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Sample records for 35-mev helium ions

  1. Radioactive Ions and Atoms in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendooven, P.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.; ńystö, J.; Takahashi, N.; Huang, W. X.

    2006-04-01

    We are investigating the use of superfluid helium as a medium to handle and manipulate radioactive ions and atoms. Preliminary results on the extraction of positive ions from superfluid helium at temperatures close to 1 K are described. Increasing the electric field up to 1.2 kV/cm did not improve the extraction. Evaporating a thin surface layer of the liquid using second-sound pulses gave an extraction efficiency of 7.2 %.

  2. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  3. Helium-ion-induced human cataractogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, E. A.; Daftari, I. K.; Meecham, W. J.; Alonso, L. C.; Collier, J. M.; Kroll, S. M.; Gillette, E. L.; Lee, A. C.; Lett, J. T.; Cox, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    Retrospective and ongoing analyses of clinical records from 347 primary intraocular melanoman patients treated with helium ions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) will allow examination of the exposure-response data for human cataract; which is a complication of the therapy from incidental exposure of the lens. Direct particle beam traversal of at least a portion of the lens usually is unavoidable in treatment of posterior intraocular tumors. The precise treatment planned for each patient permits quantitative assessment of the lenticular dose and its radiation quality. We are reporting our preliminary results on the development of helium-ion-induced lens opacifications and cataracts in 54 of these patients who had 10% or less of their lens in the treatment field. We believe these studies will be relevant to estimating the human risk for cataract in space flight.

  4. Transport and extraction of radioactive ions stopped in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. X.; Dendooven, P.; Gloos, K.; Takahashi, N.; Arutyunov, K.; Pekola, J. P.; Äystö, J.

    2003-05-01

    A new approach to convert a high energy beam to a low energy one, which is essential for the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities, has been proposed and tested at Jyväskylä, Finland. An open 223Ra alpha-decay-recoil source has been used to produce radioactive ions in superfluid helium. The alpha spectra demonstrate that the recoiling 219Rn ions have been extracted out of liquid helium. This first observation of the extraction of heavy positive ions across the superfluid helium surface was possible thanks to the high sensitivity of radioactivity detection. An efficiency of 36% was obtained for the ion extraction out of liquid helium.

  5. Ionoluminescence in the helium ion microscope.

    PubMed

    Boden, Stuart A; Franklin, Thomas M W; Scipioni, Larry; Bagnall, Darren M; Rutt, Harvey N

    2012-12-01

    Ionoluminescence (IL) is the emission of light from a material due to excitation by an ion beam. In this work, a helium ion microscope (HIM) has been used in conjunction with a luminescence detection system to characterize IL from materials in an analogous way to how cathodoluminescence (CL) is characterized in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A survey of the helium ion beam induced IL characteristics, including images and spectra, of a variety of materials known to exhibit CL in an SEM is presented. Direct band-gap semiconductors that luminesce strongly in the SEM are found not do so in the HIM, possibly due to defect-related nonradiative pathways created by the ion beam. Other materials do, however, exhibit IL, including a cerium-doped garnet sample, quantum dots, and rare-earth doped LaPO4 nanocrystals. These emissions are a result of transitions between f electron states or transitions across size dependent band gaps. In all these samples, IL is found to decay with exposure to the beam, fitting well to double exponential functions. In an exploration of the potential of this technique for biological tagging applications, imaging with the IL emitted by rare-earth doped LaPO4 nanocrystals, simultaneously with secondary electron imaging, is demonstrated at a range of magnifications.

  6. Ion Beam Scattering by Background Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillet, Anne; Hughes, Thomas; Boerner, Jeremiah

    2015-11-01

    The presence of background gases can cause charged particle beams to become more diffuse due to scattering. Calculations for the transport of an ion beam have been performed using Aleph, a particle-in-cell plasma modeling code, and verified against a general envelop equation for charged particle beams. We have investigated the influence of background helium on the coherence and transmitted current of the ion beam. Collisions between ions and neutral particles were calculated assuming isotropic elastic scattering. Since this tends to predict larger scattering angles than are expected at high energies, these are conservative estimates for beam scattering. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  7. Quantum entanglement in helium-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-C.; Ho, Y. K.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, there have been considerable interests to investigate quantum entanglement in two-electron atoms [1-3]. Here we investigate quantum entanglement for the ground and excited states of helium-like ions using correlated wave functions, concentrating on the particle-particle entanglement coming from the continuous spatial degrees of freedom. We use the two-electron wave functions constructed by employing B-spline basis to calculate the linear entropy of the reduced density matrix L=1-TrA(ρA^2 ) as a measure of the spatial entanglement. HereρA=TrB(| >AB AB<|) is the one-electron reduced density matrix obtained after tracing the two-electron density matrix over the degrees of freedom of the other electron. We have investigated the spatial entanglement for the helium-like systems with Z=1 to Z=10. For the helium atoms (Z=2), we have calculated the linear entropy for the ground state and the 1sns ^1S^e (n=2-10) excited states. Results are compared with other calculations [1-3]. [4pt] [1] J. P. Coe and I. D'Amico, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 254, 012010 (2010) [0pt] [2] D. Manzano et. al., J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43, 275301 (2010) [0pt] [3] J. S. Dehesa et. al., J. Phys. B 45, 015504 (2012)

  8. Energy loss of helium ions in zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Lantschner, G.H.; Eckardt, J.C.; Lifschitz, A.F.; Arista, N.R.; Araujo, L.L.; Duarte, P.F.; Santos, J.H.R. dos; Behar, M.; Dias, J.F.; Grande, P.L.; Montanari, C.C.; Miraglia, J.E.

    2004-06-01

    The energy loss of helium ions in zinc has been measured in the energy range from 37.5 to 1750 keV/amu using the transmission technique and the Rutherford backscattering method. In addition, calculations using the extended Friedel sum rule, the unitary convolution approximation, and the local plasma approximation have been performed. The contributions of the inner-shell and valence electrons to the total energy loss are separately evaluated. The measurements and calculations are in good agreement over an extended range of energies, and both of them yield stopping values higher than those provided by SRIM 2003.

  9. Lamb shift in the muonic helium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Martynenko, A. P.

    2007-07-15

    The Lamb shift (2P{sub 1/2}-2S{sub 1/2}) in the muonic helium ion ({mu}-{sub 2}{sup 4}He){sup +} is calculated with the account of contributions of orders {alpha}{sup 3}, {alpha}{sup 4}, {alpha}{sup 5}, and {alpha}{sup 6}. Special attention is given to corrections of the electron vacuum polarization, the nuclear structure, and recoil effects. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift 1381.72 meV can be considered as a reliable estimate for the comparison with experimental data.

  10. Focal depth measurement of scanning helium ion microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongxuan; Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Han; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-07-14

    When facing the challenges of critical dimension measurement of complicated nanostructures, such as of the three dimension integrated circuit, characterization of the focal depth of microscopes is important. In this Letter, we developed a method for characterizing the focal depth of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) by using an atomic force microscope tip characterizer (ATC). The ATC was tilted in a sample chamber at an angle to the scanning plan. Secondary electron images (SEIs) were obtained at different positions of the ATC. The edge resolution of the SEIs shows the nominal diameters of the helium ion beam at different focal levels. With this method, the nominal shapes of the helium ion beams were obtained with different apertures. Our results show that a small aperture is necessary to get a high spatial resolution and high depth of field images with HIM. This work provides a method for characterizing and improving the performance of HIM.

  11. Helium Ion Microscope-Assisted Nanomachining of Resonant Nanostrings

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Peng; van den Hurk, Remko; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion microscopy has recently emerged as a potent tool for the in-situ modification and imaging of nanoscale devices. For example; finely focused helium ion beams have been used for the milling of pores in suspended structures. We here report the use of helium ion milling for the post-fabrication modification of nanostrings machined from an amorphous SiCN material. The modification consisted of milling linear arrays of holes along the length of nanostrings. This milling results in a slight decrease of resonant frequency while increasing the surface to volume ratio of the device. The frequency decrease is attributed to a reduction of the effective Young’s modulus of the string, which in turn reduces the tension the string is under. Such experimental observations are supported by the finite element analysis of milled and non-milled strings. PMID:27420070

  12. The Helium Atom and Isoelectronic Ions in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patil, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    The energy levels of the helium atom and isoelectronic ions in two dimensions are considered. The difficulties encountered in the analytical evaluation of the perturbative and variational expressions for the ground state, promote an interesting factorization of the inter-electronic interaction, leading to simple expressions for the energy. This…

  13. Anomalous Decline of Molecular Ion Mobility in Cooled Helium Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, Kazumasa; Hananoe, Masatoshi; Matsuzawa, Michio

    2005-11-01

    We present a first successful theoretical account of the ion mobilities of N2+ and O2+ in helium gas at 4.3 K. Measured mobilities of various molecular ions at low effective temperatures reportedly tend to values smaller than their polarization limits, with the exception of N2+ [J. Sanderson , J. Phys. BJPAPEH0953-4075 26, L465 (1993)10.1088/0953-4075/26/15/006; J. SandersonJ. Phys. BJPAPEH0953-407527, L433 (1994)10.1088/0953-4075/27/14/021]. The present theoretical results obtained by the classical trajectory calculations agree with the experimental ones very well, and make it definitive that the anomalous decline of molecular ion mobility is caused by a Feshbach-like resonance due to the anisotropic interaction potential between a molecular ion and a helium atom. The mechanism thus revealed is supported by quantitative quantum mechanical calculations. The process appears very similar to that of laser cooling.

  14. Helium Ion Imaging and Milling at the Nanometer Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Bin

    2009-03-01

    The helium ion microscope (HeIM) is a new, powerful instrument for nano-metrology and nanotechnology. As an emerging imaging and measurement tool it offers several advantages over the traditional scanning electron microscope (SEM) currently in use in research and manufacturing facilities across the world. First, resolution 2 to 4 times better than that from comparable SEMs is theoretically possible, due to the very high source brightness and the short wavelength of the helium ions. Ion images with unprecedented resolution have been routinely collected on a wide range of samples with sub-nanometer features. More importantly, the interaction volume of the helium ion beam in the sample is substantially different in its size and shape from that of the electron beam in an SEM. As a consequence, the signals generated, especially secondary electrons, reveal more surface details. Imaging by the HeIM can further benefit from the superb depth of field and the fact that He ion imaging is less susceptible to sample charging. In addition, it is possible to compensate for charging by the use of an electron flood gun. Scattered He ions produced as a result of Rutherford scattering of the incident ions on the target nuclei can provide material contrast information that can be used for quantitative compositional analysis. Beyond imaging, the HeIM is a potent tool for milling and modifying surface structures at the nanometer scale, due to the relatively low mass of the helium ion, the narrow ion beam, and especially the low beam currents. It is possible to drill close to 10 nm diameter holes and mill other nanoscale structures that cannot be fabricated with any other method. It is expected that, as with the electron beam, it is feasible to expose resist and deposit various materials with He ion beam irradiation. The work is at its exploratory stage, and likely soon will yield more exciting results. This presentation will report on some of the newest research work on the NIST helium

  15. Helium-ion-induced release of hydrogen from graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The ion-induced release of hydrogen from AXF-5Q graphite was studied for 350-eV helium ions. The hydrogen was implanted into the graphite with a low energy (approx.200 eV) and to a high fluence. This achieved a thin (approx.10-nm), saturated near-surface region. The release of hydrogen was measured as a function of helium fluence. A model that includes ion-induced detrapping, retrapping, and surface recombination was used to analyze the experimental data. A value of (1.65 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2/ was obtained from the detrapping cross section, and a value of (0.5 to 4) x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 4//atoms was obtained for the recombination coefficient. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Positive ion extraction across the superfluid-vapor helium interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purushothaman, S.; Peräjärvi, K.; Ranjan, M.; Saastamoinen, A.; Gloos, K.; Takahashi, N.; Dendooven, P.

    2009-02-01

    The extraction efficiency of positive Rn ions across the superfluid-vapor helium interface above ~1.3 K indicates that extraction results from thermal activation across a barrier of about 20 K. Below ~1.3 K, the extraction efficiency is constant at about 0.7%. The evaporation of the superfluid surface by second sound pulses has a negative impact on the ion extraction, but not on the ions themselves. It takes 3.2(6) s at 1.60 K and 15(6) s at 1.15 K for the extraction process to recover from a disturbed state of yet unknown nature.

  17. Investigation of Cellular Interactions of Nanoparticles by Helium Ion Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arey, Bruce W.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, Yumei; Tolic, Ana; Williams, Nolann G.; Orr, Galya

    2011-06-01

    The helium ion mircroscope (HIM) probes light elements (e.g. C, N, O, P) with high contrast due to the large variation in secondary electron yield, which minimizes the necessity of specimen staining. A defining characteristic of HIM is its remarkable capability to neutralize charge by the implementation of an electron flood gun, which eliminates the need for coating non-conductive specimens for imaging at high resolution. In addition, the small convergence angle in HeIM offers a large depth of field (~5x FE-SEM), enabling tall structures to be viewed in focus within a single image. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we investigate the interactions of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) at the surface of alveolar type II epithelial cells grown at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The increasing use of nanomaterials in a wide range of commercial applications has the potential to increase human exposure to these materials, but the impact of such exposure on human health is still unclear. One of the main routs of exposure is the respiratory tract, where alveolar epithelial cells present a vulnerable target at the interface with ambient air. Since the cellular interactions of NPs govern the cellular response and ultimately determine the impact on human health, our studies will help delineating relationships between particle properties and cellular interactions and response to better evaluate NP toxicity or biocompatibility. The Rutherford backscattered ion (RBI) is a helium ions imaging mode, which backscatters helium ions from every element except hydrogen, with a backscatter yield that depends on the atomic number of the target. Energy-sensitive backscatter analysis is being developed, which when combined with RBI image information, supports elemental identification at helium ion nanometer resolution. This capability will enable distinguishing NPs from cell surface structures with nanometer resolution.

  18. Investigation of cellular interactions of nanoparticles by helium ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arey, B. W.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, Y.; Tolic, A.; Williams, N.; Orr, G.

    2011-06-01

    The helium ion microscope (HIM) probes light elements (e.g. C, N, O, P) with high contrast due to the large variation in secondary electron yield, which minimizes the necessity of specimen staining. A defining characteristic of HIM is its remarkable capability to neutralize charge by the implementation of an electron flood gun, which eliminates the need for coating non-conductive specimens for imaging at high resolution. In addition, the small convergence angle in HeIM offers a large depth of field (~5× FE-SEM), enabling tall structures to be viewed in focus within a single image. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we investigate the interactions of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) at the surface of alveolar type II epithelial cells grown at the airliquid interface (ALI). The increasing use of nanomaterials in a wide range of commercial applications has the potential to increase human exposure to these materials, but the impact of such exposure on human health is still unclear. One of the main routs of exposure is the respiratory tract, where alveolar epithelial cells present a vulnerable target at the interface with ambient air. Since the cellular interactions of NPs govern the cellular response and ultimately determine the impact on human health, our studies will help delineating relationships between particle properties and cellular interactions and response to better evaluate NP toxicity or biocompatibility. The Rutherford backscattered ion (RBI) is a helium ions imaging mode, which backscatters helium ions from every element except hydrogen, with a backscatter yield that depends on the atomic number of the target. Energy-sensitive backscatter analysis is being developed, which when combined with RBI image information, supports elemental identification at helium ion nanometer resolution. This capability will enable distinguishing NPs from cell surface structures with nanometer resolution.

  19. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Parish, Chad M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Tan, Lizhen; ...

    2016-10-24

    Here we irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ~50 dpa, ~15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ~8 nm, ~1021 m-3 (CNA), and of ~3 nm, 1023 m-3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces inmore » all alloys survived ~50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Finally, among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.« less

  20. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, C. M.; Unocic, K. A.; Tan, L.; Zinkle, S. J.; Kondo, S.; Snead, L. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Katoh, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ∼50 dpa, ∼15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ∼8 nm, ∼1021 m-3 (CNA), and of ∼3 nm, 1023 m-3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ∼50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  1. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Tan, Lizhen; Zinkle, S. J.; Kondo, Sosuke; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hoelzer, David T.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-10-24

    Here we irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ~50 dpa, ~15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ~8 nm, ~1021 m-3 (CNA), and of ~3 nm, 1023 m-3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ~50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Finally, among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  2. Failure of choroidal melanoma to respond to helium ion therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Char, D.H.; Crawford, J.B.; Castro, J.R.; Woodruff, K.H.

    1983-02-01

    Helium ion irradiation is a promising alternative therapy for choroidal melanoma. In short-term follow-up (less than 5 years), more than 90% (18/19) of treated patients demonstrated tumor regression. Researchers had to enucleate five eyes after helium ion therapy either because of continued tumor growth (four patients) or other complications (one patient). Two melanomas continued to grow and seemed to be radioresistant. In two other tumors it retrospectively seemed that the entire lesion was not inside the radiation field. In one patient total retinal detachment and glaucoma developed; enucleation was performed because of a painful eye. Metastatic disease developed in no patients. The treatment failures emphasize that there are a number of unresolved issues regarding the use of charged-particle irradiation in the treatment of melanoma. Further studies must be performed to answer these questions and better delineate the use of these newer forms of therapy.

  3. Neovascular glaucoma after helium ion irradiation for uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.K.; Char, D.H.; Castro, J.L.; Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.; Stone, R.D.

    1986-02-01

    Neovascular glaucoma developed in 22 of 169 uveal melanoma patients treated with helium ion irradiation. Most patients had large melanomas; no eyes containing small melanomas developed anterior segment neovascularization. The mean onset of glaucoma was 14.1 months (range, 7-31 months). The incidence of anterior segment neovascularization increased with radiation dosage; there was an approximately three-fold increase at 80 GyE versus 60 GyE of helium ion radiation (23% vs. 8.5%) (P less than 0.05). Neovascular glaucoma occurred more commonly in larger tumors; the incidence was not affected by tumor location, presence of subretinal fluid, nor rate of tumor regression. Fifty-three percent of patients had some response with intraocular pressures of 21 mmHg or less to a combination of antiglaucoma treatments.

  4. Genetic changes in mammalian cells transformed by helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G.; Yang, T. C.; Roots, R.

    Midterm Syrian Hamster embryo (SHE) cells were employed to study high LET-radiation induced tumorigenesis. Normal SHE cells (secondary passage) were irradiated with accelerated helium ions at an incident energy of 22 MeV/u (9-10 keV/μm). Transformed clones were isolated after growth in soft agar of cells obtained from the foci of the initial monolayer plated postirradiation. To study the progression process of malignant transformation, the transformed clones were followed by monolayer subculturing for prolonged periods of time. Subsequently, neoplasia tests in nude mice were done. In this work, however, we have focused on karyotypic changes in the banding patterns of the chromosomes during the early part of the progressive process of cell transformation for helium ion-induced transformed cells.

  5. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-21

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 10(4) ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 10(5)/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies.

  6. Effective doping of low energy ions into superfluid helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lei; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-21

    We report a facile method of doping cations from an electrospray ionization (ESI) source into superfluid helium droplets. By decelerating and stopping the ion pulse of reserpine and substance P from an ESI source in the path of the droplet beam, about 10{sup 4} ion-doped droplets (one ion per droplet) can be recorded, corresponding to a pickup efficiency of nearly 1 out of 1000 ions. We attribute the success of this simple approach to the long residence time of the cations in the droplet beam. The resulting size of the doped droplets, on the order of 10{sup 5}/droplet, is measured using deflection and retardation methods. Our method does not require an ion trap in the doping region, which significantly simplifies the experimental setup and procedure for future spectroscopic and diffraction studies.

  7. Effect of ion flux on helium retention in helium-irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, A.; Valles, G.; Caturla, M. J.; Martin-Bragado, I.

    2013-05-01

    Helium retention in irradiated tungsten leads to swelling, pore formation, sample exfoliation and embrittlement with deleterious consequences in many applications. In particular, the use of tungsten in future nuclear fusion plants is proposed due to its good refractory properties. However, serious concerns about tungsten survivability stems from the fact that it must withstand severe irradiation conditions. In magnetic fusion as well as in inertial fusion (particularly with direct drive targets), tungsten components will be exposed to low and high energy ion irradiation (helium), respectively. A common feature is that the most detrimental situations will take place in pulsed mode, i.e., high flux irradiation. There is increasing evidence of a correlation between a high helium flux and an enhancement of detrimental effects on tungsten. Nevertheless, the nature of these effects is not well understood due to the subtleties imposed by the exact temperature profile evolution, ion energy, pulse duration, existence of impurities and simultaneous irradiation with other species. Object Kinetic Monte Carlo is the technique of choice to simulate the evolution of radiation-induced damage inside solids in large temporal and space scales. We have used the recently developed code MMonCa (Modular Monte Carlo simulator), presented at COSIRES 2012 for the first time, to study He retention (and in general defect evolution) in tungsten samples irradiated with high intensity helium pulses. The code simulates the interactions among a large variety of defects and during the irradiation stage and the subsequent annealing steps. The results show that the pulsed mode leads to significantly higher He retention at temperatures higher than 700 K. In this paper we discuss the process of He retention in terms of trap evolution. In addition, we discuss the implications of these findings for inertial fusion.

  8. Transport coefficients of He+ ions in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Rainer; Viehland, Larry; Gray, Benjamin; Wright, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    New experimental mobilities of 4He+ in 4He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, have been determined. Uncertainties in the mobilities were reduced to about 1% by using a shuttered drift tube. Comparison with previously measured values show that only one set of previous data is reliable. We demonstrate that the mobilities and diffusion coeffcients of 4He+ in 4He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N with high precision if accurate potential energy curves are available for the X2Σu+ and A2Σg+ states, and if one takes into account resonant charge transfer and corrects for quantum-mechanical effects. Potentials, obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X =6,7) basis sets using the CASSCF +MRCISD approach were found to be in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available (separately) and with experiment, and those were subsequently used in a new computer program to determine semi-classical phase shifts and transport cross sections, from which the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. A new set of data for the mobilities of alpha particles (He2+) ions was obtained as a byproduct of the experiment, but the transport theory has not yet been completed.

  9. Transport coefficients of He(+) ions in helium.

    PubMed

    Viehland, Larry A; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R; Wright, Timothy G

    2016-02-21

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of (4)He(+) in (4)He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X(2)Σu (+) and A(2)Σg (+) states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of (4)He(+) in (4)He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  10. Helium and heavy ion measurements with the CRRES satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Edmund Gary

    The CRRES satellite was in service from July 1990 to October 1991, during a period of high solar modulation and solar activity. The ONR-604 experiment aboard CRRES measured helium with isotopic resolution in the energy range 38-110 MeV/nucleon, and heavy ions through iron at 200-500 MeV/nucleon. Although solar modulation was high throughout the CRRES mission, the mission included periods of solar quiescence as well as a number of large solar flares and associated solar energetic particle events. Measurements were made of helium and heavy ions during both the quiet times and the flare periods. A study was made to search for anomalous component helium in the Earth's magnetosphere using the magnetic field as a rigidity filter. This effort was inconclusive due to background in the outer electron radiation belt. During the solar quiet times, the helium spectrum above 60 MeV/nucleon is consistent with the galactic cosmic rays. Below that energy, a separate component appears early in the mission and rises in prominence over the course of the mission, dominating over the galactic cosmic rays below 60 MeV/nucleon. The distinctness of this component is seen both in the helium spectra and the 3He/4He ratio. An association of this component with interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections is suggested. During the March and June 1991 flare periods, helium spectral characteristics and isotopic ratios are measured. The results are compared to related diagnostic phenomena of gradual and impulsive solar energetic particle acceleration. The average 3He/4He ratio in both periods is enriched relative to the solar wind; 0.01 in June 1991 and 0.07 in March. The March period contains spikes in the isotopic ratio rising to 0.22. Signatures of known solar phenomena are compared to attempt to identify the predominant acceleration mechanism of each major flare. The development of the CRRES/SPACERAD Heavy Ion Model of the Environment (CHIME) is described and the results presented.

  11. Cryogenic helium as stopping medium for high-energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purushothaman, S.; Dendooven, P.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Ronkainen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Äystö, J.; Peräjärvi, K.; Takahashi, N.; Gloos, K.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the survival and transport efficiency of 219Rn ions emitted by a 223Ra source in high-density cryogenic helium gas, with ionisation of the gas induced by a proton beam. The combined efficiency of ion survival and transport by an applied electric field was measured as a function of ionisation rate density for electric fields up to 160 V/cm and for three temperature and density combinations: 77 K, 0.18 mg/cm3, 10 K, 0.18 mg/cm3 and 10 K, 0.54 mg/cm3. At low beam intensity or high electric field, an efficiency of 30 % is obtained, confirming earlier results. A sharp drop in efficiency is observed at a "threshold" ionisation rate density which increases with the square of the applied electric field. At 160 V/cm, the efficiency stays above 10% up to an ionisation rate density of 1012 ion-electron pairs/cm3/s. The observed behaviour is understood as the result of shielding of the applied field by the weak plasma created by the proton beam: it counteracts the effective transport of ions and electrons, leading to recombination between the two. We conclude that cryogenic helium gas at high-density and high electric field is a promising medium for the transformation of very high-energy ions into low-energy ones.

  12. Improving ion mobility measurement sensitivity by utilizing helium in an ion funnel trap.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Baker, Erin S; Smith, Richard D

    2014-06-03

    Ion mobility instruments that utilize nitrogen as buffer gas are often preceded by an ion trap and accumulation region that also uses nitrogen, and for different inert gases, no significant effects upon performance are expected for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) of larger ions. However, we have observed significantly improved performance for an ion funnel trap upon adding helium; the signal intensities for higher m/z species were improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to using pure nitrogen. The effect of helium upon IMS resolving power was also studied by introducing a He/N2 gas mixture into the drift cell, and in some cases, a slight improvement was observed compared to pure N2. The improvement in signal can be largely attributed to faster and more efficient ion ejection into the drift tube from the ion funnel trap.

  13. Improving Ion Mobility Measurement Sensitivity by Utilizing Helium in an Ion Funnel Trap

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility instruments that utilize nitrogen as buffer gas are often preceded by an ion trap and accumulation region that also uses nitrogen, and for different inert gases, no significant effects upon performance are expected for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) of larger ions. However, we have observed significantly improved performance for an ion funnel trap upon adding helium; the signal intensities for higher m/z species were improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to using pure nitrogen. The effect of helium upon IMS resolving power was also studied by introducing a He/N2 gas mixture into the drift cell, and in some cases, a slight improvement was observed compared to pure N2. The improvement in signal can be largely attributed to faster and more efficient ion ejection into the drift tube from the ion funnel trap. PMID:24786390

  14. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 124 Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions (Web, free access)   The databases ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR calculate stopping-power and range tables for electrons, protons, or helium ions. Stopping-power and range tables can be calculated for electrons in any user-specified material and for protons and helium ions in 74 materials.

  15. Helium Tagging Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy of Reactive Ions.

    PubMed

    Roithová, Jana; Gray, Andrew; Andris, Erik; Jašík, Juraj; Gerlich, Dieter

    2016-02-16

    The interrogation of reaction intermediates is key for understanding chemical reactions; however their direct observation and study remains a considerable challenge. Mass spectrometry is one of the most sensitive analytical techniques, and its use to study reaction mixtures is now an established practice. However, the information that can be obtained is limited to elemental analysis and possibly to fragmentation behavior, which is often challenging to analyze. In order to extend the available experimental information, different types of spectroscopy in the infrared and visible region have been combined with mass spectrometry. Spectroscopy of mass selected ions usually utilizes the powerful sensitivity of mass spectrometers, and the absorption of photons is not detected as such but rather translated to mass changes. One approach to accomplish such spectroscopy involves loosely binding a tag to an ion that will be removed by absorption of one photon. We have constructed an ion trapping instrument capable of reaching temperatures that are sufficiently low to enable tagging by helium atoms in situ, thus permitting infrared photodissociation spectroscopy (IRPD) to be carried out. While tagging by larger rare gas atoms, such as neon or argon is also possible, these may cause significant structural changes to small and reactive species, making the use of helium highly beneficial. We discuss the "innocence" of helium as a tag in ion spectroscopy using several case studies. It is shown that helium tagging is effectively innocent when used with benzene dications, not interfering with their structure or IRPD spectrum. We have also provided a case study where we can see that despite its minimal size there are systems where He has a huge effect. A strong influence of the He tagging was shown in the IRPD spectra of HCCl(2+) where large spectral shifts were observed. While the presented systems are rather small, they involve the formation of mixtures of isomers. We have therefore

  16. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Rice, William L; Van Hoek, Alfred N; Păunescu, Teodor G; Huynh, Chuong; Goetze, Bernhard; Singh, Bipin; Scipioni, Larry; Stern, Lewis A; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details and provide

  17. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the

  18. Whole-cell imaging at nanometer resolutions using fast and slow focused helium ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Udalagama, Chammika N B; Chen, Ce-Belle; Bettiol, Andrew A; Pickard, Daniel S; Venkatesan, T; Watt, Frank

    2011-10-05

    Observations of the interior structure of cells and subcellular organelles are important steps in unraveling organelle functions. Microscopy using helium ions can play a major role in both surface and subcellular imaging because it can provide subnanometer resolutions at the cell surface for slow helium ions, and fast helium ions can penetrate cells without a significant loss of resolution. Slow (e.g., 10-50 keV) helium ion beams can now be focused to subnanometer dimensions (∼0.25 nm), and keV helium ion microscopy can be used to image the surfaces of cells at high resolutions. Because of the ease of neutralizing the sample charge using a flood electron beam, surface charging effects are minimal and therefore cell surfaces can be imaged without the need for a conducting metallic coating. Fast (MeV) helium ions maintain a straight path as they pass through a cell. Along the ion trajectory, the helium ion undergoes multiple electron collisions, and for each collision a small amount of energy is lost to the scattered electron. By measuring the total energy loss of each MeV helium ion as it passes through the cell, we can construct an energy-loss image that is representative of the mass distribution of the cell. This work paves the way to use ions for whole-cell investigations at nanometer resolutions through structural, elemental (via nuclear elastic backscattering), and fluorescence (via ion induced fluorescence) imaging.

  19. Data-driven RBE parameterization for helium ion beams.

    PubMed

    Mairani, A; Magro, G; Dokic, I; Valle, S M; Tessonnier, T; Galm, R; Ciocca, M; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Jäkel, O; Haberer, T; Pedroni, P; Böhlen, T T

    2016-01-21

    Helium ion beams are expected to be available again in the near future for clinical use. A suitable formalism to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for treatment planning (TP) studies is needed. In this work we developed a data-driven RBE parameterization based on published in vitro experimental values. The RBE parameterization has been developed within the framework of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model as a function of the helium linear energy transfer (LET), dose and the tissue specific parameter (α/β)ph of the LQ model for the reference radiation. Analytic expressions are provided, derived from the collected database, describing the RBEα = αHe/αph and Rβ = βHe/βph ratios as a function of LET. Calculated RBE values at 2 Gy photon dose and at 10% survival (RBE10) are compared with the experimental ones. Pearson's correlation coefficients were, respectively, 0.85 and 0.84 confirming the soundness of the introduced approach. Moreover, due to the lack of experimental data at low LET, clonogenic experiments have been performed irradiating A549 cell line with (α/β)ph = 5.4 Gy at the entrance of a 56.4 MeV u(-1)He beam at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. The proposed parameterization reproduces the measured cell survival within the experimental uncertainties. A RBE formula, which depends only on dose, LET and (α/β)ph as input parameters is proposed, allowing a straightforward implementation in a TP system.

  20. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  1. Direct nano-patterning of graphene with helium ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Naitou, Y.; Iijima, T.; Ogawa, S.

    2015-01-19

    Helium ion microscopy (HIM) was used for direct nano-patterning of single-layer graphene (SLG) on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. This technique involves irradiation of the sample with accelerated helium ions (He{sup +}). Doses of 2.0 × 10{sup 16 }He{sup + }cm{sup −2} from a 30 kV beam induced a metal-insulator transition in the SLG. The resolution of HIM patterning on SLG was investigated by fabricating nanoribbons and nanostructures. Analysis of scanning capacitance microscopy measurements revealed that the spatial resolution of HIM patterning depended on the dosage of He{sup +} in a non-monotonic fashion. Increasing the dose from 2.0 × 10{sup 16} to 5.0 × 10{sup 16 }He{sup + }cm{sup −2} improved the spatial resolution to several tens of nanometers. However, doses greater than 1.0 × 10{sup 17 }He{sup + }cm{sup −2} degraded the patterning characteristics. Direct patterning using HIM is a versatile approach to graphene fabrication and can be applied to graphene-based devices.

  2. Electron Spin Resonance of Positive Ions in Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, George Sutton

    ESR from the positive ion in liquid helium were recorded as a function of temperature from 1.3 K to 7.5 K, and as a function of isotopic ^3He concentration from 4% ^3He to 96% ^3He. The ESR signals of the positive ion are g-shifted up-field 0.443 +/- 0.002 Gauss from the free electron g-value of the negative ion. The g-shift was independent of all externally controllable parameters. The relaxation times T_1 and T_2 were extracted from the ESR data. The relaxation times were found to change exponentially with the reciprocal of the temperature. Changes in the relaxation times as a function of temperature and ^3He concentration are interpreted in terms of Atkins' "snowball" model for the positive ion. A theoretical calculation of the local ^3He concentration as a function of the distance from the ion center, temperature, and bulk ^3He concentration is carried out. There is good agreement between the measured values of T_2 and those predicted from the theoretical calculation. We interpret the measured T_2's as resulting from the presence of ^3He atoms in the solid "snowball". Relatively short T_1's are measured for the positive ion. We interpret the measured T_1 's as resulting from the motion of ^3 He atoms on the "surface" of the positive ion "snowball". The motion of ^3He atoms in the proposed "surface" region of the "snowball" is different from the motion of the atoms in the liquid or solid state. ESR signals from the negative ion at external pressures very near the freezing pressure have been reinterpreted as resulting from the formation of a similar "surface" region around the electron "bubble" at high pressures.

  3. Observation of a helium ion energy threshold for retention in tungsten exposed to hydrogen/helium mixture plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Deslandes, A.; Morgan, T. W.; Elliman, R. G.; De Temmerman, G.; Kluth, P.; Riley, D.; Corr, C. S.

    2016-10-01

    Helium retention is measured in tungsten samples exposed to mixed H/He plasma in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device. It is observed that there is very little He retention below helium ion impact energies of 9.0+/- 1.4 eV, indicating the existence of a potential barrier which must be overcome for implantation to occur. The helium retention in samples exposed to plasma at temperatures  >1000 K is strongly correlated with nano-bubble formation measured using grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering. The diameters of nano-bubbles were not found to increase with increasing helium concentration, indicating that additional helium must be accommodated by increasing the bubble concentration or an increase in bubble pressure. For some samples pre-irradiation with heavy ions of 2.0 MeV energy is investigated to simulate the effects of neutron damage. It is observed that nano-bubble sizes are comparable between samples pre-irradiated with heavy-ions, and those without heavy-ion pre-irradiation.

  4. Effects of sequential tungsten and helium ion implantation on nano-indentation hardness of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D. E. J.; Edmondson, P. D.; Roberts, S. G.

    2013-06-24

    To simulate neutron and helium damage in a fusion reactor first wall sequential self-ion implantation up to 13 dpa followed by helium-ion implantation up to 3000 appm was performed to produce damaged layers of {approx}2 {mu}m depth in pure tungsten. The hardness of these layers was measured using nanoindentation and was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Substantial hardness increases were seen in helium implanted regions, with smaller hardness increases in regions which had already been self-ion implanted, thus, containing pre-existing dislocation loops. This suggests that, for the same helium content, helium trapped in distributed vacancies gives stronger hardening than helium trapped in vacancies condensed into dislocation loops.

  5. Effects of sequential tungsten and helium ion implantation on nano-indentation hardness of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. E. J.; Edmondson, P. D.; Roberts, S. G.

    2013-06-01

    To simulate neutron and helium damage in a fusion reactor first wall sequential self-ion implantation up to 13 dpa followed by helium-ion implantation up to 3000 appm was performed to produce damaged layers of ˜2 μm depth in pure tungsten. The hardness of these layers was measured using nanoindentation and was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Substantial hardness increases were seen in helium implanted regions, with smaller hardness increases in regions which had already been self-ion implanted, thus, containing pre-existing dislocation loops. This suggests that, for the same helium content, helium trapped in distributed vacancies gives stronger hardening than helium trapped in vacancies condensed into dislocation loops.

  6. Theory of the Lamb shift in muonic helium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Krutov, A. A.; Martynenko, A. P. Martynenko, G. A.; Faustov, R. N.

    2015-01-15

    The Lamb shift (2P{sub 1/2}-2S{sub 1/2}) in muonic helium ions (μ{sub 2}{sup 3}){sup +}, (μ{sup 2/4}He){sup +} is calculated taking into account the contributions of the order of α{sup 3}, α{sup 4}, α{sup 5}, and α{sup 6}. Special attention is paid to corrections for the polarization of the vacuum, as well as the structure and recoil of the nucleus. Numerical values 1259.8583 meV ((μ{sub 2}{sup 3}He){sup +}) and 1379.1107 meV ((μ{sub 2}{sup 4}He){sup +}) obtained for the shifts can be considered reliable estimates when compared to the experimental data of the CREMA collaboration.

  7. Sympathetic ophthalmia complicating helium ion irradiation of a choroidal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, P.D.; Char, D.H.; Crawford, J.B.; Waterhouse, W.

    1987-11-01

    Sympathetic ophthalmia was diagnosed 49 months after helium ion irradiation of a left choroidal melanoma. The patient maintained good vision until 18 months after therapy, when she developed neovascular glaucoma. This complication required multiple therapeutic procedures, including topical anti-inflammatory and antiglaucomatous drops, 360 degrees peripheral panretinal cryoblation, and a single 180 degrees application of inferior cyclocryotherapy over a 2 1/2-year period. Four weeks after the cyclocryotherapy, inflammation was noted in both eyes, and, one month later, enucleation of the left sympathogenic eye was performed. Serial histopathologic sections showed a full-thickness, fibrovascular, scleral scar and tantalum marker ring suture without uveal incarceration. Penetrating surgical trauma, a uveal melanoma, and multiple nonpenetrating treatments resulted in the development of sympathetic ophthalmia.

  8. Data-driven RBE parameterization for helium ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairani, A.; Magro, G.; Dokic, I.; Valle, S. M.; Tessonnier, T.; Galm, R.; Ciocca, M.; Parodi, K.; Ferrari, A.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Pedroni, P.; Böhlen, T. T.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion beams are expected to be available again in the near future for clinical use. A suitable formalism to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for treatment planning (TP) studies is needed. In this work we developed a data-driven RBE parameterization based on published in vitro experimental values. The RBE parameterization has been developed within the framework of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model as a function of the helium linear energy transfer (LET), dose and the tissue specific parameter {{(α /β )}\\text{ph}} of the LQ model for the reference radiation. Analytic expressions are provided, derived from the collected database, describing the \\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}α}={α\\text{He}}/{α\\text{ph}} and {{\\text{R}}β}={β\\text{He}}/{β\\text{ph}} ratios as a function of LET. Calculated RBE values at 2 Gy photon dose and at 10% survival (\\text{RB}{{\\text{E}}10} ) are compared with the experimental ones. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were, respectively, 0.85 and 0.84 confirming the soundness of the introduced approach. Moreover, due to the lack of experimental data at low LET, clonogenic experiments have been performed irradiating A549 cell line with {{(α /β )}\\text{ph}}=5.4 Gy at the entrance of a 56.4 MeV u-1He beam at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. The proposed parameterization reproduces the measured cell survival within the experimental uncertainties. A RBE formula, which depends only on dose, LET and {{(α /β )}\\text{ph}} as input parameters is proposed, allowing a straightforward implementation in a TP system.

  9. Understanding Imaging and Metrology with the Helium Ion Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladár, András E.; Ming, Bin

    2009-09-01

    One barrier to innovation confronting all phases of nanotechnology is the lack of accurate metrology for the characterization of nanomaterials. Ultra-high resolution microscopy is a key technology needed to achieve this goal. But, current microscope technology is being pushed to its limits. The scanning and transmission electron microscopes have incrementally improved in performance and other scanned probe technologies such as atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and focused ion beam microscopes have all been applied to nanotechnology with various levels of success. A relatively new tool for nanotechnology is the scanning helium ion microscope (HIM). The HIM is a new complementary imaging and metrology technology for nanotechnology which may be able to push the current resolution barrier lower. But, successful imaging and metrology with this instrument entails new ion beam/specimen interaction physics which must be fully understood. As a new methodology, HIM is beginning to show promise and the abundance of potentially advantageous applications for nanotechnology have yet to be fully exploited. This presentation will discuss some of the progress made at NIST in understanding the science behind this new technique.

  10. Analysis of helium-ion scattering with a desktop computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J. W.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes a program written in an enhanced BASIC language for a desktop computer, for simulating the energy spectra of high-energy helium ions scattered into two concurrent detectors (backward and glancing). The program is designed for 512-channel spectra from samples containing up to 8 elements and 55 user-defined layers. The program is intended to meet the needs of analyses in materials sciences, such as metallurgy, where more than a few elements may be present, where several elements may be near each other in the periodic table, and where relatively deep structure may be important. These conditions preclude the use of completely automatic procedures for obtaining the sample composition directly from the scattered ion spectrum. Therefore, efficient methods are needed for entering and editing large amounts of composition data, with many iterations and with much feedback of information from the computer to the user. The internal video screen is used exclusively for verbal and numeric communications between user and computer. The composition matrix is edited on screen with a two-dimension forms-fill-in text editor and with many automatic procedures, such as doubling the number of layers with appropriate interpolations and extrapolations. The control center of the program is a bank of 10 keys that initiate on-event branching of program flow. The experimental and calculated spectra, including those of individual elements if desired, are displayed on an external color monitor, with an optional inset plot of the depth concentration profiles of the elements in the sample.

  11. Impact of helium implantation and ion-induced damage on reflectivity of molybdenum mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carrasco, A.; Petersson, P.; Hallén, A.; Grzonka, J.; Gilbert, M. R.; Fortuna-Zalesna, E.; Rubel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Molybdenum mirrors were irradiated with Mo and He ions to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on diagnostic first mirrors in next-generation fusion devices. Up to 30 dpa were produced under molybdenum irradiation leading to a slight decrease of reflectivity in the near infrared range. After 3 × 1017 cm-2 of helium irradiation, reflectivity decreased by up to 20%. Combined irradiation by helium and molybdenum led to similar effects on reflectivity as irradiation with helium alone. Ion beam analysis showed that only 7% of the implanted helium was retained in the first 40 nm layer of the mirror. The structure of the near-surface layer after irradiation was studied with scanning transmission electron microscopy and the extent and size distribution of helium bubbles was documented. The consequences of ion-induced damage on the performance of diagnostic components are discussed.

  12. Numerical investigation of depth profiling capabilities of helium and neon ions in ion microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rzeznik, Lukasz; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of polymers by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been a topic of interest for many years. In recent years, the primary ion species evolved from heavy monatomic ions to cluster and massive cluster primary ions in order to preserve a maximum of organic information. The progress in less-damaging sputtering goes along with a loss in lateral resolution for 2D and 3D imaging. By contrast the development of a mass spectrometer as an add-on tool for the helium ion microscope (HIM), which uses finely focussed He+ or Ne+ beams, allows for the analysis of secondary ions and small secondary cluster ions with unprecedented lateral resolution. Irradiation induced damage and depth profiling capabilities obtained with these light rare gas species have been far less investigated than ion species used classically in SIMS. In this paper we simulated the sputtering of multi-layered polymer samples using the BCA (binary collision approximation) code SD_TRIM_SP to study preferential sputtering and atomic mixing in such samples up to a fluence of 1018 ions/cm2. Results show that helium primary ions are completely inappropriate for depth profiling applications with this kind of sample materials while results for neon are similar to argon. The latter is commonly used as primary ion species in SIMS. For the two heavier species, layers separated by 10 nm can be distinguished for impact energies of a few keV. These results are encouraging for 3D imaging applications where lateral and depth information are of importance. PMID:28144525

  13. Numerical investigation of depth profiling capabilities of helium and neon ions in ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Patrick; Rzeznik, Lukasz; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of polymers by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been a topic of interest for many years. In recent years, the primary ion species evolved from heavy monatomic ions to cluster and massive cluster primary ions in order to preserve a maximum of organic information. The progress in less-damaging sputtering goes along with a loss in lateral resolution for 2D and 3D imaging. By contrast the development of a mass spectrometer as an add-on tool for the helium ion microscope (HIM), which uses finely focussed He(+) or Ne(+) beams, allows for the analysis of secondary ions and small secondary cluster ions with unprecedented lateral resolution. Irradiation induced damage and depth profiling capabilities obtained with these light rare gas species have been far less investigated than ion species used classically in SIMS. In this paper we simulated the sputtering of multi-layered polymer samples using the BCA (binary collision approximation) code SD_TRIM_SP to study preferential sputtering and atomic mixing in such samples up to a fluence of 10(18) ions/cm(2). Results show that helium primary ions are completely inappropriate for depth profiling applications with this kind of sample materials while results for neon are similar to argon. The latter is commonly used as primary ion species in SIMS. For the two heavier species, layers separated by 10 nm can be distinguished for impact energies of a few keV. These results are encouraging for 3D imaging applications where lateral and depth information are of importance.

  14. Observation of electron spin resonance of negative ions in liquid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, J. F.; Dahm, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Electron spin resonance signals of negative ions in liquid helium were observed. The line width and g-value were measured. Electrons injected into helium by field emission from ferromagnetic tips are shown to be polarized. A new technique for the measurement of electron spin polarization is presented.

  15. Effect of 800 keV argon ions pre-damage on the helium blister formation of tungsten exposed to 60 keV helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of Ar8+ ions pre-damage on the following He2+ irradiation behavior of polycrystalline tungsten. We compared the irradiation resistance performance against 60 keV He2+ ions of undamaged tungsten samples with that of pre-damaged samples which were preliminarily exposed to 800 keV Ar8+ ions at a fluence of 4 × 1019 ions m-2. The experimental results indicate that the helium blistering of tungsten could be effectively relieved by the Ar8+ ions pre-damage, while the retention of helium around low energy desorption sites in the pre-damaged tungsten was larger than that of the undamaged samples. A strong orientation dependence of blistering had been observed, with the blister occurred preferentially on the surface of grains with normal direction close to <111>. The Ar8+ ions irradiation-induced damage altered the morphology of helium bubbles in tungsten exposed to the following He2+ irradiation significantly. The intensity of helium release peaks at relatively low temperatures (<600 K) was enhanced due to Ar8+ ions pre-damage.

  16. Arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave propagation in a magnetized dense plasma containing helium ions and degenerate electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S.; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Z.

    2016-06-01

    The obliquely propagating arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave is studied in a dense magnetized plasma having singly and doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons pressures. The Fermi temperature for ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons described by N. M. Vernet [(Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007), p. 57] is used to define ion acoustic speed in ultra-dense plasmas. The pseudo-potential approach is used to solve the fully nonlinear set of dynamic equations for obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized plasma containing helium ions. The upper and lower Mach number ranges for the existence of electrostatic solitons are found which depends on the obliqueness of the wave propagation with respect to applied magnetic field and charge number of the helium ions. It is found that only compressive (hump) soliton structures are formed in all the cases and only subsonic solitons are formed for a singly charged helium ions plasma case with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons. Both subsonic and supersonic soliton hump structures are formed for doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons plasma case containing singly as well as doubly charged helium ions. The effect of propagation direction on the soliton amplitude and width of the electrostatic waves is also presented. The numerical plots are also shown for illustration using dense plasma parameters of a compact star (white dwarf) from literature.

  17. Nanostructuring of molybdenum and tungsten surfaces by low-energy helium ions

    SciTech Connect

    De Temmerman, Gregory; Bystrov, Kirill; Zielinski, Jakub J.; Balden, Martin; Matern, Gabriele; Arnas, Cecile; Marot, Laurent

    2012-07-15

    The formation of metallic nanostructures by exposure of molybdenum and tungsten surfaces to high fluxes of low energy helium ions is studied as a function of the ion energy, plasma exposure time, and surface temperature. Helium plasma exposure leads to the formation of nanoscopic filaments on the surface of both metals. The size of the helium-induced nanostructure increases with increasing surface temperature while the thickness of the modified layer increases with time. In addition, the growth rate of the nanostructured layer also depends on the surface temperature. The size of the nanostructure appears linked with the size of the near-surface voids induced by the low energy ions. The results presented here thus demonstrate that surface processing by low-energy helium ions provides an efficient route for the formation of porous metallic nanostructures.

  18. A NRA study of temperature and heavy ion irradiation effects on helium migration in sintered uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Garcia, P.; Labrim, H.; Sauvage, T.; Carlot, G.; Desgardin, P.; Barthe, M. F.; Piron, J. P.

    2006-10-01

    Helium implanted uranium dioxide sintered samples were studied using nuclear reaction analysis prior to and following heavy ion irradiations and temperature anneals at 800 °C and 1100 °C. The results show that the heavy ion irradiations do not produce measurable long range movement of helium atoms. However, the ion irradiations do affect the behaviour of helium during subsequent temperature anneals. As regards the 800 °C anneal, the reduced mobility of helium in the ion-irradiated samples is interpreted as resulting from enhanced helium atom segregation produced by the ion-irradiation. Conversely at 1100 °C, the initial heavy ion irradiation appears to produce a greater than expected movement of helium within the bulk of the sample which could be an indication of defect assisted helium diffusion. Thermal diffusion coefficients are also reported at 800 °C and 1100 °C based on an analysis using a one-dimensional diffusion model.

  19. Helium Ion Microscopy Visualizes Lipid Nanodomains in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Matthias; Frese, Natalie; Beyer, André; Heimann, Peter; Widera, Darius; Mönkemöller, Viola; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2015-11-18

    Cell membranes are composed of 2D bilayers of amphipathic lipids, which allow a lateral movement of the respective membrane components. These components are arranged in an inhomogeneous manner as transient micro- and nanodomains, which are believed to be crucially involved in the regulation of signal transduction pathways in mammalian cells. Because of their small size (diameter 10-200 nm), membrane nanodomains cannot be directly imaged using conventional light microscopy. Here, direct visualization of cell membrane nanodomains by helium ion microscopy (HIM) is presented. It is shown that HIM is capable to image biological specimens without any conductive coating and that HIM images clearly allow the identification of nanodomains in the ultrastructure of membranes with 1.5 nm resolution. The shape of these nanodomains is preserved by fixation of the surrounding unsaturated fatty acids while saturated fatty acids inside the nanodomains are selectively removed. Atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, 3D structured illumination microscopy, and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy provide additional evidence that the structures in the HIM images of cell membranes originate from membrane nanodomains. The nanodomains observed by HIM have an average diameter of 20 nm and are densely arranged with a minimal nearest neighbor distance of ≈ 15 nm.

  20. Hydration of magnesia cubes: a helium ion microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Johannes; Bourret, Gilles R

    2016-01-01

    Summary Physisorbed water originating from exposure to the ambient can have a strong impact on the structure and chemistry of oxide nanomaterials. The effect can be particularly pronounced when these oxides are in physical contact with a solid substrate such as the ones used for immobilization to perform electron or ion microscopy imaging. We used helium ion microscopy (HIM) and investigated morphological changes of vapor-phase-grown MgO cubes after vacuum annealing and pressing into foils of soft and high purity indium. The indium foils were either used as obtained or, for reference, subjected to vacuum drying. After four days of storage in the vacuum chamber of the microscope and at a base pressure of p < 10−7 mbar, we observed on these cubic particles the attack of residual physisorbed water molecules from the indium substrate. As a result, thin magnesium hydroxide layers spontaneously grew, giving rise to characteristic volume expansion effects, which depended on the size of the particles. Rounding of the originally sharp cube edges leads to a significant loss of the morphological definition specific to the MgO cubes. Comparison of different regions within one sample before and after exposure to liquid water reveals different transformation processes, such as the formation of Mg(OH)2 shells that act as diffusion barriers for MgO dissolution or the evolution of brucite nanosheets organized in characteristic flower-like microstructures. The findings underline the significant metastability of nanomaterials under both ambient and high-vacuum conditions and show the dramatic effect of ubiquitous water films during storage and characterization of oxide nanomaterials. PMID:27335725

  1. Helium ion microscopy for high-resolution visualization of the articular cartilage collagen network.

    PubMed

    Vanden Berg-Foels, W S; Scipioni, L; Huynh, C; Wen, X

    2012-05-01

    The articular cartilage collagen network is an important research focus because network disruption results in cartilage degeneration and patient disability. The recently introduced helium ion microscope (HIM), with its smaller probe size, longer depth of field and charge neutralization, has the potential to overcome the inherent limitations of electron microscopy for visualization of collagen network features, particularly at the nanoscale. In this study, we evaluated the capabilities of the helium ion microscope for high-resolution visualization of the articular cartilage collagen network. Images of rabbit knee cartilage were acquired with a helium ion microscope; comparison images were acquired with a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Sharpness of example high-resolution helium ion microscope and field emission scanning electron microscope images was quantified using the 25-75% rise distance metric. The helium ion microscope was able to acquire high-resolution images with unprecedented clarity, with greater sharpness and three-dimensional-like detail of nanoscale fibril morphologies and fibril connections, in samples without conductive coatings. These nanoscale features could not be resolved by field emission scanning electron microscopy, and three-dimensional network structure could not be visualized with transmission electron microscopy. The nanoscale three-dimensional-like visualization capabilities of the helium ion microscope will enable new avenues of investigation in cartilage collagen network research.

  2. A comparison of neon versus helium ion beam induced deposition via Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Smith, Daryl A; Rack, Philip D

    2013-03-22

    The ion beam induced nanoscale synthesis of PtCx (where x ∼ 5) using the trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV) (MeCpPt(IV)Me3) precursor is investigated by performing Monte Carlo simulations of helium and neon ions. The helium beam leads to more lateral growth relative to the neon beam because of its larger interaction volume. The lateral growth of the nanopillars is dominated by molecules deposited via secondary electrons in both the simulations. Notably, the helium pillars are dominated by SE-I electrons whereas the neon pillars are dominated by SE-II electrons. Using a low precursor residence time of 70 μs, resulting in an equilibrium coverage of ∼4%, the neon simulation has a lower deposition efficiency (3.5%) compared to that of the helium simulation (6.5%). At larger residence time (10 ms) and consequently larger equilibrium coverage (85%) the deposition efficiencies of helium and neon increased to 49% and 21%, respectively; which is dominated by increased lateral growth rates leading to broader pillars. The nanoscale growth is further studied by varying the ion beam diameter at 10 ms precursor residence time. The study shows that total SE yield decreases with increasing beam diameters for both the ion types. However, helium has the larger SE yield as compared to that of neon in both the low and high precursor residence time, and thus pillars are wider in all the simulations studied.

  3. Diagnostics of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source helium plasma with the injection of 23Na1+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Galatà, A.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Thuillier, T.; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the utilization of an injected 23Na1+ ion beam as a diagnostics of the helium plasma of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The obtained data allows estimating the upper limit for the ion-ion collision mean-free path of the incident sodium ions, the lower limit of ion-ion collision frequencies for all charge states of the sodium ions and the lower limit of the helium plasma density. The ion-ion collision frequencies of high charge state ions are shown to be at least on the order of 1-10 MHz and the plasma density is estimated to be on the order of 1011 cm-3 or higher. The experimental results are compared to simulations of the 23Na1+ capture into the helium plasma. The results indicate that the lower breeding efficiency of light ions in comparison to heavier elements is probably due to different capture efficiencies in which the in-flight ionization of the incident 1 + ions plays a vital role.

  4. The Effects of the Pauli Exclusion Principle in Determining the Ionization Energies of the Helium Atom and Helium-Like Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    For helium and helium-like ions, we have examined the differences between the values of the ionization energies as calculated from the Bohr theory and those measured in experiments. We find that these differences vary linearly with the atomic number of the system. Using this result, we show how the Bohr model for single-electron systems may be…

  5. S-states of helium-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2012-03-01

    A simple Mathematica (version 7) code for computing S-state energies and wave functions of two-electron (helium-like) ions is presented. The elegant technique derived from the classical papers of Pekeris is applied. The basis functions are composed of the Laguerre functions. The method is based on the perimetric coordinates and specific properties of the Laguerre polynomials. Direct solution of the generalized eigenvalues and eigenvectors problem is used, distinct from the Pekeris works. No special subroutines were used, only built-in objects supported by Mathematica. The accuracy of the results and computation times depend on the basis size. The ground state and the lowest triplet state energies can be computed with a precision of 12 and 14 significant figures, respectively. The accuracy of the higher excited states calculations is slightly worse. The resultant wave functions have a simple analytical form, that enables calculation of expectation values for arbitrary physical operators without any difficulties. Only three natural parameters are required in the input. The new version of Mathematica code takes into account the fact that the negative hydrogen ion has only one bound state. New version program summaryProgram title: TwoElAtomSL(SH) Catalogue identifier: AEHY_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHY_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 998 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 286 543 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 7.0 and 8.0 Computer: Any PC with a Mathematica installation Operating system: Any which supports Mathematica; tested under Microsoft Windows XP and Linux SUSE 11.0 RAM:⩾10 bytes Classification: 2.1, 2.2, 2.7, 2.9 Catalogue identifier of previous

  6. 15 years experience with helium ion radiotherapy for uvealmelanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Joseph R.; D.H. Char, P.L. Petti; Daftarii, K.; Quivey,J.M.; Singh, R.P.; Blakeley, E.A.; Phillips, T.L.

    1997-06-01

    Purpose: To review the long-term experience of helium iontherapy as a therapeutic alternative to enucleation for uveal melanoma,particularly with respect to survival, local control, and morbidity.Methods and Materials: 347 patients with uveal melanoma were treated withheluim ion RT from 1978-1992. A nonrandomized dose-searching study wasundertaken, with doses progressively reduced from 80 GyE in fivefractionsto 48 GyE in four fractions, given in 3-15 days, mean of 7days. Results: Local control was achieved in 96 percent of patients, withno difference in the rate of local control being seen at 80, 70, 60, or50 GyE in five fractions. At the lowest dose level of 48 GyE in fourfractions, the local control rate fell to 87 percent. Fifteen of 347patients (4 percent) had local regrowth in the eye requiring enucleation(12 patients), laser (1 patient) or reirradiation (2 patients). The timeof appearance of local regrowth ranged from 4 months to 5 yearsposttreatment, with 85 percent occurring within 3 years. Of the 347patients, 208 are alive as of May 1, 1997. The median follow up of allpatients is 8.5 years, range 1-17 years. Kaplan-Maier (K-M) survival is80 percent at 5 years, 76 percent at 10 years, and 72 percent at 15 yearsposttreatment. Patients with tumors not involving the ciliary body have a15-year K-M survival of 80 percent. The results for patients whose tumorsinvolved the ciliary body are poor, with a 15-year K-M survival of 43percent. Seventy-five percent of patients with tumors at least 3.0 mmfrom the fovea and optic nerve, and initial ultrasound height less than6.0 mm, retained vision of 20/200 or better posttreatment. Patients withtumors larger than 6 mm in thickness, or with tumors lying close to theoptic nerve or fovea, have a reduced chance of retaining useful vision.The enucleation rate is 19 percent, 3 percent for local failure and 16percent because of complications of the helium RT, particularlyneovascular glaucoma, which occurred in 35 percent of

  7. Simulation study on retention and reflection from tungsten carbide under high fluence of helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, T.; Kawamura, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Yamamura, Y.

    2001-03-01

    We have studied, with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT-DIFFUSE, the fluence-dependence of the amount of helium atoms retained in tungsten carbide at room temperature under helium ion bombardment. The retention behavior may be understood qualitatively in terms of irradiation-dependent diffusion coefficient assumed and range. The re-emission, reflection and sputtering from tungsten carbide under helium ion irradiation were derived and compared with each other. We have discussed the retention curves for incident energy of 5 keV at incident angles of 0° and 80° and of 500 eV at 0°. The energy spectra of helium atoms reflected from tungsten carbide for incident energy of 500 eV at 0° and 80° were compared with those from graphite and tungsten.

  8. Helium ion irradiation behavior of Ni-1wt.%SiCNP composite and the effect of ion flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. L.; Huang, H. F.; Xie, R.; Thorogood, G. J.; Yang, C.; Li, Z. J.; Xu, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    Silicon carbide nanoparticle-reinforced nickel metal (Ni-SiCNP composite) samples were bombarded by helium ions with fluences of 1 × 1016 and 3 × 1016 ions/cm2 at two different fluxes. The microstructural and mechanical changes were characterized via TEM and nanoindentation. Nano-scaled helium bubbles in the shape of spheres were observed in the samples irradiated at high flux and polygons at low flux. The number of helium bubbles increased with the fluence, whereas their mean size remained unaffected. In addition, the nanohardness of the damage layer also increased as the fluence increased. In addition this study suggests that a higher flux results in a higher number of smaller helium bubbles, while showing no obvious effect on the irradiation-induced hardening of the materials.

  9. Microinstabilities in hydrogen- and helium-dominated multi-ion-species plasmas in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunami, Masanori; Nakata, Motoki; Sugama, Hideo; Tanaka, Kenji; Toda, Shinichiro

    2017-04-01

    The ion scale microinstabilities in the large helical device (LHD) are investigated by the gyrokinetic simulations for the multi-ion-species plasmas including hydrogen, helium, and impurity ions. The observations in the LHD experiments show that the ion temperature increases with the decreases of the ratio of hydrogen density to helium density. It is found from the linear gyrokinetic simulations with the multi-ion-species and real-mass kinetic electrons in the LHD discharges that the growth rates of the ion scale microinstabilities are reduced for the helium-dominated multi-species plasma compared with the hydrogen-dominated one. In addition to the differences of the conditions including the temperature, the density profiles, and the temperature ratio between both plasmas, due to the dependence on the mass number and the electric charge of the mixed ion species, the mixing length estimates obtained from the linear simulations predicts smaller ion thermal diffusivity for the helium-dominated plasma than the hydrogen-dominated one in the hydrogen gyro-Bohm unit, which is consistent with the experimental results.

  10. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentecoste, Lucile; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal; Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (1011-1014 ions.cm2.s-1) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He+), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  11. S-states of helium-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2011-09-01

    A simple Mathematica (version 7) code for computing S-state energies and wave functions of two-electron (helium-like) ions is presented. The elegant technique derived from the classical papers of Pekeris (1958, 1959, 1962, 1965, 1971) [1-3] is applied. The basis functions are composed of the Laguerre functions. The method is based on the perimetric coordinates and specific properties of the Laguerre polynomials. Direct solution of the generalized eigenvalues and eigenvectors problem is used, distinct from the Pekeris works. No special subroutines were used, only built-in objects supported by Mathematica. The accuracy of the results and computation times depend on the basis size. The ground state and the lowest triplet state energies can be computed with a precision of 12 and 14 significant figures, respectively. The accuracy of the higher excited states calculations is slightly worse. The resultant wave functions have a simple analytical form, that enables calculation of expectation values for arbitrary physical operators without any difficulties. Only three natural parameters are required in the input. The above Mathematica code is simpler than the earlier version (Liverts and Barnea, 2010 [4]). At the same time, it is faster and more accurate. Program summaryProgram title: TwoElAtomSL(SH) Catalogue identifier: AEHY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11 434 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 540 063 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 7.0 Computer: Any PC Operating system: Any which supports Mathematica; tested under Microsoft Windows XP and Linux SUSE 11.0 RAM:⩾10 bytes Classification: 2.1, 2.2, 2.7, 2.9 Nature of problem: The Schr

  12. High Power Ion Heating in Helium and Hydrogen Plasmas for Advanced Plasma Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira; Hagiwara, Tatsuya; Domon, Masakazu; Taguchi, Takahiro

    High power ion cyclotron resonance heating is performed in a fast-flowing plasma operated with hydrogen and helium gases. Ion heating is clearly observed in hydrogen plasma as well as in helium plasma. The resonance region of magnetic field is broader and wave absorption efficiency is higher in hydrogen plasma than those in helium plasma. The thermal energy of the heated ions is converted to the kinetic energy of the exhaust plume by passing through a diverging magnetic nozzle set in a downstream region. In the magnetic nozzle energy conversion occurred as keeping the magnetic moment constant, but some discrepancy was observed in larger gradient of magnetic field. The kinetic energy of the exhaust plume is successfully controlled by an input power of radio-frequency wave, which is one of the key technologies for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) type plasma thruster.

  13. Cavity morphology in a Ni based superalloy under heavy ion irradiation with hot pre-injected helium. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Yao, Zhongwen; Daymond, Mark R.; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2014-03-01

    In the current investigation, TEM in-situ heavy ion (1 MeV Kr2+) irradiation with helium pre-injected at elevated temperature (400 °C) was conducted to simulate in-reactor neutron irradiation induced damage in CANDU spacer material Inconel X-750, in an effort to understand the effects of helium on irradiation induced cavity microstructures. Three different quantities of helium, 400 appm, 1000 appm, and 5000 appm, were pre-injected directly into TEM foils at 400 °C. The samples containing helium were then irradiated in-situ with 1 MeV Kr2+ at 400 °C to a final dose of 5.4 dpa (displacement per atom). Cavities were formed from the helium injection solely and the cavity density and size increased with increasing helium dosage. In contrast to previous heavy ion irradiations with cold pre-injected helium, heterogeneous nucleation of cavities was observed. During the ensuing heavy ion irradiation, dynamical observation showed noticeable size increase in cavities which nucleated close to the grain boundaries. A "bubble-void" transformation was observed after Kr2+ irradiation to high dose (5.4 dpa) in samples containing 1000 appm and 5000 appm helium. Cavity distribution was found to be consistent with in-reactor neutron irradiation induced cavity microstructures. This implies that the distribution of helium is greatly dependent on the injection temperature, and helium pre-injection at high temperature is preferred for simulating the migration of the transmutation produced helium.

  14. Helium behaviour in UO2 through low fluence ion implantation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, P.; Gilabert, E.; Martin, G.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Sauvage, T.; Desgardin, P.; Barthe, M.-F.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we focus on experiments involving implantation of 500 keV 3He ions in sintered polycrystalline material. Samples are implanted at low fluences (˜2 ×1013 ions/cm2) and subsequently isothermally annealed in a highly sensitive thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) device PIAGARA (Plateforme Interdisciplinaire pour l'Analyse des GAz Rares en Aquitaine). The helium fluencies studied are two to three orders of magnitude lower than previous Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) experiments carried out on identical samples implanted at identical energies. The fractional release of helium obtained in the TDS experiments is interpreted using a three-dimensional axisymmetric diffusion model which enables results to be quantitatively compared to previous NRA data. The analysis shows that helium behaviour is qualitatively independent of ion fluency over three orders of magnitude: helium diffusion appears to be strongly inhibited below 1273 K within the centre of the grains presumably as a result of helium bubble precipitation. The scenario involving diffusion at grain boundaries and in regions adjacent to them observed at higher fluencies is quantitatively confirmed at much lower doses. The main difference lies in the average width of the region in which uninhibited diffusion occurs.

  15. The formation of microvoids in MgO by helium ion implantation and thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Fedorov, A. V.; Labohm, F.; Neeft, E. A. C.; Konings, R. J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of microvoids in metal oxides by helium implantation and thermal annealing is observed under similar conditions as has been shown earlier for silicon. Cleaved MgO (1 0 0) single crystals were implanted with 30 keV 3He ions with doses varying from 10 15 to 10 16 cm -2 and subsequently thermally annealed from RT to 1500 K. Monitoring of the defect depth profile and the retained amount of helium was performed by positron beam analysis and neutron depth profiling, respectively. For a dose larger than 2 × 10 15 cm -2 annealing of the defects was observed in two stages: at 1000 K helium filled monovacancies dissociated, and other defects still retaining the helium were formed, and at 1300 K all helium left the sample while an increase of positron-valence-electron annihilations was observed, indicating an increase of the volume available in the defects. The voids of nm size were located at shallower depth than the implanted helium. At lower dose no voids were left after high temperature annealing. Voids can also be created, and even more effectively, by hydrogen or deuterium implantation. The voids are stable to temperatures of 1500 K. The use of the nanovoids as a precursor state for nanoprecipitates of metals or other species is discussed.

  16. Observations of energetic helium ions in the earth's radiation belts during a sequence of geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of energetic (MeV) helium ions made with Explorer 45 during a sequence of magnetic storms during June through December of 1972 are presented. It is noted that the first of these storms started on June 17 and had a Dst index excursion to -190 gamma and that the MeV helium ions were perturbed primarily beyond 3 earth radii in the equatorial radiation belts with a typical flux increase of an order of magnitude at L equal to 4. The second storm period was in August and was associated with very major solar flare activity. While the Dst extremum was at best 35 gamma less than the June storm, this period can be characterized as irregular (or multi-storm) with strong compression of the magnetosphere and very large (order of magnitude) MeV helium ion flux enhancements down to L approximately equal to 2. After this injection, the trapped helium ion fluxes showed positive spherical slope with the peak beyond 3.15 MeV at L equal to 2.5; at the lowest observable L shells, little flux decay was seen during the remainder of the year.

  17. The interaction of a nanoscale coherent helium-ion probe with a crystal.

    PubMed

    D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2013-11-01

    Thickness fringing was recently observed in helium ion microscopy (HIM) when imaging magnesium oxide cubes using a 40 keV convergent probe in scanning transmission mode. Thickness fringing is also observed in electron microscopy and is due to quantum mechanical, coherent, multiple elastic scattering attenuated by inelastic phonon excitation (thermal scattering). A quantum mechanical model for elastic scattering and phonon excitation correctly models the thickness fringes formed by the helium ions. However, unlike the electron case, the signal in the diffraction plane is due mainly to the channeling of ions which have first undergone inelastic thermal scattering in the first few atomic layers so that the origin of the thickness fringes is not due to coherent interference effects. This quantum mechanical model affords insight into the interaction of a nanoscale, focused coherent ion probe with the specimen and allows us to elucidate precisely what is needed to achieve atomic resolution HIM.

  18. Creation and physical aspects of luminescent patterns using helium ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Veligura, Vasilisa; Hlawacek, Gregor; Gastel, Raoul van; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene; Jahn, Uwe

    2014-05-14

    The helium ion microscope provides a sub-nanometer size He{sup +} ion beam which can be employed for materials modification. We demonstrate how material properties can be tuned in a helium ion microscope with very high precision using, as an example, the modification of the luminescence properties of a sodium chloride crystal. Although the beam size is extremely small, the actually affected sample volume is much bigger due to collision cascades. We have directly measured the diameter of the interaction volume of the 35 keV He{sup +} beam with a sodium chloride crystal using ionoluminescence. The experimental results are compared to stopping and range of ions in matter simulations and calculations of the point spread function.

  19. a Measurement of Cross-Sections for Charge Transfer in Proton + Helium ---> Helium Ion + Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, Michael Chadbourne

    A microwave-resonance, optical-detection technique is used to measure the cross sections for charge transfer into the n = 3,L,m(,L) states of hydrogen by protons colliding with a helium gas target at energies between 30 and 80 keV. The feeding of the n = 3 states by states in higher n manifolds created by the collisions has been taken into account for the first time in this type of measurement, with a significant effect on the results. The final cross sections are one of only two measurements of the L,m(,L) cross sections in this system, and the only one to be able to resolve the 3d cross sections. The. uncertainties are 10% to 30% of the cross sections at all energies. The results are (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). Energy (keV). 30 50 60 80. (sigma)(,3s). 10('-18)cm('2) 1.6(3) 2.4(5) 2.0(4) 1.4(3). 3s(,0) 1 1 1 1. p(,0) 0.58(8) 0.19(2) 0.18(2) 0.13(1). p(,1) 0.36(6) 0.08(1) 0.04(1) 0.05(1). TOTAL 0.94(10) 0.27(2) 0.22(2) 0.18(1). d(,0) 0.055(10) 0.017(4) 0.019(4) 0.013(3). d(,1) 0.046(7) 0.014(3) 0.014(3) 0.010(2). d(,2) 0.022(4) 0.001(2) -0.002(2) -0.002(2). TOTAL 0.123(12) 0.032(5) 0.031(5) 0.021(4). (TABLE ENDS).

  20. Imaging and nanofabrication with the helium ion microscope of the Van Leeuwenhoek Laboratory in Delft.

    PubMed

    Alkemade, Paul F A; Koster, Emma M; van Veldhoven, Emile; Maas, Diederik J

    2012-01-01

    Although helium ion microscopy (HIM) was introduced only a few years ago, many new application fields are emerging. The connecting factor between these novel applications is the unique interaction of the primary helium ion beam with the sample material at and just below its surface. In particular, the HIM secondary electron signal stems from an area that is extremely well localized around the point of incidence of the primary beam. This makes the HIM well suited for both high-resolution imaging and high-resolution nanofabrication. Another advantage in nanofabrication is the low ion backscattering fraction, which leads to a weak proximity effect. The subnanometer probe size and the unique beam-materials interactions have opened new areas of research. This review presents a selection of studies conducted on a single instrument. The selection encompasses applications ranging from imaging to nanofabrication and from fundamental academic research to applied industrial developments.

  1. Estimation of the helium ion density distribution in the plasmasphere based on a single IMAGE/EUV image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, S.; Fok, M.-C.; Brandt, P. C.; Higuchi, T.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a technique by which to estimate the spatial distribution of plasmaspheric helium ions based on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) data obtained from the IMAGE satellite. The estimation is performed using a linear inversion method based on the Bayesian approach. The global imaging data from the IMAGE satellite enable us to estimate a global two-dimensional distribution of the helium ions in the plasmasphere. We applied this technique to a synthetic EUV image generated from a numerical model. This technique was confirmed to successfully reproduce the helium ion density that generated the synthetic EUV data. We also demonstrate how the proposed technique works for real data using two real EUV images.

  2. Microstructure of a 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel before and after helium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Chunming; Wang, Lumin

    2014-12-01

    A 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel with the nominal compositions of Fe-14Cr-2 W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 (wt.%) was produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Helium ion was implanted into the 14Cr-ODS steel along with Eurofer 97 steel as reference at 400 °C to a fluence of 1 × 1017 He+/cm2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annual dark field (HAADF) scanning TEM (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) were used to characterize the microstructure of 14Cr-ODS and Eurofer 97 steels before and after helium implantation. High-density Y-Ti-O-rich nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates as well as large Cr-Ti rich oxides were observed in the 14Cr-ODS steel. The average size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates is 9 nm. After helium implantation, the helium bubbles formed in the 14Cr-ODS steel exhibit the smaller size and the lower volume fraction than that in Eurofer 97 steel, indicating high-density nano-scale precipitates can effectively suppress the coarsening of helium bubbles.

  3. Temperature dependent mobility measurements of alkali earth ions in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putlitz, Gisbert Zu; Baumann, I.; Foerste, M.; Jungmann, K.; Riediger, O.; Tabbert, B.; Wiebe, J.; Zühlke, C.

    1998-05-01

    Mobility measurements of impurity ions in superfluid helium are reported. Alkali earth ions were produced with a laser sputtering technique and were drawn inside the liquid by an electric field. The experiments were carried out in the temperature region from 1.27 up to 1.66 K. The temperature dependence of the mobility of Be^+-ions (measured here for the first time) differs from that of the other alkali earth ions Mg^+, Ca^+, Sr^+ and Ba^+, but behaves similar to that of He^+ (M. Foerste, H. Günther, O. Riediger, J. Wiebe, G. zu Putlitz, Z. Phys. B) 104, 317 (1997). Theories of Atkins (A. Atkins, Phys. Rev.) 116, 1339 (1959) and Cole (M.W. Cole, R.A. Bachmann Phys. Rev. B) 15, 1388 (1977) predict a different defect structure for He^+ and the alkali earth ions: the helium ion is assumed to form a snowball like structure whereas for the alkali earth ions a bubble structure is assumed. If the temperature dependence is a characteristic feature for the different structures, then it seems likely that the Be^+ ion builds a snowball like structure.

  4. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  5. Helium ion microscope generated nitrogen-vacancy centres in type Ib diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, D.; Fox, D.; O'Hara, N.; Usov, V.; Scanlan, D.; McEvoy, N.; Duesberg, G. S.; Cross, G. L. W.; Zhang, H. Z.; Donegan, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    We report on position and density control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres created in type Ib diamond using localised exposure from a helium ion microscope and subsequent annealing. Spatial control to <380 nm has been achieved. We show that the fluorescence lifetime of the created centres decreases with increasing ion dose. Furthermore, we show that for doses >1 × 1017 ion/cm2, significant damage of the diamond lattice occurs resulting in fluorescence quenching and amorphization. This places an upper limit on the density of NV centres that can be created using this method.

  6. Computer simulations of helium-solvated ions: solid-like versus liquid-like defect structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolini, Stefano; Ancilotto, Francesco; Toigo, Flavio

    2007-03-01

    The local order around several alkali (Li^+ and Na^+) and alkali-earth (Be^+, Mg^+ and Ca^+) ions in ^4He clusters has been studied using ground-state path integral Monte Carlo simulations. We apply a criterion based on multipole dynamical correlations to discriminate between solid-like versus liquid-like behavior of the He solvent surrounding the impurity-ion. In agreement with existing experimental measurements in bulk helium, our findings suggest that Be^+ produces a solid-(``snowball'')-like structure, similarly to alkali ions and in contrast to heavier alkali-earth ones, for which a liquid-like environment is predicted.

  7. Reflection properties of hydrogen ions at helium irradiated tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, K.; Tawada, Y.; Lee, H. T.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, N.; Sasao, M.; Kisaki, M.; Nishiura, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yamaoka, H.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured W surfaces prepared by He bombardment exhibit characteristic angular distributions of hydrogen ion reflection upon injection of 1 keV H+ beam. A magnetic momentum analyzer that can move in the vacuum chamber has measured the angular dependence of the intensity and the energy of reflected ions. Broader angular distributions were observed for He-irradiated tungsten samples compared with that of the intrinsic polycrystalline W. Both intensity and energy of reflected ions decreased in the following order: the polycrystalline W, the He-bubble containing W, and the fuzz W. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations based on Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target code suggests that lower atom density near the surface can make the reflection coefficients lower due to increasing number of collisions.

  8. Charge transfer between O{sup +} ions and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.B.; Stancil, P.C.; Liebermann, H.P.; Funke, P.; Buenker, R.J.

    2005-06-15

    The charge-transfer processes O{sup +}({sup 4}S{sup 0},{sup 2}D{sup 0},{sup 2}P{sup 0})+He{yields}O({sup 3}P)+He{sup +} have been investigated by using a fully quantal molecular-orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) approach. Cross sections are presented for ion energies from 0.5 to 10 keV and compared with those from recent experiments and semiclassical theory. Good agreement is found between the QMOCC results and the measurements. Particular attention is given to addressing the metastable component of the experimental ion beams. We further argue that the so-called 'suppressed electron-capture effect' for metastable ions proposed by Wolfrum et al. is not a viable mechanism to explain their measurements. However, the current QMOCC calculations were found to reproduce neither the ground-state nor metastable-state cross sections predicted by the semiclassical method.

  9. Charge Dependent Effects in Double-Photo-Ionization of Helium-Like Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Matt; Colgan, James

    2006-10-01

    A study is made of triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for double-photo-ionization (DPI) of helium-like ions. The angular distribution between the equal energy outgoing electrons is examined as a function of the nuclear target charge. Time-dependent close-coupling theory (TDCC) will be used to solve the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation for both outgoing electrons. The TDCC method treats the correlation between the electrons without approximation. Previous theoretical models that have calculated the TDCS for helium-like ions have only included the electron-electron interaction through approximate perturbative methods. We will analyze the effects of the electron correlation and its dependence relative to the nuclear charge. We will compare our calculations with previous experimental and theoretical work, where available.

  10. Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels under helium implantation and heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hengqing; Zhang, Chonghong; Yang, Yitao; Meng, Yancheng; Jang, Jinsung; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels after multi-energy He-ion implantation, or after irradiation with energetic heavy ions including Xe and Bi-ions was investigated with nano-indentation technique. Three kinds of high-Cr ODS ferritic steels including the commercial MA956 (19Cr-3.5Al), the 16Cr-0.1Ti and the 16Cr-3.5Al-0.1Zr were used. Data of nano-hardness were analyzed with an approach based on Nix-Gao model. The depth profiles of nano-hardness can be understood by the indentation size effect (ISE) in specimens of MA956 implanted with multi-energy He-ions or irradiated with 328 MeV Xe ions, which produced a plateau damage profile in the near-surface region. However, the damage gradient overlaps the ISE in the specimens irradiated with 9.45 Bi ions. The dose dependence of the nano-hardness shows a rapid increase at low doses and a slowdown at higher doses. An 1/2-power law dependence on dpa level is obtained. The discrepancy in nano-hardness between the helium implantation and Xe-ion irradiation can be understood by using the average damage level instead of the peak dpa level. Helium-implantation to a high dose (7400 appm/0.5 dpa) causes an additional hardening, which is possibly attributed to the impediment of motion dislocations by helium bubbles formed in high concentration in specimens.

  11. Experimental studies of the stopping powers of various types of matter for protons and helium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Potetyunko, G.N.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental studies of the stopping powers of various types of matter for protons and helium ions are reviewed. The experimental methods of determining the stopping power are analyzed and the ranges where they are applicable are discussed. A comparison is made with the experimental data cited in the most commonly used tables of stopping powers. Empirical formulas for the stopping power and the rule of additivity of the stopping powers of multicomponent matter are discussed.

  12. Stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.

    1989-12-01

    One of the more challenging problems of vascular neurosurgery is the management of surgically-inaccessible arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we have developed the method of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle (helium-ion) Bragg peak radiosurgery for treatment of inoperable intracranial AVMs in over 300 patients since 1980 (Fabrikant et al. 1989, Fabrikant et al. 1985, Levy et al. 1989). This report describes patient selection, treatment method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered. 4 refs.

  13. Cavity morphology in a Ni based superalloy under heavy ion irradiation with hot pre-injected helium. II

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, He; Yao, Zhongwen Daymond, Mark R.; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2014-03-14

    In the current investigation, TEM in-situ heavy ion (1 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) irradiation with helium pre-injected at elevated temperature (400 °C) was conducted to simulate in-reactor neutron irradiation induced damage in CANDU spacer material Inconel X-750, in an effort to understand the effects of helium on irradiation induced cavity microstructures. Three different quantities of helium, 400 appm, 1000 appm, and 5000 appm, were pre-injected directly into TEM foils at 400 °C. The samples containing helium were then irradiated in-situ with 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} at 400 °C to a final dose of 5.4 dpa (displacement per atom). Cavities were formed from the helium injection solely and the cavity density and size increased with increasing helium dosage. In contrast to previous heavy ion irradiations with cold pre-injected helium, heterogeneous nucleation of cavities was observed. During the ensuing heavy ion irradiation, dynamical observation showed noticeable size increase in cavities which nucleated close to the grain boundaries. A “bubble-void” transformation was observed after Kr{sup 2+} irradiation to high dose (5.4 dpa) in samples containing 1000 appm and 5000 appm helium. Cavity distribution was found to be consistent with in-reactor neutron irradiation induced cavity microstructures. This implies that the distribution of helium is greatly dependent on the injection temperature, and helium pre-injection at high temperature is preferred for simulating the migration of the transmutation produced helium.

  14. Characterization of two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride using scanning electron and scanning helium ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongxuan; Gao, Jianhua; Ishida, Nobuyuki; Xu, Mingsheng; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of the structural and physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as layer number and inelastic mean free path measurements, is very important to optimize their synthesis and application. In this study, we characterize the layer number and morphology of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets on a metallic substrate using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM). Using scanning beams of various energies, we could analyze the dependence of the intensities of secondary electrons on the thickness of the h-BN nanosheets. Based on the interaction between the scanning particles (electrons and helium ions) and h-BN nanosheets, we deduced an exponential relationship between the intensities of secondary electrons and number of layers of h-BN. With the attenuation factor of the exponential formula, we calculate the inelastic mean free path of electrons and helium ions in the h-BN nanosheets. Our results show that HIM is more sensitive and consistent than FE-SEM for characterizing the number of layers and morphology of 2D materials.

  15. Characterization of two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride using scanning electron and scanning helium ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongxuan E-mail: msxu@zju.edu.cn; Gao, Jianhua; Ishida, Nobuyuki; Xu, Mingsheng E-mail: msxu@zju.edu.cn; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-01-20

    Characterization of the structural and physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as layer number and inelastic mean free path measurements, is very important to optimize their synthesis and application. In this study, we characterize the layer number and morphology of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets on a metallic substrate using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM). Using scanning beams of various energies, we could analyze the dependence of the intensities of secondary electrons on the thickness of the h-BN nanosheets. Based on the interaction between the scanning particles (electrons and helium ions) and h-BN nanosheets, we deduced an exponential relationship between the intensities of secondary electrons and number of layers of h-BN. With the attenuation factor of the exponential formula, we calculate the inelastic mean free path of electrons and helium ions in the h-BN nanosheets. Our results show that HIM is more sensitive and consistent than FE-SEM for characterizing the number of layers and morphology of 2D materials.

  16. Rapid and precise scanning helium ion microscope milling of solid-state nanopores for biomolecule detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jijin; Ferranti, David C; Stern, Lewis A; Sanford, Colin A; Huang, Jason; Ren, Zheng; Qin, Lu-Chang; Hall, Adam R

    2011-06-10

    We report the formation of solid-state nanopores using a scanning helium ion microscope. The fabrication process offers the advantage of high sample throughput along with fine control over nanopore dimensions, producing single pores with diameters below 4 nm. Electronic noise associated with ion transport through the resultant pores is found to be comparable with levels measured on devices made with the established technique of transmission electron microscope milling. We demonstrate the utility of our nanopores for biomolecular analysis by measuring the passage of double-strand DNA.

  17. Applicability of the Atkins model to the ion behavior in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiderer, P.; Shikin, V.

    2009-02-01

    The properties of ion clusters in superfluid helium are usually treated within the model proposed by Atkins (the snowball model). However, although a solid sphere of radius Ra around the seed ion can actually exist, it is vitally important to which extent it really governs the scattering mechanisms of various thermal excitations at the cluster. Detailed analysis of available data on the phonon as well as the impurity and Stokes mobilities reveals that the true unifying factor in the discussed picture is a power-law density enhancement in the vicinity of the seed charged particle caused by the polarization forces rather than the radius Ra

  18. Evaluation of EUV resist performance below 20nm CD using helium ion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Diederik; van Veldhoven, Emile; van Langen-Suurling, Anja; Alkemade, Paul F. A.; Wuister, Sander; Hoefnagels, Rik; Verspaget, Coen; Meessen, Jeroen; Fliervoet, Timon

    2014-04-01

    For the introduction of EUV lithography, development of high performance EUV resists is of key importance. This development involves studies into resist sensitivity, resolving power and pattern uniformity. We have used a sub-nanometer-sized 30 keV helium ion beam to expose chemically amplified (CAR) EUV resists. There are similarities in the response of resists to He+ ions and EUV photons: both excite Secondary Electrons with similar energy distributions.The weak backscattering of the He+ ions results in ultra-low proximity effects. This fact enables the exposure of dense and detailed patterns by focused He+ ion beams without the need for proximity correction. This paper presents contact holes and lines at 40-nm pitch in an EUV CAR resist. We have used resist sensitivity, contrast, resolution (CD) and pattern fidelity (LCDU, LWR and dose-to-print) as metrics for a comparison of SHIBL with EUVL. We show that Scanning Helium Ion Beam Lithography (SHIBL) can be a useful and economically attractive technology to (pre-)screen novel EUV resists prior to their final performance evaluation in an EUV scanner.

  19. Synthesis of nanowires via helium and neon focused ion beam induced deposition with the gas field ion microscope.

    PubMed

    Wu, H M; Stern, L A; Chen, J H; Huth, M; Schwalb, C H; Winhold, M; Porrati, F; Gonzalez, C M; Timilsina, R; Rack, P D

    2013-05-03

    The ion beam induced nanoscale synthesis of platinum nanowires using the trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV) (MeCpPt(IV)Me3) precursor is investigated using helium and neon ion beams in the gas field ion microscope. The He(+) beam induced deposition resembles material deposited by electron beam induced deposition with very small platinum nanocrystallites suspended in a carbonaceous matrix. The He(+) deposited material composition was estimated to be 16% Pt in a matrix of amorphous carbon with a large room-temperature resistivity (∼3.5 × 10(4)-2.2 × 10(5) μΩ cm) and temperature-dependent transport behavior consistent with a granular material in the weak intergrain tunnel coupling regime. The Ne(+) deposited material has comparable composition (17%), however a much lower room-temperature resistivity (∼600-3.0 × 10(3) μΩ cm) and temperature-dependent electrical behavior representative of strong intergrain coupling. The Ne(+) deposited nanostructure has larger platinum nanoparticles and is rationalized via Monte Carlo ion-solid simulations which show that the neon energy density deposited during growth is much larger due to the smaller ion range and is dominated by nuclear stopping relative to helium which has a larger range and is dominated by electronic stopping.

  20. Formation of c-BN nanoparticles by helium, lithium and boron ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aradi, Emily; Erasmus, Rudolph M.; Derry, Trevor E.

    2012-02-01

    Ion induced phase transformation from the soft graphitic hexagonal boron nitride ( h-BN) to ultrahard cubic boron nitride ( c-BN) nanoparticles is presented in the work herein. Ion implantation was used as a technique to introduce boron lithium and helium ions, at the energy of 150 keV and fluences ranging from 1 × 10 14 to 1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2, into hot pressed, polycrystalline h-BN. Analyses using Raman Spectroscopy showed that He +, Li + and B + led to a h-BN to c-BN phase transition, evident from the longitudinal optical (LO) Raman phonon features occurring in the implanted samples' spectra. The nature of these phonon peaks and their downshifting is explained using the spatial phonon correlation model.

  1. Removing Beam Current Artifacts in Helium Ion Microscopy: A Comparison of Image Processing Techniques.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Anders J; Portoles, Jose F; Sano, Naoko; Cumpson, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    The development of the helium ion microscope (HIM) enables the imaging of both hard, inorganic materials and soft, organic or biological materials. Advantages include outstanding topographical contrast, superior resolution down to <0.5 nm at high magnification, high depth of field, and no need for conductive coatings. The instrument relies on helium atom adsorption and ionization at a cryogenically cooled tip that is atomically sharp. Under ideal conditions this arrangement provides a beam of ions that is stable for days to weeks, with beam currents in the order of picoamperes. Over time, however, this stability is lost as gaseous contamination builds up in the source region, leading to adsorbed atoms of species other than helium, which ultimately results in beam current fluctuations. This manifests itself as horizontal stripe artifacts in HIM images. We investigate post-processing methods to remove these artifacts from HIM images, such as median filtering, Gaussian blurring, fast Fourier transforms, and principal component analysis. We arrive at a simple method for completely removing beam current fluctuation effects from HIM images while maintaining the full integrity of the information within the image.

  2. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-01

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as {1 1 1}-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on {1 1 1} and {2 1 1} surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while {0 0 1} and {0 1 1} surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to {1 1 1} and {2 1 1} tungsten surfaces than is observed for {0 0 1} or {0 1 1} surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten "fuzz" in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  3. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-14

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as (1 1 1)-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) tungsten surfaces than is observed for (0 0 1) or (0 1 1) surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten “fuzz” in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  4. Postmortem examination of 22 pancreatic carcinoma patients treated with helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Castro, J.R.; Quivey, J.M.; Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.; Tobias, C.A.; Walton, R.E.; Peters, T.C.

    1984-02-01

    Postmortem findings are available in this report in 22 patients with pancreatic carcinoma treated with helium ions at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; California. This represents the largest group evaluated histologically in the literature and is the first report evaluating effects of particle radiation in pancreatic tissue. Patient survival after therapy averaged 9 months. Most died of infection and/or pulmonary emboli. Local control was achieved in 27%. The pancreatic tumors had histologically more severe radiation changes than nontumor bearing pancreas. Irradiated bone marrow was severely hypocellular, and irradiated skin was atrophic. Five patients had radiation injury in the gastrointestinal tract. The spinal cord, liver, and kidneys showed no damage. This study demonstrates the safety of helium particle irradiation with present therapeutic planning. Injury to tumor was seen without excessive damage to adjacent tissues.

  5. Hyperfine structure measurement of 87Rb atoms injected into superfluid helium as highly energetic ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Kei; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Wakui, Takashi; Mitsuya, Yousuke; Hayasaka, Miki; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Odashima, Hitoshi; Ueno, Hideki; Matsuo, Yukari; Orochi Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new nuclear laser spectroscopy technique that is called OROCHI (Optical RI-atoms Observation in Condensed Helium as Ioncatcher). In OROCHI, highly energetic ion beam is injected into superfluid helium (He II) and is trapped as atoms. Hyperfine structure (HFS) and Zeeman splitting of trapped atoms is measured using laser-microwave (MW)/radiofrequency (RF) double resonance method. We deduce nuclear moments and spin values from the measured splittings, respectively So far, we measured Zeeman splitting of 84-87Rb atoms To evaluate the validity of the OROCHI method, it is necessary to investigate the following two points not only for Zeeman but also for HFS splitings. (i) What is the accuracy in frequency in our measurement? (ii) How high beam intensity is necessary to observe resonance spectra? For this purpose we conducted online experiment using 87Rb beam and measured the HFS splitting of injected 87Rb atoms in He II.

  6. Focused helium-ion beam irradiation effects on electrical properties of multi-layer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Stanford, Michael; Cross, Nick; Duscher, Gerd; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are currently receiving great attention due to their excellent opto-electronic properties. Tuning optical and electrical properties of mono and few layers TMDs, such as Tungsten diselenide (WSe2), by controlling the defects, is an intriguing opportunity to fabricate the next generation opto-electronic devices. Here, we report the effects of focused helium ion beam irradiation on structural, optical and electrical properties of few layer WSe2, via high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements. By controlling the ion irradiation dose, we selectively introduced precise defects in few layer WSe2 thereby locally tuning the electrically resistivity of the material. Hole transport in the few layer WSe2 is severely affected compared to electron transport for the same dose of helium ion beam irradiation studied. Furthermore, by selectively exposing the ion beams, we demonstrate the lateral p-n junction in few layer WSe2 flakes, which constitute an important advance towards two dimensional opto-electronic devices. Materials Science and Technology Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  7. Energy levels and transition rates for helium-like ions with Z = 10-36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, R.; Guo, X. L.; Wang, K.; Li, S.; Yan, J.; Chen, C. Y.; Brage, T.; Zou, Y. M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: Helium-like ions provide an important X-ray spectral diagnostics in astrophysical and high-temperature fusion plasmas. An interpretation of the observed spectra provides information on temperature, density, and chemical compositions of the plasma. Such an analysis requires information for a wide range of atomic parameters, including energy levels and transition rates. Our aim is to provide a set of accurate energy levels and transition rates for helium-like ions with Z = 10-36. Methods: The second-order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) was adopted in this paper. To support our MBPT results, we performed an independent calculation using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method. Results: We provide accurate energies for the lowest singly excited 70 levels among 1snl(n ≤ 6,l ≤ (n-1)) configurations and the lowest doubly excited 250 levels arising from the K-vacancy 2ln'l'(n' ≤ 6,l' ≤ (n'-1)) configurations of helium-like ions with Z = 10-36. Wavelengths, transition rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are calculated for the E1, M1, E2, and M2 transitions among these levels. The radiative lifetimes are reported for all the calculated levels. Conclusions: Our MBPT results for singly excited n ≤ 2 levels show excellent agreement with other elaborate calculations, while those for singly excited n ≥ 3 and doubly excited levels show significant improvements over previous theoretical results. Our results will be very helpful for astrophysical line identification and plasma diagnostics. Full Tables 1 and 2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A141

  8. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  9. Spectroscopic study of energetic helium-ion irradiation effects on nuclear graphite tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Wan; Lee, K. W.; Choi, D. M.; Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-02-01

    Helium ion-irradiation effects on the nuclear graphite tiles were studied in order to understand the structural modifications and damages that can be produced by fusion reaction in tokamaks. The surface morphological changes due to increasing dose of the irradiation were examined by the field-effect scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy elucidated the changes in the shallow surface bonding configurations caused by the energetic irradiation. Raman spectroscopy revealed the structural defects and diamond-like carbon sites that increased with increasing irradiation dose, and the average inter-defect distance was found from the Raman peak intensities as a function of the irradiation dose.

  10. Fabrication of carbon nanotube nanogap electrodes by helium ion sputtering for molecular contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, Cornelius; Vieker, Henning; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Hennrich, Frank; Muñoz Torres, David; Eaton, Thomas R.; Mayor, Marcel; Kappes, Manfred M.; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; and others

    2014-03-10

    Carbon nanotube nanogaps have been used to contact individual organic molecules. However, the reliable fabrication of a truly nanometer-sized gap remains a challenge. We use helium ion beam lithography to sputter nanogaps of only (2.8 ± 0.6) nm size into single metallic carbon nanotubes embedded in a device geometry. The high reproducibility of the gap size formation provides a reliable nanogap electrode testbed for contacting small organic molecules. To demonstrate the functionality of these nanogap electrodes, we integrate oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecular rods, and measure resistance before and after gap formation and with and without contacted molecules.

  11. Investigation of hydrogen and helium pumping by sputter ion pumps for Jupiter and outer planets mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomena of ion pumping is reviewed with emphasis on the pumping mechanism for hydrogen and helium. The experimental tests measure the performance of a small, flight proven ion pump which has a nominal four liter/second pumping speed for air. The speed of this pump for hydrogen and helium, and for hydrogen/helium mixes, is presented with particular detail regarding the time dependence. Pump test results are related to anticipated performance of the mass spectrometer by the pumping speeds for the gases to the partial pressure in the ion source. From this analysis, the pump specifications are quantified in terms of mission goals and in terms of observed pumping speeds for the various gases, load levels, and time periods.

  12. Nanoscale helium ion microscopic analysis of collagen fibrillar changes following femtosecond laser dissection of human cornea.

    PubMed

    Riau, Andri K; Poh, Rebekah; Pickard, Daniel S; Park, Chris H J; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, femtosecond lasers have emerged as an important tool to perform accurate and fine dissections with minimal collateral damage in biological tissue. The most common surgical procedure in medicine utilizing femtosecond laser is LASIK. During the femtosecond laser dissection process, the corneal collagen fibers inevitably undergo biomechanical and thermal changes on a sub-micro- or even a nanoscale level, which can potentially lead to post-surgical complications. In this study, we utilized helium ion microscopy, complemented with transmission electron microscopy to examine the femtosecond laser-induced collagen fibrillar damage in ex vivo human corneas. We found that the biomechanical damage induced by laser etching, generation of tissue bridges, and expansion of cavitation bubble and its subsequent collapse, created distortion to the surrounding collagen lamellae. Femtosecond laser-induced thermal damage was characterized by collapsed collagen lamellae, loss of collagen banding, collagen coiling, and presence of spherical debris. Our findings have shown the ability of helium ion microscopy to provide high resolution images with unprecedented detail of nanoscale fibrillar morphological changes in order to assess a tissue damage, which could not be resolved by conventional scanning electron microscopy previously. This imaging technology has also given us a better understanding of the tissue-laser interactions in a nano-structural manner and their possible effects on post-operative wound recovery.

  13. Ultrastructural analysis of wild type and mutant Drosophila melanogaster using helium ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Boseman, Adam; Nowlin, Kyle; Ashraf, Sarmadia; Yang, Jijin; Lajeunesse, Dennis

    2013-08-01

    Insects have evolved numerous adaptations to survive a variety of environmental conditions. Given that the primary interface between insects and the environment is mediated through their skin or cuticle, many of these adaptations are found in extraordinary cuticle diversity both in morphology and structure. Not all of these adaptions manifest themselves in changes in the chemical composition of the cuticle but rather as elaborations of the surface structures of the cuticle. Typically the examination of these micro- and nanoscale structures has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Typically, in order to decrease surface charging and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface, but this layer limits the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. In this paper we use a new technology, helium ion microscopy (HIM) to examine surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant Drosophila. Helium ion microscopy permits high resolution imaging of biological samples without the need for coating. We compare HIM to traditional SEM and demonstrate certain advantages of this type of microscopy, with our focus being high resolution characterization of nanostructures on the cuticle of Drosophila melanogaster and potentially other biological specimens.

  14. Optical Nanoscopy of High Tc Cuprate Nanoconstriction Devices Patterned by Helium Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Litombe, N. E.; Hoffman, Jennifer E.; Božović, I.

    2017-03-01

    Helium-ion beams (HIB) focused to sub-nanometer scales have emerged as powerful tools for high-resolution imaging as well as nano-scale lithography, ion milling or deposition. Quantifying irradiation effects is essential for reliable device fabrication but most of the depth profiling information is provided by computer simulations rather than experiment. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) to provide three-dimensional (3D) dielectric characterization of high-temperature superconductor devices fabricated by HIB. By imaging the infrared dielectric response we find that amorphization caused by the nominally 0.5 nm HIB extends throughout the entire 26.5 nm thickness of the cuprate film and by about 500 nm laterally. This unexpectedly widespread structural and electronic damage can be attributed to a Helium depth distribution substantially modified by internal device interfaces. Our study introduces AFM-SNOM as a quantitative nano-scale tomographic technique for non-invasive 3D characterization of irradiation damage in a wide variety of devices.

  15. Double-differential cross sections for single ionization of helium by bare ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, S.; Samanta, R.; Purkait, M.

    2013-11-01

    Double-differential cross sections (DDCS) for single ionization of helium by impact of proton and highly charged carbon ion have been calculated in the framework of four-body formalism using the three-Coulomb wave model (3C-4B) and first Born approximation (FBA-4B), respectively. The correlated motion of the particles interacting through long-range Coulomb potential is properly taken into account in the final state. In this paper, the energy and angular distributions of DDCS of low- and high-energy electron emission for ground-state helium atoms have been investigated. The ejected electrons are affected by the two-center field of the target and the projectile ion. The two-center effects are confined to comparison with other theoretical results. The results obtained, both from the 3C-4B and FBA-4B models, are compared with other theoretical and experimental findings. The present results are found to reproduce the peak structure of the experimental observations. Large discrepancy occurs between the present two theories at forward and backward angles except about the emission angle 90°. The present computed results obtained by the 3C-4B model are in good agreement with the available experimental findings.

  16. ERDA with an external helium ion micro-beam: Advantages and potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calligaro, T.; Castaing, J.; Dran, J.-C.; Moignard, B.; Pivin, J.-C.; Prasad, G. V. R.; Salomon, J.; Walter, P.

    2001-07-01

    Preliminary ERDA experiments at atmospheric pressure have been performed with our external microprobe set-up currently used for the analysis of museum objects by PIXE, RBS and NRA. The objective was to check the feasibility of hydrogen (and deuterium) profiling with an external beam of 3-MeV helium ions. The standard scattering geometry (incident beam at 15° with respect to sample surface and emerging protons or deuterons at 15° in the forward direction) was kept, but the thin foil absorber was replaced by helium gas filling the space between the beam spot and the detector over a distance of about 84 mm. Several standards prepared by ion implantation, with well known H or D depth profiles, were first analysed, which indicated that the analytical capability was as good as under vacuum. A striking feature is the much lower surface peak than under vacuum, a fact that enhances the sensitivity for H analysis near the surface. The same type of measurement was then performed on different materials to show the usefulness of the technique. As a first example, we have checked that the incorporation of H or D into sapphire crystals during mechanical polishing is below the detection limit. Another example is the measurement of the H content in emeralds which can be used as an additional compositional criterion for determining the provenance of emeralds set in museum jewels. The advantages and limitations of our set-up are discussed and several possible applications in the field of cultural heritage are described.

  17. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-05-07

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient's body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. In most cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy.

  18. Optical nanoscopy of high Tc cuprate nanoconstriction devices patterned by helium ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Gozar, Adrian; Litombe, N. E.; Hoffman, Jennifer E.; ...

    2017-02-06

    Helium ion beams (HIB) focused to subnanometer scales have emerged as powerful tools for high-resolution imaging as well as nanoscale lithography, ion milling, or deposition. Quantifying irradiation effects is an essential step toward reliable device fabrication, but most of the depth profiling information is provided by computer simulations rather than the experiment. Here, we demonstrate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) to provide three-dimensional (3D) dielectric characterization of high-temperature superconductor devices fabricated by HIB. By imaging the infrared dielectric response obtained from light demodulation at multiple harmonics of the AFM tapping frequency,more » we find that amorphization caused by the nominally 0.5 nm HIB extends throughout the entire 26.5 nm thickness of the cuprate film and by ~500 nm laterally. This unexpectedly widespread damage in morphology and electronic structure can be attributed to a helium depth distribution substantially modified by the internal device interfaces. Lastly, our study introduces AFM-SNOM as a quantitative tomographic technique for noninvasive 3D characterization of irradiation damage in a wide variety of nanoscale devices.« less

  19. Ion formation upon electron collisions with valine embedded in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Nikolaus; Ralser, Stefan; Renzler, Michael; Harnisch, Martina; Kaiser, Alexander; Denifl, Stefan; Böhme, Diethard K.; Scheier, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We report here experimental results for the electron ionization of large superfluid helium nanodroplets with sizes of about 105 atoms that are doped with valine and clusters of valine. Spectra of both cations and anions were monitored with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (mass resolution >4000). Clear series of peaks with valine cluster sizes up to at least 40 and spaced by the mass of a valine molecule are visible in both the cation and anion spectra. Ion efficiency curves are presented for selected cations and anions at electron energies up to about 40 eV and these provide insight into the mode of ion formation. The measured onset of 24.59 eV for cations is indicative of valine ionization by He+ whereas broad resonances at 2, 10 and 22 eV (and beyond) in the formation of anions speak to the occurrence of various modes of dissociative electron attachment by collisions with electrons or He*- and the influence of droplet size on the relative importance of these processes. Comparisons are also made with gas phase results and these provide insight into a matrix effect within the superfluid helium nanodroplet. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  20. Reaching the theoretical resonance quality factor limit in coaxial plasmonic nanoresonators fabricated by helium ion lithography.

    PubMed

    Melli, M; Polyakov, A; Gargas, D; Huynh, C; Scipioni, L; Bao, W; Ogletree, D F; Schuck, P J; Cabrini, S; Weber-Bargioni, A

    2013-06-12

    Optical antenna structures have revolutionized the field of nano-optics by confining light to deep subwavelength dimensions for spectroscopy and sensing. In this work, we fabricated coaxial optical antennae with sub-10-nanometer critical dimensions using helium ion lithography (HIL). Wavelength dependent transmission measurements were used to determine the wavelength-dependent optical response. The quality factor of 11 achieved with our HIL fabricated structures matched the theoretically predicted quality factor for the idealized flawless gold resonators calculated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD). For comparison, coaxial antennae with 30 nm critical dimensions were fabricated using both HIL and the more common Ga focus ion beam lithography (Ga-FIB). The quality factor of the Ga-FIB resonators was 60% of the ideal HIL results for the same design geometry due to limitations in the Ga-FIB fabrication process.

  1. Influence of the ionization-energy losses of high-energy bismuth ions on the development of helium blisters in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Reutov, V. F. Dmitriev, S. N.; Sohatsky, A. S.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.

    2015-10-15

    Understanding the behavior of helium in solids under conditions of intense ionizing radiation is of particular interest in solving many problems of nuclear, fusion, and space materials science and also in microelectronics. The observed effect of suppressing the formation of helium blisters on the surface of helium ion-doped silicon as a result of irradiation with high-energy bismuth ions is reported in this publication. It is suggested that a possible decrease in the concentration of helium atoms in silicon is due to their radiationinduced desorption from the area of doping in terms of the high-impact ionization of bismuth ions.

  2. Extraction of radioactive positive ions across the surface of superfluid helium: A new method to produce cold radioactive nuclear beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. X.; Dendooven, P.; Gloos, K.; Takahashi, N.; Pekola, J. P.; Äystö, J.

    2003-09-01

    Alpha-decay recoils 219Rn were stopped in superfluid helium and positive ions were extracted by electric field into the vapour phase. This first quantitative observation of extraction was successfully conducted using highly sensitive radioactivity detection. The efficiency for extraction across the liquid surface was 23 ± 4% at 1.60 K, the release time was 90 ± 10 ms at 1.50 K and the barrier for positive ions through a free superfluid-helium surface was 19.4 ± 4.5 K. The pulsed second sound proved to be effective in enhancing the extraction.

  3. Optoelectronic characteristics and applications of helium ion-implanted silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers are an attractive platform for the fabrication of planar lightwave circuits (PLCs) because they offer the potential for low-cost fabrication using mature complementary metal--organic--semiconductor (CMOS) compatible processes developed in the microelectronics industry. At the wavelengths of interest for telecommunications, SOI waveguides can have low optical losses (0.1dB/cm). Besides, the strong optical confinement offered by the high index contrast between silicon (Si) (n=3.45) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) (n=1.45) makes it possible to scale photonic devices to sub-micron level. In addition, the high optical intensity arising from the strong optical confinement inside the waveguide makes it possible to observe nonlinear optical effects, such as Raman and Kerr effects, in chip-scale devices. Helium ion implantation can not only reduce the free-carrier loss, but can also enhance the detection responsivity of below-bandgap wavelengths (1440 1590 nm). We propose and demonstrate an in-line channel power monitor (ICPM) based on helium ion implanted silicon waveguides. The implanted waveguide can detect light at 1440 1590 nm which are normally not detectable by silicon. We study the enhanced photoresponse of helium ion implanted waveguide samples which were annealed at different temperatures and for different durations. We then make use of the ICPM to perform a system application, called optical-burst-and-transient-equalizer (OBTE). The OBTE may provide a compact and low-cost solution to compensate gain-transient, gain-spectrum-tilt and to equalize the upstream packet amplitude in erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) amplified hybrid dense-wavelength-division-multiplexed (DWDM) and time-division-multiplexed (TDM) passive-optical-networks (PONs). The OBTE may be monolithically integrated on SOI platform and is potentially low cost and compact. The OBTE can compensate complicated gain slope shape, which may be generated in cascaded EDFAs or

  4. Ion velocity distribution functions in argon and helium discharges: detailed comparison of numerical simulation results and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir S.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Mustafaev, Alexander S.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Monte Carlo collision method, we have performed simulations of ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) taking into account both elastic collisions and charge exchange collisions of ions with atoms in uniform electric fields for argon and helium background gases. The simulation results are verified by comparison with the experiment data of the ion mobilities and the ion transverse diffusion coefficients in argon and helium. The recently published experimental data for the first seven coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the ion energy and angular distribution functions are used to validate simulation results for IVDF. Good agreement between measured and simulated IVDFs shows that the developed simulation model can be used for accurate calculations of IVDFs.

  5. Radiation effects on microstructure and hardness of a titanium aluminide alloy irradiated by helium ions at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Zhu, Hanliang; Ionescu, Mihail; Dayal, Pranesh; Davis, Joel; Carr, David; Harrison, Robert; Edwards, Lyndon

    2015-04-01

    A 45XD TiAl alloy possessing a lamellar microstructure was irradiated using 5 MeV helium ions to a fluence of 5 × 1021 ion m-2 (5000 appm) with a dose of about 1 dpa (displacements per atom). A uniform helium ion stopping damage region about 17 μm deep from the target surface was achieved by applying an energy degrading wheel. Radiation damage defects including helium-vacancy clusters and small helium bubbles were found in the microstructure of the samples irradiated at room temperature. With increasing irradiation temperature to 300 °C and 500 °C helium bubbles were clearly observed in both the α2 and γ phases of the irradiated microstructure. By means of nanoindentation significant irradiation hardening was measured. For the samples irradiated at room temperature the hardness increased from 5.6 GPa to 8.5 GPa and the irradiation-hardening effect reduced to approximately 8.0 GPa for the samples irradiated at 300 °C and 500 °C.

  6. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  7. Surface Response of Lithium Coatings on High Z Refractory Metal under Deuterium And Helium Ion Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Anton L.

    Lithium has proven to be a very interesting plasma facing component (PFC) material. It has been used as a wall coating in multiple research tokamaks, and at many of these facilities, lithium has improved confinement time by reducing hydrogen recycling from the walls of the reactor. Tungsten is also being considered as a durable PFC for fusion environments. The International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) will use a full tungsten divertor. Many operating tokamaks are using ITER like walls for testing ITER designs. From these tests and from controlled experiments, tungsten has shown some detrimental material changes under low energy deuterium and helium ion irradiation. Some of these material defects are holes, bubbles, voids, and fuzz. Because of the use of lithium in a number of tokamaks and the use of tungsten in many test reactors as well, studies have begun to study the behavior of lithium on the refractory metal tungsten. These studies deposited 100 and 500 nm of lithium on commercial tungsten discs and irradiated them with 100 eV deuterium, 1 keV helium, and deuterium and helium from two separate ion guns. The thicknesses of the lithium layers were determined by the temperature of the evaporator, over time, entered into a model using the Knudsen equation combined with an effusion model. This model was verified using AFM scans and SEM cross section micrographs of lithium layers on silicon substrates. Irradiations were carried out to a medium deuterium fluence of (1-3)x1017 D+/cm2. The surface chemistry of the samples before, after, and during irradiation was characterized using x-ray electron spectroscopy (XPS) in situ. These studies show that lithium on tungsten retains deuterium in a similar manner as does lithium on carbon; however, when helium is a secondary ion during irradiation, it can inhibit the deuterium retention in the lithium. In addition, the lithium is not eroded from the surface of the tungsten at the fluences that were achieved is this

  8. Helium Gas Regulation System for the Light-Ion Guide Gas Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Bryan; Clark, Henry; Chen, Lixin

    2013-10-01

    This is a proof-of-concept project to show that it is possible to construct a cost-effective helium gas regulation system for TAMU Cyclotron Institute's light-ion guide gas cell, using store ordered components. By purchasing the individual necessary parts, we designed and constructed a system that was less expensive than purchasing a pre-constructed system from a manufacturer, and could easily be scaled larger or smaller to accommodate any number of gas bottles. Utilizing LabVIEW software, I was able to write a program that allows the system to be controlled remotely, and an automation program that causes the system to change immediately between bottles, whenever one is almost empty, allowing the system to supply a constant flow of helium gas for several days. Although both the construction and the programming of the system can be seen as rough and unrefined, due to the time-restraints placed on me, the project adequately proves that the concept is valid and entirely possible, as the system is fully functional and able to fulfill its intended purpose. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  9. Nanoforging Single Layer MoSe2 Through Defect Engineering with Focused Helium Ion Beams

    DOE PAGES

    Iberi, Vighter; Liang, Liangbo; Ievlev, Anton V.; ...

    2016-08-02

    Development of devices and structures based on the layered 2D materials critically hinges on the capability to induce, control, and tailor the electronic, transport, and optoelectronic properties via defect engineering, much like doping strategies have enabled semiconductor electronics and forging enabled introduction of iron age. Here, we demonstrate the use of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) for tailoring the functionality of single layer MoSe2 locally, and decipher associated mechanisms at atomic level. We demonstrate He+ beam bombardment that locally creates vacancies, shifts the Fermi energy landscape and thereby increases the Young s modulus of elasticity. Furthermore, we observe formore » the first time, an increase in the B-exciton photoluminescence signal from the nanoforged regions at room temperature. In conclusion, the approach for precise defect engineering demonstrated here opens opportunities for creating functional 2D optoelectronic devices with a wide range of customizable properties that include operating in the visible region.« less

  10. Nanoforging Single Layer MoSe2 Through Defect Engineering with Focused Helium Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberi, Vighter; Liang, Liangbo; Ievlev, Anton V.; Stanford, Michael G.; Lin, Ming-Wei; Li, Xufan; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Jesse, Stephen; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Joy, David C.; Xiao, Kai; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-08-01

    Development of devices and structures based on the layered 2D materials critically hinges on the capability to induce, control, and tailor the electronic, transport, and optoelectronic properties via defect engineering, much like doping strategies have enabled semiconductor electronics and forging enabled introduction the of iron age. Here, we demonstrate the use of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) for tailoring the functionality of single layer MoSe2 locally, and decipher associated mechanisms at the atomic level. We demonstrate He+ beam bombardment that locally creates vacancies, shifts the Fermi energy landscape and increases the Young’s modulus of elasticity. Furthermore, we observe for the first time, an increase in the B-exciton photoluminescence signal from the nanoforged regions at the room temperature. The approach for precise defect engineering demonstrated here opens opportunities for creating functional 2D optoelectronic devices with a wide range of customizable properties that include operating in the visible region.

  11. Recombination-cascade X-ray spectra of highly charged helium-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the relative intensity distribution among the X-ray spectral lines of helium-like ions from the n = 2 states produced through recombination processes such as radiative and charge transfer recombination may be given by considering in detail the radiative cascades following recombination. Model calculations are presented with predicted line ratios for Ar XVII and Fe XXV in recombination-dominated noncoronal plasmas. In particular, compared to coronal intensities, the singlet resonance line (w) should be much weaker relative to the triplet intercombination (x, y) and forbidden (z) lines, yielding large values for the ratio G = (x + y + z)/w. Accurate configuration interaction type wave functions are employed to calculate the eigenenergies, transition probabilities, and cascade coefficients. Certain relevant tokamak and astrophysical observations are discussed.

  12. The role of collisions in the acceleration of the slow solar wind: origin of the helium ions at solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Diaz, Eduardo; Blelly, Pierre Louis; Rouillard, Alexis Paul; Lavraud, Benoit; Pinto, Rui

    2016-04-01

    At solar maximum, the slow solar wind presents an enhanced helium abundance compared to solar minimum (Aellig et al., 2001; Kasper et al., 2007, 2012). Sanchez-Diaz et al. (2016) found that the yearly average of helium abundance in the slow solar wind is very well correlated with the yearly average in the proton mass flux right above the transition region. This correlation is especially remarkable for the very slow solar wind (V<300 km/s), where the proton flux is especially high. We hypothesized that the helium abundance might be enhanced due to a non-negligible amount of Coulomb collisions between hydrogen and helium when the proton mass flux is so elevated (5 times bigger than at solar minimum and one order of magnitude bigger than in the fast solar wind). To explore the role of H to He collisions in the acceleration of He ions, we input the proton temperature and expansion factor profiles resulting from the combination of a Potential Field Source Model (PFSS) and a 1D hydrodynamic solar wind model described in Pinto et al. (2009) into a collisional two fluid model. The model assumes that there is no heating for the helium ions in the very slow solar wind. We evaluate the possible role of Coulomb collisions on the escape of He for a number of different geometries and boundary conditions.

  13. Maskless Lithography and in situ Visualization of Conductivity of Graphene using Helium Ion Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Iberi, Vighter O.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Zhang, X. -G.; Matola, Brad R.; Linn, Allison R.; Joy, David Charles; Adam Justin Rondinone

    2015-07-07

    The remarkable mechanical and electronic properties of graphene make it an ideal candidate for next generation nanoelectronics. With the recent development of commercial-level single-crystal graphene layers, the potential for manufacturing household graphene-based devices has improved, but significant challenges still remain with regards to patterning the graphene into devices. In the case of graphene supported on a substrate, traditional nanofabrication techniques such as e-beam lithography (EBL) are often used in fabricating graphene nanoribbons but the multi-step processes they require can result in contamination of the graphene with resists and solvents. In this letter, we report the utility of scanning helium ion lithography for fabricating functional graphene nanoconductors that are supported directly on a silicon dioxide layer, and we measure the minimum feature size achievable due to limitations imposed by thermal fluctuations and ion scattering during the milling process. Further we demonstrate that ion beams, due to their positive charging nature, may be used to observe and test the conductivity of graphene-based nanoelectronic devices in situ.

  14. Helium Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy and Electrical Characterization of Glass Nanocapillaries with Reproducible Tip Geometries.

    PubMed

    Zweifel, Ludovit P; Shorubalko, Ivan; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2016-02-23

    Nanopores fabricated from glass microcapillaries are used in applications ranging from scanning ion conductance microscopy to single-molecule detection. Still, evaluating the nanocapillary tip by a noninvasive means remains challenging. For instance, electron microscopy characterization techniques can charge, heat, and contaminate the glass surface and typically require conductive coatings that influence the final tip geometry. Per contra, electrical characterization by the means of ion current through the capillary lumen provides only indirect geometrical details of the tips. Here, we show that helium scanning transmission ion microscopy provides a nondestructive and precise determination of glass nanocapillary tip geometries. This enables the reproducible fabrication of axially asymmetric blunt, bullet, and hourglass-shaped tips with opening diameters from 20 to 400 nm by laser-assisted pulling. Accordingly, this allows for an evaluation of how tip shape, pore diameter, and opening angle impact ionic current rectification behavior and the translocation of single molecules. Our analysis shows that current drops and translocation dwell times are dominated by the pore diameter and opening angles regardless of nanocapillary tip shape.

  15. Helium ion beam lithography (HIBL) using HafSOx as the resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Feixiang; Manichev, Viacheslav; Li, Mengjun; Mitchson, Gavin; Yakshinskiy, Boris; Gustafsson, Torgny; Johnson, David; Garfunkel, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Helium ion beam lithography (HIBL) is a novel alternative lithographic technique with the capacity of fabricating highresolution and high-density features. Only limited research has been performed exploring HIBL to date. HafSOx (Hf(OH)4-2x-2y(O2)x(SO4)y·qH2O) is a negative-tone inorganic resist that is one of several candidate resist materials for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) and e-beam lithography (EBL), and has been demonstrated to show high resolution, moderate sensitivity and low line-edge roughness (LER) in both EUVL and EBL. To date, no ion beam lithography work on HafSOx has been reported. In this study, we tested HafSOx as an HIBL resist and achieved a high sensitivity compared with EBL with a turn-on dose D100 ~ 2-4 μC/cm2. We obtained sub-10 nm line widths with low LER. A simple Monte Carlo simulation suggests that ionizing excitation accounts for most of the incident He ions' energy loss.

  16. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klingner, N; Heller, R; Hlawacek, G; von Borany, J; Notte, J; Huang, J; Facsko, S

    2016-03-01

    Time of flight backscattering spectrometry (ToF-BS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of ≤54nm and a time resolution of Δt≤17ns(Δt/t≤5.4%) are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing devices. The particular implementation of ToF-BS and ToF-SIMS techniques are described, results are presented and advantages, difficulties and limitations of this new techniques are discussed.

  17. Biologically optimized helium ion plans: calculation approach and its in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Mairani, A; Dokic, I; Magro, G; Tessonnier, T; Kamp, F; Carlson, D J; Ciocca, M; Cerutti, F; Sala, P R; Ferrari, A; Böhlen, T T; Jäkel, O; Parodi, K; Debus, J; Abdollahi, A; Haberer, T

    2016-06-07

    Treatment planning studies on the biological effect of raster-scanned helium ion beams should be performed, together with their experimental verification, before their clinical application at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). For this purpose, we introduce a novel calculation approach based on integrating data-driven biological models in our Monte Carlo treatment planning (MCTP) tool. Dealing with a mixed radiation field, the biological effect of the primary (4)He ion beams, of the secondary (3)He and (4)He (Z  =  2) fragments and of the produced protons, deuterons and tritons (Z  =  1) has to be taken into account. A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) in water, representative of a clinically-relevant scenario, has been biologically optimized with the MCTP and then delivered at HIT. Predictions of cell survival and RBE for a tumor cell line, characterized by [Formula: see text] Gy, have been successfully compared against measured clonogenic survival data. The mean absolute survival variation ([Formula: see text]) between model predictions and experimental data was 5.3%  ±  0.9%. A sensitivity study, i.e. quantifying the variation of the estimations for the studied plan as a function of the applied phenomenological modelling approach, has been performed. The feasibility of a simpler biological modelling based on dose-averaged LET (linear energy transfer) has been tested. Moreover, comparisons with biophysical models such as the local effect model (LEM) and the repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model were performed. [Formula: see text] values for the LEM and the RMF model were, respectively, 4.5%  ±  0.8% and 5.8%  ±  1.1%. The satisfactorily agreement found in this work for the studied SOBP, representative of clinically-relevant scenario, suggests that the introduced approach could be applied for an accurate estimation of the biological effect for helium ion radiotherapy.

  18. Biologically optimized helium ion plans: calculation approach and its in vitro validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairani, A.; Dokic, I.; Magro, G.; Tessonnier, T.; Kamp, F.; Carlson, D. J.; Ciocca, M.; Cerutti, F.; Sala, P. R.; Ferrari, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Jäkel, O.; Parodi, K.; Debus, J.; Abdollahi, A.; Haberer, T.

    2016-06-01

    Treatment planning studies on the biological effect of raster-scanned helium ion beams should be performed, together with their experimental verification, before their clinical application at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). For this purpose, we introduce a novel calculation approach based on integrating data-driven biological models in our Monte Carlo treatment planning (MCTP) tool. Dealing with a mixed radiation field, the biological effect of the primary 4He ion beams, of the secondary 3He and 4He (Z  =  2) fragments and of the produced protons, deuterons and tritons (Z  =  1) has to be taken into account. A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) in water, representative of a clinically-relevant scenario, has been biologically optimized with the MCTP and then delivered at HIT. Predictions of cell survival and RBE for a tumor cell line, characterized by {{(α /β )}\\text{ph}}=5.4 Gy, have been successfully compared against measured clonogenic survival data. The mean absolute survival variation ({μΔ \\text{S}} ) between model predictions and experimental data was 5.3%  ±  0.9%. A sensitivity study, i.e. quantifying the variation of the estimations for the studied plan as a function of the applied phenomenological modelling approach, has been performed. The feasibility of a simpler biological modelling based on dose-averaged LET (linear energy transfer) has been tested. Moreover, comparisons with biophysical models such as the local effect model (LEM) and the repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model were performed. {μΔ \\text{S}} values for the LEM and the RMF model were, respectively, 4.5%  ±  0.8% and 5.8%  ±  1.1%. The satisfactorily agreement found in this work for the studied SOBP, representative of clinically-relevant scenario, suggests that the introduced approach could be applied for an accurate estimation of the biological effect for helium ion radiotherapy.

  19. Description of a sample holder for ion channeling near liquid-helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudin, B.; Dubus, M.; Viargues, F.

    1990-01-01

    Ion channeling is sensitive to very small shifts (10 -2 nm) of the atomic equilibrium positions. As a consequence, this technique appears to be suitable to study lattice dynamics, in particular when a displacive phase transition occurs. As many phase transitions of interest are observed at low temperature, we developed a three-axis goniometer in order to perform channeling experiments between 5 and 30 K. As no thermal screen could be placed between the sample and the ion beam, the quantity of heat radiated onto the sample holder was very large. The technical solutions which were chosen to overcome this difficulty and ensure both an efficient cooling and a good rotational mobility of the sample are described in detail. A liquid-helium flow of ˜ 6.5 1/h was found to be necessary to achieve a continuous refrigeration of the sample at 5 K. To conclude, proton channeling experiments in the blue bronze, K 0.3MoO 3, are presented as an illustration of the device possibilities.

  20. Maskless Lithography and in situ Visualization of Conductivity of Graphene using Helium Ion Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Iberi, Vighter O.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Zhang, X. -G.; ...

    2015-07-07

    The remarkable mechanical and electronic properties of graphene make it an ideal candidate for next generation nanoelectronics. With the recent development of commercial-level single-crystal graphene layers, the potential for manufacturing household graphene-based devices has improved, but significant challenges still remain with regards to patterning the graphene into devices. In the case of graphene supported on a substrate, traditional nanofabrication techniques such as e-beam lithography (EBL) are often used in fabricating graphene nanoribbons but the multi-step processes they require can result in contamination of the graphene with resists and solvents. In this letter, we report the utility of scanning helium ionmore » lithography for fabricating functional graphene nanoconductors that are supported directly on a silicon dioxide layer, and we measure the minimum feature size achievable due to limitations imposed by thermal fluctuations and ion scattering during the milling process. Further we demonstrate that ion beams, due to their positive charging nature, may be used to observe and test the conductivity of graphene-based nanoelectronic devices in situ.« less

  1. Nanopatterning and Electrical Tuning of MoS2 Layers with a Subnanometer Helium Ion Beam.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel S; Zhou, Yangbo; Maguire, Pierce; O'Neill, Arlene; Ó'Coileáin, Cormac; Gatensby, Riley; Glushenkov, Alexey M; Tao, Tao; Duesberg, Georg S; Shvets, Igor V; Abid, Mohamed; Abid, Mourad; Wu, Han-Chun; Chen, Ying; Coleman, Jonathan N; Donegan, John F; Zhang, Hongzhou

    2015-08-12

    We report subnanometer modification enabled by an ultrafine helium ion beam. By adjusting ion dose and the beam profile, structural defects were controllably introduced in a few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) sample and its stoichiometry was modified by preferential sputtering of sulfur at a few-nanometer scale. Localized tuning of the resistivity of MoS2 was demonstrated and semiconducting, metallic-like, or insulating material was obtained by irradiation with different doses of He(+). Amorphous MoSx with metallic behavior has been demonstrated for the first time. Fabrication of MoS2 nanostructures with 7 nm dimensions and pristine crystal structure was also achieved. The damage at the edges of these nanostructures was typically confined to within 1 nm. Nanoribbons with widths as small as 1 nm were reproducibly fabricated. This nanoscale modification technique is a generalized approach that can be applied to various two-dimensional (2D) materials to produce a new range of 2D metamaterials.

  2. Rotational state-changing cold collisions of hydroxyl ions with helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Daniel; Lee, Seunghyun; Carelli, Fabio; Spieler, Steffen; Lakhmanskaya, Olga; Endres, Eric S.; Kumar, Sunil S.; Gianturco, Franco; Wester, Roland

    2015-06-01

    Cold molecules are important for many applications, from fundamental precision measurements, quantum information processing, quantum-controlled chemistry, to understanding the cold interstellar medium. Molecular ions are known to be cooled efficiently in sympathetic collisions with cold atoms or ions. However, little knowledge is available on the elementary cooling steps, because the determination of quantum state-to-state collision rates at low temperature is very challenging for both experiment and theory. Here we present a method to manipulate molecular quantum states by non-resonant photodetachment. Based on this we provide absolute quantum scattering rate coefficients under full quantum state control for the rotationally inelastic collision of hydroxyl anions with helium. Experiment and quantum scattering theory show excellent agreement without adjustable parameters. Very similar rate coefficients are obtained for two different isotopes, which is linked to several quantum scattering resonances appearing at different energies. The presented method is also applicable to polyatomic systems and will help elucidate non-radiative processes in polyaromatic hydrocarbons and protein chromophores.

  3. Effect of bombardment with iron ions on the evolution of helium, hydrogen, and deuterium blisters in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, V. F.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Sokhatskii, A. S.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of bombardment with iron ions on the evolution of gas porosity in silicon single crystals has been studied. Gas porosity has been produced by implantation hydrogen, deuterium, and helium ions with energies of 17, 12.5, and 20 keV, respectively, in identical doses of 1 × 1017 cm-2 at room temperature. For such energy of bombarding ions, the ion doping profiles have been formed at the same distance from the irradiated surface of the sample. Then, the samples have been bombarded with iron Fe10+ ions with energy of 150 keV in a dose of 5.9 × 1014 cm-2. Then 30-min isochoric annealing has been carried out with an interval of 50°C in the temperature range of 250-900°C. The samples have been analyzed using optical and electron microscopes. An extremely strong synergetic effect of sequential bombardment of silicon single crystals with gas ions and iron ions at room temperature on the nucleation and growth of gas porosity during postradiation annealing has been observed. For example, it has been shown that the amorphous layer formed in silicon by additional bombardment with iron ions stimulates the evolution of helium blisters, slightly retards the evolution of hydrogen blisters, and completely suppresses the evolution of deuterium blisters. The results of experiments do not provide an adequate explanation of the reason for this difference; additional targeted experiments are required.

  4. A miniaturised electron ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer that uses a unique helium ion removal pulsing technique specifically for gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Jiang; Huang, Zhengxu; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Hui; Tan, Guobin; Gao, Wei; Yang, Peng-yuan

    2013-06-21

    A miniaturised reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with an electron ionisation ion source has been developed for the analysis of gases. An entirely new helium ion removal pulsing technique in this mass spectrometer is used to achieve an improved performance for the first time. The helium carrier gas, which enters into the source along with the gaseous sample, is simultaneously ionised and then orthogonally introduced into the time-of-fight mass analyser. Once the relatively light helium ions in the ion packet become extremely close to the reflectron plate (B-plate for short in this article), a modulated pulse is instantaneously applied on the B-plate and a negative reflectron voltage is set to the B-plate and lasts for a very short period, during which all the helium ions are directly bumped into the B-plate and subsequently removed. The helium ion removal pulsing technique can efficiently avoid saturation of the micro-channel plate caused by too many helium ions. A compact and durable instrument is designed, which has a mass resolving resolution greater than 400 FWHM for online gas analysis. The technology may also be further developed to remove other ions for TOF mass spectrometry.

  5. Implementation of spot scanning dose optimization and dose calculation for helium ions in Hyperion

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Hermann; Schreiner, Thomas; Georg, Dietmar

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Helium ions ({sup 4}He) may supplement current particle beam therapy strategies as they possess advantages in physical dose distribution over protons. To assess potential clinical advantages, a dose calculation module accounting for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was developed and integrated into the treatment planning system Hyperion. Methods: Current knowledge on RBE of {sup 4}He together with linear energy transfer considerations motivated an empirical depth-dependent “zonal” RBE model. In the plateau region, a RBE of 1.0 was assumed, followed by an increasing RBE up to 2.8 at the Bragg-peak region, which was then kept constant over the fragmentation tail. To account for a variable proton RBE, the same model concept was also applied to protons with a maximum RBE of 1.6. Both RBE models were added to a previously developed pencil beam algorithm for physical dose calculation and included into the treatment planning system Hyperion. The implementation was validated against Monte Carlo simulations within a water phantom using γ-index evaluation. The potential benefits of {sup 4}He based treatment plans were explored in a preliminary treatment planning comparison (against protons) for four treatment sites, i.e., a prostate, a base-of-skull, a pediatric, and a head-and-neck tumor case. Separate treatment plans taking into account physical dose calculation only or using biological modeling were created for protons and {sup 4}He. Results: Comparison of Monte Carlo and Hyperion calculated doses resulted in a γ{sub mean} of 0.3, with 3.4% of the values above 1 and γ{sub 1%} of 1.5 and better. Treatment plan evaluation showed comparable planning target volume coverage for both particles, with slightly increased coverage for {sup 4}He. Organ at risk (OAR) doses were generally reduced using {sup 4}He, some by more than to 30%. Improvements of {sup 4}He over protons were more pronounced for treatment plans taking biological effects into account. All

  6. Helium-ion radiation therapy at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: recent results of a Northern California Oncology Group Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.; Collier, J.M.; Zink, S.R.; Pitluck, S.; Phillips, T.L.; Char, D.; Gutin, P.; Gauger, G.

    1985-01-01

    We report on the first decade of the helium-ion radiotherapy clinical trial being carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Over 500 patients have now been treated. We have had very good results to date in treating patients with small tumors critically located near a radiation-sensitive organ which would preclude delivering a curative dose with conventional radiotherapy. On the other hand, patients with larger tumors where the tumor dose cannot be increased more than 10% over conventional radiotherapy have not responded well to helium ion radiotherapy. This is illustrated by discussing selected patient groups in detail, namely those with uveal melanoma, small, low-grade tumors near the central nervous system, carcinoma of the pancreas, and carcinoma of the esophagus.

  7. Cavity morphology in a Ni based superalloy under heavy ion irradiation with cold pre-injected helium. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Yao, Zhongwen; Daymond, Mark R.; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2014-03-01

    In order to understand radiation damage in the nickel based superalloy Inconel X-750 in thermal reactors, where (n, α) transmutation reaction also occurred in addition to fast neutron induced atomic displacement, heavy ion (1 MeV Kr2+) irradiation with pre-injected helium was performed under in-situ observations of an intermediate voltage electron microscope at Argonne National Laboratory. By comparing to our previous studies using 1 MeV Kr2+ irradiation solely, the pre-injected helium was found to be essential in cavity nucleation. Cavities started to be visible after Kr2+ irradiation to 2.7 dpa at ≥200 °C in samples containing 200 appm, 1000 appm, and 5000 appm helium, respectively, but not at lower temperatures. The cavity growth was observed during the continuous irradiation. Cavity formation appeared along with a reduced number density of stacking fault tetrahedra, vacancy type defects. With higher pre-injected helium amount, a higher density of smaller cavities was observed. This is considered to be the result of local trapping effect of helium which disperses vacancies. The average cavity size increases with increasing irradiation temperatures; the density reduced; and the distribution of cavities became heterogeneous at elevated temperatures. In contrast to previous characterization of in-reactor neutron irradiated Inconel X-750, no obvious cavity sink to grain boundaries and phase boundaries was found even at high doses and elevated temperatures. MC-type carbides were observed as strong sources for agglomeration of cavities due to their enhanced trapping strength of helium and vacancies.

  8. Cavity morphology in a Ni based superalloy under heavy ion irradiation with cold pre-injected helium. I

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, He; Yao, Zhongwen Daymond, Mark R.; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2014-03-14

    In order to understand radiation damage in the nickel based superalloy Inconel X-750 in thermal reactors, where (n, α) transmutation reaction also occurred in addition to fast neutron induced atomic displacement, heavy ion (1 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) irradiation with pre-injected helium was performed under in-situ observations of an intermediate voltage electron microscope at Argonne National Laboratory. By comparing to our previous studies using 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} irradiation solely, the pre-injected helium was found to be essential in cavity nucleation. Cavities started to be visible after Kr{sup 2+} irradiation to 2.7 dpa at ≥200 °C in samples containing 200 appm, 1000 appm, and 5000 appm helium, respectively, but not at lower temperatures. The cavity growth was observed during the continuous irradiation. Cavity formation appeared along with a reduced number density of stacking fault tetrahedra, vacancy type defects. With higher pre-injected helium amount, a higher density of smaller cavities was observed. This is considered to be the result of local trapping effect of helium which disperses vacancies. The average cavity size increases with increasing irradiation temperatures; the density reduced; and the distribution of cavities became heterogeneous at elevated temperatures. In contrast to previous characterization of in-reactor neutron irradiated Inconel X-750, no obvious cavity sink to grain boundaries and phase boundaries was found even at high doses and elevated temperatures. MC-type carbides were observed as strong sources for agglomeration of cavities due to their enhanced trapping strength of helium and vacancies.

  9. Enhanced End-Contacts by Helium Ion Bombardment to Improve Graphene-Metal Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kunpeng; Su, Yajuan; Zhan, Jun; Shahzad, Kashif; Zhu, Huilong; Zhao, Chao; Luo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Low contact resistance between graphene and metals is of paramount importance to fabricate high performance graphene-based devices. In this paper, the impact of both defects induced by helium ion (He+) bombardment and annealing on the contact resistance between graphene and various metals (Ag, Pd, and Pt) were systematically explored. It is found that the contact resistances between all metals and graphene are remarkably reduced after annealing, indicating that not only chemically adsorbed metal (Pd) but also physically adsorbed metals (Ag and Pt) readily form end-contacts at intrinsic defect locations in graphene. In order to further improve the contact properties between Ag, Pd, and Pt metals and graphene, a novel method in which self-aligned He+ bombardment to induce exotic defects in graphene and subsequent thermal annealing to form end-contacts was proposed. By using this method, the contact resistance is reduced significantly by 15.1% and 40.1% for Ag/graphene and Pd/graphene contacts with He+ bombardment compared to their counterparts without He+ bombardment. For the Pt/graphene contact, the contact resistance is, however, not reduced as anticipated with He+ bombardment and this might be ascribed to either inappropriate He+ bombardment dose, or inapplicable method of He+ bombardment in reducing contact resistance for Pt/graphene contact. The joint efforts of as-formed end-contacts and excess created defects in graphene are discussed as the cause responsible for the reduction of contact resistance.

  10. Precise fabrication of a 5 nm graphene nanopore with a helium ion microscope for biomolecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunsheng; Huang, Qimeng; Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Daming; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-01-01

    We report a scalable method to fabricate high-quality graphene nanopores for biomolecule detection using a helium ion microscope (HIM). HIM milling shows promising capabilities for precisely controlling the size and shape, and may allow for the potential production of nanopores at wafer scale. Nanopores could be fabricated at different sizes ranging from 5 to 30 nm in diameter in few minutes. Compared with the current solid-state nanopore fabrication techniques, e.g. transmission electron microscopy, HIM is fast. Furthermore, we investigated the exposure-time dependence of graphene nanopore formation: the rate of pore expansion did not follow a simple linear relationship with exposure time, but a fast expansion rate at short exposure time and a slow rate at long exposure time. In addition, we performed biomolecule detection with our patterned graphene nanopore. The ionic current signals induced by 20-base single-stranded DNA homopolymers could be used as a basis for homopolymer differentiation. However, the charge interaction of homopolymer chains with graphene nanopores, and the conformations of homopolymer chains need to be further considered to improve the accuracy of discrimination.

  11. Precise fabrication of a 5 nm graphene nanopore with a helium ion microscope for biomolecule detection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunsheng; Huang, Qimeng; Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Daming; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-01-27

    We report a scalable method to fabricate high-quality graphene nanopores for biomolecule detection using a helium ion microscope (HIM). HIM milling shows promising capabilities for precisely controlling the size and shape, and may allow for the potential production of nanopores at wafer scale. Nanopores could be fabricated at different sizes ranging from 5 to 30 nm in diameter in few minutes. Compared with the current solid-state nanopore fabrication techniques, e.g. transmission electron microscopy, HIM is fast. Furthermore, we investigated the exposure-time dependence of graphene nanopore formation: the rate of pore expansion did not follow a simple linear relationship with exposure time, but a fast expansion rate at short exposure time and a slow rate at long exposure time. In addition, we performed biomolecule detection with our patterned graphene nanopore. The ionic current signals induced by 20-base single-stranded DNA homopolymers could be used as a basis for homopolymer differentiation. However, the charge interaction of homopolymer chains with graphene nanopores, and the conformations of homopolymer chains need to be further considered to improve the accuracy of discrimination.

  12. Measurements of the intercombination and forbidden lines from helium-like ions in Tokamaks and Electron Beam Ion Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; von Goeler, S; Stodiek, W; Beiersdorfer, P; Rice, J E; Ince-Cushman, A

    2007-08-22

    The paper reviews the results from tokamak experiments for the line ratios x/w, y/w, and z/w from helium-like ions with Z in the range from 14 to 28. With exception of the DITE experiments, where these line ratios were found to be in agreement with theoretical predictions, all other tokamak experiments yielded values that were significantly larger than predicted. The reasons for these discrepancies are not yet understood. It is possible that radial profile effects were not properly taken into account in the majority of the tokamak experiments. The paper also gives a short historical review of the X-ray diagnostic developments and also presents very recent data from a new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which records spatially resolved spectra with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm in the plasma. These new data can be Abel inverted, so that it will be possible to determine line ratios at each radial position in the plasma. Effects of radial profiles, which may have affected the chord-integrated measurements of the past, will thus be eliminated in the future.

  13. TH-A-19A-05: Modeling Physics Properties and Biologic Effects Induced by Proton and Helium Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Taleei, R; Titt, U; Peeler, C; Guan, F; Mirkovic, D; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Currently, proton and carbon ions are used for cancer treatment. More recently, other light ions including helium ions have shown interesting physical and biological properties. The purpose of this work is to study the biological and physical properties of helium ions (He-3) in comparison to protons. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations with FLUKA, GEANT4 and MCNPX were used to calculate proton and He-3 dose distributions in water phantoms. The energy spectra of proton and He-3 beams were calculated with high resolution for use in biological models. The repair-misrepairfixation (RMF) model was subsequently used to calculate the RBE. Results: The proton Bragg curve calculations show good agreement between the three general purpose Monte Carlo codes. In contrast, the He-3 Bragg curve calculations show disagreement (for the magnitude of the Bragg peak) between FLUKA and the other two Monte Carlo codes. The differences in the magnitude of the Bragg peak are mainly due to the discrepancy in the secondary fragmentation cross sections used by the codes. The RBE for V79 cell lines is about 0.96 and 0.98 at the entrance of proton and He-3 ions depth dose respectively. The RBE increases to 1.06 and 1.59 at the Bragg peak of proton and He-3 ions. The results demonstrated that LET, microdosimetric parameters (such as dose-mean lineal energy) and RBE are nearly constant along the plateau region of Bragg curve, while all parameters increase within the Bragg peak and at the distal edge for both proton and He-3 ions. Conclusion: The Monte Carlo codes should revise the fragmentation cross sections to more accurately simulate the physical properties of He-3 ions. The increase in RBE for He-3 ions is higher than for proton beams at the Bragg peak.

  14. Radiative properties of molecular nitrogen ions produced by helium Penning ionization and argon effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, George, III; Song, Kyo-Dong

    1994-01-01

    The development of hypersonic aerospace vehicles requires a better understanding on the thermal and chemical nonequilibrium kinetics of participating species in shock layers. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes developed for such flowfields overestimate the radiation in the spectral region of 300 - 600 nm. A speculation for this overestimation is that inclusion of Ar, CO2, and H2O at the upper atmosphere flight region makes a significant impact on radiative kinetics of molecular nitrogen ions. To define the effects of minority species on the radiative kinetics of N2(+), an experimental setup was made by using the helium Penning ionization. The vibrational and rotational temperature were measured by mapping the vibrational and rotational distributions of N2(+) emission with high spectroscopic resolution and absolute intensity measurements. Measured vibrational temperatures were in the range from 18,000 to 36,000 K, and rotational temperatures were in the range from 300 to 370 K. The irradiance of 391.44 nm line and rotational and vibrational temperatures were analyzed to define argon and CO2 effects on the N2(+) emission. When Ar or CO2 is injected with N2, the rotational temperature did not change. The irradiances were reduced by 34 percent and 78 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. The vibrational temperatures were increased by 24.1 percent and 82.9 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. It appears that there are no significant effects from small concentrations of Ar and CO2 at the upper atmosphere flight region.

  15. Radiation Resistance of Structural Materials of Nuclear Reactors on Irradiation with High-Energy Hydrogen and Helium Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, F. F.; Komarov, A. F.; Pil‧ko, Vl. V.; Pil‧ko, V. V.

    2013-11-01

    Basic principles of determination of the radiation resistance of structural materials of nuclear reactors with implantation of high-energy hydrogen and helium atoms have been presented. The parameters of the process of implantation of light irons have been calculated. By scanning-electron-microscopy, optical-microscopy, and interference methods, the authors have studied the surface structure of samples of steel-3, stainless steel, and D16 alloy immediately after irradiating them with hydrogen and helium atoms with an energy of 200 to 400 keV in the range of doses from 1016 to 3 · 1017 ions/cm2 and after annealing these samples thermally at temperatures from 300 to 550°C. Threshold blistering doses for all the studied materials and annealing temperatures for visualizing structural defects have been determined.

  16. The development and advantages of helium ion microscopy for the study of block copolymer nanopatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Alan P.; Senthamaraikannan, Ramsankar; Ghoshal, Tandra; Chaudhari, Atul; Leeson, Michael; Morris, Mick A.

    2015-03-01

    Helium ion microscopy (HIM) has been used to study nanopatterns formed in block copolymer (BCP) thin films. Owing to its' small spot size, minimal forward scattering of the incident ion and reduced velocity compared to electrons of comparable energy, HIM has considerable advantages and provides pattern information and resolution not attainable with other commercial microscopic techniques. In order to realize the full potential of BCP nanolithography in producing high density ultra-small features, the dimensions and geometry of these BCP materials will need to be accurately characterized through pattern formation, development and pattern transfer processes. The preferred BCP pattern inspection techniques (to date) are principally atomic force microscopy (AFM) and secondary electron microscopy (SEM) but suffer disadvantages in poor lateral resolution (AFM) and the ability to discriminate individual polymer domains (SEM). SEM suffers from reduced resolution when a more surface sensitive low accelerating voltage is used and low surface signal when a high accelerating voltage is used. In addition to these drawbacks, SEM can require the use of a conductive coating on these insulating materials and this reduces surface detail as well as increasing the dimensions of coated features. AFM is limited by the dimensions of the probe tip and a skewing of lateral dimension results. This can be eliminated through basic geometry for large sparse features, but when dense small features need to be characterized AFM lacks reliability. With this in mind, BCP inspection by HIM can offer greater insight into block ordering, critical dimensions and, critically, line edge roughness (LER) a critical parameter whose measurement is well suited to HIM because of its' enhanced edge contrast. In this work we demonstrate the resolution capabilities of HIM using various BCP systems (lamellar and cylinder structures). Imaging of BCP patterns of low molecular weight (MW)/low feature size which

  17. Development and testing of a pulsed helium ion source for probing materials and warm dense matter studies.

    PubMed

    Ji, Q; Seidl, P A; Waldron, W L; Takakuwa, J H; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Persaud, A; Barnard, J J; Schenkel, T

    2016-02-01

    The neutralized drift compression experiment was designed and commissioned as a pulsed, linear induction accelerator to drive thin targets to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ∼1 eV using intense, short pulses (∼1 ns) of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. At that kinetic energy, heating a thin target foil near the Bragg peak energy using He(+) ions leads to more uniform energy deposition of the target material than Li(+) ions. Experiments show that a higher current density of helium ions can be delivered from a plasma source compared to Li(+) ions from a hot plate type ion source. He(+) beam pulses as high as 200 mA at the peak and 4 μs long were measured from a multi-aperture 7-cm-diameter emission area. Within ±5% variation, the uniform beam area is approximately 6 cm across. The accelerated and compressed pulsed ion beams can be used for materials studies and isochoric heating of target materials for high energy density physics experiments and WDM studies.

  18. Development and testing of a pulsed helium ion source for probing materials and warm dense matter studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Q. Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Persaud, A.; Schenkel, T.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.

    2016-02-15

    The neutralized drift compression experiment was designed and commissioned as a pulsed, linear induction accelerator to drive thin targets to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ∼1 eV using intense, short pulses (∼1 ns) of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. At that kinetic energy, heating a thin target foil near the Bragg peak energy using He{sup +} ions leads to more uniform energy deposition of the target material than Li{sup +} ions. Experiments show that a higher current density of helium ions can be delivered from a plasma source compared to Li{sup +} ions from a hot plate type ion source. He{sup +} beam pulses as high as 200 mA at the peak and 4 μs long were measured from a multi-aperture 7-cm-diameter emission area. Within ±5% variation, the uniform beam area is approximately 6 cm across. The accelerated and compressed pulsed ion beams can be used for materials studies and isochoric heating of target materials for high energy density physics experiments and WDM studies.

  19. Development and testing of a pulsed helium ion source for probing materials and warm dense matter studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Q.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-02-01

    The neutralized drift compression experiment was designed and commissioned as a pulsed, linear induction accelerator to drive thin targets to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ˜1 eV using intense, short pulses (˜1 ns) of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. At that kinetic energy, heating a thin target foil near the Bragg peak energy using He+ ions leads to more uniform energy deposition of the target material than Li+ ions. Experiments show that a higher current density of helium ions can be delivered from a plasma source compared to Li+ ions from a hot plate type ion source. He+ beam pulses as high as 200 mA at the peak and 4 μs long were measured from a multi-aperture 7-cm-diameter emission area. Within ±5% variation, the uniform beam area is approximately 6 cm across. The accelerated and compressed pulsed ion beams can be used for materials studies and isochoric heating of target materials for high energy density physics experiments and WDM studies.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Helium-like ions with Z=10-36 transition rates (Si+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, R.; Guo, X. L.; Wang, K.; Li, S.; Yan, J.; Chen, C. Y.; Brage, T.; Zou, Y. M.

    2016-08-01

    We provide accurate energies for the lowest singly excited 70 levels among 1snl(n<=6,l<=(n-1)) configurations and the lowest doubly excited 250 levels arising from the K-vacancy 2ln'l(n'<=6,l<=(n'-1)) configurations of helium-like ions with Z=10-36. Wavelengths, transition rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are calculated for the E1, M1, E2, and M2 transitions among these levels. The radiative lifetimes are reported for all the calculated levels. (4 data files).

  1. Ab initio molecular treatment for charge transfer by P{sup 3+} ions on hydrogen and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, A.; Zaidi, A.; Lahmar, S.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.

    2010-02-15

    A theoretical treatment of charge-transfer processes induced by collision of phosphorus P{sup 3+}(3s{sup 2}){sup 1}S ions on atomic hydrogen and helium has been carried out using ab initio potential-energy curves and couplings at the multireference configuration interaction level of theory. The cross sections calculated by means of semiclassical collision methods show the existence of a significant charge transfer in the 0.1-700-keV laboratory energy range. Radial and rotational coupling interactions were analyzed for both collision systems.

  2. Can particle beam therapy be improved using helium ions? - a planning study focusing on pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Knäusl, Barbara; Fuchs, Hermann; Dieckmann, Karin; Georg, Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    Aim To explore the potential of scanned helium ion beam therapy ((4)He) compared to proton therapy in a comparative planning study focusing on pediatric patients. This was motivated by the superior biological and physical characteristics of (4)He. Material and methods For eleven neuroblastoma (NB), nine Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), five Wilms tumor (WT), five ependymoma (EP) and four Ewing sarcoma (EW) patients, treatment plans were created for protons and (4)He. Dose prescription to the planning target volume (PTV) was 21 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE)] (NB), 19.8 Gy (RBE) (HL), 25.2 Gy (RBE) for the WT boost volume and 54 Gy (RBE) for EP and EW patients. A pencil beam algorithm for protons (constant RBE = 1.1) and (4)He was implemented in the treatment planning system Hyperion. For (4)He the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was calculated with a 'zonal' model based on different linear energy transfer regions. Results Target constraints were fulfilled for all indications. For NB patients differences for kidneys and liver were observed for all dose-volume areas, except the high-dose volume. The body volume receiving up to 12.6 Gy (RBE) was reduced by up to 10% with (4)He. For WT patients the mean and high-dose volume for the liver was improved when using (4)He. For EP normal tissue dose was reduced using (4)He with 12.7% of the voxels receiving higher doses using protons. For HL and EW sarcoma patients the combination of large PTV volumes with the position of the organs at risk (OARs) obliterated the differences between the two particle species, while patients with the heart close to the PTV could benefit from (4)He. Conclusion Treatment plan quality improved with (4)He compared to proton plans, but advantages in OAR sparing were depending on indication and tumor geometries. These first results of scanned (4)He therapy motivate comprehensive research on (4)He, including acquisition of experimental data to improve modeling of (4)He.

  3. Mobilities of ground-state and metastable O/+/, O2/+/, O/2+/, and O2/2+/ ions in helium and neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, R.; Biondi, M. A.; Hayashi, M.

    1982-09-01

    The ionic mobilities of O(+), O2(+), O(2+), and O2(2+) in helium and neon have been measured using a selected-ion drift apparatus (SIDA). It is found that the mobilities of both O(+) and O2(+) ions in the metastable states (2D or 4Pi u) are measurably smaller than those of the same ions carried out by using known, state-selective ion-molecule reactions. A similar mobility differentiation of ground-state and metastable ions was not observed for the O(2+) and O2(2+) ions.

  4. Patterning, Characterization and Chemical Sensing Applications of Graphene Nanoribbon Arrays Down to 5 nm Using Helium Ion Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Ahmad; Liu, Gang; Liu, Bilu; Zhang, Luyao; Liu, He; Ohlberg, Douglas; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-03-01

    Bandgap engineering of graphene is an essential step towards employing graphene in electronic and sensing applications. Recently, graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) were used to create a bandgap in graphene and function as a semiconducting switch. Although GNRs with widths of <10 nm have been achieved, problems like GNR alignment, width control, uniformity, high aspect ratios, and edge roughness must be resolved in order to introduce GNRs as a robust alternative technology. Here we report patterning, characterization and superior chemical sensing of ultra-narrow aligned GNR arrays down to 5 nm width using helium ion beam lithography (HIBL) for the first time. The patterned GNR arrays possess narrow and adjustable widths, high aspect ratios, and relatively high quality. Field-effect transistors were fabricated on such GNR arrays and temperature-dependent transport measurements show the thermally activated carrier transport in the GNR array structure. Furthermore, we have demonstrated exceptional NO2 gas sensitivity of the 5 nm GNR array devices down to ppb levels. The results show the potential of HIBL fabricated GNRs for the electronic and sensing applications. We would like to thank HP labs for the use of helium ion microscope. We thank Professor Kang L. Wang and Stephen B. Cronin for help with some of the experiments. We acknowledge the office of Naval Research for financial support.

  5. Effective particle energies for stopping power calculation in radiotherapy treatment planning with protons and helium, carbon, and oxygen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.

    2016-10-01

    The stopping power ratio (SPR) of body tissues relative to water depends on the particle energy. For simplicity, however, most analytical dose planning systems do not account for SPR variation with particle energy along the beam’s path, but rather assume a constant energy for SPR estimation. The range error due to this simplification could be indispensable depending on the particle species and the assumed energy. This error can be minimized by assuming a suitable energy referred to as an ‘effective energy’ in SPR estimation. To date, however, the effective energy has never been investigated for realistic patient geometries. We investigated the effective energies for proton, helium-, carbon-, and oxygen-ion radiotherapy using volumetric models of the reference male and female phantoms provided by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The range errors were estimated by comparing the particle ranges calculated when particle energy variations were and were not considered. The effective energies per nucleon for protons and helium, carbon, and oxygen ions were 70 MeV, 70 MeV, 131 MeV, and 156 MeV, respectively. Using the determined effective energies, the range errors were reduced to  ⩽0.3 mm for respective particle species. For SPR estimation of multiple particle species, an effective energy of 100 MeV is recommended, with which the range error is  ⩽0.5 mm for all particle species.

  6. Helium ion microscopy based wall thickness and surface roughness analysis of polymer foams obtained from high internal phase emulsion.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, C; Viswanathan, P; Jepson, M A E; Liu, X; Battaglia, G

    2014-04-01

    Due to their wide range of applications, porous polymers obtained from high internal phase emulsions have been widely studied using scanning electron microscopy. However, due to their lack of electrical conductivity, quantitative information of wall thicknesses and surface roughness, which are of particular interest to tissue engineering, has not been obtained. Here, Helium Ion Microscopy is used to examine uncoated polymer foams and some very strong but unexpected contrast is observed, the origin of which is established here. Based on this analysis, a method for the measurement of wall thickness variations and wall roughness measurements has been developed, based on the modeling of Helium ion transmission. The results presented here indicate that within the walls of the void structure there exist small features with height variations of ~30 nm and wall thickness variations from ~100 nm to larger 340 nm in regions surrounding interconnecting windows within the structure. The suggested imaging method is applicable to other porous carbon based structures with wall thicknesses in the range of 40-340 nm.

  7. Ferromagnetic resonance study of Co/Pd/Co/Ni multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy irradiated with helium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beaujour, J.-M. L.; Kent, A. D.; Tudosa, I.; Ravelosona, D.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2011-02-01

    We present a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) study of the effect of helium ion irradiation on the magnetic anisotropy, the linewidth and the Gilbert damping of a Co/Ni multilayer coupled to Co/Pd bilayers. The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases linearly with He ion fluence, leading to a transition to in-plane magnetization at a critical fluence of 5x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. We find that the damping is nearly independent of fluence but the FMR linewidth at fixed frequency has a maximum near the critical fluence, indicating that the inhomogeneous broadening of the FMR line is a nonmonotonic function of the He ion fluence. Based on an analysis of the angular dependence of the FMR linewidth, the inhomogeneous broadening is associated with spatial variations in the magnitude of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. These results demonstrate that ion irradiation may be used to systematically modify the magnetic anisotropy and distribution of magnetic anisotropy parameters of Co/Pd/Co/Ni multilayers for applications and basic physics studies.

  8. Ferromagnetic resonance study of Co/Pd/Co/Ni multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy irradiated with helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaujour, J.-M. L.; Kent, A. D.; Ravelosona, D.; Tudosa, I.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2011-02-01

    We present a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) study of the effect of helium ion irradiation on the magnetic anisotropy, the linewidth and the Gilbert damping of a Co/Ni multilayer coupled to Co/Pd bilayers. The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases linearly with He ion fluence, leading to a transition to in-plane magnetization at a critical fluence of 5×1014 ions/cm2. We find that the damping is nearly independent of fluence but the FMR linewidth at fixed frequency has a maximum near the critical fluence, indicating that the inhomogeneous broadening of the FMR line is a nonmonotonic function of the He ion fluence. Based on an analysis of the angular dependence of the FMR linewidth, the inhomogeneous broadening is associated with spatial variations in the magnitude of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. These results demonstrate that ion irradiation may be used to systematically modify the magnetic anisotropy and distribution of magnetic anisotropy parameters of Co/Pd/Co/Ni multilayers for applications and basic physics studies.

  9. Optical properties of planar waveguides on ZnWO₄ formed by carbon and helium ion implantation and effects of annealing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Liu, Tao; Guo, Sha-Sha; Guan, Jing; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2010-08-30

    We report on the optical properties of ZnWO(4) planar waveguides created by ion implantation, and the effect annealing has on these structures. Planar optical waveguides in ZnWO(4) crystals are fabricated by 5.0 MeV carbon ion implantation with a fluence of 1 × 10(15) ions/cm(2) or 500 keV helium ion implantation with the a fluence of 1 × 10(16) ions/cm(2). The thermal stability was investigated by 60 minute annealing cycles at different temperatures ranging from 260°C to 550°C in air. The guided modes were measured by a model 2010 prism coupler at wavelengths of 633 nm and 1539 nm. The reflectivity calculation method (RCM) was applied to simulate the refractive index profile in these waveguides. The near-field light intensity profiles were measured using the end-face coupling method. The absorption spectra show that the implantation processes have almost no influence on the visible band absorption.

  10. Determination of the light ion abundances in the strong-helium star HR 3089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Using line blanketed model stellar atmospheres and a spectrum synthesis approach, a differential abundance study of the ultraviolet spectrum of HR 3089 relative to the normal star lambda Sco was performed. Both stars were found to have the same abundances of carbon and silicon, but the helium and nitrogen are significantly enhanced in HR 3089. The atmospheric parameters and the distribution of abundances found for HR 3089 agree well with the results of Osmer and Peterson on sharp-lined helium-rich stars. The rotational velocity of 160 km/sec found for HR 3089 places a constraint on the role of diffusion in producing the abundance anomalies. Examination of the resonance lines of C II, N II, Si III and Si IV shows no evidence for mass loss in either star.

  11. The structure of triply excited, negative-ion resonances in the autoionizing region of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trantham, K. W.; Jacka, M.; Rau, A. R. P.; Buckman, S. J.

    1999-02-01

    The formation and decay of the two lowest-lying, triply excited 0953-4075/32/3/021/img7 resonances in the autoionizing region of the helium spectrum (57-60 eV) have been studied by measuring electron-impact excitation functions for the n = 2 singly excited states of helium as a function of electron scattering angle. These results offer unambiguous confirmation of the classification of these states as 0953-4075/32/3/021/img8 and 0953-4075/32/3/021/img9, respectively. Furthermore, the observation of the relative strengths of the decay of these features into the various final states enables some speculation as to the structure of the three excited electrons.

  12. Characterization of a compact ECR plasma source and its applications to studies of helium ion damage to tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D.; Buchenauer, D.; Whaley, J.; Friddle, R.

    2016-02-01

    Exposure of tungsten to low energy (<100 eV) helium plasmas at temperatures between 900-1900 K in both laboratory experiments and tokamaks has been shown to cause severe nanoscale modification of the near surface resulting in the growth of tungsten tendrils. Tendril formation can lead to non-sputtered erosion and dust formation. Here we report on characterization of a compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) He plasma source with an ion flux of ˜2.5 × 1019 ions m-2 s-1, average fluence of 3 × 1024 ions m-2, and the surface morphology changes seen on the exposed tungsten surfaces. Exposures of polished tungsten disks at temperatures up to 1270 K have been performed and characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) scans. Bubbles and craters have been seen on the exposed tungsten surface growing to up to 150 nm in diameter. The ECR source has been tested for eventual use on a scanning tunneling microscopy experiment intended to study the early stages of surface morphology change due to He ion exposure.

  13. Lifetime and quenching of CO /a super 3 pi/ produced by recombination of CO2 ions in a helium afterglow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wauchop, T. S.; Broida, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration that rapid dissociative recombination of CO2(+) in a flowing, helium afterglow is an efficient source of CO in the a super 3 pi metastable state. Ions produced by mixing CO2 with He(2 super 3 S) recombine to produce a CO metastable afterglow with a number density as great as 10 to the 9th per sq cm. Monitoring of the (a super 3 pi-X super 1 sigma) Cameron transition in CO was used to study the lifetime and quenching of CO (a super 3 pi) by CO2, N2, NO, and He. Recombination of CO2(+) also produces CO in the d super 3 delta and a' super 3 sigma states.

  14. Nanoforging Single Layer MoSe2 Through Defect Engineering with Focused Helium Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Iberi, Vighter; Liang, Liangbo; Ievlev, Anton V.; Stanford, Michael G.; Lin, Ming-Wei; Li, Xufan; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Jesse, Stephen; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Joy, David C.; Xiao, Kai; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-08-02

    Development of devices and structures based on the layered 2D materials critically hinges on the capability to induce, control, and tailor the electronic, transport, and optoelectronic properties via defect engineering, much like doping strategies have enabled semiconductor electronics and forging enabled introduction of iron age. Here, we demonstrate the use of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) for tailoring the functionality of single layer MoSe2 locally, and decipher associated mechanisms at atomic level. We demonstrate He+ beam bombardment that locally creates vacancies, shifts the Fermi energy landscape and thereby increases the Young s modulus of elasticity. Furthermore, we observe for the first time, an increase in the B-exciton photoluminescence signal from the nanoforged regions at room temperature. In conclusion, the approach for precise defect engineering demonstrated here opens opportunities for creating functional 2D optoelectronic devices with a wide range of customizable properties that include operating in the visible region.

  15. Simultaneous quiet time observations of energetic radiation belt protons and helium ions - The equatorial alpha/p ratio near 1 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, T. A.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of energetic helium ions and protons in the earth's radiation belts has been conducted with Explorer 45 in the immediate vicinity of the equatorial plane. Protons were measured from less than 1 keV to 1.6 MeV and also above 3.3 MeV in a channel responsive up to 22 MeV; helium ions were monitored in three passbands: 910 keV to 3.15 MeV, 590 to 910 keV, and 2.0 to 3.99 MeV. Alpha/proton flux ratios were found to vary significantly with energy and location in the radiation belts. At equal energy per nucleon a range of variability for alpha/p from 0.0001 to well above 0.001 was found, and at equal energy per ion the corresponding variability was from 0.001 to above 10. The latter findings emphasize the relative importance of the very energetic helium ions in the overall radiation belt ion populations.

  16. Modification of the crystal structure of gadolinium gallium garnet by helium ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostafiychuk, B. K.; Yaremiy, I. P. Yaremiy, S. I.; Fedoriv, V. D.; Tomyn, U. O.; Umantsiv, M. M.; Fodchuk, I. M.; Kladko, V. P.

    2013-12-15

    The structure of gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) single crystals before and after implantation by He{sup +} ions has been investigated using high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods and the generalized dynamic theory of X-ray scattering. The main types of growth defects in GGG single crystals and radiation-induced defects in the ion-implanted layer have been determined. It is established that the concentration of dislocation loops in the GGG surface layer modified by ion implantation increases and their radius decreases with an increase in the implantation dose.

  17. YBa2Cu3O7 Nanowire Josephson Junctions Directly Written with a Focused Helium Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cybart, Shane A.; Cho, Ethan Y.; Zhou, Yuchao W.; Dynes, Robert C.

    We will present electrical transport measurements for superconducting nanowire Josephson junctions with widths ranging between 500 to 25 nm. The junctions were fabricated by using a 500-pm diameter helium ion beam to pattern superconducting nanowires, into 25-nm thick YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) thin films. The key to this direct-write method is that irradiated regions of the YBCO turn insulating for moderate ion doses which allows for very fine features to be defined (~2 nm). Nanowire junctions were fabricated with the length of the nanowire oriented along different crystallographic directions in the a - b plane. They exhibit a large increase in the anisotropy of the Josephson critical current and voltage state conductance as the nanowire width is decreased. In the narrowest of wires, the conductance changes by an order of magnitude. We interpret these observations to be due to the Josephson junctions being smaller than the granularity of the films. Measuring these single grains reveals characteristics of the a - b plane d-wave symmetry of superconductivity in YBCO. This work is funded by AFOSR.

  18. Two-wavelength Raman study of poly(ethylene terephthalate) surfaces modified by helium plasma-based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, M.; Tóth, A.; Mohai, M.; Bertóti, I.; Szépvölgyi, J.; Tóth, S.; Himics, L.; Koós, M.

    2012-12-01

    The surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was modified by helium plasma-based ion implantation (He PBII). The untreated and surface modified samples were characterised with optical absorption spectroscopy and two-wavelength micro-Raman spectroscopy excited with 488 nm and 785 nm light sources, allowing to examine the chemical bonding configuration of the surface layers on different depths and by selective enhancement of vibrations of different structural units. Upon treatment, simultaneously with the development of the broad D and G bands, a gradual decrease of the peaks corresponding to the Cdbnd C stretching and Cdbnd O stretching modes were observed with both excitations. Downshifting and broadening were detected for the Cdbnd C peak with both excitations and also for the Cdbnd O peak with the 488 nm excitation due to formation of condensed aromatic rings. Oppositely, upshifting was found with 785 nm excitation for the Cdbnd O peak and especially for its broad shoulder newly developed at the high wavenumber side. The latter feature was assigned to Cdbnd O groups attached to polymer chains without conjugation and the bands behaviour was interpreted by breaking of the Cdbnd C bonds of the polymer, leading to the formation of a crosslinked, disordered and stressed structure with still intact Cdbnd O groups, due to the increased nuclear damage at the end of the ion track.

  19. Gettering of transition metals by cavities in silicon formed by helium ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.A.; Myers, S.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1996-09-01

    We have recently completed studies which quantitatively characterize the ability of nanometer-size cavities formed by He ion implantation to getter detrimental metal impurities in Si. Cavity microstructures formed in Si by ion implantation of He and subsequent annealing have been found to capture metal impurities by two mechanisms: (1) chemisorption on internal walls at low concentrations and (2) silicide precipitation at concentrations exceeding the solid solubility. Experiments utilizing ion-beam analysis, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry were performed to quantitatively characterize the gettering effects and to determine the free energies associated with the chemisorbed metal atoms as a function of temperature. Mathematical models utilizing these results have been developed to predict gettering behavior.

  20. Resource Letter SH-1: Superfluid Helium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallock, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of books, textbooks, and films on superfluid helium. Also lists research reports/reviews arranged by category, including among others, early history, microscopic understanding, ions in helium, helium in rotation, vortices and quantization, helium films and constricted geometrics, persistence flow, and superfluid helium…

  1. Structural response of transient heat loading on a molybdenum surface exposed to low-energy helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, G.; Tripathi, J. K.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-03-01

    The advancement of fusion reactor engineering is currently inhibited by the lack of knowledge surrounding the stability of plasma facing components (PFCs) in a tokamak environment. During normal operation, events of high heat loading occur periodically where large amounts of energy are imparted onto the PFC surface. Concurrently, irradiation by low-energy helium ions present in the fusion plasma can result in the synthesis of a fibre form nanostructure on the PFC surface, called ‘fuzz’. In order to understand how this heterogeneous structure evolves and deforms in response to transient heat loading, a pulsed Nd:YAG millisecond laser is used to simulate these events on a fuzz form molybdenum (Mo) surface. Performance was analysed by three metrics: nanostructure evolution, particle emission, and improvement in optical properties. Experiments performed at the upper end of the expected range for type-I edge-localized modes (ELMs) found that the helium-induced nanostructure completely disappears after 200 pulses of the laser at 1.5 MJ m-2. In situ mass loss measurements found that the amount of particles leaving the surface increases as energy density increases and the rate of emission increases with pulse count. Finally, optical properties assisted in providing a qualitative indication of fuzz density on the Mo surface; after 400 pulses at 1.5 MJ m-2, the optical reflectivity of the damaged surface is ~90% of that of a mirror polished Mo sample. These findings provide different results than previous studies done with tungsten (W), and further help illustrate the complicated nature of how transient events of high heat loading in a tokamak environment might impact the performance and lifetime of PFCs in ITER and future DEMO devices (Ueda et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 901-6).

  2. Ultra-precise single-ion atomic mass measurements on deuterium and helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafonte, S. L.; Van Dyck, R. S., Jr.

    2015-04-01

    The former University of Washington Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer (UW-PTMS), now located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany, was used in the decade before the move to determine new values for the deuteron atomic mass, M (2H+) = 2.013 553 212 745(40) u, and the deuterium atomic mass, M (2H) = 2.014 101 778 052(40) u, both of which are now more than an order-of-magnitude more accurate than the previous best 1994-MIT measurements of these quantities. The new value for the deuteron’s mass can then be used with the accepted 2010-CODATA proton mass and the most recent 1999-measurement of the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray binding energy of the deuteron to refine the neutron’s mass to mn = 1.008 664 916 018(435) u which has about half the uncertainty relative to the value computed using that previous 1994-MIT deuterium measurement. As a result, further improvements of mn must now come from a more accurate determination of the wavelength of this gamma ray. In this same period of time, this spectrometer has also been used to determine new values for the helion atomic mass, M (3He2+) = 3.014 932 246 668(43) u, and the neutral helium-3 atomic mass, M (3He) = 3.016 029 321 675(43) u, which are both about 60 times more accurate than the 2006-SMILETRAP measurements, but disagree with the 4.4-times less-accurate 2015-Florida-State measurements by 0.76 nu. It is expected that these helium-3 results will be used in the future 3H/3He mass ratio (to be determined by the Heidelberg, Germany version of the old UW-PTMS) in order to generate a more accurate value for the tritium atomic mass.

  3. Differential ion mobility separations in up to 100% helium using microchips.

    PubMed

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    The performance of differential IMS (FAIMS) analyzers is much enhanced by gases comprising He, especially He/N2 mixtures. However, electrical breakdown has limited the He fraction to ~50%-75%, depending on the field strength. By the Paschen law, the threshold field for breakdown increases at shorter distances. This allows FAIMS using chips with microscopic channels to utilize much stronger field intensities (E) than "full-size" analyzers with wider gaps. Here we show that those chips can employ higher He fractions up to 100%. Use of He-rich gases improves the resolution and resolution/sensitivity balance substantially, although less than for full-size analyzers. The optimum He fraction is ~80%, in line with first-principles theory. Hence, one can now measure the dependences of ion mobility on E in pure He, where ion-molecule cross section calculations are much more tractable than in other gases that form deeper and more complex interaction potentials. This capability may facilitate quantitative modeling of high-field ion mobility behavior and, thus, FAIMS separation properties, which would enable a priori extraction of structural information about the ions.

  4. Differential Ion Mobility Separations in up to 100 % Helium Using Microchips

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of differential IMS (FAIMS) analyzers is much enhanced by gases comprising He, especially He/N2 mixtures. However, electrical breakdown has limited the He fraction to ~50 %–75 %, depending on the field strength. By the Paschen law, the threshold field for breakdown increases at shorter distances. This allows FAIMS using chips with microscopic channels to utilize much stronger field intensities (E) than “full-size” analyzers with wider gaps. Here we show that those chips can employ higher He fractions up to 100 %. Use of He-rich gases improves the resolution and resolution/sensitivity balance substantially, although less than for full-size analyzers. The optimum He fraction is ~80 %, in line with first-principles theory. Hence, one can now measure the dependences of ion mobility on E in pure He, where ion-molecule cross section calculations are much more tractable than in other gases that form deeper and more complex interaction potentials. This capability may facilitate quantitative modeling of high-field ion mobility behavior and, thus, FAIMS separation properties, which would enable a priori extraction of structural information about the ions. PMID:24402673

  5. Fractional Diffusion, Low Exponent Lévy Stable Laws, and 'Slow Motion' Denoising of Helium Ion Microscope Nanoscale Imagery.

    PubMed

    Carasso, Alfred S; Vladár, András E

    2012-01-01

    Helium ion microscopes (HIM) are capable of acquiring images with better than 1 nm resolution, and HIM images are particularly rich in morphological surface details. However, such images are generally quite noisy. A major challenge is to denoise these images while preserving delicate surface information. This paper presents a powerful slow motion denoising technique, based on solving linear fractional diffusion equations forward in time. The method is easily implemented computationally, using fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithms. When applied to actual HIM images, the method is found to reproduce the essential surface morphology of the sample with high fidelity. In contrast, such highly sophisticated methodologies as Curvelet Transform denoising, and Total Variation denoising using split Bregman iterations, are found to eliminate vital fine scale information, along with the noise. Image Lipschitz exponents are a useful image metrology tool for quantifying the fine structure content in an image. In this paper, this tool is applied to rank order the above three distinct denoising approaches, in terms of their texture preserving properties. In several denoising experiments on actual HIM images, it was found that fractional diffusion smoothing performed noticeably better than split Bregman TV, which in turn, performed slightly better than Curvelet denoising.

  6. Precision, high dose radiotherapy. II. Helium ion treatment of tumors adjacent to critical central nervous system structures

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Castro, J.R.; Collier, J.M.; Gauger, G.; Gutin, P.; Phillips, T.L.; Pitluck, S.; Walton, R.E.

    1985-07-01

    In this paper, the authors present a technique for treating relatively small, low grade tumors located very close to critical, radiation sensitive central nervous system structures such as the spinal cord and the brain stem. A beam of helium ions is used to irradiate the tumor. The nearby normal tissues are protected by exploiting the superb dose localization properties of this beam, particularly its well defined and controllable range in tissue, the increased dose deposited near the end of this range (i.e., the Bragg peak), the sharp decrease in dose beyond the Bragg peak, and the sharp penumbra of the beam. To illustrate the technique, the authors present a group of 19 patients treated for chordomas, meningiomas and low grade chondrosarcomas in the base of the skull or spinal column. They have been able to deliver high, uniform doses to the target volumes, while keeping the doses to the nearby critical tissues below the threshold for radiation damage. Follow-up on this group of patients is short, averaging 22 months (2 to 75 months). Currently, 15 patients have local control of their tumor. Two major complications, a spinal cord transsection and optic tract damage, are discussed in detail. Their treatment policies have been modified to minimize the risk of these complications in the future, and they are continuing to use this method to treat such patients.

  7. Active voltage contrast imaging of cross-sectional surface of multilayer ceramic capacitor using helium ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, C.; Ishida, N.; Masuda, H.; Nagano, S.; Kitahara, M.; Ogata, Y.; Fujita, D.

    2016-08-01

    We studied active voltage contrast (AVC) imaging using helium ion microscopy (HIM). We observed secondary electron (SE) images of the cross-sectional surface of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with and without a voltage applied to the internal electrodes. When no voltage was applied, we obtained an image reflecting the material contrast between the Ni internal electrode region and the BaTiO3 dielectric region of the cross-sectional surface of the MLCC. When a voltage was applied, the electrical potential difference between the grounded and the positively biased internal electrodes affected the contrast (voltage contrast). Moreover, attenuation of the SE intensity from the grounded to the positively biased internal electrodes was observed in the dielectric region. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements of the contact potential difference (CPD) were performed on the same sample. By using the AVC image from the HIM observation and the CPD image from the KPFM measurement, we could quantitatively evaluate the electrical potential. We think that the results of this study will lead to an expansion in the number of applications of HIM.

  8. Binding of copper and nickel to cavities in silicon formed by helium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S. M.; Follstaedt, D. M.; Bishop, D. M.

    Cavities formed in Si by He ion implantation and annealing are shown to be strong traps for Cu and Ni impurities. Experiments utilizing ion-beam analysis and transmission electron microscopy indicate that Cu is trapped at the internal surfaces of cavities up to approximately 1 monolayer coverage with a binding energy of 2.2 +/- 0.2 eV relative to solution. This is greater than the heat of solution from the precipitated Cu3Si phase, determined to be 1.7 eV in agreement with earlier work. Copper at cavity-wall sites is reversibly replaced by H during heating in H2 gas, indicating the relative stability of the two surface terminations. Initial results for Ni impurities indicate that trapping at cavities is again energetically preferred to silicide formation. The saturation coverage of Ni on the internal surfaces, however, is an order of magnitude smaller for Ni than Cu, consistent with published studies of external-surface adsorption. These results suggest that cavity trapping may getter metallic impurities in Si more effectively than methods based on silicide precipitation.

  9. Binding of copper and nickel to cavities in silicon formed by helium ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Bishop, D.M.

    1993-12-01

    Cavities formed in Si by He ion implantation and annealing are shown to be strong traps for Cu and Ni impurities. Experiments utilizing ion-beam analysis and transmission electron microscopy indicate that Cu is trapped at the internal surfaces of cavities up to {approximately}1 monolayer coverage with a binding energy of 2.2{plus_minus}0.2 eV relative to solution. This is greater than the heat of solution from the precipitated Cu{sub 3}Si phase, determined to be 1.7 eV in agreement with earlier work. Copper at cavity-wall sites is reversibly replaced by H during heating in H{sub 2} gas, indicating the relative stability of the two surface terminations. Initial results for Ni impurities indicate that trapping at cavities is again energetically preferred to silicide formation. The saturation coverage of Ni on the internal surfaces, however, is an order of magnitude smaller for Ni than Cu, consistent with published studies of external-surface adsorption. These results suggest that cavity trapping may getter metallic impurities in Si more effectively than methods based on silicide precipitation.

  10. Double ionization of helium by bare ions: Theoretical study of the fully differential cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, S. D.; Garibotti, C. R.; Otranto, S.

    2011-06-15

    This work presents a theoretical study of fully differential cross sections (FDCSs) for the double ionization of an He target by ion impact within a distorted wave model. The initial atomic system is described by two approximated wave functions of different accuracy proposed by Bonham and Kohl. For the final channel several models are considered based upon improvements and simplifications of the well-known three-body Coulomb (3C) model. The influence of the receding projectile on the resulting fragments is also studied by implementing a model with effective charges that depend on the momenta of the four particles. The FDCSs resulting for different electron energy sharing are discussed. The sensitivity of the FDCSs to the projectile charge sign and magnitude is explored over the energy range 700 keV/amu through 6 MeV/amu.

  11. Simultaneous ion luminescence imaging and spectroscopy of individual aerosol particles with external proton or helium microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, Wataru; Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Koka, Masashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2014-08-01

    Simultaneous microscopic imaging and spectroscopy of individual aerosol particles were performed with an external microbeam. Visible luminescence induced by the external microbeam was successfully used as a probe to detect organic contaminants in the targets. Combined ion luminescence (IL)/particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of the aerosol targets revealed microscopic chemical and elemental composition distributions under ambient atmospheric conditions. The simple confocal micro-optics for the IL spectroscopy and microscopic imaging were sufficiently sensitive for detecting these molecules at sub-parts per million concentrations and at a wavelength resolution of less than 5 nm. The IL spectra were monitored to prevent severe damage to the samples. Furthermore, our IL system has the advantage that it is simple to add to a conventional micro-PIXE system.

  12. Spectroscopic observation of helium-ion- and hydrogen-catalyzed hydrino transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Randell L.; Lu, Ying; Akhtar, Kamran

    2010-06-01

    Four predictions of Mills’ Grand Unified Theory of Classical Physics (GUTCP) regarding atomic hydrogen undergoing a catalytic reaction with certain atomized elements and ions which resonantly, nonradiatively accept integer multiples of the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, m · 27.2 eV wherein m is an integer, have been confirmed experimentally. Specifically, a catalyst comprises a chemical or physical process with an enthalpy change equal to an integer multiple m of the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, 27.2 eV. For He+ m = 2, due to its ionization reaction to He2+, and two H atoms formed from H2 by collision with a third, hot H can also act as a catalyst with m = 2 for this third H. The product is H(1/ p), fractional Rydberg states of atomic hydrogen called “hydrino atoms” wherein n = 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, …, 1/ p( p≤137 is an integer) replaces the well-known parameter n = integer in the Rydberg equation for hydrogen excited states. The predictions for the hydrino reaction of (1) pumping of the catalyst excited states, (2) characteristic EUV continuum radiation, (3) fast H, and (4) hydrino products were observed in multiple catalyst-hydrogen plasma systems.

  13. Spectroscopic observation of helium-ion- and hydrogen-catalyzed hydrino transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Randell; Lu, Ying; Akhtar, Kamran

    2010-06-01

    Four predictions of Mills' Grand Unified Theory of Classical Physics (GUTCP) regarding atomic hydrogen undergoing a catalytic reaction with certain atomized elements and ions which resonantly, nonradiatively accept integer multiples of the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, m · 27.2 eV wherein m is an integer, have been confirmed experimentally. Specifically, a catalyst comprises a chemical or physical process with an enthalpy change equal to an integer multiple m of the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, 27.2 eV. For He+ m = 2, due to its ionization reaction to He2+, and two H atoms formed from H2 by collision with a third, hot H can also act as a catalyst with m = 2 for this third H. The product is H(1/p), fractional Rydberg states of atomic hydrogen called "hydrino atoms" wherein n = 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, …, 1/p(p≤137 is an integer) replaces the well-known parameter n = integer in the Rydberg equation for hydrogen excited states. The predictions for the hydrino reaction of (1) pumping of the catalyst excited states, (2) characteristic EUV continuum radiation, (3) fast H, and (4) hydrino products were observed in multiple catalyst-hydrogen plasma systems.

  14. Separated-Oscillatory Measurement of the N = 2 Lamb Shift in Helium Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitzsch, Martin Erich

    1992-09-01

    Using a fast ion beam and a ~ 14 GHz microwave separated-oscillatory-field geometry, the 2S_{1/2}-2P_{1/2 } Lamb shift in _sp{4} {2}He^{+} has been measured with a precision of 44 ppm. This transition has a large natural linewidth of 1600 MHz, which causes great technical obstacles to a precise linecenter determination. The Ramsey SOF technique narrowed the signal down by means of an interference effect to a (subnatural) linewidth of 600 MHz. Twin tunable miniature microwave cavities served as the separated interaction regions, resonantly enhancing the electric-field amplitude to about 600 V/cm. A complementary phase-variation technique developed in this laboratory also yielded a Lamb-shift determination in reasonable agreement with the more precise frequency-scanned result. The final experimental value for the He ^{+} n = 2 Lamb shift is {cal S}(He^{+ }, n = 2) = 14042.67(62) MHz, in excellent agreement with the latest theoretical prediction. This result is the most precise measurement of { cal S}(He^{+} , n = 2) by a microwave resonance technique; although a recent "quench anisotropy" measurement has yielded a more precise number in excellent agreement with the present result. This experiment has served as a useful test of QED atomic structure calculations, determining the higher -order electron self-energy remainder to be Delta G_{SE}(Zalpha) = -22.15(1.34). This quantity currently represents the greatest remaining source of theoretical uncertainty in this very difficult QED calculation.

  15. Focused helium-ion beam irradiation effects on electrical transport properties of few-layer WSe2: Enabling nanoscale direct write homo-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael; Noh, Joo Hyon; Koehler, Michael R.; Mandrus, David G.; Duscher, Gerd; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Ward, Thomas Zac; Rack, Philip D.; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Belianinov, Alex; Cross, Nicholas

    2016-06-06

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are currently receiving significant attention due to their promising opto-electronic properties. Tuning optical and electrical properties of mono and few-layer TMDs, such as tungsten diselenide (WSe2), by controlling the defects, is an intriguing opportunity to synthesize next generation two dimensional material opto-electronic devices. Here, we report the effects of focused helium ion beam irradiation on the structural, optical and electrical properties of few-layer WSe2, via high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. By controlling the ion irradiation dose, we selectively introduce precise defects in few-layer WSe2 thereby locally tuning the resistivity and transport properties of the material. Hole transport in the few layer WSe2 is degraded more severely relative to electron transport after helium ion irradiation. Moreover, by selectively exposing material with the ion beam, we demonstrate a simple yet highly tunable method to create lateral homo-junctions in few layer WSe2 flakes, which constitutes an important advance towards two dimensional opto-electronic devices.

  16. Focused helium-ion beam irradiation effects on electrical transport properties of few-layer WSe2: enabling nanoscale direct write homo-junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford, Michael G.; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Belianinov, Alex; Cross, Nicholas; Noh, Joo Hyon; Koehler, Michael R.; Mandrus, David G.; Duscher, Gerd; Rondinone, Adam J.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Ward, T. Zac; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-06-01

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are currently receiving significant attention due to their promising opto-electronic properties. Tuning optical and electrical properties of mono and few-layer TMDs, such as tungsten diselenide (WSe2), by controlling the defects, is an intriguing opportunity to synthesize next generation two dimensional material opto-electronic devices. Here, we report the effects of focused helium ion beam irradiation on the structural, optical and electrical properties of few-layer WSe2, via high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. By controlling the ion irradiation dose, we selectively introduce precise defects in few-layer WSe2 thereby locally tuning the resistivity and transport properties of the material. Hole transport in the few layer WSe2 is degraded more severely relative to electron transport after helium ion irradiation. Furthermore, by selectively exposing material with the ion beam, we demonstrate a simple yet highly tunable method to create lateral homo-junctions in few layer WSe2 flakes, which constitutes an important advance towards two dimensional opto-electronic devices.

  17. Focused helium-ion beam irradiation effects on electrical transport properties of few-layer WSe2: Enabling nanoscale direct write homo-junctions

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael; Noh, Joo Hyon; Koehler, Michael R.; ...

    2016-06-06

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are currently receiving significant attention due to their promising opto-electronic properties. Tuning optical and electrical properties of mono and few-layer TMDs, such as tungsten diselenide (WSe2), by controlling the defects, is an intriguing opportunity to synthesize next generation two dimensional material opto-electronic devices. Here, we report the effects of focused helium ion beam irradiation on the structural, optical and electrical properties of few-layer WSe2, via high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. By controlling the ion irradiation dose, we selectively introduce precise defects in few-layer WSe2 thereby locally tuningmore » the resistivity and transport properties of the material. Hole transport in the few layer WSe2 is degraded more severely relative to electron transport after helium ion irradiation. Moreover, by selectively exposing material with the ion beam, we demonstrate a simple yet highly tunable method to create lateral homo-junctions in few layer WSe2 flakes, which constitutes an important advance towards two dimensional opto-electronic devices.« less

  18. Spatial distribution and yield of DNA double-strand breaks induced by 3-7 MeV helium ions in human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, Bjorn; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Holley, William R.; Lobrich, Markus; Zeitlin, Cary; Chatterjee, Aloke; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerated helium ions with mean energies at the target location of 3-7 MeV were used to simulate alpha-particle radiation from radon daughters. The experimental setup and calibration procedure allowed determination of the helium-ion energy distribution and dose in the nuclei of irradiated cells. Using this system, the induction of DNA double-strand breaks and their spatial distributions along DNA were studied in irradiated human fibroblasts. It was found that the apparent number of double-strand breaks as measured by a standard pulsed-field gel assay (FAR assay) decreased with increasing LET in the range 67-120 keV/microm (corresponding to the energy of 7-3 MeV). On the other hand, the generation of small and intermediate-size DNA fragments (0.1-100 kbp) increased with LET, indicating an increased intratrack long-range clustering of breaks. The fragment size distribution was measured in several size classes down to the smallest class of 0.1-2 kbp. When the clustering was taken into account, the actual number of DNA double-strand breaks (separated by at least 0.1 kbp) could be calculated and was found to be in the range 0.010-0.012 breaks/Mbp Gy(-1). This is two- to threefold higher than the apparent yield obtained by the FAR assay. The measured yield of double-strand breaks as a function of LET is compared with theoretical Monte Carlo calculations that simulate the track structure of energy depositions from helium ions as they interact with the 30-nm chromatin fiber. When the calculation is performed to include fragments larger than 0.1 kbp (to correspond to the experimental measurements), there is good agreement between experiment and theory.

  19. Helium cyclotron resonance within the earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, B.H.; McIlwain, C.E.; McPherron, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A histogram of electromagnetic Alfven/ion cyclotron wave frequencies, sampled within the geostationary enviroment and normalized by the equatorial proton cyclotron frequency, shows a dramatic gap centered near the helium (He/sup +/) cyclotron frequency. Also, strongly cyclotron phase bunched helium ions (20--200 eV) have been observed directly within the vicinity of wave environments. These observations are interpreted as resulting from the absorption of the waves through cyclotron resonance by cool ambient populations of helium ions.

  20. Amorphization of Al[sub 6]Mn phase in an Al-14 a/o Mn alloy during low energy helium ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, K.G.M.; Krishan, K. . Materials Science Division); Vijayalakshmi, M. . Metallurgy Division)

    1993-10-01

    Amorphization of ordered intermetallic compounds has been observed during ion, electron and neutron irradiations. Investigations have been carried out in a number of systems. It has been generally observed that intermetallic compounds with a narrow range of homogeneity (line compounds) amorphize on irradiation. The present paper reports the observation of irradiation-induced amorphization in the Al[sub 6]Mn phase in an Al-14 a/o Mn alloy. The dose and energy dependence of the amorphization process are discussed. The present studies suggest that the defects produced during irradiation rather than the implanted atoms (helium) play a major role in the crystalline to amorphous transition.

  1. HELIOS: a helium line-ratio spectral-monitoring diagnostic used to generate high resolution profiles near the ion cyclotron resonant heating antenna on TEXTOR.

    PubMed

    Unterberg, E A; Schmitz, O; Fehling, D H; Stoschus, H; Klepper, C C; Muñoz-Burgos, J M; Van Wassenhove, G; Hillis, D L

    2012-10-01

    Radial profiles of electron temperature and density are measured at high spatial (∼1 mm) and temporal (≥10 μs) resolution using a thermal supersonic helium jet. A highly accurate detection system is applied to well-developed collisional-radiative model codes to produce the profiles. Agreement between this measurement and an edge Thomson scattering measurement is found to be within the error bars (≲20%). The diagnostic is being used to give profiles near the ion cyclotron resonant heating antenna on TEXTOR to better understand RF coupling to the core.

  2. Effects of indirect actions and oxygen on relative biological effectiveness: estimate of DSB induction and conversion induced by gamma rays and helium ions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Chen, Fang-Hsin; Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Hsiao, Ya-Yun

    2015-07-01

    Clustered DNA damage other than double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be detrimental to cells and can lead to mutagenesis or cell death. In addition to DSBs induced by ionizing radiation, misrepair of non-DSB clustered damage contributes extra DSBs converted from DNA misrepair via pathways for base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair. This study aimed to quantify the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) when DSB induction and conversion from non-DSB clustered damage misrepair were used as biological endpoints. The results showed that both linear energy transfer (LET) and indirect action had a strong impact on the yields for DSB induction and conversion. RBE values for DSB induction and maximum DSB conversion of helium ions (LET = 120 keV/μm) to (60)Co gamma rays were 3.0 and 3.2, respectively. These RBE values increased to 5.8 and 5.6 in the absence of interference of indirect action initiated by addition of 2-M dimethylsulfoxide. DSB conversion was ∼1-4% of the total non-DSB damage due to gamma rays, which was lower than the 10% estimate by experimental measurement. Five to twenty percent of total non-DSB damage due to helium ions was converted into DSBs. Hence, it may be possible to increase the yields of DSBs in cancerous cells through DNA repair pathways, ultimately enhancing cell killing.

  3. The effect of carbon impurities on molybdenum surface morphology evolution under high-flux low-energy helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Gonderman, S.; Bharadwaj, N.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the role of carbon (C) impurities, in molybdenum (Mo) fuzz evolutions on Mo surface during 100 eV He+ ion irradiations. In this study we considered 0.01, 0.05, and 0.5% C+ ion impurities in He+ ion irradiations. For introducing such tiny C+ ion impurities, gas mixtures of He and CH4 have been chosen in following ratios; 99.95: 0.05, 99.75: 0.25, and 97.5: 2.5. Apart from these three cases, two additional cases, 100% He+ ion (for Mo fuzz growth due to only He+ ions) and 100% H+ ion (for confirming the significance of tiny 0.04-2.0% H+ ions in terms of Mo fuzz evolutions on Mo surface, if any), have also been considered. Ion energy (100 eV), ion fluence (2.6 × 1024 ions m-2), and target temperature (923 K) were kept constant for each experiment and their selections were based on our previous studies [1,2]. Our study shows homogeneously populated and highly dense Mo fuzz evolutions on entire Mo surface for 100% He+ ion irradiation case. Enhancement of C+ ion impurities in He+ ions causes a sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions, leading to almost complete prevention of Mo fuzz evolutions for 0.5% C+ ion impurity concentrations. Additionally, no fuzz formation for 100% H+ ion irradiation at all, were seen (apart from some tiny nano-structuring, in very limited regions). This indicates that there is no significant role of H+ ions in Mo fuzz evolutions (at least for such tiny amount, 0.04-2.0% H+ ions). The study is significant to understand the behavior of potential high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs), in the, presence of tiny amount of C impurities, for nuclear fusion relevant applications.

  4. WE-EF-BRA-05: Experimental Design for High-Throughput In-Vitro RBE Measurements Using Protons, Helium and Carbon Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, F; Titt, U; Patel, D; Bronk, L; Taleei, R; Peeler, C; Mirkovic, D; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R; Jakel, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To design and validate experimental setups for investigation of dose and LET effects in cell kill for protons, helium and carbon ions, in high throughput and high accuracy cell experiments. Methods: Using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit, we designed 3 custom range compensators to simultaneously expose cancer cells to different doses and LETs from selected portions of pristine ion beams from the entrance to points just beyond the Bragg peak. To minimize the spread of LET, we utilized mono-energetic uniformly scanned beams at the HIT facility with support from the DKFZ. Using different entrance doses and LETs, a matrix of cell survival data was acquired leading to a specific RBE matrix. We utilized the standard clonogenic assay for H460 and H1437 lung-cancer cell lines grown in 96-well plates. Using these plates, the data could be acquired in a small number of exposures. The ion specific compensators were located in a horizontal beam, designed to hold two 96-wells plates (12 columns by 8 rows) at an angle of 30o with respect to the beam direction. Results: Using about 20 hours of beam time, a total of about 11,000 wells containing cancer cells could be irradiated. The H460 and H1437 cell lines exhibited a significant dependence on LET when they were exposed to comparable doses. The results were similar for each of the investigated ion species, and indicate the need to incorporate RBE into the ion therapy planning process. Conclusion: The experimental design developed is a viable approach to rapidly acquire large amounts of accurate in-vitro RBE data. We plan to further improve the design to achieve higher accuracy and throughput, thereby facilitating the irradiation of multiple cell types. The results are indicative of the possibility to develop a new degree of freedom (variable RBE) for future clinical ion therapy optimization. Work supported by the Sister Institute Network Fund (SINF), University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

  5. Fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p 4P state of the helium negative ion He-.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Li, Chun; Yan, Zong-Chao; Drake, G W F

    2014-12-31

    The fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p (4)P state of the helium negative ion He(-) are calculated in Hylleraas coordinates, including relativistic and QED corrections up to O(α(4)mc(2)), O((μ/M)α(4)mc(2)), O(α(5)mc(2)), and O((μ/M)α(5)mc(2)). Higher order corrections are estimated for the ionization energy. A comparison is made with other calculations and experiments. We find that the present results for the fine structure splittings agree with experiment very well. However, the calculated ionization energy deviates from the experimental result by about 1 standard deviation. The estimated theoretical uncertainty in the ionization energy is much less than the experimental accuracy.

  6. Comparative effects of 60Co gamma-rays and neon and helium ions on cycle duration and division probability of EMT 6 cells. A time-lapse cinematography study.

    PubMed

    Collyn-d'Hooghe, M; Hemon, D; Gilet, R; Curtis, S B; Valleron, A J; Malaise, E P

    1981-03-01

    Exponentially growing cultures of EMT 6 cells were irradiated in vitro with neon ions, helium ions or 60Co gamma-rays. Time-lapse cinematography allowed the determination, for individual cells, of cycle duration, success of the mitotic division and the age of the cell at the moment of irradiation. Irradiation induced a significant mitotic delay increasing proportionally with the delivered dose. Using mitotic delay as an endpoint, the r.b.e. for neon ions with respect to 60Co gamma-rays was 3.3 +/- 0.2 while for helium ions it was 1.2 +/- 0.1. Mitotic delay was greatest in those cells that had progressed furthest in their cycle at the time of irradiation. No significant mitotic delay was observed in the post-irradiation generation. Division probability was significantly reduced by irradiation both in the irradiated and in the post-irradiated generation. The reduction in division probability obtained with 3 Gy of neon ions was similar to that obtained after irradiation with 6 Gy of helium ions or 60Co gamma-rays.

  7. First-principles study of the threshold effect in the electronic stopping power of LiF and SiO2 for low-velocity protons and helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Fei; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Jinxia; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2014-02-01

    Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the electronic stopping power of LiF and SiO2-cristobalite-high crystalline thin films when protons and helium ions are hyperchanneling in the <001> axis. In this theoretical framework, ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory calculations for electrons are combined with molecular dynamics simulations for ions in real time and real space. The energy transfer process between the ions and the electronic subsystem of LiF and SiO2 nanostructures is studied. The velocity-proportional stopping power of LiF and SiO2 for protons and helium ions is predicted in the low-energy range. The measured velocity thresholds of protons in LiF and SiO2, and helium ions in LiF are reproduced. The convergence of the threshold effect with respect to the separation of grid points is confirmed. The underlying physics of the threshold effect is clarified by analyzing the conduction band electron distribution. In addition, the electron transfer processes between the projectile ions and solid atoms in hyperchanneling condition are studied, and its effects on the energy loss is investigated.

  8. Role of carbon impurities on the surface morphology evolution of tungsten under high dose helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of carbon impurities on the surface evolution (e.g., fuzz formation) of tungsten (W) surface during 300 eV He ions irradiation was studied. Several tungsten samples were irradiated by He ion beam with a various carbon ions percentage. The presence of minute carbon contamination within the He ion beam was found to be effective in preventing the fuzz formation. At higher carbon concentration, the W surface was found to be fully covered with a thick graphitic layer on the top of tungsten carbide (WC) layer that cover the sample surface. Lowering the ion beam carbon percentage was effective in a significant reduction in the thickness of the surface graphite layer. Under these conditions the W surface was also found to be immune for the fuzz formation. The effect of W fuzz prevention by the WC formation on the sample surface was more noticeable when the He ion beam had much lower carbon (C) ions content (0.01% C). In this case, the fuzz formation was prevented on the vast majority of the W sample surface, while W fuzz was found in limited and isolated areas. The W surface also shows good resistance to morphology evolution when bombarded by high flux of pure H ions at 900 °C.

  9. COMMENT: Comment on `Asymptotic behaviour of the total cross section for double ionization of helium-like ions by electrons'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, B. G.; Rejoub, R.; Stebbings, R. F.

    2002-04-01

    Defrance et al (Defrance P, Kereselidze T M, Noselidze I L and Tzulukidze M F 2001b J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 34 4957-68; Defrance P, Kereselidze T, Noselidze I and Tzulukidze M 2001a 22nd Int. Conf. on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (Santa Fe, CA) (abstracts of contributed papers) p 315) have reported calculations of the electron-impact double-ionization cross section for helium that display a markedly different high-energy behaviour than do most of the published experimental data and they contend that new precise measurements are needed. The results presented here confirm the correctness of the more recent experimental data and indicate that revision of the theory is required.

  10. SU-E-T-539: Maximum Energy of Helium and Carbon Ions Clinically Needed for Spine, Lung, Prostate and Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pompos, A; Choy, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S; Timmerman, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Maximum available kinetic energy of accelerated heavy ions is a critical parameter to consider during the establishment of a heavy ion therapy center. It dictates the maximum range in tissue and determines the size and cost of ion gantry. We have started planning our heavy ion therapy center and we report on the needed ion range. Methods: We analyzed 50 of random SBRT-spine, SBRT- lung, prostate and pancreatic cancer patients from our photon clinic. In the isocentric axial CT cut we recorded the maximum water equivalent depth (WED4Field) of PTV’s most distal edge in four cardinal directions and also in a beam direction that required the largest penetration, WEDGantry. These depths were then used to calculate the percentage of our patients we would be able to treat as a function of available maximum carbon and helium beam energy. Based on the Anterior-Posterior WED for lung patients and the maximum available ion energy we estimated the largest possible non-coplanar beam entry angle φ (deviation from vertical) in the isocentric vertical sagittal plane. Results: We found that if 430MeV/u C-12, equivalently 220MeV/u He-4, beams are available, more than 96% (98%) of all patients can be treated without any gantry restrictions (in cardinals angles only) respectively. If the energy is reduced to 400MeV/u C-12, equivalently 205MeV/u He-4, the above fractions reduce to 80% (87%) for prostate and 88% (97%) for other sites. This 7% energy decrease translates to almost 5% gantry size and cost decrease for both ions. These energy limits in combination with the WED in the AP direction for lung patients resulted in average non-coplanar angles of φ430MeV/u = 68°±8° and φ400MeV/u = 65°±10° if nozzle clearance permits them. Conclusion: We found that the two worldwide most common maximum carbon beam energies will treat above 80% of all our patients.

  11. Next generation multi-scale biophysical characterization of high precision cancer particle radiotherapy using clinical proton, helium-, carbon- and oxygen ion beams

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Chaudhri, Naved; Krunic, Damir; Tessonnier, Thomas; Ferrari, Alfredo; Parodi, Katia; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Haberer, Thomas; Abdollahi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The growing number of particle therapy facilities worldwide landmarks a novel era of precision oncology. Implementation of robust biophysical readouts is urgently needed to assess the efficacy of different radiation qualities. This is the first report on biophysical evaluation of Monte Carlo simulated predictive models of prescribed dose for four particle qualities i.e., proton, helium-, carbon- or oxygen ions using raster-scanning technology and clinical therapy settings at HIT. A high level of agreement was found between the in silico simulations, the physical dosimetry and the clonogenic tumor cell survival. The cell fluorescence ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) technology was employed to detect particle traverse per cell nucleus. Across a panel of radiobiological surrogates studied such as late ROS accumulation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activation), the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) chiefly correlated with the radiation species-specific spatio-temporal pattern of DNA double strand break (DSB) formation and repair kinetic. The size and the number of residual nuclear γ-H2AX foci increased as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) and RBE, reminiscent of enhanced DNA-damage complexity and accumulation of non-repairable DSB. These data confirm the high relevance of complex DSB formation as a central determinant of cell fate and reliable biological surrogates for cell survival/RBE. The multi-scale simulation, physical and radiobiological characterization of novel clinical quality beams presented here constitutes a first step towards development of high precision biologically individualized radiotherapy. PMID:27494855

  12. Helium tables.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havill, Clinton H

    1928-01-01

    These tables are intended to provide a standard method and to facilitate the calculation of the quantity of "Standard Helium" in high pressure containers. The research data and the formulas used in the preparation of the tables were furnished by the Research Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  13. Single- and double-electron loss from helium by collisions with v>=v0 multiply charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvelplund, P.; Haugen, H. K.; Knudsen, H.

    1980-11-01

    Cross sections for single- and double-electron loss (electron capture plus impact ionization) for H+, Heq+, Oq+, and Auq+ incident on helium have been measured at velocities from ~v0 to ~10v0. The charge state q was varied from 1 to 21, depending on velocity and projectile. The energy and charge-state dependence of the single-loss cross section at the lower velocities is reasonably well described by the model of Olson based on Coulomb interaction between particles and classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations. The results for H+, He+, and He++ at high velocities are in good agreement with earlier experimental values of Pivovar et al. and with Bethe-Born calculations of Gillespie. The double-loss cross section, which for highly charged projectiles amounts to as much as 60% of the single loss, is found to behave quite differently from the single-loss cross section, both as a function of incident charge and velocity. While single-loss cross sections at velocities between v0 and 2v0 are almost independent of energy and proportional to q, the double-loss cross sections are approximately proportional to energy and to q2.

  14. L-Shell X-Ray Production Cross Sections for Calcium, Iron, Nickel, Copper, Zinc, Gallium, and Germanium by Hydrogen, Helium, and Lithium Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeir, Michael Ridge

    1992-01-01

    L-shell x-ray production cross sections are presented for Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, and Ge by 0.5- to 5.0-MeV protons and by 0.5- to 8.0-MeV helium ions and Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ge by 0.75- to 4.5-MeV lithium ions. These measurements are compared to the first Born theory and the perturbed -stationary-state theory with energy-loss, Coulomb deflection, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR). The results are also compared to previous experimental investigations. The high precision x-ray measurements were performed with a windowless Si(Li) detector. The efficiency of the detector was determined by the use of thin target atomic -field bremsstrahlung produced by 66.5 keV electrons. The measured bremsstrahlung spectra were compared to theoretical bremsstrahlung distributions in order to obtain an efficiency versus energy curve. The targets for the measurement were manufactured by the vacuum evaporation of the target element onto thin foils of carbon. Impurities in the carbon caused interferences in the L-shell x-ray peaks. Special cleansing procedures were developed that reduced the impurity concentrations in the carbon foil, making the use of less than 5 mug/cm^2 targets possible. The first Born theory is seen to greatly overpredict the data at low ion energies. The ECPSSR theory matches the data very well at the high energy region. At low energies, while fitting the data much more closely than the first Born theory, the ECPSSR theory does not accurately predict the trend of the data. This is probably due to the onset of molecular-orbital effects, a mechanism not accounted for in the ECPSSR theory.

  15. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Self-Assembly Nanocones Formed on Tungsten Surface Induced by Helium Ion Irradiation and Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shilin; Ran, Guang; Lei, Penghui; Wu, Shenghua; Chen, Nanjun; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly nanocone structures on the surface of polycrystalline tungsten were created by He+ ion irradiation and then annealing, and the resulting topography and morphology were characterized using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The cross-sectional samples of the self-assembly nanocones were prepared using an in situ–focused ion beam and then observed using transmission electron microscopy. The self-assembly nanocones were induced by the combined effect of He+ ion irradiation, the annealing process and the chromium impurity. The distribution characteristics, density and morphology of the nanocones exhibited a distinct difference relating to the crystal orientations. The highest density of the nanocones was observed on the grain surface with a (1 1 1) orientation, with the opposite for that with a (0 0 1) orientation and a medium value on the (1 0 1)-oriented grain. The size of the self-assembly nanocones increased with increasing the annealing time which met a power-law relationship. Irradiation-induced defects acted as the nucleation locations of the protrusions which attracted the migration of the tiny amount of chromium atoms. Under the action of temperature, the protrusions finally evolved into the nanocones. PMID:28335337

  16. Experimental investigation of the reaction of helium ions with dimethyl ether: stereodynamics of the dissociative charge exchange process.

    PubMed

    Cernuto, Andrea; Tosi, Paolo; Martini, Luca Matteo; Pirani, Fernando; Ascenzi, Daniela

    2017-03-09

    The fate of dimethyl ether (DME, CH3OCH3) in collisions with He(+) ions is of high relevance for astrochemical models aimed at reproducing the abundances of complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium. Here we report an investigation on the reaction of He(+) ions with DME carried out using a Guided Ion Beam Mass Spectrometer (GIB-MS), which allows the measurement of reactive cross-sections and branching ratios (BRs) as a function of the collision energy. We obtain insights into the dissociative charge (electron) exchange mechanism by investigating the nature of the non-adiabatic transitions between the relevant potential energy surfaces (PESs) in an improved Landau-Zener approach. We find that the large interaction anisotropy could induce a pronounced orientation of the polar DME molecule in the electric field generated by He(+) so that at short distances the collision complex is confined within pendular states, a particular case of bending motion, which gives rise to intriguing stereodynamic effects. The positions of the intermolecular potential energy curve crossings indicate that He(+) captures an electron from an inner valence orbital of DME, thus causing its dissociation. In addition to the crossing positions, the symmetry of the electron density distribution of the involved DME orbitals turns out to be a further major point affecting the probability of electron transfer. Thus, the anisotropy of the intermolecular interaction and the electron densities of the orbitals involved in the reaction are the key "ingredients" for describing the dynamics of this dissociative charge transfer.

  17. Nano Josephson superconducting tunnel junctions in YBa2Cu3O(7-δ) directly patterned with a focused helium ion beam.

    PubMed

    Cybart, Shane A; Cho, E Y; Wong, T J; Wehlin, Björn H; Ma, Meng K; Huynh, Chuong; Dynes, R C

    2015-07-01

    Since the discovery of the high-transition-temperature superconductors (HTSs), researchers have explored many methods to fabricate superconducting tunnel junctions from these materials for basic science purposes and applications. HTS circuits operating at liquid-nitrogen temperatures (∼77 K) would significantly reduce power requirements in comparison with those fabricated from conventional superconductors. The difficulty is that the superconducting coherence length is very short and anisotropic in these materials, typically ∼2 nm in the a-b plane and ∼0.2 nm along the c axis. The electrical properties of Josephson junctions are therefore sensitive to chemical variations and structural defects on atomic length scales. To make multiple uniform HTS junctions, control at the atomic level is required. In this Letter we demonstrate all-HTS Josephson superconducting tunnel junctions created by using a 500-pm-diameter focused beam of helium ions to directly write tunnel barriers into YBa2Cu3O(7-δ) (YBCO) thin films. We demonstrate the ability to control the barrier properties continuously from conducting to insulating by varying the irradiation dose. This technique could provide a reliable and reproducible pathway for scaling up quantum-mechanical circuits operating at liquid-nitrogen temperatures, as well as an avenue to conduct novel planar superconducting tunnelling studies for basic science.

  18. Fractional Diffusion, Low Exponent Lévy Stable Laws, and ‘Slow Motion’ Denoising of Helium Ion Microscope Nanoscale Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Carasso, Alfred S.; Vladár, András E.

    2012-01-01

    Helium ion microscopes (HIM) are capable of acquiring images with better than 1 nm resolution, and HIM images are particularly rich in morphological surface details. However, such images are generally quite noisy. A major challenge is to denoise these images while preserving delicate surface information. This paper presents a powerful slow motion denoising technique, based on solving linear fractional diffusion equations forward in time. The method is easily implemented computationally, using fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithms. When applied to actual HIM images, the method is found to reproduce the essential surface morphology of the sample with high fidelity. In contrast, such highly sophisticated methodologies as Curvelet Transform denoising, and Total Variation denoising using split Bregman iterations, are found to eliminate vital fine scale information, along with the noise. Image Lipschitz exponents are a useful image metrology tool for quantifying the fine structure content in an image. In this paper, this tool is applied to rank order the above three distinct denoising approaches, in terms of their texture preserving properties. In several denoising experiments on actual HIM images, it was found that fractional diffusion smoothing performed noticeably better than split Bregman TV, which in turn, performed slightly better than Curvelet denoising. PMID:26900518

  19. RBE of d(59)-Be neutrons and of 650-MeV helium ions at different depths for growth reduction in Vivia faba

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dam, J.; Billiet, G.; Wambersie, A.; Bridier, A.; Dutreix, A.; Bouhnik, C.

    1980-01-01

    RBE and OER measurements for d(50)-Be neutrons produced at the cyclotron CYCLONE (Louvain-la-Neuve) and RBE measurements for 650-MeV helium ions produced at the synchrotron SATURNE (Saclay) were perfomed using growth reduction in Vicia faba root meristems. For d(50)-Be neutrons, RBE increases from 2.8 to 3.6 and 4.1 for neutron absorbed doses decreasing from 0.9 to 0.4 and 0.25 Gy, respectively, /sup 60/Co-..gamma.. rays being used as reference. The OER for d(500-Be neutrons was found equal to 1.5 and the OER for /sup 60/Co was 2.6; their ratio (or gain factor) is then equal to 1.8 RBE of the 650-MeV He/sup 2 +/ beam, produced at SATURNE, was investigated as a function of depth in the irradiated medium, taking as reference the initial plateau region. For the dose range which could be investigated with Vicia faba, RBE increases from 1.4 to 1.5 and 2.0 at the beginning, middle, and end of the spreadout Bragg peak, i.e., at depths of 13, 15, and 17 cm, respectively. RBE of the He/sup 2 +/ beam in the initial plateau region was found equal to 1.1 with respect to /sup 60/Co-..gamma.. rays.

  20. Nano Josephson superconducting tunnel junctions in YBa2Cu3O7-δ directly patterned with a focused helium ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cybart, Shane A.; Cho, E. Y.; Wong, T. J.; Wehlin, Björn H.; Ma, Meng K.; Huynh, Chuong; Dynes, R. C.

    2015-07-01

    Since the discovery of the high-transition-temperature superconductors (HTSs), researchers have explored many methods to fabricate superconducting tunnel junctions from these materials for basic science purposes and applications. HTS circuits operating at liquid-nitrogen temperatures (˜77 K) would significantly reduce power requirements in comparison with those fabricated from conventional superconductors. The difficulty is that the superconducting coherence length is very short and anisotropic in these materials, typically ˜2 nm in the a-b plane and ˜0.2 nm along the c axis. The electrical properties of Josephson junctions are therefore sensitive to chemical variations and structural defects on atomic length scales1. To make multiple uniform HTS junctions, control at the atomic level is required. In this Letter we demonstrate all-HTS Josephson superconducting tunnel junctions created by using a 500-pm-diameter focused beam of helium ions to directly write tunnel barriers into YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) thin films. We demonstrate the ability to control the barrier properties continuously from conducting to insulating by varying the irradiation dose. This technique could provide a reliable and reproducible pathway for scaling up quantum-mechanical circuits operating at liquid-nitrogen temperatures, as well as an avenue to conduct novel planar superconducting tunnelling studies for basic science.

  1. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites.

  2. Enhanced Radiation-tolerant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel and its Microstructure Evolution under Helium-implantation and Heavy-ion Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Wang, Xu; Xie, Rui; Li, Zhengyuan; Higgins, Michael; Liu, Chunming; Gao, Fei; Wang, Lumin

    2017-01-01

    The world eagerly needs cleanly-generated electricity in the future. Fusion reactor is one of the most ideal energy resources to defeat the environmental degradation caused by the consumption of traditional fossil energy. To meet the design requirements of fusion reactor, the development of the structural materials which can sustain the elevated temperature, high helium concentration and extreme radiation environments is the biggest challenge for the entire material society. Oxide dispersion strengthened steel is one of the most popular candidate materials for the first wall/blanket applications in fusion reactor. In this paper, we evaluate the radiation tolerance of a 9Cr ODS steel developed in China. Compared with Ferritic/Martensitic steel, this ODS steel demonstrated a significantly higher swelling resistance under ion irradiation at 460 °C to 188 displacements per atom. The role of oxides and grain boundaries on void swelling has been explored. The results indicated that the distribution of higher density and finer size of nano oxides will lead a better swelling resistance for ODS alloy. The original pyrochlore-structured Y2Ti2O7 particles dissolved gradually while fine Y-Ti-O nano clusters reprecipitated in the matrix during irradiation. The enhanced radiation tolerance is attributed to the reduced oxide size and the increased oxide density. PMID:28079191

  3. Enhanced Radiation-tolerant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel and its Microstructure Evolution under Helium-implantation and Heavy-ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Wang, Xu; Xie, Rui; Li, Zhengyuan; Higgins, Michael; Liu, Chunming; Gao, Fei; Wang, Lumin

    2017-01-01

    The world eagerly needs cleanly-generated electricity in the future. Fusion reactor is one of the most ideal energy resources to defeat the environmental degradation caused by the consumption of traditional fossil energy. To meet the design requirements of fusion reactor, the development of the structural materials which can sustain the elevated temperature, high helium concentration and extreme radiation environments is the biggest challenge for the entire material society. Oxide dispersion strengthened steel is one of the most popular candidate materials for the first wall/blanket applications in fusion reactor. In this paper, we evaluate the radiation tolerance of a 9Cr ODS steel developed in China. Compared with Ferritic/Martensitic steel, this ODS steel demonstrated a significantly higher swelling resistance under ion irradiation at 460 °C to 188 displacements per atom. The role of oxides and grain boundaries on void swelling has been explored. The results indicated that the distribution of higher density and finer size of nano oxides will lead a better swelling resistance for ODS alloy. The original pyrochlore-structured Y2Ti2O7 particles dissolved gradually while fine Y-Ti-O nano clusters reprecipitated in the matrix during irradiation. The enhanced radiation tolerance is attributed to the reduced oxide size and the increased oxide density.

  4. Enhanced Radiation-tolerant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel and its Microstructure Evolution under Helium-implantation and Heavy-ion Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Wang, Xu; Xie, Rui; Li, Zhengyuan; Higgins, Michael; Liu, Chunming; Gao, Fei; Wang, Lumin

    2017-01-12

    The world eagerly needs cleanly-generated electricity in the future. Fusion reactor is one of the most ideal energy resources to defeat the environmental degradation caused by the consumption of traditional fossil energy. To meet the design requirements of fusion reactor, the development of the structural materials which can sustain the elevated temperature, high helium concentration and extreme radiation environments is the biggest challenge for the entire material society. Oxide dispersion strengthened steel is one of the most popular candidate materials for the first wall/blanket applications in fusion reactor. In this paper, we evaluate the radiation tolerance of a 9Cr ODS steel developed in China. Compared with Ferritic/Martensitic steel, this ODS steel demonstrated a significantly higher swelling resistance under ion irradiation at 460 °C to 188 displacements per atom. The role of oxides and grain boundaries on void swelling has been explored. The results indicated that the distribution of higher density and finer size of nano oxides will lead a better swelling resistance for ODS alloy. The original pyrochlore-structured Y2Ti2O7 particles dissolved gradually while fine Y-Ti-O nano clusters reprecipitated in the matrix during irradiation. The enhanced radiation tolerance is attributed to the reduced oxide size and the increased oxide density.

  5. Effect of dislocations on helium retention in deformed pure iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Y. H.; Cao, X. Z.; Jin, S. X.; Lu, E. Y.; Hu, Y. C.; Zhu, T.; Kuang, P.; Xu, Q.; Wang, B. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of dislocations created by deformation on helium retention in pure iron, including the helium atoms diffusion along the dislocation line and desorption from dislocation trapping sites, were investigated. The dislocation defect was introduced in specimens by cold-rolling, and then 5 keV helium ions were implanted into the deformed specimens. Slow positron beam technology and thermal desorption spectroscopy were used to investigate the evolution of dislocation defects and the desorption behavior of helium atoms under influence of dislocation. The behaviors of S-E, W-E and S-W plots indicate clearly that lots of helium atoms remain in the deformed specimen and helium atoms combining with dislocation change the distribution of electron density. The helium desorption plot indicates that dislocation accelerates helium desorption at 293 K-600 K and facilitates helium dissociation from HenVm (n/m = 1.8) cluster.

  6. Helium anion formation inside helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour Al Maalouf, Elias; Reitshammer, Julia; Ribar, Anita; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of He∗- is examined with improved electron energy resolution of about 100 meV utilizing a hemispherical electron monochromator. The work presented provides a precise determination of the three previously determined resonance peak positions that significantly contribute to the formation of He∗- inside helium nanodroplets in the energy range from 20 eV to 29.5 eV. In addition, a new feature is identified located at 27.69 ± 0.18 eV that we assign to the presence of O2 as a dopant inside the droplet. With increasing droplet size a small blue shift of the resonance positions is observed. Also for the relatively low electron currents used in the present study (i.e., 15-70 nA) a quadratic dependence of the He∗- ion yield on the electron current is observed.

  7. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  8. Initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA Fragmentation patterns depend on linear energy transfer in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts irradiated with helium, carbon and neon ions.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yuichiro; Yamada, Shinya; Hase, Yoshihiro; Shikazono, Naoya; Narumi, Issay; Tanaka, Atsushi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    The ability of ion beams to kill or mutate plant cells is known to depend on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the ions, although the mechanism of damage is poorly understood. In this study, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were quantified by a DNA fragment-size analysis in tobacco protoplasts irradiated with high-LET ions. Tobacco BY-2 protoplasts, as a model of single plant cells, were irradiated with helium, carbon and neon ions having different LETs and with gamma rays. After irradiation, DNA fragments were separated into sizes between 1600 and 6.6 kbp by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Information on DNA fragmentation was obtained by staining the gels with SYBR Green I. Initial DSB yields were found to depend on LET, and the highest relative biological effectiveness (about 1.6) was obtained at 124 and 241 keV/microm carbon ions. High-LET carbon and neon ions induced short DNA fragments more efficiently than gamma rays. These results partially explain the large biological effects caused by high-LET ions in plants.

  9. Helium anion formation inside helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalouf, Elias Jabbour Al; Reitshammer, Julia; Ribar, Anita; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of He∗- is examined with improved electron energy resolution of about 100 meV utilizing a hemispherical electron monochromator. The work presented provides a precise determination of the three previously determined resonance peak positions that significantly contribute to the formation of He∗- inside helium nanodroplets in the energy range from 20 eV to 29.5 eV. In addition, a new feature is identified located at 27.69 ± 0.18 eV that we assign to the presence of O2 as a dopant inside the droplet. With increasing droplet size a small blue shift of the resonance positions is observed. Also for the relatively low electron currents used in the present study (i.e., 15-70 nA) a quadratic dependence of the He∗- ion yield on the electron current is observed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  10. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  11. Effects of helium and hydrogen on radiation-induced microstructural changes in austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Ko, Eunsol; Lim, Sangyeop; Kwon, Junhyun

    2015-09-01

    Microstructural changes in austenitic stainless steel by helium, hydrogen, and iron ion irradiation were investigated with transmission electron microscopy. Typical radiation-induced changes, such as the formation of Frank loops in the matrix and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) or depletion at grain boundaries, were observed after ion irradiation. The helium ion irradiation led to the formation of cavities both at grain boundaries and in the matrix, as well as the development of smaller Frank loops. The hydrogen ion irradiation generated stronger RIS behavior at the grain boundaries compared to irradiation with helium and iron ions. The effects of helium and hydrogen on radiation-induced microstructural changes were discussed.

  12. Helium damage and helium effusion in fully stabilised zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damen, P. M. G.; Matzke, Hj.; Ronchi, C.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Fromknecht, R.; van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.

    2002-05-01

    Fully stabilised zirconia (FSZ) samples have been implanted with helium-ions of different energies (200 keV and 1 MeV) and with different fluences (1.4×10 13-1.4×10 16 He +/cm 2). Neutron depth profiling (NDP) for different annealing temperatures and effusion experiments in two different experimental systems with different thermal annealings have been performed on these samples. The samples were analysed by electron microscopy during the various annealing stages. For the low-fluence samples, the diffusion of helium is probably caused by vacancy assisted interstitial diffusion with an activation energy of 1.6 eV. In the highest fluence samples probably high pressure bubbles are formed during thermal annealing.

  13. Helium Accumulation Behavior in Iron Based Model Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, R.; Morishita, K.; Kimura, A.

    2003-09-15

    Helium desorption from Fe-based model alloys irradiated by energetic helium ions was measured during post-irradiation annealing to investigate the energetics and kinetics of formation and annihilation of helium-related defects. Desorption temperatures were observed to be widely ranged from 450 to 1500 K, indicating that helium is bound to a wide variety of trapping sites such as vacancies and dislocations at various binding states. Such a feature is also observed in fusion ferritic steel. A comparison of helium desorption spectra obtained using Fe, Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Ni alloys showed that helium is more strongly trapped in bcc Fe than fcc Fe. It indicates that the long distance migration of helium takes place less frequently in bcc matrix, which may reduce the probability of helium clustering. Fusion ferric steel has a lot of trapping sites for helium such as dislocations, solute atoms, the interface of precipitates, impurities and lath boundaries, and so on, and in addition, it has bct matrix, indicating that most of helium atoms must be dispersed in the matrix and therefore it is difficult for them to cluster as a bubble. This may be a reason for higher helium resistance of the steel.

  14. Helium transport in plasma edge regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Gabal, Hanaa Hassan

    The transport of neutral helium atoms near diverter or limiter target plates in fusion devices was studied. Two simulation codes, based on Monte Carlo techniques, were developed. The first treats the problem in one-dimensional geometry and the second considers two-dimensional effects. The atomic processes of ionization of helium atoms by electron impact and elastic scattering with plasma ions are included. The total and differential elastic scattering cross-sections were calculated classically using an ab initio calculation of the interatomic potential. The thermal motion and the streaming of the ions along the magnetic field, which can be at an angle to the target plate, are included. Results obtained with the one-dimensional code show significant effects of elastic collisions below about 10 eV, causing a substantial fraction of the helium atoms to be reflected back to the target plate. This effect can be beneficial for the pumping of helium from the discharge chamber. The two-dimensional Monte Carlo code was used to study helium recycling near a flat, vented target plate. A parametric study is performed to examine the dependence of the pumping efficiency on plasma parameters and geometric aspects. Results show that the pumping of neutral helium can be increased by shortening and widening the ports as well as by increasing the angle between the magnetic field and the target plate. Also, keeping the ion temperature below about 10 eV and the plasma density around a few 10(exp 14) cu cm near the targe plate can be beneficial for the pumping of helium gas.

  15. Nonrelativistic contributions of order {alpha}{sup 5}m{sub {mu}c}{sup 2} to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and deuterium, and in the muonic helium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Karshenboim, S. G.; Ivanov, V. G.; Korzinin, E. Yu.; Shelyuto, V. A.

    2010-06-15

    Contributions to the energy levels in light muonic atoms and, in particular, to the Lamb shift fall into a few well-distinguished classes. The related diagrams are calculated using different approaches. In particular, there is a specific type of nonrelativistic (NR) contribution. Here, we consider such corrections to the Lamb shift of order {alpha}{sup 5}m{sub {mu}.} These contributions are due to free vacuum-polarization loops as well as to various effects of light-by-light scattering. The closed loop in the related diagrams is an electronic one, which allows an NR consideration of the muon. Both types of contributions have been known for some time, however, the results obtained to date are only partial results. We complete a calculation of the {alpha}{sup 5}m{sub {mu}}contributions for muonic hydrogen. The results are also adjusted for muonic deuterium atom and helium ion.

  16. Energetic ionized helium in the quiet time radiation belts - Theory and comparison with observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.; Fritz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of helium ion distributions in the inner magnetosphere are compared to observations made by ATS-6 and Explorer-45. Coupled transport equations for equatorially mirroring singly and doubly ionized helium ions in the steady state limit with an outer boundary of L = 7 are solved. Radial profiles and energy spectra are computed at all lower L values. Theoretical quiet time predictions are compared to satellite observations of energetic helium ions in the lower MeV range. It is found that the theory adequately represents the principal characteristics of the radiation belt helium ion population.

  17. Space and time resolved spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas: A study of density-sensitive x-ray transitions in helium-like and neon-like ions

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Bruce Kai Fong

    1988-09-01

    The determination of level populations and detailed population mechanisms in dense plasmas has become an increasingly important problem in atomic physics. In this work, the density variation of line intensities and level populations in aluminum K-shell and molybdenum and silver L-shell emission spectra have been measured from high-powered, laser-produced plasmas. For each case, the density dependence of the observed line emission is due to the effect of high frequency electron-ion collisions on metastable levels. The density dependent line intensities vary greatly in laser-produced plasmas and can be used to extract detailed information concerning the population kinetics and level populations of the ions. The laser-plasmas had to be fully characterized in order to clearly compare the observed density dependence with atomic theory predictions. This has been achieved through the combined use of new diagnostic instruments and microdot targets which provided simultaneously space, time, and spectrally resolved data. The plasma temperatures were determined from the slope of the hydrogen-like recombination continuum. The time resolved electron density profiles were measured using multiple frame holographic interferometry. Thus, the density dependence of K-shell spectral lines could be clearly examined, independent of assumptions concerning the dynamics of the plasma. In aluminum, the electron density dependence of various helium-like line intensity ratios were measured. Standard collisional radiative equilibrium models fail to account for the observed density dependence measured for the ''He/sub ..cap alpha..//IC'' ratio. Instead, a quasi-steady state atomic model based on a purely recombining plasma is shown to accurately predict the measured density dependence. This same recombining plasma calculation successfully models the density dependence of the high-n ''He/sub ..gamma..//He/sub ..beta../'' and ''He/sub delta//He/sub ..beta../'' helium-like resonance line intensity

  18. The adsorption of helium atoms on coronene cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzthaler, Thomas; Rasul, Bilal; Kuhn, Martin; Lindinger, Albrecht; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the first experimental study of the attachment of multiple foreign atoms to a cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The chosen PAH was coronene, C24H12, which was added to liquid helium nanodroplets and then subjected to electron bombardment. Using mass spectrometry, coronene cations decorated with helium atoms were clearly seen and the spectrum shows peaks with anomalously high intensities ("magic number" peaks), which represent ion-helium complexes with added stability. The data suggest the formation of a rigid helium layer consisting of 38 helium atoms that completely cover both faces of the coronene ion. Additional magic numbers can be seen for the further addition of 3 and 6 helium atoms, which are thought to attach to the edge of the coronene. The observation of magic numbers for the addition of 38 and 44 helium atoms is in good agreement with a recent path integral Monte Carlo prediction for helium atoms on neutral coronene. An understanding of how atoms and molecules attach to PAH ions is important for a number of reasons including the potential role such complexes might play in the chemistry of the interstellar medium.

  19. Production of Zero-Energy Radioactive Nuclear Beams through Extraction from the Liquid-Vapour Interface of Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Huang, W. X.; Dendooven, P.; Gloos, K.; Pekola, J. P.; ńystö, J.

    2004-04-01

    A new approach has been investigated to create an ultra-cold radioactive beam from high-energy ions. A 223Ra alpha-decay recoil source has been used to produce radioactive ions in superfluid helium. The alpha spectra demonstrate that the recoiling 219Rn ions have been extracted out of liquid helium. This first observation of the extraction of heavy positive ions across the superfluid helium surface has been possible thanks to the high sensitivity of radioactive ion detection. An efficiency of 36 % has been obtained for the ion extraction out of liquid helium.

  20. Radiation effects in stainless steel and TiMoN coatings at low-energy helium, krypton and xenon ion impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislitsin, Sergey; Uglov, Vladimir; Larionov, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    The paper reports results of comparative studies of the structure and physical-mechanical properties of stainless Cr18Ni10Ti steel and (TiMo)N coatings irradiated by He, Kr, and Xe ions with an energy of 20 keV/charge. Samples of steel and specimens with TiMoN coating on steel substrates synthesized by vacuum condensation with ion bombardment were irradiated with He, Ks and Xe ions on the low-energy channel of a DC-60 heavy-ion accelerator. It was found that the TiMoN coating significantly exceeds Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel in the entire range of studied properties, such as strength, corrosion resistance and tendency to blistering.

  1. A study of helium mobility in polycrystalline uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, P.; Martin, G.; Desgardin, P.; Carlot, G.; Sauvage, T.; Sabathier, C.; Castellier, E.; Khodja, H.; Barthe, M.-F.

    2012-11-01

    The mobility of Helium in polycrystalline uranium dioxide was studied by implanting samples with 3He ions at depths of approximately 1 μm and at concentrations in the region of 0.1 at.%. Samples were subsequently annealed at temperatures ranging between 700 °C and 1100 °C. Helium movement was then characterised using three different types of Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) techniques based on the 3He(d,α)p reaction. The fraction of helium released from samples was measured during annealing at high temperature as a function of time. After each annealing sequence, helium depth profiles were obtained for each sample. In some cases, samples were characterised over small areas (60 × 60 μm2), using a micrometre size deuteron beam. This enables the measurement of helium distributions at the surface of samples. Using this novel approach which provides time and space dependent information relating to helium atom location, we show that grain boundaries act as effective short circuits for helium movement and release at all temperatures. Also, at temperatures above approximately 800 °C, in areas around the grain boundaries extending into the grain over distances of the order of microns, helium diffusion is high. In areas further into the grain, diffusion proceeds much more slowly presumably as a result of helium cluster formation. These observations are interpreted based on radiation damage production and annealing processes.

  2. Noncavitating Pump For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael; Swift, Walter; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1996-01-01

    Immersion pump features high efficiency in cryogenic service. Simple and reliable centrifugal pump transfers liquid helium with mass-transfer efficiency of 99 percent. Liquid helium drawn into pump by helical inducer, which pressurizes helium slightly to prevent cavitation when liquid enters impeller. Impeller then pressurizes liquid. Purpose of pump to transfer liquid helium from supply to receiver vessel, or to provide liquid helium flow for testing and experimentation.

  3. The Descending Helium Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helseth, Lars Egil

    2014-01-01

    I describe a simple and fascinating experiment wherein helium leaks out of a rubber balloon, thereby causing it to descend. An estimate of the volumetric leakage rate is made by measuring its rate of descent.

  4. Helium cooling systems for large superconducting physics detector magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.

    The large superconducting detector magnets used for high energy physics experiments are virtually all indirectly cooled. In general, these detector magnets are not cryogenically stabilized. Therefore, there are a number of choices for cooling large indirectly cooled detector magnets. These choices include; 1) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by the helium refrigerator J-T circuit, 2) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by a helium pump, and 3) a peculation gravity feed cooling system which uses liquid helium from a large storage dewar. The choices for the cooling of a large detector magnet are illustrated by applying these concepts to a 4.2 meter diameter 0.5 tesla thin superconducting solenoid for an experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  5. Atmospheric helium and geomagnetic field reversals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Kern, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of the earth's helium budget is examined in the light of recent work on the interaction of the solar wind with nonmagnetic planets. It is proposed that the dominant mode of helium (He4) loss is ion pumping by the solar wind during geomagnetic field reversals, when the earth's magnetic field is very small. The interaction of the solar wind with the earth's upper atmosphere during such a period is found to involve the formation of a bow shock. The penetration altitude of the shock-heated solar plasma is calculated to be about 700 km, and ionization rates above this level are estimated for a cascade ionization (electron avalanche) process to average 10 to the 9th power ions/sq cm/sec. The calculated ionization rates and the capacity of the solar wind to remove ionized helium (He4) from the upper atmosphere during geomagnetic dipole reversals are sufficient to yield a secular equilibrium over geologic time scales. The upward transport of helium from the lower atmosphere under these conditions is found to be adequate to sustain the proposed loss rate.

  6. Competitive Deprotonation and Superoxide [O2 -•] Radical-Anion Adduct Formation Reactions of Carboxamides under Negative-Ion Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma Ionization (HePI) Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Isra; Pinto, Spencer; Weisbecker, Carl; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxamides bearing an N-H functionality are known to undergo deprotonation under negative-ion-generating mass spectrometric conditions. Herein, we report that N-H bearing carboxamides with acidities lower than that of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) preferentially form superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts, rather than deprotonate, when they are exposed to the glow discharge of a helium-plasma ionization source. For example, the spectra of N-alkylacetamides show peaks for superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts. Conversely, more acidic amides, such as N-alkyltrifluoroacetamides, preferentially undergo deprotonation under similar experimental conditions. Upon collisional activation, the O2 -• adducts of N-alkylacetamides either lose the neutral amide or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) to generate the superoxide radical-anion ( m/z 32) or the deprotonated amide [ m/z (M - H)-], respectively. For somewhat acidic carboxamides, the association between the two entities is weak. Thus, upon mildest collisional activation, the adduct dissociates to eject the superoxide anion. Superoxide-adduct formation results are useful for structure determination purposes because carboxamides devoid of a N-H functionality undergo neither deprotonation nor adduct formation under HePI conditions.

  7. Thermal helium desorption behavior in advanced ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akihiko; Sugano, R.; Matsushita, Y.; Ukai, S.

    2005-02-01

    Thermal helium desorption measurements were performed to investigate the difference in the helium trapping and accumulation behavior among a reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel and oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels after implantation of He+ ions at room temperature. Thermal helium desorption spectra (THDS) were obtained during annealing to 1200 °C at a heating rate of 1 °C/s. The THDS of the ODS steels are very similar to that of the RAF steel, except for the presence of the peak in the temperature range from 800 to 1000 °C, where the α γ transformation related helium desorption from the γ-phase is considered to occur in the 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels. The fraction of helium desorption becomes larger at higher temperatures, and this trend is increased with the amount of implanted helium. In the 9Cr-ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel. This suggests that the bubble formation was suppressed in the ODS steels. In the 12Cr-ODS steel, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration reached more than 90%, suggesting that the trapping capacity of martensite phase in the 9Cr-ODS steel is rather large.

  8. Measurements of the total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost in low-pressure inductive argon, helium, oxygen and nitrogen discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Kwang; Ku, Ju-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-02-01

    Experimental measurements of the total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost, ɛT, were performed in a low-pressure inductive atomic gases (Ar, He) and molecular gases (O2, N2) discharge. The value of ɛT was determined from a power balance based on the electropositive global (volume-averaged) model. A floating harmonic method was employed to measure ion fluxes and electron temperatures at the discharge wall. In the pressure range 5-50 mTorr, it was found that the measured ɛT ranged from about 70 to 150 V for atomic gases, but from about 180 to 1300 V for molecular gases. This difference between atomic and molecular discharge is caused by additional collisional energy losses of molecular gases. For argon discharge, the stepwise ionization effect on ɛT was observed at relatively high pressures. For different gases, the measured ɛT was evaluated with respect to the electron temperature, and then compared with the calculation results, which were derived from collisional and kinetic energy loss. The measured ɛT and their calculations showed reasonable agreement.

  9. The selection and characterization of the mutants in bioflocculant bacteria C8 induced by 3 MeV helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L. L.; Yang, Y. N.; Xue, J. M.; Ding, X. L.; Guo, R. Q.

    2009-01-01

    A 3 MeV He 2+ beam was used to irradiate C8 (a flocculant-producing bacteria) with a fluence ranging from 10 11 to 10 13 ions/cm 2. The effects on the survival ratio, TTC-dehydrogenase activity, flocculating activity and RAPD analysis are reported. The survival ratio curve caused by irradiation is proved to be "saddle-shaped". Eleven mutants were obtained, all of which had a significant change in dehydrogenase activity and most showed a positive change in flocculating activity. RAPD measurements were used to analyse the DNA of mutants with a flocculating activity over 80%, which indicated that all their DNA had been changed by irradiation.

  10. Is solid helium a supersolid?

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, Robert

    2015-05-15

    Recent experiments suggest that helium-4 atoms can flow through an experimental cell filled with solid helium. But that incompletely understood flow is quite different from the reported superfluid-like motion that so excited physicists a decade ago.

  11. Helium-refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, J.R.; Millar, B.; Sutherland, A.

    1995-08-01

    The design, procurement, and preliminary construction was completed for adding two more wet expansion engines to two helium refrigerators. These will be added in mid-year FY 1995. In addition a variable speed drive will be added to an existing helium compressor. This is part of an energy conservation upgrade project to reduce operating costs from the use of electricity and liquid nitrogen. This project involves the replacement of Joule-Thompson valves in the refrigerators with expansion engines resulting in system efficiency improvements of about 30% and improved system reliability.

  12. Helium transport in the core and stochastic edge layer in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Goto, M.; Schmitz, O.; Dai, S.; Bader, A.; Kobayashi, M.; Kawamura, G.; Moon, C.; Nakamura, Y.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2016-07-01

    Radial profiles of the density ratio of helium to hydrogen ions are measured using charge exchange spectroscopy with a two-wavelength spectrometer in the large helical device. Helium transport at the last closed flux surface (LCFS) and stochastic magnetic field layer outside the LCFS as well as in the core plasma is studied for a wide range of helium fractions, i.e. from hydrogen-dominated plasmas up to helium-dominated plasmas. The helium density profile becomes more peaked and inward convection velocity increases in the hydrogen-dominant plasma, while it becomes flat or hollow and the convection velocity is in the outward direction in the helium-dominant plasmas. The density gradient of helium at the LCFS is twice that of hydrogen and becomes steeper as the hydrogen becomes more dominant.

  13. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  14. Energetic helium particles trapped in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jiasheng; Guzik, T. Gregory; Sang, Yeming; Wefel, John P.; Cooper, John F.

    1994-01-01

    High energy (approximately 40-100 MeV/nucleon) geomagnetically trapped helium nuclei have been measured, for the first time, by the ONR-604 instrument during the 1990/1991 Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission. The helium events observed at L less than 2.3 have a pitch angle distribution peaking perpendicular to the local magnetic field and are contained in peaks located at L = 1.2 and 1.9. The events in each peak can be characterized by power law energy spectra with indices of 10.0 +/- 0.7 for L = 1.9-2.3 and 6.8 +/- 1.0 for L = 1.15-1.3, before the large storm of 24 March 1991. CRRES was active during solar maximum when the anomalous component is excluded from the inner heliosphere, making it unlikely that the observed events derived from the anomalous component. The trapped helium counting rates decrease gradually with time indicating that these high energy ions were not injected by flares during the 1990/91 mission. Flare injection prior to mid-1990 may account for the highest energy particles, while solar wind injection during magnetic storms and subsequent acceleration could account for the helium at lower energies.

  15. Proton and helium cyclotron anisotropy instability thresholds in the magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. Peter; Convery, Patrick D.; Denton, Richard E.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Anderson, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    Both the protons and the helium ions of the terrestrial magnetosheath typically display T (sub perpendicular) greater than T (sub parallel), where perpendicular to and parallel to denote directions perpendicular and parallel to the background magnetic field. Observations of the highly compressed magnetosheath show an inverse correlation between these ion temperature anisotropies and the parallel proton beta. Computer simulations have demonstrated that these correlations are due to wave-particle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron anisotropy instabilities. These correlations correspond to linear theory thresholds of the proton cyclotron and the helium cyclotron instabilities. This paper uses linear Vlasov theory and the assumption of a constant maximum growth rate to obtain closed-form expressions for these thresholds as a function of the relative helium density and the parallel proton beta in a parameter model of the magnetosheath.

  16. Stable complex-rotation eigenvalues that correspond to no full resonances in scattering: Examples in positron scattering by the helium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Akinori; Shimamura, Isao

    2004-07-01

    Hyperspherical close-coupling calculations for S- and P-wave positron scattering by He{sup +} ions produce no full resonances in the eigenphase sum {delta}(E) in the two regions of energy E where stable eigenvalues E{sub r}-i{gamma}/2 with large {gamma} were found previously by the complex-rotation method (CRM); {delta}(E) increases only by one radian in the lower-E region, and even decreases almost monotonically in the higher-E region, implying time advance, rather than time delay, due to the collision. However, the peaks found in the trace of time-delay matrix, Tr Q(E), are consistent with the CRM eigenvalues. This suggests that these eigenvalues indeed represent S-matrix poles in the complex-E plane, but that their effects on scattering are almost masked by the background {delta} due to the large {gamma}. This work uses a general relation Tr Q(E)=2({Dirac_h}/2{pi})(d{delta}/dE), proved here for any functional form of {delta}(E), and hence, both on and off resonance. This is a generalization of the well-known single-channel time-delay formula and of the multichannel formula proved previously for the Breit-Wigner resonance with a constant background S matrix.

  17. Helium solubility in SON68 nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Fares, Toby; Peuget, Sylvain; Bouty, Olivier; Broudic, Veronique; Maugeri, Emilio; Bes, Rene; Jegou, Christophe; Chamssedine, Fadel; Sauvage, Thierry; Deschanels, Xavier

    2012-12-15

    Helium behavior in a sodium borosilicate glass (SON68) dedicated to the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste is examined. Two experimental approaches on nonradioactive glass specimens are implemented: pressurized helium infusion experiments and {sup 3}He ion implantation experiments. The temperature variation of helium solubility in SON68 glass was determined and analyzed with the harmonic oscillator model to determine values of the energy of interaction E(0) at the host sites (about -4000 J/mol), the vibration frequency (about 1.7 x 10{sup 11} s{sup -1}), and the density of solubility sites (2.2 x 10{sup 21} sites cm{sup -3}). The implantation experiments show that a non diffusive transport phenomenon (i.e., athermal diffusion) is involved in the material when the helium concentration exceeds 2.3 x 10{sup 21} He cm{sup -3}, and thus probably as soon as it exceeds the density of solubility sites accessible to helium in the glass. We propose that this transport mechanism could be associated with the relaxation of the stress gradient induced by the implanted helium profile, which is favored by the glass damage. Microstructural characterization by TEM and ESEM of glass specimens implanted with high helium concentrations showed a homogeneous microstructure free of bubbles, pores, or cracking at a scale of 10 nm. (authors)

  18. Calculations of cosmic-ray helium transport in shielding materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1993-01-01

    The transport of galactic cosmic-ray helium nuclei and their secondaries through bulk shielding is considered using the straight-ahead approximation to the Boltzmann equation. A data base for nuclear interaction cross sections and secondary particle energy spectra for high-energy light-ion breakup is presented. The importance of the light ions H-2, H-3, and He-3 for cosmic-ray risk estimation is discussed, and the estimates of the fractional contribution to the neutron flux from helium interactions compared with other particle interactions are presented using a 1977 solar minimum cosmic-ray spectrum.

  19. Production of Doubly Excited Projectile States in Collisions of 0.1 Mev/u SILVER(+4) Ions with Helium, Hydrogen, and Argon Gas Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood-Lemons, Theresa Ann

    An important problem in atomic dynamics is the structure of very high doubly excited states, in which two electrons are excited away from the rest of the electrons in the ionic core, making their mutual interaction and correlation as important as their individual interaction with the remaining core. In this work, we study the formation of doubly excited projectile states near the double escape threshold in collisions of 0.1 MeV/u Ag^{+4} ions with He, H_2, and Ar gas targets. We detect projectile states in which one electron occupies a high Rydberg state and a second electron (a cusp electron) occupies a low lying continuum state. Cusp electrons are characterized by a velocity which is nearly equal in magnitude and direction to the projectile velocity. Cusp electrons are energy analyzed with a 30 ^circ parallel plate energy analyzer, and Rydberg electrons are field ionized in a spherical ionizer before being energy analyzed in a 160^ circ^herical sector analyzer. Standard coincidence measurements between a cusp and a Rydberg electron signal the production of a doubly excited projectile state. The cross sections for producing these doubly excited projectile states are on the order of 10 ^{-20} cm^2. The production probabilities are measured as a function of cusp electron laboratory frame energy with the detected Rydberg electrons arising from a fixed band of principal quantum numbers. The laboratory frame energy distributions of cusp electrons associated with these doubly excited states are then compared to the energy distribution of cusp electrons measured without imposing a Rydberg electron coincidence requirement. For the He target, the shapes of the two energy distributions are the same. However, the width of the energy distribution of cusp electrons measured in coincidence with Rydberg electrons is smaller than the width of the cusp electron energy distribution without a coincidence requirement for the H_2 and Ar gas targets, the difference being greatest for

  20. Helium bubble evolution in a Zr–Sn–Nb–Fe–Cr alloy during post-annealing: An in-situ investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.H.; Peng, S.M.; Chen, B.; Naab, F.N.; Sun, G.A.; Zhou, W.; Xiang, X.; Sun, K.; Zu, X.T.

    2015-09-15

    The formation of helium bubbles is considered to be detrimental to the mechanical performance of the nuclear materials. The growth behaviors of helium bubbles in a helium ion implanted Zr–Sn–Nb–Fe–Cr alloy with respect to the helium fluence and subsequently annealing procedure were investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. In the as-implanted sample, the measured size distributions of the helium bubbles are consistent with the simulated helium concentrations. Moreover, the mean size of the helium bubbles increases with the increase of the irradiation temperatures and the helium fluence. The in-situ heating study performed in a transmission electron microscope indicates that the mean size of the helium bubbles increase slowly below 923 K and dramatically above 923 K. The coarsening mechanism of the helium bubbles in the alloy is suggested based on the study. - Highlights: • Helium bubble growth in zirconium with annealing was in-situ investigated in TEM. • The mean helium bubble size increase with helium fluence and annealing temperature. • Helium bubble size distribution is same as that of helium concentration by SRIM. • Mean bubble size increases slowly and quickly with temperature below and above 923 K. • The growth mechanism of the helium bubbles in Zr alloy has been discussed.

  1. Nanostructures from hydrogen and helium implantation of aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    McWatters, Bruce Ray; Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2010-03-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen and helium implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on implantations of hydrogen and helium ions at 25 keV in aluminum. The hydrogen and helium systems result in remarkably different nanostructures of aluminum at the surface. Scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam, and transmission electron microscopy show that both implantations result in porosity that persists approximately 200 nm deep. However, hydrogen implantations tend to produce larger and more irregular voids that preferentially reside at defects. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce much smaller porosity on the order of 10 nm that is regular and creates a bicontinuous structure in the porous region. The primary difference driving the formation of the contrasting structures is likely the relatively high mobility of hydrogen and the ability of hydrogen to form alanes that are capable of desorbing and etching Al (111) faces.

  2. Electronic structure and enthalpy of hydrogen and helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.; Klepeis, J. E.; Schafer, K. J.; Barbee, T. W., III

    1992-11-01

    The first local density approximation (LDA) calculations of the electronic structure, equation of state, and enthalpy of mixing were carried out for a number of different compositions of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices. These are fully quantum mechanical, self-consistent calculations utilizing state-of-the-art methods of electron band theory, which make no assumptions regarding pressure ionization. The major approximation in the LDA method is that the exchange and correlation energy is given by a free electron functional in terms of the local electron density. The majority of previous mixture calculations start with the assumption that both hydrogen and helium are pressure-ionized so that the electronic structure is approximately that of free or weakly screened electrons in the presence of positive ions. Stevenson used a hard-sphere mixture model for the ions with an ion-ion pseudopotential to account for electron screening and predicted that a mixture containing 7% helium by number, the composition believed to be present in Jupiter and Saturn, would phase separate at a temperature of about 7000 K at 8 Mbar. Subsequent calculations carried out for the fully ionized mixture and for a mixture of screened ions (linear response theory) have all arrived at predictions similar to those of Stevenson. MacFarlane and Hubbard performed Thomas-Fermi-Dirac calculations for mixing enthalpies of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices and predicted that phase separation would not occur at any temperature.

  3. Auroral helium precipitation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axford, W. I.; Chivers, H. J. A.; Eberhardt, P.; Geiss, J.; Buehler, F.

    1972-01-01

    Application of the metal foil sampling technique, which has been used to measure helium, neon, and argon fluxes in the solar wind, to the problem of measuring the fluxes of these gases in the auroral primary radiation. Aluminum and platinum foils have been flown into two bright auroras and have been recovered. The foils have been analyzed for helium and neon isotopes with a mass spectrometer; so far only He4 has been detected. In the first flight the precipitating flux of He4 with particle energies above about 1 keV was approximately 1,000,000 per sq cm per sec, and the backscattered flux was smaller by about a factor of 10. In the second flight the aurora was less bright, and the He4 fluxes were lower by a factor of about 2. A rough analysis suggests that the mean energy of the incident particles was greater than 3 keV.

  4. Applications of Groundwater Helium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Hilton, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Helium abundance and isotope variations have widespread application in groundwater-related studies. This stems from the inert nature of this noble gas and the fact that its two isotopes ? helium-3 and helium-4 ? have distinct origins and vary widely in different terrestrial reservoirs. These attributes allow He concentrations and 3He/4He isotope ratios to be used to recognize and quantify the influence of a number of potential contributors to the total He budget of a groundwater sample. These are atmospheric components, such as air-equilibrated and air-entrained He, as well as terrigenic components, including in situ (aquifer) He, deep crustal and/or mantle He and tritiogenic 3He. Each of these components can be exploited to reveal information on a number of topics, from groundwater chronology, through degassing of the Earth?s crust to the role of faults in the transfer of mantle-derived volatiles to the surface. In this review, we present a guide to how groundwater He is collected from aquifer systems and quantitatively measured in the laboratory. We then illustrate the approach of resolving the measured He characteristics into its component structures using assumptions of endmember compositions. This is followed by a discussion of the application of groundwater He to the types of topics mentioned above using case studies from aquifers in California and Australia. Finally, we present possible future research directions involving dissolved He in groundwater.

  5. Education in Helium Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gistau Baguer, G. M.

    2004-06-01

    On the one hand, at the end of the time I was active in helium refrigeration, I noticed that cryogenics was stepping into places where it was not yet used. For example, a conventional accelerator, operating at room temperature, was to be upgraded to reach higher particle energy. On the other hand, I was a little bit worried to let what I had so passionately learned during these years to be lost. Retirement made time available, and I came gradually to the idea to teach about what was my basic job. I thought also about other kinds of people who could be interested in such lessons: operators of refrigerators or liquefiers who, often by lack of time, did not get a proper introduction to their job when they started, young engineers who begin to work in cryogenics… and so on. Consequently, I have assembled a series of lessons about helium refrigeration. As the audiences have different levels of knowledge in the field of cryogenics, I looked for a way of teaching that is acceptable for all of them. The course is split into theory of heat exchangers, refrigeration cycles, technology and operation of main components, process control, and helium purity.

  6. Education in Helium Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Gistau Baguer, G. M.

    2004-06-23

    On the one hand, at the end of the time I was active in helium refrigeration, I noticed that cryogenics was stepping into places where it was not yet used. For example, a conventional accelerator, operating at room temperature, was to be upgraded to reach higher particle energy. On the other hand, I was a little bit worried to let what I had so passionately learned during these years to be lost. Retirement made time available, and I came gradually to the idea to teach about what was my basic job. I thought also about other kinds of people who could be interested in such lessons: operators of refrigerators or liquefiers who, often by lack of time, did not get a proper introduction to their job when they started, young engineers who begin to work in cryogenics... and so on.Consequently, I have assembled a series of lessons about helium refrigeration. As the audiences have different levels of knowledge in the field of cryogenics, I looked for a way of teaching that is acceptable for all of them. The course is split into theory of heat exchangers, refrigeration cycles, technology and operation of main components, process control, and helium purity.

  7. The winter helium bulge revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianjing; Wang, Wenbin; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Burns, Alan; Sutton, Eric; Solomon, Stanley C.; Qian, Liying; Lucas, Greg

    2014-10-01

    A newly implemented helium module in the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics general circulation model offers the first opportunity in three decades to describe helium behavior in the context of a first principles, self-consistent model and to test early theories of wintertime helium bulge formation. This study shows general agreement with the findings of Reber and Hays (1973) but articulates the definitive role of vertical advection in the bulge formation. Our findings indicate vertical advection and molecular diffusion are the dominate processes responsible for the solstice helium distribution. Horizontal winds indirectly contribute to the helium bulge formation by their divergent wind field that leads to vertical winds in order to maintain thermosphere mass continuity. As a minor gas, thermospheric helium does not contribute to mass continuity and its distribution is dictated by more local interactions and constraints.

  8. Thermal annealing behaviour and defect evolution of helium in fully stabilised zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damen, P. M. G.; van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.; Schut, H.; van Huis, M. A.

    2003-06-01

    Helium implantations in fully stabilised zirconia have been performed with 30 keV ions with high doses (5.1 × 10 16 and 2.6 × 10 16 cm -2) and low doses (6.3 × 10 15 and 1.7 × 10 15 cm -2). The retained amount of helium and depth profiles have been monitored with neutron depth profiling and the damage distribution with positron beam analysis (PBA) after several annealing steps. The temperature dependent helium release was investigated by thermal helium desorption spectrometry. In the low dose samples, helium is released through diffusion as seen by a broadening of the helium distribution peak. PBA, performed with a two-layer model, shows shrinkage of the damage layer during annealing. For the high dose samples the helium peak does not broaden after annealing. Helium is retained up to high temperatures which is ascribed to bubble formation during thermal annealing. Fitting of the PBA results to a three-layer model shows that the ion implanted layer gets narrower after annealing at 600 K, up to 1000 K the S-parameter is increasing because helium is released from the bubbles, whereby vacancy clusters are left behind.

  9. Measurements of the nonthermal helium escape from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, S.; Kallio, E.; Lundin, R.; Koskinen, H.

    1995-11-01

    The automatic space plasma experiment with a rotating analyzer (ASPERA) onboard the Phobos 2 spacecraft has recently revealed the presence of planetary He+ ions at Mars (Barabash and Norberg, 1994). In the present work the analysis is continued in order to estimate the total outflow of the He+ ions which are swept away by the solar wind. For the Phobos epoch the total He+ outflow rate was found to be (1.2+/-0.6)×1024 ions/s. The escape occurs mainly near the Martian magnetopause. Considering extreme errors in the measurements, the maximum helium outflow could range up to 2.4×1024 s-1. From a scaling of the helium profile suggested by Moroz et al. (1990) to obtain the measured loss rate, one can deduce the helium abundance in the Martian upper atmosphere. It turns out that helium is a dominant gas in the Martian exosphere at altitudes between 500 and 1250 km. However, recently reported observations of the weak EUV emissions (108 photons) from the Martian He I suggest an abundance that is 18.5 times lower (Krasnopolsky et al., 1994). Possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed. The helium production rate near Mars can, in turn, be roughly estimated from the production rate for the Earth by using a scaling argument, since the only source of helium in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets is radioactive decay of certain isotopes of uranium and thorium. Present estimates suggest a degassing rate of 8×1022 atoms/s only (Krasnopolsky et al., 1993). However, under steady state conditions one would expect the production and loss rates to be equal. The discrepancy leads us to the conclusion that either the helium degassing rate should be corrected (or the amount of uranium is higher on Mars than anticipated) or helium may also be delivered on Mars by other sources, for example, as solar wind α particles. The observed high total outflow of ions which are 4 times heavier than protons may result in an effective mass loading. Thus helium may play an important

  10. High temperature creep of a helium-implanted titanium aluminide alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Per; Chen, Jiachao; Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    The creep properties of an intermetallic alloy Ti-46Al-2W-0.5Si (at%) including strain rate and time to fracture were investigated in vacuum using helium-implanted and non-implanted samples, at a temperature of 1073 K and a stress of 200 MPa. The implantation was performed using 24 MeV He-ions, homogeneously implanting the samples with up to 1333 appm (atomic parts per million) helium. The size and location of helium bubbles were determined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Samples implanted with helium content above 10 appm exhibited strong helium embrittlement, reducing both the time to fracture and the elongation at fracture. The corresponding critical helium bubble size r c was determined to 10 nm.

  11. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  12. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  13. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Helium and Helium Usage Data. 52.208-8 Section 52.208-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.208-8 Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data. As prescribed in 8.505, insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  14. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  15. Multiple ionization of argon by helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, C. C.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We apply the continuum distorted-wave eikonal initial state and the independent electron model to describe the multiple ionization of Ar by He2+ and He+ in the energy range 0.1-10 Mev amu-1. Auger-like post collisional processes are included, which enhance the high energy multiple ionization cross sections via ionization of the inner shells. All Ar electrons (K, L and M-shells) have been included in these calculations. The results agree well with the experimental data at high energies, where the post-collisional ionization is the main contribution. At intermediate impact energies the description is also good though it tends to overestimate the triple and quadruple ionization data at intermediate energies. We analyze this by comparing the present results for He+2 in Ar, with previous ones for He+2 in Ne and Kr. It was found that the theoretical description improves from Ne to Ar and Kr, with the latter being nicely described even at intermediate energies. The present formalism is also tested for Ar inner shell and total ionization cross sections. In all the cases the results above 0.1 MeV amu-1 are quite reasonable, as compared with the experimental data available and with the ECPSSR values.

  16. Atomically resolved phase transition of fullerene cations solvated in helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, M.; Renzler, M.; Postler, J.; Ralser, S.; Spieler, S.; Simpson, M.; Linnartz, H.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Cami, J.; Mauracher, A.; Wang, Y.; Alcamí, M.; Martín, F.; Beyer, M. K.; Wester, R.; Lindinger, A.; Scheier, P.

    2016-11-01

    Helium has a unique phase diagram and below 25 bar it does not form a solid even at the lowest temperatures. Electrostriction leads to the formation of a solid layer of helium around charged impurities at much lower pressures in liquid and superfluid helium. These so-called `Atkins snowballs' have been investigated for several simple ions. Here we form HenC60+ complexes with n exceeding 100 via electron ionization of helium nanodroplets doped with C60. Photofragmentation of these complexes is measured by merging a tunable narrow-bandwidth laser beam with the ions. A switch from red- to blueshift of the absorption frequency of HenC60+ on addition of He atoms at n=32 is associated with a phase transition in the attached helium layer from solid to partly liquid (melting of the Atkins snowball). Elaborate molecular dynamics simulations using a realistic force field and including quantum effects support this interpretation.

  17. Atomically resolved phase transition of fullerene cations solvated in helium droplets

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, M.; Renzler, M.; Postler, J.; Ralser, S.; Spieler, S.; Simpson, M.; Linnartz, H; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Cami, J.; Mauracher, A.; Wang, Y.; Alcamí, M.; Martín, F.; Beyer, M. K.; Wester, R.; Lindinger, A.; Scheier, P.

    2016-01-01

    Helium has a unique phase diagram and below 25 bar it does not form a solid even at the lowest temperatures. Electrostriction leads to the formation of a solid layer of helium around charged impurities at much lower pressures in liquid and superfluid helium. These so-called ‘Atkins snowballs' have been investigated for several simple ions. Here we form HenC60+ complexes with n exceeding 100 via electron ionization of helium nanodroplets doped with C60. Photofragmentation of these complexes is measured by merging a tunable narrow-bandwidth laser beam with the ions. A switch from red- to blueshift of the absorption frequency of HenC60+ on addition of He atoms at n=32 is associated with a phase transition in the attached helium layer from solid to partly liquid (melting of the Atkins snowball). Elaborate molecular dynamics simulations using a realistic force field and including quantum effects support this interpretation. PMID:27874002

  18. Stability of the Helium-Antiproton System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of their Born-Oppenheimer calculations of this system Todd and Armour noted that the lowest-lying state closely resembles the hydrogen negative ion, since the antiproton lies very close to the helium nucleus and shields one unit of nuclear charge. In the present paper this observation will be taken seriously to produce a variationally correct estimate of the total energy of this system, along with a similar estimate of the energy of the once-ionized system. The nonadiabatic effect of exactly treating the reduced masses improves the results.

  19. Irradiation damage effects on helium migration in sintered uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Sabathier, C.; Carlot, G.; Desgardin, P.; Raepsaet, C.; Sauvage, T.; Khodja, H.; Garcia, P.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the effects of radiation on helium migration are investigated through the analysis of polycrystalline uranium dioxide samples irradiated at fluences up to 5 × 10 15 at. cm -2 with 8 MeV iodine ions. Following irradiation, samples are implanted with 500 keV 3He + ions at fluences in the range of 10 16 at. cm -2. Three nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) techniques are subsequently implemented using the 3He( 2H, 1H) 4He reaction. The influence of temperature using NRA was first studied based upon 3He depth profile changes and the on-line monitoring of helium release. The effect of the sample microstructure was also investigated at the grain scale by performing analyses of the helium spatial distribution with a nuclear microprobe. Neither substantial helium release nor depth profile changes are observed at temperatures below 900 °C in irradiated samples. Following annealing at temperatures above 1000 °C, a substantial proportion of the implanted helium is released from the samples. From this temperature upwards, the two dimensional He cartographies reveal that the gas has been preferentially released in the vicinity of grain boundaries. These results can be interpreted in the light of previous studies in terms of gas precipitation and re-solution. Helium precipitation is enhanced in irradiated samples up to 900 °C because of the presence of irradiation induced defects. At temperatures in excess of 1000 °C, the precipitated helium is partly returned to the matrix hence it is preferentially released in regions adjacent to grain boundaries, which appear to act as defect sinks.

  20. Rayleigh Scattering by Helium in Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišák, J.; Kubát, J.; Krtička, J.

    2017-02-01

    We study the influence of Rayleigh scattering by helium on synthetic spectra and stellar atmosphere models. Rayleigh scattering by helium is often neglected in hot star atmosphere models. This approximation is justified by the small population of helium in stars with solar composition (about 10% by number) and lower Rayleigh scattering total cross section of helium with respect to neutral hydrogen. However, for stars with large helium abundances Rayleigh scattering by helium can be a significant opacity source.

  1. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, P.R.; Gray, K.E.

    1988-09-13

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation is disclosed. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains [sup 3]He and [sup 4]He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing [sup 3]He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a [sup 3]He rich liquid phase from a dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the [sup 3]He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase. 2 figs.

  2. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick R.; Gray, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains .sup.3 He and .sup.4 He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing .sup.3 He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a .sup.3 He rich liquid phase from a dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the .sup.3 He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase.

  3. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  4. IBA studies of helium mobility in nuclear materials revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocellier, P.; Agarwal, S.; Miro, S.; Vaubaillon, S.; Leprêtre, F.; Serruys, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to point out and to discuss some features extracted from the study of helium migration in nuclear materials performed during the last fifteen years using ion beam analysis (IBA) measurements. The first part of this paper is devoted to a brief description of the two main IBA methods used, i.e. deuteron induced nuclear reaction for 3He depth profiling and high-energy heavy-ion induced elastic recoil detection analysis for 4He measurement. In the second part, we provide an overview of the different studies carried out on model nuclear waste matrices and model nuclear reactor structure materials in order to illustrate and discuss specific results in terms of key influence parameters in relation with thermal or radiation activated migration of helium. Finally, we show that among the key parameters we have investigated as able to influence the height of the helium migration barrier, the following can be considered as pertinent: the experimental conditions used to introduce helium (implanted ion energy and implantation fluence), the grain size of the matrix, the lattice cell volume, the Young's modulus, the ionicity degree of the chemical bond between the transition metal atom M and the non-metal atom X, and the width of the band gap.

  5. Soft or hard ionization of molecules in helium nanodroplets? An electron impact investigation of alcohols and ethers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengfu; Brereton, Scott M; Wheeler, Martyn D; Ellis, Andrew M

    2005-12-21

    Electron impact (70 eV) mass spectra of a series of C1-C6 alcohols encased in large superfluid liquid helium nanodroplets (approximately 60,000 helium atoms) have been recorded. The presence of helium alters the fragmentation patterns when compared with the gas phase, with some ion product channels being more strongly affected than others, most notably cleavage of the C(alpha)-H bond in the parent ion to form the corresponding oxonium ion. Parent ion intensities are also enhanced by the helium, but only for the two cyclic alcohols studied, cyclopentanol and cyclohexanol, is this effect large enough to transform the parent ion from a minor product (in the gas phase) into the most abundant ion in the helium droplet experiments. To demonstrate that these findings are not unique to alcohols, we have also investigated several ethers. The results obtained for both alcohols and ethers are difficult to explain solely by rapid cooling of the excited parent ions by the surrounding superfluid helium, although this undoubtedly takes place. A second factor also seems to be involved, a cage effect which favors hydrogen atom loss over other fragmentation channels. The set of molecules explored in this work suggest that electron impact ionization of doped helium nanodroplets does not provide a sufficiently large softening effect to be useful in analytical mass spectrometry.

  6. Doubly charged CO2 clusters formed by ionization of doped helium nanodroplets☆

    PubMed Central

    Daxner, Matthias; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-01-01

    Helium nanodroplets are doped with carbon dioxide and ionized by electrons. Doubly charged cluster ions are, for the first time, identified based on their characteristic patterns of isotopologues. Thanks to the high mass resolution, large dynamic range, and a novel method to eliminate contributions from singly charged ions from the mass spectra, we are able to observe doubly charged cluster ions that are smaller than the ones reported in the past. The likely mechanism by which doubly charged ions are formed in doped helium droplets is discussed. PMID:25844051

  7. Summary of results from the TEXTOR helium self-pumping experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.N.; Krauss, A.; Nygren, R.E.; Doyle, B.L.; Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H.

    1992-03-01

    Helium removal experiments were conducted in TEXTOR with a small helium self-pumping module located in a modified ALT-I limiter head. The module contained two heated nickel alloy trapping plates, a nickel deposition filament array, a Langmuir probe, flux probe, and thermocouples. The experiment examined plasma helium removal via trapping of helium ions in the deposited nickel surfaces. Such helium removal was successfully observed, with about 10% of the helium He/D plasma being removed in a {approximately}1 s period. The module was found to be compatible with overall tokamak operation with essentially no sputtered nickel entering the core plasma. The temperature rise on the ion-exposed inner trapping plate, during a plasma shot, is consistent with a nickel a local sheath potential of {approximately}3 kT{sub e}. Post-tokamak test examination of the trapping plates shows helium atom concentrations in the deposited nickel consistent with the observed helium removal, and shows very small D concentrations.

  8. Submersion of potassium clusters in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An der Lan, Lukas; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Schöbel, Harald; Denifl, Stephan; Märk, Tilmann D.; Ellis, Andrew M.; Scheier, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Small alkali clusters do not submerge in liquid helium nanodroplets but instead survive predominantly in high spin states that reside on the surface of the nanodroplet. However, a recent theoretical prediction by Stark and Kresin [Phys. Rev. BPLRBAQ1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.085401 81, 085401 (2010)], based on a classical description of the energetics of bubble formation for a fully submerged alkali cluster, suggests that the alkali clusters can submerge on energetic grounds when they exceed a critical size. Following recent work on sodium clusters, where ion yield data from electron impact mass spectrometry was used to obtain the first experimental evidence for alkali cluster submersion, we report here on similar experiments for potassium clusters. Evidence is presented for full cluster submersion at n>80 for Kn clusters, which is in good agreement with the recent theoretical prediction. In an additional observation, we report “magic number” sizes for both Kn+ and Kn2+ ions derived from helium droplets, which are found to be consistent with the jellium model.

  9. Spatially dependent cluster dynamics modeling of microstructure evolution in low energy helium irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faney, T.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    In fusion reactors, plasma facing components (PFC) and in particular the divertor will be irradiated with high fluxes of low energy (˜100 eV) helium and hydrogen ions. Tungsten is one of the leading candidate divertor materials for ITER and DEMO fusion reactors. However, the behavior of tungsten under high dose, coupled helium/hydrogen exposure remains to be fully understood. The PFC response and performance changes are intimately related to microstructural changes, such as the formation of point defect clusters, helium and hydrogen bubbles or dislocation loops. Computational materials modeling has been used to investigate the mechanisms controlling microstructural evolution in tungsten following high dose, high temperature helium exposure. The aim of this study is to understand and predict helium implantation, primary defect production and defect diffusion, helium-defect clustering and interactions below a tungsten surface exposed to low energy helium irradiation. The important defects include interstitial clusters, vacancy clusters, helium interstitials and helium-vacancy clusters. We report results from a one-dimensional, spatially dependent cluster dynamics model based on the continuum reaction-diffusion rate theory to describe the evolution in space and time of all these defects. The key parameter inputs to the model (diffusion coefficients, migration and binding energies, initial defect production) are determined from a combination of atomistic materials modeling and available experimental data.

  10. Migration and release of helium-3 implanted in single-crystal nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Several nickel single-crystal samples were implanted with 150-keV helium-3 ions to doses between 9.2 x 10/sup 18/ and 2.0 x 10/sup 20/ m/sup -2/. After implantation, the samples were isochronally annealed at various temperatures between 300 and 1300/sup 0/C. Following each annealing step, helium distributions were measured by a nuclear-reaction technique called neutron depth profiling. The technique determines a helium profile from the measured energy distribution of emitted protons produced by the /sup 3/He(n,p)/sup 3/H reaction when a sample is placed in a thermal-neutron beam. The measured profiles were then deconvoluted by an iterative chi-square minimization method. The helium depth profiles can be compared to illustrate helium migration or loss as a function of annealing temperature. Two new results were determined by this experiment and may be summarized as follows. The first results was the demonstration of a helium-concentration-dependent release pattern where one sample with an initial helium dose of about 6 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -2/ was the most stable and displayed the least amount of helium release up to annealing temperatures as high as 1300/sup 0/C. The second result was the observation that profile peaking (a narrowing of the helium distribution with an increase in peak concentration) occurred for samples with initial doses within a certain range when annealed at 1000/sup 0/C.ng-tool

  11. Precision spectroscopy of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Cancio, P.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; De Natale, P.; De Mauro, C.; Krachmalnicoff, V.; Inguscio, M.

    2005-05-05

    Accurate Quantum-Electrodynamics (QED) tests of the simplest bound three body atomic system are performed by precise laser spectroscopic measurements in atomic Helium. In this paper, we present a review of measurements between triplet states at 1083 nm (23S-23P) and at 389 nm (23S-33P). In 4He, such data have been used to measure the fine structure of the triplet P levels and, then, to determine the fine structure constant when compared with equally accurate theoretical calculations. Moreover, the absolute frequencies of the optical transitions have been used for Lamb-shift determinations of the levels involved with unprecedented accuracy. Finally, determination of the He isotopes nuclear structure and, in particular, a measurement of the nuclear charge radius, are performed by using hyperfine structure and isotope-shift measurements.

  12. PROPERTIES OF THE DIFFUSE NEUTRAL HELIUM IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Moise, E.; Raymond, J.; Kuhn, J. R.

    2010-10-20

    Sensitive SOLARC imaging spectropolarimetric observations from Haleakala reveal a diffuse coronal surface brightness in the He I 1083 nm line. A series of observations suggests that this signal originates from an 'inner source' of neutral helium atoms in the solar corona. Here, we explore the possibility that this cold coronal component originates from helium ions that are neutralized by the near-Sun dust and subsequently excited to the metastable 1s2s {sup 3} S state, which then scatters photons from the solar disk. This picture suggests a deficit of coronal dust inside about 2-4 R{sub sun} in order to account for both the flat radial brightness distribution and the small velocity line width of the observations. We find a strong correlation between the polarized He brightness and coronal white light brightness that supports the argument that electronic collisional excitation of the metastable helium triplet level is responsible for our polarization signal.

  13. Repair of sublethal and potentially lethal radiation damage by rat embryos exposed to gamma rays or helium lons.

    PubMed

    Ward, W F; Aceto, H; Sandusky, M

    1976-09-01

    Embryonic survival was examined in rats exposed to a 24-hour split-dose regimen of gamma rays or extended-Bragg-peak (EBP) helium ions on the fifth and sixth days of gestation. The data indicate that EBP helium ions, which are known to have a single-dose relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.0, exhibit a split-dose RBE of 1.5 with respect to embryo killing. Using an experimental rat embryo system, delayed implantation, it was also noted that the embryocidal damage induced by EBP helium ions contains a smaller potentially lethal component than that induced by gamma rays.

  14. Modeling the chemical kinetics of high-pressure glow discharges in mixtures of helium with real air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalder, K. R.; Vidmar, R. J.; Nersisyan, G.; Graham, W. G.

    2006-05-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure glow discharges generated in both pure helium and helium-air mixtures have been studied using a plasma chemistry code originally developed for simulations of electron-beam-produced air plasmas. Comparisons are made with experimental data obtained from high-pressure glow discharges in helium-air mixtures developed by applying sinusoidal voltage wave forms between two parallel planar metallic electrodes covered by glass plates, with frequencies ranging from 10 to 50 kHz and electric field strengths up to 5 kV/cm. The code simulates the plasma chemistry following periodic pulsations of ionization in prescribed E/N environments. Many of the rate constants depend on gas temperature, electron temperature, and E/N. In helium plasmas with small amounts (~850 ppm) of air added, rapid conversion of atomic helium ions to molecular helium ions dominate the positive ion kinetics and these species are strongly modulated while the radical species are not. The charged and neutral species concentrations at atmospheric pressure with air impurity levels up to 10 000 ppm are predicted. The negative ion densities are very small but increase as the air impurity level is raised, which indicates that in helium-based systems operated in open air the concentration of negative ions would be significant. If water vapor at typical humidity levels is present as one of the impurities, hydrated cluster ions eventually comprise a significant fraction of the charged species.

  15. Helium on Mars and Venus: EUVE observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.; Gladstone, G. Randall

    2005-08-01

    Long-exposure spectroscopy of Mars and Venus with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) has revealed emissions of He 584 Å on both planets and He 537 Å/O + 539 Å and He + 304 Å on Venus. Our knowledge of the solar emission at 584 Å, eddy diffusion in Mars' upper atmosphere, electron energy distributions above Mars' ionopause, and hot oxygen densities in Mars' exosphere has been significantly improved since our analysis of the first EUVE observation of Mars [Krasnopolsky, Gladstone, 1996, Helium on Mars: EUVE and Phobos data and implications for Mars' evolution, J. Geophys. Res. 101, 15,765-15,772]. These new results and a more recent EUVE observation of Mars are the motivation for us to revisit the problem in this paper. We find that the abundance of helium in the upper atmosphere, where the main loss processes occur, is similar to that in the previous paper, though the mixing ratio in the lower and middle atmosphere is now better estimated at 10±6 ppm. Our estimate of the total loss of helium is almost unchanged at 8×10 s, because a significant decrease in the loss by electron impact ionization above the ionopause is compensated by a higher loss in collisions with hot oxygen. We neglect the outgassing of helium produced by radioactive decay of U and Th because of the absence of current volcanism and a very low upper limit to the seepage of volcanic gases. The capture of solar wind α-particles is currently the only substantial source of helium on Mars, and its efficiency remains at 0.3. A similar analysis of EUV emissions from Venus results in a helium abundance in the upper atmosphere which is equal to the mean of the abundances measured previously with two optical and two mass spectrometers, and a derived helium mixing ratio in the middle and lower atmosphere of 9±6 ppm. Helium escape by ionization and sweeping out of helium ions by the solar wind above the ionopause is smaller than that calculated by Prather and McElroy [1983, Helium on Venus

  16. Liquid Helium 3 and Solid Helium at Yale and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. M.

    2006-03-01

    Many of the foundations of low temperature physics in the latter half of the twentieth century were built at Yale University under the leadership of Professor Cecil T. Lane who came to Yale in 1932 and Henry A. Fairbank who obtained his Ph.D. at Yale in 1944 under Lane's guidance. This discussion will mainly treat the contributions of Henry Fairbank and his students during the period between 1954 and 1963, when Henry Fairbank left Yale to become chairman of the Physics Dept. at Duke University. Following World War II small amounts of helium three became available to low temperature experimenters. Henry Fairbank’s graduate students were provided with the opportunity to investigate second sound in dilute and later concentrated mixtures of helium three in superfluid helium four. These measurements showed strong effects of the phase separation in helium 3 - helium 4 mixtures previously discovered in the laboratory of William Fairbank (a student of Lane and a brother of Henry Fairbank). As more helium three became available, studies of pure helium three were performed, including measurements of the thermal conductivity, the density and the specific heat. Early evidence for the melting curve minimum was found. The main emphasis in this work was to search for Fermi liquid behavior. Much of the later work in this area was performed by the group of John Wheatley at the University of Illinois. In studies of solid helium four at Yale, a surprising observation was made. Hitherto it had been thought that hcp was the stable phase throughout the low temperature part of the phase diagram. It was found via ultrasound experiments that a small silver of bcc solid existed at the lowest pressures. While this author was a graduate student at Yale, Henry Fairbank pointed out to him the possibility of cooling helium three via adiabatic compression from the liquid into the solid phase. (Pomeranchuk Cooling). A brief discussion is given of the use of this technique in the discovery of

  17. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office's Authorized List of Federal Helium Suppliers available via the Internet at http://www.nm.blm.gov..., insert the following clause: Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data (APR 2002) (a)...

  18. Computer studies of reemission and depth profiles for helium on molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Yasunori

    1987-08-01

    Adding the diffusion processes to the existing ACAT code, the reemission mechanisms and depth profiles under heavy bombardments have been investigated for 4 keV 3He + ions on molybdenum, where the ion-induced detrapping or the collisions between newly implanted helium ions and previously trapped heliums are taken into account, and the diffusion of thermalized helium atoms is numerically calculated. It is found that the reemission processes are composed of three mechanisms, i.e., ordinary particle reflection, ion-induced reemission promoted by radiation-enhanced diffusion, and thermal release due to radiation-enhanced diffusion. At low temperatures the ion-induced reemission promoted by the radiation-enhanced diffusion is the most important process. Concerning the critical dose, the helium saturation concentration and the helium retention curve, we have obtained good agreement with the experiments, but the calculated penetration depth has shown a larger values than the experimental results. The calculated reemission rate curve has a sharp peak at the critical dose or shows oscillatory behavior, which is explained explicitly by introducing the critical surface density for the ion-induced reemission.

  19. Dynamical interaction of helium bubbles with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Arakawa, K.; Birtcher, R. C.; Materials Science Division; Shimane Univ.; Osaka Univ.

    2008-12-01

    Dynamic interaction of helium bubble with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy has been studied using in situ irradiation and electron microscopy. During the irradiation of the alloy by 400 keV Fe{sup +} ions at temperatures where no thermal motion takes place, induced displacement of small helium bubbles was observed: the bubbles underwent sporadic and instant displacement. The displacement was of the order of a few nanometers. The experimentally determined displacement probability of helium bubbles is consistent with the calculated probability of their dynamic interaction with sub-cascades introduced by the irradiation. Furthermore, during the irradiation of the alloy at higher temperatures, both retarded and accelerated Brownian type motions were observed. These results are discussed on the basis of dynamic interaction of helium bubbles with point defects that survive through high-energy self-ion irradiation.

  20. Helium-3 Generation from the Interaction of Deuterium Plasma inside a Hydrogenated Lattice: Red Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Leal-Escalante, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Helium-3 has been created in a nuclear fusion reaction by fusing deuterium ions from deuterium plasma with hydrogen ions in a “RED” (the Spanish word for net) or crystal lattice, a method we called red fusion ("Fusion en la red cristalina"), because is a new method to make nuclear fusion reaction. In this paper, it will be show the experimental results where the helium-3 has been generated for the first time in this kind of new method to confine deuterium and hydrogen inside the RED or lattice of the hydrogenated crystal and that confinement inside the RED facilitated overcoming the Coulomb barrier between them and helium-3 and phonons are produced in this fusion reaction. The results of a long time research in which helium-3, has been created in a fusion reaction inside the lattice or RED of the crystal that contained hydrogen after adequate interaction of deuterium plasma at appropriate high temperature and magnetic confinement of the Mirror/Cusp Plasma Machine at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, designed by the authors. Several mass spectra and visible light spectrum where the presence of helium-3 was detected are shown. The experiment was repeated more than 200 times showing always the generation of helium-3. In this experiment no gamma rays were detected. For this experiment several diagnostic instruments were used. The data collection with these control instrumentation are shown. Thus, it is an important new way to generate Helium-3. reserved.

  1. Electron impact ionization-excitation of Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo; Gomez, A. I.; Gasaneo, G.; Mitnik, D. M.; Ambrosio, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for the process of ionization-excitation of Helium by fast electron impact in which the residual ion is left in the n =2 excited state. We chose the strongly asymmetric kinematics used in the experiment performed by Dupré et al.. In a perturbative scheme, for high projectile energies the four-body problem reduces to a three-body one and, within that framework, we solve the time- independent Schrödinger equation with a Sturmian approach. The method, based on Generalized Sturmian Functions (GSF), is employed to obtain the initial ground state of Helium, the single-continuum state and the scattering wave function; for each of them, the GSF basis is constructed with the corresponding adequate asymptotic conditions. Besides, the method presents the following advantage: the scattering amplitudes can be extracted directly in the asymptotic region of the scattering solution, and thus the TDCS can be obtained without requiring a matrix element evaluation.

  2. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs{sup +} is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs{sup +}-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10{sup 6} helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  3. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs(+) is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs(+)-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10(6) helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  4. Genetic changes in Mammalian cells transformed by helium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. . Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche); Yang, T.C.; Roots, R. )

    1990-11-01

    Midterm Syrian Hamster embryo (SHE) cells were employed to study high LET-radiation induced tumorigenesis. Normal SHE cells (secondary passage) were irradiated with accelerated helium ions at an incident energy of 22 MeV/u (9--10 keV/{mu}m). Transformed clones were isolated after growth in soft agar of cells obtained from the foci of the initial monolayer plated postirradiation. To study the progression process of malignant transformation, the transformed clones were followed by monolayer subculturing for prolonged periods of time. Subsequently, neoplasia tests in nude mice were done. In this work, however, we have focused on karyotypic changes in the banding patterns of the chromosomes during the early part of the progressive process of cell transformation for helium ion-induced transformed cells. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Calculation of quasi-static helium triplet diffuse line profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Calculated spectral line profiles (intensity distributions) of the helium triplet diffuse series were obtained using the quasi-static approximation for ions and electrons. In these calculations, Doppler broadening, although negligible in most of the cases, was included as a device to avoid singularities. Plots and tabulations of the calculated profiles are presented, in addition to a discussion of the computational procedure and the validity of the calculations.

  6. Study of Cryogenic Plasma in Superfluid Liquid Helium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-23

    Virial coefficient will be calculated. And the equation of state will give us a clue to the study of the critical phenomenon in the complex plasma...is satisfied by the presence of electrons, ions, and the charged fine particles. With the explicit formulation of the interaction energy, the second ...on the order of micro seconds in an X-band mode cylindrical cavity filled with Liquid helium. Although the transmission signals through the cavity

  7. Photoionization of atoms and molecules. [of hydrogen, helium, and xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review on the present state of knowledge in photoionization is presented. Various experimental techniques that have been developed to study photoionization, such as fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, are examined. Various atoms and molecules were chosen to illustrate these techniques, specifically helium and xenon atoms and hydrogen molecules. Specialized photoionization such as in positive and negative ions, excited states, and free radicals is also treated. Absorption cross sections and ionization potentials are also discussed.

  8. COSMIC-RAY HELIUM HARDENING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Ioka, Kunihito

    2011-03-01

    Recent observations by the CREAM and ATIC-2 experiments suggest that (1) the spectrum of cosmic-ray (CR) helium is harder than that of CR protons below the knee energy, 10{sup 15}eV, and (2) all CR spectra become hard at {approx}>10{sup 11}eV nucleon{sup -1}. We propose a new idea, that higher energy CRs are generated in a more helium-rich region, to explain the hardening without introducing different sources for CR helium. The helium-to-proton ratio at {approx}100 TeV exceeds the Big Bang abundance Y = 0.25 by several times, and the different spectrum is not reproduced within the diffusive shock acceleration theory. We argue that CRs are produced in a chemically enriched region, such as a superbubble, and the outward-decreasing abundance naturally leads to the hard spectrum of CR helium if CRs escape from the supernova remnant shock in an energy-dependent way. We provide a simple analytical spectrum that also fits well the hardening due to the decreasing Mach number in the hot superbubble with {approx}10{sup 6} K. Our model predicts hard and concave spectra for heavier CR elements.

  9. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.; Scime, Earl E.

    1996-01-01

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  10. Charge transfer dissociation (CTD) mass spectrometry of peptide cations using kiloelectronvolt helium cations.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2014-11-01

    A kiloelectronvolt beam of helium ions is used to ionize and fragment precursor peptide ions starting in the 1+ charge state. The electron affinity of helium cations (24.6 eV) exceeds the ionization potential of protonated peptides and can therefore be used to abstract an electron from--or charge exchange with--the isolated precursor ions. Kiloelectronvolt energies are used, (1) to overcome the Coulombic repulsion barrier between the cationic reactants, (2) to overcome ion-defocussing effects in the ion trap, and (3) to provide additional activation energy. Charge transfer dissociation (CTD) of the [M+H](+) precursor of Substance P gives product ions such as [M+H](2+•) and a dominant series of a ions in both the 1+ and 2+ charge states. These observations, along with the less-abundant a + 1 ions, are consistent with ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) results of others and indicate that C-C(α) cleavages are possible through charge exchange with helium ions. Although the efficiencies and timescale of CTD are not yet suitable for on-line chromatography, this new approach to ion activation provides an additional potential tool for the interrogation of gas phase ions.

  11. Formation of Au and tetrapyridyl porphyrin complexes in superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cheng; Latimer, Elspeth; Spence, Daniel; Al Hindawi, Aula M A A; Bullen, Shem; Boatwright, Adrian; Ellis, Andrew M; Yang, Shengfu

    2015-07-14

    Binary clusters containing a large organic molecule and metal atoms have been formed by the co-addition of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (H2TPyP) molecules and gold atoms to superfluid helium nanodroplets, and the resulting complexes were then investigated by electron impact mass spectrometry. In addition to the parent ion H2TPyP yields fragments mainly from pyrrole, pyridine and methylpyridine ions because of the stability of their ring structures. When Au is co-added to the droplets the mass spectra are dominated by H2TPyP fragment ions with one or more Au atoms attached. We also show that by switching the order in which Au and H2TPyP are added to the helium droplets, different types of H2TPyP-Au complexes are clearly evident from the mass spectra. This study suggests a new route for the control over the growth of metal-organic compounds inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

  12. Helium ionization detection apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, R.

    1984-01-01

    In a gas chromatograph apparatus comprising a gas supply (He carrier gas), a sample injection apparatus, a chromatograph column, a He ion detector, and connecting tubes, a foreign gas (other than He) injection apparatus is installed between the sample injection apparatus and the detector. Mixing of the sample gas and foreign gas takes place readily, the sample gas is always maintained at a stable concentrator range, and accurate measurements are possible, especially at low sample gas concentrations.

  13. STIRAP on helium: Excitation to Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Deqian

    Research in optically induced transitions between dierent atomic levels has a long history. For transitions between states driven by a coherent optical eld, the theoretical eciency could be ideally high as 100% but there could be many factors preventing this. In the three state helium atom excitation process, i.e. 23S→33P→nL , the stimulated emission from intermediate state makes it hard to achieve ecient population transfer to the nal state through an intuitive excitation order. One technique to achieve a higher eciency is Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (STIRAP) which is being studied and under research in our lab. Unlike traditional three level excitation processes, STIRAP actually uses a counter intuitive pulsed laser beams timing arrangement. The excitation objects are metastable helium atoms traveling in a vacuum system with a longitudinal velocity of ~ 1070 m/s. We are using a 389 nm UV laser to connect the 23S and the 33P state and a frequency tunable ~790 nm IR laser to connect the 33P state and the dierent Rydberg states. A third 1083 nm wavelength laser beam drives the 23S → 23P transition to transversely separate the residual metastable atoms and the Rydberg atoms for eciency measurements. The data is taken by a stainless steel detector in the vacuum system. As the Rydberg atoms will get ionized by blackbody radiation under room temperature, we can utilize this for their detection. An ion detector sitting on the eld plate is capable to collect the ion signals of the Rydberg atoms for detection. So far the whole system has not been ready for data collection and measurement, so here we are using data and results from previous theses for discussions. The highest transition frequency that has ever been achieved in our lab is around 70% after corrections.

  14. Rogue mantle helium and neon.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis

    2008-02-15

    The canonical model of helium isotope geochemistry describes the lower mantle as undegassed, but this view conflicts with evidence of recycled material in the source of ocean island basalts. Because mantle helium is efficiently extracted by magmatic activity, it cannot remain in fertile mantle rocks for long periods of time. Here, I suggest that helium with high 3He/4He ratios, as well as neon rich in the solar component, diffused early in Earth's history from low-melting-point primordial material into residual refractory "reservoir" rocks, such as dunites. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoir rocks being stretched and tapped to different extents during melting.

  15. Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, W. Payton; Heath, Jason E.

    2016-07-01

    This work describes initial experimental results of helium tracer release monitoring during deformation of shale. Naturally occurring radiogenic 4He is present in high concentration in most shales. During rock deformation, accumulated helium could be released as fractures are created and new transport pathways are created. We present the results of an experimental study in which confined reservoir shale samples, cored parallel and perpendicular to bedding, which were initially saturated with helium to simulate reservoir conditions, are subjected to triaxial compressive deformation. During the deformation experiment, differential stress, axial, and radial strains are systematically tracked. Release of helium is dynamically measured using a helium mass spectrometer leak detector. Helium released during deformation is observable at the laboratory scale and the release is tightly coupled to the shale deformation. These first measurements of dynamic helium release from rocks undergoing deformation show that helium provides information on the evolution of microstructure as a function of changes in stress and strain.

  16. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  17. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  18. Detachment of helium plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briesemeister, A. R.; Canik, J. M.; Isler, R. C.; Hillis, D. L.; Shafer, M. W.; McLean, A. G.; Makowski, M. A.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Meyer, W. H.; Moser, A. L.; Wang, H.; Watkins, J. G.

    2016-10-01

    In low power, Ohmic plasmas, the high recycling regime typically seen as core density is increased in deuterium plasmas, was not observed in helium plasmas. When neutral helium beam heating was added, the high recycling regime returned as predicted using the SOLPS code. Modeling shows that increasing input power reduces neutral penetration across the separatrix, reducing radiation from the confined plasma and allowing a larger fraction of the input power to be carried into the scrape off layer. Detailed measurements including divertor ion and electron temperatures and densities and radiation emission patterns are presented at a variety of heating levels including both H and L-mode plasmas. An understanding of the differences between detachment in the helium and deuterium plasmas will be important for understanding how divertor conditions in the helium startup phase of ITER will differ from those in deuterium operation. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Highly Excited States of cs Atoms on Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackner, F.; Theisen, M.; Koch, M.; Ernst, W. E.

    2011-06-01

    Cs atoms on the surface of helium nanodroplets have been excited to high lying nS (n = 8-11), nP (n = 8-11), and nD (n = 6-10) levels. A two-step excitation scheme via the 62P1/2(2Π1/2) state using two cw lasers was applied. This intermediate state has the advantage that a large fraction of the excited Cs atoms does not desorb from the helium nanodroplets. An absorption spectrum was recorded by detecting laser induced fluorescence light from the 62P3/2→62S1/2 transition. The pseudo-diatomic model for helium nanodroplets doped with single alkali-metal atoms holds for the observed spectrum. An investigation of spectral trends shows that the n'2P(Π)←62P1/2(2Π1/2) and n'2D(Δ)←62P1/2(2Π1/2) (n' > 9) transitions are lower in energy than the corresponding free-atom transitions. This indicates that the Cs*--HeN potential becomes attractive for these highly excited states. Our results suggest a possibility of generating an artificial super-atom with a positive ion core inside a helium nanodroplet and the electron outside, which will be subject to future experiments. M. Theisen, F. Lackner, F. Ancilotto, C. Callegari, and W.E. Ernst, Eur. Phys. J. D 61, 403-408 (2011)

  20. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  2. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  3. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is a colorless,...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  8. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  9. Applying the helium ionization detector in chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Andrawes, F. F.; Brazell, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    High noise levels and oversensitivity of helium detector make flame-ionization and thermal-conductivity detectors more suitable for chromotography. Deficiencies are eliminated by modifying helium device to operate in saturation rather than multiplication mode. Result is low background current, low noise, high stability, and high sensitivity. Detector analyzes halocarbons, hydrocarbons, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, and inorganics without requiring expensive research-grade helium.

  10. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is...

  12. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium. 582.1355 Section 582.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Helium. (a) Product. Helium. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1355 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Helium. 184.1355 Section 184.1355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1355 Helium. (a) Helium (empirical formula He, CAS Reg. No. 7440-59-7) is...

  15. Why Helium Ends in "-Ium"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.; Holme, Thomas; Cooper, Melanie; White, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Edward Frankland and Norman Lockyer researched upon a gaseous spectra in relation to the physical constitution of the sun and named it as "helium" (from Greek "helios" meaning "sun"). Since Lockyer apparently never formally proposed the name in print, it is not known why he chose to use a metallic end "ium".

  16. Helium diffusion in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    1992-01-01

    We calculate improved standard solar models using the new Livermore (OPAL) opacity tables, an accurate (exportable) nuclear energy generation routine which takes account of recent measurements and analyses, and the recent Anders-Grevesse determination of heavy element abundances. We also evaluate directly the effect of the diffusion of helium with respect to hydrogen on the calculated neutrino fluxes, on the primordial solar helium abundance, and on the depth of the convective zone. Helium diffusion increases the predicted event rates by about 0.8 SNU, or 11 percent of the total rate, in the chlorine solar neutrino experiment, by about 3.5 SNU, or 3 percent, in the gallium solar neutrino experiments, and by about 12 percent in the Kamiokande and SNO solar neutrino experiments. The best standard solar model including helium diffusion and the most accurate nuclear parameters, element abundances, and radiative opacity predicts a value of 8.0 SNU +/- 3.0 SNU for the C1-37 experiment and 132 +21/-17 SNU for the Ga - 71 experiment, where the uncertainties include 3 sigma errors for all measured input parameters.

  17. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-15

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 4}{sup +}, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl{sub 4} doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He){sub n}C{sup +}, (He){sub n}Cl{sup +}, and (He){sub n}CCl{sup +}. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  18. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  19. Effect of Helium ion irradiation on the structure, the phase stability, and the microhardness of TiN, TiAlN, and TiAlYN nanostructured coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, F. F.; Konstantinov, S. V.; Strel'nitskij, V. E.; Pilko, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    The radiation resistance of nanostructured TiN, TiAlN, and TiAlYN coatings is studied after 500-keV He+ ion irradiation in the fluence range 5 × 1016-3 × 1017 ions/cm2. The radiation-induced changes in the phase composition, the structure, the lattice parameters, the morphology, and the mechanical properties of coatings are investigated. Blistering is found to be absent, and the radiation fluence is shown to affect the strength properties of the thin coatings nonlinearly. A significant decrease in the grain sizes is detected upon ion irradiation, which causes an increase in the microhardness and the radiation resistance of the coatings. The TiN, TiAlN, and TiAlYN coatings are found to be radiation-resistant coatings, which do not undergo serious degradation during high-fluence ion irradiation.

  20. High-temperature helium-loop facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high-temperature helium loop is a facility for materials testing in ultrapure helium gas at high temperatures. The closed loop system is capable of recirculating high-purity helium or helium with controlled impurities. The gas loop maximum operating conditions are as follows: 300 psi pressure, 500 lb/h flow rate, and 2100/sup 0/F temperature. The two test sections can accept samples up to 3.5 in. diameter and 5 ft long. The gas loop is fully instrumented to continuously monitor all parameters of loop operation as well as helium impurities. The loop is fully automated to operate continuously and requires only a daily servicing by a qualified operator to replenish recorder charts and helium makeup gas. Because of its versatility and high degree of parameter control, the helium loop is applicable to many types of materials research. This report describes the test apparatus, operating parameters, peripheral systems, and instrumentation system.

  1. Electron impact ionization and multiphoton ionization of doped superfluid helium droplets: A comparison.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-02-28

    We compare characteristics of electron impact ionization (EI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI) of doped superfluid helium droplets using the same droplet source. Selected dopant ion fragments from the two ionization schemes demonstrate different dependence on the doping pressure, which could be attributed to the different ionization mechanisms. While EI directly ionizes helium atoms in a droplet therefore has higher yields for bigger droplets (within a limited size range), MPI is insensitive to the helium in a droplet and is only dependent on the number of dopant molecules. The optimal timing of the ionization pulse also varies with the doping pressure, implying a velocity slip among different sized droplets. Calculations of the doping statistics and ionization probabilities qualitatively agree with the experimental data. Our results offer a word of caution in interpreting the pressure and timing dependence of superfluid helium droplets, and we also devise a scheme in achieving a high degree of doping while limiting the contribution of dopant clusters.

  2. The application of laser Rayleigh scattering to gas density measurements in hypersonic helium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, J. C.; Honaker, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the mean static free-stream gas density have been made in two Langley Research Center helium facilities, the 3-inch leg of the high-Reynolds-number helium complex and the 22-inch hypersonic helium tunnel. Rayleigh scattering of a CW argon ion laser beam at 514.5 nm provided the basic physical mechanism. The behavior of the scattered signal was linear, confirmed by a preliminary laboratory study. That study also revealed the need to introduce baffles to reduce stray light. A relatively simple optical system and associated photon-counting electronics were utilized to obtain data for densities from 10 to the 23rd to 10 to the 25th per cu m. The major purpose, to confirm the applicability of this technique in the hypersonic helium flow, was accomplished.

  3. Helium-Implantation-Induced Damage in NHS Steel Investigated by Slow-Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan-Fei; Shen, Tie-Long; Gao, Xing; Gao, Ning; Yao, Cun-Feng; Sun, Jian-Rong; Wei, Kong-Fang; Li, Bing-Sheng; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xing-Zhong; Zhu, Ya-Bin; Pang, Li-Long; Cui, Ming-Huan; Chang, Hai-Long; Wang, Ji; Zhu, Hui-Ping; Wang, Dong; Song, Peng; Sheng, Yan-Bin; Zhang, Hong-Peng; Hu, Bi-Tao; Wang, Zhi-Guang

    2014-03-01

    Evolutions of defects and helium contained defects produced by atomic displacement and helium deposition with helium implantation at different temperatures in novel high silicon (NHS) steel are investigated by a slow positron beam. Differences of the defect information among samples implanted by helium to a fluence of 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 at room temperature, 300°C, 450°C and 750°C are discussed. It is found that the mobility of vacancies and vacancy clusters, a recombination of vacancy-type defects and the formation of the He-V complex lead to the occurrence of these differences. At high temperature irradiations, a change of the diffusion mechanism of He atoms/He bubbles might be one of the reasons for the change of the S-parameter.

  4. Electron impact ionization and multiphoton ionization of doped superfluid helium droplets: A comparison

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We compare characteristics of electron impact ionization (EI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI) of doped superfluid helium droplets using the same droplet source. Selected dopant ion fragments from the two ionization schemes demonstrate different dependence on the doping pressure, which could be attributed to the different ionization mechanisms. While EI directly ionizes helium atoms in a droplet therefore has higher yields for bigger droplets (within a limited size range), MPI is insensitive to the helium in a droplet and is only dependent on the number of dopant molecules. The optimal timing of the ionization pulse also varies with the doping pressure, implying a velocity slip among different sized droplets. Calculations of the doping statistics and ionization probabilities qualitatively agree with the experimental data. Our results offer a word of caution in interpreting the pressure and timing dependence of superfluid helium droplets, and we also devise a scheme in achieving a high degree of doping while limiting the contribution of dopant clusters. PMID:26931697

  5. Approximating the Helium Wavefunction in Positronium-Helium Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiRienzi, Joseph; Drachman, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    In the Kohn variational treatment of the positronium- hydrogen scattering problem the scattering wave function is approximated by an expansion in some appropriate basis set, but the target and projectile wave functions are known exactly. In the positronium-helium case, however, a difficulty immediately arises in that the wave function of the helium target atom is not known exactly, and there are several ways to deal with the associated eigenvalue in formulating the variational scattering equations to be solved. In this work we will use the Kohn variational principle in the static exchange approximation to d e t e e the zero-energy scattering length for the Ps-He system, using a suite of approximate target functions. The results we obtain will be compared with each other and with corresponding values found by other approximation techniques.

  6. Phase separation of metallic hydrogen-helium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.; Beck, H.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the thermodynamic functions and phase-separation boundaries of solid metallic hydrogen-helium alloys at temperatures between zero and 19,000 K and at pressures between 15 and 90 Mbar. Expressions for the band-structure energy of a randomly disordered alloy (including third order in the electron-ion interaction) are derived and evaluated. Short- and long-range orders are included by the quasi-chemical method, and lattice dynamics in the virtual-crystal harmonic approximation. It is concluded that at temperatures below 4000 K, there is essentially complete phase separation of hydrogen-helium alloys and that a miscibility gap remains at the highest temperatures and pressures considered. The relevance of these results to models of the deep interior of Jupiter is briefly discussed.

  7. Phase separation of metallic hydrogen-helium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.; Beck, H.

    1976-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the thermodynamic functions and phase separation boundaries of solid metallic hydrogen helium alloys at temperatures between 0 K and 19,000 K and at pressures between 15 and 90 megabars. Expressions for the band structure energy of a randomly disordered alloy (including third order in the electron ion interaction) are derived and evaluated. Short and long range order are included by the quasi-chemical method, and lattice dynamics in the virtual crystal harmonic approximation. We conclude that at temperatures below 4,000 K there is complete phase separation of hydrogen helium alloys, and that a miscibility gap remains at the highest temperatures and pressures considered. The relevance of these results to models of the deep interior of Jupiter is briefly discussed.

  8. Nanostructuring of Palladium with Low-Temperature Helium Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Fiflis, P.; Christenson, M.P.; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2015-01-01

    Impingement of high fluxes of helium ions upon metals at elevated temperatures has given rise to the growth of nanostructured layers on the surface of several metals, such as tungsten and molybdenum. These nanostructured layers grow from the bulk material and have greatly increased surface area over that of a not nanostructured surface. They are also superior to deposited nanostructures due to a lack of worries over adhesion and differences in material properties. Several palladium samples of varying thickness were biased and exposed to a helium helicon plasma. The nanostructures were characterized as a function of the thickness of the palladium layer and of temperature. Bubbles of ~100 nm in diameter appear to be integral to the nanostructuring process. Nanostructured palladium is also shown to have better catalytic activity than not nanostructured palladium. PMID:28347109

  9. Helium Droplets Doped with Sulfur and C60

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clusters of sulfur are grown by passing superfluid helium nanodroplets through a pickup cell filled with sulfur vapor. In some experiments the droplets are codoped with C60. The doped droplets are collided with energetic electrons and the abundance distributions of positively and negatively charged cluster ions are recorded. We report, specifically, distributions of Sm+, Sm–, and C60Sm– containing up to 41 sulfur atoms. We also observe complexes of sulfur cluster anions with helium; distributions are presented for HenSm– with n ≤ 31 and m ≤ 3. The similarity between anionic and cationic C60Sm± spectra is in striking contrast to the large differences between spectra of Sm+ and Sm–. PMID:26045732

  10. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, P.; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as "fuzz". The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  11. Superfluid helium leak sealant study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one leak specimens were fabricated in the ends of stainless steel and aluminum tubes. Eighteen of these tubes were coated with a copolymer material to seal the leak. The other three specimens were left uncoated and served as control specimens. All 21 tubes were cold shocked in liquid helium 50 times and then the leak rate was measured while the tubes were submerged in superfluid helium at 1.7 K. During the cold shocks two of the coated specimens were mechanically damaged and eliminated from the test program. Of the remaining 16 coated specimens one suffered a total coating failure and resulting high leak rate. Another three of the coated specimens suffered partial coating failures. The leak rates of the uncoated specimens were also measured and reported. The significance of various leak rates is discussed in view of the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Dewar performance.

  12. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results.

  13. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyevodin, V. N.; Karpov, S. A.; Kopanets, I. E.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)4He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ˜1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  14. Detecting scintillations in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2013-09-01

    We review our work in developing a tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB)-based detection system for a measurement of the neutron lifetime using magnetically confined ultracold neutrons (UCN). As part of the development of the detection system for this experiment, we studied the scintillation properties of liquid helium itself, characterized the fluorescent efficiencies of different fluors, and built and tested three detector geometries. We provide an overview of the results from these studies as well as references for additional information.

  15. Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.; Dominick, Sam M.; Anderson, John E.; Gille, John P.; Martin, Tim A.; Marino, John S.; Paynter, Howard L.; Traill, R. Eric; Herzl, Alfred; Gotlib, Sam

    1988-01-01

    Replenishment of superfluid helium (SFHe) offers the potential of extending the on-orbit life of observatories, satellite instruments, sensors and laboratories which operate in the 2 K temperature regime. A reference set of resupply customers was identified as representing realistic helium servicing requirements and interfaces for the first 10 years of superfluid helium tanker (SFHT) operations. These included the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), the Particle Astrophysics Magnet Facility (Astromag), and the Microgravity and Materials Processing Sciences Facility (MMPS)/Critical Point Phenomena Facility (CPPF). A mixed-fleet approach to SFHT utilization was considered. The tanker permits servicing from the Shuttle cargo bay, in situ when attached to the OMV and carried to the user spacecraft, and as a depot at the Space Station. A SFHT Dewar ground servicing concept was developed which uses a dedicated ground cooling heat exchanger to convert all the liquid, after initial fill as normal fluid, to superfluid for launch. This concept permits the tanker to be filled to a near full condition, and then cooled without any loss of fluid. The final load condition can be saturated superfluid with any desired ullage volume, or the tank can be totally filed and pressurized. The SFHT Dewar and helium plumbing system design has sufficient component redundancy to meet fail-operational, fail-safe requirements, and is designed structurally to meet a 50 mission life usage requirement. Technology development recommendations were made for the selected SFHT concept, and a Program Plan and cost estimate prepared for a phase C/D program spanning 72 months from initiation through first launch in 1997.

  16. Vorticity matching in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, David C.

    1991-12-01

    Recent experiments have rekindled interest in high Reynolds number flows using superfluid helium. In a continuing series of experiments, the flow of helium II through various devices (smooth pipes, corrugated pipes, valves, venturies, turbine flowmeters, and coanda flowmeters for example) was investigated. In all cases, the measured values (typically, mass flow rates and pressure drops) were found to be well described by classical relations for high Reynolds flows. This is unexpected since helium II consists of two interpenetrating fluids; one fluid with nonzero viscosity (the normal fluid) and one with zero viscosity (the superfluid). Only the normal fluid component should directly obey classical relations. Since the experiments listed above only measure the external behavior of the flow (i.e., pressure drops over devices), there is a great deal of room for interpretation of their results. One possible interpretation is that in turbulent flows the normal fluid and the superfluid velocity fields are somehow 'locked' together, presumably by the mutual friction force between the superfluid vortex filaments and the normal fluid. We refer to this locking together of the two fluids as 'vorticity matching.'

  17. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  18. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  19. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  20. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  1. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  2. 43 CFR 16.2 - Applications for helium disposition agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applications for helium disposition... HELIUM § 16.2 Applications for helium disposition agreements. The application for a helium disposition... Secretary to determine that the proposal will conserve helium that will otherwise be wasted, drained,...

  3. Ras Laffan helium recovery unit 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauve, Eric Arnaud; Grabié, Veronique; Grillot, David; Delcayre, Franck; Deschildre, Cindy

    2012-06-01

    In May 2010, Air Liquide was awarded a contract for the Engineering Procurement and Construction (Turnkey EPC) for a second helium recovery unit [RLH II] dedicated to the Ras Laffan refinery in Qatar. This unit will come in addition to the one [RLH I] delivered and commissioned by Air Liquide in 2005. It will increase the helium production of Qatar from 10% to 28% of worldwide production. RLH I and RLH II use Air Liquide Advanced Technologies helium liquefiers. With a production of 8 tons of liquid helium per day, the RLH I liquefier is the world largest, but not for long. Thanks to the newly developed turbine TC7, Air Liquide was able to propose for RLH II a single liquefier able to produce over 20 tons per day of liquid helium without liquid nitrogen pre-cooling. This liquefier using 6 Air Liquide turbines (TC series) will set a new record in the world of helium liquefaction.

  4. Helium recovery and purification at CHMFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Meng, Q.; Ouyang, Z.; Shi, L.; Ai, X.; Chen, X.

    2017-02-01

    Currently, rising demand and declining reserves of helium have led to dramatic increases in the helium price. The High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CHMFL) has made efforts since its foundation to increase the percentage of helium recovered. The piping network connects all the helium experimental facilities to the recovery system, and even exhaust ports of pressure relief valves and vacuum pumps are also connected. In each year, about 30,000 cubic meters helium gas is recovered. The recovery gas is purified, liquefied and supplied to the users again. This paper will provide details about the helium recovery and purification system at CHMFL, including system flowchart, components, problems and solutions.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of hydrogen-helium plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. F.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the thermodynamic properties of an atomic hydrogen-helium plasma for postulated conditions present in a stagnation shock layer of a spacecraft entering the atmosphere of Jupiter. These properties can be used to evaluate transport properties, to calculate convective heating, and to investigate nonequilibrium behavior. The calculations have been made for temperatures from 10,000 to 100,000 K, densities of 10 to the minus 7th and .00001 g cu cm, and three plasma compositions: pure hydrogen, 50% hydrogen/50% helium, and pure helium. The shock layer plasma consists of electrons, protons, atomic hydrogen, atomic helium, singly ionized helium, and doubly atomized helium. The thermodynamic properties which have been investigated are: pressure, average molecular weight, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat, and isentropic speed of sound. A consistent model was used for the reduction of the ionization potential in the calculation of the partition functions.

  6. Detection of helium in irradiated Fe9Cr alloys by coincidence Doppler broadening of slow positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xingzhong; Zhu, Te; Jin, Shuoxue; Kuang, Peng; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Eryang; Gong, Yihao; Guo, Liping; Wang, Baoyi

    2017-03-01

    An element analysis method, coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy of slow positron annihilation, was employed to detect helium in ion-irradiated Fe9Cr alloys. Spectra with higher peak to background ratio were recorded using a two-HPGe detector coincidence measuring system. It means that information in the high-momentum area of the spectra can be used to identify helium in metals. This identification is not entirely dependent on the helium concentration in the specimens, but is related to the structure and microscopic arrangement of atoms surrounding the positron annihilation site. The results of Doppler broadening spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy show that vacancies and dislocations were formed in ion-irradiated specimens. Thermal helium desorption spectrometry was performed to obtain the types of He traps.

  7. 48 CFR 52.208-8 - Required Sources for Helium and Helium Usage Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pressure and 70 degrees Fahrenheit temperature) of gaseous helium or 7510 liters of liquid helium delivered... provide to the Contracting Officer the following data within 10 days after the Contractor or...

  8. Energy, helium, and the future: II

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, M.C.; Hammel, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of helium as a critical resource material has been recognized specifically by the scientific community and more generally by the 1960 Congressional mandate to institute a long-range conservation program. A major study mandated by the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 resulted in the publication in 1975 of the document, The Energy-Related Applications of Helium, ERDA-13. This document contained a comprehensive review and analysis relating to helium resources and present and future supply/demand relationships with particular emphasis upon those helium-dependent energy-related technologies projected to be implemented in the post-2000 year time period, e.g., fusion. An updated overview of the helium situation as it exists today is presented. Since publication of ERDA-13, important changes in the data base underlying that document have occurred. The data have since been reexamined, revised, and new information included. Potential supplies of helium from both conventional and unconventional natural gas resources, projected supply/demand relationships to the year 2030 based upon a given power-generation scenario, projected helium demand for specific energy-related technologies, and the supply options (national and international) available to meet that demand are discussed. An updated review will be given of the energy requirements for the extraction of helium from natural gas as they relate to the concentration of helium. A discussion is given concerning the technical and economic feasibility of several methods available both now and conceptually possible, to extract helium from helium-lean natural gas, the atmosphere, and outer space. Finally, a brief review is given of the 1980 Congressional activities with respect to the introduction and possible passage of new helium conservation legislation.

  9. Helium isotopic abundance variation in nature

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-08-01

    The isotopic abundance of helium in nature has been reviewed. This atomic weight value is based on the value of helium in the atmosphere, which is invariant around the world and up to a distance of 100,000 feet. Helium does vary in natural gas, volcanic rocks and gases, ocean floor sediments, waters of various types and in radioactive minerals and ores due to {alpha} particle decay of radioactive nuclides.

  10. Radioactive transitions in the helium isoelectronic sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1971-01-01

    The principles of the atomic spectrum theory are used to quantitatively analyze radiation transitions in two-electron helium-like atomic systems. Quantum theoretical methods, describing absorption and emission of a single photon in a radiative transition between two stationary states of an atomic system, reproduced the energy level diagram for the low lying states of helium. Reliable values are obtained from accurate variationally determined two-electron nonrelativistic wave functions for radiative transition probabilities of 2 3p states in the helium isoelectric sequence, and for the 2 1s and 2 3s1 states of the helium sequence.

  11. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  12. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  13. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  14. 43 CFR 3195.35 - What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... obligation to purchase refined helium under a Helium Distribution Contract? 3195.35 Section 3195.35 Public... OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Helium Supplier Requirements § 3195.35 What happens if I have an outstanding obligation to purchase refined helium under a...

  15. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  16. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  17. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  18. 43 CFR 3195.20 - Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who must purchase major helium requirements from Federal helium suppliers? 3195.20 Section 3195.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating... (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.20 Who must purchase major...

  19. DIADDHEM set-up: New IBA facility for studying the helium behavior in nuclear glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamssedine, F.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.

    2010-06-01

    The immobilization of fission products and minor actinides by vitrification is the reference process for industrial management of high-level radioactive wastes generated from spent fuel reprocessing. The glassy matrix is subjected to radiation damage and radiogenic helium generation due to the alpha decays of minor actinides. A specific experimental study has been conducted to better understand the behavior of helium and its diffusion mechanisms in the borosilicate glass. Helium production is simulated by external irradiation with 3He + ions at a concentration (2 × 10 15 He cm -2) equivalent to the one obtained after 1000 years of glass storage. He diffusion coefficients as function of temperature are extracted from the evolution of the depth profiles after annealing. The 3He(d, α) 1H Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) technique is successfully used for in situ low-temperature measurements of depth profiles. Its high depth resolution allows detecting helium mobility at a temperature as low as 250 K and the presence of a trapped helium fraction. The good agreement of our first values of diffusion coefficients with the literature data highlights the relevance of the implantation technique in the study of helium diffusion mechanisms in borosilicate glasses.

  20. Optical and mechanical properties of electron bubbles in superfluid helium-4

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Z.; Wei, W.; Yang, Y.; Maris, H. J.

    2014-12-15

    A series of experiments has revealed the existence of a large number (about 18) of different types of negative ions in superfluid helium-4. Despite much effort, the physical nature of these “exotic ions” has still not been determined. We discuss possible experiments which may be able to help determine the structure of these objects.

  1. Helium, Iron and Electron Particle Transport and Energy Transport Studies on the TFTR Tokamak

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Synakowski, E. J.; Efthimion, P. C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B. C.; Tang, W. M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Johnson, D .W.; Mansfield, D. K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M. C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M. W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  2. Production of zero energy radioactive beams through extraction across superfluid helium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Huang, W. X.; Gloos, K.; Dendooven, P.; Pekola, J. P.; Äystö, J.

    2003-05-01

    A radioactive 223Ra source was immersed in superfluid helium at 1.2- 1.7 K. Electric fields transported recoiled 219Rn ions in the form of snowballs to the surface and further extracted them across the surface. The ions were focussed onto an aluminium foil and alpha particle spectra were taken with a surface barrier spectrometer. This enabled us to determine the efficiency for each process unambiguously. The pulsed second sound wave proved effective in enhancing the extraction of positive ions from the surface. Thus we offer a novel method for study of impurities in superfluid helium and propose this method for production of zero energy nuclear beams for use at radioactive ion beam facilities.

  3. Rydberg States of Na-doped Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabbels, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    The dynamics of excited states of Na atoms deposited on the surface of helium nanodroplets has been investigated with velocity map ion imaging, photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight mass-spectroscopy. For the first time, the excitation spectra of Na-doped helium nanodroplets corresponding to Rydberg states of Na atoms have been measured from the lowest excited 3p state up to the ionization threshold. All lines in the excitation spectra are shifted and broadened with respect to the corresponding atomic lines. In addition to bare Na* atoms also Na*HeN (N = 1-6) exciplexes are detected upon excitation. Photoelectron spectroscopy reveals the desorption of Na* not only in the initially excited states but also in lower lying states, indicating that relaxation plays an important role. The recorded velocity distributions show interesting characteristics: for the lowest states the mean kinetic energy of Na* increases linearly with excitation energy. The velocity distributions of Na*HeN exciplexes do not manifest such remarkable properties. The observations can be largely explained by assuming that the interaction of Na* with the helium nanodroplet can be described by the sum of Na*-He pair potentials.

  4. Helium II level measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, D.; Hilton, D. K.; Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a survey of cryogenic liquid level measurement techniques applicable to superfluid helium (He II) is given. The survey includes both continuous and discrete measurement techniques. A number of different probes and controlling circuits for this purpose have been described in the literature. They fall into one of the following categories: capacitive liquid level gauges, superconducting wire liquid level gauges, thermodynamic (heat transfer-based) liquid level gauges, resistive gauges, ultrasound and transmission line-based level detectors. The present paper reviews these techniques and their suitability for He II service. In addition to these methods, techniques for measuring the total liquid volume and mass gauging are also discussed.

  5. Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The accomplishments and recommendations of the two-phase Superfluid Helium Tanker (SFHT) study are presented. During the first phase of the study, the emphasis was on defining a comprehensive set of user requirements, establishing SFHT interface parameters and design requirements, and selecting a fluid subsystem design concept. During the second phase, an overall system design concept was constructed based on appropriate analyses and more detailed definition of requirements. Modifications needed to extend the baseline for use with cryogens other than SFHT have been determined, and technology development needs related to the recommended design have been assessed.

  6. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  7. Quantum Dynamics of Helium Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    helium clusters [10-12]. (10) DMC starts with the time - dependent Schr ~ dinger equation in imaginary time and has been employed most- The approximate...bound. (For example, the binding values may be computed by the Metropolis approach . energy of He 3 is five times greater than that of 1l1lie I We first...or four times for computational effort. If this is also the case with the the larger clusters) its original size. If the maximum en- DMC approach

  8. Design of subcooled helium II refrigerator with helium-3 cold compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, D.; Saji, N.; Ohya, H.; Asakura, H.; Kubota, M.; Kaneko, Y.; Nagai, S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper will study the possibility of a He II refrigerator made up of three cold compressors by making use of helium-3 characteristics. This system is compact enough to fit inside a small cold box, so it can be easily connected with an existing helium-4 refrigerator. The authors designed the compressors, calculated the He II cooling capacity, 4.4 K refrigeration load, required inventory of helium-3, and Carnot efficiency. Though helium-3 is expensive, the required inventory of helium-3 to be filled inside this He II refrigerator was calculated to be small enough to prove practicality of constructing this refrigerator.

  9. Helium Speech: An Application of Standing Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Taking a breath of helium gas and then speaking or singing to the class is a favorite demonstration for an introductory physics course, as it usually elicits appreciative laughter, which serves to energize the class session. Students will usually report that the helium speech "raises the frequency" of the voice. A more accurate description of the…

  10. Paramagnetic Attraction of Impurity-Helium Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, E. P.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-helium solids are formed when a mixture of impurity and helium gases enters a volume of superfluid helium. Typical choices of impurity gas are hydrogen deuteride, deuterium, nitrogen, neon and argon, or a mixture of these. These solids consist of individual impurity atoms and molecules as well as clusters of impurity atoms and molecules covered with layers of solidified helium. The clusters have an imperfect crystalline structure and diameters ranging up to 90 angstroms, depending somewhat on the choice of impurity. Immediately following formation the clusters aggregate into loosely connected porous solids that are submerged in and completely permeated by the liquid helium. Im-He solids are extremely effective at stabilizing high concentrations of free radicals, which can be introduced by applying a high power RF dis- charge to the impurity gas mixture just before it strikes the super fluid helium. Average concentrations of 10(exp 19) nitrogen atoms/cc and 5 x 10(exp 18) deuterium atoms/cc can be achieved this way. It shows a typical sample formed from a mixture of atomic and molecular hydrogen and deuterium. It shows typical sample formed from atomic and molecular nitrogen. Much of the stability of Im-He solids is attributed to their very large surface area to volume ratio and their permeation by super fluid helium. Heat resulting from a chance meeting and recombination of free radicals is quickly dissipated by the super fluid helium instead of thermally promoting the diffusion of other nearby free radicals.

  11. Theoretical model of the helium pinhole microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Adrià Salvador; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the development of neutral helium microscopes has gained increasing interest. The low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms makes helium microscopy an attractive candidate for the imaging of a range of samples. The simplest neutral helium microscope is the so-called pinhole microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by two consecutive apertures (skimmer and pinhole), which together determine the beam spot size and hence the resolution at a given working distance to the sample. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and working distance. Here we present an optimization model for the helium pinhole microscope system. We show that for a given resolution and working distance, there is a single intensity maximum. Further we show that with present-day state-of-the-art detector technology (ionization efficiency 1 ×10-3 ), a resolution of the order of 600 nm at a working distance of 3 mm is possible. In order to make this quantification, we have assumed a Lambertian reflecting surface and calculated the beam spot size that gives a signal 100 cts/s within a solid angle of 0.02 π sr, following an existing design. Reducing the working distance to the micron range leads to an improved resolution of around 40 nm.

  12. LOX Tank Helium Removal for Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2009-01-01

    System studies have shown a significant advantage to reusing the hydrogen and oxygen left in these tanks after landing on the Moon in fuel cells to generate power and water for surface systems. However in the current lander concepts, the helium used to pressurize the oxygen tank can substantially degrade fuel cell power and water output by covering the reacting surface with inert gas. This presentation documents an experimental investigation of methods to remove the helium pressurant while minimizing the amount of the oxygen lost. This investigation demonstrated that significant quantities of Helium (greater than 90% mole fraction) remain in the tank after draining. Although a single vent cycle reduced the helium quantity, large amounts of helium remained. Cyclic venting appeared to be more effective. Three vent cycles were sufficient to reduce the helium to small (less than 0.2%) quantities. Two vent cycles may be sufficient since once the tank has been brought up to pressure after the second vent cycle the helium concentration has been reduced to the less than 0.2% level. The re-pressurization process seemed to contribute to diluting helium. This is as expected since in order to raise the pressure liquid oxygen must be evaporated. Estimated liquid oxygen loss is on the order of 82 pounds (assuming the third vent cycle is not required).

  13. Cellular effects of helium in different organs.

    PubMed

    Oei, Gezina T M L; Weber, Nina C; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt

    2010-06-01

    Experimental research in cardiac and neuronal tissue has shown that besides volatile anesthetics and xenon, the nonanesthetic noble gas helium also reduces ischemia-reperfusion damage. Even though the distinct mechanisms of helium-induced organ protection are not completely unraveled, several signaling pathways have been identified. Beside the protective effects on heart and brain that are mainly obtained by different pre- and postconditioning protocols, helium also exerts effects in the lungs, the immune system, and the blood vessels. Obviously, this noble gas is biochemically not inert and exerts biologic effects, although until today the question remains open on how these changes are mediated. Because of its favorable characteristics and the lack of hemodynamic side effects, helium is suitable for use also in critically ill patients. This review covers the cellular effects of helium, which may lead to new clinical strategies of tissue salvage in ischemia-reperfusion situations, both within and outside the perioperative setting.

  14. Cryogenic helium 2 systems for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E.; Katz, L.; Hendricks, J.; Karr, G.

    1978-01-01

    Two cryogenic systems are described which will provide cooling for experiments to be flown on Spacelab 2 in the early 1980's. The first system cools a scanning infrared telescope by the transfer of cold helium gas from a separate superfluid helium storage dewar. The flexible design permits the helium storage dewar and transfer assembly to be designed independent of the infrared experiment. Where possible, modified commerical apparatus is used. The second cryogenic system utilizes a specially designed superfluid dewar in which a superfluid helium experiment chamber is immersed. Each dewar system employs a porous plug as a phase separator to hold the liquid helium within the dewar and provide cold gas to a vent line. To maintain the low vapor pressure of the superfluid, each system requires nearly continuous prelaunch vacuum pump service, and each will vent to space during the Spacelab 2 flight.

  15. Rectangular nanovoids in helium-implanted and thermally annealed MgO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, B. J.; van Veen, A.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Schut, H.; Fedorov, A. V.; Labohm, F.

    2000-02-01

    Cleaved MgO(100) single crystals were implanted with 30 keV 3He ions with doses varying from 1×1019 to 1×1020m-2 and subsequently thermally annealed from 100 to 1100 °C. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed the existence of sharply rectangular nanosize voids at a depth slightly shallower than the helium-implantation range. Monitoring of the defect depth profile and the retained amount of helium was performed by positron-beam analysis and neutron depth profiling, respectively.

  16. On the stability of cationic complexes of neon with helium--solving an experimental discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Peter; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2013-10-21

    Helium nanodroplets are doped with neon and ionized by electrons. The size-dependence of the ion abundance of HenNex(+), identified in high-resolution mass spectra, is deduced for complexes containing up to seven neon atoms and dozens of helium atoms. Particularly stable ions are inferred from anomalies in the abundance distributions. Two pronounced anomalies at n = 11 and 13 in the HenNe(+) series confirm drift-tube data reported by Kojima et al. [T. M. Kojima et al., Z. Phys. D, 1992, 22, 645]. The discrepancy with previously published spectra of neon-doped helium droplets, which did not reveal any abundance anomalies [T. Ruchti et al., J. Chem. Phys., 1998, 109, 10679-10687; C. A. Brindle et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 123, 064312], is most likely due to limited mass resolution, which precluded unambiguous analysis of contributions from different ions with identical nominal mass. However, calculated dissociation energies of HenNe(+) reported so far do not correlate with the present data, possibly because of challenges in correctly treating the linear, asymmetric [He-Ne-He](+) ionic core in HenNe(+). Anomalies identified in the distributions of HenNex(+) for x > 1, including prominent ones at He12Ne2(+) and He14Ne2(+), may help to better understand solvation of Ne(+) and Nex(+) in helium.

  17. Thermodynamics and phase separation of dense fully-ionized hydrogen-helium fluid mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    The free energy of a hydrogen-helium fluid mixture is evaluated for the temperatures and densities appropriate to the deep interior of a giant planet such as Jupiter. The electrons are assumed to be fully pressure-ionized and degenerate. In this regime, an appropriate first approximation to the ionic distribution functions can be found by assuming hard sphere interactions. Corrections to this approximation are incorporated by means of the perturbation theory of Anderson and Chandler. Approximations for the three-body interactions and the nonlinear response of the electron gas to the ions are included. It is predicted that a hydrogen-helium mixture, containing 10% by number of helium ions, separates into hydrogen-rich and helium-rich phases below about 8000 K, at the pressures relevant to Jupiter (4-40 Megabars). It is also predicted that the alloy occupies less volume per ion than the separated phases. The equations of state and other thermodynamic derivatives are tabulated. Implications of these results are discussed.

  18. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR DE-FG02-05ER64097 Systems and Methods for Injecting Helium Beams into a Synchrotron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, David A

    2008-09-30

    A research grant was approved to fund development of requirements and concepts for extracting a helium-ion beam at the LLUMC proton accelerator facility, thus enabling the facility to better simulate the deep space environment via beams sufficient to study biological effects of accelerated helium ions in living tissues. A biologically meaningful helium-ion beam will be accomplished by implementing enhancements to increase the accelerator's maximum proton beam energy output from 250MeV to 300MeV. Additional benefits anticipated from the increased energy include the capability to compare possible benefits from helium-beam radiation treatment with proton-beam treatment, and to provide a platform for developing a future proton computed tomography imaging system.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of low pressure helium microwave driven discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinho, Susana; Felizardo, Edgar; Tatarova, Elena; Alves, Luis Lemos

    2016-09-01

    Surface wave driven discharges are reliable plasma sources that can produce high levels of vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation (VUV and EUV). The richness of the emission spectrum makes this type of discharge a possible alternative source in EUV/VUV radiation assisted applications. However, due to challenging experimental requirements, publications concerning EUV radiation emitted by microwave plasmas are scarce and a deeper understanding of the main mechanisms governing the emission of radiation in this spectral range is required. To this end, the EUV radiation emitted by helium microwave driven plasmas operating at 2.45 GHz has been studied for low pressure conditions. Spectral lines from excited helium atoms and ions were detected via emission spectroscopy in the EUV/VUV regions. Novel data concerning the spectral lines observed in the 23 - 33 nm wavelength range and their intensity behaviour with variation of the discharge operational conditions are presented. The intensity of all the spectral emissions strongly increases with the microwave power delivered to the plasma up to 400 W. Furthermore, the intensity of all the ion spectral emissions in the EUV range decreases by nearly one order of magnitude as the pressure was raised from 0.2 to 0.5 mbar. Work funded by FCT - Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia, under Project UID/FIS/50010/2013 and grant SFRH/BD/52412/2013 (PD-F APPLAuSE).

  20. Helium and neon abundances and compositions in cometary matter.

    PubMed

    Marty, Bernard; Palma, Russell L; Pepin, Robert O; Zimmermann, Laurent; Schlutter, Dennis J; Burnard, Peter G; Westphal, Andrew J; Snead, Christopher J; Bajt, Sasa; Becker, Richard H; Simones, Jacob E

    2008-01-04

    Materials trapped and preserved in comets date from the earliest history of the solar system. Particles captured by the Stardust spacecraft from comet 81P/Wild 2 are indisputable cometary matter available for laboratory study. Here we report measurements of noble gases in Stardust material. Neon isotope ratios are within the range observed in "phase Q," a ubiquitous, primitive organic carrier of noble gases in meteorites. Helium displays 3He/4He ratios twice those in phase Q and in Jupiter's atmosphere. Abundances per gram are surprisingly large, suggesting implantation by ion irradiation. The gases are probably carried in high-temperature igneous grains similar to particles found in other Stardust studies. Collectively, the evidence points to gas acquisition in a hot, high ion-flux nebular environment close to the young Sun.

  1. Helium and Neon Abundances and Compositions in Cometary Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, B; Palma, R L; Pepin, R O; Zimmmermann, L; Schlutter, D J; Burnard, P G; Westphal, A J; Snead, C J; Bajt, S; Becker, R H; Simones, J E

    2007-10-15

    Materials trapped and preserved in comets date from the earliest history of the solar system. Particles captured by the Stardust spacecraft from comet Wild 2 are indisputable cometary matter available for laboratory study. Here they report measurements of noble gases in Stardust material. neon isotope ratios are within the range observed in 'phase Q', a ubiquitous, primitive organic carrier of noble gases in meteorites. Helium displays {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios twice those in phase Q and in Jupiter's atmosphere. Abundances per gram are surprisingly large, suggesting implantation by ion irradiation. The gases are carried in high temperature igneous grains similar to particles found in other Stardust studies. Collectively the evidence points to gas acquisition in a hot, high ion flux nebular environment close to the young Sun.

  2. Experimental and numerical investigation of time evolution of discharge current and optical emission in helium-nitrogen cryoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneoka, Hitoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Choi, Jai Hyuk; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    Cryoplasmas represent a class of non-equilibrium plasmas whose gas temperature can be controlled below room temperature. However, so far, the influence of the plasma gas temperature on the plasma chemical reactions has not yet been examined in detail. Here we investigated the time-dependent reaction dynamics related to optical emission in helium-nitrogen cryoplasmas. We acquired voltage and discharge current waveforms, optical emission spectra, and observed a temporal change of the emission intensity in helium-nitrogen cryoplasmas at two experimental conditions (temperatures of temperature detector: 5 K and plasma gas temperature: 28 K (condition A), 40 K and 54 K (condition B)). Two time-dependent phenomena were observed: the first was a longer duration of the discharge current compared to that of helium emission at both conditions A and B, and the second was nitrogen ion emission delayed by about 8 µs with respect to the emissions of atomic helium and helium dimers at 40 K. The experimental observations could be reproduced qualitatively by a global reaction model, which took into account the effect of the plasma gas temperature on the reaction rate constants and the diffusion coefficients. The simulations suggested that the reactions related to metastable helium atom were the key reactions, and that the long lifetimes of metastable helium atoms at cryogenic gas temperatures are crucial for the appearance of the time-dependent phenomena. These results imply that the plasma gas temperature is one of the key parameters in non-equilibrium plasma chemistry.

  3. Electric response in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagovets, Tymofiy V.

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the electric response of superfluid helium that arises in the presence of a second sound standing wave. It was found that the signal of the electric response is observed in a narrow range of second sound excitation power. The linear dependence of the signal amplitude has been derived at low excitation power, however, above some critical power, the amplitude of the signal is considerably decreased. It was established that the rapid change of the electric response is not associated with a turbulent regime generated by the second sound wave. A model of the appearance of the electric response as a result of the oscillation of electron bubbles in the normal fluid velocity field in the second sound wave is presented. Possible explanation for the decrease of the electric response are presented.

  4. Nondipole effects in helium photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, Luca; Moccia, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    An accurate calculation of the nondipole anisotropy parameter γ in the photoionization of helium below the N = 2 threshold is presented. The calculated results are in fairly good agreement with the experimental results of Krässig et al (2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 203002), but not as good as the accuracy of the calculation should have warranted. A careful examination of the possible causes for the observed discrepancies between theory and experiment seems to rule out any role either of the multipolar terms higher than the electric quadrupole, or of the singlet-triplet spin-orbit mixing. It is argued that such discrepancies might have an instrumental origin, due to the difficulty of measuring vanishingly small total cross sections σtot with the required accuracy. In such eventuality, it might be more appropriate to use a parameter other than γ, such as for instance the drag current, to measure the nondipole anisotropy of the photoelectron angular distribution.

  5. Atom lithography with metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, Claire S.; Reeves, Jason; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2010-02-15

    A bright metastable helium (He*) beam is collimated sequentially with the bichromatic force and three optical molasses velocity compression stages. Each He* atom in the beam has 20 eV of internal energy that can destroy a molecular resist assembled on a gold coated silicon wafer. Patterns in the resist are imprinted onto the gold layer with a standard selective etch. Patterning of the wafer with the He{sup *} was demonstrated with two methods. First, a mesh was used to protect parts of the wafer making an array of grid lines. Second, a standing wave of {lambda}=1083 nm light was used to channel and focus the He* atoms into lines separated by {lambda}/2. The patterns were measured with an atomic force microscope establishing an edge resolution of 80 nm. Our results are reliable and repeatable.

  6. Helium Saturation of Liquid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Moran, Clifford M.

    1990-01-01

    The research is in three areas which are: (1) techniques were devised for achieving the required levels of helium (He) saturation in liquid propellants (limited to monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)); (2) the values were evaluated for equilibrium solubilities of He in liquid propellants as currently used in the industry; and (3) the He dissolved in liquid propellants were accurately measured. Conclusions drawn from these studies include: (1) Techniques for dissolving He in liquid propellants depending upon the capabilities of the testing facility (Verification of the quantity of gas dissolved is essential); (2) Until greater accuracy is obtained, the equilibrium solubility values of He in MMH and NTO as cited in the Air Force Propellant Handbooks should be accepted as standard (There are still enough uncertainties in the He saturation values to warrant further basic experimental studies); and (3) The manometric measurement of gas volume from a frozen sample of propellant should be the accepted method for gas analysis.

  7. Helium retention and surface blistering characteristics of tungsten with regard to first wall conditions in an inertial fusion energy reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, S. B.; Gidcumb, S. M.; Forsythe, D.; Parikh, N. R.; Hunn, J. D.; Snead, L. L.; Lamaze, G. P.

    2005-12-01

    The first wall of an inertial fusion energy reactor may suffer from surface blistering and exfoliation due to helium ion fluxes and extreme temperatures. Tungsten is a candidate for the first wall material. A study of helium retention and surface blistering with regard to helium dose, temperature and tungsten microstructure was conducted to learn how the damaging effects of helium may be diminished. Single crystal and polycrystalline tungsten samples were implanted with 1.3 MeV 3He in doses ranging from 1019/m2 to 1022/m2. Implanted samples were analyzed by 3He(d, p)4He nuclear reaction analysis and neutron depth profiling techniques. Surface blistering occurred for doses greater than 1021 He/m2 and was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Repeated cycles of implantation and flash annealing indicated that helium retention was reduced with decreasing implant dose per cycle. A carbon foil energy degrader, currently in development, will allow a continuous spectrum of helium implantation energy matching the theoretical models of He ion fluxes within the IFE reactor.

  8. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich

    2015-02-28

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–He{sub n} vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm{sup −1}). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Al{sub n} photoion with n larger than two.

  9. QED shifts and solution to the Bethe logarithm problem for helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Gordon W. F.; Goldman, S. P.

    2000-06-01

    A new method is presented for the calculation of the mean exictation energy (Bethe logarithm) for helium and other two-electron systems [1]. The method requires only a single matrix diagonalization within a correlated Hylleraas basis set extended to contain a wide range of distance scales. High precision results are obtained for the ground states of Ps^-, H^-, and all the S- and P-states of heliumlike ions up to n = 5, including finite mass corrections. The result for the ground state of helium is 4.370 160 218(3) in units of Rydbergs for the case of infinite nuclear mass. The results are used to calculate revised values for the quantum electrodynamic energy shifts for the helium S- and P-states. A comparison with high precision measurements will be presented. [1] G. W. F. Drake and S. P. Goldman, Can. J. Phys. 77, in press (1999).

  10. Helium refrigeration considerations for cryomodule design

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2014-01-29

    Many of the present day accelerators are based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, packaged in cryo-modules (CM), which depend on helium refrigeration at sub-atmospheric pressures, nominally 2 K. These specialized helium refrigeration systems are quite cost intensive to produce and operate. Particularly as there is typically no work extraction below the 4.5-K supply, it is important that the exergy loss between this temperature level and the CM load temperature(s) be minimized by the process configuration choices. This paper will present, compare and discuss several possible helium distribution process arrangements to support the CM loads.

  11. Apparatus and method for determining the gas permeability and flux of helium through the materials and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchenko, V. T.; Lisenkov, A. A.; Vinogradov, M. L.

    2014-11-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring flow of helium through the materials and coatings, obtained by ion-plasma technologies, are developed and tested. The apparatus for the measurement is designed on the basis of a helium leak detector TI1-14, produced by JSC "Zavod Izmeriter, that provides a minimum detectable flow of helium 7.10-13 Pa.m3/s. The purpose of the study is the creating apparatus and method to determine gas permeability and helium flux through new materials and coatings to create the hermetic devices with special properties. This devices are made from polymer coated with metals, and they should replace full metals device analogues in the field of aerospace engineering.

  12. Helium irradiation effects in single crystals of MgAl 2O 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeft, E. A. C.; Schram, R. P. C.; van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2000-05-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel, (MgAl2O4), is a promising material as a uranium free matrix for the transmutation of americium. Fission products and α-particles are produced during the transmutation. The impact of α-particles is simulated by 30 keV 3He ion implantations at room temperature (RT) with the doses 6.2, 16, 20 and 53×1015 cm-2. In another set of experiments a single crystal MgAl2O4 (1 0 0) sample is irradiated with α-particles (4.5 MeV) from a 241Am source at RT to a dose of 1.3×1012 cm-2. Helium release from the implanted samples was studied by thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The numerical analysis of the experimental thermal desorption results of α-implanted samples to a very low helium concentration (0.0288 appm in the irradiation zone of 12.4 μm) show that helium release is dominated by helium interstitial diffusion with an activation energy of 1.8 eV. In the case of high dose implantation to 1.74 at.% in the implantation zone approximately of 100 nm, helium is released from He-vacancy clusters with the activation energy of 2.35 eV. The evolution of the helium concentration profile in the temperature range from RT to 1483 K is monitored by neutron depth profiling (NDP). It confirms that the release of helium is governed by dissociation from vacancy clusters.

  13. Enhancement of helium exhaust by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at LHD and TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, O.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Bader, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Evans, T. E.; Funaba, H.; Goto, M.; Mitarai, O.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Narushima, Y.; Nicolai, D.; Samm, U.; Tanaka, H.; Yamada, H.; Yoshinuma, M.; Xu, Y.; TEXTOR, the; LHD Experiment Groups

    2016-10-01

    The ability to exhaust helium as the fusion born plasma impurity is a critical requirement for burning plasmas. We demonstrate in this paper that resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields can be used to actively manipulate helium exhaust characteristics. We present results from puff/pump studies at TEXTOR as example for a tokamak with a pumped limiter and from the Large Helical Device (LHD) with the closed helical divertor as example for a heliotron/stellarator device. For LHD, the effective helium confinement time τ p,\\text{He}\\ast is a factor of 7-8 higher in the low and high density regimes explored when compared to TEXTOR discharges. This is attributed to ion root impurity transport which is one particular impurity transport regime assessed experimentally at LHD and which facilitates helium penetration to the plasma core. However, when an edge magnetic island is induced by externally applied RMP fields, τ p,\\text{He}\\ast is decreased by up to 30% and hence τ p,\\text{He}\\ast values closer to those of TEXTOR can be established. The combination of TEXTOR and LHD results suggest that a magnetic island induced by the RMP field in the plasma source region is an important ingredient for improving helium exhaust. The reduction in τ p,\\text{He}\\ast seen is caused by a combination of improved helium exhaust due to an enhanced coupling to the pumping systems, increased outward transport and a reduced fueling efficiency for the helium injected and recycling from the wall elements.

  14. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  19. Helium resources of the United States, 1987. Information Circular/1988

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The helium-resources base of the United States was estimated by the Bureau of Mines to be 1040 Bcf as of January 1, 1987. These resources are divided into four categories in decreasing degree of assurance of their existence: (1) helium in storage and in proved natural gas reserves, 265 Bcf, (2) helium in probable natural gas resources, 228 Bcf, (3) helium in possible natural gas resources, 320 Bcf, and (4) helium in speculative natural gas resources, 227 Bcf. These helium resources are further divided into depleting and nondepleting, with the helium in storage being in a separate classification.

  20. Non-equilibrium Helium Ionization in an MHD Simulation of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11-18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  1. Helium release and microstructural changes in Er(D,T)2-x3Hex films).

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D. S.; Browning, James Frederick; Snow, Clark Sheldon; Banks, James Clifford; Mangan, Michael A.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Brewer, Luke N.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2007-12-01

    Er(D,T){sub 2-x} {sup 3}He{sub x}, erbium di-tritide, films of thicknesses 500 nm, 400 nm, 300 nm, 200 nm, and 100 nm were grown and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Ion Beam Analysis to determine variations in film microstructure as a function of film thickness and age, due to the time-dependent build-up of {sup 3}He in the film from the radioactive decay of tritium. Several interesting features were observed: One, the amount of helium released as a function of film thickness is relatively constant. This suggests that the helium is being released only from the near surface region and that the helium is not diffusing to the surface from the bulk of the film. Two, lenticular helium bubbles are observed as a result of the radioactive decay of tritium into {sup 3}He. These bubbles grow along the [111] crystallographic direction. Three, a helium bubble free zone, or 'denuded zone' is observed near the surface. The size of this region is independent of film thickness. Four, an analysis of secondary diffraction spots in the Transmission Electron Microscopy study indicate that small erbium oxide precipitates, 5-10 nm in size, exist throughout the film. Further, all of the films had large erbium oxide inclusions, in many cases these inclusions span the depth of the film.

  2. NON-EQUILIBRIUM HELIUM IONIZATION IN AN MHD SIMULATION OF THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11–18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  3. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Agakishiev, H.; Tang, A.; et al.

    2011-04-24

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus ({sup 4}He), also known as the anti-{alpha} ({alpha}), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the {alpha}-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B < -1 have been observed only as rare products of interactions at particle accelerators, where the rate of antinucleus production in high-energy collisions decreases by a factor of about 1,000 with each additional antinucleon. Here we report the observation of {sup 4}He, the heaviest observed antinucleus to date. In total, 18 {sup 4}He counts were detected at the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in 10{sup 9} recorded gold-on-gold (Au+Au) collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 200 GeV and 62 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair. The yield is consistent with expectations from thermodynamic and coalescent nucleosynthesis models, providing an indication of the production rate of even heavier antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of {sup 4}He in cosmic radiation.

  4. Development of a transferline connecting a helium liquefier coldbox and a liquid helium Dewar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rajendran S.; Rane, Tejas; Chakravarty, Anindya; Joemon, V.

    2017-02-01

    A helium liquefier with demonstrated capacity of 32 1/hr has been developed by BARC. Mumbai. A transferline for two way flow of helium between the helium liquefier coldbox and receiver Dewar has been developed in-house at BARC. Further, a functionally similar, but structurally improved transferline has been developed through a local fabricator. This paper describes and discusses issues related to the development of these cryogenic transferlines. The developed transferlines have been tested with a flow of liquid nitrogen and successfully utilised later in the helium liquefier plant.

  5. Effect of simultaneous helium implantation on the microstructure evolution of Inconel X-750 superalloy during dual-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changizian, P.; Zhang, H. K.; Yao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on investigation into the effect of helium implantation on microstructure evolution in Inconel X-750 superalloy during dual-beam (Ni+/He+) irradiation. The 1 MeV Ni+ ions with the damage rate of 10-3 dpa/s as well as 15 keV He+ ions using rate of 200 appm/dpa were simultaneously employed to irradiate specimens at 400 °C to different doses. Microstructure characterization has been conducted using high-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM results show that simultaneous helium injection has significant influence on irradiation-induced microstructural changes. The disordering of γ‧ (Ni3 (Al, Ti)) precipitates shows noticeable delay in dose level compared to mono heavy ion irradiation, which is attributed to the effect of helium on promoting the dynamic reordering process. In contrast to previous studies on single-beam ion irradiation, in which no cavities were reported even at high doses, very small (2-5 nm) cavities were detected after irradiation to 5 dpa, which proved that helium plays crucial role in cavity formation. TEM characterization also indicates that the helium implantation affects the development of dislocation loops during irradiation. Large 1/3 <1 1 1> Frank loops in the size of 10-20 nm developed during irradiation at 400 °C, whereas similar big loops detected at higher irradiation temperature (500 °C) during sole ion irradiation. This implies that the effect of helium on trapping the vacancies can help to develop the interstitial Frank loops at lower irradiation temperatures.

  6. Helium Plants and Storage. Design Manual 24.2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Helium Air Separation System for a Supersonic Wind Tunnel.. 24.2-6 4 Four-Way Four-Port Valve ................................... 24.2-11 5 Friction...7) Weather and climatic conditions. 5. FACTS ON HELIUM. Federal agencies use helium in helium-shielded arc weld- ing, supersonic wind tunnels, and...station at the nearest railroad connection for transferring helium from railroad tank car to truck trailer. c. Compressor Station. Generally , the initial

  7. Development of charcoal sorbents for helium cryopumping

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Tobin, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Testing of the cryogenically cooled charcoal using fusion-compatible binders for pumping helium has shown promising results. The program demonstrated comparable or improved performance with these binders compared to the charcoal (type and size) using an epoxy binder.

  8. Primary helium heater for propellant pressurization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichmuth, D. M.; Nguyen, T. V.; Pieper, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The primary helium heater is a unique design that provides direct heating of pressurant gas for large pressure fed propulsion systems. It has been conceptually designed to supply a heated (800-1000 R) pressurization gas to both a liquid oxygen and an RP-1 propellant tank. This pressurization gas is generated within the heater by mixing super critical helium (40-300 R and 3000-1600 psi) with an appropriate amount of combustion products from a 4:1 throttling stoichiometric LO2/LH2 combustor. This simple, low cost and reliable mixer utilizes the large quantity of helium to provide stoichiometric combustor cooling, extend the throttling limits and enhance the combustion stability margin. Preliminary combustion, thermal, and CFD analyses confirm that this low-pressure-drop direct helium heater can provide the constant-temperature pressurant suitable for tank pressurization of both fuel and oxidizer tanks of large pressure fed vehicles.

  9. Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat; Hogan, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium Program Space Technology presents the Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications. The topics include: 1) Capability; 2) Applications; and 3) Advantages. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  10. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  11. Helium and Enhanced Image of the Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video blinks between an image in Helium and an enhanced image. The original image is from AIA on SDO and the enhanced image was created at the LM Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory (LMSAL) by D...

  12. CHARACTERIZING TRITIUM WASTE USING HELIUM RATIOS

    SciTech Connect

    Ovink, R.W.; McMahon, W.J.; Borghese, J.V.; Olsen, K.B.

    2003-02-27

    When routine sampling revealed greatly elevated tritium levels (3.14 x 105 Bq/L [8.5-million pCi/liter]) in the groundwater near a solid waste landfill at the Hanford Site, an innovative technique was used to assess the extent of the plume. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios, relative to ambient air-in-soil gas samples, were used to identify the tritium source and initially delineate the extent of the groundwater tritium plume. This approach is a modification of a technique developed in the late 1960s to age-date deep ocean water as part of the GEOSECS ocean monitoring program. Poreda, et al. (1) and Schlosser, et al. (2) applied this modified technique to shallow aquifers. A study was also conducted to demonstrate the concept of using helium-3 as a tool to locate vadose zone sources of tritium and tracking groundwater tritium plumes at Hanford (3). Seventy sampling points were installed around the perimeter and along four transects downgradient of the burial ground. Soil gas samples were collected, analyzed for helium isotopes, and helium-3/helium-4 ratios were calculated for these 70 points. The helium ratios indicated a vadose zone source of tritium along the northern edge of the burial ground that is likely the source of tritium in the groundwater. The helium ratios also indicate the groundwater plume is traveling east-northeast from the burial ground and that no up-gradient tritium sources are affecting the burial ground. Based on the helium ratio results, six downgradient groundwater sampling locations were identified to verify the tritium plume extent and groundwater tritium concentrations. The tritium results from the initial groundwater samples confirmed that elevated helium ratios were indicative of tritium contamination in the local groundwater. The measurement of helium isotopes in soil gas provided a rapid and cost- effective technique to define the shape and extent of tritium contamination from the burial ground. Using this soil gas sampling approach, the

  13. Helium Reionization in From New Sightlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syphers, David

    2017-01-01

    A very small number of sightlines to z~3 quasars have been studied in detail to show the progress of helium reionization. Although studying the same sightlines with each new UV spectrograph lead to a better understanding of them, the sightline variance is very strong during this patchy and extended process. We discuss detailed R>10,000 COS data from new sightlines, and what they reveal about the progress and end of helium reionization.

  14. Cosmogenic helium in a terrestrial igneous rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    New helium isotopic measurements on samples from the Kula formation of Haleakala volcano of Hawaii are presented that are best explained by an in situ cosmogenic origin for a significant fraction of the He-3. Results from crushing and stepwise heating experiments, and consideration of the exposure age of the sample at the surface and the cosmic ray fluxes strongly support this hypothesis. Although crustal cosmogenic helium has been proposed previously, this represents its first unambiguous identification in a terrestrial sample.

  15. Perspectives on Lunar Helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Harrison H.

    1999-01-01

    Global demand for energy will likely increase by a factor of six or eight by the mid-point of the 21st Century due to a combination of population increase, new energy intensive technologies, and aspirations for improved standards of living in the less-developed world (1). Lunar helium-3 (3He), with a resource base in the Tranquillitatis titanium-rich lunar maria (2,3) of at least 10,000 tonnes (4), represents one potential energy source to meet this rapidly escalating demand. The energy equivalent value of 3He delivered to operating fusion power plants on Earth would be about 3 billion per tonne relative to today's coal which supplies most of the approximately 90 billion domestic electrical power market (5). These numbers illustrate the magnitude of the business opportunity. The results from the Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (6) suggests that 3He also may be concentrated at the lunar poles along with solar wind hydrogen (7). Mining, extraction, processing, and transportation of helium to Earth requires new innovations in engineering but no known new engineering concepts (1). By-products of lunar 3He extraction, largely hydrogen, oxygen, and water, have large potential markets in space and ultimately will add to the economic attractiveness of this business opportunity (5). Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion technology appears to be the most attractive and least capital intensive approach to terrestrial fusion power plants (8). Heavy lift launch costs comprise the largest cost uncertainty facing initial business planning, however, many factors, particularly long term production contracts, promise to lower these costs into the range of 1-2000 per kilogram versus about 70,000 per kilogram fully burdened for the Apollo Saturn V rocket (1). A private enterprise approach to developing lunar 3He and terrestrial IEC fusion power would be the most expeditious means of realizing this unique opportunity (9). In spite of the large, long-term potential

  16. Sonic helium detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  17. Advanced helium magnetometer for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this effort was demonstration of the concepts for an advanced helium magnetometer which meets the demands of future NASA earth orbiting, interplanetary, solar, and interstellar missions. The technical effort focused on optical pumping of helium with tunable solid state lasers. We were able to demonstrate the concept of a laser pumped helium magnetometer with improved accuracy, low power, and sensitivity of the order of 1 pT. A number of technical approaches were investigated for building a solid state laser tunable to the helium absorption line at 1083 nm. The laser selected was an Nd-doped LNA crystal pumped by a diode laser. Two laboratory versions of the lanthanum neodymium hexa-aluminate (LNA) laser were fabricated and used to conduct optical pumping experiments in helium and demonstrate laser pumped magnetometer concepts for both the low field vector mode and the scalar mode of operation. A digital resonance spectrometer was designed and built in order to evaluate the helium resonance signals and observe scalar magnetometer operation. The results indicate that the laser pumped sensor in the VHM mode is 45 times more sensitive than a lamp pumped sensor for identical system noise levels. A study was made of typical laser pumped resonance signals in the conventional magnetic resonance mode. The laser pumped sensor was operated as a scalar magnetometer, and it is concluded that magnetometers with 1 pT sensitivity can be achieved with the use of laser pumping and stable laser pump sources.

  18. High efficiency pump for space helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael G.; Swift, Walter L.; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    A centrifugal pump was developed for the efficient and reliable transfer of liquid helium in space. The pump can be used to refill cryostats on orbiting satellites which use liquid helium for refrigeration at extremely low temperatures. The pump meets the head and flow requirements of on-orbit helium transfer: a flow rate of 800 L/hr at a head of 128 J/kg. The overall pump efficiency at the design point is 0.45. The design head and flow requirements are met with zero net positive suction head, which is the condition in an orbiting helium supply Dewar. The mass transfer efficiency calculated for a space transfer operation is 0.99. Steel ball bearings are used with gas fiber-reinforced teflon retainers to provide solid lubrication. These bearings have demonstrated the longest life in liquid helium endurance tests under simulated pumping conditions. Technology developed in the project also has application for liquid helium circulation in terrestrial facilities and for transfer of cryogenic rocket propellants in space.

  19. Helium bubble formation in ultrafine and nanocrystalline tungsten under different extreme conditions

    DOE PAGES

    El-atwani, O.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Hinks, J. A.; ...

    2014-12-25

    We investigated the effects of helium ion irradiation energy and sample temperature on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks in ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten. Irradiations were performed at displacement and non-displacement energies and at temperatures above and below that required for vacancy migration. Microstructural investigations were performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) combined with either in-situ or ex-situ ion irradiation. Under helium irradiation at an energy which does not cause atomic displacements in tungsten (70 eV), regardless of temperature and thus vacancy migration conditions, bubbles were uniformly distributed with no preferential bubble formation on grain boundaries. Moreover,more » at energies that can cause displacements, bubbles were observed to be preferentially formed on the grain boundaries only at high temperatures where vacancy migration occurs. Under these conditions, the decoration of grain boundaries with large facetted bubbles occurred on nanocrystalline grains with dimensions less than 60 nm. Finally, we discuss the importance of vacancy supply and the formation and migration of radiation-induced defects on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks and the resulting irradiation tolerance of ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten to bubble formation.« less

  20. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2014-03-15

    In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Zγ, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter θ(= T{sub e}/T{sub h}) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1 atm, 10 atm, and 100 atm in the temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Zγ with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter.

  1. Helium bubble formation in ultrafine and nanocrystalline tungsten under different extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    El-atwani, O.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Hinks, J. A.; Greaves, G.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-12-25

    We investigated the effects of helium ion irradiation energy and sample temperature on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks in ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten. Irradiations were performed at displacement and non-displacement energies and at temperatures above and below that required for vacancy migration. Microstructural investigations were performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) combined with either in-situ or ex-situ ion irradiation. Under helium irradiation at an energy which does not cause atomic displacements in tungsten (70 eV), regardless of temperature and thus vacancy migration conditions, bubbles were uniformly distributed with no preferential bubble formation on grain boundaries. Moreover, at energies that can cause displacements, bubbles were observed to be preferentially formed on the grain boundaries only at high temperatures where vacancy migration occurs. Under these conditions, the decoration of grain boundaries with large facetted bubbles occurred on nanocrystalline grains with dimensions less than 60 nm. Finally, we discuss the importance of vacancy supply and the formation and migration of radiation-induced defects on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks and the resulting irradiation tolerance of ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten to bubble formation.

  2. How hot are your ions in TWAVE ion mobility spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Merenbloom, Samuel I; Flick, Tawnya G; Williams, Evan R

    2012-03-01

    Effective temperatures of ions during traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) analysis were measured using singly protonated leucine enkephalin dimer as a chemical thermometer by monitoring dissociation of the dimer into monomer, as well as the subsequent dissociation of monomer into a-, b-, and y-ions, as a function of instrumental parameters. At fixed helium cell and TWIMS cell gas flow rates, the extent of dissociation does not vary significantly with either the wave velocity or wave height, except at low (<500 m/s) wave velocities that are not commonly used. Increasing the flow rate of nitrogen gas into the TWIMS cell and decreasing the flow rate of helium gas into the helium cell resulted in greater dissociation. However, the mobility distributions of the fragment ions formed by dissociation of the dimer upon injection into the TWIMS cell are nearly indistinguishable from those of fragment ions formed in the collision cell prior to TWIMS analysis for all TWIMS experiments. These results indicate that heating and dissociation occur when ions are injected into the TWIMS cell, and that the effective temperature subsequently decreases to a point at which no further dissociation is observed during the TWIMS analysis. An upper limit to the effective ion temperature of 449 K during TWIMS analysis is obtained at a helium flow rate of 180 mL/min, TWIMS flow rate of 80 mL/min, and traveling wave height of 40 V, which is well below previously reported values. Effects of ion heating in TWIMS on gas-phase protein conformation are presented.

  3. Helium and Neon in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  4. Measurement of Helium-3/Helium-4 Ratios in Soil Gas at the 618-11 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Dresel, P Evan; Evans, John C.

    2001-10-31

    Seventy soil gas-sampling points were installed around the perimeter of the 618-11 Burial Ground, approximately 400 feet downgradient of well 699-13-3A, and in four transects downgradient of the burial ground to a maximum distance of 3,100 feet. Soil gas samples were collected and analyzed for helium-3/helium-4 ratios from these 70 points. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios determined from the soil gas sampling points showed significant enrichments, relative to ambient air helium-3 concentrations. The highest concentrations were located along the northern perimeter of the burial ground. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios (normalized to the abundances in ambient air) ranged from 1.0 to 62 around the burial ground. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from the 4 transect downgradient of the burial ground ranged from 0.988 to 1.68. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from around the burial ground suggest there is a vadose zone source of tritium along the north side of the burial ground. This vadose zone source is likely the source of tritium in the groundwater. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios also suggest the groundwater plume is traveling east-northeast from the burial ground and the highest groundwater tritium value may be to the north of well 699-13-3A. Finally, there appears to be no immediately upgradient sources of tritium impacting the burial ground since all the upgradient helium-3/helium-4 ratios are approximately 1.0.

  5. Heavy ion therapy: Bevalac epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    An overview of heavy ion therapy at the Bevelac complex (SuperHILac linear accelerator + Bevatron) is given. Treatment planning, clinical results with helium ions on the skull base and uveal melanoma, clinical results with high-LET charged particles, neon radiotherapy of prostate cancer, heavy charged particle irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma, preliminary results in heavy charged particle irradiation of bone sarcoma, and irradiation of bile duct carcinoma with charged particles and-or photons are all covered. (GHH)

  6. Simulation of alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Charu L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Gandy, Amy S.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2016-03-01

    A surrogate approach of ion beam irradiation is employed to simulate alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses. Bismuth and helium ions of different energies have been selected for simulating glass matrix modification owing to radiolysis and ballistic damage due to recoil atoms. Structural modification and change in coordination number of network former were probed by employing Reflectance Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies as a consequence of ion irradiation. Depolymerisation is observed in glass sample irradiated at intermediate energy of 2 MeV. Helium blisters of micron size are seen in glass sample irradiated at low helium ion energy of 30 keV.

  7. Imaging using accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1982-05-01

    Several methods for imaging using accelerated heavy ion beams are being investigated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Using the HILAC (Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator) as an injector, the Bevalac can accelerate fully stripped atomic nuclei from carbon (Z = 6) to krypton (Z = 34), and partly stripped ions up to uranium (Z = 92). Radiographic studies to date have been conducted with helium (from 184-inch cyclotron), carbon, oxygen, and neon beams. Useful ranges in tissue of 40 cm or more are available. To investigate the potential of heavy-ion projection radiography and computed tomography (CT), several methods and instrumentation have been studied.

  8. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A.; Hemmers, O.

    1997-04-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He{sup +}nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energy at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al.

  9. The Oxford electron-beam ion trap: A device for spectroscopy of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, J. D.; Varney, A. J.; Margolis, H. S.; Baird, P. E. G.; Grant, I. P.; Groves, P. D.; Hallett, W. A.; Handford, A. T.; Hirst, P. J.; Holmes, A. R.; Howie, D. J. H.; Hunt, R. A.; Nobbs, K. A.; Roberts, M.; Studholme, W.; Wark, J. S.; Williams, M. T.; Levine, M. A.; Dietrich, D. D.; Graham, W. G.; Williams, I. D.; O'Neil, R.; Rose, S. J.

    1994-04-01

    An electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) has just been completed in the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford. The design is similar to the devices installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is intended that the Oxford EBIT will be used for x-ray and UV spectroscopy of hydrogenic and helium-like ions, laser resonance spectroscopy of hydrogenic ions and measurements of dielectronic recombination cross sections, in order to test current understanding of simple highly charged ions.

  10. The solar flare iron line to continuum ratio and the coronal abundances of iron and helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Narrow band Ross filter measurements of the Fe 25 line flux around 0.185 nm and simultaneous broadband measurements during a solar flare were used to determine the relationship between the solar coronal abundances of iron and helium. The Fe 25 ion population was also determined as a function of time. The proportional counter and the Ross filter on OSO-7 were utilized. The data were analyzed under the separate assumptions that (1) the electron density was high enough that a single temperature could characterize the continuum spectrum and the ionization equilibrium, and that (2) the electron density was low so that the ion populations trailed the electron temperature in time. It was found that the density was at least 5x10 to the 9th power, and that the high density assumption was valid. It was also found that the iron abundance is 0.000011 for a helium abundance of 0.2, relative to hydrogen.

  11. Method and means of reducing erosion of components of plasma devices exposed to helium and hydrogen isotope radiation

    DOEpatents

    Kaminsky, Manfred S.; Das, Santosh K.; Rossing, Thomas D.

    1977-01-25

    Surfaces of components of plasma devices exposed to radiation by atoms or ions of helium or isotopes of hydrogen can be protected from damage due to blistering by shielding the surfaces with a structure formed by sintering a powder of aluminum or beryllium and its oxide or by coating the surfaces with such a sintered metal powder.

  12. The structures and stabilities of helium cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Peter J.; Murrell, John N.

    Previously published 2-body and 3-body terms for an n-valued representation of the potential functions of Hen+ have been used to examine the structures of larger clusters. For n = 3-8 the most stable structure has a linear He3+ core surrounded by weakly bound, nearly neutral atoms, with up to four lying in an equatorial plane. Such structures persist as metastable species up to n = 12. For n > 8 the most stable structure consists of a He2+ core with up to nine atoms closely attached. The first excited state is predicted to have a vertical excitation energy of between 5·5 eV and 5·9 eV, changing little with n. This is in broad agreement with experimental observations.

  13. On the systematics of line ratios along the helium isoelectronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, A. K.

    1982-12-01

    Temperature and change dependence of the line ratios involving the forbidden, intercombination, and the resonance lines is investigated for helium-like ions of C, O, Ne, Si, S, Ca, and Fe. Systematic variations are found and should facilitate the interpretation of observed data. Calculations are carried out using more accurate atomic data than earlier works resulting in significant differences. A few recent observations from laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are discussed.

  14. Suicide by asphyxiation due to helium inhalation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Matthew O; Hall, Martin T; Edwards, Jeffrey D; Vaughn, Michael G; Perron, Brian E; Winecker, Ruth E

    2011-03-01

    Suicide by asphyxiation using helium is the most widely-promoted method of "self-deliverance" by right-to-die advocates. However, little is known about persons committing such suicides or the circumstances and manner in which they are completed. Prior reports of suicides by asphyxiation involving helium were reviewed and deaths determined by the North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner to be helium-associated asphyxial suicides occurring between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2008 were included in a new case series examined in this article. The 10 asphyxial suicides involving helium identified in North Carolina tended to occur almost exclusively in non-Hispanic, white men who were relatively young (M age = 41.1 T 11.6). In 6 of 10 cases, decedents suffered from significant psychiatric dysfunction; in 3 of these 6 cases, psychiatric disorders were present comorbidly with substance abuse. In none of these cases were decedents suffering from terminal illness. Most persons committing suicide with helium were free of terminal illness but suffered from psychiatric and/or substance use disorders.

  15. Thermal Performance of the XRS Helium Insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan R.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Tuttle, James G.; Shirron, Peter J.; Warner, Brent A.; Boyle, Robert F.; Canavan, Edgar R.

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) is an instrument on the Japanese Astro-E satellite, scheduled for launch early in the year 2000. The XRS Helium Insert comprises a superfluid helium cryostat, an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR), and the XRS calorimeters with their cold electronics. The calorimeters are capable of detecting X-rays over the energy range 0.1 to 10 keV with a resolution of 12 eV. The Helium Insert completed its performance and verification testing at Goddard in January 1999. It was shipped to Japan, where it has been integrated with the neon dewar built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries. The Helium Insert was given a challenging lifetime requirement of 2.0 years with a goal of 2.5 years. Based on the results of the thermal performance tests, the predicted on-orbit lifetime is 2.6 years with a margin of 30%. This is the result of both higher efficiency in the ADR cycle and the low temperature top-off, more than compensating for an increase in the parasitic heat load. This paper presents a summary of the key design features and the results of the thermal testing of the XRS Helium Insert.

  16. BASG thermomechanical pump helium 2 transfer tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, G. L.; Newell, D. A.; Urbach, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the effort described was to perform experiments and calculations related to using a thermomechanical pump in the space-based resupply of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) with Helium 2. Thermomechanical (fountain effect) pumps have long been suggested as a means for pumping large quantities of Helium 2. The unique properties of Helium 2 have made it useful for cooling space instruments. Several space science missions, including SIRTF, are now being planned which would benefit greatly from on-orbit resupply of Helium 2. A series of experiments were performed to demonstrate that large volumes of Helium 2 can be transferred with a thermomechanical pump at high flow rates and at high efficiency from one dewar to another through valves and lines that are similar to the plumbing arrangement that would be necessary to accomplish such a transfer on-orbit. In addition, temperature, pressure, and flow rate data taken during the tests were used to verify and refine a computer model which was developed.

  17. Hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocák, Miroslav; Müller, Ewald; Weiss, Achim; Kifonidis, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    We desribe and discuss hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash using an initial model of a 1.25 M⊙ star with a metallicity of 0.02 near at its peak. Past research concerned with the dynamics of the core helium flash is inconclusive. Its results range from a confirmation of the standard picture, where the star remains in hydrostatic equilibrium during the flash (Deupree 1996), to a disruption or a significant mass loss of the star (Edwards 1969; Cole & Deupree 1980). However, the most recent multidimensional hydrodynamic study (Dearborn et al. 2006) suggests a quiescent behavior of the core helium flash and seems to rule out an explosive scenario. Here we present partial results of a new comprehensive study of the core helium flash, which seem to confirm this qualitative behavior and give a better insight into operation of the convection zone powered by helium burning during the flash. The hydrodynamic evolution is followed on a computational grid in spherical coordinates using our new version of the multi-dimensional hydrodynamic code HERAKLES, which is based on a direct Eulerian implementation of the piecewise parabolic method.

  18. TRANSPARENT HELIUM IN STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  19. Polarization effects in ionization-excitation of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Andersen, Nils

    2004-05-01

    We present a parameterization of experiments for simultaneous ionization-excitation of helium, leaving the He^+ ion in the excited n=2 states. In addition to the wellknown observables for coherent excitation of an atomic or ionic P-state [1], we explore the additional opportunities provided by the degeneracy of the 2s and 2p states in a purely Coulombic system. Results from model calculations for some of the new observables are presented, together with the corresponding polarized charge clouds. These observables should be measurable using, e.g., the COLTRIMS technique [2]. [1] N. Andersen and K. Bartschat, Polarization, Alignment, and Orientation in Atomic Collisions (Springer, New York 2001) [2] J. Ullrich et al., Rep. Prog. Phys. 66 (2003) 1463

  20. Global model including multistep ionizations in helium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seung-Ju; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-12-01

    Particle and power balance equations including stepwise ionizations are derived and solved in helium plasmas. In the balance equations, two metastable states (21S1 in singlet and 23S1 triplet) are considered and the followings are obtained. The plasma density linearly increases and the electron temperature is relatively in a constant value against the absorbed power. It is also found that the contribution to multi-step ionization with respect to the single-step ionization is in the range of 8%-23%, as the gas pressure increases from 10 mTorr to 100 mTorr. Compared to the results in the argon plasma, there is little variation in the collisional energy loss per electron-ion pair created (ɛc) with absorbed power and gas pressure due to the small collision cross section and higher inelastic collision threshold energy.

  1. Helium Speech: An Application of Standing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, Christopher D.

    2011-04-01

    Taking a breath of helium gas and then speaking or singing to the class is a favorite demonstration for an introductory physics course, as it usually elicits appreciative laughter, which serves to energize the class session. Students will usually report that the helium speech "raises the frequency" of the voice. A more accurate description of the phenomenon requires that we distinguish between the frequencies of sound produced by the larynx and the filtering of those frequencies by the vocal tract. We will describe here an experiment done by introductory physics students that uses helium speech as a context for learning about the human vocal system and as an application of the standing sound-wave concept. Modern acoustic analysis software easily obtained by instructors for student use allows data to be obtained and analyzed quickly.

  2. Quantum Halo States in Helium Tetramers.

    PubMed

    Stipanović, Petar; Vranješ Markić, Leandra; Boronat, Jordi

    2017-01-12

    The universality of quantum halo states enables a comparison of systems from different fields of physics, as demonstrated in two- and three-body clusters. In the present work, we studied weakly bound helium tetramers in order to test whether some of these four-body realistic systems qualify as halos. Their ground-state binding energies and structural properties were thoroughly estimated using the diffusion Monte Carlo method with pure estimators. Helium tetramer properties proved to be less sensitive on the potential model than previously evaluated trimer properties. We predict the existence of realistic four-body halo (4)He2(3)He2, whereas (4)He4 and (4)He3(3)He are close to the border and thus can be used as prototypes of quasi-halo systems. Our results could be tested by the experimental determination of the tetramers' structural properties using a setup similar to the one developed for the study of helium trimers.

  3. Helium corona-assisted air discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Nan; Gao Lei; Ji Ailing; Cao Zexian

    2011-10-15

    Operation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases including air at low voltages yet without consuming any inert gas will enormously promote the application of non-thermal plasmas. By taking advantage of the low onset voltage for helium corona, air discharge was successfully launched at much reduced voltages with a needle-plate system partly contained in a helium-filled glass bulb--for a needle-plate distance of 12 mm, 1.0 kV suffices. Ultraviolet emission from helium corona facilitates the discharging of air, and the discharge current manifests distinct features such as relatively broad Trichel pulses in both half periods. This design allows safe and economic implementation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases, which will find a broad palette of applications in surface modification, plasma medicine and gas treatment, etc.

  4. Feasibility of lunar Helium-3 mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschneider, Andreas; Van Overstraeten, Dmitry; Van der Reijnst, Roy; Van Hoorn, Niels; Lamers, Marvin; Hubert, Laurent; Dijk, Bert; Blangé, Joey; Hogeveen, Joel; De Boer, Lennaert; Noomen, Ron

    With fossil fuels running out and global energy demand increasing, the need for alternative energy sources is apparent. Nuclear fusion using Helium-3 may be a solution. Helium-3 is a rare isotope on Earth, but it is abundant on the Moon. Throughout the space community lunar Helium-3 is often cited as a major reason to return to the Moon. Despite the potential of lunar Helium-3 mining, little research has been conducted on a full end-to-end mission. This abstract presents the results of a feasibility study conducted by students from Delft University of Technology. The goal of the study was to assess whether a continuous end-to-end mission to mine Helium-3 on the Moon and return it to Earth is a viable option for the future energy market. The set requirements for the representative end-to-end mission were to provide 10% of the global energy demand in the year 2040. The mission elements have been selected with multiple trade-offs among both conservative and novel concepts. A mission architecture with multiple decoupled elements for each transportation segment (LEO, transfer, lunar surface) was found to be the best option. It was found that the most critical element is the lunar mining operation itself. To supply 10% of the global energy demand in 2040, 200 tons of Helium-3 would be required per year. The resulting regolith mining rate would be 630 tons per second, based on an optimistic concentration of 20 ppb Helium-3 in lunar regolith. Between 1,700 to 2,000 Helium-3 mining vehicles would be required, if using University of Wisconsin’s Mark III miner. The required heating power, if mining both day and night, would add up to 39 GW. The resulting power system mass for the lunar operations would be in the order of 60,000 to 200,000 tons. A fleet of three lunar ascent/descent vehicles and 22 continuous-thrust vehicles for orbit transfer would be required. The costs of the mission elements have been spread out over expected lifetimes. The resulting profits from Helium

  5. Thermodynamic properties of hydrogen-helium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of an atomic hydrogen-helium plasma are calculated and tabulated for temperatures from 10,000 to 100,000 K as a function of the mass fraction ratio of atomic hydrogen. The tabulation is for densities from 10 to the minus 10th power to 10 to the minus 6th power gm/cu cm and for hydrogen mass fraction ratios of 0, 0.333, 0.600, 0.800, and 1.0, which correspond to pure helium, 50 percent hydrogen per unit volume, 75 percent hydrogen per unit volume, 89 percent hydrogen per unit volume, and pure hydrogen plasmas, respectively. From an appended computer program, calculations can be made at other densities and mass fractions. The program output agrees well with previous thermodynamic property calculations for limiting cases of pure hydrogen and pure helium plasmas.

  6. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  7. Superfluid helium-4 in one dimensional channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duk Y.; Banavar, Samhita; Chan, Moses H. W.; Hayes, John; Sazio, Pier

    2013-03-01

    Superfluidity, as superconductivity, cannot exist in a strict one-dimensional system. However, the experiments employing porous media showed that superfluid helium can flow through the pores of nanometer size. Here we report a study of the flow of liquid helium through a single hollow glass fiber of 4 cm in length with an open id of 150 nm between 1.6 and 2.3 K. We found the superfluid transition temperature was suppressed in the hollow cylinder and that there is no flow above the transition. Critical velocity at temperature below the transition temperature was determined. Our results bear some similarity to that found by Savard et. al. studying the flow of helium through a nanohole in a silicon nitrite membrane. Experimental study at Penn State is supported by NSF Grants No. DMR 1103159.

  8. Component separation of oceanic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roether, Wolfgang; Well, Roland; Putzka, Alfred; Rüth, Christine

    1998-11-01

    A new procedure to quantify the components of oceanic helium ("terrigenic" 3He and 4He released from the ocean floor and "tritiugenic" 3He from tritium decay) is described. Terrigenic He and nonatmospheric 3He (i.e., terrigenic and tritiugenic combined) are obtained in terms of measured concentrations of the He isotopes and also of neon (Ne) (which improves the separation considerably), assuming terrigenic He to vanish in the mixed layer. For the subsequent separation of terrigenic and tritiugenic 3He, additional information is required and 3He due to natural tritium represents a complication. The procedure is applied to data from a hydrographic section in the South Atlantic (19°S, 1991) and one in the Eastern Mediterranean (1987). The 1σ data precisions and a systematic error accounting for uncertainties in mixed-layer He are approximately 0.3%. Sections of the new representations of oceanic He and 3He and comparisons to the nearest classical quantities (i.e., 3He, He) are presented. In the South Atlantic the 3He distribution reflects the hydrographic structure. East of 20°W the average 3He/4He ratio of terrigenic He below 800 m is 4.5±0.8 times the atmospheric ratio, which implies a substantial contribution of crustal He. In the upper waters, tritiugenic 3He (0.5 tritium units, ±20%) is separated from terrigenic 3He. In the Eastern Mediterranean, tritiugenic 3He is quantified throughout the water column in the presence of substantial levels of terrigenic He; the release rate of terrigenic He from the sea floor is found to be 3.1±1.2 1010 atoms m-2 s-1, similar to the rate for continental crust, with a mantle He contribution of 5±1.2% only. Recommendations for future work are to reduce the mentioned systematic error and the uncertainty margins of the He and Ne solubilities and of 3He due to natural tritium.

  9. On the size and structure of helium snowballs formed around charged atoms and clusters of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-09-18

    Helium nanodroplets doped with argon, krypton, or xenon are ionized by electrons and analyzed in a mass spectrometer. HenNgx(+) ions containing up to seven noble gas (Ng) atoms and dozens of helium atoms are identified; the high resolution of the mass spectrometer combined with advanced data analysis make it possible to unscramble contributions from isotopologues that have the same nominal mass but different numbers of helium or Ng atoms, such as the magic He20(84)Kr2(+) and the isobaric, nonmagic He41(84)Kr(+). Anomalies in these ion abundances reveal particularly stable ions; several intriguing patterns emerge. Perhaps most astounding are the results for HenAr(+), which show evidence for three distinct, solid-like solvation shells containing 12, 20, and 12 helium atoms. This observation runs counter to the common notion that only the first solvation shell is solid-like but agrees with calculations by Galli et al. for HenNa(+) [J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 7300] that reveal three shells of icosahedral symmetry. HenArx(+) (2 ≤ x ≤ 7) ions appear to be especially stable if they contain a total of n + x = 19 atoms. A sequence of anomalies in the abundance distribution of HenKrx(+) suggests that rings of six helium atoms are inserted into the solvation shell each time a krypton atom is added to the ionic core, from Kr(+) to Kr3(+). Previously reported strong anomalies at He12Kr2(+) and He12Kr3(+) [Kim , J. H.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 214301] are attributed to a contamination. Only minor local anomalies appear in the distributions of HenXex(+) (x ≤ 3). The distributions of HenKr(+) and HenXe(+) show strikingly similar, broad features that are absent from the distribution of HenAr(+); differences are tentatively ascribed to the very different fragmentation dynamics of these ions.

  10. Pump performance requirement for the liquid helium orbital resupply tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Ng, Y. S.

    1988-01-01

    The Liquid Helium Orbital Resupply Tanker (currently renamed to Superfluid Helium Tanker) will greatly enhance the lifetime of the space missions which require superfluid helium. The Superfluid Helium Tanker pump performance requirement is driven by the superfluid helium replenishment needs of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). SIRTF is one of the space missions which will require on-orbit superfluid helium resupply in the 1990s. The Superfluid Helium Tanker will carry at least 10,000 L of superfluid helium and provide a minimum pump head of 170 torr (0 to 200 L/h) to cool SIRTF from 150 to 2 K. When the SIRTF tank starts to collect liquid, a minimum flow rate of 300 L/h with a pump head of 60 torr is required to fill the 4000-liter tank.

  11. 5. INTERIOR, LOOKING PAST HELIUM COMPRESSORS NO. 3 AND NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR, LOOKING PAST HELIUM COMPRESSORS NO. 3 AND NO. 2, TO NORTHEAST FRONT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Helium building no. 2 west and south sides. Looking 70 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Helium building no. 2 west and south sides. Looking 70 ENE. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Helium Tank Building No. 1, Near intersection of Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  14. Helium building no. 2 east and north sides. Looking 270 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Helium building no. 2 east and north sides. Looking 270 W. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Helium Tank Building No. 1, Near intersection of Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  15. 8. ORIGINAL HELIUM COMPRESSOR, CIRCA 1957, BY HASKELL ENGINEERING, GLENDALE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. ORIGINAL HELIUM COMPRESSOR, CIRCA 1957, BY HASKELL ENGINEERING, GLENDALE, CALIFORNIA. Looking north. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. The prospects of a subnanometer focused neon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Rahman, F H M; McVey, Shawn; Farkas, Louis; Notte, John A; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    The success of the helium ion microscope has encouraged extensions of this technology to produce beams of other ion species. A review of the various candidate ion beams and their technical prospects suggest that a neon beam might be the most readily achieved. Such a neon beam would provide a sputtering yield that exceeds helium by an order of magnitude while still offering a theoretical probe size less than 1-nm. This article outlines the motivation for a neon gas field ion source, the expected performance through simulations, and provides an update of our experimental progress.

  17. The dynamics and helium distribution in hydrogen-helium fluid planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    The simple case of a homogeneous planet without first-order phase transitions is considered and an investigation is conducted concerning a pure hydrogen planet in which a first-order phase transition takes place from fluid molecular hydrogen to fluid metallic hydrogen. Attention is also given to convection in the presence of a compositional gradient, the effects of helium insolubility in a cooling hydrogen-helium planet, a hydrogen-helium planet in its early evolution, and the case in which influence of phase transition occurs much later in the evolution of the planet.

  18. Electron diffraction of CBr4 in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-07-21

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr4 as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr4 similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr4 doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules.

  19. Retention and surface blistering of helium irradiated tungsten as a first wall material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, S. B.; Gidcumb, S. M.; Parikh, N. R.; Forsythe, D. G.; Patnaik, B. K.; Hunn, J. D.; Snead, L. L.; Lamaze, G. P.

    2005-12-01

    The first wall of an inertial fusion energy reactor may suffer from surface blistering and exfoliation due to helium ion irradiation and extreme temperatures. Tungsten is a candidate for the first wall material. A study of helium retention and surface blistering with regard to helium dose, temperature, pulsed implantation, and tungsten microstructure was conducted to better understand what may occur at the first wall of the reactor. Single crystal and polycrystalline tungsten samples were implanted with 1.3 MeV 3He in doses ranging from 10 19 m -2 to 10 22 m -2. Implanted samples were analyzed by 3He(d,p) 4He nuclear reaction analysis and 3He(n,p)T neutron depth profiling techniques. Surface blistering was observed for doses greater than 10 21 He/m 2. For He fluences of 5 × 10 20 He/m 2, similar retention levels in both microstructures resulted without blistering. Implantation and flash heating in cycles indicated that helium retention was mitigated with decreasing He dose per cycle.

  20. Electron diffraction of CBr4 in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr4 as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr4 similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr4 doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules.

  1. The EUV Helium Spectrum in the Quiet Sun: A By-Product of Coronal Emission?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andretta, Vincenzo; DelZanna, Giulio; Jordan, Stuart D.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we test one of the mechanisms proposed to explain the intensities and other observed properties of the solar helium spectrum, and in particular of its Extreme-Ultraviolet (EUV) resonance lines. The so-called Photoionisation-Recombination (P-R) mechanism involves photoionisation of helium atoms and ions by EUV coronal radiation, followed by recombination cascades. We present calibrated measurements of EUV flux obtained with the two CDS spectrometers on board SOHO, in quiescent solar regions. We were able to obtain an essentially complete estimate of the total photoionizing flux in the wavelength range below 504 A (the photoionisation threshold for He(I)), as well as simultaneous measurements with the same instruments of the intensities of the strongest EUV helium lines: He(II) lambda304, He(I) lambda584, and He(I) lambda537. We find that there are not enough EUV photons to account for the observed helium line intensities. More specifically, we conclude that He(II) intensities cannot be explained by the P-R mechanism. Our results, however, leave open the possibility that the He(I) spectrum could be formed by the P-R mechanism, with the He(II) lambda304 line as a significant photoionizating source.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed.

  3. THE VISCOSITY OF HELIUM-CESIUM MIXTURES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The viscosities of helium-cesium mixtures having mole fractions of cesium from zero to unity were evaluated using a Lennard - Jones 6-12 interaction potential for all encounters in the Enskog Chapman expressions for the viscosity of a binary mixture. (Author)

  4. Electrons on helium — The ``polaron'' transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, E. Y.; Grimes, C. C.; Adams, G.

    1984-07-01

    We describe the observation of the polaronic transition of a system of electrons supported above a helium film. The electron mobility drops sharply by more than four orders of magnitude as the film thickness is reduced below ≈ 1000 Å. The transition was observed in the temperature range 0.4 ⩽ T ⩽ 1 K.

  5. The Weakest Link: Bonding between Helium Atoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Lawrence L.; Blinder, S. M.

    2007-01-01

    A highly simplified model for helium dimers that reproduces their essential features without the need for elaborate computation is presented. The He-He potential is predicted to have minimum of 10.9 K at a nuclear separation of 5.61 bohrs.

  6. 30 CFR 256.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Helium. 256.11 Section 256.11 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Oil, Gas,...

  7. Thermal flickers: A semianalytical approach. [helium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdang, J.; Buchler, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    In order to enhance physical insight into the nature of thermal oscillations arising from a thin helium burning shell, the behavior in its phase plane of a simple two zone model which, however, contains all the relevant physics is analyzed. This simple model very naturally reproduces thermal flickers and is relatively insensitive to all but two parameters.

  8. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Management, General... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  9. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Management, General... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  10. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Management, General... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  11. Helium and Sulfur Hexafluoride in Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forinash, Kyle; Dixon, Cory L.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inhaled helium on the human voice were investigated in a recent article in "The Physics Teacher." As mentioned in that article, demonstrations of the effect are a popular classroom activity. If the number of YouTube videos is any indication, the effects of sulfur hexafluoride on the human voice are equally popular.…

  12. Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2012-06-25

    Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

  13. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  14. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  15. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  16. 43 CFR 3195.24 - What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? 3195.24 Section 3195.24 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.24 What must I do before contacting a non-Federal helium supplier for my helium needs? You must make an initial determination about...

  17. An Assessment of Helium Evolution from Helium-Saturated Propellant Depressurization in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Bich N.; Best, Frederick; Wong, Tony; Kurwitz, Cable; McConnaughey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Helium evolution from the transfer of helium-saturated propellant in space is quantified to assess its impacts from creating two-phase gas/liquid flow from the supply tank, gas injection into the receiving tank, and liquid discharge from the receiving tank. Propellant transfer takes place between two similar tanks whose maximum storage capacity is approximately 2.55 cubic meters each. The maximum on-orbit propellants transfer capability is 9000 lbm (fuel and oxidizer). The transfer line is approximately 1.27 cm in diameter and 6096 cm in length and comprised of the fluid interconnect system (FICS), the orbiter propellant transfer system (OPTS), and the International Space Station (ISS) propulsion module (ISSPM). The propellant transfer rate begins at approximately 11 liter per minute (lpm) and subsequently drops to approximately 0.5 lpm. The tank nominal operating pressure is approximately 1827 kPa (absolute). The line pressure drops for Monomethy1hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) at 11.3 lpm are approximately 202 kPa and 302 kPa, respectively. The pressure-drop results are based on a single-phase flow. The receiving tank is required to vent from approximately 1827 kPa to a lower pressure to affect propellant transfer. These pressure-drop scenarios cause the helium-saturated propellants to release excess helium. For tank ullage venting, the maximum volumes of helium evolved at tank pressure are approximately 0.5 ft3 for MMH and 2 ft3 for NTO. In microgravity environment, due to lack of body force, the helium evolution from a liquid body acts to propel it, which influences its fluid dynamics. For propellant transfer, the volume fractions of helium evolved at line pressure are 0.1% by volume for MMH and 0.6 % by volume for NTO at 11.3 lpm. The void fraction of helium evolved varies as an approximate second order power function of flow rate.

  18. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A.

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  19. Evaluation of helium cooling for fusion divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Baxi, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    The divertors of future fusion reactors will have a power throughput of several hundred MW. The peak heat flux on the diverter surface is estimated to be 5 to 15 MW/m{sup 2} at an average heat flux of 2 MW/m{sup 2}. The divertors have a requirement of both minimum temperature (100{degrees}C) and maximum temperature. The minimum temperature is dictated by the requirement to reduce the absorption of plasma, and the maximum temperature is determined by the thermo-mechanical properties of the plasma facing materials. Coolants that have been considered for fusion reactors are water, liquid metals and helium. Helium cooling has been shown to be very attractive from safety and other considerations. Helium is chemically and neutronically inert and is suitable for power conversion. The challenges associated with helium cooling are: (1) Manifold sizes; (2) Pumping power; and (3) Leak prevention. In this paper the first two of the above design issues are addressed. A variety of heat transfer enhancement techniques are considered to demonstrate that the manifold sizes and the pumping power can be reduced to acceptable levels. A helium-cooled diverter module was designed and fabricated by GA for steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}. This module was recently tested at Sandia National Laboratories. At an inlet pressure of 4 MPa, the module was tested at a steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}. The pumping power required was less than 1% of the power removed. These results verified the design prediction.

  20. Helium diffusion coefficient measurements in R7T7 nuclear glass by 3He(d,α) 1H nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamssedine, F.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.; Fares, T.; Martin, G.

    2010-05-01

    The immobilization of fission products and minor actinides by vitrification is the reference process for industrial management of high-level radioactive wastes generated by spent fuel reprocessing. Radiation damage and radiogenic helium accumulation must be specifically studied to evaluate the effects of minor actinide alpha decay on the glass long-term behavior under repository conditions. A specific experimental study was conducted for a comprehensive evaluation of the behavior of helium and its diffusion mechanisms in borosilicate nuclear waste glass. Helium production was simulated by external implantation with 3He ions at a concentration (≈1 at.%) 30 times higher than obtained after 10,000 years of storage. Helium diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature were extracted from the depth profiles after annealing. The 3He(d,α) 1H nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique was successfully adopted for low-temperature in situ measurements of depth profiles. Its high depth resolution revealed helium mobility at temperatures as low as 253 K and the presence of a trapped helium fraction. The diffusion coefficients of un-trapped helium atoms follow an Arrhenius law between 253 K and 323 K. An activation energy of 0.55 ± 0.03 eV was determined, which is consistent with a process controlled by diffusion in the glass free volume.