languages based on modified flat-Earth, round- Earth, and rotating oblate spheroidal Earth geodesy and gravitation models, and independently derived equations-of-motion and propagation techniques. The resulting simulated parameter trajectories were compared by over-plotting and difference-plotting to yield a family of solutions. In total, seven simulation tools were exercised.

  7. Further Investigations of Gravity Modeling on Surface-Interacting Vehicle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    A vehicle simulation is "surface-interacting" if the state of the vehicle (position, velocity, and acceleration) relative to the surface is important. Surface-interacting simulations perform ascent, entry, descent, landing, surface travel, or atmospheric flight. The dynamics of surface-interacting simulations are influenced by the modeling of gravity. Gravity is the sum of gravitation and the centrifugal acceleration due to the world s rotation. Both components are functions of position relative to the world s center and that position for a given set of geodetic coordinates (latitude, longitude, and altitude) depends on the world model (world shape and dynamics). Thus, gravity fidelity depends on the fidelities of the gravitation model and the world model and on the interaction of the gravitation and world model. A surface-interacting simulation cannot treat the gravitation separately from the world model. This paper examines the actual performance of different pairs of world and gravitation models (or direct gravity models) on the travel of a subsonic civil transport in level flight under various starting conditions.

  8. High fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model effects on race vehicle performance predictions using multi-body simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-07-01

    We described in this paper the development of a high fidelity vehicle aerodynamic model to fit wind tunnel test data over a wide range of vehicle orientations. We also present a comparison between the effects of this proposed model and a conventional quasi steady-state aerodynamic model on race vehicle simulation results. This is done by implementing both of these models independently in multi-body quasi steady-state simulations to determine the effects of the high fidelity aerodynamic model on race vehicle performance metrics. The quasi steady state vehicle simulation is developed with a multi-body NASCAR Truck vehicle model, and simulations are conducted for three different types of NASCAR race tracks, a short track, a one and a half mile intermediate track, and a higher speed, two mile intermediate race track. For each track simulation, the effects of the aerodynamic model on handling, maximum corner speed, and drive force metrics are analysed. The accuracy of the high-fidelity model is shown to reduce the aerodynamic model error relative to the conventional aerodynamic model, and the increased accuracy of the high fidelity aerodynamic model is found to have realisable effects on the performance metric predictions on the intermediate tracks resulting from the quasi steady-state simulation.

  9. Computational Simulation of Dynamic Response of Vehicle Tatra T815 and the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlček, Jozef; Valašková, Veronika

    2016-10-01

    The effect of a moving load represents the actual problem which is analysed in engineering practice. The response of the vehicle and its dynamic effect on the pavement can be analysed by experimental or computational ways. The aim of this paper was to perform computer simulations of a vehicle-ground interaction. For this purpose, a half-part model of heavy lorry Tatra 815 and ground was modelled in computational programmes ADINA and PLAXIS based on FEM methods, utilizing analytical approaches. Two procedures were then selected for further calculations. The first one is based on the simplification of the stiffer pavement layers to the beam element supported by the springs simulating the subgrade layers using Winkler-Pasternak theory of elastic half-space. Modulus of subgrade reaction was determined in the standard programme trough the simulation of a plate load test. Second approach considers a multi-layered ground system with layers of different thicknesses and material properties. For comparison of outputs of both approaches, the same input values were used for every calculation procedure. Crucial parameter for the simulations was the velocity of the passing vehicle with regard to the ground response to the impulse of the pass. Lower velocities result in almost static response of the pavement, but higher velocities induce response that can be better described by the dynamic theory. For small deformations, an elastic material model seems to be sufficient to define the ground response to the moving load, but for larger deformations advanced material models for the ground environment would be more reliable.

  10. Simulation of a typical reentry vehicle TPS local flow features and material response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, E. V.; Levin, D. A.

    2011-05-01

    Statistical BGK/DSMC and continuum N-S simulations of a typical vehicle reentry flow were performed taking into account local flow features. The local surface features were known to cause problems during the Apollo era Earth atmosphere reentry Ref. [1] and therefore require close attention as the shapes and design details of the new reentry vehicles tend to build on the Apollo reentry capsules. The TPS thermal response to the high energy reentry flow in cracks and compression pad areas is important to understand to predict the TPS degradation due to the chemical and thermal ablation. The TPS study presented in this article includes the stagnation area micro crack and compression pads which disturb the flow and cause local augmentation of heat flux, which in turn, results in higher recession rates.

  11. Quasi steady-state aerodynamic model development for race vehicle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrfeld-Halterman, J. A.; Uddin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a procedure to develop a high fidelity quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for use in race car vehicle dynamic simulations. Developed to fit quasi steady-state wind tunnel data, the aerodynamic model is regressed against three independent variables: front ground clearance, rear ride height, and yaw angle. An initial dual range model is presented and then further refined to reduce the model complexity while maintaining a high level of predictive accuracy. The model complexity reduction decreases the required amount of wind tunnel data thereby reducing wind tunnel testing time and cost. The quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for the pitch moment degree of freedom is systematically developed in this paper. This same procedure can be extended to the other five aerodynamic degrees of freedom to develop a complete six degree of freedom quasi steady-state aerodynamic model for any vehicle.

  12. Large eddy simulation of flows around ground vehicles and other bluff bodies.

    PubMed

    Krajnovic, Sinisa

    2009-07-28

    A brief review of large eddy simulation (LES) applications for different bluff-body flows performed by the author and his co-workers is presented. Examples of flows range from simple cube flows characterized by sharp edge separation over a three-dimensional hill where LES relies on good near-wall resolution, to complex flows of a tall, finite cylinder that contains several flow regimes that cause different challenges to LES. The second part of the paper is devoted to flows around ground vehicles at moderate Reynolds numbers. Although the present review proves the applicability of LES for various bluff-body flows, an increase of the Reynolds number towards the operational speeds of ground vehicles requires accurate near-wall modelling for a successful LES.

  13. Applying Monte Carlo Simulation to Launch Vehicle Design and Requirements Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, John M.; Beard, Bernard B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is focused on applying Monte Carlo simulation to probabilistic launch vehicle design and requirements verification. The approaches developed in this paper can be applied to other complex design efforts as well. Typically the verification must show that requirement "x" is met for at least "y" % of cases, with, say, 10% consumer risk or 90% confidence. Two particular aspects of making these runs for requirements verification will be explored in this paper. First, there are several types of uncertainties that should be handled in different ways, depending on when they become known (or not). The paper describes how to handle different types of uncertainties and how to develop vehicle models that can be used to examine their characteristics. This includes items that are not known exactly during the design phase but that will be known for each assembled vehicle (can be used to determine the payload capability and overall behavior of that vehicle), other items that become known before or on flight day (can be used for flight day trajectory design and go/no go decision), and items that remain unknown on flight day. Second, this paper explains a method (order statistics) for determining whether certain probabilistic requirements are met or not and enables the user to determine how many Monte Carlo samples are required. Order statistics is not new, but may not be known in general to the GN&C community. The methods also apply to determining the design values of parameters of interest in driving the vehicle design. The paper briefly discusses when it is desirable to fit a distribution to the experimental Monte Carlo results rather than using order statistics.

  14. Simulation of the Effect of Realistic Space Vehicle Environments on Binary Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Poirier, D. R.; Heinrich, J. C.; Sung, P. K.; Felicelli, S. D.; Phelps, Lisa (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Simulations that assess the effect of space vehicle acceleration environments on the solidification of Pb-Sb alloys are reported. Space microgravity missions are designed to provide a near zero-g acceleration environment for various types of scientific experiments. Realistically. these space missions cannot provide a perfect environment. Vibrations caused by crew activity, on-board experiments, support systems stems (pumps, fans, etc.), periodic orbital maneuvers, and water dumps can all cause perturbations to the microgravity environment. In addition, the drag on the space vehicle is a source of acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the impact of these vibration-perturbations and the steady-state drag acceleration on the experiments. These predictions can be used to design mission timelines. so that the experiment is run during times that the impact of the acceleration environment is acceptable for the experiment of interest. The simulations reported herein were conducted using a finite element model that includes mass, species, momentum, and energy conservation. This model predicts the existence of "channels" within the processing mushy zone and subsequently "freckles" within the fully processed solid, which are the effects of thermosolutal convection. It is necessary to mitigate thermosolutal convection during space experiments of metal alloys, in order to study and characterize diffusion-controlled transport phenomena (microsegregation) that are normally coupled with macrosegregation. The model allows simulation of steady-state and transient acceleration values ranging from no acceleration (0 g). to microgravity conditions (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) g), to terrestrial gravity conditions (1 g). The transient acceleration environments simulated were from the STS-89 SpaceHAB mission and from the STS-94 SpaceLAB mission. with on-orbit accelerometer data during different mission periods used as inputs for the simulation model. Periods of crew exercise

  15. Simulation and Analyses of Stage Separation of Two-Stage Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Neirynck, Thomas A.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Scallion, William I.; Murphy, K. J.; Covell, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has initiated the development of methodologies, techniques and tools needed for analysis and simulation of stage separation of next generation reusable launch vehicles. As a part of this activity, ConSep simulation tool is being developed which is a MATLAB-based front-and-back-end to the commercially available ADAMS(Registerd TradeMark) solver, an industry standard package for solving multi-body dynamic problems. This paper discusses the application of ConSep to the simulation and analysis of staging maneuvers of two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) Bimese reusable launch vehicles, one staging at Mach 3 and the other at Mach 6. The proximity and isolated aerodynamic database were assembled using the data from wind tunnel tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. The effects of parametric variations in mass, inertia, flight path angle, altitude from their nominal values at staging were evaluated. Monte Carlo runs were performed for Mach 3 staging to evaluate the sensitivity to uncertainties in aerodynamic coefficients.

  16. Simulation and Analyses of Stage Separation Two-Stage Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Neirynck, Thomas A.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Scallion, William I.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Covell, Peter F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA has initiated the development of methodologies, techniques and tools needed for analysis and simulation of stage separation of next generation reusable launch vehicles. As a part of this activity, ConSep simulation tool is being developed which is a MATLAB-based front-and-back-end to the commercially available ADAMS(registered Trademark) solver, an industry standard package for solving multi-body dynamic problems. This paper discusses the application of ConSep to the simulation and analysis of staging maneuvers of two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) Bimese reusable launch vehicles, one staging at Mach 3 and the other at Mach 6. The proximity and isolated aerodynamic database were assembled using the data from wind tunnel tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. The effects of parametric variations in mass, inertia, flight path angle, altitude from their nominal values at staging were evaluated. Monte Carlo runs were performed for Mach 3 staging to evaluate the sensitivity to uncertainties in aerodynamic coefficients.

  17. Time Accurate CFD Simulations of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle in the Transonic Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojahn, Josh; Ruf, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Significant asymmetries in the fluid dynamics were calculated for some cases in the CFD simulations of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle through its abort trajectories. The CFD simulations were performed steady state and in three dimensions with symmetric geometries, no freestream sideslip angle, and motors firing. The trajectory points at issue were in the transonic regime, at 0 and +/- 5 angles of attack with the Abort Motors with and without the Attitude Control Motors (ACM) firing. In some of the cases the asymmetric fluid dynamics resulted in aerodynamic side forces that were large enough that would overcome the control authority of the ACMs. MSFC's Fluid Dynamics Group supported the investigation into the cause of the flow asymmetries with time accurate CFD simulations, utilizing a hybrid RANS-LES turbulence model. The results show that the flow over the vehicle and the subsequent interaction with the AB and ACM motor plumes were unsteady. The resulting instantaneous aerodynamic forces were oscillatory with fairly large magnitudes. Time averaged aerodynamic forces were essentially symmetric.

  18. NASA Integrated Vehicle Health Management (NIVHM) A New Simulation Architecture. Part I; An Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, Gene

    2005-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to explore the development of a new architecture for simulating a vehicle health monitoring system in support of NASA s on-going Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) initiative. As discussed in NASA MSFC s IVHM workshop on June 29-July 1, 2004, a large number of sensors will be required for a robust IVHM system. The current simulation architecture is incapable of simulating the large number of sensors required for IVHM. Processing the data from the sensors into a format that a human operator can understand and assimilate in a timely manner will require a paradigm shift. Data from a single sensor is, at best, suspect and in order to overcome this deficiency, redundancy will be required for tomorrow s sensors. The sensor technology of tomorrow will allow for the placement of thousands of sensors per square inch. The major obstacle to overcome will then be how we can mitigate the torrent of data from raw sensor data to useful information to computer assisted decisionmaking.

  19. [Instantaneous emission simulation for light-duty diesel vehicle with different driving cycles by CMEM model].

    PubMed

    Dai, Pu; Chen, Chang-Hong; Huang, Cheng; Li, Li; Jia, Ji-Hong; Dong, Yan-Qiang

    2009-05-15

    CMEM model for calculating time based instantaneous emission from light duty diesel vehicle and its input parameters were introduced. On-board test data were used to validate the simulation results. The relative error of THC, CO, and NOx are 14.2%, 3.7% and 32.7%, respectively, while the correlation coefficients reach 0.73, 0.72 and 0.87. The instantaneous emissions of the light duty diesel vehicle simulated by CMEM model are strongly coherent with the transient driving cycle in Shanghai. The simulation of instantaneous emissions and fuel economy under the ECE-15 cycle, FTP cycle, Japan 10-15 cycle and the cycle of shanghai arterial road show that the instantaneous emissions decline with the increase of the vehicle speed, especially from 0-10 km x h(-1) to 10-20 km x h(-1). The acceleration process dominated the whole emissions, which contributes over 30% of the total emission, and sometimes it even reaches over 70%. The contributions of shanghai arterial road for idle condition are 40% and 30%, emission factors of CO are 1.3, 1.5 and 1.4 times of ECE-15 cycle, FTP cycle, Japan 10-15 cycle respectively; THC are respectively 1.5, 2.1 and 1.9 times of above cycles; and emission factors of NOx are respectively 1.2, 1.3 and 1.3 times of ECE-15 cycle, FTP cycle and Japan 10-15 cycle. The fuel economy of the light-duty diesel car on shanghai arterial road is the worst, which is 9.56 km x L(-1). The driving cycles used on abroad can not reflect the actual driving conditions in China.

  20. Reactivity-controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle system simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott J.; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-22

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity-controlled compression ignition has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion. The reactivity-controlled compression ignition concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. In this paper, a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition strategy is employed where the engine switches from reactivity-controlled compression ignition to conventional diesel combustion when speed and load demand are outside of the experimentally determined reactivity-controlled compression ignition range. The potential for reactivity-controlled compression ignition to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition–enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition, conventional diesel combustion, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Drive cycle simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. Multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Finally, engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared with conventional diesel combustion, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.

  1. Reactivity-controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle system simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Curran, Scott J.; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-22

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity-controlled compression ignition has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion. The reactivity-controlled compression ignition concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. In this paper, a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition strategy is employed where the engine switches from reactivity-controlled compression ignition to conventional diesel combustion whenmore » speed and load demand are outside of the experimentally determined reactivity-controlled compression ignition range. The potential for reactivity-controlled compression ignition to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition–enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition, conventional diesel combustion, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Drive cycle simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. Multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Finally, engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared with conventional diesel combustion, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.« less

  2. Evaluating the Impact of Road Grade on Simulated Commercial Vehicle Fuel Economy Using Real-World Drive Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lopp, Sean; Wood, Eric; Duran, Adam

    2015-10-13

    Commercial vehicle fuel economy is known to vary significantly with both positive and negative road grade. Medium- and heavy-duty vehicles operating at highway speeds require incrementally larger amounts of energy to pull heavy payloads up inclines as road grade increases. Non-hybrid vehicles are then unable to recapture energy on descent and lose energy through friction braking. While the on-road effects of road grade are well understood, the majority of standard commercial vehicle drive cycles feature no climb or descent requirements. Additionally, existing literature offers a limited number of sources that attempt to estimate the on-road energy implications of road grade in the medium- and heavy-duty space. This study uses real-world commercial vehicle drive cycles from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Fleet DNA database to simulate the effects of road grade on fuel economy across a range of vocations, operating conditions, and locations. Drive-cycles are matched with vocation-specific vehicle models and simulated with and without grade. Fuel use due to grade is presented, and variation in fuel consumption due to drive cycle and vehicle characteristics is explored through graphical and statistical comparison. The results of this study suggest that road grade accounts for 1%-9% of fuel use in commercial vehicles on average and up to 40% on select routes.

  3. A human operator simulator model of the NASA Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, F. A., III; Doane, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A generic operator model called HOS was used to simulate the behavior and performance of a pilot flying a transport airplane during instrument approach and landing operations in order to demonstrate the applicability of the model to problems associated with interfacing a crew with a flight system. The model which was installed and operated on NASA Langley's central computing system is described. Preliminary results of its application to an investigation of an innovative display system under development in Langley's terminal configured vehicle program are considered.

  4. A Computer Simulation of Vehicle and Actuator Dynamics for a Hexapod Walking Robot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California f,.i DTIC I sa , DO ELECTEo JUN 3 01994 THESIS A Computer Simulation of Vehicle and Actuator Dynamics...o olldto d 0401rdlir So n regedi tha bsdai atiti er a•ry othw aspea of this oolietr @4 mao•r oari. lndudrig suggeseom for retducig this bufdon to...Offiof Matagensied aid Budget. Pspew.,,A pReujamn Prmg (07044I0 ). WashitOn. DC 20503 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Ban PONT DATE 3 . REPORTT AND DATE5

  5. Challenges to Computational Aerothermodynamic Simulation and Validation for Planetary Entry Vehicle Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Kleb, Bil

    2010-01-01

    Challenges to computational aerothermodynamic (CA) simulation and validation of hypersonic flow over planetary entry vehicles are discussed. Entry, descent, and landing (EDL) of high mass to Mars is a significant driver of new simulation requirements. These requirements include simulation of large deployable, flexible structures and interactions with reaction control system (RCS) and retro-thruster jets. Simulation of radiation and ablation coupled to the flow solver continues to be a high priority for planetary entry analyses, especially for return to Earth and outer planet missions. Three research areas addressing these challenges are emphasized. The first addresses the need to obtain accurate heating on unstructured tetrahedral grid systems to take advantage of flexibility in grid generation and grid adaptation. A multi-dimensional inviscid flux reconstruction algorithm is defined that is oriented with local flow topology as opposed to grid. The second addresses coupling of radiation and ablation to the hypersonic flow solver - flight- and ground-based data are used to provide limited validation of these multi-physics simulations. The third addresses the challenges of retro-propulsion simulation and the criticality of grid adaptation in this application. The evolution of CA to become a tool for innovation of EDL systems requires a successful resolution of these challenges.

  6. Challenges to Computational Aerothermodynamic Simulation and Validation for Planetary Entry Vehicle Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Kleb, Bil

    2010-01-01

    Challenges to computational aerothermodynamic (CA) simulation and validation of hypersonic flow over planetary entry vehicles are discussed. Entry, descent, and landing (EDL) of high mass to Mars is a significant driver of new simulation requirements. These requirements include simulation of large deployable, flexible structures and interactions with reaction control system (RCS) and retro-thruster jets. Simulation of radiation and ablation coupled to the flow solver continues to be a high priority for planetary entry analyses, especially for return to Earth and outer planet missions. Three research areas addressing these challenges are emphasized. The first addresses the need to obtain accurate heating on unstructured tetrahedral grid systems to take advantage of flexibility in grid generation and grid adaptation. A multi-dimensional inviscid flux reconstruction algorithm is defined that is oriented with local flow topology as opposed to grid. The second addresses coupling of radiation and ablation to the hypersonic flow solver--flight- and ground-based data are used to provide limited validation of these multi-physics simulations. The third addresses the challenges of retro-propulsion simulation and the criticality of grid adaptation in this application. The evolution of CA to become a tool for innovation of EDL systems requires a successful resolution of these challenges.

  7. Extraction and Separation Modeling of Orion Test Vehicles with ADAMS Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Anderson, Keith; Cuthbert, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project has increased efforts to demonstrate the performance of fully integrated parachute systems at both higher dynamic pressures and in the presence of wake fields using a Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle (PCDTV) and a Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV), respectively. Modeling the extraction and separation events has proven challenging and an understanding of the physics is required to reduce the risk of separation malfunctions. The need for extraction and separation modeling is critical to a successful CPAS test campaign. Current PTV-alone simulations, such as Decelerator System Simulation (DSS), require accurate initial conditions (ICs) drawn from a separation model. Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS), a Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) tool, was employed to provide insight into the multi-body six degree of freedom (DOF) interaction between parachute test hardware and external and internal forces. Components of the model include a composite extraction parachute, primary vehicle (PTV or PCDTV), platform cradle, a release mechanism, aircraft ramp, and a programmer parachute with attach points. Independent aerodynamic forces were applied to the mated test vehicle/platform cradle and the separated test vehicle and platform cradle. The aero coefficients were determined from real time lookup tables which were functions of both angle of attack ( ) and sideslip ( ). The atmospheric properties were also determined from a real time lookup table characteristic of the Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) atmosphere relative to the planned test month. Representative geometries were constructed in ADAMS with measured mass properties generated for each independent vehicle. Derived smart separation parameters were included in ADAMS as sensors with defined pitch and pitch rate criteria used to refine inputs to analogous avionics systems for optimal separation conditions. Key design variables were dispersed in a Monte

  8. Analysis of experimental hydrogen engine data and hydrogen vehicle performance and emissions simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.M.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reports the engine and vehicle simulation and analysis done at Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) as a part of a joint optimized hydrogen engine development effort. Project participants are: Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNLC), responsible for experimental evaluation; Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), responsible for detailed fluid mechanics engine evaluations, and the University of Miami, responsible for engine friction reduction. Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios, so that NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency.

  9. Modeling, analysis, and simulation of the co-development of road networks and vehicle ownership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingtao; Ye, Zhirui; Shan, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional logistic model is proposed to describe the co-development of road networks and vehicle ownership. The endogenous interaction between road networks and vehicle ownership and how natural market forces and policies transformed into their co-development are considered jointly in this model. If the involved parameters satisfy a certain condition, the proposed model can arrive at a steady equilibrium level and the final development scale will be within the maximum capacity of an urban traffic system; otherwise, the co-development process will be unstable and even manifest chaotic behavior. Then sensitivity tests are developed to determine the proper values for a series of parameters in this model. Finally, a case study, using Beijing City as an example, is conducted to explore the applicability of the proposed model to the real condition. Results demonstrate that the proposed model can effectively simulate the co-development of road network and vehicle ownership for Beijing City. Furthermore, we can obtain that their development process will arrive at a stable equilibrium level in the years 2040 and 2045 respectively, and the equilibrium values are within the maximum capacity.

  10. Analysis of experimental hydrogen engine data and hydrogen vehicle performance and emissions simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    This paper reports the engine and vehicle simulation and analysis done at Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) as a part of a joint optimized hydrogen engine development effort. Project participants are: Sandia National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Miami. Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios. NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency. In this paper, a simplified engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. The experimental data are used to adjust the empirical constants in the heat release rate and heat transfer correlation. The results indicate that hydrogen lean-burn spark-ignite engines can provide Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) levels in either a series hybrid or a conventional automobile.

  11. Numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The following papers are presented: (1) numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the Integrated Space Shuttle vehicle; (2) a generalized scheme for 3-D hyperbolic grid generation; (3) collar grids for intersecting geometric components within the Chimera overlapped grid scheme; and (4) application of the Chimera overlapped grid scheme to simulation of Space Shuttle ascent flows.

  12. On-Track Testing as a Validation Method of Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of a Formula SAE Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingart, Robert

    This thesis is about the validation of a computational fluid dynamics simulation of a ground vehicle by means of a low-budget coast-down test. The vehicle is built to the standards of the 2014 Formula SAE rules. It is equipped with large wings in the front and rear of the car; the vertical loads on the tires are measured by specifically calibrated shock potentiometers. The coast-down test was performed on a runway of a local airport and is used to determine vehicle specific coefficients such as drag, downforce, aerodynamic balance, and rolling resistance for different aerodynamic setups. The test results are then compared to the respective simulated results. The drag deviates about 5% from the simulated to the measured results. The downforce numbers show a deviation up to 18% respectively. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis of inlet velocities, ride heights, and pitch angles was performed with the help of the computational simulation.

  13. CFD flowfield simulation of Delta Launch Vehicles in a power-on configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavish, D. L.; Gielda, T. P.; Soni, B. K.; Deese, J. E.; Agarwal, R. K.

    1993-07-01

    This paper summarizes recent work at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) to develop and validate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of under expanded rocket plume external flowfields for multibody expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). Multi engine reacting gas flowfield predictions of ELV base pressures are needed to define vehicle base drag and base heating rates for sizing external nozzle and base region insulation thicknesses. Previous ELV design programs used expensive multibody power-on wind tunnel tests that employed chamber/nozzle injected high pressure cold or hot-air. Base heating and pressure measurements were belatedly made during the first flights of past ELV's to correct estimates from semi-empirical engineering models or scale model tests. Presently, CFD methods for use in ELV design are being jointly developed at the Space Transportation Division (MDA-STD) and New Aircraft Missiles Division (MDA-NAMD). An explicit three dimensional, zonal, finite-volume, full Navier-Stokes (FNS) solver with finite rate hydrocarbon/air and aluminum combustion kinetics was developed to accurately compute ELV power-on flowfields. Mississippi State University's GENIE++ general purpose interactive grid generation code was chosen to create zonal, finite volume viscous grids. Axisymmetric, time dependent, turbulent CFD simulations of a Delta DSV-2A vehicle with a MB-3 liquid main engine burning RJ-1/LOX were first completed. Hydrocarbon chemical kinetics and a k-epsilon turbulence model were employed and predictions were validated with flight measurements of base pressure and temperature. Zonal internal/external grids were created for a Delta DSV-2C vehicle with a MB-3 and three Castor-1 solid motors burning and a Delta-2 with an RS-27 main engine (LOX/RP-1) and 9 GEM's attached/6 burning. Cold air, time dependent FNS calculations were performed for DSV-2C during 1992. Single phase simulations that employ finite rate hydrocarbon and aluminum (solid fuel) combustion

  14. CFD flowfield simulation of Delta Launch Vehicles in a power-on configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavish, D. L.; Gielda, T. P.; Soni, B. K.; Deese, J. E.; Agarwal, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent work at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) to develop and validate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of under expanded rocket plume external flowfields for multibody expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). Multi engine reacting gas flowfield predictions of ELV base pressures are needed to define vehicle base drag and base heating rates for sizing external nozzle and base region insulation thicknesses. Previous ELV design programs used expensive multibody power-on wind tunnel tests that employed chamber/nozzle injected high pressure cold or hot-air. Base heating and pressure measurements were belatedly made during the first flights of past ELV's to correct estimates from semi-empirical engineering models or scale model tests. Presently, CFD methods for use in ELV design are being jointly developed at the Space Transportation Division (MDA-STD) and New Aircraft Missiles Division (MDA-NAMD). An explicit three dimensional, zonal, finite-volume, full Navier-Stokes (FNS) solver with finite rate hydrocarbon/air and aluminum combustion kinetics was developed to accurately compute ELV power-on flowfields. Mississippi State University's GENIE++ general purpose interactive grid generation code was chosen to create zonal, finite volume viscous grids. Axisymmetric, time dependent, turbulent CFD simulations of a Delta DSV-2A vehicle with a MB-3 liquid main engine burning RJ-1/LOX were first completed. Hydrocarbon chemical kinetics and a k-epsilon turbulence model were employed and predictions were validated with flight measurements of base pressure and temperature. Zonal internal/external grids were created for a Delta DSV-2C vehicle with a MB-3 and three Castor-1 solid motors burning and a Delta-2 with an RS-27 main engine (LOX/RP-1) and 9 GEM's attached/6 burning. Cold air, time dependent FNS calculations were performed for DSV-2C during 1992. Single phase simulations that employ finite rate hydrocarbon and aluminum (solid fuel) combustion

  15. CFD Simulation of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle with Booster Separation Motor and Reaction Control Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, L. M.; Vicker, D.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate a very complicated flow field encountered during the space shuttle ascent. The flow field features nozzle plumes from booster separation motor (BSM) and reaction control system (RCS) jets with a supersonic incoming cross flow at speed of Mach 4. The overset Navier-Stokes code OVERFLOW, was used to simulate the flow field surrounding the entire space shuttle launch vehicle (SSLV) with high geometric fidelity. The variable gamma option was chosen due to the high temperature nature of nozzle flows and different plume species. CFD predicted Mach contours are in good agreement with the schlieren photos from wind tunnel test. Flow fields are discussed in detail and the results are used to support the debris analysis for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) task.

  16. Simulation and Analyses of Multi-Body Separation in Launch Vehicle Staging Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.; Samareh, Jamshid; Covell, Peter F.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    2006-01-01

    The development of methodologies, techniques, and tools for analysis and simulation of multi-body separation is critically needed for successful design and operation of next generation launch vehicles. As a part of this activity, ConSep simulation tool is being developed. ConSep is a generic MATLAB-based front-and-back-end to the commercially available ADAMS. solver, an industry standard package for solving multi-body dynamic problems. This paper discusses the 3-body separation capability in ConSep and its application to the separation of the Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) from the External Tank (ET) and the Orbiter. The results are compared with STS-1 flight data.

  17. Comparison of transport properties models for numerical simulations of Mars entry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jiaao; Wang, Jingying; Gao, Zhenxun; Jiang, Chongwen; Lee, Chunhian

    2017-01-01

    Effects of two different models for transport properties, including the approximate model and the collision integral model, on hypersonic flow simulations of Mars entry vehicles are numerically investigated. A least square fitting is firstly performed using the best-available data of collision integrals for Martian atmosphere species within the temperature range of 300-20,000 K. Then, the performance of these two transport properties models are compared for an equilibrium Martian atmosphere gas mixture at 10 kPa and temperatures ranging from 1000 to 10,000 K. Finally, four flight conditions chosen from the trajectory of the Mars Pathfinder entry vehicle are numerically simulated. It is indicated that the approximate model is capable of accurately providing the distributions of species mass fractions and temperatures in the flowfield. Both models give similar translational-rotational and vibrational heat fluxes. However, the chemical diffusion heat fluxes predicted by the approximate model are significantly larger than the results computed by the collision integral model, particularly in the vicinity of the forebody stagnation point, whose maximum relative error of 15% for the super-catalytic case. The diffusion model employed in the approximate model is responsible to the discrepancy. In addition, the wake structure is largely unaffected by the transport properties models.

  18. Further validation of artificial neural network-based emissions simulation models for conventional and hybrid electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Tóth-Nagy, Csaba; Conley, John J; Jarrett, Ronald P; Clark, Nigel N

    2006-07-01

    With the advent of hybrid electric vehicles, computer-based vehicle simulation becomes more useful to the engineer and designer trying to optimize the complex combination of control strategy, power plant, drive train, vehicle, and driving conditions. With the desire to incorporate emissions as a design criterion, researchers at West Virginia University have developed artificial neural network (ANN) models for predicting emissions from heavy-duty vehicles. The ANN models were trained on engine and exhaust emissions data collected from transient dynamometer tests of heavy-duty diesel engines then used to predict emissions based on engine speed and torque data from simulated operation of a tractor truck and hybrid electric bus. Simulated vehicle operation was performed with the ADVISOR software package. Predicted emissions (carbon dioxide [CO2] and oxides of nitrogen [NO(x)]) were then compared with actual emissions data collected from chassis dynamometer tests of similar vehicles. This paper expands on previous research to include different driving cycles for the hybrid electric bus and varying weights of the conventional truck. Results showed that different hybrid control strategies had a significant effect on engine behavior (and, thus, emissions) and may affect emissions during different driving cycles. The ANN models underpredicted emissions of CO2 and NO(x) in the case of a class-8 truck but were more accurate as the truck weight increased.

  19. Steering a simulated unmanned aerial vehicle using a head-slaved camera and HMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Sjoerd C.; Padmos, Pieter

    1997-06-01

    Military use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is gaining importance. Video cameras in these devices are often operated with joysticks and their image is displayed on a CRT. In this experiment, the simulated camera of a simulated UAV was slaved to the operator's head movements and displayed using a helmet mounted display (HMD). The task involved maneuvering a UAV along a winding course marked by tress. The influence of several parameters of the set-up on a set of flight handling characteristics was assessed. To enable variation of FOV and to study the effect of the HMD optics, a simulated HMD consisting of a head slaved window, was projected on a screen. One of the FOVs, generated in this way, corresponded with the FOV of the real HMD, enabling a comparison. The results show that the simulated HMD yields a significantly better performance that the real HMD. Performance with a FOV of 17 degrees is significantly lower than with 34 or 57 degrees. An image lag of 50 ms, typical of pan-and-tilt servo motor systems, has a small but significant influence on steering accuracy. Monocular and stereoscopic presentation did not result in significant performance differences.

  20. High-Alpha Research Vehicle Lateral-Directional Control Law Description, Analyses, and Simulation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Bacon, Barton J.

    1998-01-01

    This report contains a description of a lateral-directional control law designed for the NASA High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The HARV is a F/A-18 aircraft modified to include a research flight computer, spin chute, and thrust-vectoring in the pitch and yaw axes. Two separate design tools, CRAFT and Pseudo Controls, were integrated to synthesize the lateral-directional control law. This report contains a description of the lateral-directional control law, analyses, and nonlinear simulation (batch and piloted) results. Linear analysis results include closed-loop eigenvalues, stability margins, robustness to changes in various plant parameters, and servo-elastic frequency responses. Step time responses from nonlinear batch simulation are presented and compared to design guidelines. Piloted simulation task scenarios, task guidelines, and pilot subjective ratings for the various maneuvers are discussed. Linear analysis shows that the control law meets the stability margin guidelines and is robust to stability and control parameter changes. Nonlinear batch simulation analysis shows the control law exhibits good performance and meets most of the design guidelines over the entire range of angle-of-attack. This control law (designated NASA-1A) was flight tested during the Summer of 1994 at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center.

  1. Soldier/Hardware-in-the-loop Simulation-based Combat Vehicle Duty Cycle Measurement: Duty Cycle Experiment 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-24

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Soldier/Hardware-in-the-loop Simulation -based Combat Vehicle...dcscorp.com Keywords: Motion base simulator , hybrid electric power system, man-in-the-loop, hardware-in-the-loop, long haul. ABSTRACT: This...paper describes a human-in-the-loop motion-based simulator interfaced to hybrid-electric power system hardware both of which were used to measure the

  2. Quantifying the Effect of Fast Charger Deployments on Electric Vehicle Utility and Travel Patterns via Advanced Simulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Burton, E.

    2015-02-01

    The disparate characteristics between conventional (CVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in terms of driving range, refill/recharge time, and availability of refuel/recharge infrastructure inherently limit the relative utility of BEVs when benchmarked against traditional driver travel patterns. However, given a high penetration of high-power public charging combined with driver tolerance for rerouting travel to facilitate charging on long-distance trips, the difference in utility between CVs and BEVs could be marginalized. We quantify the relationships between BEV utility, the deployment of fast chargers, and driver tolerance for rerouting travel and extending travel durations by simulating BEVs operated over real-world travel patterns using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool for Vehicles (BLAST-V). With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, BLAST-V has been developed to include algorithms for estimating the available range of BEVs prior to the start of trips, for rerouting baseline travel to utilize public charging infrastructure when necessary, and for making driver travel decisions for those trips in the presence of available public charging infrastructure, all while conducting advanced vehicle simulations that account for battery electrical, thermal, and degradation response. Results from BLAST-V simulations on vehicle utility, frequency of inserted stops, duration of charging events, and additional time and distance necessary for rerouting travel are presented to illustrate how BEV utility and travel patterns can be affected by various fast charge deployments.

  3. Study on Dynamical Simulation of Railway Vehicle Bogie Parameters Test-bench Electro-hydraulic Servo System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhikun; Su, Jian; Xu, Guan; Cao, Xiaoning

    Dynamical mathematical model was established for accurately positioning, fast response and real-time tracing of electro-hydraulic servo control system in railway vehicle bog ie parameters test system with elastic load. The model could precisely control the output of position and force of the hydraulic cylinders. Induction method was proposed in the paper. Dynamical simulation verified the mathematical model by SIMULINK software. Meanwhile the key factors affecting the dynamical characteristics of the system were discussed in detail. Through the simulation results, high precision is obtained in application and the need of real-time control on the railway vehicle bogie parameters test-bench is realized.

  4. Analytical Simulations of Energy-Absorbing Impact Spheres for a Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Marcus Dwight; Fasanella, Edwin L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations were performed to aid in the design of an energy-absorbing impact sphere for a passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that is a possible architecture for the Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. The MSR EEV concept uses an entry capsule and energy-absorbing impact sphere designed to contain and limit the acceleration of collected samples during Earth impact without a parachute. The spherical shaped impact sphere is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid composite, graphite-epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Collected Martian samples will fit inside a smaller spherical sample container at the center of the EEV's cellular structure. Comparisons were made of analytical results obtained using MSC.Dytran with test results obtained from impact tests performed at NASA Langley Research Center for impact velocities from 30 to 40 m/s. Acceleration, velocity, and deformation results compared well with the test results. The correlated finite element model was then used for simulations of various off-nominal impact scenarios. Off-nominal simulations at an impact velocity of 40 m/s included a rotated cellular structure impact onto a flat surface, a cellular structure impact onto an angled surface, and a cellular structure impact onto the corner of a step.

  5. Steady-state and dynamic evaluation of the electric propulsion system test bed vehicle on a road load simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    The propulsion system of the Lewis Research Center's electric propulsion system test bed vehicle was tested on the road load simulator under the DOE Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program. This propulsion system, consisting of a series-wound dc motor controlled by an infinitely variable SCR chopper and an 84-V battery pack, is typical of those used in electric vehicles made in 1976. Steady-state tests were conducted over a wide range of differential output torques and vehicle speeds. Efficiencies of all of the components were determined. Effects of temperature and voltage variations on the motor and the effect of voltage changes on the controller were examined. Energy consumption and energy efficiency for the system were determined over the B and C driving schedules of the SAE J227a test procedure.

  6. Comparative urban drive cycle simulations of light-duty hybrid vehicles with gasoline or diesel engines and emissions controls

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E

    2013-01-01

    Electric hybridization is a very effective approach for reducing fuel consumption in light-duty vehicles. Lean combustion engines (including diesels) have also been shown to be significantly more fuel efficient than stoichiometric gasoline engines. Ideally, the combination of these two technologies would result in even more fuel efficient vehicles. However, one major barrier to achieving this goal is the implementation of lean-exhaust aftertreatment that can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations without heavily penalizing fuel efficiency. We summarize results from comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with either stoichiometric gasoline or diesel engines that include state-of-the-art aftertreatment emissions controls for both stoichiometric and lean exhaust. Fuel consumption and emissions for comparable gasoline and diesel light-duty hybrid electric vehicles were compared over a standard urban drive cycle and potential benefits for utilizing diesel hybrids were identified. Technical barriers and opportunities for improving the efficiency of diesel hybrids were identified.

  7. Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

    2010-03-31

    The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

  8. Sodalite as a vehicle to increase Re retention in waste glass simulant during vitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luksic, Steven A.; Riley, Brian J.; Parker, Kent E.; Hrma, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    Technetium (Tc) retention during Hanford waste vitrification can be increased if the volatility can be controlled. Incorporating Tc into a thermally stable mineral phase, such as sodalite, is one way to achieve increased retention. Here, rhenium (Re)-bearing sodalite was tested as a vehicle to transport perrhenate (ReO4-), a nonradioactive surrogate for pertechnetate (TcO4-), into high-level (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glass simulants. After melting HLW and LAW simulant feeds, the retention of Re in the glass was measured and compared with the Re retention in glass prepared from a feed containing Re2O7. Phase analysis of sodalite in both these glasses across a profile of temperatures describes the durability of Re-sodalite during the feed-to-glass transition. The use of Re sodalite improved the Re retention by 21% for HLW glass and 85% for LAW glass, demonstrating the potential improvement in Tc-retention if TcO4- were to be encapsulated in a Tc-sodalite prior to vitrification.

  9. Launch Condition Deviations of Reusable Launch Vehicle Simulations in Exo-Atmospheric Zoom Climbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urschel, Peter H.; Cox, Timothy H.

    2003-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has proposed a two-stage system to deliver a small payload to orbit. The proposal calls for an airplane to perform an exo-atmospheric zoom climb maneuver, from which a second-stage rocket is launched carrying the payload into orbit. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has conducted an in-house generic simulation study to determine how accurately a human-piloted airplane can deliver a second-stage rocket to a desired exo-atmospheric launch condition. A high-performance, fighter-type, fixed-base, real-time, pilot-in-the-loop airplane simulation has been modified to perform exo-atmospheric zoom climb maneuvers. Four research pilots tracked a reference trajectory in the presence of winds, initial offsets, and degraded engine thrust to a second-stage launch condition. These launch conditions have been compared to the reference launch condition to characterize the expected deviation. At each launch condition, a speed change was applied to the second-stage rocket to insert the payload onto a transfer orbit to the desired operational orbit. The most sensitive of the test cases was the degraded thrust case, yielding second-stage launch energies that were too low to achieve the radius of the desired operational orbit. The handling qualities of the airplane, as a first-stage vehicle, have also been investigated.

  10. Numerical derivation of linear perturbation model from nonlinear real-time vehicle simulations - A means of validation and increased credibility. [computerized simulation for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieudonne, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical technique has been developed which generates linear perturbation models from nonlinear real-time aircraft vehicle simulations at Langley Research Center. The technique is very general and can be applied to simulations of any system described by nonlinear differential equations. Linear models about various trim conditions have been obtained from simulations of the Boeing 737, Northrop F5-E, Cessna 180, Sikorsky CH-54, and NASA/Army Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA). One use of the derived linear models is as a validation and verification tool for the nonlinear simulation.

  11. Simulating the impacts of on-street vehicle parking on traffic operations on urban streets using cellular automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingxu; Li, Zhibin; Jiang, Hang; Zhu, Senlai; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, many bicycle lanes on urban streets are replaced with vehicle parking places. Spaces for bicycle riding are reduced, resulting in changes in bicycle and vehicle operational features. The objective of this study is to estimate the impacts of on-street parking on heterogeneous traffic operation on urban streets. A cellular automaton (CA) model is developed and calibrated to simulate bicycle lane-changing on streets with on-street parking. Two types of street segments with different bicycle lane width are considered. From the simulation, two types of conflicts between bicycles and vehicles are identified which are frictional conflicts and blocking conflicts. Factors affecting the frequency of conflicts are also identified. Based on the results, vehicle delay is estimated for various traffic situations considering the range of occupancy levels for on-street parking. Later, a numerical network example is analyzed to estimate the network impact of on-street parking on traffic assignment and operation. Findings of the study are helpful to policies and design regarding on-street vehicle parking to improve the efficiency of traffic operations.

  12. Energy analysis of electric vehicles using batteries or fuel cells through well-to-wheel driving cycle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanari, Stefano; Manzolini, Giampaolo; Garcia de la Iglesia, Fernando

    This work presents a study of the energy and environmental balances for electric vehicles using batteries or fuel cells, through the methodology of the well to wheel (WTW) analysis, applied to ECE-EUDC driving cycle simulations. Well to wheel balances are carried out considering different scenarios for the primary energy supply. The fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) are based on the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) technology, and it is discussed the possibility to feed the fuel cell with (i) hydrogen directly stored onboard and generated separately by water hydrolysis (using renewable energy sources) or by conversion processes using coal or natural gas as primary energy source (through gasification or reforming), (ii) hydrogen generated onboard with a fuel processor fed by natural gas, ethanol, methanol or gasoline. The battery electric vehicles (BEV) are based on Li-ion batteries charged with electricity generated by central power stations, either based on renewable energy, coal, natural gas or reflecting the average EU power generation feedstock. A further alternative is considered: the integration of a small battery to FCEV, exploiting a hybrid solution that allows recovering energy during decelerations and substantially improves the system energy efficiency. After a preliminary WTW analysis carried out under nominal operating conditions, the work discusses the simulation of the vehicles energy consumption when following standardized ECE-EUDC driving cycle. The analysis is carried out considering different hypothesis about the vehicle driving range, the maximum speed requirements and the possibility to sustain more aggressive driving cycles. The analysis shows interesting conclusions, with best results achieved by BEVs only for very limited driving range requirements, while the fuel cell solutions yield best performances for more extended driving ranges where the battery weight becomes too high. Results are finally compared to those of conventional internal

  13. Modeling, Simulation Design and Control of Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Drives

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio Rizzoni

    2005-09-30

    Ohio State University (OSU) is uniquely poised to establish such a center, with interdisciplinary emphasis on modeling, simulation, design and control of hybrid-electric drives for a number of reasons, some of which are: (1) The OSU Center for Automotive Research (CAR) already provides an infrastructure for interdisciplinary automotive research and graduate education; the facilities available at OSU-CAR in the area of vehicle and powertrain research are among the best in the country. CAR facilities include 31,000 sq. feet of space, multiple chassis and engine dynamometers, an anechoic chamber, and a high bay area. (2) OSU has in excess of 10 graduate level courses related to automotive systems. A graduate level sequence has already been initiated with GM. In addition, an Automotive Systems Engineering (ASE) program cosponsored by the mechanical and electrical engineering programs, had been formulated earlier at OSU, independent of the GATE program proposal. The main objective of the ASE is to provide multidisciplinary graduate education and training in the field of automotive systems to Masters level students. This graduate program can be easily adapted to fulfill the spirit of the GATE Center of Excellence. (3) A program in Mechatronic Systems Engineering has been in place at OSU since 1994; this program has a strong emphasis on automotive system integration issues, and has emphasized hybrid-electric vehicles as one of its application areas. (4) OSU researchers affiliated with CAR have been directly involved in the development and study of: HEV modeling and simulation; electric drives; transmission design and control; combustion engines; and energy storage systems. These activities have been conducted in collaboration with government and automotive industry sponsors; further, the same researchers have been actively involved in continuing education programs in these areas with the automotive industry. The proposed effort will include: (1) The development of a

  14. Use of Heated Helium to Simulate Surface Pressure Fluctuations on the Launch Abort Vehicle During Abort Motor Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; James, George H.; Burnside, Nathan J.; Fong, Robert; Fogt, Vincent A.

    2011-01-01

    The solid-rocket plumes from the Abort motor of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV, also know as Orion) were simulated using hot, high pressure, Helium gas to determine the surface pressure fluctuations on the vehicle in the event of an abort. About 80 different abort situations over a wide Mach number range, (0.3< or =M< or =1.2) and vehicle attitudes (+/-15deg) were simulated inside the NASA Ames Unitary Plan, 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. For each abort case, typically two different Helium plume and wind tunnel conditions were used to bracket different flow matching critera. This unique, yet cost-effective test used a custom-built hot Helium delivery system, and a 6% scale model of a part of the MPCV, known as the Launch Abort Vehicle. The test confirmed the very high level of pressure fluctuations on the surface of the vehicle expected during an abort. In general, the fluctuations were found to be dominated by the very near-field hydrodynamic fluctuations present in the plume shear-layer. The plumes were found to grow in size for aborts occurring at higher flight Mach number and altitude conditions. This led to an increase in the extent of impingement on the vehicle surfaces; however, unlike some initial expectations, the general trend was a decrease in the level of pressure fluctuations with increasing impingement. In general, the highest levels of fluctuations were found when the outer edges of the plume shear layers grazed the vehicle surface. At non-zero vehicle attitudes the surface pressure distributions were found to become very asymmetric. The data from these wind-tunnel simulations were compared against data collected from the recent Pad Abort 1 flight test. In spite of various differences between the transient flight situation and the steady-state wind tunnel simulations, the hot-Helium data were found to replicate the PA1 data fairly reasonably. The data gathered from this one-of-a-kind wind-tunnel test fills a gap in the manned-space programs

  15. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Model of an Inflatable-Sphere Launching Vehicle under Simulated Conditions of Mach Number and Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ross B.; Morris, Odell A.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch of a two-stage-rocket model configuration which simulated the last two stages of the launching vehicle for an inflatable sphere. Tests were made through an angle-of-attack range from -6 deg to 18 deg at dynamic pressures of 102 and 255 pounds per square foot with corresponding Mach numbers of 1.89 and 1.98 for the model both with and without a bumper arrangement designed to protect the rocket casing from the outer shell of the vehicle.

  16. Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Curran, Scott; Daw, C Stuart; Wagner, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

  17. Velocity and normal tyre force estimation for heavy trucks based on vehicle dynamic simulation considering the road slope angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zeyu; Zhang, Yunqing; Yang, James

    2016-02-01

    A precise estimation of vehicle velocities can be valuable for improving the performance of the vehicle dynamics control (VDC) system and this estimation relies heavily upon the accuracy of longitudinal and lateral tyre force calculation governed by the prediction of normal tyre forces. This paper presents a computational method based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) method to estimate both longitudinal and lateral velocities and develops a novel quasi-stationary method to predict normal tyre forces of heavy trucks on a sloping road. The vehicle dynamic model is constructed with a planar dynamic model combined with the Pacejka tyre model. The novel quasi-stationary method for predicting normal tyre forces is able to characterise the typical chassis configuration of the heavy trucks. The validation is conducted through comparing the predicted results with those simulated by the TruckSim and it has a good agreement between these results without compromising the convergence speed and stability.

  18. Numerical simulation of base flow of a long range flight vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S.; Rathod, S.; Chandra Murty, M. S. R.; Sinha, P. K.; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2012-05-01

    Numerical exploration of base flow of a long range flight vehicle is presented for different flight conditions. Three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with k-ɛ turbulence model using commercial CFD software. Simulation captured all essential flow features including flow separation at base shoulder, shear layer formation at the jet boundary, recirculation at the base region etc. With the increase in altitude, the plume of the rocket exhaust is seen to bulge more and more and caused more intense free stream and rocket plume interaction leading to higher gas temperature in the base cavity. The flow field in the base cavity is investigated in more detail, which is found to be fairly uniform at different instant of time. Presence of the heat shield is seen to reduce the hot gas entry to the cavity region due to different recirculation pattern in the base region. Computed temperature history obtained from conjugate heat transfer analysis is found to compare very well with flight measured data.

  19. Tests of an alternating current propulsion subsystem for electric vehicles on a road load simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The test results of a breadboard version of an ac electric-vehicle propulsion subsystem are presented. The breadboard was installed in the NASA Lewis Research Center Road Load Simulator facility and tested under steady-state and transient conditions. Steady-state tests were run to characterize the system and component efficiencies over the complete speed-torque range within the capability of the propulsion subsystem in the motoring mode of operation. Transient tests were performed to determine the energy consumption of the breadboard over the acceleration and cruise portions of SAE J227 and driving schedules B, C, and D. Tests in the regenerative mode were limited to the low-gear-speed range of the two speed transaxle used in the subsystem. The maximum steady-state subsystem efficiency observed for the breadboard was 81.5 percent in the high-gear-speed range in the motoring mode, and 76 percent in the regenerative braking mode (low gear). The subsystem energy efficiency during the transient tests ranged from 49.2 percent for schedule B to 68.4 percent for Schedule D.

  20. Palm cooling to reduce heat strain in subjects during simulated armoured vehicle transport.

    PubMed

    Kuennen, Matthew R; Gillum, Trevor L; Amorim, Fabiano T; Kwon, Young Sub; Schneider, Suzanne M

    2010-04-01

    This study examined whether palm cooling (PC) could reduce heat strain, measured through changes in core, mean skin, mean body temperatures, and thermal sensation in resting hyperthermic subjects wearing chemical protective garments. Ten male subjects performed three exercise bouts (6.1 km h(-1), 2-4% grade) in a hot, dry environment [mean (SD) air temperature 42.2 (0.5 degrees C), relative humidity 36.5 (1%)] until core temperature reached 38.8 degrees C. Subjects then simulated transport in an armoured vehicle by resting in a seated position for 50 min with either no cooling (NC), (PC at 10 degrees C) or palm cooling with vacuum application around the hand (PCVAC, 10 degrees C, 7.47 kPa negative pressure). Core, skin, and mean body temperatures with PC and PCVAC were lower (P < 0.05) than NC from 15 to 50 min of cooling, and thermal sensation was lower (P < 0.05) from 30 to 50 min, with no differences in any variables between PC and PCVAC. Maximal heat extraction averaged 42 (12 W), and core temperature was reduced by 0.38 (0.21 degrees C) after 50 min of PC. Heat extraction with PC was modest compared to other cooling approaches in the literature.

  1. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driving Performance: An Examination of Attentional Resources and Control Using a Driving Simulator.

    PubMed

    McManus, Benjamin; Heaton, Karen; Stavrinos, Despina

    2017-04-03

    Commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers often multitask when driving to increase travel efficiency and to increase alertness. Secondary tasks have been shown to impact CMV driving differentially, and attentional resources have been posited as a key factor. However, underlying mechanisms of secondary task engagement on attention and task performance have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is unknown if attentional control moderates these differential effects of secondary tasks and task performance. The current study aimed to examine decrements in driving performance from a resource-control theory by determining the specific relation between attentional resources and attentional control. To achieve this goal, 2 objectives were determined. Objective 1 considered the differential impact of secondary tasks on attentional resources in CMV driving performance. Objective 2 investigated individual differences in attentional control in the sample of CMV drivers. Fifty CMV drivers (Mage = 39.8 years, SD = 8.36) completed the 10-min psychomotor vigilance task providing measures of attentional control and also drove in a CMV driving simulator 4 times while presented with 1 of 4 secondary tasks. Findings linked secondary tasks to attentional resources, which, consequently affected CMV driving performance. The mediating effect of attentional resources significantly differed among varying levels of attentional control. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Impact Test and Simulation of Energy Absorbing Concepts for Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Marcus D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations have been performed to aid in the design of an energy absorbing concept for a highly reliable passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that will directly impact the Earth without a parachute. EEV's are designed to return materials from asteroids, comets, or planets for laboratory analysis on Earth. The EEV concept uses an energy absorbing cellular structure designed to contain and limit the acceleration of space exploration samples during Earth impact. The spherical shaped cellular structure is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid graphite- epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Space samples fit inside a smaller sphere at the center of the EEV's cellular structure. Comparisons of analytical predictions using MSC,Dytran with test results obtained from impact tests performed at NASA Langley Research Center were made for three impact velocities ranging from 32 to 40 m/s. Acceleration and deformation results compared well with the test results. These finite element models will be useful for parametric studies of off-nominal impact conditions.

  3. A comparison of various algorithms to extract Magic Formula tyre model coefficients for vehicle dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Alagappan, A.; Narasimha Rao, K. V.; Krishna Kumar, R.

    2015-02-01

    Tyre models are a prerequisite for any vehicle dynamics simulation. Tyre models range from the simplest mathematical models that consider only the cornering stiffness to a complex set of formulae. Among all the steady-state tyre models that are in use today, the Magic Formula tyre model is unique and most popular. Though the Magic Formula tyre model is widely used, obtaining the model coefficients from either the experimental or the simulation data is not straightforward due to its nonlinear nature and the presence of a large number of coefficients. A common procedure used for this extraction is the least-squares minimisation that requires considerable experience for initial guesses. Various researchers have tried different algorithms, namely, gradient and Newton-based methods, differential evolution, artificial neural networks, etc. The issues involved in all these algorithms are setting bounds or constraints, sensitivity of the parameters, the features of the input data such as the number of points, noisy data, experimental procedure used such as slip angle sweep or tyre measurement (TIME) procedure, etc. The extracted Magic Formula coefficients are affected by these variants. This paper highlights the issues that are commonly encountered in obtaining these coefficients with different algorithms, namely, least-squares minimisation using trust region algorithms, Nelder-Mead simplex, pattern search, differential evolution, particle swarm optimisation, cuckoo search, etc. A key observation is that not all the algorithms give the same Magic Formula coefficients for a given data. The nature of the input data and the type of the algorithm decide the set of the Magic Formula tyre model coefficients.

  4. Aerodynamic analysis and simulation of a twin-tail tilt-duct unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Cyrus

    The tilt-duct vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) concept has been around since the early 1960s; however, to date the design has never passed the research phase and development phase. Nearly 50 years later, American Dynamics Flight Systems (ADFS) is developing the AD-150, a 2,250lb weight class unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) configured with rotating ducts on each wingtip. Unlike its predecessor, the Doak VZ-4, the AD-150 features a V tail and wing sweep -- both of which affect the aerodynamic behavior of the aircraft. Because no aircraft of this type has been built and tested, vital aerodynamic research was conducted on the bare airframe behavior (without wingtip ducts). Two weeks of static and dynamic testing were performed on a 3/10th scale model at the University of Maryland's 7' x 10' low speed wind tunnel to facilitate the construction of a nonlinear flight simulator. A total of 70 dynamic tests were performed to obtain damping parameter estimates using the ordinary least squares methodology. Validation, based on agreement between static and dynamic estimates of the pitch and yaw stiffness terms, showed an average percent error of 14.0% and 39.6%, respectively. These inconsistencies were attributed to: large dynamic displacements not encountered during static testing, regressor collinearity, and, while not conclusively proven, differences in static and dynamic boundary layer development. Overall, the damping estimates were consistent and repeatable, with low scatter over a 95% confidence interval. Finally, a basic open loop simulation was executed to demonstrate the instability of the aircraft. As a result, it is recommended that future work be performed to determine trim points and linear models for controls development.

  5. Predicting Motor Vehicle Collisions in a Driving Simulator in Young Adults Using the Useful Field of View Assessment

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Benjamin; Cox, Molly K.; Vance, David E.; Stavrinos, Despina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Being involved in motor vehicle collisions is the leading cause of death in 1 to 34 year olds, and risk is particularly high in young adults. The Useful Field of View (UFOV) task, a cognitive measure of processing speed, divided attention, and selective attention, has been shown to be predictive of motor vehicle collisions in older adults, but its use as a predictor of driving performance in a young adult population has not been investigated. The present study examined whether UFOV was a predictive measure of motor vehicle collisions in a driving simulator in a young adult population. Method The 3-subtest version of UFOV (lower scores measured in milliseconds indicate better performance) was administered to 60 college students. Participants also completed an 11-mile simulated drive to provide driving performance metrics. Results Findings suggested that subtests 1 and 2 suffered from a ceiling effect. UFOV subtest 3 significantly predicted collisions in the simulated drive. Each 30 milliseconds slower on the subtest was associated with nearly a 10% increase in the risk of a simulated collision. Post-hoc analyses revealed a small partially mediating effect of subtest 3 on the relationship between driving experience and collisions. Conclusion The selective attention component of UFOV subtest 3 may be a predictive measure of crash involvement in a young adult population. Improvements in selective attention may be the underlying mechanism in how driving experience improves driving performance. PMID:25794266

  6. Experimental evaluation of hybrid vehicle fuel economy and pollutant emissions over real-world simulation driving cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaras, Georgios; Pistikopoulos, Panayotis; Samaras, Zissis

    2008-06-01

    The reduction of transport-generated CO2 emissions is currently a problem of global interest. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are considered as one promising technological solution for limiting transport-generated greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the number of HEVs in the market remains limited, but this picture will change in the years to come as HEVs are expected to pave the way for cleaner technologies in transport. In this paper, results are presented regarding fuel economy and pollutant emissions measurements of two hybrid electric production vehicles. The measurements were conducted on a Prius II and a Honda Civic IMA using both the European legislated driving cycle (New European Driving Cycle, NEDC) and real-world simulation driving cycles (Artemis). In addition to the emissions measurements, other vehicle-operating parameters were studied in an effort to better quantify the maximum CO2 reduction potential. Data from real-world operation of a Prius II vehicle were also used in the evaluation. Results indicate that in most cases both vehicles present improved energy efficiency and pollutant emissions compared to conventional cars. The fuel economy benefit of the two HEVs peaked under urban driving conditions where reductions of 60% and 40% were observed, respectively. Over higher speeds the difference in fuel economy was lower, reaching that of conventional diesel at 95 km h-1. The effect of ambient temperature on fuel consumption was also quantified. It is concluded that urban operation benefits the most of hybrid technology, leading to important fuel savings and urban air quality improvement.

  7. FY2012 Annual Progress Report for Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, Lee

    2013-03-29

    Annual progress report that evaluates the technologies and performance characteristics of advanced automotive powertrain components and subsystems in an integrated vehicle systems context. These evaluations address light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle platforms. This work is directed toward evaluating and verifying the targets of the VTO R&D teams and to providing guidance in establishing roadmaps for achievement of these goals.

  8. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-03-01

    Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

  9. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

  10. Simulation analysis of the EUSAMA Plus suspension testing method including the impact of the vehicle untested side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaj, K.

    2016-09-01

    The work deals with the simulation analysis of the half car vehicle model parameters on the suspension testing results. The Matlab simulation software was used. The considered model parameters are involved with the shock absorber damping coefficient, the tire radial stiffness, the car width and the rocker arm length. The consistent vibrations of both test plates were considered. Both wheels of the car were subjected to identical vibration, with frequency changed similar to the EUSAMA Plus principle. The shock absorber damping coefficient (for several values of the car width and rocker arm length) was changed on one and both sides of the vehicle. The obtained results are essential for the new suspension testing algorithm (basing on the EUSAMA Plus principle), which will be the aim of the further author's work.

  11. Simulated Fuel Economy and Performance of Advanced Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Using In-Use Travel Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Earleywine, M.; Gonder, J.; Markel, T.; Thornton, M.

    2010-01-01

    As vehicle powertrain efficiency increases through electrification, consumer travel and driving behavior have significantly more influence on the potential fuel consumption of these vehicles. Therefore, it is critical to have a good understanding of in-use or 'real world' driving behavior if accurate fuel consumption estimates of electric drive vehicles are to be achieved. Regional travel surveys using Global Positioning System (GPS) equipment have been found to provide an excellent source of in-use driving profiles. In this study, a variety of vehicle powertrain options were developed and their performance was simulated over GPS-derived driving profiles for 783 vehicles operating in Texas. The results include statistical comparisons of the driving profiles versus national data sets, driving performance characteristics compared with standard drive cycles, and expected petroleum displacement benefits from the electrified vehicles given various vehicle charging scenarios.

  12. A computer program (HEVSIM) for heavy duty vehicle fuel economy and performance simulation. Volume I: Description and analysis. Final report Mar-Oct 80

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, R.E.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents a description of a vehicle simulation program, which can determine the fuel economy and performance of a specified motor vehicle over a defined route as it executes a given driving schedule. Vehicle input accommodated by HEVSIM include accessories, engine, rear axle, converter, transmission, tires, aerodynamic drag coefficient, and shift logic. The report consists of three volumes. Volume I presents a description of the numerical approach and equations, Volume II is a user's manual, and Volume III contains the program listings.

  13. First-Order Simulation of Strewn Debris Fields Accompanying Exoatmospheric Re-entry Vehicle Fragmentation by Hypervelocity Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    1961). 21. Passey, Quinn R., H.J. Melosh , Effects of Atmospheric Breakup on Crater Field Formation, Icarus 42, 211-253 (1980). 22. CRC Handbook...ORDER SIMULATION OF STREWN DEBRIS FIELDS ACCO:MPANYING EXOATMOSPHERIC RE-ENTRY VEillCLE FRAGMENTATION BY HYPERVELOCITY IMPACT by Dr. Gregory W...STREWN DEBRIS FIELDS ACCOMPANYING EXOATMOSPHERIC RE-ENTRY VEHICLE FRAGMENTATION BY HYPERVELOCITY IMPACT by Dr. Gregory W. Frank Recommended By

  14. Analysis and in-simulator evaluation of display and control concepts for a terminal configured vehicle in final approach in a windshear environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Display Control configurations for the Terminal configured Vehicle in approach to landing situations were analyzed. A pilot/vehicle model was used to compare with a real time simulation study. Model results are presented and extended for the approach task during wind shear and random turbulence environments. In general, model results of performance trends matched those obtained experimentally.

  15. Validation of the driver behaviour questionnaire using behavioural data from an instrumented vehicle and high-fidelity driving simulator.

    PubMed

    Helman, S; Reed, N

    2015-02-01

    Data from two previously published studies were used to examine the correlations between scores on the violation, error and lapse sub-scales of the driver behaviour questionnaire, and observed driving speed. One dataset utilised data from an instrumented vehicle, which recorded driver speed on bends on a rural road. The other utilised data from a driving simulator study. Generally in both datasets the DBQ violation subscale was associated with objectively-measured speed, while the error and lapse sub-scales were not. These findings are consistent with the idea that the DBQ is a valid measure of observed behaviour in real driving (its original intended use) and also in simulated driving. The fact that associations were the same in real and simulated driving lends further support to the relative validity of driving simulation. The need for larger and more focused studies examining the role of different motivations in different driving situations is discussed.

  16. Fuel Economy and Performance of Mild Hybrids with Ultracapacitors: Simulations and Vehicle Test Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Pesaran, A.; Lustbader, J.; Tataria, H.

    2009-06-01

    NREL worked with GM and demonstrated equivalent performance in the Saturn Vue Belt Alternator Starter (BAS) hybrid vehicle whether running with its stock batteries or a retrofit ultracapacitor system.

  17. Simulation study of interference of crossings pedestrian and vehicle traffic at a single lane roundabout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echab, H.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Lakouari, N.

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a vehicle-pedestrian cellular automata model to investigate the characteristics of the mixed traffic at a single lane roundabout. The roundabout boundary is controlled by the injecting rates α1 ,α2 and the extracting rate β whereas pedestrians are generated with arrival probability Pcr. The pedestrian and vehicle flux are calculated in terms of rates. Also, the phase diagrams of the system in the (α1 ,Pcr) and (α1 , β) spaces are constructed. The results show that, the gridlock state is reached only when the pedestrians have the right of way over vehicles, while the maximum current state is reached when including a pedestrians' crossing decision rule. Likewise, we have found that the crosswalk location play a chief role in improving the dynamic characteristics of pedestrian and vehicle flux. Furthermore, it has turned out that the traffic is sensitive to the driver behavior.

  18. The Combat Vehicle Command and Control System. Combat Performance of Armor Battalions Using Distributed Interactive Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-16

    per round fired, manned vehicles ... ..... .. 98 28. Kills per hit scored by manned vehicles . . 99 29. Location accuracy for CFFs , CONTACT reports, and...SPOT reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 30. Description accuracy of CFFs , CONTACT reports, andSPOT reports . ..... .... . . . . . .108 I xiI• THE...superiority within the battalion’s battle space, yet air defense assets were notionally operating in direct support ( DS ) of the battalion. "Although no

  19. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-15

    The VSST team's mission is to evaluate the technologies and performance characteristics of advanced automotive powertrain components and subsystems in an integrated vehicle systems context. These evaluations address light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle platforms. This work is directed toward evaluating and verifying the targets of the VTP R&D teams and to providing guidance in establishing roadmaps for achievement of these goals.

  20. High-resolution simulation of link-level vehicle emissions and concentrations for air pollutants in a traffic-populated eastern Asian city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Huang, Ruikun; Wang, Jiandong; Yan, Han; Zheng, Yali; Hao, Jiming

    2016-08-01

    Vehicle emissions containing air pollutants created substantial environmental impacts on air quality for many traffic-populated cities in eastern Asia. A high-resolution emission inventory is a useful tool compared with traditional tools (e.g. registration data-based approach) to accurately evaluate real-world traffic dynamics and their environmental burden. In this study, Macau, one of the most populated cities in the world, is selected to demonstrate a high-resolution simulation of vehicular emissions and their contribution to air pollutant concentrations by coupling multimodels. First, traffic volumes by vehicle category on 47 typical roads were investigated during weekdays in 2010 and further applied in a networking demand simulation with the TransCAD model to establish hourly profiles of link-level vehicle counts. Local vehicle driving speed and vehicle age distribution data were also collected in Macau. Second, based on a localized vehicle emission model (e.g. the emission factor model for the Beijing vehicle fleet - Macau, EMBEV-Macau), this study established a link-based vehicle emission inventory in Macau with high resolution meshed in a temporal and spatial framework. Furthermore, we employed the AERMOD (AMS/EPA Regulatory Model) model to map concentrations of CO and primary PM2.5 contributed by local vehicle emissions during weekdays in November 2010. This study has discerned the strong impact of traffic flow dynamics on the temporal and spatial patterns of vehicle emissions, such as a geographic discrepancy of spatial allocation up to 26 % between THC and PM2.5 emissions owing to spatially heterogeneous vehicle-use intensity between motorcycles and diesel fleets. We also identified that the estimated CO2 emissions from gasoline vehicles agreed well with the statistical fuel consumption in Macau. Therefore, this paper provides a case study and a solid framework for developing high-resolution environment assessment tools for other vehicle-populated cities

  1. A Method for Incorporating Changing Structural Characteristics Due to Propellant Mass Usage in a Launch Vehicle Ascent Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGhee, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Launch vehicles consume large quantities of propellant quickly, causing the mass properties and structural dynamics of the vehicle to change dramatically. Currently, structural load assessments account for this change with a large collection of structural models representing various propellant fill levels. This creates a large database of models complicating the delivery of reduced models and requiring extensive work for model changes. Presented here is a method to account for these mass changes in a more efficient manner. The method allows for the subtraction of propellant mass as the propellant is used in the simulation. This subtraction is done in the modal domain of the vehicle generalized model. Additional computation required is primarily for constructing the used propellant mass matrix from an initial propellant model and further matrix multiplications and subtractions. An additional eigenvalue solution is required to uncouple the new equations of motion; however, this is a much simplier calculation starting from a system that is already substantially uncoupled. The method was successfully tested in a simulation of Saturn V loads. Results from the method are compared to results from separate structural models for several propellant levels, showing excellent agreement. Further development to encompass more complicated propellant models, including slosh dynamics, is possible.

  2. Numerical simulations of the occupant head response in an infantry vehicle under blunt impact and blast loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Sevagan, Gopinath; Zhu, Feng; Jiang, Binhui; Yang, King H

    2013-07-01

    This article presents the results of a finite element simulation on the occupant head response in an infantry vehicle under two separated loading conditions: (1) blunt impact and (2) blast loading conditions. A Hybrid-III dummy body integrated with a previously validated human head model was used as the surrogate. The biomechanical response of the head was studied in terms of head acceleration due to the impact by a projectile on the vehicle and intracranial pressure caused by blast wave. A series of parametric studies were conducted on the numerical model to analyze the effect of some key parameters, such as seat configuration, impact velocity, and boundary conditions. The simulation results indicate that a properly designed seat and internal surface of the infantry vehicle can play a vital role in reducing the risk of head injury in the current scenarios. Comparison of the kinematic responses under the blunt impact and blast loading conditions reveals that under the current loading conditions, the acceleration pulse in the blast scenario has much higher peak values and frequency than blunt impact case, which may reflect different head response characteristics.

  3. The impact of range anxiety and home, workplace, and public charging infrastructure on simulated battery electric vehicle lifetime utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Wood, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gas emissions, but have a limited utility due to factors including driver range anxiety and access to charging infrastructure. In this paper we apply NREL's Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool for Vehicles (BLAST-V) to examine the sensitivity of BEV utility to range anxiety and different charging infrastructure scenarios, including variable time schedules, power levels, and locations (home, work, and public installations). We find that the effects of range anxiety can be significant, but are reduced with access to additional charging infrastructure. We also find that (1) increasing home charging power above that provided by a common 15 A, 120 V circuit offers little added utility, (2) workplace charging offers significant utility benefits to select high mileage commuters, and (3) broadly available public charging can bring many lower mileage drivers to near-100% utility while strongly increasing the achieved miles of high mileage drivers.

  4. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

  5. [CFD numerical simulation onto the gas-liquid two-phase flow behavior during vehicle refueling process].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Jin-Hui; Zhu, Ling; Shang, Chao

    2011-12-01

    With the gradual improvement of environmental regulations, more and more attentions are attracted to the vapor emissions during the process of vehicle refueling. Research onto the vehicle refueling process by means of numerical simulation has been executed abroad since 1990s, while as it has never been involved so far domestically. Through reasonable simplification about the physical system of "Nozzle + filler pipe + gasoline storage tank + vent pipe" for vehicle refueling, and by means of volume of fluid (VOF) model for gas-liquid two-phase flow and Re-Normalization Group kappa-epsilon turbulence flow model provided in commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software Fluent, this paper determined the proper mesh discretization scheme and applied the proper boundary conditions based on the Gambit software, then established the reasonable numerical simulation model for the gas-liquid two-phase flow during the refueling process. Through discussing the influence of refueling velocity on the static pressure of vent space in gasoline tank, the back-flowing phenomenon has been revealed in this paper. It has been demonstrated that, the more the flow rate and the refueling velocity of refueling nozzle is, the higher the gross static pressure in the vent space of gasoline tank. In the meanwhile, the variation of static pressure in the vent space of gasoline tank can be categorized into three obvious stages. When the refueling flow rate becomes higher, the back-flowing phenomenon of liquid gasoline can sometimes be induced in the head section of filler pipe, thus making the gasoline nozzle pre-shut-off. Totally speaking, the theoretical work accomplished in this paper laid some solid foundation for self-researching and self-developing the technology and apparatus for the vehicle refueling and refueling emissions control domestically.

  6. Functional requirements for the man-vehicle systems research facility. [identifying and correcting human errors during flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.; Heffley, R. K.; Jewell, W. F.; Jex, H. R.; Mcruer, D. T.; Schulman, T. M.; Stapleford, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center proposed a man-vehicle systems research facility to support flight simulation studies which are needed for identifying and correcting the sources of human error associated with current and future air carrier operations. The organization of research facility is reviewed and functional requirements and related priorities for the facility are recommended based on a review of potentially critical operational scenarios. Requirements are included for the experimenter's simulation control and data acquisition functions, as well as for the visual field, motion, sound, computation, crew station, and intercommunications subsystems. The related issues of functional fidelity and level of simulation are addressed, and specific criteria for quantitative assessment of various aspects of fidelity are offered. Recommendations for facility integration, checkout, and staffing are included.

  7. Consumer behavior towards fuel efficient vehicles. Volume IV: operating instructions and program documentation for the CS vehicle choice simulation model. Final report, October 1977-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.R.; Berkovec, J.A.

    1980-09-01

    The report assesses consumer behavior towards fuel-efficient vehicles designed to meet recently mandated federal fuel economy standards. The study involves a comprehensive evaluation of existing nationwide survey data as well as the development of a major new econometric forecasting model of household vehicle type choice. As a result, the report describes both an assessment of consumers' current reported sentiments toward fuel-efficient vehicles and insights into expected future changes in household vehicle purchase behavior in response to changes in vehicle designs and prices, demographics, and the energy environment.

  8. The Importance of Detailed Component Simulations in the Feedsystem Development for a Two-Stage-to Orbit Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurkivich, Pete; Chandler, Frank; Grayson, Gary

    2005-01-01

    To meet the requirements for the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), a unique propulsion feed system concept was identified using crossfeed between the booster and orbiter stages that could reduce the Two-Stage-to-Orbit (TSTO) vehicle weight and development cost by approximately 25%. A Main Propulsion System (MPS) crossfeed water demonstration test program was configured to address all the activities required to reduce the risks for the MPS crossfeed system. A transient, one-dimensional system simulation was developed for the subscale crossfeed water flow tests. To ensure accurate representation of the crossfeed valve's dynamics in the system model, a high-fidelity, three-dimensional, computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) model was employed. The results from the CFD model were used to specify the valve's flow characteristics in the system simulation. This yielded a crossfeed system model that was anchored to the specific valve hardware and achieved good agreement with the measured test data. These results allowed the transient models to be correlated and validated and used for full scale mission predictions. The full scale model simulations indicate crossfeed is ' viable with the system pressure disturbances at the crossfeed transition being less than experienced by the propulsion system during engine start and shutdown transients.

  9. Rapidly Re-Configurable Flight Simulator Tools for Crew Vehicle Integration Research and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, Paul C.; Trujillo, Anna; Pritchett, Amy R.

    2000-01-01

    While simulation is a valuable research and design tool, the time and difficulty required to create new simulations (or re-use existing simulations) often limits their application. This report describes the design of the software architecture for the Reconfigurable Flight Simulator (RFS), which provides a robust simulation framework that allows the simulator to fulfill multiple research and development goals. The core of the architecture provides the interface standards for simulation components, registers and initializes components, and handles the communication between simulation components. The simulation components are each a pre-compiled library 'plug-in' module. This modularity allows independent development and sharing of individual simulation components. Additional interfaces can be provided through the use of Object Data/Method Extensions (OD/ME). RFS provides a programmable run-time environment for real-time access and manipulation, and has networking capabilities using the High Level Architecture (HLA).

  10. Rapidly Re-Configurable Flight Simulator Tools for Crew Vehicle Integration Research and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.

    2002-01-01

    While simulation is a valuable research and design tool, the time and difficulty required to create new simulations (or re-use existing simulations) often limits their application. This report describes the design of the software architecture for the Reconfigurable Flight Simulator (RFS), which provides a robust simulation framework that allows the simulator to fulfill multiple research and development goals. The core of the architecture provides the interface standards for simulation components, registers and initializes components, and handles the communication between simulation components. The simulation components are each a pre-compiled library 'plugin' module. This modularity allows independent development and sharing of individual simulation components. Additional interfaces can be provided through the use of Object Data/Method Extensions (OD/ME). RFS provides a programmable run-time environment for real-time access and manipulation, and has networking capabilities using the High Level Architecture (HLA).

  11. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, Lee

    2011-01-15

    The VSST team evaluates the technologies and performance characteristics of advanced automotive powertrain components and subsystems in an integrated vehicle systems context, covering light to heavy platforms. This work is directed toward evaluating and verifying the targets of the VTP R&D teams and to provide guidance in establishing roadmaps for achievement of these goals.

  12. Demonstration of Self-Training Autonomous Neural Networks in Space Vehicle Docking Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, M. Clinton; Thaler, Stephen L.; Stevenson-Chavis, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Neural Networks have been under examination for decades in many areas of research, with varying degrees of success and acceptance. Key goals of computer learning, rapid problem solution, and automatic adaptation have been elusive at best. This paper summarizes efforts at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center harnessing such technology to autonomous space vehicle docking for the purpose of evaluating applicability to future missions.

  13. Transonic pressure and load distributions for a group of simulated launch vehicles. [Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, T. C.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure and load distributions for a related group of simulated launch vehicle configurations are presented. The configurations were selected so that the nose cone and interstage transition flare components were relatively close to one another and subject to mutual interference effects. Tests extended over a Mach number range from 0.40 to 1.20 at angles of attack from 0 deg to about 10 deg. The test Reynolds numbers, based on main stage diameter, were of the order of 0.00000098.

  14. A closed-loop dynamic simulation-based design method for articulated heavy vehicles with active trailer steering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjurul Islam, Md.; Ding, Xuejun; He, Yuping

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a closed-loop dynamic simulation-based design method for articulated heavy vehicles (AHVs) with active trailer steering (ATS) systems. AHVs have poor manoeuvrability at low speeds and exhibit low lateral stability at high speeds. From the design point of view, there exists a trade-off relationship between AHVs' manoeuvrability and stability. For example, fewer articulation points and longer wheelbases will improve high-speed lateral stability, but they will degrade low-speed manoeuvrability. To tackle this conflicting design problem, a systematic method is proposed for the design of AHVs with ATS systems. In order to evaluate vehicle performance measures under a well-defined testing manoeuvre, a driver model is introduced and it 'drivers' the vehicle model to follow a prescribed route at a given speed. Considering the interactions between the mechanical trailer and the ATS system, the proposed design method simultaneously optimises the active design variables of the controllers and passive design variables of the trailer in a single design loop (SDL). Through the design optimisation of an ATS system for an AHV with a truck and a drawbar trailer combination, this SDL method is compared against a published two design loop method. The benchmark investigation shows that the former can determine better trade-off design solutions than those derived by the latter. This SDL method provides an effective approach to automatically implement the design synthesis of AHVs with ATS systems.

  15. SimBRS: A University/Industry Consortium Focused on Simulation Based Solutions for Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-29

    employed general purpose simulation codes such as LS- DYNA or AUTODYN with soil modeled as a solid material with specific equation of state and strength...simulation results and measurements. Predictions from AUTODYN and LS-DYNA are also included in the plots. Figures 1 and 2 show the height and width...mechanism for the soil. In our simulations, the soil encloses the growing cloud of detonation products, whereas in the AUTODYN simulations the soil

  16. VTI Driving Simulator: Mathematical Model of a Four-wheeled Vehicle for Simulation in Real Time. VTI Rapport 267A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Staffan

    1984-01-01

    This report contains a theoretical model for describing the motion of a passenger car. The simulation program based on this model is used in conjunction with an advanced driving simulator and run in real time. The mathematical model is complete in the sense that the dynamics of the engine, transmission and steering system is described in some…

  17. Characterization, performance, and prediction of a lead-acid battery under simulated electric vehicle driving requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewashinka, J. G.; Bozek, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A state-of-the-art 6-V battery module in current use by the electric vehicle industry was tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center to determine its performance characteristics under the SAE J227a driving schedules B, C, and D. The primary objective of the tests was to determine the effects of periods of recuperation and long and short periods of electrical regeneration in improving the performance of the battery module and hence extendng the vehicle range. A secondary objective was to formulate a computer program that would predict the performance of this battery module for the above driving schedules. The results show excellent correlation between the laboratory tests and predicted results. The predicted performance compared with laboratory tests was within +2.4 to -3.7 percent for the D schedule, +0.5 to -7.1 percent for the C schedule, and better than -11.4 percent for the B schedule.

  18. CFD Simulation of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle with Booster Separation Motor and Reaction Control System Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, L. M.; Vicker, D.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate a very complicated flow field encountered during the space shuttle ascent. The flow field features nozzle plumes from booster separation motor (BSM) and reaction control system (RCS) jets with a supersonic incoming cross flow at speed of Mach 4. The overset Navier-Stokes code OVERFLOW, was used to simulate the flow field surrounding the entire space shuttle launch vehicle (SSLV) with high geometric fidelity. The variable gamma option was chosen due to the high temperature nature of nozzle flows and different plume species. CFD predicted Mach contours are in good agreement with the schlieren photos from wind tunnel test. Flow fields are discussed in detail and the results are used to support the debris analysis for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) task.

  19. Methodology Development of Computationally-Efficient Full Vehicle Simulations for the Entire Blast Event

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    Unlimited 18 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code ) 586-282-6471 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18...The first card allows switching the chassis and hull from deformable to rigid. The CODE =2 is used and allows activating the switch when the...hull from rigid to deformable. The CODE =4 is used and allows activating the switch when the contact force between the ground and the vehicle is

  20. A Non-Linear Simulation for an Autonomous Unmanned Air Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    translational flight mode, but was not easily adaptable to anything other than the narrow range of conditions planned for AROD. The Sandia Labs papers also...Mechanics Conference, AIAA, Washington, D.C., Aug. 1988, pp. 720-731. [DOD 92] "DoD Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Master Plan ," Department of Defense...34 Master’s Thesis, Department of Electrical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico , Lisbon, Portugal, 1991. [Cra 86] Craig, J.J., Introduction to

  1. Numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    1992-01-01

    This project forms part of the long term computational effort to simulate the time dependent flow over the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle (orbiter, solid rocket boosters (SRB's), external tank (ET), and attach hardware) during its ascent mode for various nominal and abort flight conditions. Due to the limitations of experimental data such as wind tunnel wall effects and the difficulty of safely obtaining valid flight data, numerical simulations are undertaken to supplement the existing data base. This data can then be used to predict the aerodynamic behavior over a wide range of flight conditions. Existing computational results show relatively good overall comparison with experiments but further refinement is required to reduce numerical errors and to obtain finer agreements over a larger parameter space. One of the important goals of this project is to obtain better comparisons between numerical simulations and experiments. In the simulations performed so far, the geometry has been simplified in various ways to reduce the complexity so that useful results can be obtained in a reasonable time frame due to limitations in computer resources. In this project, the finer details of the major components of the Space Shuttle are modeled better by including more complexity in the geometry definition. Smaller components not included in early Space Shuttle simulations will now be modeled and gridded.

  2. Drag Reduction CFD Simulations and Flow Visualization of Light Vehicle-Trailer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdson, Lorenz; Boyer, Henry; Lange, Carlos F.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments and CFD were performed to study the effect a deflector had on the flow and drag force associated with a 2010 F-150 truck and cargo trailer Light Vehicle-Trailer System (LVTS). Image Correlation Velocimetry (ICV) on smokewire streaklines measured the velocity field on the model mid-plane. CFD estimated the drag reduction as 13% at a Re of 14,900 with a moving ground-plane, and 17% without. Experiments suggested that the low Re does not diminish the full-scale relevance of the drag reduction results. One low Re effect was the presence of a separation bubble on the hood of the tow vehicle whose size reduced with an increase in Re. Three other characteristic flow patterns were identified: separation off the lead vehicle cab, stagnation of the free-stream on the trailer face for the no-deflector case, and subsequent separation at the trailer front corner. Comparisons of the ICV and CFD results with no deflector indicated good agreement in the direction of the velocity vectors, and the smoke streaklines and CFD streamlines also agreed well. However, for the deflector case, the CFD found an entirely different topological solution absent in the experiment. A pair of vertically-oriented mid-plane vortices were wrapped around the front of the trailer. Support from the Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Grant 41747 is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. A new model to compute the desired steering torque for steer-by-wire vehicles and driving simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fankem, Steve; Müller, Steffen

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the control of the hand wheel actuator in steer-by-wire (SbW) vehicles and driving simulators (DSs). A novel model for the computation of the desired steering torque is presented. The introduced steering torque computation does not only aim to generate a realistic steering feel, which means that the driver should not miss the basic steering functionality of a modern conventional steering system such as an electric power steering (EPS) or hydraulic power steering (HPS), and this in every driving situation. In addition, the modular structure of the steering torque computation combined with suitably selected tuning parameters has the objective to offer a high degree of customisability of the steering feel and thus to provide each driver with his preferred steering feel in a very intuitive manner. The task and the tuning of each module are firstly described. Then, the steering torque computation is parameterised such that the steering feel of a series EPS system is reproduced. For this purpose, experiments are conducted in a hardware-in-the-loop environment where a test EPS is mounted on a steering test bench coupled with a vehicle simulator and parameter identification techniques are applied. Subsequently, how appropriate the steering torque computation mimics the test EPS system is objectively evaluated with respect to criteria concerning the steering torque level and gradient, the feedback behaviour and the steering return ability. Finally, the intuitive tuning of the modular steering torque computation is demonstrated for deriving a sportier steering feel configuration.

  4. Cryo-Tracker mass gauging system testing in a large-scale expendable launch vehicle LOX tank simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieb, Daniel J.; Haberbusch, Mark S.; Yeckley, Alexander J.

    2006-05-01

    Sierra Lobo tested its patented Cryo-Tracker(R) probe and Mass Gauging System in a large scale Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) liquid oxygen tank simulation for NASA. Typical Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank operations were simulated at Lockheed Martin's Engineering Propulsion Laboratory in Denver, Colorado. The Cryo-Tracker(R) probe is 33 feet long, the longest built to date. It was mounted in the tank at only two locations, separated by 26 feet. Each test simulated typical Lockheed Martin booster pre-launch tanking operations, including filling the tank with LOX at fill rates typically used at the launch pad, and maintaining the fill level for a period representative of a typical pad hold. The Cryo-Tracker(R) Mass Gauging System was the primary instrument used for monitoring the fill and controlling the topping operations. Each test also simulated a typical flight profile, expelling the LOX at representative pressures and expulsion flow rates. During expulsion, the Cryo-Tracker(R) System served to generate an Engine Cut-Off (ECO) signal. Test objectives were as follows: Cryo-Tracker(R) data will be validated by flight-like propellant instruments currently used in launch vehicles; the probe will survive the harsh environment (which will be documented by a digital video camera) with no loss of signal or structural integrity; the system will successfully measure liquid levels and temperatures under all conditions and calculate propellant mass in real-time; the system will successfully demonstrate its feasibility as a control sensor for LOX filling and topping operations, as well as for engine cut-off. All objectives were met and the test results are presented.

  5. Development of simulation interfaces for evaluation task with the use of physiological data and virtual reality applied to a vehicle simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Mateus R.; Costa, Henrik; Oliveira, Luiz; Bernardes, Thiago; Aguiar, Carla; Miosso, Cristiano; Oliveira, Alessandro B. S.; Diniz, Alberto C. G. C.; Domingues, Diana Maria G.

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims at describing an experimental platform used to evaluate the performance of individuals at training immersive physiological games. The platform proposed is embedded in an immersive environment in a CAVE of Virtual Reality and consists on a base frame with actuators with three degrees of freedom, sensor array interface and physiological sensors. Physiological data of breathing, galvanic skin resistance (GSR) and pressure on the hand of the user and a subjective questionnaire were collected during the experiments. The theoretical background used in a project focused on Software Engineering, Biomedical Engineering in the field of Ergonomics and Creative Technologies in order to presents this case study, related of an evaluation of a vehicular simulator located inside the CAVE. The analysis of the simulator uses physiological data of the drivers obtained in a period of rest and after the experience, with and without movements at the simulator. Also images from the screen are captured through time at the embedded experience and data collected through physiological data visualization (average frequency and RMS graphics). They are empowered by the subjective questionnaire as strong lived experience provided by the technological apparatus. The performed immersion experience inside the CAVE allows to replicate behaviors from physical spaces inside data space enhanced by physiological properties. In this context, the biocybrid condition is expanded beyond art and entertainment, as it is applied to automotive engineering and biomedical engineering. In fact, the kinesthetic sensations amplified by synesthesia replicates the sensation of displacement in the interior of an automobile, as well as the sensations of vibration and vertical movements typical of a vehicle, different speeds, collisions, etc. The contribution of this work is the possibility to tracing a stress analysis protocol for drivers while operating a vehicle getting affective behaviors coming from

  6. Relationship Between Motor Vehicle Collisions and Results of Perimetry, Useful Field of View, and Driving Simulation in Drivers With Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Andrew J.; Boer, Erwin R.; Gracitelli, Carolina P. B.; Rosen, Peter N.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between Motor Vehicle Collisions (MVCs) in drivers with glaucoma and standard automated perimetry (SAP), Useful Field of View (UFOV), and driving simulator assessment of divided attention. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 153 drivers from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study. All subjects had SAP and divided attention was assessed using UFOV and driving simulation using low-, medium-, and high-contrast peripheral stimuli presented during curve negotiation and car following tasks. Self-reported history of MVCs and average mileage driven were recorded. Results: Eighteen of 153 subjects (11.8%) reported a MVC. There was no difference in visual acuity but the MVC group was older, drove fewer miles, and had worse binocular SAP sensitivity, contrast sensitivity, and ability to divide attention (UFOV and driving simulation). Low contrast driving simulator tasks were the best discriminators of MVC (AUC 0.80 for curve negotiation versus 0.69 for binocular SAP and 0.59 for UFOV). Adjusting for confounding factors, longer reaction times to driving simulator divided attention tasks provided additional value compared with SAP and UFOV, with a 1 standard deviation (SD) increase in reaction time (approximately 0.75 s) associated with almost two-fold increased odds of MVC. Conclusions: Reaction times to low contrast divided attention tasks during driving simulation were significantly associated with history of MVC, performing better than conventional perimetric tests and UFOV. Translational Relevance: The association between conventional tests of visual function and MVCs in drivers with glaucoma is weak, however, tests of divided attention, particularly using driving simulation, may improve risk assessment. PMID:26046007

  7. Simulation Trial Results for the Cooperative Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Demonstration (SA15)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    acknowl- edges the location and then replies when it has found the target. Description Code Notes Hunt Target HHH pos where pos is the MGRS location of...the target to hunt Acknowledge AAA HHH pos where pos is the MGRS location of the target to hunt Found Target VVV 2.2.5 Meredith MMI (Singapore Control...phase, Reacquire, was initiated by the Meredith vehicle sending a Reacquire message with an MGRS coordinate to Mullaya (“ HHH ” pos). Mullaya would then

  8. A Microcomputer-Based Control And Simulation Of An Advanced Ipm Synchronous Machine Drive System For Electric Vehicle Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, B. K.; Szczesny, P. M.

    1987-10-01

    Advanced digital control and computer-aided control system design techniques are playing key roles in the complex drive system design and control implementation. The paper describes a high performance microcomputer-based control and digital simulation of an inverter-fed interior permanent magnet (IPM) synchronous machine which uses Neodymium-Iron-Boron magnet. The fully operational four-quadrant drive system includes constant-torque region with zero speed operation and high speed field-weakening constant-power region. The control uses vector or field-oriented technique in constant-torque region with the direct axis aligned to the stator flux, whereas the constant-power region control is based on torque angle orientation of the impressed square-wave voltage. All the key feedback signals for the control are estimated with precision. The drive system is basically designed with an outer torque control loop for electric vehicle application, but speed and position control loops can be added for other industrial applications. The distributed microcomputer-based control system is based on Intel-8096 microcontroller and Texas Instruments TMS32010 type digital signal processor. The complete drive system has been simulated using the VAX-based simulation language SIMNON* to verify the feasibility of the control laws and to study the performances of the drive system. The simulation results are found to have excellent correlation with the laboratory breadboard tests.

  9. Pilot/vehicle model analysis of visual and motion cue requirements in flight simulation. [helicopter hovering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, S.; Lancraft, R.; Zacharias, G.

    1980-01-01

    The optimal control model (OCM) of the human operator is used to predict the effect of simulator characteristics on pilot performance and workload. The piloting task studied is helicopter hover. Among the simulator characteristics considered were (computer generated) visual display resolution, field of view and time delay.

  10. An integrated characteristic simulation method for hydraulically damped rubber mount of vehicle engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Rong; Wang, Jia-Cai; Hagiwara, Ichiro

    2005-09-01

    Hydraulically Damped Rubber Mount (HDM) is widely equipped in vehicle powertrain mounting system and plays an important role in noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) control of vehicle. It is necessary that static and dynamic characteristics of HDM and its effectiveness on vibration isolation of powertrain system are predicted at design and development stage. In this paper, a kind of graphic HDM modeling method integrating with parameter identifications obtained from finite element (FE) analysis and experimental analysis is investigated to predict performance of HDM. The fluid-structure interactions in HDM are explored by predictions of volumetric elasticity and equivalent piston area of fluid chamber using a kind of hydrostatic fluid-structure FE method in commercial code of ABAQUS. Predications of static elasticity and dynamic characteristics and frequency response analysis of a typical HDM with fixed-decoupler verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. This research helps automotive engineers to enhance computer-aided system technology in design and development of HDM and powertrain mounting system.

  11. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

  12. Impact of multisource VOC emission on in-vehicle air quality: test chamber simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzik, K.; Faber, J.; Goƚda-Kopek, A.; Łomankiewicz, D.

    2016-09-01

    Air quality inside vehicle may be strongly influenced by the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The sources of these compounds may be different. In case of new vehicles VOC mainly originate from off-gassing of interior materials, while in used cars exterior pollution, like exhaust gases, starts to dominate. The aim of this work was to check the influence of multiple VOC sources on concentration of volatile organic compounds emitted from car interior parts. For this purpose material emission tests were performed in 1 m3 emission testing chamber (WKE 1000, Weiss, Germany) at 65 °C, 5% RH and with air exchange. Three different car parts were studied: sun visor, headlining, and handbrake lever cover. It was stated that volatile organic compounds concentration inside test chamber during the test performed with three different parts inside was significantly lower than those being result of addition of the results obtained for parts tested separately. Presented results indicate interactions between different materials and their emissions as well as prove that some of materials acts like sorbents.

  13. Modelling and simulation of a dual-clutch transmission vehicle to analyse the effect of pump selection on fuel economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlawat, R.; Fathy, H. K.; Lee, B.; Stein, J. L.; Jung, D.

    2010-07-01

    Positive displacement pumps are used in automotive transmissions to provide pressurised fluid to various hydraulic components in the transmission and also lubricate the mechanical components. The output flow of these pumps increases with pump/transmission speed, almost linearly, but the transmission flow requirements often saturate at higher speeds, resulting in excess flow capacity that must be wasted by allowing it to drain back to the sump. This represents a parasitic loss in the transmission leading to a loss in fuel economy. To overcome this issue, variable displacement pumps have been used in the transmission, where the output flow can be reduced by controlling the displacement of the pump. The use of these pumps in automatic transmissions has resulted in better fuel economy as compared with some types of fixed displacement pumps. However, the literature does not fully explore the benefits of variable displacement pumps to a specific type of transmission namely, dual-clutch transmission (DCT), which has different pressure and flow requirements from an epicyclic gear train. This paper presents an analysis of the effect of pump selection on fuel economy in a five-speed DCT of a commercial vehicle. Models of the engine, transmission, and vehicle are developed along with the models of two different types of pumps: a fixed displacement gerotor pump and a variable displacement vane pump. The models are then parameterised using experimental data, and the fuel economy of the vehicle is simulated on a standard driving cycle. The results suggest that the fuel economy benefit obtained by the use of the variable displacement pump in DCTs is comparable to the benefit previously shown for these pumps in automatic transmissions.

  14. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation: A Multidisciplinary Design System for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John K.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in computational technology and in physics-based modeling are making large scale, detailed simulations of complex systems possible within the design environment. For example, the integration of computing, communications, and aerodynamics has reduced the time required to analyze ma or propulsion system components from days and weeks to minutes and hours. This breakthrough has enabled the detailed simulation of major propulsion system components to become a routine part of design process and to provide the designer with critical information about the components early in the design process. This paper describes the development of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS), a multidisciplinary system of analysis tools that is focussed on extending the simulation capability from components to the full system. This will provide the product developer with a "virtual wind tunnel" that will reduce the number of hardware builds and tests required during the development of advanced aerospace propulsion systems.

  15. Utilization of Fast Running Models in Buried Blast Simulations of Ground Vehicles for Significant Computational Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    the Kriging method for metamodel generation [10, 11]. PCA distills the blast loading time histories generated by actual simulations (at the training...and to the definition of X is considered to be negligible. The Kriging method is used to generate metamodels for the principal components of...the training point simulations in order to build FRMs. Kriging asserts that the response at a particular location can be determined by considering the

  16. Sodalite as a vehicle to increase Re retention in waste glass simulant during vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Luksic, Steven A.; Riley, Brian J.; Parker, Kent E.; Hrma, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    Technetium retention during Hanford waste vitrification can be increased by inhibiting technetium volatility from the waste glass melter. Incorporating technetium into a mineral phase, such as sodalite, is one way to achieve this. Rhenium-bearing sodalite was tested as a vehicle to transport perrhenate (ReO4-), a nonradioactive surrogate for pertechnetate (TcO4-), into high-level (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glasses. After melting feeds of these two glasses, the retention of rhenium was measured and compared with the rhenium retention in glass prepared from a feed containing Re2O7 as a standard. The rhenium retention was 21% higher for HLW glass and 85% higher for LAW glass when added to samples in the form of sodalite as opposed to when it was added as Re2O7, demonstrating the efficacy of this type of an approach.

  17. Disinfection susceptibility of waterborne pseudomonads and Legionellae under simulated space vehicle conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfeters, Gordon A.; Pyle, Barry H.; Watters, Shelley K.; Cargill, Kari L.; Yu, Feipeng P.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of waterborne bacteria from iodinated systems to iodine is examined with particular attention to the recovery of the organisms. The use of iodine as a disinfectant for space-vehicle water is described, and references are made to studies of iodine sensitivity and the relationship between growth rate and iodine sensitivity. Growth following iodination is discussed, and bacterial responses to nutrient restriction are examined for both P aeruginosa and Legionella pneumophila. The low level of organic nutrients in spacecraft water allows the selection for bacteria that are less sensitive to halogens. The formation of biofilms within the water-treatment system enhances bacterial resistance to iodine, and in the case of high-quality water it is shown that sublethal doses of iodine can stimulate bacterial growth. Water treatment should therefore be based on antecedent growth conditions, nutrient limitation, biofilm formation, and ambient selective pressures.

  18. Piloted Simulation Evaluation of a Model-Predictive Automatic Recovery System to Prevent Vehicle Loss of Control on Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Liu, Yuan; Sowers, Thomas S.; Owen, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a model-predictive automatic recovery system for aircraft on the verge of a loss-of-control situation. The system determines when it must intervene to prevent an imminent accident, resulting from a poor approach. It estimates the altitude loss that would result from a go-around maneuver at the current flight condition. If the loss is projected to violate a minimum altitude threshold, the maneuver is automatically triggered. The system deactivates to allow landing once several criteria are met. Piloted flight simulator evaluation showed the system to provide effective envelope protection during extremely unsafe landing attempts. The results demonstrate how flight and propulsion control can be integrated to recover control of the vehicle automatically and prevent a potential catastrophe.

  19. The effects of in-vehicle tasks and time-gap selection while reclaiming control from adaptive cruise control (ACC) with bus simulator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsang-Wei; Hwang, Sheue-Ling; Su, Jau-Ming; Chen, Wan-Hui

    2008-05-01

    This research aimed to find out the effects of in-vehicle distractions and time-gap settings with a fix-based bus driving simulator in a following scenario. Professional bus drivers were recruited to perform in-vehicle tasks while driving with adaptive cruise control (ACC) of changeable time-gap settings in freeway traffic. Thirty subjects were divided equally into three groups for different in-vehicle task modes (between subjects), including no task distraction, hands-free, and manual modes. Further, time-gap settings for the experimental ACC were: shorter than 1.0 s, 1.0-1.5 s, 1.5-2.0 s, and longer than 2.0 s (within subjects). Longitudinal (mean headway, forward collision rate, and response time) and lateral control (mean lateral lane position and its standard deviation) performance was assessed. In the results, longitudinal control performance was worsened by both shorter time-gaps and heavier in-vehicle tasks. But the interaction indicated that the harm by heavier in-vehicle distraction could be improved by longer time-gaps. As for the lateral control, it would only be negatively affected by shorter time-gap settings. This research indicates the effects of time-gaps and in-vehicle distraction, as well as the interaction. Proper time-gap selection under different in-vehicle distractions can help avoid accidents and keep safe.

  20. Development of a vehicle-track model assembly and numerical method for simulation of wheel-rail dynamic interaction due to unsupported sleepers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian Jun; Ahmed, A. K. W.; Rakheja, Subhash; Khajepour, Amir

    2010-12-01

    In practice, it is not very uncommon to find railway track systems with unsupported sleepers due to the uneven settlement of a ballasted track system. These unsupported sleepers are among the major vibration excitations for a train and track system when a train moves forwards on a track. The vibration induced by unsupported sleepers can cause a large dynamic contact force between wheels and rails. For heavily loaded high-speed trains, the deteriorated sleeper support may lead to accelerated degradation of the railway track and vehicle components, and may thus impose safety risk to the operation. This paper presents analyses of a coupled vehicle-track assembly consisting of a roll plane vehicle model, a continuous track system model and an adaptive wheel-rail contact model. In order to improve the simulation efficiency, a numerical approach based on the central finite difference method is proposed in this investigation. The developed model assembly and proposed simulation method are utilised to simulate the vehicle-track dynamic interaction in the presence of unsupported sleepers. The dynamic response in terms of the dynamic wheel-rail interaction force due to one or multiple unsupported sleepers is studied. Important factors influencing the dynamic wheel-rail interaction force in the presence of sleeper voids are also investigated. The results show that the vehicle speed, the gap size and the number of unsupported sleepers primarily dictate the magnitude of impact load which can be significant.

  1. Development of a Rotary Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Simulation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Raptor 90 UAV platform. Simulink was used to execute the core simulation update loop, with externally linked modules providing functionality for...autopilot code module written in MATLAB . Additionally, a MATLAB interface for an inertial motion unit was developed to aid in future autopilot research.

  2. Decision Processes in Simulation-Based Training for ISAF Vehicle Patrols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    ADA564696. Human Modelling for Military Application (Applications militaires de la modelisation humaine). RTO-MP-HFM-202 14. ABSTRACT Gaining...Simulation Training supporting Military Operational Processes, PhD Thesis , School of Computing, Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH), Sweden

  3. Communications Network Design, Simulation, and Analysis for an Autonomous Unmanned Vehicle System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited COMMUNICATONS ...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iii Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited COMMUNICATONS NETWORK DESIGN, SIMULATION, AND ANALYSIS FOR AN...search.janes.com.libproxy.nps.edu/Search&Prod _Name=JFS&, accessed Apr. 28, 2011. [20] British Broadcasting Corporation , “Nigerian attack closes oilfield,” BBC

  4. Laboratory Simulation of the Effect of Rocket Thrust on a Precessing Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Oscar; Bausley, Henry; Cohen, Sam; Falcon-Martin, Miguel; Furumoto, Gary (Editor); Horio, Asikin; Levitt, David; Walsh, Amy

    1990-01-01

    Ground tests of solid propellant rocket motors have shown that metal-containing propellants produce various amounts of slag (primarily aluminum oxide) which is trapped in the motor case, causing a loss of specific impulse. Although not yet definitely established, the presence of a liquid pool of slag also may contribute to nutational instabilities that have been observed with certain spin-stabilized, upper-stage vehicles. Because of the rocket's axial acceleration, absent in the ground tests, estimates of in-flight slag mass have been very uncertain. Yet such estimates are needed to determine the magnitude of the control authority of the systems required for eliminating the instability. A test rig with an eccentrically mounted hemispherical bowl was designed and built which incorporates a follower force that properly aligns the thrust vector along the axis of spin. A program that computes the motion of a point mass in the spinning and precessing bowl was written. Using various RPMs, friction factors, and initial starting conditions, plots were generated showing the trace of the point mass around the inside of the fuel tank. The apparatus will incorporate future design features such as a variable nutation angle and a film height measuring instrument. Data obtained on the nutational instability characteristics will be used to determine order of magnitude estimates of control authority needed to minimize the sloshing effect.

  5. Aerospace Toolbox---a flight vehicle design, analysis, simulation ,and software development environment: I. An introduction and tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Paul M.; Wells, Randy

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents a demonstrated approach to significantly reduce the cost and schedule of non real-time modeling and simulation, real-time HWIL simulation, and embedded code development. The tool and the methodology presented capitalize on a paradigm that has become a standard operating procedure in the automotive industry. The tool described is known as the Aerospace Toolbox, and it is based on the MathWorks Matlab/Simulink framework, which is a COTS application. Extrapolation of automotive industry data and initial applications in the aerospace industry show that the use of the Aerospace Toolbox can make significant contributions in the quest by NASA and other government agencies to meet aggressive cost reduction goals in development programs. The part I of this paper provides a detailed description of the GUI based Aerospace Toolbox and how it is used in every step of a development program; from quick prototyping of concept developments that leverage built-in point of departure simulations through to detailed design, analysis, and testing. Some of the attributes addressed include its versatility in modeling 3 to 6 degrees of freedom, its library of flight test validated library of models (including physics, environments, hardware, and error sources), and its built-in Monte Carlo capability. Other topics to be covered in this part include flight vehicle models and algorithms, and the covariance analysis package, Navigation System Covariance Analysis Tools (NavSCAT). Part II of this paper, to be published at a later date, will conclude with a description of how the Aerospace Toolbox is an integral part of developing embedded code directly from the simulation models by using the Mathworks Real Time Workshop and optimization tools. It will also address how the Toolbox can be used as a design hub for Internet based collaborative engineering tools such as NASA's Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) and Lockheed Martin's Interactive Missile Design Environment

  6. Aerospace Toolbox--a flight vehicle design, analysis, simulation, and software development environment II: an in-depth overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Paul M.

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a demonstrated approach to significantly reduce the cost and schedule of non real-time modeling and simulation, real-time HWIL simulation, and embedded code development. The tool and the methodology presented capitalize on a paradigm that has become a standard operating procedure in the automotive industry. The tool described is known as the Aerospace Toolbox, and it is based on the MathWorks Matlab/Simulink framework, which is a COTS application. Extrapolation of automotive industry data and initial applications in the aerospace industry show that the use of the Aerospace Toolbox can make significant contributions in the quest by NASA and other government agencies to meet aggressive cost reduction goals in development programs. The part I of this paper provided a detailed description of the GUI based Aerospace Toolbox and how it is used in every step of a development program; from quick prototyping of concept developments that leverage built-in point of departure simulations through to detailed design, analysis, and testing. Some of the attributes addressed included its versatility in modeling 3 to 6 degrees of freedom, its library of flight test validated library of models (including physics, environments, hardware, and error sources), and its built-in Monte Carlo capability. Other topics that were covered in part I included flight vehicle models and algorithms, and the covariance analysis package, Navigation System Covariance Analysis Tools (NavSCAT). Part II of this series will cover a more in-depth look at the analysis and simulation capability and provide an update on the toolbox enhancements. It will also address how the Toolbox can be used as a design hub for Internet based collaborative engineering tools such as NASA's Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) and Lockheed Martin's Interactive Missile Design Environment (IMD).

  7. Compaction-Based Deformable Terrain Model as an Interface for Real-Time Vehicle Dynamics Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-16

    to vehicular loads, and the resulting visco-elastic-plastic stress/strain on the affected soil volume. Pedo transfer functions allow for the... resulting visco-elastic-plastic stress/strain on the affected soil volume. Pedo transfer functions allow for the calculation of the soil mechanics model...in section 2. Example simulations will include timing and profiling results for sequential, CPU parallel and CPU & GPU parallel implementations in

  8. Tracked Vehicle Dynamics Modeling and Simulation Methodology, with Control, using RecurDyn Software Package

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    track segment, with pins connecting each track segment. The modeler must align each segment properly with the track pins with the sprocket teeth and...representative track segment is copied and linked together using a simplified algorithm which assumes each track segment is identical, with force/ torque pairs...simulation, RecurDyn feeds CoLink the desired inputs (error term, speed, direction, etc), CoLink performs the programmed operation (generates torque

  9. Challenges to Computational Aerothermodynamic Simulation and Validation for Planetary Entry Vehicle Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Pathfinder simulations were validated with ballistic range data and wind - tunnel data obtained for Viking. The pre-flight discovery of a static instability...which case ablation had a significant impact on the radiation. 4.9 Towed Ballute A series of wind tunnel tests were conducted at Langley in Mach 6 air...retracted the motion appears steady (at least with regard to images captured in the Schlieren). The topology of the wind tunnel case is different than the

  10. Force Limiting Vibration Tests Evaluated from both Ground Acoustic Tests and FEM Simulations of a Flight Like Vehicle System Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a series of ground acoustic tests with the dual goals of informing analytical judgment, and validating analytical methods when estimating vibroacoustic responses of launch vehicle subsystems. The process of repeatedly correlating finite element-simulated responses with test-measured responses has assisted in the development of best practices for modeling and post-processing. In recent work, force transducers were integrated to measure interface forces at the base of avionics box equipment. Other force data was indirectly measured using strain gauges. The combination of these direct and indirect force measurements has been used to support and illustrate the advantages of implementing the Force Limiting approach for equipment qualification tests. The comparison of force response from integrated system level tests to measurements at the same locations during component level vibration tests provides an excellent illustration. A second comparison of the measured response cases from the system level acoustic tests to finite element simulations has also produced some principles for assessing the suitability of Finite Element Models (FEMs) for making vibroacoustics estimates. The results indicate that when FEM models are employed to guide force limiting choices, they should include sufficient detail to represent the apparent mass of the system in the frequency range of interest.

  11. How uncertain is the future of electric vehicle market: Results from Monte Carlo simulations using a nested logit model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changzheng; Lin, Zhenhong

    2016-12-08

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are widely regarded as an important component of the technology portfolio designed to accomplish policy goals in sustainability and energy security. However, the market acceptance of PEVs in the future remains largely uncertain from today's perspective. By integrating a consumer choice model based on nested multinomial logit and Monte Carlo simulation, this study analyzes the uncertainty of PEV market penetration using Monte Carlo simulation. Results suggest that the future market for PEVs is highly uncertain and there is a substantial risk of low penetration in the early and midterm market. Top factors contributing to market share variability are price sensitivities, energy cost, range limitation, and charging availability. The results also illustrate the potential effect of public policies in promoting PEVs through investment in battery technology and infrastructure deployment. Here, continued improvement of battery technologies and deployment of charging infrastructure alone do not necessarily reduce the spread of market share distributions, but may shift distributions toward right, i.e., increase the probability of having great market success.

  12. How uncertain is the future of electric vehicle market: Results from Monte Carlo simulations using a nested logit model

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Changzheng; Oak Ridge National Lab.; Lin, Zhenhong; ...

    2016-12-08

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are widely regarded as an important component of the technology portfolio designed to accomplish policy goals in sustainability and energy security. However, the market acceptance of PEVs in the future remains largely uncertain from today's perspective. By integrating a consumer choice model based on nested multinomial logit and Monte Carlo simulation, this study analyzes the uncertainty of PEV market penetration using Monte Carlo simulation. Results suggest that the future market for PEVs is highly uncertain and there is a substantial risk of low penetration in the early and midterm market. Top factors contributing to market sharemore » variability are price sensitivities, energy cost, range limitation, and charging availability. The results also illustrate the potential effect of public policies in promoting PEVs through investment in battery technology and infrastructure deployment. Here, continued improvement of battery technologies and deployment of charging infrastructure alone do not necessarily reduce the spread of market share distributions, but may shift distributions toward right, i.e., increase the probability of having great market success.« less

  13. Simulating the Effect of Space Vehicle Environments on Directional Solidification of a Binary Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, D. G.; Heinrich, J. C.; Poirier, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    Space microgravity missions are designed to provide a microgravity environment for scientific experiments, but these missions cannot provide a perfect environment, due to vibrations caused by crew activity, on-board experiments, support systems (pumps, fans, etc.), periodic orbital maneuvers, and water dumps. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the impact of these vibrations on space experiments, prior to performing them. Simulations were conducted to study the effect of the vibrations on the directional solidification of a dendritic alloy. Finite element ca!cu!attie?ls were dme with a simd2titcr based on a continuum model of dendritic solidification, using the Fractional Step Method (FSM). The FSM splits the solution of the momentum equation into two steps: the viscous intermediate step, which does not enforce continuity; and the inviscid projection step, which calculates the pressure and enforces continuity. The FSM provides significant computational benefits for predicting flows in a directionally solidified alloy, compared to other methods presently employed, because of the efficiency gains in the uncoupled solution of velocity and pressure. finite differences, arises when the interdendritic liquid reaches the eutectic temperature and concentration. When a node reaches eutectic temperature, it is assumed that the solidification of the eutectic liquid continues at constant temperature until all the eutectic is solidified. With this approach, solidification is not achieved continuously across an element; rather, the element is not considered solidified until the eutectic isotherm overtakes the top nodes. For microgravity simulations, where the convection is driven by shrinkage, it introduces large variations in the fluid velocity. When the eutectic isotherm reaches a node, all the eutectic must be solidified in a short period, causing an abrupt increase in velocity. To overcome this difficulty, we employed a scheme to numerically predict a more accurate value

  14. Clogging evaluation of open graded friction course pavements tested under rainfall and heavy vehicle simulators.

    PubMed

    Coleri, Erdem; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M

    2013-11-15

    In this study a new procedure is developed to obtain core samples from field sections to assess clogging mechanisms of open graded friction course (OGFC) pavements using X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The approach compared X-ray computed tomography (CT) images taken before and after: (1) rainfall simulations without trafficking to investigate particle-related clogging and (2) full-scale accelerated pavement rutting tests (APT) to investigate deformation related clogging of OGFC layers. Rainfall simulations were performed with runoff water of known total suspended solids (TSS) and particle size distributions (PSDs). Full-scale accelerated rutting tests were performed under controlled temperature and loads. Both investigations were performed for three different OGFC pavements with different layer thicknesses and mix types. The clogging of rutting test sections were also evaluated by comparing the surface permeability measurements performed before and after APT testing. The results of X-ray CT image processing revealed a significant reduction in air-void content of core samples after APT rutting tests. The highest air-void reduction was concentrated at the bottom of the OGFC layers. Permeability measurements also showed a 40%-90% reduction in permeability after APT trafficking. X-ray CT image processing of core samples tested under simulated rainfall showed that air void content reduction is concentrated in the lower part (2-6 mm from the bottom) of the OGFC layers as a result of particle accumulation. Small changes in air void contents were observed in the upper part of the OGFC layers (10-15 mm) while these reductions in air void contents were not significant to cause surface overflow and hence it is expected that the tested OGFC pavements will have sufficient permeability to infiltrate water during most average storm events.

  15. Machine learning from computer simulations with applications in rail vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Mehdi; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    The application of stochastic modelling for learning the behaviour of a multibody dynamics (MBD) models is investigated. Post-processing data from a simulation run are used to train the stochastic model that estimates the relationship between model inputs (suspension relative displacement and velocity) and the output (sum of suspension forces). The stochastic model can be used to reduce the computational burden of the MBD model by replacing a computationally expensive subsystem in the model (suspension subsystem). With minor changes, the stochastic modelling technique is able to learn the behaviour of a physical system and integrate its behaviour within MBD models. The technique is highly advantageous for MBD models where real-time simulations are necessary, or with models that have a large number of repeated substructures, e.g. modelling a train with a large number of railcars. The fact that the training data are acquired prior to the development of the stochastic model discards the conventional sampling plan strategies like Latin Hypercube sampling plans where simulations are performed using the inputs dictated by the sampling plan. Since the sampling plan greatly influences the overall accuracy and efficiency of the stochastic predictions, a sampling plan suitable for the process is developed where the most space-filling subset of the acquired data with ? number of sample points that best describes the dynamic behaviour of the system under study is selected as the training data. Results indicated that the stochastic modelling technique is effective in improving the computational efficiency of the MBD model without compromising the accuracy of the predictions, although the improvements in the computational efficiency of the technique could not be quantified due to the inefficiencies associated with transferring the data between multiple software packages (SIMPACK, SIMULINK).

  16. Is the infant car seat challenge useful? A pilot study in a simulated moving vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Renu; Williams, Georgina; Kilonback, Anna; Toward, Martin; Griffin, Michael; Blair, Peter S; Fleming, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that preterm infants complete a predischarge ‘car seat challenge’ observation for cardiorespiratory compromise while in a car seat. This static challenge does not consider the more upright position in a car or the vibration of the seat when the car is moving. This pilot study was designed to assess the cardiorespiratory effects of vibration, mimicking the effect of being in a moving car, on preterm and term infants. Methods A simulator was designed to reproduce vertical vibration similar to that in a rear-facing car seat at 30 mph. 19 healthy newborn term and 21 preterm infants, ready for hospital discharge, underwent cardiorespiratory measurements while lying flat in a cot (baseline), static in the seat (30°), simulator (40°) and during motion (vibration 40°). Results Median test age was 13 days (range 1–65 days) and median weight was 2.5 kg (IQR: 2.1–3.1 kg). Compared with baseline observations, only the total number of desaturations was significantly increased when infants were placed at 30° (p=0.03). At 40°, or with vibration, respiratory and heart rates increased and oxygen saturation decreased significantly. Profound desaturations <85% significantly increased during motion, regardless of gestational age. Conclusions This is the first study to assess the effect of motion on infants seated in a car safety seat. Term and preterm infants showed significant signs of potentially adverse cardiorespiratory effects in the upright position at 40°, particularly with simulated motion, not identified in the standard challenge. A larger study is required to investigate the significance of these results. PMID:27694399

  17. Real-Time and High-Fidelity Simulation Environment for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    was rendered in OpenGL . Urban Environment The environment consisted of a 3D mesh model of a city. The mesh was created using a commercial tool...system. We rendered the 3D scene (in OpenGL ) and read back the depth buffer in a raster that matched the raster characteristics of a typical LIDAR...configure the simulation. Visualization is done using custom 3D graphics software based on OGRE and OpenGL . The software runs on a standard Linux

  18. Use of hexafluoroethane to simulate the inviscid real-gas effects on blunt entry vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental and theoretical investigation of the use of equilibrium hexafluoroethane C2F6 as an undissociated test gas in a wind tunnel to simulate the inviscid aerodynamic characteristics of blunt bodies in high-speed flight where dissociation occurs. The results indicate that the use of C2F6 as a test gas in wind tunnels is a practical and relatively simple and inexpensive method of obtaining test conditions with large normal-shock density ratios. Equations for the thermodynamic and transport properties of C2F6 are also included.

  19. Design of a bio-inspired controller for dynamic soaring in a simulated unmanned aerial vehicle.

    PubMed

    Barate, Renaud; Doncieux, Stéphane; Meyer, Jean-Arcady

    2006-09-01

    This paper is inspired by the way birds such as albatrosses are able to exploit wind gradients at the surface of the ocean for staying aloft for very long periods while minimizing their energy expenditure. The corresponding behaviour has been partially reproduced here via a set of Takagi-Sugeno-Kang fuzzy rules controlling a simulated glider. First, the rules were hand-designed. Then, they were optimized with an evolutionary algorithm that improved their efficiency at coping with challenging conditions. Finally, the robustness properties of the controller generated were assessed with a view to its applicability to a real platform.

  20. Angular and Linear Velocity Estimation for a Re-Entry Vehicle Using Six Distributed Accelerometers: Theory, Simulation and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G

    2003-04-28

    This report describes a feasibility study. We are interested in calculating the angular and linear velocities of a re-entry vehicle using six acceleration signals from a distributed accelerometer inertial measurement unit (DAIMU). Earlier work showed that angular and linear velocity calculation using classic nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) solvers is not practically feasible, due to mathematical and numerical difficulties. This report demonstrates the theoretical feasibility of using model-based nonlinear state estimation techniques to obtain the angular and linear velocities in this problem. Practical numerical and calibration issues require additional work to resolve. We show that the six accelerometers in the DAIMU are not sufficient to provide observability, so additional measurements of the system states are required (e.g. from a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit). Given the constraint that our system cannot use GPS, we propose using the existing on-board 3-axis magnetometer to measure angular velocity. We further show that the six nonlinear ODE's for the vehicle kinematics can be decoupled into three ODE's in the angular velocity and three ODE's in the linear velocity. This allows us to formulate a three-state Gauss-Markov system model for the angular velocities, using the magnetometer signals in the measurement model. This re-formulated model is observable, allowing us to build an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) for estimating the angular velocities. Given the angular velocity estimates from the EKF, the three ODE's for the linear velocity become algebraic, and the linear velocity can be calculated by numerical integration. Thus, we do not need direct measurements of the linear velocity to provide observability, and the technique is mathematically feasible. Using a simulation example, we show that the estimator adds value over the numerical ODE solver in the presence of measurement noise. Calculating the velocities in the presence of

  1. Generic vehicle speed models based on traffic simulation: Development and application

    SciTech Connect

    Margiotta, R.; Cohen, H.; Elkins, G.; Rathi, A.; Venigalla, M.

    1994-12-15

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research project to develop new methods of estimating speeds for inclusion in the Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) Analytical Process. The paper focuses on the effects of traffic conditions excluding incidents (recurring congestion) on daily average ed and excess fuel consumption. A review of the literature revealed that many techniques have been used to predict speeds as a function of congestion but most fail to address the effects of queuing. However, the method of Dowling and Skabardonis avoids this limitation and was adapted to the research. The methodology used the FRESIM and NETSIM microscopic traffic simulation models to develop uncongested speed functions and as a calibration base for the congested flow functions. The chief contributions of the new speed models are the simplicity of application and their explicit accounting for the effects of queuing. Specific enhancements include: (1) the inclusion of a queue discharge rate for freeways; (2) use of newly defined uncongested flow speed functions; (3) use of generic temporal distributions that account for peak spreading; and (4) a final model form that allows incorporation of other factors that influence speed, such as grades and curves. The main limitation of the new speed models is the fact that they are based on simulation results and not on field observations. They also do not account for the effect of incidents on speed. While appropriate for estimating average national conditions, the use of fixed temporal distributions may not be suitable for analyzing specific facilities, depending on observed traffic patterns. Finally, it is recommended that these and all future speed models be validated against field data where incidents can be adequately identified in the data.

  2. A high performance computing framework for physics-based modeling and simulation of military ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrut, Dan; Lamb, David; Gorsich, David

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a software infrastructure made up of tools and libraries designed to assist developers in implementing computational dynamics applications running on heterogeneous and distributed computing environments. Together, these tools and libraries compose a so called Heterogeneous Computing Template (HCT). The heterogeneous and distributed computing hardware infrastructure is assumed herein to be made up of a combination of CPUs and Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The computational dynamics applications targeted to execute on such a hardware topology include many-body dynamics, smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) fluid simulation, and fluid-solid interaction analysis. The underlying theme of the solution approach embraced by HCT is that of partitioning the domain of interest into a number of subdomains that are each managed by a separate core/accelerator (CPU/GPU) pair. Five components at the core of HCT enable the envisioned distributed computing approach to large-scale dynamical system simulation: (a) the ability to partition the problem according to the one-to-one mapping; i.e., spatial subdivision, discussed above (pre-processing); (b) a protocol for passing data between any two co-processors; (c) algorithms for element proximity computation; and (d) the ability to carry out post-processing in a distributed fashion. In this contribution the components (a) and (b) of the HCT are demonstrated via the example of the Discrete Element Method (DEM) for rigid body dynamics with friction and contact. The collision detection task required in frictional-contact dynamics (task (c) above), is shown to benefit on the GPU of a two order of magnitude gain in efficiency when compared to traditional sequential implementations. Note: Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Army. The views and

  3. Simulating flow around scaled model of a hypersonic vehicle in wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markova, T. V.; Aksenov, A. A.; Zhluktov, S. V.; Savitsky, D. V.; Gavrilov, A. D.; Son, E. E.; Prokhorov, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    A prospective hypersonic HEXAFLY aircraft is considered in the given paper. In order to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of a new construction design of the aircraft, experiments with a scaled model have been carried out in a wind tunnel under different conditions. The runs have been performed at different angles of attack with and without hydrogen combustion in the scaled propulsion engine. However, the measured physical quantities do not provide all the information about the flowfield. Numerical simulation can complete the experimental data as well as to reduce the number of wind tunnel experiments. Besides that, reliable CFD software can be used for calculations of the aerodynamic characteristics for any possible design of the full-scale aircraft under different operation conditions. The reliability of the numerical predictions must be confirmed in verification study of the software. The given work is aimed at numerical investigation of the flowfield around and inside the scaled model of the HEXAFLY-CIAM module under wind tunnel conditions. A cold run (without combustion) was selected for this study. The calculations are performed in the FlowVision CFD software. The flow characteristics are compared against the available experimental data. The carried out verification study confirms the capability of the FlowVision CFD software to calculate the flows discussed.

  4. Drive cycle simulation of high efficiency combustions on fuel economy and exhaust properties in light-duty vehicles

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Zhiming; Curran, Scott J.; Parks, James E.; ...

    2015-04-06

    We present fuel economy and engine-out emissions for light-duty (LD) conventional and hybrid vehicles powered by conventional and high-efficiency combustion engines. Engine technologies include port fuel-injected (PFI), direct gasoline injection (GDI), reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) and conventional diesel combustion (CDC). In the case of RCCI, the engine utilized CDC combustion at speed/load points not feasible with RCCI. The results, without emissions considered, show that the best fuel economies can be achieved with CDC/RCCI, with CDC/RCCI, CDC-only, and lean GDI all surpassing PFI fuel economy significantly. In all cases, hybridization significantly improved fuel economy. The engine-out hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxidemore » (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate matter (PM) emissions varied remarkably with combustion mode. The simulated engine-out CO and HC emissions from RCCI are significantly higher than CDC, but RCCI makes less NOx and PM emissions. Hybridization can improve lean GDI and RCCI cases by increasing time percentage for these more fuel efficient modes. Moreover, hybridization can dramatically decreases the lean GDI and RCCI engine out emissions. Importantly, lean GDI and RCCI combustion modes decrease exhaust temperatures, especially for RCCI, which limits aftertreatment performance to control tailpipe emissions. Overall, the combination of engine and hybrid drivetrain selected greatly affects the emissions challenges required to meet emission regulations.« less

  5. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  6. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.; Harris, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured mesh Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  7. Drive cycle simulation of high efficiency combustions on fuel economy and exhaust properties in light-duty vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Curran, Scott J.; Parks, James E.; Smith, David E.; Wagner, Robert M.; Daw, C. Stuart; Edwards, K. Dean; Thomas, John F.

    2015-04-06

    We present fuel economy and engine-out emissions for light-duty (LD) conventional and hybrid vehicles powered by conventional and high-efficiency combustion engines. Engine technologies include port fuel-injected (PFI), direct gasoline injection (GDI), reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) and conventional diesel combustion (CDC). In the case of RCCI, the engine utilized CDC combustion at speed/load points not feasible with RCCI. The results, without emissions considered, show that the best fuel economies can be achieved with CDC/RCCI, with CDC/RCCI, CDC-only, and lean GDI all surpassing PFI fuel economy significantly. In all cases, hybridization significantly improved fuel economy. The engine-out hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate matter (PM) emissions varied remarkably with combustion mode. The simulated engine-out CO and HC emissions from RCCI are significantly higher than CDC, but RCCI makes less NOx and PM emissions. Hybridization can improve lean GDI and RCCI cases by increasing time percentage for these more fuel efficient modes. Moreover, hybridization can dramatically decreases the lean GDI and RCCI engine out emissions. Importantly, lean GDI and RCCI combustion modes decrease exhaust temperatures, especially for RCCI, which limits aftertreatment performance to control tailpipe emissions. Overall, the combination of engine and hybrid drivetrain selected greatly affects the emissions challenges required to meet emission regulations.

  8. Extraction-Separation Performance and Dynamic Modeling of Orion Test Vehicles with Adams Simulation: 2nd Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Anderson, Keith; Varela, Jose G.; Bernatovich, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Orion Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project has advanced into the third generation of its parachute test campaign and requires technically comprehensive modeling capabilities to simulate multi-body dynamics (MBD) of test articles released from a C-17. Safely extracting a 30,000 lbm mated test article from a C-17 and performing stable mid-air separation maneuvers requires an understanding of the interaction between elements in the test configuration and how they are influenced by extraction parachute performance, aircraft dynamics, aerodynamics, separation dynamics, and kinetic energy experienced by the system. During the real-time extraction and deployment sequences, these influences can be highly unsteady and difficult to bound. An avionics logic window based on time, pitch, and pitch rate is used to account for these effects and target a favorable separation state in real time. The Adams simulation has been employed to fine-tune this window, as well as predict and reconstruct the coupled dynamics of the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV) and Cradle Platform Separation System (CPSS) from aircraft extraction through the mid-air separation event. The test-technique for the extraction of CPAS test articles has evolved with increased complexity and requires new modeling concepts to ensure the test article is delivered to a stable test condition for the programmer phase. Prompted by unexpected dynamics and hardware malfunctions in drop tests, these modeling improvements provide a more accurate loads prediction by incorporating a spring-damper line-model derived from the material properties. The qualification phase of CPAS testing is on the horizon and modeling increasingly complex test-techniques with Adams is vital to successfully qualify the Orion parachute system for human spaceflight.

  9. A simulator evaluation of the effects of attention maintenance training on glance distributions of younger novice drivers inside and outside the vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Divekar, Gautam; Pradhan, Anuj K.; Masserang, Kathleen M.; Reagan, Ian; Pollatsek, Alexander; Fisher, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Driver distraction inside and outside the vehicle is increasingly a problem, especially for younger drivers. In many cases the distraction is associated with long glances away from the forward roadway. Such glances have been shown to be highly predictive of crashes. Ideally, one would like to develop and evaluate a training program which reduced these long glances. Thus, an experiment was conducted in a driving simulator to test the efficacy of a training program, FOCAL, that was developed to teach novice drivers to limit the duration of glances that are inside the vehicle while performing an in-vehicle task, such as looking for a CD or finding the 4-way flashers. The test in the simulator showed that the FOCAL trained group performed significantly better than the placebo trained group on several measures, notably on the percentage of within-vehicle glances that were greater than 2, 2.5, and 3 s. However, the training did not generalize to glances away from the roadway (e.g., when drivers were asked to attend to a sign adjacent to the roadway, both trained and untrained novice drivers were equally likely to make especially long glances at the sign). PMID:24415905

  10. Study of the process of destruction of fibroconcrete slabs under a static load simulating the action of a motor vehicle's wheel on a bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojanowska, R.

    1982-09-01

    As part of a study of the feasibility of using fibroconcrete in bridge construction, the process of destruction of quadratic fibroconcrete slabs supported freely around their circumference and reinforced with scattered steel fibers was investigated. The static load was distributed to simulate the effect of a vehicle's wheel on a bridge. Fibroconcrete was shown to be capable of withstanding significant loads and is recommended for use in bridge construction. The bases for its suitability are formulated mathematically.

  11. Hybrid Vehicle Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-17

    Driving Sequence," Federal Register, 35(219): 17288-313 (10 November 1970). 7. "Electric Cars : Where Batteries Stand," Automotive Industry, 185(13): 81-83...Storage Systems, November 1979. 11. Hiroyuko, Imai. "Optimal Acceleration Performance and Storage Battery Voltage of an Electric Automobile Viewed from...ARE:,/35X, 16HNOMINAL VOLTAGE=, F4.0 C,/35X13HBATTERY MASS=,F5.0) C C ENTER HYBRID VARIABLES. FIRST CARD- 1 IF HYBRID,0 IF NOT. NEXT CAR C )IF IHYB=1

  12. Dynamic vehicle-track interaction in switches and crossings and the influence of rail pad stiffness - field measurements and validation of a simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pålsson, Björn A.; Nielsen, Jens C. O.

    2015-06-01

    A model for simulation of dynamic interaction between a railway vehicle and a turnout (switch and crossing, S&C) is validated versus field measurements. In particular, the implementation and accuracy of viscously damped track models with different complexities are assessed. The validation data come from full-scale field measurements of dynamic track stiffness and wheel-rail contact forces in a demonstrator turnout that was installed as part of the INNOTRACK project with funding from the European Union Sixth Framework Programme. Vertical track stiffness at nominal wheel loads, in the frequency range up to 20 Hz, was measured using a rolling stiffness measurement vehicle (RSMV). Vertical and lateral wheel-rail contact forces were measured by an instrumented wheel set mounted in a freight car featuring Y25 bogies. The measurements were performed for traffic in both the through and diverging routes, and in the facing and trailing moves. The full set of test runs was repeated with different types of rail pad to investigate the influence of rail pad stiffness on track stiffness and contact forces. It is concluded that impact loads on the crossing can be reduced by using more resilient rail pads. To allow for vehicle dynamics simulations at low computational cost, the track models are discretised space-variant mass-spring-damper models that are moving with each wheel set of the vehicle model. Acceptable agreement between simulated and measured vertical contact forces at the crossing can be obtained when the standard GENSYS track model is extended with one ballast/subgrade mass under each rail. This model can be tuned to capture the large phase delay in dynamic track stiffness at low frequencies, as measured by the RSMV, while remaining sufficiently resilient at higher frequencies.

  13. A Simulation Study of a Speed Control System for Autonomous On-Road Operation of Automotive Vehicles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    control signals sent to the vehicle.[Ref. 81 In another study of vehicle automatic longitudinal control, Bender, Fenton, and Olson investigated a car ...includes all types of driverless industrial trucks, such as fork trucks and electric tractors. Due to industrial demands. AGV’s also include different...types of conveyor assemblies and trolleys. However. the discussion to follow is limited to driverless industrial trucks. Successful research with

  14. Transient simulation of coolant peak temperature due to prolonged fan and/or water pump operation after the vehicle is keyed-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Suh Chyn; Masjuki, Haji Hassan; Kalam, Md. Abul; Hazrat, Md. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Automotive designers should design a robust engine cooling system which works well in both normal and severe driving conditions. When vehicles are keyed-off suddenly after some distance of hill-climbing driving, the coolant temperature tends to increase drastically. This is because heat soak in the engine could not be transferred away in a timely manner, as both the water pump and cooling fan stop working after the vehicle is keyed-off. In this research, we aimed to visualize the coolant temperature trend over time before and after the vehicles were keyed-off. In order to prevent coolant temperature from exceeding its boiling point and jeopardizing engine life, a numerical model was further tested with prolonged fan and/or water pump operation after keying-off. One dimensional thermal-fluid simulation was exploited to model the vehicle's cooling system. The behaviour of engine heat, air flow, and coolant flow over time were varied to observe the corresponding transient coolant temperatures. The robustness of this model was proven by validation with industry field test data. The numerical results provided sensible insights into the proposed solution. In short, prolonging fan operation for 500 s and prolonging both fan and water pump operation for 300 s could reduce coolant peak temperature efficiently. The physical implementation plan and benefits yielded from implementation of the electrical fan and electrical water pump are discussed.

  15. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Eric Y.

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parameters of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.

  16. Analysis, testing and verification of the behavior of composite pavements under Florida conditions using a heavy vehicle simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia Gutierrez, Patricio Enrique

    Whitetopping (WT) is a rehabilitation method to resurface deteriorated asphalt pavements. While some of these composite pavements have performed very well carrying heavy load, other have shown poor performance with early cracking. With the objective of analyzing the applicability of WT pavements under Florida conditions, a total of nine full-scale WT test sections were constructed and tested using a Heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS) in the APT facility at the FDOT Material Research Park. The test sections were instrumented to monitor both strain and temperature. A 3-D finite element model was developed to analyze the WT test sections. The model was calibrated and verified using measured FWD deflections and HVS load-induced strains from the test sections. The model was then used to evaluate the potential performance of these test sections under critical temperature-load condition in Florida. Six of the WT pavement test sections had a bonded concrete-asphalt interface by milling, cleaning and spraying with water the asphalt surface. This method produced excellent bonding at the interface, with shear strength of 195 to 220 psi. Three of the test sections were intended to have an unbonded concrete-asphalt interface by applying a debonding agent in the asphalt surface. However, shear strengths between 119 and 135 psi and a careful analysis of the strain and the temperature data indicated a partial bond condition. The computer model was able to satisfactorily model the behavior of the composite pavement by mainly considering material properties from standard laboratory tests and calibrating the spring elements used to model the interface. Reasonable matches between the measured and the calculated strains were achieved when a temperature-dependent AC elastic modulus was included in the analytical model. The expected numbers of repetitions of the 24-kip single axle loads at critical thermal condition were computed for the nine test sections based on maximum tensile stresses

  17. The consequences of an increase in heavy goods vehicles for passenger car drivers' mental workload and behaviour: a simulator study.

    PubMed

    de Waard, Dick; Kruizinga, Anje; Brookhuis, Karel A

    2008-03-01

    The effects of an increase in Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) on merging behaviour and on mental workload of motorists during filtering in and out of traffic were studied. Participants drove in a driving simulator in a total of 12 conditions; twice in each of two weather conditions and in three traffic conditions. The weather conditions were clear weather and foggy weather. The traffic conditions were without HGVs (i.e. only private cars), the current mix of HGVs and private cars, and a condition with a 70% increase of HGVs leading to an HGV column in the slow lane. The focus of the study was on assessing effects on behaviour and mental workload during filtering into traffic, and during exiting from the motorway. During the experiment driving performance was registered, behaviour was observed, self reports were collected, and the participant's heart rate was recorded. The results showed that directly after filtering into traffic the variation in driving speed increased and the minimum time headway decreased with an increase in the proportion of HGVs. Joining motorway traffic was considered to involve greater effort and risk in the condition with a column of HGVs. The effects of the conditions on heart rate are less clear, although the moment when the participants joined the traffic is clearly visible. The effects of weather conditions were limited, drivers adapting their driving behaviour in adverse weather by reducing speed. To exit the motorway is not a difficult manoeuvre. For that reason the lane change from the left hand to the right hand lane that preceded the exit was analysed. Although increased mental effort was reported and the lane change was visible in the heart rate record, no critical changes as a result of increase in proportion of HGVs were found for this manoeuvre. However, in the condition with a column of HGVs, the exit that had to be taken was most frequently missed as HGVs obstructed the view of the exit signs. It is concluded that an increase in

  18. Routing Vehicles with Ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wen Fang; Lee, Lai Soon; Majid, Zanariah Abdul; Seow, Hsin Vonn

    Routing vehicles involve the design of an optimal set of routes for a fleet of vehicles to serve a number of customers with known demands. This research develops an Ant Colony Optimization for the vehicle routing with one central depot and identical vehicles. The procedure simulates the behavior of real ants that always find the shortest path between their nest and a food source through a form of communication, pheromone trail. Finally, preliminary results on the learning of the algorithm testing on benchmark data set will be presented in this paper.

  19. Vehicle Rustproofing,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Corrosion Areas - G.M.) 11. Vehicle Rustproofing Guide for Vehicle Maintenance Managers 12. Chart - Vehicle Buy Program FY 83-87 13. Vehicle ...on the Vehicle Buy Program. k. The impact of a total fleet rustproofing policy on industry. I. Potential problems in Quality Control and Warranty...FY83-87, the Air Force intends to buy $2.5 billion worth of vehicles (Atch 12); thus, a total fleet treatment program for that period could cost as

  20. Using virtual instruments to develop an actuator-based hardware-in-the-loop simulation test-bed for autopilot of unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun-Ping; Ju, Jiun-Yan; Liang, Yen-Chu

    2008-12-01

    Since the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) bring forth many innovative applications in scientific, civilian, and military fields, the development of UAVs is rapidly growing every year. The on-board autopilot that reliably performs attitude and guidance control is a vital part for out-of-sight flights. However, the control law in autopilot is designed according to a simplified plant model in which the dynamics of real hardware are usually not taken into consideration. It is a necessity to develop a test-bed including real servos to make real-time control experiments for prototype autopilots, so called hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation. In this paper on the basis of the graphical application software LabVIEW, the real-time HIL simulation system is realized efficiently by the virtual instrumentation approach. The proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller in autopilot for the pitch angle control loop is experimentally determined by the classical Ziegler-Nichols tuning rule and exhibits good transient and steady-state response in real-time HIL simulation. From the results the differences between numerical simulation and real-time HIL simulation are also clearly presented. The effectiveness of HIL simulation for UAV autopilot design is definitely confirmed

  1. Optimizing Safe Motion for Autonomous Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    k of the vehicle motion (dk/ds) as the only control variable for the vehicle where s is the length along the vehicle trajectory. Previous motion...function for vehicle motion control is demonstrated by algorithmic simulation and by usc on the autonomous mobile robot Yamabico 11I at the Naval...only control variable for the vehicle, where s is the length along the vehicle trajectory. Previous motion planning of the autonomous mobile robot

  2. Software Design Document Vehicle Simulation CSCI (5). Volume 3, Sections 2.5.4 - 2.6.18.12.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    vec sub Section 2.6.2.65 vec mag3 /simnet/common/include/global/sim macros.h zero qet-new velocities Section 2.5.12.29.3 f mat copy Section 2.6.2.12.1...Section 2.1.2.2.3.1.1 vehicle place Section 2.5.19.1.2 v_mag Macro defined in /simnet/releasesrclibsrc/include/dyn state.h mag3 Macro defined in

  3. Prediction of Vehicle Mobility on Large-Scale Soft-Soil Terrain Maps Using Physics-Based Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-04

    steering system, and power train. A penalty technique is used to impose joint and contact constraints. An asperity-friction is used to model joint...and contact friction. A proportional derivative (PD) controller is used to control the speed of the vehicle while a steering controller is used to...and contact constraints using a time-stepping explicit integration procedure. The DEM soil model can account for the soil cohesion, compressibility

  4. Responses of the Acutely Injured Spinal Cord to Vibration that Simulates Transport in Helicopters or Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Manouchehri, Neda; Melnyk, Angela D; Chak, Jason; Tigchelaar, Seth; So, Kitty; Okon, Elena B; Jiang, Shudong; Kinsler, Rachel; Barazanji, Khalid; Cripton, Peter A; Kwon, Brian K

    2016-12-15

    In the military environment, injured soldiers undergoing medical evacuation via helicopter or mine-resistant ambush-protected vehicle (MRAP) are subjected to vibration and shock inherent to the transport vehicle. We conducted the present study to assess the consequences of such vibration on the acutely injured spinal cord. We used a porcine model of spinal cord injury (SCI). After a T10 contusion-compression injury, animals were subjected to 1) no vibration (n = 7-8), 2) whole body vibration at frequencies and amplitudes simulating helicopter transport (n = 8), or 3) whole body vibration simulating ground transportation in an MRAP ambulance (n = 7). Hindlimb locomotor function (using Porcine Thoracic Injury Behavior Scale [PTIBS]), Eriochrome Cyanine histochemistry and biochemical analysis of inflammatory and neural damage markers were analyzed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) expression levels for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were similar between the helicopter or MRAP group and the unvibrated controls. Spared white/gray matter tended to be lower in the MRAP-vibrated animals than in the unvibrated controls, especially rostral to the epicenter. However, spared white/gray matter in the helicopter-vibrated group appeared normal. Although there was a relationship between the extent of sparing and the extent of locomotor recovery, no significant differences were found in PTIBS scores between the groups. In summary, exposures to vibration in the context of ground (MRAP) or aeromedical (helicopter) transportation did not significantly impair functional outcome in our large animal model of SCI. However, MRAP vibration was associated with increased tissue damage around the injury site, warranting caution around exposure to vehicle vibration acutely after SCI.

  5. Reduced Order Modeling for Rapid Simulation of Blast Events of a Military Ground Vehicle and Its Occupants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-12

    event, 0-100ms (blastoff), 800-1000ms (slam-down) Prescribed accelerative vertical motion / PSM Prescribed structural motion was used to model the...motion ( PSM ) file to be input to MADYMO. The deformation of the hull floor in MADYMO is shown in Figure 19. PSM captures the deformation of the...structure in the model, but it does not allow the deformed parts of the model to move with the rest of the vehicle. In other words, the PSM method when

  6. Simulation model of the F/A-18 high angle-of-attack research vehicle utilized for the design of advanced control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, Mark E.; Bundick, W. Thomas; Messina, Michael D.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Carzoo, Susan W.; Yeager, Jessie C.; Beissner, Fred L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The 'f18harv' six degree-of-freedom nonlinear batch simulation used to support research in advanced control laws and flight dynamics issues as part of NASA's High Alpha Technology Program is described in this report. This simulation models an F/A-18 airplane modified to incorporate a multi-axis thrust-vectoring system for augmented pitch and yaw control power and actuated forebody strakes for enhanced aerodynamic yaw control power. The modified configuration is known as the High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The 'f18harv' simulation was an outgrowth of the 'f18bas' simulation which modeled the basic F/A-18 with a preliminary version of a thrust-vectoring system designed for the HARV. The preliminary version consisted of two thrust-vectoring vanes per engine nozzle compared with the three vanes per engine actually employed on the F/A-18 HARV. The modeled flight envelope is extensive in that the aerodynamic database covers an angle-of-attack range of -10 degrees to +90 degrees, sideslip range of -20 degrees to +20 degrees, a Mach Number range between 0.0 and 2.0, and an altitude range between 0 and 60,000 feet.

  7. Check-Cases for Verification of 6-Degree-of-Freedom Flight Vehicle Simulations. Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Shelton, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    This NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment was established to develop a set of time histories for the flight behavior of increasingly complex example aerospacecraft that could be used to partially validate various simulation frameworks. The assessment was conducted by representatives from several NASA Centers and an open-source simulation project. This document contains details on models, implementation, and results.

  8. Design and simulation of a fast-charging station for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Nathalie Pulmones

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing interest in green technologies in transportation, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) have proven to be the best short-term solution to minimize greenhouse gas emissions. Despite such interest, conventional vehicle drivers are still reluctant in using such a new technology, mainly because of the long duration (4-8 hours) required to charge PHEV batteries with the currently existing Level I and II chargers. For this reason, Level III fast-charging stations capable of reducing the charging duration to 10-15 minutes are being considered. The present thesis focuses on the design of a fast-charging station that uses, in addition to the electrical grid, two stationary energy storage devices: a flywheel energy storage and a supercapacitor. The power electronic converters used for the interface of the energy sources with the charging station are designed. The design also focuses on the energy management that will minimize the PHEV battery charging duration as well as the duration required to recharge the energy storage devices. For this reason, an algorithm that minimizes durations along with its mathematical formulation is proposed, and its application in fast charging environment will be illustrated by means of two scenarios.

  9. Integration Of Launch Vehicle Simulation/Analysis Tools And Lunar Cargo Lander Design. Part 2/2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeJean, George Brian; Shiue, Yeu-Sheng Paul; King, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Part 2, which will be discussed in this report, will discuss the development of a Lunar Cargo Lander (unmanned launch vehicle) that will transport usable payload from Trans- Lunar Injection to the moon. The Delta IV-Heavy was originally used to transport the Lunar Cargo Lander to TLI, but other launch vehicles have been studied. In order to uncover how much payload is possible to land on the moon, research was needed in order to design the sub-systems of the spacecraft. The report will discuss and compare the use of a hypergolic and cryogenic system for its main propulsion system. The guidance, navigation, control, telecommunications, thermal, propulsion, structure, mechanisms, landing gear, command, data handling, and electrical power sub-systems were designed by scaling off other flown orbiters and moon landers. Once all data was collected, an excel spreadsheet was created to accurately calculate the usable payload that will land on the moon along with detailed mass and volume estimating relations. As designed, The Lunar Cargo Lander can plant 5,400 lbm of usable payload on the moon using a hypergolic system and 7,400 lbm of usable payload on the moon using a cryogenic system.

  10. Intermittent communications modeling and simulation for autonomous unmanned maritime vehicles using an integrated APM and FSMC framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Ayodeji; Straatemeier, Logan; Rogers, Ted; Valdez, Pierre; Griendling, Kelly; Cooksey, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    In this work a framework is presented for addressing the issue of intermittent communications faced by autonomous unmanned maritime vehicles operating at sea. In particular, this work considers the subject of predictive atmospheric signal transmission over multi-path fading channels in maritime environments. A Finite State Markov Channel is used to represent a Nakagami-m modeled physical fading radio channel. The range of the received signal-to-noise ratio is partitioned into a finite number of intervals which represent application-specific communications states. The Advanced Propagation Model (APM), developed at the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center San Diego, provides a characterization of the transmission channel in terms of evaporation duct induced signal propagation loss. APM uses a hybrid ray-optic and parabolic equations model which allows for the computation of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation over various sea and/or terrain paths. These models which have been integrated in the proposed framework provide a strategic and mission planning aid for the operation of maritime unmanned vehicles at sea.

  11. Experiments with Plasmas Produced by Potassium-Seeded Cyanogen Oxygen Flames for Study of Radio Transmission at Simulated Reentry Vehicle Plasma Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W.; Gooderum, Paul B.

    1961-01-01

    A method for the chemical production of an ionized gas stream for application to radio transmission studies is described. Involved is the combustion of gaseous cyanogen and oxygen with the addition of vaporized potassium in some cases to further increase the ionization. Experiments are described in which a 3-inch-diameter subsonic free jet at atmospheric pressure is used, and the results are presented. The plasma obtained by using this method is sufficient to simulate plasma conditions expected for reentering hypersonic vehicles. The unseeded plasma stream temperature is indicated to be about 4,200 K, with the degree of ionization indicated to be that expected from thermal equilibrium considerations. Measurements of radio-signal loss due to the unseeded flame plasma are presented for microwaves of 8 to 20 kmc transmitted through the stream and for a dipole transmitting model of 219.5 mc immersed in the stream. Favorable comparison of these results with the simple plane-wave signal-attenuation theory was obtained. In the case of a 9.4-kmc microwave signal of 30-kw peak power, the preliminary indication is that the plasma characteristics were not changed due to this strong signal. Comparison of a simplified concept of radio-signal attenuation due to plasmas is made with some hypersonic reentry vehicle signal-loss data. Other areas of plasma research using this method for the transmission problem are indicated.

  12. Driving-Simulator-Based Test on the Effectiveness of Auditory Red-Light Running Vehicle Warning System Based on Time-To-Collision Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuedong; Xue, Qingwan; Ma, Lu; Xu, Yongcun

    2014-01-01

    The collision avoidance warning system is an emerging technology designed to assist drivers in avoiding red-light running (RLR) collisions at intersections. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of auditory warning information on collision avoidance behaviors in the RLR pre-crash scenarios and further to examine the casual relationships among the relevant factors. A driving-simulator-based experiment was designed and conducted with 50 participants. The data from the experiments were analyzed by approaches of ANOVA and structural equation modeling (SEM). The collisions avoidance related variables were measured in terms of brake reaction time (BRT), maximum deceleration and lane deviation in this study. It was found that the collision avoidance warning system can result in smaller collision rates compared to the without-warning condition and lead to shorter reaction times, larger maximum deceleration and less lane deviation. Furthermore, the SEM analysis illustrate that the audio warning information in fact has both direct and indirect effect on occurrence of collisions, and the indirect effect plays a more important role on collision avoidance than the direct effect. Essentially, the auditory warning information can assist drivers in detecting the RLR vehicles in a timely manner, thus providing drivers more adequate time and space to decelerate to avoid collisions with the conflicting vehicles. PMID:24566631

  13. Driving-simulator-based test on the effectiveness of auditory red-light running vehicle warning system based on time-to-collision sensor.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuedong; Xue, Qingwan; Ma, Lu; Xu, Yongcun

    2014-02-21

    The collision avoidance warning system is an emerging technology designed to assist drivers in avoiding red-light running (RLR) collisions at intersections. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of auditory warning information on collision avoidance behaviors in the RLR pre-crash scenarios and further to examine the casual relationships among the relevant factors. A driving-simulator-based experiment was designed and conducted with 50 participants. The data from the experiments were analyzed by approaches of ANOVA and structural equation modeling (SEM). The collisions avoidance related variables were measured in terms of brake reaction time (BRT), maximum deceleration and lane deviation in this study. It was found that the collision avoidance warning system can result in smaller collision rates compared to the without-warning condition and lead to shorter reaction times, larger maximum deceleration and less lane deviation. Furthermore, the SEM analysis illustrate that the audio warning information in fact has both direct and indirect effect on occurrence of collisions, and the indirect effect plays a more important role on collision avoidance than the direct effect. Essentially, the auditory warning information can assist drivers in detecting the RLR vehicles in a timely manner, thus providing drivers more adequate time and space to decelerate to avoid collisions with the conflicting vehicles.

  14. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation experiment for semi-active vibration control of lateral vibrations of railway vehicle by magneto-rheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Lee, Jae-Ha; Yang, Dong-Ho; You, Won-Hee

    2014-07-01

    The active lateral suspension (ALS) of a train consists of either active or semi-active technologies. However, such an active system on a real railway vehicle is not easy to test because of cost and time. In this study, a hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) system is developed to test the ALS. To this end, the dynamic model of a railway vehicle is equipped with the actuator, two bogies and four-wheel sets, and the ALS is used. The proposed HILS system consists of an alternating current servo motor connected to a ball-screw mechanism and a digital control system. The digital control system implements the dynamic model and the control algorithm. The design and manufacture of the HILS system are explained in detail. Both the passive damper and the magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper are tested using the HILS system, where the sky-hook control algorithm was applied for the MR fluid damper. Experimental results show that the proposed HILS system can be effectively used for the performance estimation of the ALS.

  15. Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

  16. Human-robot interaction modeling and simulation of supervisory control and situational awareness during field experimentation with military manned and unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Tony; Metcalfe, Jason; Brewster, Benjamin; Manteuffel, Christopher; Jaswa, Matthew; Tierney, Terrance

    2010-04-01

    The proliferation of intelligent systems in today's military demands increased focus on the optimization of human-robot interactions. Traditional studies in this domain involve large-scale field tests that require humans to operate semiautomated systems under varying conditions within military-relevant scenarios. However, provided that adequate constraints are employed, modeling and simulation can be a cost-effective alternative and supplement. The current presentation discusses a simulation effort that was executed in parallel with a field test with Soldiers operating military vehicles in an environment that represented key elements of the true operational context. In this study, "constructive" human operators were designed to represent average Soldiers executing supervisory control over an intelligent ground system. The constructive Soldiers were simulated performing the same tasks as those performed by real Soldiers during a directly analogous field test. Exercising the models in a high-fidelity virtual environment provided predictive results that represented actual performance in certain aspects, such as situational awareness, but diverged in others. These findings largely reflected the quality of modeling assumptions used to design behaviors and the quality of information available on which to articulate principles of operation. Ultimately, predictive analyses partially supported expectations, with deficiencies explicable via Soldier surveys, experimenter observations, and previously-identified knowledge gaps.

  17. A microcomputer-based control and simulation of an advanced IPM (Interior Permanent Magnet) synchronous machine drive system for electric vehicle propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, B. K.; Szczesny, P. M.

    Advanced digital control and computer-aided control system design techniques are playing key roles in the complex drive system design and control implementation. The paper describes a high performance microcomputer-based control and digital simulation of an inverter-fed Interior Permanent Magnet (IPM) synchronous machine which uses a neodymium-iron-boron magnet. The fully operational four-quadrant drive system includes constant-torque region with zero speed operation and high speed field-weakening constant-power region. The control uses vector or field-oriented technique in constant-torque region with the direct axis aligned to the stator flux, whereas the constant-power region control is based on torque angle orientation of the impressed square-wave voltage. All the key feedback signals for the control are estimated with precision. The drive system is basically designed with an outer torque control loop for electric vehicle appliation, but speed and position control loops can be added for other industrial applications. The distributed microcomputer-based control system is based on Intel-8096 microcontroller and Texas Instruments TMS32010 type digital signal processor. The complete drive system has been simulated using the VAX-based simulation language SIMMON.

  18. Experience with a three-axis side-located controller during a static and centrifuge simulation of the piloted launch of a manned multistage vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, William H.; Holleman, Euclid C.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine a human pilot's ability to control a multistage vehicle through the launch trajectory. The simulation was performed statically and dynamically by utilizing a human centrifuge. An interesting byproduct of the program was the three-axis side-located controller incorporated for pilot control inputs. This method of control proved to be acceptable for the successful completion of the tracking task during the simulation. There was no apparent effect of acceleration on the mechanical operation of the controller, but the pilot's control feel deteriorated as his dexterity decreased at high levels of acceleration. The application of control in a specific control mode was not difficult. However, coordination of more than one mode was difficult, and, in many instances, resulted in inadvertent control inputs. The acceptable control harmony at an acceleration level of 1 g became unacceptable at higher acceleration levels. Proper control-force harmony for a particular control task appears to be more critical for a three-axis controller than for conventional controllers. During simulations in which the pilot wore a pressure suit, the nature of the suit gloves further aggravated this condition.

  19. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation of MIG Welding of T-Joints of Thin Aluminum Plates for Top Class Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonazzi, Enrico; Colombini, Elena; Panari, Davide; Vergnano, Alberto; Leali, Francesco; Veronesi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The integration of experiments with numerical simulations can efficiently support a quick evaluation of the welded joint. In this work, the MIG welding operation on aluminum T-joint thin plate has been studied by the integration of both simulation and experiments. The aim of the paper is to enlarge the global database, to promote the use of thin aluminum sheets in automotive body industries and to provide new data. Since the welding of aluminum thin plates is difficult to control due to high speed of the heat source and high heat flows during heating and cooling, a simulation model could be considered an effective design tool to predict the real phenomena. This integrated approach enables new evaluation possibilities on MIG-welded thin aluminum T-joints, as correspondence between the extension of the microstructural zones and the simulation parameters, material hardness, transient 3D temperature distribution on the surface and inside the material, stresses, strains, and deformations. The results of the mechanical simulations are comparable with the experimental measurements along the welding path, especially considering the variability of the process. The results could well predict the welding-induced distortion, which together with local heating during welding must be anticipated and subsequently minimized and counterbalance.

  20. Development of a Blast Event Simulation Process for Multi-Scale Modeling of Composite Armor for Light Weight Vehicles (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    the constitutive micro-level like fiber failures, matrix damage , inelasticity, interfacial debonding to the global structural response level. The MAC...micromechanical analysis establishes the overall elastoplastic behavior of the multiphase inelastic composite. This is expressed as an effective elastic-plastic...fiber failures, matrix damage , interfacial debonding, throughout the structural response. This fully coupled multi-scale simulation frame will be

  1. Integrated Testing, Simulation and Analysis of Electric Drive Options for Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.

    2012-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory verified diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reduction and cost implications of plug-in hybrid gasoline and diesel variants. These variants are run on a field-data-derived design matrix to analyze the effects of drive cycle, distance, battery replacements, battery capacity, and motor power on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. Two cost scenarios using fuel prices corresponding to forecasted highs for 2011 and 2030 and battery costs per kilowatt-hour representing current and long-term targets compare plug-in hybrid lifetime costs with diesel conventional lifetime costs. Under a future cost scenario of $100/kWh battery energy and $5/gal fuel, plug-in hybrids are cost effective. Assuming a current cost of $700/kWh and $3/gal fuel, they rarely recoup the additional motor and battery cost. The results highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle, daily driving distance, and kinetic intensity. For instances in the current-cost scenario where the additional plug-in hybrid cost is regained in fuel savings, the combination of kinetic intensity and daily distance travelled does not coincide with the usage patterns observed in the field data. If the usage patterns were adjusted, the hybrids could become cost effective.

  2. Validation of Finite Element Crash Test Dummy Models for Predicting Orion Crew Member Injuries During a Simulated Vehicle Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabiei, Al; Lawrence, Charles; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2009-01-01

    A series of crash tests were conducted with dummies during simulated Orion crew module landings at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. These tests consisted of several crew configurations with and without astronaut suits. Some test results were collected and are presented. In addition, finite element models of the tests were developed and are presented. The finite element models were validated using the experimental data, and the test responses were compared with the computed results. Occupant crash data, such as forces, moments, and accelerations, were collected from the simulations and compared with injury criteria to assess occupant survivability and injury. Some of the injury criteria published in the literature is summarized for completeness. These criteria were used to determine potential injury during crew impact events.

  3. Unique digital imagery interface between a silicon graphics computer and the kinetic kill vehicle hardware-in-the-loop simulator (KHILS) wideband infrared scene projector (WISP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Ricky A.; Moren, Stephen E.; Skalka, Marion S.

    1998-07-01

    Providing a flexible and reliable source of IR target imagery is absolutely essential for operation of an IR Scene Projector in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation environment. The Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulator (KHILS) at Eglin AFB provides the capability, and requisite interfaces, to supply target IR imagery to its Wideband IR Scene Projector (WISP) from three separate sources at frame rates ranging from 30 - 120 Hz. Video can be input from a VCR source at the conventional 30 Hz frame rate. Pre-canned digital imagery and test patterns can be downloaded into stored memory from the host processor and played back as individual still frames or movie sequences up to a 120 Hz frame rate. Dynamic real-time imagery to the KHILS WISP projector system, at a 120 Hz frame rate, can be provided from a Silicon Graphics Onyx computer system normally used for generation of digital IR imagery through a custom CSA-built interface which is available for either the SGI/DVP or SGI/DD02 interface port. The primary focus of this paper is to describe our technical approach and experience in the development of this unique SGI computer and WISP projector interface.

  4. Electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. These concepts are discussed.

  5. Vehicle Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-14

    Dimensions. Pertinent physical dimensions are determined using standard mensurative instrumentation such as steel tape measures, plumb bobs...vehicles use ITOP 2-2- 801(1)5. 4.2.3 Center of Gravity (CG). Determine the center of gravity of the test vehicle in accordance with TOP 2-2...8006. For tracked vehicles use ITOP 2-2-800(1)7. 4.2.4 Ground Pressure. Determine ground pressure in accordance with TOP 2-2-801. For tracked

  6. Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model. The effect of vibration on launch vehicle dynamics was studied. Conditions included three modes of instability. The film includes close up views of the simulator fuel tank with and without stability control. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030984. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  7. Launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, William S.

    1994-06-01

    Concentrated efforts by NASA and the DOD to begin development of a new large launch vehicle have been under way for over a decade. Options include the National Launch System, Advanced Launch System, a heavy lift vehicle, a Shuttle-derived vehicle, a Titan-derived vehicle, Single stage To Orbit, NASP and Spacelifter, to name a few. All initially promised low operations costs achieved at development costs in the $5 billion - $10 billion range. However, none has obtained approval for development, primarily because it became apparent that these cost goals could not realistically be met.

  8. Vehicle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Tom; Modlin, Tom; Suddreth, Jack; Wheeler, Tom; Tenney, Darrel R.; Bayless, Ernest O.; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bolstad, Donald A.; Croop, Harold; Dyer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Perspectives of the subpanel on expendable launch vehicle structures and cryotanks are: (1) new materials which provide the primary weight savings effect on vehicle mass/size; (2) today's investment; (3) typically 10-20 years to mature and fully characterize new materials.

  9. Descent vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of descent vehicles marked a new stage in the development of cosmonautics, involving the beginning of manned space flight and substantial progress in space research on the distant bodies of the Solar System. This booklet describes these vehicles and their structures, systems, and purposes. It is intended for the general public interested in modern problems of space technology.

  10. Simulation of real-gas effects on pressure distributions for aeroassist flight experiment vehicle and comparison with prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure distributions measured on a 60 degree half-angle elliptic cone, raked off at an angle of 73 degrees from the cone centerline and having an ellipsoid nose (ellipticity equal to 2.0 in the symmetry plane) are presented for angles of attack from -10 degrees to 10 degrees. The high normal shock density ratio aspect of a real gas was simulated by testing in Mach 6 air and CF sub 4 (density ratio equal to 5.25 and 12.0, respectively). The effects of Reynolds number, angle of attack, and normal shock density ratio on these measurements are examined, and comparisons with a three dimensional Euler code known as HALIS are made. A significant effect of density ratio on pressure distributions on the cone section of the configuration was observed; the magnitude of this effect decreased with increasing angle of attack. The effect of Reynolds number on pressure distributions was negligible for forebody pressure distributions, but a measurable effect was noted on base pressures. In general, the HALIS code accurately predicted the measured pressure distributions in air and CF sub 4.

  11. An experimental determination in Calspan Ludwieg tube of the base environment of the integrated space shuttle vehicle at simulated Mach 4.5 flight conditions (test IH5 of model 19-OTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drzewiecki, R. F.; Foust, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A model test program was conducted to determine heat transfer and pressure distributions in the base region of the space shuttle vehicle during simulated launch trajectory conditions of Mach 4.5 and pressure altitudes between 90,000 and 210,000 feet. Model configurations with and without the solid propellant booster rockets were examined to duplicate pre- and post-staging vehicle geometries. Using short duration flow techniques, a tube wind tunnel provided supersonic flow over the model. Simultaneously, combustion generated exhaust products reproduced the gasdynamic and thermochemical structure of the main vehicle engine plumes. Heat transfer and pressure measurements were made at numerous locations on the base surfaces of the 19-OTS space shuttle model with high response instrumentation. In addition, measurements of base recovery temperature were made indirectly by using dual fine wire and resistance thermometers and by extrapolating heat transfer measurements.

  12. Reduced Order Modeling for Rapid Simulations of Blast and Rollover Events of a Ground Vehicle and its Occupants Using Rigid Body Dynamic Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-11

    MADYMO ground vehicle model developed in Task 1. - Route a standard seatbelt around the occupant model and connect it to vehicle anchor locations...Figure 3.1 Dummy and Harness System Setup Seatbelts were modeled with 2-dimensional finite element parts and 1-dimensional multi-body parts, with...well as adapting this methodology to specific ground vehicle programs and validate it against physical test results from LFT&E. 7.1: Technology

  13. Analysis of material entrainment with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and simulation of the debris-flow event at the Sattelbach torrent - Austria, 2013.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidl, Christian; Schraml, Klaus; Moser, Markus; Hübl, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    In summer 2013, a disastrous debris-flow destroyed several houses and infrastructure facilities on the fan of the Sattelbach catchment located in the district of St. Johann im Pongau, Salzburg (Austria). Fortunately, no damage to persons could be registered. The debris flow was triggered by shallow landslides within the upper catchment, mobilizing in total approximately 4,000 m3 of debris. However, the volume of the debris-flow event at the fan was documented with 12,000 m3, whereas a maximum discharge of 380 m3/s was estimated near the fan apex. Witnesses reported only one big wave passing the fan area, which seems to be out of character for a typical Alpine debris-flow event showing such high discharge. For the later, one would suppose multiple smaller waves. Due to the fact of evolving material entrainment resulted in one big wave, the debris-flow event at the Sattelbach catchment was chosen as case study to analyze mass bulking. For this reason, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was used to establish a digital terrain model (DTM) of the whole reach after the event. This terrain model was then compared to a LiDAR DTM, showing the topographical situation before the event. Based on the analyzed mass bulking along the whole reach, numerical simulations were performed using the DAN3D (Dynamic Analysis of Landslides in Three Dimensions) code. The DAN3D model allows selection between different rheologies as well as the implementation of entrainment. The study will show the applicability of UAV's in small and steep catchments and will test DAN 3D a debris-flow simulation tool with an implemented mass-bulking model.

  14. How Small Can a Launch Vehicle Be?

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C

    2005-06-23

    Trajectory simulations from Earth to orbit indicate comparative velocity requirements depending on vehicle size, for several propellant options. Smaller vehicles are more affected by drag, resulting in steeper trajectories that require more total velocity. Although they are technically challenging, launch vehicles smaller than 1 ton are not ruled out by the nature of ascent trajectories.

  15. Aeroacoustics of Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    While for airplanes the subject of aeroacoustics is associated with community noise, for space vehicles it is associated with vibro-acoustics and structural dynamics. Surface pressure fluctuations encountered during launch and travel through lower part of the atmosphere create intense vibro-acoustics environment for the payload, electronics, navigational equipment, and a large number of subsystems. All of these components have to be designed and tested for flight-certification. This presentation will cover all three major sources encountered in manned and unmanned space vehicles: launch acoustics, ascent acoustics and abort acoustics. Launch pads employ elaborate acoustic suppression systems to mitigate the ignition pressure waves and rocket plume generated noise during the early part of the liftoff. Recently we have used large microphone arrays to identify the noise sources during liftoff and found that the standard model by Eldred and Jones (NASA SP-8072) to be grossly inadequate. As the vehicle speeds up and reaches transonic speed in relatively denser part of the atmosphere, various shock waves and flow separation events create unsteady pressure fluctuations that can lead to high vibration environment, and occasional coupling with the structural modes, which may lead to buffet. Examples of wind tunnel tests and computational simulations to optimize the outer mold line to quantify and reduce the surface pressure fluctuations will be presented. Finally, a manned space vehicle needs to be designed for crew safety during malfunctioning of the primary rocket vehicle. This brings the subject of acoustic environment during abort. For NASAs Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), abort will be performed by lighting rocket motors atop the crew module. The severe aeroacoustics environments during various abort scenarios were measured for the first time by using hot helium to simulate rocket plumes in the Ames unitary plan wind tunnels. Various considerations used for the

  16. Research on Hybrid Vehicle Drivetrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhongzhi

    Hybrid cars as a solution to energy saving, emission reduction measures, have received widespread attention. Motor drive system as an important part of the hybrid vehicles as an important object of study. Based on the hybrid electric vehicle powertrain control system for permanent magnet synchronous motor as the object of study. Can be applied to hybrid car compares the characteristics of traction motors, chose permanent magnet synchronous Motors as drive motors for hybrid vehicles. Building applications in hybrid cars in MATLAB/Simulink simulation model of permanent-magnet synchronous motor speed control system and analysis of simulation results.

  17. Hybrid electric vehicles TOPTEC

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-21

    This one-day TOPTEC session began with an overview of hybrid electric vehicle technology. Updates were given on alternative types of energy storage, APU control for low emissions, simulation programs, and industry and government activities. The keynote speech was about battery technology, a key element to the success of hybrids. The TOPEC concluded with a panel discussion on the mission of hybrid electric vehicles, with a perspective from industry and government experts from United States and Canada on their view of the role of this technology.

  18. Age differences in the takeover of vehicle control and engagement in non-driving-related activities in simulated driving with conditional automation.

    PubMed

    Clark, Hallie; Feng, Jing

    2016-09-26

    High-level vehicle automation has been proposed as a valuable means to enhance the mobility of older drivers, as older drivers experience age-related declines in many cognitive functions that are vital for safe driving. Recent research attempted to examine age differences in how engagement in non-driving-related activities impact driving performance, by instructing drivers to engage in mandatory pre-designed activities. While the mandatory engagement method allows a precise control of the timing and mental workload of the non-driving-related activities, it is different from how a driver would naturally engage in these activities. This study allowed younger (age 18-35, mean age=19.9years) and older drivers (age 62-81, mean age=70.4years) to freely decide when and how to engage in voluntarily chosen non-driving-related activities during simulated driving with conditional automation. We coded video recordings of participants' engagement in non-driving-related activities. We examined the effect of age, level of activity-engagement and takeover notification interval on vehicle control performance during the takeover, by comparing between the high and low engagement groups in younger and older drivers, across two takeover notification interval conditions. We found that both younger and older drivers engaged in various non-driving-related activities during the automated driving portion, with distinct preferences on the type of activity for each age group (i.e., while younger drivers mostly used an electronic device, older drivers tended to converse). There were also significant differences between the two age groups and between the two notification intervals on various driving performance measures. Older drivers benefited more than younger drivers from the longer interval in terms of response time to notifications. Voluntary engagement in non-driving-related activities did not impair takeover performance in general, although there was a trend of older drivers who were

  19. Space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A space vehicle having an improved ascent configuration for use in traveling in space is presented. Components of the vehicle are: (1) a winged orbiter having an elongater fuselage and rearwardly directed main engines fixed to the fuselage; (2) an elongated tank assembly of an improved configuration disposed forwardly of the fuselage and connected with the main engines of the vehicle for supplying liquid propellants; and (3) a booster stage comprising a pair of integrated solid rocket boosters connected with the orbiter immediately beneath the fuselage and extended in substantial parallelism.

  20. Air Vehicle Technology Integration Program (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0015: Open Control Platform (OCP) Software Enabled Control (SEC) Hardware in the Loop Simulation - OCP Hardware Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    AFRL-VA-WP-TR-2006-3075 AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0015: Open Control Platform (OCP) Software Enabled...2001– 05/28/2004 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F33615-00-D-3052-0015 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM

  1. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1998-08-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  2. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1997-02-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  3. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1998-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  4. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1997-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  5. Software architecture of biomimetic underwater vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praczyk, Tomasz; Szymak, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are vehicles that are entirely or partly independent of human decisions. In order to obtain operational independence, the vehicles have to be equipped with a specialized software. The main task of the software is to move the vehicle along a trajectory with collision avoidance. Moreover, the software has also to manage different devices installed on the vehicle board, e.g. to start and stop cameras, sonars etc. In addition to the software embedded on the vehicle board, the software responsible for managing the vehicle by the operator is also necessary. Its task is to define mission of the vehicle, to start, to stop the mission, to send emergency commands, to monitor vehicle parameters, and to control the vehicle in remotely operated mode. An important objective of the software is also to support development and tests of other software components. To this end, a simulation environment is necessary, i.e. simulation model of the vehicle and all its key devices, the model of the sea environment, and the software to visualize behavior of the vehicle. The paper presents architecture of the software designed for biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicle (BAUV) that is being constructed within the framework of the scientific project financed by Polish National Center of Research and Development.

  6. Modeling and Simulation of the ARES UPPER STAGE Transportation, Lifting, Stacking and Mating Operations Within the Vehicle Assembly Building at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kromis, Phillip A.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the modeling and simulation of the Ares Upper Stage Transportation, lifting, stacking, and mating operations within the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). An aerial view of KSC Launch Shuttle Complex, two views of the Delmia process control layout, and an upper stage move subroutine and breakdown are shown. An overhead image of the VAB and the turning basin along with the Pegasus barge at the turning basin are also shown. This viewgraph presentation also shows the actual design and the removal of the mid-section spring tensioners, the removal of the AFT rear and forward tensioners tie downs, and removing the AFT hold down post and mount. US leaving the Pegasus Barge, the upper stage arriving at transfer aisle, upper stage receiving/inspection in transfer aisle, and an overhead view of upper stage receiving/inspection in transfer aisle are depicted. Five views of the actual connection of the cabling to the upper stage aft lifting hardware are shown. The upper stage transporter forward connector, two views of the rotation horizontal to vertical, the disconnection of the rear bolt ring cabling, the lowering of the upper stage to the inspection stand, disconnection of the rear bolt ring from the upper stage, the lifting of the upper stage and inspection of AFT fange, and the transfer of upper stage in an integrated stack are shown. Six views of the mating of the upper stage to the first stage are depicted. The preparation, inspection, and removal of the forward dome are shown. The upper stage mated on the integrated stack and crawler is also shown. This presentation concludes with A Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) utilizing male and female models for assessing risk factors to the upper extremities of human beings in an actual physical environment.

  7. Request for Correction of Information Concerning the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's EPAct/V2/E-89 Fuel Effects Study and Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator Model (MOVES2014) Docket ID Nos. EPA420-R-13-002, FRL-9917-26-OAR

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Petition for the US EPA to correct information concerning motor vehicle fiel emissions represented in the Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator model (MOVES2014) and the EPAct/V2/E-89 fuel effects study (EPAct study)1 on which it is based

  8. The Cargo Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rourke, K. H.

    1992-03-01

    NASA's Cargo Transfer Vehicle is a key element of the National Launch System currently under definition by a joint USAF and NASA development program. The CTV reference mission and configuration are described. Key mission and system requirements are analyzed and summarized including CTV electrical power and energy, main engine thrust, RCS configurations. Methods of control system validation using full 6DoF simulations are presented.

  9. General outlook of pavement and vehicle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mamlouk, M.S.

    1997-11-01

    The interaction between vehicle and pavement is complex since pavement roughness excites the dynamic forces generated by vehicles, while these dynamic forces simultaneously increase the pavement roughness. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the results of recent research related to pavement and vehicle dynamics and their interaction and to evaluate their potential use in the design and management of pavements. Pavement dynamic models are capable of determining stresses, strains, and deflections in various directions when harmonic, pulse, or transient loads are applied. Vehicle dynamic models simulate the effect of pavement roughness on the inertia of various vehicle components. These models can predict the dynamic forces produced by different axles and wheels of traveling vehicles at different locations along the pavement. Pavement response computed using dynamic models matches field measurements closer than those computed using static models. The concept of vehicle-pavement interaction can be applied to weigh-in-motion, pavement design and performance, and vehicle regulations.

  10. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1994-03-15

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 11 figures.

  11. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1996-03-12

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 14 figs.

  12. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1996-01-01

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  13. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1994-01-01

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  14. DBD Plasma Actuators for Flow Control in Air Vehicles and Jet Engines - Simulation of Flight Conditions in Test Chambers by Density Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma actuators for active flow control in aircraft and jet engines need to be tested in the laboratory to characterize their performance at flight operating conditions. DBD plasma actuators generate a wall-jet electronically by creating weakly ionized plasma, therefore their performance is affected by gas discharge properties, which, in turn, depend on the pressure and temperature at the actuator placement location. Characterization of actuators is initially performed in a laboratory chamber without external flow. The pressure and temperature at the actuator flight operation conditions need to be simultaneously set in the chamber. A simplified approach is desired. It is assumed that the plasma discharge depends only on the gas density, while other temperature effects are assumed to be negligible. Therefore, tests can be performed at room temperature with chamber pressure set to yield the same density as in operating flight conditions. The needed chamber pressures are shown for altitude flight of an air vehicle and for jet engines at sea-level takeoff and altitude cruise conditions. Atmospheric flight conditions are calculated from standard atmosphere with and without shock waves. The engine data was obtained from four generic engine models; 300-, 150-, and 50-passenger (PAX) aircraft engines, and a military jet-fighter engine. The static and total pressure, temperature, and density distributions along the engine were calculated for sea-level takeoff and for altitude cruise conditions. The corresponding chamber pressures needed to test the actuators were calculated. The results show that, to simulate engine component flows at in-flight conditions, plasma actuator should be tested over a wide range of pressures. For the four model engines the range is from 12.4 to 0.03 atm, depending on the placement of the actuator in the engine. For example, if a DBD plasma actuator is to be placed at the compressor exit of a 300 PAX engine, it

  15. Antenna Measurements: Test & Analysis of the Radiated Emissions/Immunity of the NASA/Orion Spacecraft Dart Parachute Simulator & Prototype Capsule - The Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgard, John D.

    2012-01-01

    For future NASA Manned Space Exploration of the Moon and Mars, a blunt body capsule, called the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), composed of a Crew Module (CM) and a Service Module (SM), with a parachute decent assembly is planned for reentry back to Earth. A Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is being developed for preliminary prototype parachute drop tests at the Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) to simulate high-speed reentry to Earth from beyond Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) and to provide measurements of position, velocity, acceleration, attitude, temperature, pressure, humidity, and parachute loads. The primary and secondary (backup) avionics systems on CPAS also provide mission critical firing events to deploy, reef, and release the parachutes in three stages (extraction, drogues, mains) using mortars and pressure cartridge assemblies. In addition, a Mid-Air Delivery System (MDS) is used to separate the capsule from the sled that is used to eject the capsule from the back of the drop plane. Also, high-speed and high-definition cameras in a Video Camera System (VCS) are used to film the drop plane extraction and parachute landing events. Intentional and unintentional radiation emitted from and received by antennas and electronic devices on/in the CEV capsule, the MDS sled, and the VCS system are being tested for radiated emissions/immunity (susceptibility) (RE/RS). To verify Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) of the Orion capsule, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) measurements are being made inside a semi-anechoic chamber at NASA/JSC on the components of the CPAS system. Measurements are made at 1m from the components-under-test (CUT). In addition, EMI measurements of the integrated CEV system are being made inside a hanger at YPG. These measurements are made in a complete circle, at 30? angles or less, around the Orion Capsule, the spacecraft system under-test (SUT). Near-field B-Dot probe measurements on the surface of the Orion capsule are being extrapolated

  16. Green Vehicle Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Green Vehicle Guide Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us ... your needs. Search for a SmartWay Vehicle Green Vehicle Guide ​What is a green vehicle? Alternative fuels ...

  17. Vehicle Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    UNISTICK is an airplane-like joystick being developed by Johnson Engineering under NASA and VA sponsorship. It allows a driver to control a vehicle with one hand, and is based upon technology developed for the Apollo Lunar Landings of the 1970's. It allows severely handicapped drivers to operate an automobile or van easily. The system is expected to be in production by March 1986.

  18. Hermes vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretenet, J.-C.

    1984-10-01

    Projected mission profiles and computational models of the Hermes winged manned reentry vehicle are discussed. Launched into a low orbit with a crew of at most four by the Ariane 5 vehicle, Hermes will serve transportation, crew relief, safety, and freight carriage functions. It will have a nominal 300-500 km circular or 600-900 km heliosynchronous orbit, weigh from 13,500-16,700 kg, and return in hypersonic glide to a wheeled landing. The vehicle dimensions will be 15-18 m length, 6 m height at the tail fin, and a 10 m span. The L/D ratio will be 1.5-1.6, thereby furnishing a cross range of 2500 km. Hermes will have a Shuttle-type fuselage, carbon-carbon nose, and insulation on the extrados designed to keep the structure at 175 C or lower. The avionics will have 3-4 levels of redundance, each mission phase-dependent. Power will be supplied by three fuel cells and a bank of four Ag-Zn batteries. Hardware development is scheduled to begin in 1988.

  19. Vehicle Dynamic Prediction Systems with On-Line Identification of Vehicle Parameters and Road Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ling-Yuan; Chen, Tsung-Lin

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a vehicle dynamics prediction system, which consists of a sensor fusion system and a vehicle parameter identification system. This sensor fusion system can obtain the six degree-of-freedom vehicle dynamics and two road angles without using a vehicle model. The vehicle parameter identification system uses the vehicle dynamics from the sensor fusion system to identify ten vehicle parameters in real time, including vehicle mass, moment of inertial, and road friction coefficients. With above two systems, the future vehicle dynamics is predicted by using a vehicle dynamics model, obtained from the parameter identification system, to propagate with time the current vehicle state values, obtained from the sensor fusion system. Comparing with most existing literatures in this field, the proposed approach improves the prediction accuracy both by incorporating more vehicle dynamics to the prediction system and by on-line identification to minimize the vehicle modeling errors. Simulation results show that the proposed method successfully predicts the vehicle dynamics in a left-hand turn event and a rollover event. The prediction inaccuracy is 0.51% in a left-hand turn event and 27.3% in a rollover event. PMID:23202231

  20. Space Vehicle Reliability Modeling in DIORAMA

    SciTech Connect

    Tornga, Shawn Robert

    2016-07-12

    When modeling system performance of space based detection systems it is important to consider spacecraft reliability. As space vehicles age the components become prone to failure for a variety of reasons such as radiation damage. Additionally, some vehicles may lose the ability to maneuver once they exhaust fuel supplies. Typically failure is divided into two categories: engineering mistakes and technology surprise. This document will report on a method of simulating space vehicle reliability in the DIORAMA framework.

  1. Modeling vehicle emissions in different types of Chinese cities: importance of vehicle fleet and local features.

    PubMed

    Huo, Hong; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin; Yao, Zhiliang; Wang, Xintong; Zheng, Bo; Streets, David G; Wang, Qidong; Ding, Yan

    2011-10-01

    We propose a method to simulate vehicle emissions in Chinese cities of different sizes and development stages. Twenty two cities are examined in this study. The target year is 2007. Among the cities, the vehicle emission factors were remarkably different (the highest is 50-90% higher than the lowest) owing to their distinct local features and vehicle technology levels, and the major contributors to total vehicle emissions were also different. A substantial increase in vehicle emissions is foreseeable unless stronger measures are implemented because the benefit of current policies can be quickly offset by the vehicle growth. Major efforts should be focused on all cities, especially developing cities where the requirements are lenient. This work aims a better understanding of vehicle emissions in all types of Chinese cities. The proposed method could benefit national emission inventory studies in improving accuracy and help in designing national and local policies for vehicle emission control.

  2. Test vs. simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles C.

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in tabular form: (1) simulation capability assessments (no propulsion system test); (2) advanced vehicle simulation capability assessment; (3) systems tests identified events; (4) main propulsion test article (MPTA) testing evaluation; (5) Saturn 5, 1B, and 1 testing evaluation. Special vehicle simulation issues that are propulsion related are briefly addressed.

  3. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  4. Integration of Computational Geometry, Finite Element, and Multibody System Algorithms for the Development of New Computational Methodology for High-Fidelity Vehicle Systems Modeling and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-11

    suited for efficient communications with CAD systems. It is the main objective of phase I of this SBIR project to demonstrate the feasibility of...for efficient communications with CAD systems. It is the main objective of phase I of this SBIR project to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a...civilian wheeled and tracked vehicle models that include significant details. The new software technology will allow for: 1) preserving CAD geometry

  5. Integration of Computational Geometry, Finite Element, and Multibody System Algorithms for the Development of New Computational Methodology for High-Fidelity Vehicle Systems Modeling and Simulation. ADDENDUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-12

    suited for efficient communications with CAD systems. It is the main objective of phase I and Phase I Option of this SBIR project to demonstrate the...with CAD systems. It is the main objective of phase I and Phase I Option of this SBIR project to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a new MBS...wheeled and tracked vehicle models that include significant details. The new software technology will allow for: 1) preserving CAD geometry when FE

  6. Analysis of vehicle dynamics under sadden cross wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the way of calculating aerodynamic forces acting on a vehicle passing in the region of sadden cross wind was presented. The CarDyn, a vehicle dynamics simulation program, developed by the author was used. The effects of the cross wind were studied with a fixed steering wheel simulation. On the base of computer simulations the car cross wind sensitivity were determined, and vehicle responses such as lateral offset, side acceleration and yaw angular velocity are presented.

  7. NONROAD Model (Nonroad Engines, Equipment, and Vehicles)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NONROAD2008 has been incorporated into the new MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES2014 and MOVES2014a). EPA recommends using MOVES2014a if you are having problems installing or using NONROAD2008 on newer operating systems.

  8. Zack Crues on Space Exploration Vehicle Mockup

    NASA Video Gallery

    Zack Crues, the Space Exploration Vehicle modeling and simulation lead, talks to NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean about the importance of creating an immersive virtual reality environment fo...

  9. Forestry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Power Pack II provides an economical means of moving a power source into remote roadless forest areas. It was developed by Prof. Miles and his associates, working in cooperation with the University of California's Department of Forestry. The team combined its own design of an all-terrain vehicle with a suspension system based on the NASA load equalization technology. Result is an intermediate-sized unit which carries a power source and the powered tools to perform a variety of forest management tasks which cannot be done economically with current equipment. Power Pack II can traverse very rough terrain and climb a 60 degree slope; any one of the wheels can move easily over an obstacle larger than itself. Work is being done on a more advanced Power Pack III.

  10. Vehicle suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Mikina, S.J.

    1986-08-05

    This patent describes a vehicle consisting of sprung and unsprung masses, the combination of struts and support springs for the weight of the sprung mass, an axis defined by pivots between sprung and unsprung masses, with a front pivot approximately midway between the wheels and near the vertical and horizontal planes through the front axles, with a rear pivot lying in an axis through the front pivot and in a plane through the center-of-gravity of the sprung mass, with the plane parallel to the centrifugal force vector through the center-of-gravity of the sprung mass, and with the rear pivot positioned approximately midway between the rear wheels, means for transmitting the centrifugal force component on the front pivot to the front wheels and ground, and means for transmitting the centrifugal force component on the rear pivot to the rear wheels and ground.

  11. Launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, J. B.

    The basic principles which determine launcher design and hence constrain the spacecraft payload are determined. Some key features of the principal launcher alternatives in Europe and the U.S., namely, the unmanned, expendable Ariane and the manned, substantially reusable, Space Shuttle, are outlined. The equations of motion of the rocket are specialized to the vertical plane, parallel and normal to the flight direction, and to the motion of the center of mass and the pitch rotation. A typical Ariane 2 flight profile for transfer into GTO is illustrated. Some representative mission requirements for spacecraft launches are reviewed. Launch vehicle burnout velocities for spacecraft emplacement are given. Geostationary orbit emplacement, orbital mission performance, and configuration interactions are discussed.

  12. Consumer Vehicle Choice Model Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David L

    2012-08-01

    In response to the Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions standards, automobile manufacturers will need to adopt new technologies to improve the fuel economy of their vehicles and to reduce the overall GHG emissions of their fleets. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the Optimization Model for reducing GHGs from Automobiles (OMEGA) to estimate the costs and benefits of meeting GHG emission standards through different technology packages. However, the model does not simulate the impact that increased technology costs will have on vehicle sales or on consumer surplus. As the model documentation states, “While OMEGA incorporates functions which generally minimize the cost of meeting a specified carbon dioxide (CO2) target, it is not an economic simulation model which adjusts vehicle sales in response to the cost of the technology added to each vehicle.” Changes in the mix of vehicles sold, caused by the costs and benefits of added fuel economy technologies, could make it easier or more difficult for manufacturers to meet fuel economy and emissions standards, and impacts on consumer surplus could raise the costs or augment the benefits of the standards. Because the OMEGA model does not presently estimate such impacts, the EPA is investigating the feasibility of developing an adjunct to the OMEGA model to make such estimates. This project is an effort to develop and test a candidate model. The project statement of work spells out the key functional requirements for the new model.

  13. A computer simulation of the transient response of a 4 cylinder Stirling engine with burner and air preheater in a vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of computer programs are presented with full documentation which simulate the transient behavior of a modern 4 cylinder Siemens arrangement Stirling engine with burner and air preheater. Cold start, cranking, idling, acceleration through 3 gear changes and steady speed operation are simulated. Sample results and complete operating instructions are given. A full source code listing of all programs are included.

  14. Downhill simplex approach for vehicle headlights detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ho-Joong; Kim, Ho-Kun; Oh, Il-Whan; Choi, Kyoung-Ho

    2014-03-01

    Nighttime vehicle detection is an essential problem to be solved in the development of highway surveillance systems that provide information about the vehicle speed, traffic volume, and traffic jams, and so on. In this paper, a novel downhill simplex approach for vehicle headlights detection is presented. In the proposed approach, a rough position of vehicle headlights is detected first. Then, a downhill simplex optimization approach is adopted to find the accurate location of vehicle headlights. For the optimization process, a novel cost function is designed and various headlights are evaluated for possible headlight positions on the detected vehicles, locating an optimal headlight position. Simulation results are provided to show the robustness of the proposed approach for headlights detection.

  15. Simulating the potential effects of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on the energy budget and tax revenues for Onondaga County, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Stephen B.

    My objectives were to predict the energetic effects of a large increase in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and their implications on fuel tax collections in Onondaga County. I examined two alternative taxation policies. To do so, I built a model of county energy consumption based on prorated state-level energy consumption data and census data. I used two scenarios to estimate energy consumption trends over the next 30 years and the effects of PHEV on energy use and fuel tax revenues. I found that PHEV can reduce county gasoline consumption, but they would curtail fuel tax revenues and increase residential electricity demand. A one-cent per VMT tax on PHEV users provides insufficient revenue to replace reduced fuel tax collection. A sales tax on electricity consumption generates sufficient replacement revenue at low PHEV market shares. However, at higher shares, the tax on electricity use would exceed the current county tax rate. Keywords: electricity, energy, gasoline, New York State, Onondaga County, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, transportation model, tax policy

  16. Traffic modelling framework for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlote, Arieh; Crisostomi, Emanuele; Kirkland, Stephen; Shorten, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews and improves a recently proposed model of road network dynamics. The model is also adapted and generalised to represent the patterns of battery consumption of electric vehicles travelling in the road network. Simulations from the mobility simulator SUMO are given to support and to illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach. Applications relevant in the field of electric vehicles, such as optimal routing and traffic load control, are provided to illustrate how the proposed model can be used to address typical problems arising in contemporary road network planning and electric vehicle mobility.

  17. Hybrid Control of Electric Vehicle Lateral Dynamics Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabti, Khatir; Bourahla, Mohamend; Mostefai, Lotfi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for motion control applied to driver stability system of an electric vehicle with independently driven wheels. By formulating the vehicle dynamics using an approximating the tire-force characteristics into piecewise affine functions, the vehicle dynamics cen be described as a linear hybrid dynamical system to design a hybrid model predictive controller. This controller is expected to make the yaw rate follow the reference ensuring the safety of the car passengers. The vehicle speed is estimated using a multi-sensor data fusion method. Simulation results in Matlab/Simulink have shown that the proposed control scheme takes advantages of electric vehicle and enhances the vehicle stability.

  18. An Autonomous Platform Simulator (APS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    communications between vehicle sim- ulators, sufficient data is needed to display the platform on a remote simulator as well as model its movement. Information ...window manager interface, FOGM modeling , and the overall program structure. 2. The Firing Platform Simulator The Firing Platform Simulator was a class...brakes, and steering. 3. Vehicle Motion Modeling Realistically simulating the response of vehicles to controls, such as throttle and steering, and to

  19. DEPSCOR: Research on ARL’s Intelligent Control Architecture: Hierarchical Hybrid-Model Based Design, Verification, Simulation, and Synthesis of Mission Control for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    simulation tool can also be enhanced to get real time sensor information as feedback and then take actions accordingly. The simulation tool can be...indicates correct implementation) Change: TimeToWaypoint DistanceToWaypoint MinSpeed to check the various situations with the guard condition */ Efl ...guard condition */ Efl ] (WaypointNavigatorP. Time To Waypoint < WaypointNavigatorP.DistanceTo Waypoint / WaypointNavigatorP.MinSpeed) imply

  20. Vehicle/engine integration. [orbit transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, L. P.; Vinopal, T. J.; Florence, D. E.; Michel, R. W.; Brown, J. R.; Bergeron, R. P.; Weldon, V. A.

    1984-01-01

    VEHICLE/ENGINE Integration Issues are explored for orbit transfer vehicles (OTV's). The impact of space basing and aeroassist on VEHICLE/ENGINE integration is discussed. The AOTV structure and thermal protection subsystem weights were scaled as the vehicle length and surface was changed. It is concluded that for increased allowable payload lengths in a ground-based system, lower length-to-diameter (L/D) is as important as higher mixture ration (MR) in the range of mid L/D ATOV's. Scenario validity, geometry constraints, throttle levels, reliability, and servicing are discussed in the context of engine design and engine/vehicle integration.

  1. The adaptive cruise control vehicles in the cellular automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rui; Wu, Qing-Song

    2006-11-01

    This Letter presented a cellular automata model where the adaptive cruise control vehicles are modelled. In this model, the constant time headway policy is adopted. The fundamental diagram is presented. The simulation results are in good agreement with the analytical ones. The mixture of ACC vehicles with manually driven vehicles is investigated. It is shown that with the introduction of ACC vehicles, the jam can be suppressed.

  2. Near-term hybrid vehicle program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design of a hybrid vehicle which fully meets or exceeds the requirements set forth in the Near Term Hybrid Vehicle Program is documented. Topics addressed include the general layout and styling, the power train specifications with discussion of each major component, vehicle weight and weight breakdown, vehicle performance, measures of energy consumption, and initial cost and ownership cost. Alternative design options considered and their relationship to the design adopted, computer simulation used, and maintenance and reliability considerations are also discussed.

  3. A computational fluid dynamics simulation of the hypersonic flight of the Pegasus(TM) vehicle using an artificial viscosity model and a nonlinear filtering method. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, John Cadiz

    1995-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code, PARC3D, is tested to see if its use of non-physical artificial dissipation affects the accuracy of its results. This is accomplished by simulating a shock-laminar boundary layer interaction and several hypersonic flight conditions of the Pegasus(TM) launch vehicle using full artificial dissipation, low artificial dissipation, and the Engquist filter. Before the filter is applied to the PARC3D code, it is validated in one-dimensional and two-dimensional form in a MacCormack scheme against the Riemann and convergent duct problem. For this explicit scheme, the filter shows great improvements in accuracy and computational time as opposed to the nonfiltered solutions. However, for the implicit PARC3D code it is found that the best estimate of the Pegasus experimental heat fluxes and surface pressures is the simulation utilizing low artificial dissipation and no filter. The filter does improve accuracy over the artificially dissipative case but at a computational expense greater than that achieved by the low artificial dissipation case which has no computational time penalty and shows better results. For the shock-boundary layer simulation, the filter does well in terms of accuracy for a strong impingement shock but not as well for weaker shock strengths. Furthermore, for the latter problem the filter reduces the required computational time to convergence by 18.7 percent.

  4. 75 FR 76185 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard, Rearview Mirrors; Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Efficacy of Rear-Mounted Mirror Systems, and Convex Driver's-Side Mirrors iv. Use of Monte Carlo Simulation.... Using Blind Zone Area as a Basis for Countermeasure Requirement D. Use of Convex Driver's-Side Mirrors E... vehicle that a driver must be able to see when the vehicle is in reverse gear. This rulemaking action...

  5. Electric-car simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.; Slusser, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    PARAMET, interactive simulation program for parametric studies of electric vehicles, guides user through simulation by menu and series of prompts for input parameters. Program considers aerodynamic drag, rolling resistance, linear and rotational acceleration, and road gradient as forces acting on vehicle.

  6. Characteristics of mixed traffic flow with non-motorized vehicles and motorized vehicles at an unsignalized intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dong-Fan; Gao, Zi-You; Zhao, Xiao-Mei; Li, Ke-Ping

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, a new two-dimensional car-following model is proposed to depict the features of mixed traffic flow consisting of motorized vehicles ( m-vehicle) and non-motorized vehicles ( nm-vehicle), based on the two-dimensional optimal velocity (OV) model by Nakayama et al. [A. Nakayama, K. Hasebe, Y. Sugiyama, Phys. Rev. E 71 (2005) 036121]. In the proposed model, velocity difference terms are introduced, which are regarded as important factors for traffic behavior. Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the interaction between left-turning nm-vehicle flow and straight-going m-vehicle flow at a typical unsignalized interaction. The results show that the straight-going m-vehicle flow just next to nm-lane is disturbed more seriously than others. In addition, a well-known phenomenon in reality is observed that groups of m-vehicles and nm-vehicles pass through the intersection alternately.

  7. Advances in fuel cell vehicle design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, Jennifer

    Factors such as global warming, dwindling fossil fuel reserves, and energy security concerns combine to indicate that a replacement for the internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle is needed. Fuel cell vehicles have the potential to address the problems surrounding the ICE vehicle without imposing any significant restrictions on vehicle performance, driving range, or refuelling time. Though there are currently some obstacles to overcome before attaining the widespread commercialization of fuel cell vehicles, such as improvements in fuel cell and battery durability, development of a hydrogen infrastructure, and reduction of high costs, the fundamental concept of the fuel cell vehicle is strong: it is efficient, emits zero harmful emissions, and the hydrogen fuel can be produced from various renewable sources. Therefore, research on fuel cell vehicle design is imperative in order to improve vehicle performance and durability, increase efficiency, and reduce costs. This thesis makes a number of key contributions to the advancement of fuel cell vehicle design within two main research areas: powertrain design and DC/DC converters. With regards to powertrain design, this research first analyzes various powertrain topologies and energy storage system types. Then, a novel fuel cell-battery-ultracapacitor topology is presented which shows reduced mass and cost, and increased efficiency, over other promising topologies found in the literature. A detailed vehicle simulator is created in MATLAB/Simulink in order to simulate and compare the novel topology with other fuel cell vehicle powertrain options. A parametric study is performed to optimize each powertrain and general conclusions for optimal topologies, as well as component types and sizes, for fuel cell vehicles are presented. Next, an analytical method to optimize the novel battery-ultracapacitor energy storage system based on maximizing efficiency, and minimizing cost and mass, is developed. This method can be applied

  8. An Integrated Vehicle Modeling Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Totah, Joseph J.; Kinney, David J.; Kaneshige, John T.; Agabon, Shane

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes an Integrated Vehicle Modeling Environment for estimating aircraft geometric, inertial, and aerodynamic characteristics, and for interfacing with a high fidelity, workstation based flight simulation architecture. The goals in developing this environment are to aid in the design of next generation intelligent fight control technologies, conduct research in advanced vehicle interface concepts for autonomous and semi-autonomous applications, and provide a value-added capability to the conceptual design and aircraft synthesis process. Results are presented for three aircraft by comparing estimates generated by the Integrated Vehicle Modeling Environment with known characteristics of each vehicle under consideration. The three aircraft are a modified F-15 with moveable canards attached to the airframe, a mid-sized, twin-engine commercial transport concept, and a small, single-engine, uninhabited aerial vehicle. Estimated physical properties and dynamic characteristics are correlated with those known for each aircraft over a large portion of the flight envelope of interest. These results represent the completion of a critical step toward meeting the stated goals for developing this modeling environment.

  9. Modeling of Semi-Active Vehicle Suspension with Magnetorhological Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasa, Richard; Danko, Ján; Milesich, Tomáš; Magdolen, Ľuboš

    2014-12-01

    Modeling of suspension is a current topic. Vehicle users require both greater driving comfort and safety. There is a space to invent new technologies like magnetorheological dampers and their control systems to increase these conflicting requirements. Magnetorheological dampers are reliably mathematically described by parametric and nonparametric models. Therefore they are able to reliably simulate the driving mode of the vehicle. These simulations are important for automotive engineers to increase vehicle safety and passenger comfort.

  10. A hypersonic vehicle approach to planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murbach, Marcus S.

    1993-01-01

    An enhanced Mars network class mission using a lifting hypersonic entry vehicle is proposed. The basic vehicle, derived from a mature hypersonic flight system called SWERVE, offers several advantages over more conventional low L/D or ballistic entry systems. The proposed vehicle has greatly improved lateral and cross range capability (e.g., it is capable of reaching the polar regions during less than optimal mission opportunities), is not limited to surface target areas of low elevation, and is less susceptible to problems caused by Martian dust storms. Further, the integrated vehicle has attractive deployment features and allows for a much improved evolutionary path to larger vehicles with greater science capability. Analysis of the vehicle is aided by the development of a Mars Hypersonic Flight Simulator from which flight trajectories are obtained. Atmospheric entry performance of the baseline vehicle is improved by a deceleration skirt and transpiration cooling system which significantly reduce TPS (Thermal Protection System) and flight battery mass. The use of the vehicle is also attractive in that the maturity of the flight systems make it cost-competitive with the development of a conventional low L/D entry system. Finally, the potential application of similar vehicles to other planetary missions is discussed.

  11. Auditory Perception of Motor Vehicle Travel Paths

    PubMed Central

    Ashmead, Daniel H.; Grantham, D. Wesley; Maloff, Erin S.; Hornsby, Benjamin; Nakamura, Takabun; Davis, Timothy J.; Pampel, Faith; Rushing, Erin G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective These experiments address concerns that motor vehicles in electric engine mode are so quiet that they pose a risk to pedestrians, especially those with visual impairments. Background The “quiet car” issue has focused on hybrid and electric vehicles, although it also applies to internal combustion engine vehicles. Previous research has focused on detectability of vehicles, mostly in quiet settings. Instead, we focused on the functional ability to perceive vehicle motion paths. Method Participants judged whether simulated vehicles were traveling straight or turning, with emphasis on the impact of background traffic sound. Results In quiet, listeners made the straight-or-turn judgment soon enough in the vehicle’s path to be useful for deciding whether to start crossing the street. This judgment is based largely on sound level cues rather than the spatial direction of the vehicle. With even moderate background traffic sound, the ability to tell straight from turn paths is severely compromised. The signal-to-noise ratio needed for the straight-or-turn judgment is much higher than that needed to detect a vehicle. Conclusion Although a requirement for a minimum vehicle sound level might enhance detection of vehicles in quiet settings, it is unlikely that this requirement would contribute to pedestrian awareness of vehicle movements in typical traffic settings with many vehicles present. Application The findings are relevant to deliberations by government agencies and automobile manufacturers about standards for minimum automobile sounds and, more generally, for solutions to pedestrians’ needs for information about traffic, especially for pedestrians with sensory impairments. PMID:22768645

  12. Simulation verification techniques study. Subsystem simulation validation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Reddell, J. P.; Schoonmaker, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques for validation of software modules which simulate spacecraft onboard systems are discussed. An overview of the simulation software hierarchy for a shuttle mission simulator is provided. A set of guidelines for the identification of subsystem/module performance parameters and critical performance parameters are presented. Various sources of reference data to serve as standards of performance for simulation validation are identified. Environment, crew station, vehicle configuration, and vehicle dynamics simulation software are briefly discussed from the point of view of their interfaces with subsystem simulation modules. A detailed presentation of results in the area of vehicle subsystems simulation modules is included. A list of references, conclusions and recommendations are also given.

  13. Launch Vehicle Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.

    1999-01-01

    This report summaries the key accomplishments of Georgia Tech's Space Systems Design Laboratory (SSDL) under NASA Grant NAG8-1302 from NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center. The report consists of this summary white paper, copies of technical papers written under this grant, and several viewgraph-style presentations. During the course of this grant four main tasks were completed: (1)Simulated Combined-Cycle Rocket Engine Analysis Module (SCCREAM), a computer analysis tool for predicting the performance of various RBCC engine configurations; (2) Hyperion, a single stage to orbit vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 pound payloads to the International Space Station Orbit; (3) Bantam-X Support - a small payload mission; (4) International Trajectory Support for interplanetary human Mars missions.

  14. A computer program (HEVSIM) for heavy duty vehicle fuel economy and performance simulation. Volume II: Users' manual. Final report Mar-Oct 80

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, R.E.

    1981-09-01

    Volume II is the second volume of a three volume document describing the computer program HEVSIM for use with buses and heavy duty trucks. This volume is a user's manual describing how to prepare data input and execute the program. A strong effort has been made to prepare this manual from a user's viewpoint. Sample cases have been included to illustrate the various simulation methods available, and the most frequently used HEVSIM options.

  15. Behaviour recognition of ground vehicle using airborne monitoring of unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyondong; Kim, Seungkeun; Shin, Hyo-Sang; Tsourdos, Antonios; White, Brian A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a behaviour recognition methodology for ground vehicles moving within road traffic using unmanned aerial vehicles in order to identify suspicious or abnormal behaviour. With the target information acquired by unmanned aerial vehicles and estimated by filtering techniques, ground vehicle behaviour is first classified into representative driving modes, and then a string pattern matching theory is applied to detect suspicious behaviours in the driving mode history. Furthermore, a fuzzy decision-making process is developed to systematically exploit all available information obtained from a complex environment and confirm the characteristic of behaviour, while considering spatiotemporal environment factors as well as several aspects of behaviours. To verify the feasibility and benefits of the proposed approach, numerical simulations on moving ground vehicles are performed using realistic car trajectory data from an off-the-shelf traffic simulation software.

  16. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  17. Ground Vehicle Power and Mobility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-17

    foreign oil – Alternative sources sought – wind, solar , bio-mass, waste to energy • Operational issues – Battery usage & limitations – energy & power...Inefficient management/ distribution of power – Demand for soldier- wearable power • Increased emphasis on system power metrics (KPPs, low consumption...Full Vehicle Environmental Test Cell – Ambient temperature control to 160°F – Solar load simulation – Wind speeds up to 20mph in eight possible

  18. Skylab rescue space vehicle flight readiness test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jevitt, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A Skylab Rescue Space Vehicle flight readiness test is described which ensures that space vehicle systems are in a state of flight readiness and are compatible with associated ground support equipment. The functions of propellant loading, umbilical ejection, ignition, holddown arm release, liftoff, and service arm and tail service mast retraction are simulated. The test outline is presented along with a list of references, intercommunications information, operations interface control chart, and flight test.

  19. Energy Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A; Markel, T; Zolot, M; Sprik, S; Tataria, H; Duong, T

    2005-08-01

    In recent years, hydrogen fuel cell (FC) vehicle technology has received considerable attention as a strategy to decrease oil consumption and reduce harmful emissions. However, the cost, transient response, and cold performance of FC systems may present significant challenges to widespread adoption of the technology for transportation in the next 15 years. The objectives of this effort were to perform energy storage modeling with fuel cell vehicle simulations to quantify the benefits of hybridization and to identify a process for setting the requirements of ES for hydrogen-powered FC vehicles for U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program.

  20. Automated mixed traffic vehicle control and scheduling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, T. K. C.; Chon, K.

    1976-01-01

    The operation and the expected performance of a proposed automatic guideway transit system which uses low speed automated mixed traffic vehicles (AMTVs) were analyzed. Vehicle scheduling and headway control policies were evaluated with a transit system simulation model. The effect of mixed traffic interference on the average vehicle speed was examined with a vehicle pedestrian interface model. Control parameters regulating vehicle speed were evaluated for safe stopping and passenger comfort. Some preliminary data on the cost and operation of an experimental AMTV system are included. These data were the result of a separate task conducted at JPL, and were included as background information.

  1. Using the lead vehicle as preview sensor in convoy vehicle active suspension control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafizur; Rideout, Geoff

    2012-12-01

    Both ride quality and roadholding of actively suspended vehicles can be improved by sensing the road ahead of the vehicle and using this information in a preview controller. Previous applications have used look-ahead sensors mounted on the front bumper to measure terrain beneath. Such sensors are vulnerable, potentially confused by water, snow, or other soft obstacles and offer a fixed preview time. For convoy vehicle applications, this paper proposes using the overall response of the preceding vehicle(s) to generate preview controller information for follower vehicles. A robust observer is used to estimate the states of a quarter-car vehicle model, from which road profile is estimated and passed on to the follower vehicle(s) to generate a preview function. The preview-active suspension, implemented in discrete time using a shift register approach to improve simulation time, reduces sprung mass acceleration and dynamic tyre deflection peaks by more than 50% and 40%, respectively. Terrain can change from one vehicle to the next if a loose obstacle is dislodged, or if the vehicle paths are sufficiently different so that one vehicle misses a discrete road event. The resulting spurious preview information can give suspension performance worse than that of a passive or conventional active system. In this paper, each vehicle can effectively estimate the road profile based on its own state trajectory. By comparing its own road estimate with the preview information, preview errors can be detected and suspension control quickly switched from preview to conventional active control to preserve performance improvements compared to passive suspensions.

  2. Point-spread function and MTF characterization of the kinetic-kill-vehicle hardware-in-the-loop simulation (KHILS) infrared-laser scene projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Terri L.; Boreman, Glenn D.; Ducharme, Alfred D.; Rapp, Ronald J.

    1993-08-01

    A Scophony Infrared Scene Projector (IRSP) is being used at Wright Laboratories Armament Directorate, Guided Interceptor Technology Branch, Eglin AFB, to evaluate thermal-imaging guidance systems. This hardware-in-the-loop testing system reduces the number of necessary field trials and has potential for in-laboratory simulation where the performance of entire seeker systems can be analyzed. The performance of an optical system, in terms of such characteristics as wavefront error, resolution, and transfer factor, can be measured with knowledge of the system MTF and PSF performance. A slow-scan calibration system was used to measure an image plane of the IRSP under three separate configurations of the system. MTFs and PSFs were derived for the IRSP without the use of the scatter screen, with the scatter screen in place, and with the scatter screen rotating.

  3. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

  4. MRV - Modular Robotic Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, Justin; Bluethmann, Bill

    2015-01-01

    The Modular Robotic Vehicle, or MRV, completed in 2013, was developed at the Johnson Space Center in order to advance technologies which have applications for future vehicles both in space and on Earth. With seating for two people, MRV is a fully electric vehicle modeled as a "city car", suited for busy urban environments.

  5. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  6. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

  7. Electric Vehicle Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2011-01-01

    With President Obama's goal to have one million electric vehicles (EV) on the road by 2015, the electric vehicle technician should have a promising and busy future. "The job force in the car industry is ramping up for a revitalized green car industry," according to Greencareersguide.com. An electric vehicle technician will safely troubleshoot and…

  8. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  9. Solar space vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.E.

    1982-10-19

    This invention relates to space vehicle where solar energy is used to generate steam, which in turn, propels the vehicle in space. A copper boiler is provided and a novel solar radiation condensing means is used to focus the sunlight on said boiler. Steam generated in said boiler is exhausted to the environment to provide a thrust for the vehicle.

  10. Transformable descent vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichkhadze, K. M.; Finchenko, V. S.; Aleksashkin, S. N.; Ostreshko, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    This article presents some types of planetary descent vehicles, the shape of which varies in different flight phases. The advantages of such vehicles over those with unchangeable form (from launch to landing) are discussed. It is shown that the use of transformable descent vehicles widens the scope of possible tasks to solve.

  11. Hyperspectral Vehicle BRDF Learning: An Exploration of Vehicle Reflectance Variation and Optimal Measures of Spectral Similarity for Vehicle Reacquisition and Tracking Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svejkosky, Joseph

    The spectral signatures of vehicles in hyperspectral imagery exhibit temporal variations due to the preponderance of surfaces with material properties that display non-Lambertian bi-directional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs). These temporal variations are caused by changing illumination conditions, changing sun-target-sensor geometry, changing road surface properties, and changing vehicle orientations. To quantify these variations and determine their relative importance in a sub-pixel vehicle reacquisition and tracking scenario, a hyperspectral vehicle BRDF sampling experiment was conducted in which four vehicles were rotated at different orientations and imaged over a six-hour period. The hyperspectral imagery was calibrated using novel in-scene methods and converted to reflectance imagery. The resulting BRDF sampled time-series imagery showed a strong vehicle level BRDF dependence on vehicle shape in off-nadir imaging scenarios and a strong dependence on vehicle color in simulated nadir imaging scenarios. The imagery also exhibited spectral features characteristic of sampling the BRDF of non-Lambertian targets, which were subsequently verified with simulations. In addition, the imagery demonstrated that the illumination contribution from vehicle adjacent horizontal surfaces significantly altered the shape and magnitude of the vehicle reflectance spectrum. The results of the BRDF sampling experiment illustrate the need for a target vehicle BRDF model and detection scheme that incorporates non-Lambertian BRDFs. A new detection algorithm called Eigenvector Loading Regression (ELR) is proposed that learns a hyperspectral vehicle BRDF from a series of BRDF measurements using regression in a lower dimensional space and then applies the learned BRDF to make test spectrum predictions. In cases of non-Lambertian vehicle BRDF, this detection methodology performs favorably when compared to subspace detections algorithms and graph-based detection algorithms that

  12. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intactvehicles found the same trend, with hydrophilic vehicle having greater delivery. In conclusion, phosphate buffered saline vehicle resulted in higher permeation into and across skin compared to mineral oil vehicle for all simulated models of compromised skin.

  13. Multi-vehicle target selection for adaptive cruise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Seungwuk; Kang, Hyoung-Jin; Yi, Kyongsu

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a target selection strategy for adaptive cruise control (ACC) in multiple vehicle traffic situations. Since there are many vehicles in a real road and various transitions between the subject vehicle and the neighbouring vehicles occurred, it is important to establish a target selection and a control strategy for applying the ACC system to multiple vehicle traffic scenes in order to improve the driver acceptance and the vehicle safety. For this purpose, it is necessary to determine which neighbouring vehicle is an important target for the adaptive cruise control and prevention of collision depending on a driving situation. A primary target selection algorithm decides an in-lane target and provides the information to a longitudinal controller in order to drive a subject vehicle smoothly and to ensure safety in multi-vehicle traffic situations. The proposed selection algorithm consists of an in-lane target detection, a motion-based analysis and an integration process. The performance and safety benefits of a multi-vehicle ACC system with proposed target selection strategy are investigated via simulations using several driving scenarios. Simulation results show that the system response is smooth and safe even in multiple vehicle driving situations.

  14. Description and History of the MOBILE Highway Vehicle Emission Factor Model

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    MOBILE is an EPA model for estimating pollution from highway vehicles. It has been superseded by the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES). MOBILE calculates emissions of hydrocarbons (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO).

  15. Performance of an Automated-Mixed-Traffic-Vehicle /AMTV/ System. [urban people mover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, T. K. C.; Chon, K.

    1978-01-01

    This study analyzes the operation and evaluates the expected performance of a proposed automatic guideway transit system which uses low-speed Automated Mixed Traffic Vehicles (AMTV's). Vehicle scheduling and headway control policies are evaluated with a transit system simulation model. The effect of mixed-traffic interference on the average vehicle speed is examined with a vehicle-pedestrian interface model. Control parameters regulating vehicle speed are evaluated for safe stopping and passenger comfort.

  16. Vehicle/engine integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, L. P.; Vinopal, T. J.; Florence, D. E.; Michel, R. W.; Brown, J. R.; Bergeron, R. P.; Weldon, V. A.

    1984-04-01

    VEHICLE/ENGINE Integration Issues are explored for orbit transfer vehicles (OTV's). The impact of space basing and aeroassist on VEHICLE/ENGINE integration is discussed. The AOTV structure and thermal protection subsystem weights were scaled as the vehicle length and surface was changed. It is concluded that for increased allowable payload lengths in a ground-based system, lower length-to-diameter (L/D) is as important as higher mixture ration (MR) in the range of mid L/D ATOV's. Scenario validity, geometry constraints, throttle levels, reliability, and servicing are discussed in the context of engine design and engine/vehicle integration.

  17. VEHICLE FOR SLAVE ROBOT

    DOEpatents

    Goertz, R.C.; Lindberg, J.F.

    1962-01-30

    A reeling device is designed for an electrical cable supplying power to the slave slde of a remote control manipulator mounted on a movable vehicle. As the vehicle carries the slave side about in a closed room, the device reels the cable in and out to maintain a variable length of the cable between the vehicle and a cable inlet in the wall of the room. The device also handles a fixed length of cable between the slave side and the vehicle, in spite of angular movement of the slave side with respect to the vehicle. (AEC)

  18. Impact of Solar Control PVB Glass on Vehicle Interior Temperatures, Air-Conditioning Capacity, Fuel Consumption, and Vehicle Range

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Venson, T.; Ramroth, L.; Rose, M.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the impact of Saflex1 S-series Solar Control PVB (polyvinyl butyral) configurations on conventional vehicle fuel economy and electric vehicle (EV) range. The approach included outdoor vehicle thermal soak testing, RadTherm cool-down analysis, and vehicle simulations. Thermal soak tests were conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in Golden, Colorado. The test results quantified interior temperature reductions and were used to generate initial conditions for the RadTherm cool-down analysis. The RadTherm model determined the potential reduction in air-conditioning (A/C) capacity, which was used to calculate the A/C load for the vehicle simulations. The vehicle simulation tool identified the potential reduction in fuel consumption or improvement in EV range between a baseline and modified configurations for the city and highway drive cycles. The thermal analysis determined a potential 4.0% reduction in A/C power for the Saflex Solar PVB solar control configuration. The reduction in A/C power improved the vehicle range of EVs and fuel economy of conventional vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  19. Vehicle capture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacke, Kenneth L.

    1998-12-01

    Primex Aerospace Company, under contract with the U.S. Army Armament Research Development & Engineering Center (ARDEC), has developed a portable vehicle capture system for use at vehicle checkpoints. Currently when a vehicle does not stop at a checkpoint, there are three possible reactions: let the vehicle go unchallenged, pursue the vehicle or stop the vehicle with lethal force. This system provides a non-lethal alternative that will stop and contain the vehicle. The system is completely portable with the heaviest component weighing less than 120 pounds. It can be installed with no external electrical power or permanent anchors required. In its standby mode, the system does not impede normal traffic, but on command erects a barrier in less than 1.5 seconds. System tests have been conducted using 5,100 and 8.400 pound vehicles, traveling at speeds up to 45 mph. The system is designed to minimize vehicle damage and occupant injury, typically resulting in deceleration forces of less than 2.5 gs on the vehicle. According to the drivers involved in tests at 45 mph, the stopping forces feel similar to a panic stop with the vehicle brakes locked. The system is completely reusable and be rapidly reset.

  20. Vehicle Systems Panel deliberations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Tom; Modlin, Tom; Suddreth, Jack; Wheeler, Tom; Tenney, Darrel R.; Bayless, Ernest O.; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bolstad, Donald A.; Croop, Harold; Dyer, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Vehicle Systems Panel addressed materials and structures technology issues related to launch and space vehicle systems not directly associated with the propulsion or entry systems. The Vehicle Systems Panel was comprised of two subpanels - Expendable Launch Vehicles & Cryotanks (ELVC) and Reusable Vehicles (RV). Tom Bales, LaRC, and Tom Modlin, JSC, chaired the expendable and reusable vehicles subpanels, respectively, and co-chaired the Vehicle Systems Panel. The following four papers are discussed in this section: (1) Net Section components for Weldalite Cryogenic Tanks, by Don Bolstad; (2) Build-up Structures for Cryogenic Tanks and Dry Bay Structural Applications, by Barry Lisagor; (3) Composite Materials Program, by Robert Van Siclen; (4) Shuttle Technology (and M&S Lessons Learned), by Stan Greenberg.

  1. Quantifying electric vehicle battery degradation from driving vs. vehicle-to-grid services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai; Coignard, Jonathan; Zeng, Teng; Zhang, Cong; Saxena, Samveg

    2016-11-01

    The risk of accelerated electric vehicle battery degradation is commonly cited as a concern inhibiting the implementation of vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology. However, little quantitative evidence exists in prior literature to refute or substantiate these concerns for different grid services that vehicles may offer. In this paper, a methodology is proposed to quantify electric vehicle (EV) battery degradation from driving only vs. driving and several vehicle-grid services, based on a semi-empirical lithium-ion battery capacity fade model. A detailed EV battery pack thermal model and EV powertrain model are utilized to capture the time-varying battery temperature and working parameters including current, internal resistance and state-of-charge (SOC), while an EV is driving and offering various grid services. We use the proposed method to simulate the battery degradation impacts from multiple vehicle-grid services including peak load shaving, frequency regulation and net load shaping. The degradation impact of these grid services is compared against baseline cases for driving and uncontrolled charging only, for several different cases of vehicle itineraries, driving distances, and climate conditions. Over the lifetime of a vehicle, our results show that battery wear is indeed increased when vehicles offer V2G grid services. However, the increased wear from V2G is inconsequential compared with naturally occurring battery wear (i.e. from driving and calendar ageing) when V2G services are offered only on days of the greatest grid need (20 days/year in our study). In the case of frequency regulation and peak load shaving V2G grid services offered 2 hours each day, battery wear remains minimal even if this grid service is offered every day over the vehicle lifetime. Our results suggest that an attractive tradeoff exists where vehicles can offer grid services on the highest value days for the grid with minimal impact on vehicle battery life.

  2. Dynamics of Motorized Vehicle Flow under Mixed Traffic Circumstance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong-Wei; Gao, Zi-You; Zhao, Xiao-Mei; Xie, Dong-Fan

    2011-04-01

    To study the dynamics of mixed traffic flow consisting of motorized and non-motorized vehicles, a car-following model based on the principle of collision free and cautious driving is proposed. Lateral friction and overlapping driving are introduced to describe the interactions between motorized vehicles and non-motorized vehicles. By numerical simulations, the flux-density relation, the temporal-spatial dynamics, and the velocity evolution are investigated in detail. The results indicate non-motorized vehicles have a significant impact on the motorized vehicle flow and cause the maximum flux to decline by about 13%. Non-motorized vehicles can decrease the motorized vehicle velocity and cause velocity oscillation when the motorized vehicle density is low. Moreover, non-motorized vehicles show a significant damping effect on the oscillating velocity when the density is medium and high, and such an effect weakens as motorized vehicle density increases. The results also stress the necessity for separating motorized vehicles from non-motorized vehicles.

  3. Railway vehicle performance optimisation using virtual homologation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, H.; Madeira, J. F. A.; Ambrósio, J.; Pombo, J.

    2016-09-01

    Unlike regular automotive vehicles, which are designed to travel in different types of roads, railway vehicles travel mostly in the same route during their life cycle. To accept the operation of a railway vehicle in a particular network, a homologation process is required according to local standard regulations. In Europe, the standards EN 14363 and UIC 518, which are used for railway vehicle acceptance, require on-track tests and/or numerical simulations. An important advantage of using virtual homologation is the reduction of the high costs associated with on-track tests by studying the railway vehicle performance in different operation conditions. This work proposes a methodology for the improvement of railway vehicle design with the objective of its operation in selected railway tracks by using optimisation. The analyses required for the vehicle improvement are performed under control of the optimisation method global and local optimisation using direct search. To quantify the performance of the vehicle, a new objective function is proposed, which includes: a Dynamic Performance Index, defined as a weighted sum of the indices obtained from the virtual homologation process; the non-compensated acceleration, which is related to the operational velocity; and a penalty associated with cases where the vehicle presents an unacceptable dynamic behaviour according to the standards. Thus, the optimisation process intends not only to improve the quality of the vehicle in terms of running safety and ride quality, but also to increase the vehicle availability via the reduction of the time for a journey while ensuring its operational acceptance under the standards. The design variables include the suspension characteristics and the operational velocity of the vehicle, which are allowed to vary in an acceptable range of variation. The results of the optimisation lead to a global minimum of the objective function in which the suspensions characteristics of the vehicle are

  4. Reduction of Military Vehicle Acquisition Time and Cost through Advanced Modelling and Virtual Simulation (La reduction des couts et des delais d’acquisition des vehicules militaires par la modelisation avancee et la simulation de produit virtuel)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    l’informatique – a naturellement conduit à envisager l’usage de la simulation de façon systématique tout au long d’un programme naval comme un élément...les fonctions de transfert des déformations souples au niveau des capteurs gyromètre et accéléromètre du système de commande de vol sur les braquages

  5. Development of a computational model for an underwater autonomous vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galls, Samuel Fernando

    This research includes the development of a computational model created to autonomously navigate a biomimetic underwater vehicle. The navigation procedure uses as input a set of vehicle geometric and state variables and from that it predicts the needed vehicle body deformations so that the vehicle can navigate through a set of given waypoints. The first task is to develop a two dimensional numerical simulation based on an unsteady panel method coupled with the vehicle dynamics. Numerous test cases spanning the range of possible conditions are processed with the current simulation and this data is subsequently used to train a neural network. The trained network can predict what body deflection time history is necessary for the vehicle to navigate a given set of waypoints. Validation results are presented that show the accuracy of the present flow solver and several test cases of autonomous navigation are presented to show the capabilities of the current method.

  6. Simulation of Airplane and Rocket Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahbah, Magdy M.; Berning, Michael J.; Choy, Tony S.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation and Optimization of Rocket Trajectories program (SORT) contains comprehensive mathematical models for simulating aircraft dynamics, freely falling objects, and many types of ballistic trajectories. Provides high-fidelity, three-degrees-of-freedom simulation for atmospheric and exoatmospheric flight. It numerically models vehicle subsystems and vehicle environment. Used for wide range of simulations. Written in machine-independent FORTRAN 77.

  7. Current CFD Practices in Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2012-01-01

    The quest for sustained space exploration will require the development of advanced launch vehicles, and efficient and reliable operating systems. Development of launch vehicles via test-fail-fix approach is very expensive and time consuming. For decision making, modeling and simulation (M&S) has played increasingly important roles in many aspects of launch vehicle development. It is therefore essential to develop and maintain most advanced M&S capability. More specifically computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been providing critical data for developing launch vehicles complementing expensive testing. During the past three decades CFD capability has increased remarkably along with advances in computer hardware and computing technology. However, most of the fundamental CFD capability in launch vehicle applications is derived from the past advances. Specific gaps in the solution procedures are being filled primarily through "piggy backed" efforts.on various projects while solving today's problems. Therefore, some of the advanced capabilities are not readily available for various new tasks, and mission-support problems are often analyzed using ad hoc approaches. The current report is intended to present our view on state-of-the-art (SOA) in CFD and its shortcomings in support of space transport vehicle development. Best practices in solving current issues will be discussed using examples from ascending launch vehicles. Some of the pacing will be discussed in conjunction with these examples.

  8. Traffic flow characteristics in a mixed traffic system consisting of ACC vehicles and manual vehicles: A hybrid modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yao-Ming; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Wu, Qing-Song; Wang, Ruili

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we have investigated traffic flow characteristics in a traffic system consisting of a mixture of adaptive cruise control (ACC) vehicles and manual-controlled (manual) vehicles, by using a hybrid modelling approach. In the hybrid approach, (i) the manual vehicles are described by a cellular automaton (CA) model, which can reproduce different traffic states (i.e., free flow, synchronised flow, and jam) as well as probabilistic traffic breakdown phenomena; (ii) the ACC vehicles are simulated by using a car-following model, which removes artificial velocity fluctuations due to intrinsic randomisation in the CA model. We have studied the traffic breakdown probability from free flow to congested flow, the phase transition probability from synchronised flow to jam in the mixed traffic system. The results are compared with that, where both ACC vehicles and manual vehicles are simulated by CA models. The qualitative and quantitative differences are indicated.

  9. Integrated dynamics modeling for supercavitating vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seonhong; Kim, Nakwan

    2015-06-01

    We have performed integrated dynamics modeling for a supercavitating vehicle. A 6-DOF equation of motion was constructed by defining the forces and moments acting on the supercavitating body surface that contacted water. The wetted area was obtained by calculating the cavity size and axis. Cavity dynamics were determined to obtain the cavity profile for calculating the wetted area. Subsequently, the forces and moments acting on each wetted part-the cavitator, fins, and vehicle body-were obtained by physical modeling. The planing force-the interaction force between the vehicle transom and cavity wall-was calculated using the apparent mass of the immersed vehicle transom. We integrated each model and constructed an equation of motion for the supercavitating system. We performed numerical simulations using the integrated dynamics model to analyze the characteristics of the supercavitating system and validate the modeling completeness. Our research enables the design of high-quality controllers and optimal supercavitating systems.

  10. A high performance pneumatic braking system for heavy vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jonathan I.; Cebon, David

    2010-12-01

    Current research into reducing actuator delays in pneumatic brake systems is opening the door for advanced anti-lock braking algorithms to be used on heavy goods vehicles. However, these algorithms require the knowledge of variables that are impractical to measure directly. This paper introduces a sliding mode braking force observer to support a sliding mode controller for air-braked heavy vehicles. The performance of the observer is examined through simulations and field testing of an articulated heavy vehicle. The observer operated robustly during single-wheel vehicle simulations, and provided reasonable estimates of surface friction from test data. The effect of brake gain errors on the controller and observer are illustrated, and a recursive least squares estimator is derived for the brake gain. The estimator converged within 0.3 s in simulations and vehicle trials.

  11. SOLON: An autonomous vehicle mission planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudziak, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The State-Operator Logic Machine (SOLON) Planner provides an architecture for effective real-time planning and replanning for an autonomous vehicle. The highlights of the system, which distinguish it from other AI-based planners that have been designed previously, are its hybrid application of state-driven control architecture and the use of both schematic representations and logic programming for the management of its knowledge base. SOLON is designed to provide multiple levels of planning for a single autonomous vehicle which is supplied with a skeletal, partially-specified mission plan at the outset of the vehicle's operations. This mission plan consists of a set of objectives, each of which will be decomposable by the planner into tasks. These tasks are themselves comparatively complex sets of actions which are executable by a conventional real-time control system which does not perform planning but which is capable of making adjustments or modifications to the provided tasks according to constraints and tolerances provided by the Planner. The current implementation of the SOLON is in the form of a real-time simulation of the Planner module of an Intelligent Vehicle Controller (IVC) on-board an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). The simulation is embedded within a larger simulator environment known as ICDS (Intelligent Controller Development System) operating on a Symbolics 3645/75 computer.

  12. Hydraulically interconnected vehicle suspension: handling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Wade A.; Zhang, Nong; Hu, William

    2011-02-01

    This paper extends recent research on vehicles with hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) systems. Such suspension schemes have received considerable attention in the research community over the last few years. This is due, in part, to their reported ability to provide stiffness and damping rates dependent on the suspension mode of operation (i.e. the bounce, roll, pitch or articulation of the unsprung masses relative to the sprung mass), rather than relying on the stiffness and damping characteristics of the single wheel stations. The paper uses a nine-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) vehicle model and simulations of a fishhook manoeuvre to assess the handling performance of a vehicle when it is fitted with: (a) a conventional independent suspension, and (b) an HIS. In the case of the latter, the fluid subsystem is modelled using a nonlinear finite-element approach, resulting in a set of coupled, first-order nonlinear differential equations, which describe the dynamics of the integrated mechanical-hydraulic vehicle system. The simulation results indicate that, in general, the HIS-equipped vehicle possesses superior handling, as measured by the sprung mass roll angle, roll rate, roll acceleration, lateral acceleration and the vehicle's Rollover Critical Factor. The potential effects of the suspension set-up on ride performance are also considered by studying the transient response when one side of the vehicle traverses a half-sine bump. The obtained results are then discussed, and it is shown that they are consistent with previous findings, both by the authors and other researchers. The presented work outlines an alternative approach for studying the dynamics of HIS-equipped vehicles, particularly suited to analyses in the time domain.

  13. GENERAL: The effect of ACC vehicles to mixed traffic flow consisting of manual and ACC vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dong-Fan; Gao, Zi-You; Zhao, Xiao-Mei

    2008-12-01

    This paper studies the effect of adaptive cruise control (ACC) system on traffic flow by using simulations. The multiple headway and velocity direrence (MHVD) model is used to depict the motion of ACC vehicles, and the simulation results are compared with the optimal velocity (OV) model which is used to depict the motion of manual vehicles. Compared the cases between the manual and the ACC vehicle flow, the fundamental diagram can be classified into four regions: I, II, III, IV. In low and high density the flux of the two models is the same; in region II the free flow region of the MHVD model is enlarged, and the flux of the MHVD model is larger than that of the OV model; in region III serious jams occur in the OV model while the ACC system suppresses the jams in the MHVD model and the traffic flow is in order, but the flux of the OV model is larger than that of the MHVD model. Similar phenomena also appeared in mixed traffic flow which consists of manual and ACC vehicles. The results indicate that ACC vehicles have significant effect on traffic flow. The improvement induced by ACC vehicles decreases with the increasing proportion of ACC vehicles.

  14. Automatic vehicle location system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automatic vehicle detection system is disclosed, in which each vehicle whose location is to be detected carries active means which interact with passive elements at each location to be identified. The passive elements comprise a plurality of passive loops arranged in a sequence along the travel direction. Each of the loops is tuned to a chosen frequency so that the sequence of the frequencies defines the location code. As the vehicle traverses the sequence of the loops as it passes over each loop, signals only at the frequency of the loop being passed over are coupled from a vehicle transmitter to a vehicle receiver. The frequencies of the received signals in the receiver produce outputs which together represent a code of the traversed location. The code location is defined by a painted pattern which reflects light to a vehicle carried detector whose output is used to derive the code defined by the pattern.

  15. Vehicle underbody fairing

    DOEpatents

    Ortega, Jason M.; Salari, Kambiz; McCallen, Rose

    2010-11-09

    A vehicle underbody fairing apparatus for reducing aerodynamic drag caused by a vehicle wheel assembly, by reducing the size of a recirculation zone formed under the vehicle body immediately downstream of the vehicle wheel assembly. The fairing body has a tapered aerodynamic surface that extends from a front end to a rear end of the fairing body with a substantially U-shaped cross-section that tapers in both height and width. Fasteners or other mounting devices secure the fairing body to an underside surface of the vehicle body, so that the front end is immediately downstream of the vehicle wheel assembly and a bottom section of the tapered aerodynamic surface rises towards the underside surface as it extends in a downstream direction.

  16. TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-30

    TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics Mr. Jim Parker, Associate Director Dr. Greg Hudas, Chief Engineer UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A (OPSEC...TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jim Parker; Greg Hudas 5d. PROJECT...Provide Transition-Ready, Cost-Effective, and Innovative Robotics and Control System Solutions for Manned, Optionally-Manned, and Unmanned Ground Vehicles

  17. Ground Vehicle Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-20

    Ground Vehicle Robotics Jim Parker Associate Director, Ground Vehicle Robotics UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...DATE 20 AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED 09-05-2013 to 15-08-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a...Willing to take Risk on technology -User Evaluated -Contested Environments -Operational Data Applied Robotics for Installation & Base Ops -Low Risk

  18. Skip trajectory flight of a ramjet-powered hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, V. M.; Aulchenko, S. M.; Zvegintsev, V. I.

    2010-07-01

    Possible skip trajectories of a flying vehicle with a periodically actuated ramjet are numerically simulated. An optimal choice of ramjet actuation areas and duration is demonstrated to ensure the maximum flight range with a given amount of the fuel. The main advantage of skip trajectories is found to be a significant (by an order of magnitude) decrease in thermal loads on the flying vehicle.

  19. Robust lateral control of highway vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.; Abdallah, C.

    1994-08-01

    Vehicle lateral dynamics are affected by vehicle mass, longitudinal velocity, vehicle inertia, and the cornering stiffness of the tires. All of these parameters are subject to variation, even over the course of a single trip. Therefore, a practical lateral control system must guarantee stability, and hopefully ride comfort, over a wide range of parameter changes. This paper describes a robust controller which theoretically guarantees stability over a wide range of parameter changes. The robust controller is designed using a frequency domain transfer function approach. An uncertainty band in the frequency domain is determined using simulations over the range of expected parameter variations. Based on this bound, a robust controller is designed by solving the Nevanlinna-Pick interpolation problem. The performance of the robust controller is then evaluated over the range of parameter variations through simulations.

  20. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    In this 1965 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) number 1 is shown in flight. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs, gave the pilot control in pitch, yaw, and roll. On the

  1. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    In this 1965 NASA Flight Reserch Center photograph the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) is shown at near maximum altitude over the south base at Edwards Air Force Base. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal translations. Sixteen smaller hydrogen-peroxide rockets, mounted in pairs

  2. Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    An inflight view from the left side of the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle, is shown in this 1964 NASA Flight Research Center photograph. The photograph was taken in front of the old NACA hangar located at the South Base, Edwards Air Force Base. When Apollo planning was underway in 1960, NASA was looking for a simulator to profile the descent to the moon's surface. Three concepts surfaced: an electronic simulator, a tethered device, and the ambitious Dryden contribution, a free-flying vehicle. All three became serious projects, but eventually the NASA Flight Research Center's (FRC) Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) became the most significant one. Hubert M. Drake is credited with originating the idea, while Donald Bellman and Gene Matranga were senior engineers on the project, with Bellman, the project manager. Simultaneously, and independently, Bell Aerosystems Company, Buffalo, N.Y., a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, had conceived a similar free-flying simulator and proposed their concept to NASA headquarters. NASA Headquarters put FRC and Bell together to collaborate. The challenge was; to allow a pilot to make a vertical landing on earth in a simulated moon environment, one sixth of the earth's gravity and with totally transparent aerodynamic forces in a 'free flight' vehicle with no tether forces acting on it. Built of tubular aluminum like a giant four-legged bedstead, the vehicle was to simulate a lunar landing profile from around 1500 feet to the moon's surface. To do this, the LLRV had a General Electric CF-700-2V turbofan engine mounted vertically in gimbals, with 4200 pounds of thrust. The engine, using JP-4 fuel, got the vehicle up to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen-peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 pounds handled the LLRV's rate of descent and horizontal

  3. Railway vehicle body structures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The strength and durability of railway vehicle structures is a major topic of engineering research and design. To reflect this importance the Railway Division of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers organised a conference to discuss all matters relating to railway vehicle design. This book presents the papers discussed in that conference. The contents include: Vehicle body design and the UIC's international contribution; LUL prototype 1986 stock - body structure; vehicle structure for the intermediate capacity transmit system vehicles; car body technology of advanced light rapid transit vehicles; concepts, techniques and experience in the idealization of car body structures for finite element analysis; Calcutta metropolitan railway; design for a lightweight diesel multiple unit body; the design of lightweight inter-city coal structures; the BREL international coach body shell structure; new concepts and design techniques versus material standards; structures of BR diesel electric freight locomotives; structural design philosophy for electric locomotives; suspension design for a locomotive with low structural frequencies; freight wagon structures; a finite element study of coal bodyside panels including the effects of joint flexibility; a fresh approach to the problem of car body design strength; energy absorption in automatic couplings and draw gear; passenger vehicle design loads and structural crashworthiness; design of the front part of railway vehicles (in case of frontal impact); the development of a theoretical technique for rail vehicle structural crashworthiness.

  4. Electric vehicle propulsion alternatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, R. R.; Schuh, R. M.; Beach, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Propulsion technology development for electric vehicles is summarized. Analytical studies, technology evaluation, and the development of technology for motors, controllers, transmissions, and complete propulsion systems are included.

  5. Modeling Languages Refine Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Cincinnati, Ohio s TechnoSoft Inc. is a leading provider of object-oriented modeling and simulation technology used for commercial and defense applications. With funding from Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts issued by Langley Research Center, the company continued development on its adaptive modeling language, or AML, originally created for the U.S. Air Force. TechnoSoft then created what is now known as its Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis Environment, or IDEA, which can be used to design a variety of vehicles and machinery. IDEA's customers include clients in green industries, such as designers for power plant exhaust filtration systems and wind turbines.

  6. ADOPT: A Historically Validated Light Duty Vehicle Consumer Choice Model

    SciTech Connect

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Lopp, S.; Ward, J.

    2015-05-04

    The Automotive Deployment Option Projection Tool (ADOPT) is a light-duty vehicle consumer choice and stock model supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. It estimates technology improvement impacts on U.S. light-duty vehicles sales, petroleum use, and greenhouse gas emissions. ADOPT uses techniques from the multinomial logit method and the mixed logit method estimate sales. Specifically, it estimates sales based on the weighted value of key attributes including vehicle price, fuel cost, acceleration, range and usable volume. The average importance of several attributes changes nonlinearly across its range and changes with income. For several attributes, a distribution of importance around the average value is used to represent consumer heterogeneity. The majority of existing vehicle makes, models, and trims are included to fully represent the market. The Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations are enforced. The sales feed into the ADOPT stock model. It captures key aspects for summing petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions This includes capturing the change in vehicle miles traveled by vehicle age, the creation of new model options based on the success of existing vehicles, new vehicle option introduction rate limits, and survival rates by vehicle age. ADOPT has been extensively validated with historical sales data. It matches in key dimensions including sales by fuel economy, acceleration, price, vehicle size class, and powertrain across multiple years. A graphical user interface provides easy and efficient use. It manages the inputs, simulation, and results.

  7. Optimization Of Simulated Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauer, Garry L.; Olson, David W.; Stevenson, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Program To Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) provides ability to target and optimize trajectories of point-mass powered or unpowered vehicle operating at or near rotating planet. Used successfully to solve wide variety of problems in mechanics of atmospheric flight and transfer between orbits. Generality of program demonstrated by its capability to simulate up to 900 distinct trajectory phases, including generalized models of planets and vehicles. VAX version written in FORTRAN 77 and CDC version in FORTRAN V.

  8. Multilevel Vehicle Design: Fuel Economy, Mobility and Safety Considerations, Part B. Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-11

    TNT - equivalent ) UNCLASSIFIED 8 Uncertainty in Charge Size & Location Underbody Blast Simulation Uncertainty in Vehicle Peak Acceleration Drop Tower...for Protection of Vehicle Occupants against Anti-Vehicular Landmine Effects.” North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, Neuilly-sur-Seine Cedex, France

  9. The Consistent Vehicle Routing Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Groer, Christopher S; Golden, Bruce; Edward, Wasil

    2009-01-01

    In the small package shipping industry (as in other industries), companies try to differentiate themselves by providing high levels of customer service. This can be accomplished in several ways, including online tracking of packages, ensuring on-time delivery, and offering residential pickups. Some companies want their drivers to develop relationships with customers on a route and have the same drivers visit the same customers at roughly the same time on each day that the customers need service. These service requirements, together with traditional constraints on vehicle capacity and route length, define a variant of the classical capacitated vehicle routing problem, which we call the consistent VRP (ConVRP). In this paper, we formulate the problem as a mixed-integer program and develop an algorithm to solve the ConVRP that is based on the record-to-record travel algorithm. We compare the performance of our algorithm to the optimal mixed-integer program solutions for a set of small problems and then apply our algorithm to five simulated data sets with 1,000 customers and a real-world data set with more than 3,700 customers. We provide a technique for generating ConVRP benchmark problems from vehicle routing problem instances given in the literature and provide our solutions to these instances. The solutions produced by our algorithm on all problems do a very good job of meeting customer service objectives with routes that have a low total travel time.

  10. A range extender hybrid electric vehicle dynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, B.K.; Pilutti, T.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a dynamic model possessing the key system components of a Range Extender Hybrid Electric Vehicle. The model is suitable for dynamic analysis, control law synthesis, and prototype simulation.

  11. Integrated development process for automated or driver-assist vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges de Sousa, Joao; Misener, James A.; Sengupta, Raja

    2002-07-01

    We describe the methodology, tools and technologies for designing and implementing communication and control systems for networked automated or driver assist vehicles. In addressing design, we discuss enabling methodologies and our suite of enabling computational tools for formal modeling, simulation, and implementation. We illustrate our description with design, development and implementation work we have performed for Automated Highway Systems, Autonomous Underwater Vehicles, Mobile Offshore Base, Unmanned Air Vehicles, and Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control. We conclude with the assertion - borne from our experience - that ground vehicle systems with any degree of automated operation could benefit from the type of integrated development process that we describe.

  12. Human Factors Vehicle Displacement Analysis: Engineering In Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, Laura Ashley; Reynolds, David; Robertson, Clay

    2010-01-01

    While positioned on the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center, tall stacked launch vehicles are exposed to the natural environment. Varying directional winds and vortex shedding causes the vehicle to sway in an oscillating motion. The Human Factors team recognizes that vehicle sway may hinder ground crew operation, impact the ground system designs, and ultimately affect launch availability . The objective of this study is to physically simulate predicted oscillation envelopes identified by analysis. and conduct a Human Factors Analysis to assess the ability to carry out essential Upper Stage (US) ground operator tasks based on predicted vehicle motion.

  13. Vehicle-network development on a communications-network testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapanotti, John L.

    2006-05-01

    Light armoured vehicles will rely on sensors, on-board computing and digital wireless communications to achieve improved performance and survivability. Constrained by low latency response to threats, individual vehicles will share sensory information with other platoon vehicles benefiting from a flexible, dynamic, self-adapting network environment. As sensor and computing capability increases, network communications will become saturated. To understand the operational requirements for these future vehicle networks, the High Capacity Technical Communications Network (HCTCN) Low Bandwidth Testbed (LBTB) has been developed to provide a simulated environment for the radios and candidate database and transmission protocols selected. These concepts and approach to network communications will be discussed in the paper.

  14. Automated and Cooperative Vehicle Merging at Highway On-Ramps

    SciTech Connect

    Rios-Torres, Jackeline; Malikopoulos, Andreas A.

    2016-08-05

    Recognition of necessities of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) is gaining momentum. CAVs can improve both transportation network efficiency and safety through control algorithms that can harmonically use all existing information to coordinate the vehicles. This paper addresses the problem of optimally coordinating CAVs at merging roadways to achieve smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. Here we present an optimization framework and an analytical closed-form solution that allows online coordination of vehicles at merging zones. The effectiveness of the efficiency of the proposed solution is validated through a simulation, and it is shown that coordination of vehicles can significantly reduce both fuel consumption and travel time.

  15. MOVES (MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSION SIMULATOR) MODEL ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A computer model, intended to eventually replace the MOBILE model and to incorporate the NONROAD model, that will provide the ability to estimate criteria and toxic air pollutant emission factors and emission inventories that are specific to the areas and time periods of interest, at scales ranging from local to national. Development of a new emission factor and inventory model for mobile source emissions. The model will be used by air pollution modelers within EPA, and at the State and local levels.

  16. Modeling hydraulic regenerative hybrid vehicles using AMESim and Matlab/Simulink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alfred; Smid, Edzko; Eshraghi, Moji; Caldwell, Niall; Woody, Dan

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the overview of the simulation modeling of a hydraulic system with regenerative braking used to improve vehicle emissions and fuel economy. Two simulation software packages were used together to enhance the simulation capability for fuel economy results and development of vehicle and hybrid control strategy. AMESim, a hydraulic simulation software package modeled the complex hydraulic circuit and component hardware and was interlinked with a Matlab/Simulink model of the vehicle, engine and the control strategy required to operate the vehicle and the hydraulic hybrid system through various North American and European drive cycles.

  17. Nuclear air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

  18. Electric Vehicle Battery Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    A serious drawback to electric vehicles [batteries only] is the idle time needed to recharge their batteries. In this challenge, students can develop ideas and concepts for battery change-out at automotive service stations. Such a capability would extend the range of electric vehicles.

  19. Vehicles for Outdoor Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The Wheelchair Motorcycle Association tests various motorized vehicles that might help the physically disabled child get about outdoors. Vehicles found to be practical for older children and adolescents include three-wheeled motorcycles and customized go-carts. An address for obtaining more information on the association is provided. (SW)

  20. Saturn IB Vehicle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This 1968 chart depicts the various mission configurations for the Saturn IB launch vehicle. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  1. Light Vehicle Preventive Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to instruct students in the performance of preventive maintenance on motor vehicles. Instructional materials are presented in three chapters as follows: (1) Major Maintenance Areas (maintenance system, tires, batteries, cooling systems, and vehicle lubrication; (2)…

  2. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper. 2 tabs.

  3. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment, and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  4. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  5. Steering Performance, Tactical Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-29

    the path of the vehicle is difficult to conu·ol which may lead to more aborted test u·ials than using driver-conu·olled steer inputs. Using a driver...reduces both the time required to prepare the vehicle and the probability of aborted u·ials. This allows more attempts to be made, but test results

  6. Intelligent Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Deidre E.; Trevino, Luis; Watson, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the overall goal of developing Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems for aerospace vehicles, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) at Marshall Space Flight Center has performed a pilot study on IVHM principals which integrates researched IVHM technologies in support of Integrated Intelligent Vehicle Management (IIVM). IVHM is the process of assessing, preserving, and restoring system functionality across flight and ground systems (NASA NGLT 2004). The framework presented in this paper integrates advanced computational techniques with sensor and communication technologies for spacecraft that can generate responses through detection, diagnosis, reasoning, and adapt to system faults in support of INM. These real-time responses allow the IIVM to modify the affected vehicle subsystem(s) prior to a catastrophic event. Furthermore, the objective of this pilot program is to develop and integrate technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce costs of operations. Recent investments in avionics, health management, and controls have been directed towards IIVM. As this concept has matured, it has become clear the INM requires the same sensors and processing capabilities as the real-time avionics functions to support diagnosis of subsystem problems. New sensors have been proposed, in addition, to augment the avionics sensors to support better system monitoring and diagnostics. As the designs have been considered, a synergy has been realized where the real-time avionics can utilize sensors proposed for diagnostics and prognostics to make better real-time decisions in response to detected failures. IIVM provides for a single system allowing modularity of functions and hardware across the vehicle. The framework that supports IIVM consists of 11 major on-board functions necessary to fully manage a space vehicle maintaining crew safety and mission

  7. Characterizing Epistemic Uncertainty for Launch Vehicle Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novack, Steven D.; Rogers, Jim; Hark, Frank; Al Hassan, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    NASA Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has the task of estimating the aleatory (randomness) and epistemic (lack of knowledge) uncertainty of launch vehicle loss of mission and crew risk and communicating the results. Launch vehicles are complex engineered systems designed with sophisticated subsystems that are built to work together to accomplish mission success. Some of these systems or subsystems are in the form of heritage equipment, while some have never been previously launched. For these cases, characterizing the epistemic uncertainty is of foremost importance, and it is anticipated that the epistemic uncertainty of a modified launch vehicle design versus a design of well understood heritage equipment would be greater. For reasons that will be discussed, standard uncertainty propagation methods using Monte Carlo simulation produce counter intuitive results and significantly underestimate epistemic uncertainty for launch vehicle models. Furthermore, standard PRA methods such as Uncertainty-Importance analyses used to identify components that are significant contributors to uncertainty are rendered obsolete since sensitivity to uncertainty changes are not reflected in propagation of uncertainty using Monte Carlo methods.This paper provides a basis of the uncertainty underestimation for complex systems and especially, due to nuances of launch vehicle logic, for launch vehicles. It then suggests several alternative methods for estimating uncertainty and provides examples of estimation results. Lastly, the paper shows how to implement an Uncertainty-Importance analysis using one alternative approach, describes the results, and suggests ways to reduce epistemic uncertainty by focusing on additional data or testing of selected components.

  8. Characterizing Epistemic Uncertainty for Launch Vehicle Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novack, Steven D.; Rogers, Jim; Al Hassan, Mohammad; Hark, Frank

    2016-01-01

    NASA Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has the task of estimating the aleatory (randomness) and epistemic (lack of knowledge) uncertainty of launch vehicle loss of mission and crew risk, and communicating the results. Launch vehicles are complex engineered systems designed with sophisticated subsystems that are built to work together to accomplish mission success. Some of these systems or subsystems are in the form of heritage equipment, while some have never been previously launched. For these cases, characterizing the epistemic uncertainty is of foremost importance, and it is anticipated that the epistemic uncertainty of a modified launch vehicle design versus a design of well understood heritage equipment would be greater. For reasons that will be discussed, standard uncertainty propagation methods using Monte Carlo simulation produce counter intuitive results, and significantly underestimate epistemic uncertainty for launch vehicle models. Furthermore, standard PRA methods, such as Uncertainty-Importance analyses used to identify components that are significant contributors to uncertainty, are rendered obsolete, since sensitivity to uncertainty changes are not reflected in propagation of uncertainty using Monte Carlo methods. This paper provides a basis of the uncertainty underestimation for complex systems and especially, due to nuances of launch vehicle logic, for launch vehicles. It then suggests several alternative methods for estimating uncertainty and provides examples of estimation results. Lastly, the paper describes how to implement an Uncertainty-Importance analysis using one alternative approach, describes the results, and suggests ways to reduce epistemic uncertainty by focusing on additional data or testing of selected components.

  9. Vehicle automation: a remedy for driver stress?

    PubMed

    Funke, G; Matthews, G; Warm, J S; Emo, A K

    2007-08-01

    The present study addressed the effects of stress, vehicle automation and subjective state on driver performance and mood in a simulated driving task. A total of 168 college students participated. Participants in the stress-induction condition completed a 'winter' drive, which included periodic loss of control episodes. Participants in the no-stress-induction condition were not exposed to loss of control. An additional, independent manipulation of vehicle speed was also conducted, consisting of two control conditions requiring manual speed regulation and a third in which vehicle speed was automatically regulated by the simulation. Stress and automation both influenced subjective distress, but the two factors did not interact. Driver performance data indicated that vehicle automation impacted performance similarly in the stress and no-stress conditions. Individual differences in subjective stress response and performance were also investigated. Resource theory provides a framework that partially but not completely explains the relationship between vehicle automation and driver stress. Implications for driver workload, safety and training are discussed.

  10. Lunar material transport vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Lyons, Douglas; Wilkins, W. Allen, Jr.; Whitehead, Harry C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed vehicle, the Lunar Material Transport Vehicle (LMTV), has a mission objective of efficient lunar soil material transport. The LMTV was designed to meet a required set of performance specifications while operating under a given set of constraints. The LMTV is essentially an articulated steering, double-ended dump truck. The vehicle moves on four wheels and has two identical chassis halves. Each half consists of a chassis frame, a material bucket, two wheels with integral curvilinear synchronous motors, a fuel cell and battery arrangement, an electromechanically actuated dumping mechanism, and a powerful microprocessor. The vehicle, as designed, is capable of transporting up to 200 cu ft of material over a one mile round trip per hour. The LMTV is capable of being operated from a variety of sources. The vehicle has been designed as simply as possible with attention also given to secondary usage of components.

  11. Automatic vehicle monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravman, J. S.; Durrani, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    Automatic vehicle monitoring systems are discussed. In a baseline system for highway applications, each vehicle obtains position information through a Loran-C receiver in rural areas and through a 'signpost' or 'proximity' type sensor in urban areas; the vehicle transmits this information to a central station via a communication link. In an advance system, the vehicle carries a receiver for signals emitted by satellites in the Global Positioning System and uses a satellite-aided communication link to the central station. An advanced railroad car monitoring system uses car-mounted labels and sensors for car identification and cargo status; the information is collected by electronic interrogators mounted along the track and transmitted to a central station. It is concluded that automatic vehicle monitoring systems are technically feasible but not economically feasible unless a large market develops.

  12. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    SciTech Connect

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  13. Vehicle body cover

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, T.

    1987-01-13

    This patent describes a vehicle body covered with a vehicle body cover which comprises: a front cover part, a rear cover part, a pair of side cover parts, and a roof cover part: the front cover part having portions adapted to cover only a hood, an area around a windshield and tops of front fenders of a vehicle body. The portion covering the hood is separated from the portions covering the tops of the fenders by cuts in the front cover part, the front cover part having an un-cut portion corresponding to a position at which the hood is hinged to the car body. The front cover part has a cut-out at a position corresponding to the windshield of the vehicle body and the front cover part has at least one cut-out at a position corresponding to where a rear view mirror is attached to the vehicle body; and the rear cover part having portions adapted to cover an area around a rear window, a trunk lid and a rear end of the vehicle body, the portion covering the trunk lid separated from the rest of the rear cover part by cuts corresponding to three sides of the trunk lid and an un-cut portion corresponding to a position at which the trunk lid is hinged to the vehicle body. The rear cover part has a hole at position corresponding to a trunk lid lock, a cut-out portion at a position corresponding to the rear window of the vehicle body, a cut-out at a position corresponding to a license plate of the vehicle body and cut-outs at positions corresponding to rear taillights of the vehicle body.

  14. Apparatus and method for modifying the operation of a robotic vehicle in a real environment, to emulate the operation of the robotic vehicle operating in a mixed reality environment

    DOEpatents

    Garretson, Justin R [Albuquerque, NM; Parker, Eric P [Albuquerque, NM; Gladwell, T Scott [Albuquerque, NM; Rigdon, J Brian [Edgewood, NM; Oppel, III, Fred J.

    2012-05-29

    Apparatus and methods for modifying the operation of a robotic vehicle in a real environment to emulate the operation of the robotic vehicle in a mixed reality environment include a vehicle sensing system having a communications module attached to the robotic vehicle for communicating operating parameters related to the robotic vehicle in a real environment to a simulation controller for simulating the operation of the robotic vehicle in a mixed (live, virtual and constructive) environment wherein the affects of virtual and constructive entities on the operation of the robotic vehicle (and vice versa) are simulated. These effects are communicated to the vehicle sensing system which generates a modified control command for the robotic vehicle including the effects of virtual and constructive entities, causing the robot in the real environment to behave as if virtual and constructive entities existed in the real environment.

  15. Interaction of railway vehicles with track in cross-winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. L.; Ding, Q. S.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a framework for simulating railway vehicle and track interaction in cross-wind. Each 4-axle vehicle in a train is modeled by a 27-degree-of-freedom dynamic system. Two parallel rails of a track are modeled as two continuous beams supported by a discrete-elastic foundation of three layers with sleepers and ballasts included. The vehicle subsystem and the track subsystem are coupled through contacts between wheels and rails based on contact theory. Vertical and lateral rail irregularities simulated using an inverse Fourier transform are also taken into consideration. The simulation of steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces on a moving railway vehicle in cross-wind is then discussed in the time domain. The Hilber Hughes Taylor α-method is employed to solve the nonlinear equations of motion of coupled vehicle and track systems in cross-wind. The proposed framework is finally applied to a railway vehicle running on a straight track substructure in cross-wind. The safety and comfort performance of the moving vehicle in cross-wind are discussed. The results demonstrate that the proposed framework and the associated computer program can be used to investigate interaction problems of railway vehicles with track in cross-wind.

  16. Particulate Matter Speciation Profiles for Light-duty Gasoline Vehicles in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Representative particulate matter (PM2.5) profiles for particles less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers are estimated from the Kansas City Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions Study for use in the US EPA’s vehicle emission model, the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES). The profiles ...

  17. FASTSim: A Model to Estimate Vehicle Efficiency, Cost and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Wang, L.; Wood, E.; Lopp, S.; Ramroth, L.

    2015-05-04

    The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is a high-level advanced vehicle powertrain systems analysis tool supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. FASTSim provides a quick and simple approach to compare powertrains and estimate the impact of technology improvements on light- and heavy-duty vehicle efficiency, performance, cost, and battery batches of real-world drive cycles. FASTSim’s calculation framework and balance among detail, accuracy, and speed enable it to simulate thousands of driven miles in minutes. The key components and vehicle outputs have been validated by comparing the model outputs to test data for many different vehicles to provide confidence in the results. A graphical user interface makes FASTSim easy and efficient to use. FASTSim is freely available for download from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s website (see www.nrel.gov/fastsim).

  18. Performance testing of the AC propulsion ELX electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.E.; MacDowall, R.D.; Burke, A.F.

    1994-06-01

    Performance testing of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle is described. Test data are presented and analyzed. The ELX vehicle is the first of a series of electric vehicles of interest to the California Air Resources Board. The test series is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of energy and the California Air Resources Board. The tests which were conducted showed that the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle has exceptional acceleration and range performance. when the vehicle`s battery was fully charged, the vehicle can accelerate from 0 to 96 km/h in about 10 seconds. Energy consumption and range tests using consecutive FUDS and HWFET Driving cycles (the all-electric cycle) indicate that the energy economy of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle with regenerative braking is 97 W{center_dot}h/km, with a range of 153 km (95 miles). Computer simulations performed using the SIMPLEV Program indicate that the vehicle would have a range of 327 km (203 miles) on the all-electric cycle if the lead acid batteries were replaced with NiMH batteries having an energy density of 67 W{center_dot}h/kg. Comparisons of FUDS test data with and without regenerative braking indicated that regenerative braking reduced the energy consumption of the ELX vehicle by approximately 25%.

  19. Graphical Analysis of Mars Vehicle Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Kevin

    1990-01-01

    The task assigned to the Mission Planning and Analysis Division for FY89 was to produce a video tape depicting the assembly of a Mars Piloted Vehicle at a man tended vehicle assembly platform, co-orbiting with Space Station Freedom. This request was made by the Transportation Node Integration Agent of the Lunar/Mars Exploration Office. Along with the request, a data package was provided which contained the latest technical briefings by the Transportation Node and Space Transportation Integration Agents. This information was used as the basis of a conceptual study performed using kinematic manipulator simulations.

  20. Parametric Testing of Launch Vehicle FDDR Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Bajwa, Anupa; Berg, Peter; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    For the safe operation of a complex system like a (manned) launch vehicle, real-time information about the state of the system and potential faults is extremely important. The on-board FDDR (Failure Detection, Diagnostics, and Response) system is a software system to detect and identify failures, provide real-time diagnostics, and to initiate fault recovery and mitigation. The ERIS (Evaluation of Rocket Integrated Subsystems) failure simulation is a unified Matlab/Simulink model of the Ares I Launch Vehicle with modular, hierarchical subsystems and components. With this model, the nominal flight performance characteristics can be studied. Additionally, failures can be injected to see their effects on vehicle state and on vehicle behavior. A comprehensive test and analysis of such a complicated model is virtually impossible. In this paper, we will describe, how parametric testing (PT) can be used to support testing and analysis of the ERIS failure simulation. PT uses a combination of Monte Carlo techniques with n-factor combinatorial exploration to generate a small, yet comprehensive set of parameters for the test runs. For the analysis of the high-dimensional simulation data, we are using multivariate clustering to automatically find structure in this high-dimensional data space. Our tools can generate detailed HTML reports that facilitate the analysis.

  1. Mars manned transportation vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Faymon, Karl A.

    1987-01-01

    A viable power system technology for a surface transportation vehicle to explore the planet Mars is presented. A number of power traction systems were investigated, and it was found that a regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell appears to be attractive for a manned Mars rover application. Mission requirements were obtained from the Manned Mars Mission Working Group. Power systems weights, power, and reactants requirements were determined as a function of vehicle weights for vehicles weighing from 6,000 to 16,000 lb (2,722 to 7,257 kg), (Earth weight). The vehicle performance requirements were: velocity, 10 km/hr; range, 100 km; slope climbing capability, 30 deg uphill for 50 km; mission duration, 5 days; and crew, 5. Power requirements for the operation of scientific equipment and support system capabilities were also specified and included in this study. The concept developed here would also be applicable to a Lunar based vehicle for Lunar exploration. The reduced gravity on the Lunar surface, (over that on the Martian surface), would result in an increased range or capability over that of the Mars vehicle since many of the power and energy requirements for the vehicle are gravity dependent.

  2. Mars manned transportation vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Faymon, K.A.

    1987-07-01

    A viable power system technology for a surface transportation vehicle to explore the planet Mars is presented. A number of power traction systems were investigated, and it was found that a regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell appears to be attractive for a manned Mars rover application. Mission requirements were obtained from the Manned Mars Mission Working Group. Power systems weights, power, and reactants requirements were determined as a function of vehicle weights for vehicles weighing from 6,000 to 16,000 lb (2,722 to 7,257 kg), (Earth weight). The vehicle performance requirements were: velocity, 10 km/hr; range, 100 km; slope climbing capability, 30 deg uphill for 50 km; mission duration, 5 days; and crew, 5. Power requirements for the operation of scientific equipment and support system capabilities were also specified and included in this study. The concept developed here would also be applicable to a Lunar based vehicle for Lunar exploration. The reduced gravity on the Lunar surface, (over that on the Martian surface), would result in an increased range or capability over that of the Mars vehicle since many of the power and energy requirements for the vehicle are gravity dependent.

  3. Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Various NASA Small Business Innovation Research grants from Marshall Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center and Ames Research Center were used to develop the 'kernel' of COMCO's modeling and simulation software, the PHLEX finite element code. NASA needed it to model designs of flight vehicles; one of many customized commercial applications is UNISIM, a PHLEX-based code for analyzing underground flows in oil reservoirs for Texaco, Inc. COMCO's products simulate a computational mechanics problem, estimate the solution's error and produce the optimal hp-adapted mesh for the accuracy the user chooses. The system is also used as a research or training tool in universities and in mechanical design in industrial corporations.

  4. Phase transition in a mixture of adaptive cruise control vehicles and manual vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, R.; Hu, M.-B.; Jia, B.; Wang, R.; Wu, Q.-S.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effects of adaptive cruise control (ACC) vehicles in a mixture with manually-controlled (manual) vehicles. The manual vehicles are simulated by using the modified comfortable driving model, which can describe synchronized traffic flow. The phase transition probabilities from free flow to synchronized flow and from synchronized flow to jams are studied. The impact of ACC vehicles on the flow rates in free flow and synchronized flow and on the propagation velocity of the downstream front of jams are investigated. The dependence of microscopic properties of traffic flow, including the spatiotemporal patterns and the velocity distribution, is explored. Our results are expected to be useful for developing ACC systems.

  5. Assured crew return vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerimele, Christopher J. (Inventor); Ried, Robert C. (Inventor); Peterson, Wayne L. (Inventor); Zupp, George A., Jr. (Inventor); Stagnaro, Michael J. (Inventor); Ross, Brian P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A return vehicle is disclosed for use in returning a crew to Earth from low earth orbit in a safe and relatively cost effective manner. The return vehicle comprises a cylindrically-shaped crew compartment attached to the large diameter of a conical heat shield having a spherically rounded nose. On-board inertial navigation and cold gas control systems are used together with a de-orbit propulsion system to effect a landing near a preferred site on the surface of the Earth. State vectors and attitude data are loaded from the attached orbiting craft just prior to separation of the return vehicle.

  6. Blast resistant vehicle seat

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B

    2013-02-12

    Disclosed are various seats for vehicles particularly military vehicles that are susceptible to attack by road-bed explosive devices such as land mines or improvised explosive devices. The seats often have rigid seat shells and may include rigid bracing for rigidly securing the seat to the chassis of the vehicle. Typically embodiments include channels and particulate media such as sand disposed in the channels. A gas distribution system is generally employed to pump a gas through the channels and in some embodiments the gas is provided at a pressure sufficient to fluidize the particulate media when an occupant is sitting on the seat.

  7. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  8. VEEP - Vehicle Economy, Emissions, and Performance program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimburger, D. A.; Metcalfe, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    VEEP is a general-purpose discrete event simulation program being developed to study the performance, fuel economy, and exhaust emissions of a vehicle modeled as a collection of its separate components. It is written in SIMSCRIPT II.5. The purpose of this paper is to present the design methodology, describe the simulation model and its components, and summarize the preliminary results. Topics include chief programmer team concepts, the SDDL design language, program portability, user-oriented design, the program's user command syntax, the simulation procedure, and model validation.

  9. Transient Magnetic Fields and Current Distributions in an Electric Vehicle Caused by a Lightning Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Kanata, Jun; Ametani, Akihiro

    An electric vehicle includes more electronic parts than a gasoline-powered vehicle. Not only control but also driving circuits of electric vehicles are electrical at variance with those of gasoline-powered vehicles. It means that there is higher possibility of malfunctions on an electric vehicle due to electromagnetic disturbances caused by a lightning stroke. Therefore, it is important to establish lightning protection methodologies for electric vehicles. To solve the mechanisms that the lightning current following through the vehicle body and some other parts causes the malfunctions, it is important to clarify transient magnetic fields and current distributions in electric vehicles. In this paper, the transient magnetic fields and the current distributions in an electric vehicle are simulated using the FDTD method, and the probability of lightning damages is discussed.

  10. Motor Vehicle Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... these crashes is one part of motor vehicle safety. Here are some things you can do to ... speed or drive aggressively Don't drive impaired Safety also involves being aware of others. Share the ...

  11. Space Vehicle Valve System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Lindner, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a space vehicle valve system which controls the internal pressure of a space vehicle and the flow rate of purged gases at a given internal pressure and aperture site. A plurality of quasi-unique variable dimension peaked valve structures cover the purge apertures on a space vehicle. Interchangeable sheet guards configured to cover valve apertures on the peaked valve structure contain a pressure-activated surface on the inner surface. Sheet guards move outwardly from the peaked valve structure when in structural contact with a purge gas stream flowing through the apertures on the space vehicle. Changing the properties of the sheet guards changes the response of the sheet guards at a given internal pressure, providing control of the flow rate at a given aperture site.

  12. Experimental Semiautonomous Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Mishkin, Andrew H.; Litwin, Todd E.; Matthies, Larry H.; Cooper, Brian K.; Nguyen, Tam T.; Gat, Erann; Gennery, Donald B.; Firby, Robert J.; Miller, David P.; Loch, John L.; Slack, Marc G.

    1993-01-01

    Semiautonomous rover vehicle serves as testbed for evaluation of navigation and obstacle-avoidance techniques. Designed to traverse variety of terrains. Concepts developed applicable to robots for service in dangerous environments as well as to robots for exploration of remote planets. Called Robby, vehicle 4 m long and 2 m wide, with six 1-m-diameter wheels. Mass of 1,200 kg and surmounts obstacles as large as 1 1/2 m. Optimized for development of machine-vision-based strategies and equipped with complement of vision and direction sensors and image-processing computers. Front and rear cabs steer and roll with respect to centerline of vehicle. Vehicle also pivots about central axle, so wheels comply with almost any terrain.

  13. Vehicle speed control device

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Trump, W.E.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is described for automatically limiting the speed of a vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine having a spark ignition system with an ignition coil, comprising: sensor means for generating a speed signal directly representative of the speed of the vehicle comprising a series of speed signal pulses having a pulse repetition frequency proportional to the speed of the vehicle; control means for converting speed signal pulses into a DC voltage proportional to the vehicle speed; means for comparing the DC voltage to a predetermined DC voltage having substantially zero AC components representative of a predetermined maximum speed and for generating a difference signal in response thereto; and means for generating a pulse-width modulated control signal responsive to the difference signal; power means responsive to the control signal for intermittently interrupting the ignition system.

  14. New Mars vehicle concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1993-02-01

    The paper briefly reviews the evolution of the Mars vehicle design concepts from 1952 to 1990, and the currently understood requirements, constraints, and options for manned Mars missions in the early decades of the 21st century. The most up-to-date integrated Mars vehicle concepts for crew-carrying transfer and excursion vehicles are presented together with the Mars descent-ascent mission phases. Particular attention is given to a reusable transfer ship, which is a modular vehicle launched to earth orbit on six 185 t-class boosters and assembled there robotically; it uses dual nuclear-thermal rocket engines and liquid hydrogen propellant. The lander concept is capable of supporting many kinds of surface missions anywhere on Mars.

  15. Light Duty Vehicle Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View a fact sheet on how the Final Endangerment Finding will allow EPA to finalize the first greenhouse gas standards for new light-duty vehicles as part of the joint rulemaking with the Department of Transportation.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Program Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-06-19

    The Vehicle Technologies Program takes a systematic approach to Program implementation. Elements of this approach include the evaluation of new technologies, competitive selection of projects and partners, review of Program and project improvement, project tracking, and portfolio management and adjustment.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-09-05

    Overview of the Vehicle Technologies Program including external assessment and market view; internal assessment, program history and progress; program justification and federal role; program vision, mission, approach, strategic goals, outputs, and outcomes; and performance goals.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Program Planning

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-19

    The Vehicle Technologies Program’s strategic goal is to develop sustainable, cost-competitive technologies to reduce U.S. dependence on petroleum, increase fuel efficiency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve the Nation's energy security.

  19. Hybrid vehicle control

    DOEpatents

    Shallvari, Iva; Velnati, Sashidhar; DeGroot, Kenneth P.

    2015-07-28

    A method and apparatus for heating a catalytic converter's catalyst to an efficient operating temperature in a hybrid electric vehicle when the vehicle is in a charge limited mode such as e.g., the charge depleting mode or when the vehicle's high voltage battery is otherwise charge limited. The method and apparatus determine whether a high voltage battery of the vehicle is incapable of accepting a first amount of charge associated with a first procedure to warm-up the catalyst. If it is determined that the high voltage battery is incapable of accepting the first amount of charge, a second procedure with an acceptable amount of charge is performed to warm-up the catalyst.

  20. Potential of spark ignition engine, effect of vehicle design variables on top speed, performance, and fuel economy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zub, R.W.; Neckyfarow, C.M.; Lew, W.M.; Colello, R.G.

    1980-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the effect of vehicle characteristics on vehicle performance and fuel economy. The studies were performed using the VEHSIM (vehicle simulation) program at the Transportation Systems Center. The computer simulation offers repeatability and can predict minute changes in fuel economy based on relatively small vehicle alterations. The degree to which each vehicle parameter is modified is based upon projections presented in current literature. The results are assessed and an explanation of the interaction of the vehicle design characteristics on performance is presented.