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Sample records for 350-2500 nm spectra

  1. Optical properties of human colon tissues in the 350 - 2500 nm spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Kochubey, V. I.; Rubtsov, V. S.; Kolesnikova, E. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2014-08-01

    We present the optical characteristics of the mucosa and submucosa of human colon tissue. The experiments are performed in vitro using a LAMBDA 950 spectrophotometer in the 350 - 2500 nm spectral range. The absorption and scattering coefficients and the scattering anisotropy factor are calculated based on the measured diffuse reflectance and total and collimated transmittance spectra using the inverse Monte Carlo method.

  2. Optical properties of peritoneal biological tissues in the spectral range of 350-2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Kozintseva, M. D.; Kochubei, V. I.; Gorodkov, S. Yu.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The optical characteristics of biological tissues sampled from the anterior abdominal wall of laboratory rats are for the first time experimentally studied in a wide wavelength range (350-2500 nm). The experiments have been performed in vitro using a LAMBDA 950 (PerkinElmer, United States) spectrophotometer. Inverse Monte Carlo simulation is used to restore the spectral dependences for scattering and absorption coefficients, as well as the scattering anisotropy factor for biological tissue based on the recorded spectra of diffuse reflection and total and collimated transmissions.

  3. Reflectance spectroscopy (350-2500 nm) of solid-state polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, M. R. M.; Applin, D. M.; Norman, L.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2014-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic compounds based on fused aromatic rings, and are formed in a variety of astrophysical, solar nebula and planetary processes. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are known or suspected to occur in a wide variety of planetary settings including icy satellites, Titan’s hazes, carbonaceous meteorites, comet nuclei, ring particles; and terrestrial organic-rich lithologies such as coals, asphaltites, and bituminous sands. Relatively few measurements of the visible and near-infrared spectra of PAHs exist, yet this wavelength region (350-2500 nm) is widely used for remote sensing. This study presents detailed analyses of the 350-2500 nm reflectance spectra of 47 fine-grained powders of different high-purity solid-state PAHs. Spectral properties of PAHs change with variations in the number and connectivity of linked aromatic rings and the presence and type of side-groups and heterocycles. PAH spectra are characterized by three strong features near ∼880 nm, ∼1145 nm, and ∼1687 nm due to overtones of νCH fundamental stretching vibrations. Some PAHs are amenable to remote detection due to the presence of diagnostic spectral features, including: Nsbnd H stretching overtones at 1490-1515 nm in NH- and NH2-bearing PAHs, aliphatic or saturated bond Csbnd H overtone vibrations at ∼1180-1280 nm and ∼1700-1860 nm; a broad asymmetric feature between ∼1450 nm and ∼1900 nm due to Osbnd H stretching overtones in aromatic alcohols, Csbnd H and Cdbnd O combinations near ∼2000-2010 nm and ∼2060-2270 nm in acetyl and carboxyl-bearing PAHs. Other substituents such as sulphonyl, thioether ether and carboxyl heterocycles, or cyano, nitrate, and aromatic side groups, do not produce well-resolved diagnostic spectral features but do cause shifts in the positions of the aromatic Csbnd H vibrational overtone features. Fluorescence is commonly suppressed by the presence of heterocycles, side-groups and in many non-alternant PAHs

  4. Optical properties of parietal peritoneum in the spectral range 350-2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozintseva, Marina D.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Genina, Elina A.; Gorodkov, Sergey Y.; Morozov, Dmitry A.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    The wide application of optical methods in the areas of diagnostics, therapy and surgery of modern medicine has stimulated the investigation of optical properties of various biological tissues. Numerous investigations related to determination of tissue optical properties are available; however, the optical properties of many tissues have not been studied in a wide wavelength range. In this work the optical properties of parietal peritoneum in the wavelength range 350-2500 nm were measured. Measurement of the diffuse reflectance, total and collimated transmittance were performed using LAMBDA 950 (Perkin Elmer, USA) spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere, and values of absorption and scattering coefficients, and the scattering anisotropy factor were calculated by inverse Monte Carlo Method.

  5. Flux calibration of medium-resolution spectra from 300 nm to 2500 nm: Model reference spectra and telluric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, S.; Modigliani, A.; Freudling, W.; Giammichele, N.; Gianninas, A.; Gonneau, A.; Kausch, W.; Lançon, A.; Noll, S.; Rauch, T.; Vinther, J.

    2014-08-01

    Context. While the near-infrared wavelength regime is becoming more and more important for astrophysics there is a marked lack of spectrophotometric standard star data that would allow the flux calibration of such data. Furthermore, flux calibrating medium- to high-resolution échelle spectroscopy data is challenging even in the optical wavelength range, because the available flux standard data are often too coarsely sampled. Aims: We will provide standard star reference data that allow users to derive response curves from 300 nm to 2500 nm for spectroscopic data of medium to high resolution, including those taken with échelle spectrographs. In addition we describe a method to correct for moderate telluric absorption without the need of observing telluric standard stars. Methods: As reference data for the flux standard stars we use theoretical spectra derived from stellar model atmospheres. We verify that they provide an appropriate description of the observed standard star spectra by checking for residuals in line cores and line overlap regions in the ratios of observed (X-shooter) spectra to model spectra. The finally selected model spectra are then corrected for remaining mismatches and photometrically calibrated using independent observations. The correction of telluric absorption is performed with the help of telluric model spectra. Results: We provide new, finely sampled reference spectra without telluric absorption for six southern flux standard stars that allow the users to flux calibrate their data from 300 nm to 2500 nm, and a method to correct for telluric absorption using atmospheric models. The reference model spectra described here are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A9

  6. Flux-calibration of medium-resolution spectra from 300 nm to 2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, Sabine; Modigliani, Andrea; Freudling, Wolfram; Giammichele, Noemi; Gianninas, Alexandros; Gonneau, Anais; Kausch, Wolfgang; Lançon, Ariane; Noll, Stefan; Rauch, Thomas; Vinther, Jakob

    2014-08-01

    While the near-infrared wavelength regime is becoming more and more important for astrophysics there are few spectrophotometric standard star data available to flux calibrate such data. On the other hand flux calibrating high-resolution spectra is a challenge even in the optical wavelength range, because the available flux standard data are often too coarsely sampled. We describe a method to obtain reference spectra derived from stellar model atmospheres, which allow users to derive response curves from 300 nm to 2500 nm also for high-resolution spectra. We verified that they provide an appropriate description of the observed standard star spectra by checking for residuals in line cores and line overlap regions in the ratios of observed spectra to model spectra. The finally selected model spectra are then empirically corrected for remaining mismatches and photometrically calibrated using independent observations. In addition we have defined an automatic method to correct for moderate telluric absorption using telluric model spectra with very high spectral resolution, that can easily be adapted to the observed data. This procedure eliminates the need to observe telluric standard stars, as long as some knowledge on the target spectrum exists.

  7. Ultra-broadband gain spectra of Co2+-doped fiber pumped at 1200 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guishun; Zhang, Chaomin; Zhu, Pengfei; Jiang, Chun; Song, Pei; Zhu, Kun

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the energy levels, transition configuration and numerical model of Co2+-doped glass-ceramics fiber. A quasi-three-level system is employed to model the gain spectra of the doped fiber, and the rate and the power propagation equations are solved to analyze the effect of the fiber length, active ion concentration, pumping power as well as ambient temperature on the spectra. It is shown that the fiber has ultra-broadband gain spectra in 1.25-2.00 μm range via the 1200 nm pump, which is promising for full-band fiber amplifiers.

  8. Reinvestigation of the Emission Spectra Following the 266 NM Photolysis of Iodomethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Cian-Ping; Cheng, Hsin-I.; Chang, Bor-Chen

    2013-06-01

    Nascent emission spectra following the 266 nm photolysis of iodomethanes (CHI_3, CH_2I_2, CH_3I, and CH_2ICl) were recorded in a slow flow system, and are similar to those following the 266 nm photolysis of bromomethanes except a number of unknown bands that appear between 520 nm and 820 nm. Interestingly, there are no isotopic shifts in these unknown bands even when the precursors were replaced by the deuterated or ^{13}C-substituted isotopomers (CD_2I_2, CD_3I, and ^{13}CH_2I_2). This indicates that the carrier of these unknown bands does not contain any hydrogen or carbon atoms. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation and dispersed-fluorescence (DF) spectra were recorded, but these spectra show different vibrational structures than those of the unknown bands. While the LIF and DF spectra can be well described by the I_2 b^3 Π _{0,u} ^+ - X^1 Σ _g ^+ transition, there exist systematic deviations between the unknown bands and the I_2 b-X transition. We have improved the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios and the resolution for these unknown bands. Our new analysis shows that the unknown bands consist of several band systems including the I_2 b-X transition. Moreover, the excited state iodine atom was found in the nascent emission spectra, but its formation mechanism still remains unsolved. The details of our current progress will be presented. S.-X. Yang, G.-Y. Hou, J.-H. Dai, C-.H. Chang, and B.-C. Chang, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4785 (2010). J.-J. Du, C.-H. Chen, and B.-C. Chang, 67^{th} OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, WG04 (2012).

  9. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  10. New rotationally resolved spectra of Pluto-Charon from 350 - 900 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, Henry B.; Grundy, Will; Olkin, Cathy B.; Young, Leslie A.; Sickafoose, Amanda A.

    2015-11-01

    We are using the 11-meter Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) to acquire high-resolution rotationally resolved visible spectra of Pluto-Charon. We use the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) to observe Pluto-Charon from 350 nm to 900 nm. At 500 nm, resolution is 0.05 nm (R ~ 10,0000) and SNR per spectral resolution element is ~ 500.We planned observations for 13 dates during June-September 2014, and 13 more dates during June-September 2015. The observations for each season were spaced so as to equally sample Pluto's 6.5-day rotational period. As of the abstract submission, we have data from 11 nights (2014) and 9 nights (2015) in hand. Most of the observations were taken with observations of solar-type star HD 146233 to determine the surface reflectivity.Our results will provide constraint on the composition and spatial distribution of material on Pluto's surface, enabling comparison to previous epochs and near-infrared results, and giving a ground-truth for New Horizons' July 2015 flyby. In addition, our data will allow us to search for new spectral features in the range 350 nm to 600 nm, at a sensitivity substantially higher than previously published searches.

  11. New rotationally resolved spectra of Pluto-Charon from 350 - 900 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, Henry B.; Gulbis, Amanda; Grundy, Will; Young, Leslie A.; Olkin, Cathy B.

    2014-11-01

    We are using the 11-meter Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) to acquire the first rotationally resolved visible spectra of Pluto-Charon in nearly 20 years. We use the Robert Sobie Spectrograph (RSS) to observe Pluto-Charon from 350 nm to 900 nm. At 500 nm, resolution is 0.05 nm ( 10,0000) and SNR per spectral resolution element is ~ 500.We planned observations for 13 dates during June - August 2014, spaced so as to evenly sample Pluto's 6.5-day rotational period. As of the abstract submission, we have 8 of these in hand, two of which sample the same hemisphere as the best planned color New Horizons image. We determined the surface reflectivity by comparing with the solar-type star HD 146233. Our results will provide constraint on the composition and spatial distribution of material on Pluto's surface, enabling comparison to previous epochs and near-infrared results, and giving a present-day 'ground truth' ahead of New Horizons' July 2015 flyby. In addition, our data will allow us to search for new spectral features in the range 350 nm to 600 nm, at a sensitivity substantially higher than all previously published searches.

  12. Lightning spectra in the 850- to 1400-nm near-infrared region

    SciTech Connect

    Weidman, C. ); Boye, A. ); Crowell, L. )

    1989-09-30

    Lightning spectra in the 850- to 1400-nm near-infrared region have been recorded with 200- to 300-ms time resolution using a slitless spectrometer with a lead sulfide detector. Except for the wire portion of triggered discharge channels, rocket triggered and natural return stroke spectra are very similar. The following neutral atomic nitrogen (N I) and oxygen (O I) multiplet emissions have been identified (the wavelength, in nanometers, of the brightest line in each group is shown in parentheses): N I(2) (821.6), O I(4) (844.6), N I(1) (868.0), N I(15) (906.1), O I(8) (926.6), N I(7) (939.3), N I(19) (986.2), N I(18) (1011.3), N I(28) (1053.9), and N I(36) (1246.8). Continuum emissions with peak intensities at least an order of magnitude less than the strongest line emissions were detected. A laboratory arc simulation of return stroke discharge produced a near-IR spectrum containing all the features emitted by lightning. Addition N I radiation peaks at 1131.4 nm (N I(17)) and 1358.1 nm on the arc spectra overlapped water vapor absorption bands were not visible on lightning spectra recorded at 2.2-km range. A time-averaged lightning channel temperature of about 16,000{degree}K was calculated from the ratio of relative intensities of the N I(1) and N I(18) multiplets. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  13. Leaf Level Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emission Spectra: Narrow Band versus Full 650-800 nm Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, E.; Zhang, Q.; Campbell, P. K.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Corp, L.; Cheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) retrievals in narrow spectral regions (< 1 nm, between 750-770 nm) of the near infrared (NIR) region of Earth's reflected radiation have been achieved from satellites, including the Japanese GOSAT and the European Space Agency's Sciamachy/Envisat. However, these retrievals sample the total full-spectrum ChlF and are made at non-optimal wavelengths since they are not located at the peak fluorescence emission features. We wish to estimate the total full-spectrum ChlF based on emissions obtained at selected wavelengths. For this, we drew upon leaf emission spectra measured on corn leaves obtained from a USDA experimental cornfield in MD (USA). These emission spectra were determined for the adaxial and abaxial (i.e., top and underside) surfaces of leaves measured throughout the 2008 and 2011 growing seasons (n>400) using a laboratory instrument (Fluorolog-3, Horiba Scientific, USA), recorded in either 1 nm or 5 nm increments with monochromatic excitation wavelengths of either 532 or 420 nm. The total ChlF signal was computed as the area under the continuous spectral emission curves, summing the emission intensities (counts per second) per waveband. The individual narrow (1 or 5 nm) waveband emission intensities were linearly related to full emission values, with variable success across the spectrum. Equations were developed to estimate total ChlF from these individual wavebands. Here, we report the results for the average adaxial/abaxial emissions. Very strong relationships were achieved for the relatively high fluorescence intensities at the red chlorophyll peak, centered at 685 nm (r2= 0.98, RMSE = 5.53 x 107 photons/s) and in the nearby O2-B atmospheric absorption feature centered at 688 nm (r2 = 0.94, RMSE = 4.04 x 107), as well as in the far-red peak centered at 740 nm (r2=0.94, RMSE = 5.98 x107). Very good retrieval success occurred for the O2-A atmospheric absorption feature on the declining NIR shoulder centered at 760

  14. Sensitivity of Raman spectra excited at 325 nm to surface treatments of undoped polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodbane, S.; Deneuville, A.; Tromson, D.; Bergonzo, P.; Bustarret, E.; Ballutaud, D.

    2006-08-01

    About 20 m thick films were deposited in the same run by MPCVD at 900 °C on Si substrates and then hydrogenated in situ during 30 min with a hydrogen plasma at the same temperature. Their surfaces were kept as prepared or more or less strongly oxidized by annealing at 600 °C under ambient atmosphere or by sulphochromic acid or aqua regia treatments. Raman spectra were excited at 325 and 632.8 nm. Spectra of the as-prepared sample exhibit structures around 2835 and 2895 cm-1 from monohydride carbon-hydrogen ascribed to the atomically flat (111) and (100) areas, respectively, on the facets of the sample surface crystallites. The decrease of these structures in the normalized spectra after the various oxidation treatments confirms these assignments. The decrease is smaller for the aqua regia treatment than for the two other treatments which give similar effects. Other Raman signals from sp2 C around 1589 cm-1 and CHx bonds around 2930, 2952, 3025 and 3050 cm-1 originate from species at the surface and within the films. Their variation with the oxidizing treatments indicates a significant contribution from the surface species.

  15. Direct solar spectral irradiance and transmittance measurements from 350 to 2500 nm.

    PubMed

    Kindel, B C; Qu, Z; Goetz, A F

    2001-07-20

    A radiometrically stable, commercially available spectroradiometer was used in conjunction with a simple, custom-designed telescope to make spectrally continuous measurements of solar spectral transmittance and directly transmitted solar spectral irradiance. The wavelength range of the instrument is 350-2500 nm and the resolution is 3-11.7 nm. Laboratory radiometric calibrations show the instrument to be stable to better than 1.0% over a nine-month period. The instrument and telescope are highly portable, can be set up in a matter of minutes, and can be operated by one person. A method of absolute radiometric calibration that can be tied to published top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) solar spectra in valid Langley channels as well as regions of strong molecular absorption is also presented. High-altitude Langley plot calibration experiments indicate that this technique is limited ultimately by the current uncertainties in the TOA solar spectra, approximately 2-3%. Example comparisons of measured and modtran-modeled direct solar irradiance show that the model can be parameterized to agree with measurements over the large majority of the wavelength range to the 3% level for the two example cases shown. Side-by-side comparisons with a filter-based solar radiometer are in excellent agreement, with a mean absolute difference of tau = 0.0036 for eight overlapping wavelengths over three experiment days. PMID:18360373

  16. Quantum counter for correcting fluorescence excitation spectra at 320- to 800-nm wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Nothnagel, E A

    1987-05-15

    A procedure for recording corrected fluorescence excitation spectra to wavelengths as long as 800 nm is described. The procedure involves the use of a commercial spectrofluorometer, which is modified by substituting 1,1',3,3,3',3'-hexamethylindotricarbocyanine perchlorate in place of rhodamine B as the quantum counter dye. This modification is applicable to spectrofluorometers supplied by several different manufacturers and can be accomplished by a user having only modest technical skills. A study of the fluorescence excitation spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a is presented as an illustration of the use of the procedure. The procedure will be valuable in biological and biochemical studies that involve the use of long-wavelength fluorescent probes of either natural or synthetic origin. PMID:3619023

  17. An investigation of the 661.3 nm Diffuse Interstellar Band in Cepheid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuba, S. V.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Chekhonadskikh, F. A.; Luck, R. E.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Korotin, S. A.; Krełowski, J.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) at 661.3 nm seen in the spectra of Cepheid stars. After removal of the blending lines of ionized yttrium and neutral iron, we determined the equivalent widths (EW) of the DIB and used these values to investigate the E(B-V) - DIB EW relation. The relation found from Cepheids matches that found in B stars. This relation can help to find the reddening for newly discovered Cepheids without extensive photometric data, and thus determine their distances. The relation between E(B-V) and the DIB EW does not yield precise reddening values. It is not a substitute for better photometric or spectroscopic methods. At best, it is indicative, but it provides some information that may not be otherwise available. Defining R★=E(B-V)/DIB EW, which we consider to be the analogue of R=E(B-V)/Av, we investigated the Galactic longitudinal dependence of R★ assuming that the DIB EW value is representative of the interstellar absorption Av. We found that there is an apparent increase of the R★ value that corresponds to the abnormal absorption seen towards Cygnus constellation. Finally we constructed a 2-D map of the DIB EW distribution in the Galactic disc basing on our rather limited sample of 253 spectra of 176 Cepheids.

  18. An investigation of the 661.3 nm diffuse interstellar band in Cepheid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuba, S. V.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Chekhonadskikh, F. A.; Luck, R. E.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Korotin, S. A.; Krełowski, J.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) at 661.3 nm seen in the spectra of Cepheid stars. After removal of the blending lines of ionized yttrium and neutral iron, we determined the equivalent widths (EWs) of the DIB and used these values to investigate the E(B - V)-DIB EW relation. The relation found from Cepheids matches that found in B stars. This relation can help to find the reddening for newly discovered Cepheids without extensive photometric data, and thus determine their distances. The relation between E(B - V) and the DIB EW does not yield precise reddening values. It is not a substitute for better photometric or spectroscopic methods. At best, it is indicative, but it provides some information that may not be otherwise available. Defining R* = E(B - V)/DIB EW, which we consider to be the analogue of R = E(B - V)/Av, we investigated the Galactic longitudinal dependence of R* assuming that the DIB EW value is representative of the interstellar absorption Av. We found that there is an apparent increase of the R* value that corresponds to the abnormal absorption seen towards Cygnus constellation. Finally, we constructed a 2D map of the DIB EW distribution in the Galactic disc basing on our rather limited sample of 253 spectra of 176 Cepheids.

  19. The red edge in arid region vegetation: 340-1060 nm spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Murray, Bruce C.; Chehbouni, A.; Njoku, Eni

    1993-01-01

    -cellulose absorptions at 2090 nm and 2300 nm. Ray et al. detected absorption at 2100 nm in AVIRIS spectra of an abandoned field known to be covered by a great deal of dead plant litter. In order to better study arid region vegetation remote sensing data, it is necessary to better characterize the reflectance spectra of in situ, living, arid region plants.

  20. [Influence of cold spot temperature on 253.7 nm resonance spectra line of electrodeless discharge lamps].

    PubMed

    Dong, Jin-yang; Zhang, Gui-xin; Wang, Chang-quan

    2012-01-01

    As a kind of new electric light source, electrodeless discharge lamps are of long life, low mercury and non-stroboscopic light. The lighting effect of electrodeless discharge lamps depends on the radiation efficiency of 253.7 nm resonance spectra line to a large extent. The influence of cold temperature on 253.7 nm resonance spectra line has been studied experimentally by atomic emission spectral analysis. It was found that the radiation efficiency of 253.7 nm resonance spectra line is distributed in a nearly normal fashion with the variation of cold spot temperature, in other words, there is an optimum cold spot temperature for an electrodeless discharge lamp. At last, the results of experiments were analyzed through gas discharge theory, which offers guidance to the improvement of lighting effect for electrodeless discharge lamps. PMID:22497125

  1. Comparative ultraviolet action spectra (254-320 nm) of five wild-type eukaryotic microorganisms and Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, J.; Wheeler, J.S.; Keller, C.I.; Colley, E.; Hazle, J.D.

    1988-05-01

    The action spectra of five eukaryotic organisms and the prokaryote, Escherichia coli, were examined over the wavelength range, 254-320 nm. Both the repair competent and three repair defective strains (E. coli, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces) were examined. Tetrahymena pyriformis action spectra were performed with and without the excision repair inhibitor caffeine present. Others have observed that lethality, mutation, and the production of pyrimidine dimers show much the same wavelength dependence as DNA absorption. The results presented here demonstrate several action spectra which deviate from the DNA absorption spectra. Ultraviolet sensitization ratios (repair competent/repair defective) were also examined and were shown to change over the wavelength range. These findings suggest that DNA may not be the only important chromophore leading to cell death in the uv wavelength range studied. Since uv-B is of major importance in solar uv damage, these findings may also yield important implications for solar uv studies.

  2. Study of the emission spectra of a 1320-nm semiconductor disk laser and its second harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochelashvili, K. S.; Derzhavin, S. I.; Evdokimova, O. N.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Podmazov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The spectral characteristics of an optically pumped external-cavity semiconductor disk laser near λ = 1320 nm are studied experimentally. Intracavity second harmonic generation is obtained using an LBO nonlinear crystal. The output power at a wavelength of 660 nm in the cw regime was 620 mW, and the peak power in the pulsed regime was 795 mW.

  3. Comparison of HITRAN Calculated Spectra with Laboratory Measurements of the 820, 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Pilewskie, P.; Gore, Warren J.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    Several groups have recently been working to improve the near-infrared spectrum of water vapor on HITRAN. The unit-conversion errors found by Giver, et al have now been corrected on the recently released HITRAN-2000. The most important aspect of this article for atmospheric absorption was increasing all the HITRAN-1996 intensities of the 940 nm band by nearly 15%. New intensity measurements of this band by Brown, et al (submitted to J. Mol. Spec.) have now been included in the latest HITRAN. However, Belmiloud, et al discuss new data in the 633-1175 nm region which they expect will substantially increase the calculated absorption of solar radiation by water vapor. They suggest the 4 bands at 725, 820, 940, and 1130 nm are all stronger than the sum of the line intensities currently on HITRAN. For the 725 and 820 nm bands, their recommended intensity increases are 10% and 15%, about the same as previously noted by Grossmann and Browell and Ponsardin and Browell. Belmiloud, et al only suggest a 6% increase for the 940 nm. band over the corrected HITRAN-1996 intensities, but a large 38% increase for the 1130 nm band. The new data discussed by Belmiloud, et al have now been published in greater detail by Schermaul, et al. The intensity increase for the 1130 nm band discussed by Belmiloud, et al is very substantial; it is important to quickly determine if the HITRAN intensity values are in error by as much as they claim. Only intensity errors for the strong lines could result in the total band intensity being in error by such a large amount. To quickly get a number of spectra of the entire near-infrared region from 650 to 1650 nm, we used the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer with our 25-meter base path White absorption cell. This moderate resolution spectrometer is a flight instrument that has flown on the Sandia Twin Otter for the ARESE 11 experiment. The measured band profiles were then compared to calculated spectra using the latest HITRAN line intensities, convolved

  4. Experimental and simulated argon spectra in the 2.3-3.4 nm region from tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, M.; Fournier, K. B.; Carraro, L.; Coffey, I.; Giroud, C.; Lawson, K.; Monier-Garbet, P.; O'Mullane, M.; Ongena, J.; Puiatti, M. E.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental argon spectra in the 2.3-3.4 nm region from the Jet tokamak on a single null divertor configuration have been simulated. The spectra include lines from five ionization states, namely from Ar15+ Li-like to Ar11+ N-like ions. Collisional-radiative models have been constructed for these five Ar ions, considering electron collisional excitation and radiative decay as the populating processes of the excited states. These models give photon emission coefficients for the emitted lines at electron density and temperature values corresponding to the experimental situations. Impurity modelling is performed using a one-dimensional (1D) impurity transport code, calculating the steady-state radial distribution of the Ar ions. The Ar line brightnesses are evaluated in a post-processing subroutine and simulated spectra are obtained. The parts of the spectra corresponding to a single-ionization state do not depend on the experimental conditions and show good agreement except for the amplitude of the simulated 2s-3p Ar XVI line and the shape of the simulated 2.50 nm feature (composed of Ar XVI and Ar XV lines). On the other hand, the superposition of these spectra depends on the experimental conditions, as a consequence of the fact that the ion charge distribution depends not only on the radial profiles of the electron density and temperature, but also of the impurity transport coefficients. Simulations of the Ar spectra (including transport) give confidence in the atomic physics calculations; moreover, they allow the determination of the transport coefficients in the plasma region emitting the considered ionization states, i.e. at the interior of the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS). For a correct simulation of the amplitudes of the spectral features it is necessary to include a transport barrier inside the LCMS. As far as the atomic physics is concerned, we report improved wavelengths for Ar XV transitions and we benchmark photon emission coefficients for XUV

  5. The Infrared Spectrum of Uranium Hollow Cathode Lamps from 850 nm to 4000 nm: Wavenumbers and Line Identifications from Fourier Transform Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Lawler, James E.; Nave, Gillian; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2011-08-01

    We provide new measurements of wavenumbers and line identifications of 10, 100 U I and U II near-infrared (NIR) emission lines between 2500 cm-1 and 12, 000 cm-1 (4000-850 nm) using archival Fourier transform spectrometer spectra from the National Solar Observatory. This line list includes isolated uranium lines in the Y, J, H, K, and L bands (0.9-1.1 μm, 1.2-1.35 μm, 1.5-1.65 μm, 2.0-2.4 μm, and 3.0-4.0 μm, respectively), and provides six times as many calibration lines as thorium in the NIR spectral range. The line lists we provide enable inexpensive, commercially available uranium hollow cathode lamps to be used for high-precision wavelength calibration of existing and future high-resolution NIR spectrographs.

  6. THE INFRARED SPECTRUM OF URANIUM HOLLOW CATHODE LAMPS FROM 850 nm to 4000 nm: WAVENUMBERS AND LINE IDENTIFICATIONS FROM FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Lawler, James E.; Nave, Gillian

    2011-08-01

    We provide new measurements of wavenumbers and line identifications of 10, 100 U I and U II near-infrared (NIR) emission lines between 2500 cm{sup -1} and 12, 000 cm{sup -1} (4000-850 nm) using archival Fourier transform spectrometer spectra from the National Solar Observatory. This line list includes isolated uranium lines in the Y, J, H, K, and L bands (0.9-1.1 {mu}m, 1.2-1.35 {mu}m, 1.5-1.65 {mu}m, 2.0-2.4 {mu}m, and 3.0-4.0 {mu}m, respectively), and provides six times as many calibration lines as thorium in the NIR spectral range. The line lists we provide enable inexpensive, commercially available uranium hollow cathode lamps to be used for high-precision wavelength calibration of existing and future high-resolution NIR spectrographs.

  7. Atlas of reflectance spectra of terrestrial, lunar and meteoritic powders and frosts from 92 to 1800 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Jeffrey; Hapke, Bruce; Wells, Eddie

    1987-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of powdered samples of selected minerals, meteorites, lunar materials and frosts are presented as an aid in the interpretation of present and future remote sensing data of solar system objects. Spectra obtained in separate wavelength regions have been combined and normalized, yielding coverage from 92 to 1800 nm. Spectral features include reflectance maxima in the far UV region produced by valence-conduction interband transitions, and reflectance minima in the near UV, visible and near IR regions, produced by charge transfer and crystal field transitions. Specific maxima and minima are diagnostic of mineral type and composition; additionally, the minerals present in mixtures such as meteorites and lunar samples can be determined.

  8. Atlas of reflectance spectra of terrestrial, lunar, and meteoritic powders and frosts from 92 to 1800 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Jeffrey K.; Hapke, Bruce W.; Wells, Eddie N.

    1987-01-01

    The spectra of samples of several powder and frost materials are presented to serve in a reference database for future far-UV scans of solar system bodies. The spectra cover in the 92-1800 nm wavelengths, i.e., wavenumbers 110,000-5600/cm and photon energies from 13.5-1.5 eV. Preparation procedures for the particulates are delineated. The survey includes feldspars, orthopyroxenes, clinopyroxenes, olivines, assorted minerals, achondrites, carbonaceous chondrites and ordinary chondrites, lunar soils and rocks. Frosts of H2O, CO2, NH3 and SO2 gases were also examined. The data are expected to aid in obtaining spectral matches for asteroids and meteoroids when far-UV telescopy of solar system bodies is performed.

  9. The role of particle size in the laboratory reflectance spectra of pyroxenes: The case of the 670-nm minor feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancarella, Francesca; Orofino, Vincenzo; Blanco, Armando; D'Elia, Marcella; Fonti, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy is a very helpful tool for remote sensing investigations and has been widely used in terrestrial as well as planetary observations to study the surface composition. From this perspective, the visible (Vis) and near-infrared (NIR) regions of the spectrum, where several diagnostic absorption features of minerals are located, are well suited for the identification of such materials, in particular of rock-forming silicates. Among them, pyroxenes, which have been discovered on the surface of a number of different solar system bodies, play an important role. Up to now, both laboratory and remote sensing spectroscopic studies have been focused mainly on the two major bands at about 1 and 2 μm (the so-called Band I and Band II, respectively), while little attention has been paid to the minor bands falling in the visible range. One of the most important of them, present in many pyroxenes as well as in olivines, is the weak feature (reflectance minimum) near 670 nm, generally characterized by its variable wings (reflectance maxima) at about 570 nm and 720 nm. The intensity and the exact position of this feature depend on the type of pyroxene as well as on the grain size of the particles under consideration. In this work we present the Vis/NIR experimental reflectance spectra concerning enstatite and diopside, which are excellent representative of Low Calcium Pyroxenes (typically orthopyroxenes), and High Calcium Pyroxenes (typically clinopyroxenes) respectively. The results are very interesting and show a good correlation between the grain size of our samples and the relative intensities of the reflectance maxima occurring on both sides of the 670 nm feature. A similar study performed on Acfer 353, a pyroxene-rich eucritic meteorite of the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite family, of putative Vestan origin, shows that also in this case the variability in the Vis region of the spectra is linked to the grain size of the meteoritic particles. The connection

  10. Absorption Spectra and Absorption Coefficients for Methane in the 750-940 nm region obtained by Intracavity Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. J.; Cao, H.

    2000-10-01

    Methane spectral features are prominent in the reflected sunlight spectra from the outer planets and some of their major satellites and can provide useful information on the atmospheres of those bodies. Methane bands occurring in the visible to near-IR region are particularly important because for many of these planetary bodies, methane bands occurring in the IR are saturated. Spectral observations of these bodies also are being made at increasingly higher resolution. In order to interpret the planetary spectra, laboratory data for methane obtained at appropriate sample conditions and spectral resolution are required. Since the visible to near-IR spectrum of methane is intrinsically weak, sensitive techniques are required to perform the laboratory measurements. We have employed the intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS) technique to record methane spectrum in the visible to near-IR region. New results for room temperature methane in the 10,635 - 13,300 cm-1 region and for liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) methane in the 10,860 - 11,605 cm-1 region will be presented. Spectra throughout the more strongly absorbing sections will be shown. These spectra are acquired at a resolution of 400,000 - 500,000 and are calibrated using iodine reference spectra acquired from an extra-cavity cell at nearly the same time as when the methane data are recorded. From the spectra, absorption coefficients are determined and these are presented as averages over 1 Å and 1 cm-1 intervals. In order to obtain the results, spectra are deconvolved for the instrument function using a Fourier transform technique. The validity of the approach is verified from studies of isolated oxygen lines in the A band occurring around 760 nm. Good agreement is observed between the intensity values determined from the FT deconvolution and integration method and those derived by fitting the observed line profiles to Voigt line-shapes convoluted with the instrument function. The methane results are compared

  11. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300 to 850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function proposed by Schutgens and Stammes (2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  12. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300-850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function that was proposed in the past (Schutgens and Stammes, 2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  13. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. I. Full-disk properties: 350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Bellucci, G.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Formisano, V.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbitts, K.; Showalter, M.; Newman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Saturn's icy satellites are among the main scientific objectives of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment. This paper contains a first systematic and comparative analysis of the full-disk spectral properties of Dione, Enceladus, Epimetheus, Hyperion, Iapetus, Mimas, Phoebe, Rhea and Tethys as observed by VIMS from July 2004 to June 2005. The disk integrated properties (350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves at 550-2232 nm) and images of satellites are reported and discussed in detail together with the observed geometry. In general, the spectra in the visible spectral range are almost featureless and can be classified according to the spectral slopes: from the bluish Enceladus and Phoebe to the redder Iapetus, Hyperion and Epimetheus. In the 1000-1300 nm range the spectra of Enceladus, Tethys, Mimas and Rhea are characterized by a negative slope, consistent with a surface largely dominated by water ice, while the spectra of Iapetus, Hyperion and Phoebe show a considerable reddening pointing out the relevant role played by darkening materials present on the surface. In between these two classes are Dione and Epimetheus, which have a flat spectrum in this range. The main absorption bands identified in the infrared are the 1520, 2020, 3000 nm H2O/OH bands (for all satellites), although Iapetus dark terrains show mostly a deep 3000 nm band while the 1520 and 2020 nm bands are very faint. In this spectral range, the Iapetus spectrum is characterized by a strong reddening. The CO2 band at 4260 nm and the Fresnel ice peak around 3100 nm are evident only on Hyperion, Phoebe and Iapetus. The phase curves at 550 and at 2232 nm are reported for all the available observations in the 0??-144?? range; Rhea shows an opposition surge at visible wavelengths in the 0.5??-1.17?? interval. The improvement on the retrieval of the full-disk reflectance spectra can be appreciated by a direct comparison with ground-based telescopic data available

  14. [Study on Paddy Soil Chronosequences Based on Visiblc-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectra].

    PubMed

    Wu, Deng-wei; Zhang, Gan-lin

    2015-12-01

    To investigate spectral characteristics of different soil compositions, eight soil profiles from two paddy soil chronosequences developed on red clays and red sandstones respectively were collected in Jiangxi Province. A total of 37 soil samples were taken from each soil horizons of the profiles. The paddy soil chronosequences were chosen mainly because all soil profiles have the same land management and thus parent materials and rice cultivation time would be two major soil formative factors. This makes it possible to study spectral response characteristics of soil organic matter (SOM) and parent material characteristics. We measured diffuse reflectance spectra data of soil samples using the Cary 5000 spectrophotometer at 350-2500 nm spectral range. Spectral response characteristics of SOM and inorganic minerals in paddy soils were analyzed according to different soil horizons, soil forming times and parent materials. Experiment results showed that for soil samples from a single parent material, overall reflectance presented by PC_1 score can be calibrated for soil organic matter (SOM) content with high precision (R(RC)² = 0.91, R(RS)² = 0.79), even though the SOM content was low (not more than 20 g · kg⁻¹). The absorption strength (AS) at 1400, 1900 and 2200 nm was mainly affected by the minerals inherited from parent materials. And the more the sample was near to bottom of a soil profile, the higher the AS value. Samples with the same mineral components had the similar AS ratio among these three wavelength locations. The differences in parent materials can significantly affect spectral curve shape and spectral absorption strength. To make the calibration more interpretative, parent material factors should be considered. PMID:26964213

  15. Absolutely calibrated vacuum ultraviolet spectra in the 150-250-nm range from plasmas generated by the NIKE KrF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Feldman, Uri; Holland, G. E.; Weaver, J. L.; Mostovych, A. N.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Lehmberg, R.; Kjornarattanawanich, Benjawan; Back, C. A.

    2005-06-01

    High-resolution vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectra were recorded from plasmas generated by the NIKE KrF laser for the purpose of observing emission from the two-plasmon decay instability (TPDI) at 2/3 the NIKE wavelength (165nm). The targets were irradiated by up to 43 overlapping beams with intensity up to ≈1014W/cm2 and with beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). The targets consisted of planar foils of CH, BN, Al, Si, S, Ti, Pd, and Au. Titanium-doped silica aerogels in Pyrex cylinders were also irradiated. The spectra of the target elements were observed from charge states ranging from the neutral atoms to five times ionized. The spectrometer was absolutely calibrated using synchrotron radiation, and absolute VUV plasma emission intensities were determined. Emission from the TPDI at 165-nm wavelength was not observed from any of the irradiated targets. An upper bound on the possible TPDI emission was less than 4×10-8 the incident NIKE laser energy. The NIKE laser radiation backscattered from the silica aerogel targets at 248nm was typically 6×10-6 the incident NIKE laser energy, and the spectral broadening corresponded to the 1-THz bandwidth of the ISI smoothing. The spectra from the moderately charged plasma ions (up to five times ionized), spectral linewidths, absolute continuum emission level, and slope of the continuum were consistent with plasma temperatures in the 100-300-eV range.

  16. [Influence of indium net position on 253.7 nm resonance spectra line of electrodeless discharge lamps].

    PubMed

    Dong, Jin-Yang; Zhang, Gui-Xin; Wang, Chang-Quan; Zou, Jun; Zhao, Ting

    2012-09-01

    As a kind of new electric light source, electrodeless discharge lamps (EDL) are based on high-frequency electromagnetic induction and nonpolar gas discharge. Visible light is emitted as a result of Hg 253.7 nm resonance spectrum line inspiring phosphor. The influence of indium net position on the Hg 253. 7 nm resonance spectral line was studied experimentally by atomic emission spectral analysis. It was found that the relative intensity of Hg 253.7 nm resonance spectral line is strongest when the indium net is located at both ends of coupling coil, weaker at middle and weakest when far away from coupling coil. It was inferred that there is an optimum indium net position for EDL, and the corresponding lighting effect is maximal. The results were qualitatively analyzed from the standpoint of gas discharge theory, combined with the finite element simulation of Maxwell 3D, which has instructive value for pattern design and parametric optimization of EDL. PMID:23240386

  17. Detection of water vapour absorption around 363nm in measured atmospheric absorption spectra and its effect on DOAS evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Johannes; Polyansky, Oleg. L.; Kyuberis, Alexandra A.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Lodi, Lorenzo; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour is known to absorb light from the microwave region to the blue part of the visible spectrum at a decreasing magnitude. Ab-initio approaches to model individual absorption lines of the gaseous water molecule predict absorption lines until its dissociation limit at 243 nm. We present first evidence of water vapour absorption at 363 nm from field measurements based on the POKAZATEL absorption line list by Polyansky et al. (2016) using data from Multi-Axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and Longpath (LP)-DOAS measurements. The predicted absorptions contribute significantly to the observed optical depths with up to 2 × 10‑3. Their magnitude correlates well (R2 = 0.89) to simultaneously measured well-established water vapour absorptions in the blue spectral range from 452-499 nm, but is underestimated by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 in the ab-initio model. At a spectral resolution of 0.5nm this leads to a maximum absorption cross-section value of 5.4 × 10‑27 cm2/molec at 362.3nm. The results are independent of the employed cross-section data to compensate for the overlayed absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. The newly found absorption can have a significant impact on the spectral retrieval of absorbing trace-gas species in the spectral range around 363 nm. Its effect on the spectral analysis of O4, HONO and OClO are discussed.

  18. Continuous improvement of high-efficiency high-power 800-980nm diode lasers at Spectra-Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hanxuan; Towe, Terry; Chyr, Irving; Jin, Xu; Miller, Robert; Romero, Oscar; Liu, Daming; Brown, Denny; Truchan, Tom; Nguyen, Touyen; Crum, Trevor; Wolak, Ed; Bullock, Robert; Mott, Jeff; Harrison, James

    2009-02-01

    New-generation multi-mode 9xx mini-bars used in fiber pump modules have been developed. The epitaxial designs have been improved for lower fast-axis and slow-axis divergence, higher slope efficiency and PCE by optimizing layer structures as well as minimizing internal loss. For 915nm mini-bars with 5-mm cavity length, maximum PCE is as high as ~61% for 35W operation and remains above 59% at 45W. For 808nm, a PCE of 56% at 135W CW operation has been demonstrated with 36%-fill-factor, 3-mm-cavity-length, water-cooled bars at 50°C coolant temperature. On passive-cooled standard CS heatsinks, PCE of >51% is measured for 100W operation at 50°C heatsink temperature. Leveraging these improvements has enabled low-cost bars for high-power, high-temperature applications.

  19. Power scaling of mini-bar-based high-power 780-980nm pump modules at Spectra-Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Daming; Cutillas, Serge; Jin, Xu; Park, Sang-Ki; Johnson, Kelly; Li, Hanxuan; Truchan, Tom; Wolak, Ed; Towe, Terry; Chyr, Irving; Miller, Robert; Meissner, Arne; Lenarduzzi, Dino; Bullock, Robert; Mott, Jeff; Harrison, James

    2009-02-01

    Continued advances in high power diode laser technology enable new applications and enhance existing ones. Recently, mini-bar based modules have been demonstrated which combine the advantages of independent emitter failures previously shown in single-stripe architectures with the improved brightness retention enabled by multi-stripe architectures. In this work we highlight advances in a family of compact, environmentally rugged mini-bar based fiber coupled Orion modules. Advances in PCE (power conversion efficiency) and reliable operating power from a 9xx nm wavelength unit are shown from such modules. Additionally, highly reliable fiber coupled operation and performance data is demonstrated in other wavelengths in the 780 - 980 nm range. Data demonstrating the scaling this technology to 25W and higher power levels will be given.

  20. Correlated Two-Electron Momentum Spectra for Strong-Field Nonsequential Double Ionization of He at 800 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Jesus, V. L. B. de

    2007-12-31

    We report on a kinematically complete experiment on nonsequential double ionization of He by 25 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 1.5 PW/cm{sup 2}. The suppression of the recollision-induced excitation at this high intensity allows us to address in a clean way direct (e,2e) ionization by the recolliding electron. In contrast with earlier experimental results, but in agreement with various theoretical predictions, the two-electron momentum distributions along the laser polarization axis exhibit a pronounced V-shaped structure, which can be explained by the role of Coulomb repulsion and typical (e,2e) kinematics.

  1. High-power diode lasers at 1178  nm with high beam quality and narrow spectra.

    PubMed

    Paschke, K; Bugge, F; Blume, G; Feise, D; Erbert, G

    2015-01-01

    High-power distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers (DBR-TPLs) at 1180 nm were developed based on highly strained InGaAs quantum wells. The lasers emit a nearly diffraction-limited beam with more than two watts with a narrow spectral width. These features are believed to make this type of diode laser a key component for the manufacturing of miniaturized laser modules in the yellow and orange spectral range by second-harmonic generation to cover a spectral region currently not accessible with direct emitting diode lasers. Future applications might be the laser-cooling of sodium, high-resolution glucose-content measurements, as well as spectroscopy on rare earth elements. PMID:25531619

  2. HST Multicolor (255-1042 nm) Photometry of Saturn's Main Rings. 1; Radial Profiles, Phase and Opening Angle Variations, and Regional Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; French, Richard G.; Dones, Luke; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The main rings of Saturn were observed with the Planetary Camera of the WFPC2 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) from September 1996 to August 2000 as the'ring opening angle to Earth and Sun increased from 4 deg to 24 deg, with a spread of phase angles between 0.3 deg and 6 deg at each opening angle. The rings were routinely observed in the five HST wideband UBVRI filters (F336W, F439W, F555W, F675W, and F814W) and occasionally in the F255W, F785LP, and F1042M filters. The emphasis in this series of papers will be on radial color (implying compositional) variations. In this first paper we describe the analysis technique and calibration procedure, note revisions in a previously published Voyager ring color data analysis, and present new results based on over 100 HST images. In the 300-600 nm spectral range where the rings are red, the 555nm/336nm ratio increases by about 14% as the phase angle increases from 0.3 deg to 6 deg. This effect, never reported previously for the rings, is significantly larger than the phase reddening which characterizes other icy objects, primarily because of the redness of the rings. However, there is no discernible tendency for color to vary with ring opening angle at a given phase angle, and there is no phase variation of color where the spectrum is flat. We infer from this combination of facts that multiple intraparticle scattering, either in a regolith or between facets of an unusually rough surface, is important in these geometries, but that multiple interparticle scattering in a vertically extended layer is not. Voyager color ratios at a phase angle of 14 deg are compatible with this trend, but calibration uncertainties prevent their use in quantitative modeling. Overall ring-average spectra are compatible with those of earlier work within calibration uncertainties, but ring spectra vary noticeably with region. We refine and subdivide the regions previously defined by others. The variation seen between radial profiles of

  3. Field test of a new instrument to measure UV/Vis (300-700 nm) ambient aerosol extinction spectra in Colorado during DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R.; Scheuer, E. M.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Troop, D.; Winstead, E.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    An optical instrument has been developed to investigate aerosol extinction spectra in the ambient atmosphere. Based on a White-type cell design and using a differential optical approach, aerosol extinction spectra over the 300-700 nm ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) wavelength range are obtained. Laboratory tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) in March 2014 showed good agreement with Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS PMex, Aerodyne Research) extinction measurements (at 450, 530, and 630 nm) for a variety of aerosols, e.g., scatterers such as polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate; absorbers such as dust (including pigmented minerals), smoke (generated in a miniCAST burning propane) and laboratory smoke analogs (e.g., fullerene soot and aquadag). The instrument was field tested in Colorado in July and August 2014 aboard the NASA mobile laboratory at various ground sites during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. A description of the instrument, results from the laboratory tests, and summer field data will be presented. The instrument provides a new tool for probing in situ aerosol optical properties that may help inform remote sensing approaches well into the UV range.

  4. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: L spectra of zinc ions in the wavelength region 0.65-1.18 nm observed in a plasma heated by a Nd laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, J.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Khakhalin, S. Ya; Khabibulaev, B. K.; Érmatov, Sh A.

    1993-12-01

    A study has been made of the x-ray emission spectra of zinc ions (λ ~0.65-1.18 nm) excited in a plasma produced by the beam from a Nd laser. The wavelengths were measured within ±0.3 pm. The observed spectra have been identified. Detailed calculations have made it possible to identify, for the first time, some spectra lines due to the radiative decal of autoionizing states of Na-like zinc ions.

  5. Remote sensing of Mercury-contaminated soils through plant reflection spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunagan, S. C.; Gilmore, M. S.; Varekamp, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    The spatial extent of Hg contamination is often poorly known because current methods used to identify and map Hg soil contamination on a regional scale are time consuming and expensive. Here we test whether vegetation growing in Hg-contaminated soils has discernible characteristics in visible/near-infrared (VNIR, 350-2500nm) spectra. Previous work indicates that Hg can cause chemical and structural changes in plant tissue, including chlorophyll substitution and cell damage, which we predict may alter the reflectance spectra of plants in a measurable way. To test this hypothesis, Mustard Spinach plants (n=21) were grown in mercury-spiked soils and in Hg-contaminated soils collected in the field. The plants were grown under controlled laboratory conditions over a full growth cycle. Foliar Hg concentrations (0.174-3.993ppm) of the Mustard Spinach plants were positively correlated with Hg concentrations of soils (0.091-39.35ppm). Leaf Hg increased throughout the growth cycle but decreased in the plants grown in the Hg-spiked and field-contaminated soil at the end of the growth cycle. Leaf Hg uptake appears to occur through both roots and leaves and may vary as a function of bioavailability of Hg in the soils. Reflectance spectra of leaves were measured under artificial light in the laboratory. The potential spectral effects of Hg on the plants were quantified with selected vegetation indices (VIs) including Ratio Vegetation Index (RVI), Red Edge Position (REP) and Amplitude (REA) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and compared to foliar Hg concentrations. Correlations between VIs and foliar Hg concentrations are not statistically significant. However, RVI and REP values of plants grown in Hg-spiked and in field-contaminated soils are lower relative to those from the control plants during the early and middle portions of the growth cycle and decrease more rapidly than those from control plants at the end of the growth cycle. These lower RVI and REP values

  6. NIR absorbance characteristics of deoxynivalenol and of sound and Fusarium-damaged wheat kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The near infrared (NIR) absorption spectra of deoxynivalenol (DON) and single wheat kernels with or without DON were examined. The NIR absorption spectra of 0.5-2000 ppm of DON in acetonitrile were recorded in the 350-2500 nm range. Second derivative processing of the NIR spectra and spectral subtra...

  7. Pyroxenes Spectra Investigated by means of the Hapke's Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarniello, M.; Carli, C.; Capaccioni, F.; Sgavetti, M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we applied Hapke's radiative transfer model (Hapke, 1993, 1998, 2002, 2008) to laboratory reflectance spectra of four pyroxenes powders of known composition and grain size. We measured spectra in the 350 - 2500 nm range under different viewing conditions: this enabled us to study both spectral and photometric properties of these minerals. In particular we have studied band depth variations with grain sizes for all the investigated pyroxenes, while for one of them we also studied band depth correlation with phase angle (g), the single particle phase function and, as a further step, we tried to estimate the imaginary part of the refractive index . The dataset is composed of reflectance measurements of four pyroxenes: an orthopyroxene En88 (E), and three Ca-rich clinopyroxenes, En48Wo41 (A), En45Wo50 (D) and En33Wo49 (AD). The chemistry of these minerals was determined by Electron Microprobe Analysis (CAMECA SX50, CNR-IGG laboratory, Padova). The bidirectional reflectance spectra were measured, with 1 nm spectral sampling, with a Fieldspec-Pro spectrophotometer mounted on a goniometer in use at the SLAB (Spectroscopy LABoratory) at IASF-INAF, Rome. For the E sample (100-125 μm grain size) we acquired spectra in the 30° - 100° phase angle range. For all the minerals, measurements at fixed viewing geometry (i = 30° e = 0°) have been performed for various grain sizes (<63 μm , 100-125 μm , 125-250 μm , 250-500 μm , 500-800 μm). Analysis of the spectra obtained for the E sample show that band depths vary with the observation geometry. This behavior can be addressed to a relative variation of the contributes of single scattering (which is relevant in the band minimum) and multiple scattering (which dominates on the wings of the band) with phase angle. A fit of the phase function of this mineral for all the wavelengths of the spectral range is performed in order to give a description of the single particle phase function, which drives the single

  8. Laser photoacoustic spectra of Sm3+ ion in Sm2O3 and SmCl3.6H2O in the spectral profile 484-542 nm.

    PubMed

    Mandal, B; Thakur, S N

    2004-03-01

    Microphone based photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer to study solids in powder form was designed and fabricated. Laser PA spectra of Sm3+ ion in Sm2O3 and SmCl3.6H2O microcrystalline powders were recorded first time in 484-542 nm spectral region at room temperature. Analysis of these PA spectra shows new information on the Stark components of ground and excited states of Sm3+ ion. A comparison of Stark energy levels of Sm3+ ion in both oxide and hexahydrated chloride hosts is presented here. PMID:15036106

  9. A table of semiempirical gf values. Part 1: Wavelengths: 5.2682 nm to 272.3380 nm. [to calculate line-blanketed model atmospheres for solar and stellar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, R. L.; Peytremann, E.

    1975-01-01

    The gf values for 265,587 atomic lines selected from the line data used to calculate line-blanketed model atmospheres are tabulated. These data are especially useful for line identification and spectral synthesis in solar and stellar spectra. The gf values are calculated semiempirically by using scaled Thomas-Fermi-Dirac radial wavefunctions and eigenvectors found through least-squares fits to observed energy levels. Included in the calculation are the first five or six stages of ionization for sequences up through nickel. Published gf values are included for elements heavier than nickel. The tabulation is restricted to lines with wavelengths less than 10 micrometers.

  10. HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON-IMPACT EMISSION SPECTRA AND VIBRATIONAL EMISSION CROSS SECTIONS FROM 330-1100 nm FOR N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mangina, Rao S.; Ajello, Joseph M.; West, Robert A.; Dziczek, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Electron-impact emission cross sections for N{sub 2} were measured in the wavelength range of 330-1100 nm at 25 eV and 100 eV impact energies. Cross sections of several molecular emission bands of the first positive band system B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} A {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and the second positive band system C {sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} ({nu}'') of N{sub 2}, the first negative band (1NB) system B {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and Meinel band system A {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') of N{sub 2} {sup +} ions as well as line emissions of N (N I) and N{sup +} (N II) in the visible-optical-near-IR wavelength range reported in this work were measured for the first time in a single experimental setup at high spectral resolving power ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 10000) under single-collision-scattering geometry and optically thin conditions. Rotational emission lines of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2} {sup +} were observed for strong emission bands at a gas temperature of about 300 K. The absolute cross section of the strongest (0,0) vibrational band at 391.43 nm of 1NB was determined using the standard H{sub {alpha}} emission cross sections of H{sub 2} by electron impact at both 25 eV and 100 eV electron-impact energies, and the cross sections for the remainder of the emissions were determined using (0,0) 1NB value. A comparison of the present emission cross sections with the earlier published data from both electron energy loss and electron-impact-induced fluorescence emission is discussed.

  11. Generation and performance of automated jarosite mineral detectors for visible/near-infrared spectrometers at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Martha S.; Bornstein, Benjamin; Merrill, Matthew D.; Castaño, Rebecca; Greenwood, James P.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed two automated detectors that can recognize the sulfate mineral jarosite in unknown visible to near-infrared spectra (350-2500 nm). The two detectors are optimized for use within the terrestrial and martian atmospheres. The detectors are built from Support Vector Machines trained using a generative model to create linear mixtures of library mineral spectra. Both detectors performed with an average ˜90% accuracy on laboratory spectra of single minerals and the laboratory and field spectra of rocks collected in a hydrothermal environment. This type of algorithm will contribute to the efficiency of onboard data analysis of landed and orbital visible/near-infrared spectrometers at Mars.

  12. Fluorescence excitation spectra of the b (1)Pi(u), b(') (1)Sigma(u) (+), c(n) (1)Pi(u), and c(n) (') (1)Sigma(u) (+) states of N(2) in the 80-100 nm region.

    PubMed

    Wu, C Y Robert; Fung, Hok-Sum; Chang, Kuang-Yu; Singh, Thounaojam S; Mu, Xiao-Lan; Nee, Jan B; Chiang, Su-Yu; Judge, D L

    2007-08-28

    Fluorescence excitation spectra produced through photoexcitation of N(2) using synchrotron radiation in the spectral region between 80 and 100 nm have been studied. Two broadband detectors were employed to simultaneously monitor fluorescence in the 115-320 nm and 300-700 nm regions, respectively. The peaks in the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence excitation spectra are found to correspond to excitation of absorption transitions from the ground electronic state to the b (1)Pi(u), b(') (1)Sigma(u) (+), c(n) (1)Pi(u) (with n=4-8), c(n) (') (1)Sigma(u) (+) (with n=5-9), and c(4) (')(v('))(1)Sigma(u) (+) (with v(')=0-8) states of N(2). The relative fluorescence production cross sections for the observed peaks are determined. No fluorescence has been produced through excitation of the most dominating absorption features of the b-X transition except for the (1,0), (5,0), (6,0), and (7,0) bands, in excellent agreement with recent lifetime measurements and theoretical calculations. Fluorescence peaks, which correlate with the long vibrational progressions of the c(4) (') (1)Sigma(u) (+) (with v(')=0-8) and the b(') (1)Sigma(u) (+) (with v(') up to 19), have been observed. The present results provide important information for further unraveling of complicated and intriguing interactions among the excited electronic states of N(2). Furthermore, solar photon excitation of N(2) leading to the production of c(4) (')(0) may provide useful data required for evaluating and analyzing dayglow models relevant to the interpretation of c(4) (')(0) in the atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, and Triton. PMID:17764255

  13. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  14. High-resolution spectra of isotopic methanes near 1645 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.

    1984-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the coincidence between Er:YAG laser emission and CH4 absorption is associated with the R(8) multiplet of C-13H4 instead of the R(6) of C-12H4. The Er:YAG emission was characterized as a laser emission at 6079.4/cm with a bandwidh of 2.2/cm and overlapping CH4 emission at 6078.7/cm. The R(6) component of C-12H4 closest to 6078.7/cm is calculated to be 6077.06/cm, corresponding to an absorption coefficient (AC) of 1.12/cm per atm. The F2-prime component of R(8) of C-13H4 has an AC of 0.308/cm per atm, which corresponds well with a range of 1.2-30.30/cm per atm based on a partial pressure of 1.6/89 ppm. The Er:YAG laser is a candidate for use in spectroscopic studies of CH4 atmospheric pollutants, natural gas movement and storage and gas accumulation in coal mines.

  15. Spectra ID of recent SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, Peter

    2013-12-01

    P. Challis, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group, report spectra (range 320-860 nm) of various SN obtained during Dec. 24-27 UT by P. Challis, S. Gottilla (MMTO.org), and E. Marin (MMTO.org) with the MMT 6.5-m telescope (+ Blue Channel). Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  16. UV - ALBUQUERQUE NM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brewer 109 is located in Albuquerque NM, measuring ultraviolet solar radiation. Irradiance and column ozone are derived from this data. Ultraviolet solar radiation is measured with a Brewer Mark IV, single-monochrometer, spectrophotometer manufactured by SCI-TEC Instruments, Inc....

  17. Sunlight induced 685 nm fluorescence imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hongsuk H.; Van Der Piepen, Heinz

    1986-01-01

    The capability of a new fluorescence method is evaluated using data from an aircraft fluorescence experiment conducted on the Elbe River on August 10-14, 1981. The technique measures chlorophyll concentrations by monitoring sunlight-induced fluorescence at 685 nm. Upwelling radiance spectra and vertical profiles of upwelling radiances are presented and analyzed. The image-processing algorithm used to retrieve fluorescence signals from raw data is described.

  18. Albuquerque, NM, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Albuquerque, NM (35.0N, 106.5W) is situated on the edge of the Rio Grande River and flood plain which cuts across the image. The reddish brown surface of the Albuquerque Basin is a fault depression filled with ancient alluvial fan and lake bed sediments. On the slopes of the Manzano Mountains to the east of Albuquerque, juniper and other timber of the Cibola National Forest can be seen as contrasting dark tones of vegetation.

  19. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    portion is defined by the day/night boundary (known as the terminator).

    These two images illustrate only a small fraction of the information contained in a single LEISA scan, highlighting just one aspect of the power of infrared spectra for atmospheric studies.

  20. TUNABLE DIODE LASER MEASUREMENTS OF NO2 NEAR 670 NM AND 395 NM. (R823933)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two single-mode diode lasers were used to record high-resolution absorption spectra of NO2 (dilute in Ar) near 670.2 and 394.5 nm over a range of temperatures (296 to 774 K) and total pressures (2.4 x 10(-2) to 1 atm). A commercial InGaAsP laser was tuned 1.3 cm(-1) at a repetiti...

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopy of nucleic acid systems using synchrotron radiation from 230 nm to 354 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Malcolm; Ballini, Jean-Pierre; Vigny, Paul

    1992-07-01

    The excited states of nucleic acids are complex, both at the individual chromophore level and because of the effect of stacking interactions on the electronic states. Considerable progress has been made recently by studying the lifetimes of the stacked states and by utilizing the technique of time-resolved spectroscopy. Experimental results obtained using the ACO synchrotron at LURE, Orsay, will be presented. Resolution of the decay data gives a model-based estimate of the number of emitting species and their lifetimes, and this information is then used to deconvolate experimental time-windowed spectra (time-delayed spectra) to give true time-resolved spectra. It is a unique feature of the synchrotron, compared with the laser, that the combination of delayed detection (photon counting) with the continuous wavelength distribution of the synchrotron allows the acquisition of excitation spectra by uninterrupted repetitive scanning over a wide range of UV exciting wavelengths, in the present work from 230 nm to 354 nm. Such time-delayed excitation spectra can also be deconvoluted into components corresponding to the various time-resolved emission spectra. In this way we are able to demonstrate for the first time that ground state stacking interactions are directly responsible for excimer-like emissions. Time-resolved emission spectra and time-resolved excitation spectra will be presented for the dinucleoside phosphate d(CG) and the synthetic alternating polynucleotide poly d(GC), a `B-type' DNA structure.

  2. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectra of Halomethyl Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelhuber, Kristen M.; Wren, Scott W.; McCoy, Anne B.; Ervin, Kent M.; Lineberger, W. Carl

    2009-06-01

    Halomethyl anions undergo a significant geometry change upon electron photodetachment, resulting in multiple extended vibrational progressions in the photoelectron spectra. The normal mode analysis that successfully models photoelectron spectra when geometry changes are modest is unable to reproduce the experimental data using physically reasonable parameters. A three-dimensional anharmonic coupled-mode analysis was employed to accurately reproduce the observed vibrational structure. We present the 364 nm negative ion photoelectron spectra of the halomethyl anions CHX_2^- and CDX_2^- (X = Cl, Br, I) and report electron affinities, vibrational frequencies, and geometries.

  3. Standoff detection of biological agents using laser induced fluorescence—a comparison of 294 nm and 355 nm excitation wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Farsund, Øystein; Rustad, Gunnar; Skogan, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Standoff detection measuring the fluorescence spectra of seven different biological agents excited by 294 nm as well as 355 nm wavelength laser pulses has been undertaken. The biological warfare agent simulants were released in a semi-closed aerosol chamber at 210 m standoff distance and excited by light at either of the two wavelengths using the same instrument. Significant differences in several of the agents’ fluorescence response were seen at the two wavelengths. The anthrax simulants’ fluorescence responses were almost an order of magnitude stronger at the shorter wavelength excitation. However, most importantly, the fluorescence spectra were significantly more dissimilar at 294 nm than at 355 nm excitation with ~7 nm spectral resolution. This indicates that classification of the substances should be possible with a lower error rate for standoff detection using 294 nm rather than 355 nm excitation wavelength, or even better, utilizing both. PMID:23162732

  4. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  5. 469nm Fiber Laser Source

    SciTech Connect

    Drobshoff, A; Dawson, J W; Pennington, D M; Payne, S A; Beach, R

    2005-01-20

    We have demonstrated 466mW of 469nm light from a frequency doubled continuous wave fiber laser. The system consisted of a 938nm single frequency laser diode master oscillator, which was amplified in two stages to 5 Watts using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers and then frequency doubled in a single pass through periodically poled KTP. The 3cm long PPKTP crystal was made by Raicol Crystals Ltd. with a period of 5.9 {micro}m and had a phase match temperature of 47 degrees Centigrade. The beam was focused to a 1/e{sup 2} diameter in the crystal of 29 {micro}m. Overall conversion efficiency was 11% and the results agreed well with standard models. Our 938nm fiber amplifier design minimizes amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing an optimized core to cladding size ratio. This design allows the 3-level transition to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the 1088nm 4-level transition. We have also carefully chosen the fiber coil diameter to help suppress propagation of wavelengths longer than 938 nm. At 2 Watts, the 938nm laser had an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >10:1).

  6. Raman spectroscopy using 1550 nm (retina-safe) laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Carl; Huang, Hermes; Smith, Wayne; Farquharson, Stuart

    2011-05-01

    During the past decade, the use of portable Raman analyzers for field measurements has grown dramatically. However, most analyzers use 785 nm excitation lasers that can cause permanent eye damage. To overcome this safety concern, we have built a portable Fourier transform (FT) Raman analyzer using a 1550 nm retina-safe excitation laser and have compared its performance to our 1064 nm FT-Raman analyzer, which uses the same optical design. Raman theory predicts approximately five times lower peak intensities at 1550 nm. Although we found that intensities were as much as 20 times less intense, the analyzer is still capable of measuring spectra of sufficient quality to identify and differentiate chemicals. PMID:21513601

  7. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  8. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet emission spectra of Gd and Tb ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, D.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2010-11-15

    Theoretical extreme ultraviolet emission spectra of gadolinium and terbium ions calculated with the Cowan suite of codes and the flexible atomic code (FAC) relativistic code are presented. 4d-4f and 4p-4d transitions give rise to unresolved transition arrays in a range of ions. The effects of configuration interaction are investigated for transitions between singly excited configurations. Optimization of emission at 6.775 nm and 6.515 nm is achieved for Gd and Tb ions, respectively, by consideration of plasma effects. The resulting synthetic spectra are compared with experimental spectra recorded using the laser produced plasma technique.

  10. Photoionization of Nitromethane at 355nm and 266nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Denhi; Betancourt, Francisco; Poveda, Juan Carlos; Guerrero, Alfonso; Cisneros, Carmen; Álvarez, Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    Nitromethane is one of the high-yield clean liquid fuels, i.e., thanks to the oxygen contained in nitromethane, much less atmospheric oxygen is burned compared to hydrocarbons such as gasoline, making the nitromethane an important prototypical energetic material, the understanding of its chemistry is relevant in other fields such as atmospheric chemistry or biochemistry. In this work we present the study of photoionization dynamics by multiphoton absorption with 355 nm and 266 nm wavelength photons, using time of flight spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the observed ion products appear for both wavelength and other only in one of them; both results were compared with preview observations and new ions were detected. This work is supported by CONACYT grant 165410 and DGAPA-UNAM grants IN-107-912 and IN-102-613.

  11. High-resolution optical signatures of fresh and aged explosives in the 420nm to 620nm illumination range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunsford, Robert; Grun, Jacob; Gump, Jared

    2012-06-01

    Optical signatures of fresh and aged explosives are measured and compared to determine whether there exist differences in the signatures that can be exploited for detection. The explosives examined are RDX, TNT, and HMX, which have been heated for two weeks at 75 degrees centigrade or irradiated for two weeks with a 15-Watt ultraviolet lamp (254nm). The optical signatures are obtained by illuminating the samples with a sequence of laser wavelengths between 420nm and 620nm in 10 nm steps and measuring the spectra of light scattered from the sample at each laser wavelength. The measurements are performed on the Naval Research Laboratory's SWOrRD instrument. SWOrRD is capable of illuminating a sample with laser wavelength between 210nm and 2000nm, in steps of 0.1nm, and measuring the spectrum of light scattered from the sample at each wavelength. SWOrRD's broad tuning range, high average power (1- 300mW), narrow line width (< 4cm-1), and rapid wavelength tunability enable these measurements. Results, based on more than 80 measurements - each at 21 sequential laser wavelengths, indicate that the variation in spectral line amplitude observed when altering laser illumination wavelength differs between fresh and aged explosives. Thus, an instrument for rapid and reagent-less differentiation between aged and fresh explosives, based on illumination with a few appropriately chosen laser wavelengths appears feasible.

  12. OISL transmitter at 985 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, Robert; Lauzon, Jocelyn; Mohrdiek, Stefan; Harder, Christoph S.; Changkakoti, Rupak; Park, Peter

    1999-04-01

    For high data rate (greater than 1 Gbps) Optical Inter- Satellite Link (OISL), a compact laser transmitter with high power and good efficiency is required. A trade-off analysis between the technologies such as the mature 840 nm laser diodes, 1064 nm diode-pumped solid state laser and the more recent 1550 nm Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) is used to find the optical solution. The Si-APDs are preferred for their large detector areas and good noise figures which reduce the tracking requirements and simplify optical design of the receiver. Because of significant amount of power needed to close the link distance up to 7000 km (LEO-LEO), use of 840 nm diodes is limited. In this paper, we present an alternative system based on a system concept denoted as the SLYB (Semiconductor Laser Ytterbium Booster). The SLYB uses a polarization maintaining double-clad ytterbium fiber as a power amplifier. The device houses two semiconductor diodes that are designed to meet telecom reliability: a broad-area 917 nm pump diode and a directly modulated FP laser for signal generation. The output signal is in a linearly polarized state with an extinction ratio of 20 dB. The complete module (15 X 12 X 4.3 cm3) weighs less than 0.9 kg and delivers up to 27 dBm average output power at 985 nm. Designed primarily for direct detection using Si APDs, the transmitter offers a modulation data rate of at least 1.5 Gb/s with a modulation extinction ratio better than 13 dB. Total power consumption is expected to be lower than 8 W by using an uncooled pump laser. Preliminary radiation testing of the fiber indicates output power penalty of 1.5 dB at the end of 10 years in operation. We are presently investigating the fabrication of an improved radiation-hardened Yb-fiber for the final prototype to reduce this penalty. For higher data rate the design can be extended to a Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) scheme adding multiple channels.

  13. Tissue measurement using 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Chad A.; Wu, Huawen; Yang, William

    2013-03-01

    The use of Raman spectroscopy to provide characterization and diagnosis of biological tissues has shown increasing success in recent years. Most of this work has been performed using near-infrared laser sources such as 785 or 830 nm, in a balance of reduced intrinsic fluorescence in the tissues and quantum efficiency in the silicon detectors often used. However, even at these wavelengths, many tissues still exhibit strong or prohibitive fluorescence, and these wavelengths still cause autofluorescence in many common sampling materials, such as glass. In this study, we demonstrate the use of 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy for the study of biological tissues. A number of tissues are evaluated using the 1064 nm system and compared with the spectra obtained from a 785 nm system. Sampling materials are similarly compared. These results show that 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy provides a viable solution for measurement of highly fluorescent biological tissues such as liver and kidney, which are difficult or impossible to extract Raman at 785 nm.

  14. Sediment mineralogy based on visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrard, R.D.; Vanden Berg, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIS) can be used to measure reflectance spectra (wavelength 350-2500 nm) for sediment cores and samples. A local ground-truth calibration of spectral features to mineral percentages is calculated by measuring reflectance spectra for a suite of samples of known mineralogy. This approach has been tested on powders, core plugs and split cores, and we conclude that it works well on all three, unless pore water is present. Initial VNIS studies have concentrated on determination of relative proportions of carbonate, opal, smectite and illite in equatorial Pacific sediments. Shipboard VNIS-based determination of these four components was demonstrated on Ocean Drilling Program Leg 199. ?? The Geological Society of London 2006.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  16. Comparison of 885 nm pumping and 808 nm pumping in Nd:CNGG laser operating at 1061 nm and 935 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuxian; Li, Qinan; Zhang, Dongxiang; Feng, Baohua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Jiyang

    2010-07-01

    A Nd:CNGG laser operated at 935 nm and 1061 nm pumped at 885 nm and 808 nm, respectively, is demonstrated. The 885 nm direct pumping scheme shows some advantages over the 808 nm traditional pumping scheme. It includes higher slope efficiency, lower threshold, and better beam quality at high output power. With the direct pumping, the slope efficiency increases by 43% and the threshold decreases by 10% compared with traditional pumping in the Nd:CNGG laser operated at 935 nm. When the Nd:CNGG laser operates at 1061 nm, the direct pumping increases the slope efficiency by 14% with a 20% reduction in the oscillation threshold.

  17. Absorption spectrum of DNA for wavelengths greater than 300 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.; Griffin, K.P.

    1981-06-01

    Although DNA absorption at wavelengths greater than 300 nm is much weaker than that at shorter wavelengths, this absorption seems to be responsible for much of the biological damage caused by solar radiation of wavelengths less than 320 nm. Accurate measurement of the absorption spectrum of DNA above 300 nm is complicated by turbidity characteristic of concentrated solutions of DNA. We have measured the absorption spectra of DNA from calf thymus, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, salmon testis, and human placenta using procedures which separate optical density due to true absorption from that due to turbidity. Above 300 nm, the relative absorption of DNA increases as a function of guanine-cytosine content, presumably because the absorption of guanine is much greater than the absorption of adenine at these wavelengths. This result suggests that the photophysical processes which follow absorption of a long-wavelength photon may, on the average, differ from those induced by shorter-wavelength photons. It may also explain the lower quantum yield for the killing of cells by wavelengths above 300 nm compared to that by shorter wavelengths.

  18. Analysis of Cervical Supernatant Samples Luminescence Using 355 nm Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Stanikunas, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2010-05-01

    The biomarker discovery for accurate detection and diagnosis of cervical carcinoma and its malignant precursors represents one of the current challenges in clinical medicine. Laser induced autofluorescence spectra in cervical smear content were fitted to predict the cervical epithelium diagnosis as a lab off "optical biopsy" method. Liquid PAP supernatant sediment dried on Quartz plate spectroscopy was performed by 355 nm Nd YAG microlaser STA-1 (Standa, Ltd). For comparison a liquid supernatant spectroscopy was formed by laboratory "Perkin Elmer LS 50B spetrometer at 290, 300, 310 nm excitations. Analysis of spectrum was performed by approximation using the multi-peaks program with Lorentz functions for the liquid samples and with Gaussian functions for the dry samples. Ratio of spectral components area to the area under whole experimental curve (SPP) was calculated. The spectral components were compared by averages of SPP using Mann-Whitney U-test in histology groups. Results. Differentiation of Normal and HSIL/CIN2+ cases in whole supernatant could be performed by stationary laboratory lamp spectroscopy at excitation 290 nm and emission >379 nm with accuracy AUC 0,69, Sens 0,72, Spec 0,65. Differentiation Normal versus HSIL/CIN2+ groups in dried enriched supernatant could be performed by 355 nm microlaser excitation at emission 405-424 nm with accuracy (AUC 0,96, Sens 0,91, Spec 1.00). Diagnostic algorithm could be created for all histology groups differentiation under 355 nm excitation. Microlaser induced "optical biopsy "looks promising method for cervical screening at the point of care.

  19. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  20. Absorption Spectra of Magnesium Sulphite Hexahydrate Doped with Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Petya N.; Bunzarov, Zhelyu I.; Iliev, Ilia A.; Dimov, Todor N.

    2007-04-01

    In the work are presented absorption spectra of MgSO3.6H2O monocrystals doped with Ni. The spectra are measured in a wide spectral range (200 - 1200nm) at room temperature with polarized light. The impurity of Ni changes essentially the absorption of MgSO3.6H2O because it causes the appearance of additional spectral structures.

  1. Fourier transform Raman and IR spectra of snake skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, B. W.; Williams, A. C.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    1993-06-01

    The Fourier transform (FT) Raman and IR spectra of the shed dorsal skin of the snake Elaphe obsoleta (American black rat snake) are reported. Vibrational spectroscopic assignments are proposed for the first time. Although good quality Raman spectra were obtained from the hinge regions using an FT Raman microscope, the dorsal scale regions fluoresced even with 1064 nm IR excitation. This was ascribed to pigmentation markings on the scales.

  2. Experimental research of fluorescence spectra of watercress stressed by lack or excess of watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullo, O. A.; Fedotov, Yu. V.; Belov, M. L.; Gorodnichev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental laboratory investigations of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of watercress were conducted. The fluorescence spectra were excited by a YAG:Nd laser emitting at 532 nm. The laboratory setup was described and fluorescence spectra of watercress in stressed states caused by lack and excess of water were presented. It was established that the influence of stress caused by lack and excess of watering is manifested in changes of fluorescence spectra.

  3. Sub-180 nm generation with borate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chen; Yoshimura, Masashi; Tsunoda, Jun; Kaneda, Yushi; Imade, Mamoru; Sasaki, Takatomo; Mori, Yusuke

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrated a new scheme for the generation of 179 nm vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) light with an all-solid-state laser system. It was achieved by mixing the deep-ultraviolet (DUV) of 198.8 nm and the infrared (IR) of 1799.9 nm. While CsB3O5 (CBO) did not satisfy the phase-matching at around 180 nm, 179 nm output was generated with LiB3O5 (LBO) for the first time. The phase-matching property of LBO at around 180 nm was also investigated. There was small deviation from theoretical curve in the measurement, which is still considered reasonable.

  4. 147-nm photolysis of disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, G.G.A.; Lampe, F.W.

    1980-05-21

    The photodecomposition of Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ at 147 nm results in the formation of H/sub 2/, SiH/sub 4/, Si/sub 3/H/sub 8/, Si/sub 4/H/sub 10/, Si/sub 5/H/sub 12/, and a solid film of amorphous silicon hydride (a-Si:H). Three primary processes are proposed to account for the results, namely, (a) Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ + h..nu.. ..-->.. SiH/sub 2/ + SiH/sub 3/ + H (phi/sub a/ = 0.61); (b) Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ + h..nu.. ..-->.. SiH/sub 3/SiH + 2H (phi/sub b/ = 0.18); (c) Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ + h..nu.. ..-->.. Si/sub 2/H/sub 5/ + H (phi/sub c/ = 0.21). The overall quantum yields depend on the pressure but at 1 Torr partial pressure of Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ are PHI(-Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) = 4.3 +- 0.2, PHI(SiH/sub 4/) = 1.2 +- 0.4, PHI(Si/sub 3/H/sub 8/) = 0.91 +- 0.08, PHI(Si/sub 4/H/sub 10/) = 0.62 +- 0.03, PHI(Si,wall) = 2.2. Quantum yields for H/sub 2/ formation were not measured. A mechanism is proposed which is shown to be in accord with the experimental facts.

  5. Spectroscopy of Pluto, 380-930 Nm at Six Longitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Lorenzi, V.; Grundy, William; Licandro, J.; Binzel, R. P.

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of the Pluto-Charon pair (unresolved) in the wavelength range 380-930 nm with resolution approx..450 at six roughly equally spaced longitudes. The data were taken in May and June, 2014, with the 4.2-m Isaac Newton Telescope at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands, using the ACAM (auxiliary-port camera) in spectrometer mode, and using two solar analog stars. The new spectra clearly show absorption bands of solid CH4 at 620, 728, and 850-910 nm, which were known from earlier work. The 620-nm CH4 band is intrinsically very weak, and its appearance indicates a long optical path-length through the ice. This is especially true if it arises from CH4 dissolved in N2 ice. Earlier work (Owen et al. Science 261, 745, 1993) on the near-infrared spectrum of Pluto (1-2.5 microns) has shown that the CH4 bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths because the CH4 occurs as a solute in beta-phase crystalline N2. The optical path-length through the N2 crystals must be on the order of several cm to produce the N2 band observed at 2.15 microns. The new spectra exhibit a pronounced red slope across the entire wavelength range; the slope is variable with longitude, and differs in a small but significant way from that measured at comparable longitudes by Grundy & Fink (Icarus 124, 329, 1996) in their 15-year study of Pluto's spectrum (500-1000 nm). The new spectra will provide an independent means for calibrating the color filter bands on the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) (Reuter et al. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129, 2008) on the New Horizons spacecraft, which will encounter the Pluto-Charon system in mid-2015. They will also form the basis of modeling the spectrum of Pluto at different longitudes to help establish the nature of the non-ice component(s) of Pluto's surface. It is presumed that the non-ice component is the source of the yellow-red coloration of Pluto, which is known to be variable across the surface.

  6. Spectroscopy of Pluto at six longitudes, 380-930 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lorenzi, Vania; Grundy, Will M.; Licandro, Javier; Binzel, Richard P.

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained spectra of the Pluto-Charon pair (unresolved) in the wavelength range 380-930 nm with resolution ~450 at six roughly equally spaced longitudes. The data were taken in May and June, 2014, with the 4.2-m Isaac Newton Telescope at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands, using the ACAM (auxiliary-port camera) in spectrometer mode, and using two solar analog stars. The new spectra clearly show absorption bands of solid CH4 at 620, 728, and 850-910 nm, which were known from earlier work. The 620-nm CH4 band is intrinsically very weak, and its appearance indicates a long optical pathlength through the ice. This is especially true if it arises from CH4 dissolved in N2 ice. Earlier work (Owen et al. Science 261, 745, 1993) on the near-infrared spectrum of Pluto (1-2.5 µm) has shown that the CH4 bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths because the CH4 occurs as a solute in beta-phase crystalline N2. The optical pathlength through the N2 crystals must be on the order of several cm to produce the N2 band observed at 2.15 µm. The new spectra exhibit a pronounced red slope across the entire wavelength range; the slope is variable with longitude, and differs in a small but significant way from that measured at comparable longitudes by Grundy & Fink (Icarus 124, 329, 1996) in their 15-year study of Pluto’s spectrum (500-1000 nm). The new spectra will provide an independent means for calibrating the color filter bands on the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) (Reuter et al. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129, 2008) on the New Horizons spacecraft, which will encounter the Pluto-Charon system in mid-2015. They will also form the basis of modeling the spectrum of Pluto at different longitudes to help establish the nature of the non-ice component(s) of Pluto’s surface. It is presumed that the non-ice component is the source of the yellow-red coloration of Pluto, which is known to be variable across the surface.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Classification of stellar spectra 644-681nm (Damiani+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, F.; Prisinzano, L.; Micela; G.; Randich, S.; Gilmore, G.; Drew, J. E.; Jeffries, R. D.; Fremat, Y.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Sacco, G. G.; Smiljanic, R.; Jackson, R. J.; de Laverny, P.; Morbidelli, L.; Worley, C. C.; Hourihane, A.; Costado, M. T.; Jofre, P.; Lind, K.; Maiorca, E.

    2014-05-01

    A set of newly-defined spectral indices is presented for all stars in the field of the γ Vel cluster, observed within the Gaia-ESO Survey. All indices are based exclusively on the spectral range 6440-6810 Angstroms, corresponding to the VLT/FLAMES Giraffe setup HR15N. Fundamental stellar parameters can be derived from these indices as explained in the paper. Stars with either high cluster membership probability, or/and SB2 binaries, are flagged. (2 data files).

  8. Stars and their Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    1997-03-01

    This unique and informative text describes how stars are classified according to their spectral qualities and temperature. James Kaler explains the alphabet of stellar astronomy, running from cool M stars to hot O stars, and tells the story of their evolution. Before embarking on a voyage of cosmic discovery, the author discusses the fundamental properties of stars, their atomic structure and the formation of spectra. Then, Kaler considers each star type individually and explores its spectra in detail. A review of unusual, hard-to-classify stars, and a discussion of data related to the birth, life and death of stars round out the text. This book is an important resource for all amateur astronomers and students of astronomy. Professionals will find it a refreshing read as well.

  9. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  10. Spectral data mining for rapid measurement of organic matter in unsieved moist compost.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Somsubhra; Weindorf, David C; Ali, Md Nasim; Li, Bin; Ge, Yufeng; Darilek, Jeremy L

    2013-02-01

    Fifty-five compost samples were collected and scanned as received by visible and near-IR (VisNIR, 350-2500 nm) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The raw reflectance and first-derivative spectra were used to predict log(10)-transformed organic matter (OM) using partial least squares (PLS) regression, penalized spline regression (PSR), and boosted regression trees (BRTs). Incorporating compost pH, moisture percentage, and electrical conductivity as auxiliary predictors along with reflectance, both PLS and PSR models showed comparable cross-validation r(2) and validation root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). The BRT-reflectance model exhibited best predictability (residual prediction deviation=1.61, cross-validation r(2)=0.65, and RMSD=0.09 log(10)%). These results proved that the VisNIR-BRT model, along with easy-to-measure auxiliary variables, has the potential to quantify compost OM with reasonable accuracy. PMID:23385945

  11. Assessment of Transition Element Speciation in Glasses Using a Portable Transmission Ultraviolet-Visible-Near-Infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hunault, Myrtille; Lelong, Gérald; Gauthier, Michel; Gélébart, Frédéric; Ismael, Saindou; Galoisy, Laurence; Bauchau, Fanny; Loisel, Claudine; Calas, Georges

    2016-05-01

    A new low-cost experimental setup based on two compact dispersive optical spectrometers has been developed to measure optical absorption transmission spectra over the 350-2500nm energy range. We demonstrate how near-infrared (NIR) data are essential to identify the coloring species in addition to ultraviolet visible data. After calibration with reference glasses, the use of an original sample stage that maintains the window panel in the vertical position enables the comparison of ancient and modern glasses embedded in a panel from the Sainte-Chapelle of Paris, without any sampling. The spectral resolution enables to observe fine resonances arising in the absorption bands of Cr(3+), and the complementary information obtained in the NIR enables to determine the contribution of Fe(2+), a key indicator of glassmaking conditions. PMID:26988660

  12. Observation of Quiet Limb in He I 1083.0 nm, H Paschen alpha1281.8 nm and H Brackett gamma 2166.1 nm lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Choudhary, Debi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we shall present the results of an observational study of the quiet solar limb in the near infrared lines using the New IR Array Camera (NAC) and the vertical spectrograph at the focal plane of McMath-Pierce telescope. The NAC, at the exit port of the spectrograph, was used to record the limb spectrum in HeI 1083.0 nm, Hydrogen Paschen 1281.8 nm and Brackett 2165.5 nm wavelength regions. The NAC is a 1024x1024 InSb Alladin III Detector operating over 1-5 micron range with high density sampling at 0.018 arc second/pixel. The all-reflective optical train minimizes number of surfaces and eliminates ghosts leading to low scatter, ghost-free optics. The close-cycle cryogenic provides a stable cooling environment over six hour period with an accuracy of 0.01K leading to low dark current. The low read out noise combined with low scattered light and dark current makes NAC an ideal detector for making high quality infrared spectral observations of solar limb. The limb spectrums were obtained by placing the spectrograph slit perpendicular to the limb at an interval of 10 degrees around the solar disk. We shall report the intensity profile, line-of-sight velocity and line width distribution around the sun derived from the spectra along the slit.

  13. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  14. Multispectral processing without spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Mark S.; Finlayson, Graham D.

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out, for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 1553 (1994) we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 33 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 3003 (1994). We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting. 2003 Optical Society of America

  15. Multispectral processing without spectra.

    PubMed

    Drew, Mark S; Finlayson, Graham D

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out,for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 1553 (1994)] we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 3 x 3 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model [G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 3003 (1994)]. We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting. PMID:12868625

  16. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  17. Aqueous glucose measurement using differential absorption-based frequency domain optical coherence tomography at wavelengths of 1310 nm and 1625 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Pauline; Manoj, Murali; Sujatha, N.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Rao, Suresh R.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a combination of differential absorption technique and frequency domain optical coherence tomography for detection of glucose, which is an important analyte in medical diagnosis of diabetes. Differential absorption technique is used to detect glucose selectively in the presence of interfering species especially water and frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) helps to obtain faster acquisition of depth information. Two broadband super-luminescent diode (SLED) sources with centre wavelengths 1586 nm (wavelength range of 1540 to 1640 nm) and 1312 nm (wavelength range of 1240 to 1380 nm) and a spectral width of ≍ 60 nm (FWHM) are used. Preliminary studies on absorption spectroscopy using various concentrations of aqueous glucose solution gave promising results to distinguish the absorption characteristics of glucose at two wavelengths 1310 nm (outside the absorption band of glucose) and 1625 nm (within the absorption band of glucose). In order to mimic the optical properties of biological skin tissue, 2% and 10% of 20% intralipid with various concentrations of glucose (0 to 4000 mg/dL) was prepared and used as sample. Using OCT technique, interference spectra were obtained using an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution of 0.5 nm. Further processing of the interference spectra provided information on reflections from the surfaces of the cuvette containing the aqueous glucose sample. Due to the absorption of glucose in the wavelength range of 1540 nm to 1640 nm, a trend of reduction in the intensity of the back reflected light was observed with increase in the concentration of glucose.

  18. Fluorescence and reflectance spectra of freshly excised cervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenchuk, Alex R.; Oliva, Esther; Kaufman, Howard; Schomacker, Kevin T.; Bandarchi-Chamkhaleh, Bizhan; Pitts, Jonathan D.

    2002-05-01

    Fluorescence emission and diffuse reflectance spectra of freshly excised cervical tissue were studied with two specially designed contact probes. The objective of the study was to reach a better understanding of the relationship between spectroscopic measurements and cervical tissue morphology. Tissue samples from loop electro-surgical excision and hysterectomy specimens were measured within 20 to 90 minutes of excision. Emission spectra with 337 nm excitation, and reflectance spectra were collected at wavelengths between 370 and 720 nm from different tissue sites. Hematoxylin-eosin stained slides of the measured zones were obtained and compared to the spectra. In one experiment, a contact probe with a central illumination fiber and two concentric rings of detection fibers (radii 0.1 and 1 mm), was placed in contact with the epithelium and used to measure spectra from ectocervix and endocervix. The influence of 5% acetic acid on fluorescence and reflectance spectra was also investigated. In another experiment, a single 100-micron fiber probe was placed perpendicular to a cut edge of tissue and scanned to measure spectra in depth. Depth scans were made over various areas of the cervix

  19. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  20. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  1. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  2. SPECTRAFACTORY.NET: A DATABASE OF MOLECULAR MODEL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Cami, J.; Van Malderen, R.; Markwick, A. J. E-mail: Andrew.Markwick@manchester.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    We present a homogeneous database of synthetic molecular absorption and emission spectra from the optical to mm wavelengths for a large range of temperatures and column densities relevant for various astrophysical purposes, but in particular for the analysis, identification, and first-order analysis of molecular bands in spectroscopic observations. All spectra are calculated in the LTE limit from several molecular line lists, and are presented at various spectral resolving powers corresponding to several specific instrument simulations. The database is available online at http://www.spectrafactory.net, where users can freely browse, search, display, and download the spectra. We describe how additional model spectra can be requested for (automatic) calculation and inclusion. The database already contains over half a million model spectra for 39 molecules (96 different isotopologues) over the wavelength range 350 nm-3 mm ({approx}3-30000 cm{sup -1})

  3. Microsystem light source at 488 nm for shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Martin; Schmidt, Heinar; Sumpf, Bernd; Güther, Reiner; Erbert, Götz; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef; Tränkle, Günther

    2009-11-01

    A microsystem light source emitting at 488 nm was tested and applied as a light source for shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy (SERRDS). A nonlinear frequency conversion using a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser emission at 976 nm and a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide crystal was realized on a micro-optical bench with a footprint of 25 mm x 5 mm. Joint temperature management via the microbench is used for wavelength tuning. Two emission lines at 487.61 nm and 487.91 nm are used for the SERRDS experiments. The Raman spectra of the test sample polystyrene demonstrate that a laser bandpass filter did not need to be implemented. Resonance Raman spectra of Tartrazine (FD&C Yellow 5, E 102) in distilled water are presented to demonstrate the suitability of this light source for SERRDS in, e.g., food safety control. PMID:19891837

  4. Flat Supercontinuum Generation at 1550 nm in a Dispersion-Flattened Microstructure Fibre Using Picosecond Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-Zhao; Ren, Xiao-Min; Wang, Zi-Nan; Zhang, Xia; Huang, Yong-Qing

    2007-03-01

    The generation of a flat supercontinuum of over 80 nm in the 1550 nm region by injecting 1.6 ps 10 GHz repetition rate optical pulses into an 80-m-long dispersion-flattened microstructure fibre is demonstrated. The fibre has small normal dispersion with a variation smaller than 1.5 (ps.nm-1.km-1) between 1500 and 1650 nm. The generated supercontinuum ranging from 1513 to 1591 nm has the flatness of +/-1.5 dB and it is not so flat in the range of several nanometres around the pump wavelength 1552 nm. Numerical simulation is also used to study the effect of optical loss, fibre parameters and pumping conditions on supercontinuum generation in the dispersion-flattened microstructure fibre, and can be used for further optimization to generate flat broad spectra.

  5. UV-IR Spectra of the Icy Saturnian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Filacchione, G.; Schenk, P.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Noll, K. S.; Spencer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Cassini's multi-instrument suite allows simultaneous observations of the icy satellites of Saturn over a wide range of wavelengths. We present composite UV-IR spectra (0.1-5 microns) of the leading and trailing hemispheres of the icy moons using data from Cassini supplemented with spectra from Hubble Space Telescope (STIS). We use data of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea from the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS), the Imaging Subsystem (ISS) and the Visual-Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) taken during simultaneous measurements, or using similar observational geometries. The well-studied phase curve behaviors of the satellites are utilized to readily combine Earth-based STIS data with the Cassini datasets to create composite spectra. Focusing primarily on the UV-visible region so far, we find that the spectra of all satellites are bright and spectrally relatively flat at visible wavelengths longer than 500-600 nm; shortward of 500-600 nm the surfaces become absorbing with wavelength, resulting in reddish spectra. The satellites exhibit flattish-to-bowl-shaped spectra in the ~200-350 nm range and demonstrate the 165 nm water ice absorption edge, in varying strengths. These composite spectra are used to study the system-wide surface compositions of the satellites to understand large-scale exogenic effects (e.g., E-ring grain bombardment and radiolytic processing) at a variety of regolith sensing depths, and in particular to study implications for the presence and distribution of organics, ammonia, and other non-H2O-ice species in the system.

  6. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  7. Generation of Thermospheric OI 845 nm Emission by Bowen Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Sharpee, B. D.; Cosby, P. C.; Slanger, T. G.

    2006-12-01

    777 and 845 nm emissions from the 3p-3s multiplets of atomic oxygen are commonly observed at non-auroral latitudes in the terrestrial nightglow. By studying the relative strengths of these emissions we can learn something about the mechanisms that produce them and what they can teach us about the atmosphere. Recently [1] we have used intensity-calibrated sky spectra from the Keck telescopes to investigate the relative strengths of a wide range of O-atom Rydberg lines and have confirmed that electron-ion radiative recombination is a primary source of excitation for both the triplet and quintet systems. Following the intensity of the 777 and 845 nm lines during the night, we find that for most of the night the quintet 777 nm line is consistently stronger than the triplet 845 nm line, with a nearly constant intensity ratio I(777)/I(845) near 2.3, although both intensities fall rapidly as the night progresses. However, late in the night the 845 nm intensity levels off, while the 777 nm intensity continues to fall, and the I(777)/I(845) ratio plunges by a factor of 5-10. We interpret these observations as indicating that the O-atom quintet states are still being excited by the same mechanism as earlier in the night, i.e. radiative recombination, but some triplet states are also being excited by an additional mechanism. Such a mechanism has been proposed before [2-6] but not previously observed directly in the terrestrial nightglow. The oxygen triplet 3d-2p transition at 102.576 nm is in close coincidence with the solar hydrogen Lyman-β line at 102.572 nm. Radiative transport in the hydrogen geocorona will deliver Lyman-β intensity into the Earth's shadow and will produce triplet O(3d 3D) high in the atmosphere, even prior to direct solar illumination. The result is observable in a radiative cascade sequence 3d-3p(1129 nm) → 3p- 3s(845 nm) → 3s-2p(130 nm). A similar effect is observed in the H-α emission, which is also excited by Lyman-β absorption. This process

  8. Comprehensive Analyses of the Spectra of Iron-group Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J; Pickering, Juliet C; Liggins, Florence

    2014-06-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Group at NIST has measured atomic data of vital use to astronomy and other fields using high resolution spectrometers that are found in few other places in the world. These now include the 2-m Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer covering the region 285 nm to 5500 nm, the FT700 vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) FT spectrometer covering the region 143 nm to 900 nm, and a 10.7-m normal incidence spectrograph (NIVS) covering 30 nm to 500 nm. Recent work focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths and energy levels of iron-group elements to provide extensive data for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. Our comprehensive linelist for Fe II from 90 nm to 5500 nm contains over 13 600 lines with order of magnitude improvements in the wavelengths compared to previous work [Nave & Johansson, ApJSS 204, 1(2013)]. The spectra were observed in high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) discharges using FT spectrometers and our NIVS spectrograph. A similar analysis of Cr II contains over 5300 lines and extends the knowledge of this spectrum to the previously unobserved region between 731 nm at 5500 nm [Sansonetti, Nave, Reader & Kerber, ApJSS 202, 15 (2012); Sansonetti & Nave, ApJSS (in prep.)]. Our analysis of the Co III spectrum contains 750 lines observed in Penning discharge lamps and an additional 900 lines compiled from previous work, including Ritz wavelengths, optimized energy levels, and calculated log(gf) values [Smillie, Pickering, Nave & Smith, ApJSS (in prep.)]. NIST and ICL are currently collaborating to complete the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters for all singly-ionized iron-group elements of astrophysical interest, covering the wavelength range 80 nm to 5500 nm. This project uses archival data from FT spectrometers at NIST, ICL and Kitt Peak National Observatory, with additional spectra of HCL and Penning discharge sources taken using our FT and

  9. Spectral characteristics of caries-related autofluorescence spectra and their use for diagnosis of caries stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sung-Ae; Jung, Kyeong-Hoon; Ko, Ching-Chang; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify factors useful for diagnosis of the caries stage from laser-induced autofluorescence (AF) spectra. Affected teeth were accurately staged and allocated to four groups: sound, stage II, stage III, or stage IV. A 405-nm laser was used to produce AF spectra. The spectrum factors analyzed were spectrum slope at 550 to 600 nm, spectral area from 500 and 590 nm, and intensity ratio of peaks 625 and 667 nm (625/667 nm). DIAGNOdent was used as control measurement. AF spectra of sound teeth had a peak near 500 nm followed by a smooth decline to 800 nm. As caries progressed, some specimens in stages II to IV showed one or two peak(s) near 625 and 667 nm. Slopes at 550 to 600 nm and areas under the curve at 500 to 590 nm were significantly different (p<0.001) for each stage. Two-peak ratios were also significantly different (p<0.001) except for stage III and stage IV. DIAGNOdent readings for sound and stage II and stage III and IV were not significantly different. Among the studied factors, the spectrum slope at 550 to 600 nm and area under curve at 500 to 590 nm could be useful treatment decision-making tools for carious lesions.

  10. Simultaneous three-wavelength continuous wave laser at 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm in Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Zhao, Lianshui; Zhai, Pei; Xia, Jing; Fu, Xihong; Li, Shutao

    2013-01-01

    A continuous-wave (cw) diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG laser that generates simultaneous laser at the wavelengths 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm is demonstrated. The optimum oscillation condition for the simultaneous three-wavelength operation has been derived. Using the separation of the three output couplers, we obtained the maximum output powers of 0.24 W at 946 nm, 1.07 W at 1319 nm and 1.88 W at 1064 nm at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W. A total output power of 3.19 W for the three-wavelength was achieved at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W with optical conversion efficiency of 28.5%.

  11. Research on fluorescence spectra of cancer blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kunxiang; He, Wenliang; Zhao, Wenyan; Liu, Ying

    2007-11-01

    The fluorescence spectral characteristic of tumor blood was studied by laser-induced fluorescence technology, and compared with the fluorescence spectra of the same type healthy mice blood, the differences between them are distinct. When the whole blood solutions were induced by 407nm laser, they radiate fluorescence band from 420nm to 750 nm, which spectral peak located at 620nm. In high concentration solutions (blood concentration is higher than 4%), the fluorescence intensity are lower than normal blood, but in those low concentration solutions (blood concentration is lower than 2%) the fluorescence intensity of the tumor blood are higher than the normal ones. It is analyzed that the change of the fluorescence characteristic between the tumor blood and the normal is caused by the concentration difference of the tumor identification-porphyrin. The experimental results showed that the obvious difference of the fluorescence spectral characteristic between the forepart tumor and normal blood can offer some value assistance to clinical diagnosis on cancer.

  12. Extending the McDonald Observatory Serendipitous Survey of UV/Blue Asteroid Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilas, Faith; Cochran, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    Moderate resolution asteroid spectra in the 350 - 650 nm spectral range acquired randomly over many years (Cochran and Vilas, Icarus v 127, 121, 1997) identified absorption features in spectra of some of the asteroids. A feature centered at 430 nm was identified in the spectra of some low-albedo asteroids (C class and subclass), similar to the feature identified by Vilas et al. (Icarus, v. 102, 225,1993) in other low-albedo asteroid spectra and attributed to a ferric iron spin-forbidden transition in iron alteration minerals such as jarosite. Features at 505 nm and 430 nm were identified in the spectrum of 4 Vesta. The 505-nm feature is highly diagnostic of the amount and form of calcium in pyroxenes. This suggested further research on the sharpness and spectral placement of this feature in the spectra of Vesta and Vestoids (e.g., Cochran and Vilas, Icarus v. 134, 207, 1998). In 1997 and 1998, additional UV/blue spectra were obtained at the 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith telescope with a facility cassegrain spectrograph. These included spectra of low-albedo asteroids, the R-class asteroid 349 Dembowska, and the M-class asteroid 135 Hertha. These spectra will be presented and identified features will be discussed.

  13. Application of normalized spectra in resolving a challenging Orphenadrine and Paracetamol binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia, Ali M.; Abd El-Rahman, Mohamed K.

    2015-03-01

    Normalized spectra have a great power in resolving spectral overlap of challenging Orphenadrine (ORP) and Paracetamol (PAR) binary mixture, four smart techniques utilizing the normalized spectra were used in this work, namely, amplitude modulation (AM), simultaneous area ratio subtraction (SARS), simultaneous derivative spectrophotometry (S1DD) and ratio H-point standard addition method (RHPSAM). In AM, peak amplitude at 221.6 nm of the division spectra was measured for both ORP and PAR determination, while in SARS, concentration of ORP was determined using the area under the curve from 215 nm to 222 nm of the regenerated ORP zero order absorption spectra, in S1DD, concentration of ORP was determined using the peak amplitude at 224 nm of the first derivative ratio spectra. PAR concentration was determined directly at 288 nm in the division spectra obtained during the manipulation steps in the previous three methods. The last RHPSAM is a dual wavelength method in which two calibrations were plotted at 216 nm and 226 nm. RH point is the intersection of the two calibration lines, where ORP and PAR concentrations were directly determined from coordinates of RH point. The proposed methods were applied successfully for the determination of ORP and PAR in their dosage form.

  14. Chemiluminescence spectra of small molecules containing sulfur, selenium, and tellurium

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.D. )

    1989-04-01

    To help identify a novel emission feature extending from 550 nm to 880 nm produced in the gas-phase reaction of F{sub 2} with CS{sub 2}, the reaction of F{sub 2} with CSe{sub 2} has been studied. This reaction yields a previously observed emission feature from SeF(A) extending from 500 nm to 870 nm and a banded feature between 350 and 500 nm that resembles fluorescence from Se{sub 2}(A) but requires further analysis. An apparently new, broad feature extending from 600 nm to the near IR appears by itself under certain reaction conditions. This broad feature is unresolved at 0.1 nm resolution and is not very useful in understanding the F{sub 2}/CS{sub 2} feature. Reactions of F{sub 2} with CH{sub 3}XCH{sub 3}, where X=Se, Se{sub 2}, Te, and Te{sub 2}, are being studied as sources for emission spectra of CH{sub 2}Se and CH{sub 2}Te. Fruitful chemical trends and analogies are being exploited in effort to identify new spectra of hard-to-study small molecules in chemiluminescence.

  15. Einstein spectra of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the initial stage of the CfA survey of quasar energy distributions are reviewed. Einstein imaging proportional counter spectra of 33 quasars have been studied by fitting a single power law slope and absorption by an equivalent column density of neutral hydrogen. Comparison with the higher energy HEAO-A2 data leads to a two-component model for the X-ray spectrum. The X-ray column density is systematically lower than the 21-cm measured Galactic column density along the same line of sight.

  16. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  17. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products.

    PubMed

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G M; de Oliveira, Luiz F C

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle (Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a nu1 band at ca. 1520 cm(-1), in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a nu1 band at 1537 cm(-1) which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. A correlation between nu1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm(-1)) of the nu1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit nu1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm(-1), respectively. On the basis of the correlation between nu1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm(-1) and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm(-1), which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form. PMID:12909134

  18. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  19. Fluorescence spectra of benign and malignant prostate tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSalhi, M. S.; Masilamani, V.; Atif, M.; Farhat, K.; Rabah, D.; Turki, M. R. Al

    2012-09-01

    In this study, fluorescence emission spectrum (FES), Stokes' shift spectrum (SSS), and reflectance spectrum (RS) of benign (N = 12) and malignant prostate tissues (N = 8) were investigated to discriminate the two types of tissues. The FES was done with the excitation at 325 nm only; SSS with Δλ = 70 and Δλ = 0, the latter being equivalent to reflectance spectra. Of the three modes of spectra, SSS with Δλ = 70 nm showed the best discrimination. There were four important bands, one at 280 nm (due to tryptophan); 320 nm (due to elastin & tryptophan); 355 and 385 (due to NADH) and 440 nm (due to flavin). From the relative intensities of these bands, three ratios were evaluated. Similarly another two ratios were obtained from reflectance spectra and one more from FES. Thus, there are 6 ratio parameters which represent the relative concentration of tryptophan, elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and flavin. A statistical analysis showed that benign and malignant tissues could be classified with accuracy greater than 90%. This report is only for in vitro analysis; but employing optical fiber, this can be extended to in vivo analysis too, so that benign tumor could be distinguished without surgery.

  20. Articular cartilage optical properties in the spectral range 300--850 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Daniel W.; Roberts, Cynthia J.; Farrar, Stuart K.; Johnston, William M.; Litsky, Alan S.; Bertone, Alicia L.

    1998-07-01

    Measurements of absolute total reflectance were recorded from weight-bearing (n equals 9) and nonweight-bearing (n equals 9) equine articular cartilage specimens from 300 to 850 nm using a spectrophotometer with integrating sphere attachment. Following correction of measured spectra for interfacial reflections and edge losses, Kubelka-Munk theory was applied to estimate absorption and scattering coefficient, 1D light intensity distribution, and light penetration depth. Kubelka-Munk absorption coefficients ranged from approximately 7 cm-1 at 330 nm to approximately 1 cm-1 at 850 nm. A localized absorption peak was noted at approximately 340 nm. Above 510 nm, weight-bearing cartilage demonstrated significantly higher absorption coefficients than nonweight-bearing tissue (paired t-test, p < 0.05). Kubelka-Munk scattering coefficients ranged from approximately 40 cm-1 at 360 nm to approximately 6 cm-1 at 850 nm. No statistical differences in scattering coefficient were noted between weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing tissue. Penetration depths predicted by Kubelka-Munk theory ranged from 0.6 mm at 350 nm to over 3 mm at 850 nm. Stronger absorption in weight-bearing cartilage compared to nonweight-bearing tissue resulted in lower light penetration depths in weight-bearing cartilage at all wavelengths longer than 510 nm.

  1. Photoluminescence spectra of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in solution.

    PubMed

    Ibnaouf, K H; Prasad, Saradh; Hamdan, A; Alsalhi, M; Aldwayyan, A S; Zaman, M B; Masilamani, V

    2014-01-01

    The spectral properties of CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) of 3 nm size have been studied under different organic solvents, concentrations and temperatures. Our results showed that the absorption spectra of CdSe/ZnS in benzene have two humps; one around 420 nm and another at 525 nm, with a steady increase in absorption along UV region, and the absorption spectral profile under a wide range of concentrations did not change. On the other hand, the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdSe/ZnS in benzene showed two bands one around 375 nm and the other around 550 nm. It could be seen that the band at 375 nm is due to the interaction between the shell (ZnS) with the solvent species in high excited state, and the band at 550 nm is due to core alone (CdSe). PMID:24270709

  2. Principal-components analysis of fluorescence cross-section spectra from pathogenic and simulant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Harold I.

    2005-10-01

    Principal-components analysis of a new set of highly resolved (<1 nm) fluorescence cross-section spectra excited at 354.7 nm over the 370 646 nm band has been used to demonstrate the potential ability of UV standoff lidars to discriminate among particular biological warfare agents and simulants over short ranges. The remapped spectra produced by this technique from Bacillus globigii (Bg) and Bacillus anthracis (Ba) spores were sufficiently different to allow them to be cleanly separated, and the Ba spectra obtained from Sterne and Ames strain spores were distinguishable. These patterns persisted as the spectral resolution was subsequently degraded in processing from ˜1 to 34 nm. This is to the author's knowledge the first time that resolved fluorescence spectra from biological warfare agents have been speciated or shown to be distinguishably different from those normally used surrogates by optical spectroscopy.

  3. Absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 350-nm wavelength range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of ozone have been measured in the wavelength range 185-350 nm and in the temperature range 225-298 K. The absolute ozone concentrations were established by measuring the pressure of pure gaseous samples in the 0.08to 300-torr range, and the UV spectra were recorded under conditions where less than 1 percent of the sample decomposed. The temperature dependence is significant for wavelengths longer than about 280 nm. The absorption cross-section values around 210 nm were found to be about 10 percent larger than the previously accepted values.

  4. Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Jiang, Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2010-09-13

    We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

  5. VUV Spectra observed in C-2 FRC plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osin, Dmitry; Douglass, Jon; Tuszewski, Michel; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    A grazing incidence flat-field spectrometer was installed for observation of vuv-spectra in C-2 FRC experiment. Wavelength calibration was done by observing spectra of six different gases produced by a hollow-cathode discharge lamp . In addition, in-situ calibration and alignment were performed utilizing neutral-beam heated gases. Wavelength regions between 16 nm and 170 nm was investigated with accuracy of about 0.02 nm. VUV-spectral lines of the most abundant impurity ions were identified both for Plasma Gun and C-2 plasmas. In addition to D spectrum, strong lines of O III-VI, N IV-V, C II-III, and Fe II ions were observed during the plasma lifetime. VUV radiative power losses within energy range from 7.3 eV to 81 eV were estimated based on the calculated FRC dimensions.

  6. Photomovement in Dunaliella salina: Fluence rate-response curves and action spectra.

    PubMed

    Wayne, R; Kadota, A; Watanabe, M; Furuya, M

    1991-07-01

    We determined the action spectra of the photophobic responses as well as the phototactic response in Dunaliella salina (Volvocales) using both single cells and populations. The action spectra of the photophobic responses have maxima at 510 nm, the spectrum for phototaxis has a maximum at 450-460 nm. These action spectra are not compatible with the hypothesis that flavoproteins are the photoreceptor pigments, and we suggest that carotenoproteins or rhodopsins act as the photoreceptor pigments. We also conclude that the phototactic response in Dunaliella is an elementary response, quite independent of the step-up and step-down photophobic responses. We also determined the action spectra of the photoaccumulation response in populations of cells adapted to two different salt conditions. Both action spectra have a peak a 490 nm. The photoaccumulation response may be a complex response composed of the phototactic and photophobic responses. Blue or blue-green light does not elicit a photokinetic response in Dunaliella. PMID:24194242

  7. Photoelectron Emission Studies in CsBr at 257 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, Juan R.; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Yun; Pianetta, Piero A.; Pease, Fabian W.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    CsBr/Cr photocathodes were found [1,2] to meet the requirements of a multi-electron beam lithography system operating with a light energy of 4.8 eV (257nm). The fact that photoemission was observed with a light energy below the reported 7.3 eV band gap for CsBr was not understood. This paper presents experimental results on the presence of intra-band gap absorption sites (IBAS) in CsBr thin film photo electron emitters, and presents a model based on IBAS to explain the observed photoelectron emission behavior at energies below band gap. A fluorescence band centered at 330 nm with a FWHM of about 0.34 eV was observed in CsBr/Cr samples under 257 nm laser illumination which can be attributed to IBAS and agrees well with previously obtained synchrotron photoelectron spectra[1] from the valence band of CsBr films.

  8. Analysis of extreme ultraviolet spectra from laser produced rhenium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Liu, Luning; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly-charged rhenium ions were observed in the 1-7 nm region using two Nd:YAG lasers with pulse lengths of 150 ps and 10 ns, respectively, operating at a number of laser power densities. The maximum focused peak power density was 2.6 × 1014 W cm-2 for the former and 5.5 × 1012 W cm-2 for the latter. The Cowan suite of atomic structure codes and unresolved transition array (UTA) approach were used to calculate and interpret the emission properties of the different spectra obtained. The results show that n = 4-n = 4 and n = 4-n = 5 UTAs lead to two intense quasi-continuous emission bands in the 4.3-6.3 nm and 1.5-4.3 nm spectral regions. As a result of the different ion stage distributions in the plasmas induced by ps and ns laser irradiation the 1.5-4.3 nm UTA peak moves to shorter wavelength in the ps laser produced plasma spectra. For the ns spectrum, the most populated ion stage during the lifetime of this plasma that could be identified from the n = 4-n = 5 transitions was Re23+ while for the ps plasma the presence of significantly higher stages was demonstrated. For the n = 4-n = 4 4p64dN-4p54dN+1 + 4p64dN-14f transitions, the 4d-4f transitions contribute mainly in the most intense 4.7-5.5 nm region while the 4p-4d subgroup gives rise to a weaker feature in the 4.3-4.7 nm region. A number of previously unidentified spectral features produced by n = 4-n = 5 transitions in the spectra of Re XVI to Re XXXIX are identified.

  9. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  10. AGNs with composite spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, P.; Goncalves, A. C.; Veron-Cetty, M.-P.

    1997-03-01

    The use of the Baldwin et al. (1981PASP...93....5B) or Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987ApJS...63..295V) diagnostic diagrams allows the unambiguous classification of the nuclear emission line regions of most galaxies into one of three categories: nuclear HII regions or starbursts, Seyfert 2 galaxies and Liners. However, a small fraction of them have a "transition" spectrum. We present spectral observations of 15 "transition" objects at high-dispersion (66Å/mm) around the Hα, [NII]λλ6548,6584 and/or Hβ, [OIII]λλ4959,5007 emission lines. We show that most of these spectra are composite, due to the simultaneous presence on the slit of a Seyfert nucleus and a HII region. Seyfert 2s and Liners seem to occupy relatively small and distinct volumes in the three-dimensional space λ5007/Hβ, λ6584/Hα, λ6300/Hα.

  11. Optical properties of mucous membrane in the spectral range 350-2000 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, É. A.; Kochubey, V. I.; Tuchin, V. V.; Chikina, E. É.; Knyazev, A. B.; Mareev, O. V.

    2004-12-01

    The optical characteristics of the mucous membrane from the human maxillary sinus are studied experimentally. The experiments were carried out in vitro in the spectral range 350-2000 nm. On the basis of the measured total transmittance and diffuse reflectance spectra, the absorption and transport scattering coefficients are calculated in the entire range in terms of the inverse adding-doubling method.

  12. Interstellar Electron Density Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Hendrick Clark

    This study concerns the investigation of the form of the wavenumber spectrum of the Galactic electron density fluctuations through an examination of the scattering of the radio pulses emitted by pulsars as they propagate through the diffuse ionized interstellar gas. A widely used model for the electron density spectrum is based on the simple power-law: Pne(q)∝ q-β, where β = 11/3 is usually assumed, corresponding to Kolmogorov's turbulence spectrum. The simple Kolmogorov model provides satisfactory agreement for observations along many lines of sight; however, major inconsistencies remain. The inconsistencies suggest that an increase in the ratio of the power between the high (10-8[ m]-1≤ q<=10-7[ m]-1) and low (10-13[ m]-1≤ q<=10-12[ m]-1) wavenumbers is needed. This enhancement in the ratio can in turn be achieved by either including an inner scale, corresponding to a dissipation scale for the turbulent cascade, in the Kolmogorov spectrum or by considering steeper spectra. Spectra with spectral exponents β > 4 have been in general rejected based on observations of pulsar refractive scintillations. The special case of β = 4 has been given little attention and is analyzed in detail. Physically, this 'β = 4' model corresponds to the random distribution, both in location and orientation, of discrete objects with relatively sharp boundaries across the line of sight. An outer scale is included in the model to account for the average size of such objects. We compare the predictions of the inner-scale and β = 4 models both with published observations and observations we made as part of this investigation. We conclude that the form of the wavenumber spectrum is dependent on the line of sight. We propose a composite spectrum featuring a uniform background turbulence in presence of randomly distributed discrete objects, as modeled by the β = model.

  13. Quantum-mechanical analysis of the intensity distribution in spectra of resonant Raman scattering spectra of aqueous solutions of tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burova, T. G.; Shcherbakov, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of the intensity distribution in the resonant Raman scattering spectra of aqueous solutions of tyrosine excited by laser radiation with wavelengths of 244, 229, 218, 200, and 193 nm, as well as in the nonresonant Raman scattering spectrum excited at a wavelength of 488 nm, are performed. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the calculation results and the experimental data. It is shown that the changes in the intensity distribution observed in the spectra with a change in the excitation wavelength from 244 to 193 nm correlate with the determined changes in the contribution made by excited electronic states into the scattering tensor components. It is noted that it is necessary to take into account the Herzberg-Teller effect and that the number of excited electronic states taken into account considerably affects the calculated relative intensities of lines. The possibility of existence of several tyrosine conformers in aqueous solution at room temperature is shown.

  14. Detection of munitions grade g-series nerve agents using Raman excitation at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Eric; Wilcox, Phillip G.; Hoffland, Soren; Pardoe, Ian

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for obtaining molecular structure information of a sample. While Raman spectroscopy is a common laboratory based analytical tool, miniaturization of opto-electronic components has allowed handheld Raman analyzers to become commercially available. These handheld systems are utilized by Military and First Responder operators tasked with rapidly identifying potentially hazardous chemicals in the field. However, one limitation of many handheld Raman detection systems is strong interference caused by fluorescence of the sample or underlying surface which obscures the characteristic Raman signature of the target analyte. Munitions grade chemical warfare agents (CWAs) are produced and stored in large batches and typically have more impurities from the storage container, degradation, or unreacted precursors. In this work, Raman spectra of munitions grade CWAs were collected using a handheld Raman spectrometer with a 1064 nm excitation laser. While Raman scattering generated by a 1064 nm laser is inherently less efficient than excitation at shorter wavelengths, high quality spectra were easily obtained due to significantly reduced fluorescence of the munitions grade CWAs. The spectra of these less pure, but more operationally relevant, munitions grade CWAs were then compared to spectra of CASARM grade CWAs, as well as Raman spectra collected using the more common 785 nm excitation laser.

  15. Solar Irradiance Reference Spectra (SIRS) for IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, T.; Chamberlin, P.; Snow, M.; Harder, J.

    2008-12-01

    The IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) for solar Carrington Rotation 2068 (20 March to 16 April 2008) has been very successful in obtaining a wide variety of solar, heliospheric, and planetary observations during times of solar cycle minimum conditions. One of these efforts is the generation of solar irradiance reference spectra (SIRS) from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm using a combination of satellite and sounding rocket observations. These reference spectra include daily satellite observations from TIMED Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) from 0.1 nm to 116 nm and from Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments from 116 nm to 2400 nm. The EUV range is also improved with higher spectral resolution observations from 6 nm to 105 nm using the prototype SDO EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard a sounding rocket launched on 14 April 2008. The SIRS result is an important accomplishment in that it is the first time in having simultaneous measurements over the full spectral coverage up to 2400 nm and during solar cycle minimum conditions. The SIRS data from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm and in 0.1-nm intervals (on 0.05 nm centers) are available from http://ihy2007.org/WHI/.

  16. Characterization of woody and herbaceous biomasses lignin composition with 1064 nm dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lupoi, Jason S; Smith, Emily A

    2012-08-01

    Biomass representing different classes of bioenergy feedstocks, including woody and herbaceous species, was measured with 1064 nm Raman spectroscopy. Pine, oak, poplar, kenaf, miscanthus, pampas grass, switchgrass, alfalfa, orchard grass, and red clover were included in this study. Spectral differences have been identified with an emphasis on lignin guaiacyl and syringyl monomer content and carotenoid compounds. The interpretation of the Raman spectra was correlated with (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning spectra of select biomass samples. Thioacidolysis quantification of guaiacyl and syringyl monomer composition and the library of Raman spectra were used as a training set to develop a principal component analysis model for classifying plant samples and a principal component regression model for quantifying lignin guaiacyl and syringyl composition. Raman spectroscopy with 1064 nm excitation offers advantages over alternative techniques for biomass characterization, including low spectral backgrounds, higher spectral resolution, short analysis times, and nondestructive analyses. PMID:22800567

  17. Electronic spectra of Fe3+ oxides and oxide hydroxides in the near IR to near UV.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.; Waite, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Optical absorption and diffuse reflectance spectra of several Fe2O3 and FeOOH polymorphs (hematite, maghemite, goethite, lepidocrocite) in the near-IR to near-UV spectral regions (2000-200 nm) are presented. The spectra consist primarily of Fe3+ ligand field and ligand-to-metal charge-transfer transitions.-J.A.Z.

  18. Spectra of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John

    2015-08-01

    Non-LTE modeling is essential for interpreting the spectra of O stars and their decendents, and much progress has been made. The major uncertainty associated with analyzing photospheric spectra of O stars arises from issues related to microturbulence and macroturbulence. Many supergiants, for example, have microturbulent velocities that approach the sound speed, while macroturbulent velocities are often several times the sound speed. The cause of this turbulence is unknown, but may be related to pulsation, an underlying convection zone associated with the Fe opacity bump, or feedback from the stellar wind. Determining accurate abundances in O stars is hampered by the lack of lines belonging to low-z elements. Many species only have a few observable lines, and some of these are subject to complex non-LTE effects. A characteristic of massive stars is the existence of a stellar wind which is driven by radiation pressure. Radiation driving is inherently unstable, and this leads to winds with an inhomogeneous structure. Major issues that are still unresolved include: How are winds driven through the sonic point? What is the nature of the inhomogeneities, and how do the properties of these inhomogeneities change with density and velocity? How important is spatial porosity, and porosity in velocity space? What is the structure of the shocks, and in what stars do the shocks fail to cool? With Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars the major uncertainty arises because the classic spectroscopic radius (i.e., the location where τ = 2/3) often refers to a location in the wind — not necessarily the stellar radius associated with stellar evolution models. Derived radii are typically several times those predicted by stellar evolution calculations, although for strong-lined W-R stars it is possible to construct models that are consistent with evolution calculations. The driving of the winds in these stars is strongly coupled to the closeness of the stars to the Eddington limit and to their

  19. Absorption spectra of irradiated XRCT radiochromic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2006-06-01

    Gafchromic XRCT radiochromic film is a self-developing high sensitivity radiochromic film product which can be used for assessment of delivered radiation doses which could match applications such as computed tomography (CT) dosimetry. The film automatically changes colour upon irradiation changing from a yellow to green/brown colour. The absorption spectra of Gafchromic XRCT radiochromic film as measured with reflectance spectrophotometry have been investigated to analyse the dosimetry characteristics of the film. Results show two main absorption peaks produced from irradiation located at 636 nm and 585 nm. This is similar to EBT Gafchromic film. A high level of sensitivity is found for this film with a 1 cGy applied dose producing an approximate net optical density change of 0.3 at 636 nm. This high sensitivity combined with its relatively energy independent nature around the 100 kVp to 150 kVp x-ray energy range provides a unique enhancement in dosimetric measurement capabilities over currently available dosimetry films for CT applications.

  20. Surface Raman spectra of a biased and buried ultrathin copper phthalocyanine layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hipps, K.W.; Dowdy, J.; Hoagland, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Raman spectra of Al-AlO{sub x}-CuPc (1 nm)-M devices, where M = Ag or Pb, are reported. The first Raman spectrum of a material buried in a working (biased) tunnel diode without Ag surface enhancement or substrate roughening is reported. Comparison of the Raman spectra resulting from biased devices with inelastic electron tunneling spectra proves that the anomalous features of the CuPc tunneling spectrum are not due to electrochemical changes inside the device.

  1. Simultaneous triple 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm operation of a diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Liu, Huilong; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2014-10-01

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave (cw) triple-wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 914, 1084, and 1086 nm. A theoretical analysis has been introduced to determine the threshold conditions for simultaneous triple-wavelength laser. Using a T-shaped cavity, we realized an efficient triple-wavelength operation at 4F3/2→4I9/2 and 4F3/2→4I11/2 transitions for Nd:YVO4 crystal, simultaneously. At an absorbed pump power of 16 W (or 25 W of incident pump power), the maximum output power was 2.3 W, which included 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm three wavelengths, and the optical conversion efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power was 14.4%.

  2. Photosynthetic action spectra and adaptation to spectral light distribution in a benthic cyanobacterial mat.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, B B; Cohen, Y; Des Marais, D J

    1987-01-01

    We studied adaptation to spectral light distribution in undisturbed benthic communities of cyanobacterial mats growing in hypersaline ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. Microscale measurements of oxygen photosynthesis and action spectra were performed with microelectrodes; spectral radiance was measured with fiber-optic microprobes. The spatial resolution of all measurements was 0.1 mm, and the spectral resolution was 10 to 15 nm. Light attenuation spectra showed absorption predominantly by chlorophyll a (Chl a) (430 and 670 nm), phycocyanin (620 nm), and carotenoids (440 to 500 nm). Blue light (450 nm) was attenuated 10-fold more strongly than red light (600 nm). The action spectra of the surface film of diatoms accordingly showed activity over the whole spectrum, with maxima for Chl a and carotenoids. The underlying dense Microcoleus population showed almost exclusively activity dependent upon light harvesting by phycobilins at 550 to 660 nm. Maximum activity was at 580 and 650 nm, indicating absorption by phycoerythrin and phycocyanin as well as by allophycocyanin. Very little Chl a-dependent activity could be detected in the cyanobacterial action spectrum, even with additional 600-nm light to excite photosystem II. The depth distribution of photosynthesis showed detectable activity down to a depth of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, where the downwelling radiant flux at 600 nm was reduced to 0.2 to 0.6% of the surface flux. PMID:11536572

  3. Photosynthetic action spectra and adaptation to spectral light distribution in a benthic cyanobacterial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, B. B.; Cohen, Y.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    We studied adaptation to spectral light distribution in undisturbed benthic communities of cyanobacterial mats growing in hypersaline ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. Microscale measurements of oxygen photosynthesis and action spectra were performed with microelectrodes; spectral radiance was measured with fiber-optic microprobes. The spatial resolution of all measurements was 0.1 mm, and the spectral resolution was 10 to 15 nm. Light attenuation spectra showed absorption predominantly by chlorophyll a (Chl a) (430 and 670 nm), phycocyanin (620 nm), and carotenoids (440 to 500 nm). Blue light (450 nm) was attenuated 10-fold more strongly than red light (600 nm). The action spectra of the surface film of diatoms accordingly showed activity over the whole spectrum, with maxima for Chl a and carotenoids. The underlying dense Microcoleus population showed almost exclusively activity dependent upon light harvesting by phycobilins at 550 to 660 nm. Maximum activity was at 580 and 650 nm, indicating absorption by phycoerythrin and phycocyanin as well as by allophycocyanin. Very little Chl a-dependent activity could be detected in the cyanobacterial action spectrum, even with additional 600-nm light to excite photosystem II. The depth distribution of photosynthesis showed detectable activity down to a depth of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, where the downwelling radiant flux at 600 nm was reduced to 0.2 to 0.6% of the surface flux.

  4. Seismic noise spectra at Elko, Kanab, Landers, and Mina

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, P.W.; Rohrer, R.F.

    1987-05-26

    The ambient seismic noise at the four Digital Seismic Stations (DSS) operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is computed for four 500-second time windows: summer daytime, summer nighttime, winter daytime and winter nighttime. In terms of the averages over these windows, in the seismically important 1-10 Hz band, the order of the DSS stations in quietness is: ELKOnm at 1 Hz are: Elko 0.82 nm, Landers 0.90 nm, Kanab 0.95 nm, Mina 1.8 nm. These spectral noise data show larger than usual slope increases beginning at 1 Hz, particularly, at Mina. These slope changes are not due to DSS system noise which is 14 db below the average station noise. No physical explanation for these slope changes was forthcoming in the data. Comparing these DSS noise spectra in the 1.5 - 10 Hz band with Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) data from the stations RSNT and RSNY shows that in terms of averages: RSNTnm for a one-octave bandwidth at 1 Hz are: RSNT 0.6 nm, RSNY 2.7 nm.

  5. Seismic noise spectra at Elko, Kanab, Landers, and Mina

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, P.W.; Rohrer, R.F.

    1987-04-22

    The ambient seismic noise at the four Digital Seismic Stations (DSS) operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is computed for four 500-second time windows: summer daytime, summer nighttime, winter daytime and winter nighttime. In terms of the averages over these windows, in the seismically important 1 to 10 Hz band, the order of the DSS stations in quietness is Elkonm at 1 Hz are: Elko 0.82 nm, Landers 0.90 nm, Kanab 0.95nm, Mina 1.8 nm. These spectral noise data show larger than usual slope increases beginning at 1 Hz, particularly, at Mina. These slope changes are not due to DSS system noise which is 14 db below the average station noise. No physical explanation for these slope changes was forthcoming in the data. Comparing these DSS noise spectra in the 1.5 - 10 Hz band with Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) data from the stations RSNT and RSNY shows that in terms of averages: RSNTnm for a one-octave bandwidth at 1 Hz are: RSNT 0.6 nm, RSNY 2.7 nm.

  6. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  7. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  8. Radiometric calibration of spacecraft using small lunar images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, Hugh H.; Anderson, James M.; Becker, Kris J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the data reduction steps that can be used to extract the lunar irradiance from low resolution images of the Moon are examined and the attendant uncertainties are quantitatively assessed. The response integrated over an image is compared to a lunar irradiance model being developed from terrestrial multi-band photometric observations over the 350-2500 nm range.

  9. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Siyuan Donnelly, Vincent M. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Economou, Demetre J. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Ruchhoeft, Paul

    2015-11-09

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  10. CMOS downsizing toward sub-10 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    Recently, CMOS downsizing has been accelerated very aggressively in both production and research level, and even transistor operation of a 6 nm gate length p-channel MOSFET was reported in a conference. However, many serious problems are expected for implementing such small-geometry MOSFETs into large scale integrated circuits, and it is still questionable whether we can successfully introduce sub-10 nm CMOS LSIs into the market or not. In this paper, limitation and its possible causes for the downscaling of CMOS towards sub-10 nm are discussed with consideration of past CMOS predictions for the limitation.

  11. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  12. Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with Simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M A; Carr, A V; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hollingsworth, W G; Liao, Z; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Wegner, P J

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced growth of optical damage often determines the useful lifetime of an optic in a high power laser system. We have extended our previous work on growth of laser damage in fused silica with simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm laser irradiation by measuring the threshold for growth with various ratios of 351 nm and 1053 nm fluence. Previously we reported that when growth occurs, the growth rate is determined by the total fluence. We now find that the threshold for growth is dependent on both the magnitude of the 351 nm fluence as well as the ratio of the 351 nm fluence to the 1053 nm fluence. Furthermore, the data suggests that under certain conditions the 1053 nm fluence does not contribute to the growth.

  13. Isothermal annealing of a 620 nm optical absorption band in Brazilian topaz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isotani, Sadao; Matsuoka, Masao; Albuquerque, Antonio Roberto Pereira Leite

    2013-04-01

    Isothermal decay behaviors, observed at 515, 523, 562, and 693 K, for an optical absorption band at 620 nm in gamma-irradiated Brazilian blue topaz were analyzed using a kinetic model consisting of O- bound small polarons adjacent to recombination centers (electron traps). The kinetic equations obtained on the basis of this model were solved using the method of Runge-Kutta and the fit parameters describing these defects were determined with a grid optimization method. Two activation energies of 0.52±0.08 and 0.88±0.13 eV, corresponding to two different structural configurations of the O- polarons, explained well the isothermal decay curves using first-order kinetics expected from the kinetic model. On the other hand, thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectra measured at various temperatures showed a single band at 400 nm in the temperature range of 373-553 K in which the 620 nm optical absorption band decreased in intensity. Monochromatic TL glow curve data at 400 nm extracted from the TL emission spectra observed were found to be explained reasonably by using the knowledge obtained from the isothermal decay analysis. This suggests that two different structural configurations of O- polarons are responsible for the 620 nm optical absorption band and that the thermal annealing of the polarons causes the 400 nm TL emission band.

  14. 308nm excimer laser in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Mehraban, Shadi; Feily, Amir

    2014-01-01

    308nm xenon-chloride excimer laser, a novel mode of phototherapy, is an ultraviolet B radiation system consisting of a noble gas and halide. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the literature and summarize all the experiments, clinical trials and case reports on 308-nm excimer laser in dermatological disorders. 308-nm excimer laser has currently a verified efficacy in treating skin conditions such as vitiligo, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, alopecia areata, allergic rhinitis, folliculitis, granuloma annulare, lichen planus, mycosis fungoides, palmoplantar pustulosis, pityriasis alba, CD30+ lympho proliferative disorder, leukoderma, prurigo nodularis, localized scleroderma and genital lichen sclerosus. Although the 308-nm excimer laser appears to act as a promising treatment modality in dermatology, further large-scale studies should be undertaken in order to fully affirm its safety profile considering the potential risk, however minimal, of malignancy, it may impose. PMID:25606333

  15. Study of two-photon excitation spectra of organic compounds absorbing in the UV region

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V A; Sychev, Andrei A

    2004-12-31

    A method is proposed for recording two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of organic compounds with the help of picosecond pulses from a dye laser tunable in the range from 550 to 640 nm. The TPE spectra are obtained for organic scintillators and drugs: paraterphenyl in liquid and solid phases, stilbene single crystal and Streptocid powder, having a one-photon absorption band in the region from 270 to 350 nm. It is shown that the vibronic structure in the TPE spectra of these compounds is independent of their aggregate state and is an individual characteristic of each of the compounds. (active media)

  16. Optical extension at the 193-nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandbergen, Peter; McCallum, Martin; Amblard, Gilles R.; Domke, Wolf-Dieter; Smith, Bruce W.; Zavyalova, Lena; Petersen, John S.

    1999-07-01

    Lithography at 193nm is the first optical lithography technique that will be introduced for manufacturing of technology levels. where the required dimensions are smaller than the actual wavelength. This paper explores several techniques to extend 193nm to low k1 lithography. Most attention is given to binary mask solution in at 130nm dimensions, where k1 is 0.4. Various strong and Gaussian quadrupole illuminators were designed, manufactured and tested for this application. Strong quadrupoles show that largest DOF improvements. The drawback however, is that these strong quadrupoles are very duty cycle and dimensions specific, resulting in large proximity biases between different duty cycles. Due to their design, Gaussian quadrupoles sample much wider frequency ranges, resulting in less duty cycles specific DOF improvements and less proximity basis. At sub-130nm dimensions, strong phase shift masks provide significant latitude improvements, when compared to binary masks with quadrupole illumination. However, differences in dose to size for different duty cycles were up to 25 percent. For definition of contact holes, linewidth biasing through silylation, a key feature of the CARL bi-layer resist approach, demonstrated significant DOF latitude improvements compared to SLR at 140nm and 160nm contact holes.

  17. Optical Absorption Spectra of Sodium Borate Cobalt Doped Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Elokr, M. M.; Hassan, M. A.; Yaseen, A. M.; Elokr, R.

    2007-02-14

    Glassy system: xNa2O-(100-x-y)B2O3-yCo3O4 has been prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. Optical absorption spectra have been obtained in the range 300 - 2500 nm at room temperature. An absorption edge was observed in the near UV range, the analysis of which reveals that indirect transition is the dominant absorption mechanism. All prepared samples exhibit blue color, indicating that the Co ions are acted upon by tetrahedral ligand field. Obtained spectra were used to estimate some ligand field parameters.

  18. Astronomical spectra as powerful source for airglow studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausch, W.; Noll, S.; Unterguggenberger, S.; Proxauf, B.; Kimeswenger, S.

    2015-03-01

    Light from astronomical objects has to pass the Earth's atmosphere before it reaches ground-based telescopes. Thus, any observation taken with such facilities contains information on the chemical composition and the physical state of the atmosphere. In particular, optical and near-infrared spectra taken with such telescopes are well suited to study various airglow emissions arising in the upper atmosphere thanks to the small field-of-view of the telescopes, large mirror sizes, and the frequent usage of medium to high resolution spectrographs. We study data taken by two frequently used echelle spectrographs from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory at Cerro Paranal (Chile): UVES, operative since 1999, is a high-resolution (20000 R 110000) instrument covering the wavelength range from 300 to 1100 nm. Hence, several O2 band systems (Herzberg I+II, Chamberlain, atmospheric), the green and red OI lines ( 557 nm; 630 nm), the recently discovered FeO bands ( 550 to 720 nm), NaID ( 589 nm), and all hydroxyl bands up to OH(3-0) can be investigated. The high temporal coverage allows investigations for more than one solar cycle. The X-Shooter instrument is an echelle spectrograph which is able to take medium-resolution (3000 R 18000) spectra from 300 to 2480 nm within one shot. Therefore, it is well suited for a comprehensive study of OH, as it covers all bands with a vibrational level difference 2 (up to OH(9-7)) simultaneously, apart from the previously mentioned other lines and bands. X-Shooter was put into operation in 2009. In this presentation, we will give a review on the available spectra, their quality and time coverage. Moreover, we will illustrate the potential of the data for airglow studies by showing results

  19. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to ‑3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  20. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  1. The Double-ended 750 nm and 532 nm Laser Output from PPLN-FWM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Li, Yu-Xiang; Yao, Jian-Quan; Guo, Ling; Wang, Zhuo; Han, Sha-Sha; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Zhong, Kai

    2013-06-01

    We investigate 750 nm and 532 nm dual-wavelength laser for applications in the internet of things. A kind of optical maser is developed, in which the semiconductor module outputs the 808 nm pump light and then it goes into a double-clad Nd3+ :YAG monocrystal optical fiber through the intermediate coupler and forms a 1064 nm laser. The laser outputs come from both left and right terminals. In the right branch, the laser goes into the right cycle polarization LinNbO3 (PPLN) crystal through the right coupler, produces the optical parametric oscillation and forms the signal light λ1 (1500 nm), the idle frequency light λ2 (3660.55 nm), and the second-harmonic of the signal light λ3 (750 nm). These three kinds of light and the pump light λ4 together form the frequency matching and the quasi-phase matching, then the four-wave mixing occurs to create the high-gain light at wavelength 750 nm. Meanwhile, in the left branch, the laser goes into the left PPLN crystal through the left coupler, engenders frequency doubling and forms the light at wavelength 532 nm. That is to say, the optical maser provides 750 nm and 532 nm dual-wavelength laser outputting from two terminals, which is workable.

  2. High-speed stimulated Brillouin scattering spectroscopy at 780 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, Itay; Bilenca, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a high-speed stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) spectroscopy system that is able to acquire stimulated Brillouin gain point-spectra in water samples and Intralipid tissue phantoms over 2 GHz within 10 ms and 100 ms, respectively, showing a 10-100 fold increase in acquisition rates over current frequency-domain SBS spectrometers. This improvement was accomplished by integrating an ultra-narrowband hot rubidium-85 vapor notch filter in a simplified frequency-domain SBS spectrometer comprising nearly counter-propagating continuous-wave pump-probe light at 780 nm and conventional single-modulation lock-in detection. The optical notch filter significantly suppressed stray pump light, enabling detection of stimulated Brillouin gain spectra with substantially improved acquisition times at adequate signal-to-noise ratios (˜25 dB in water samples and ˜15 dB in tissue phantoms). These results represent an important step towards the use of SBS spectroscopy for high-speed measurements of Brillouin gain resonances in scattering and non-scattering samples.

  3. Positive partial transpose from spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, Roland

    2007-11-15

    In this paper we solve the following problem. Let H{sub nm} be a Hilbert space of dimension nm, and let A be a positive semidefinite self-adjoint linear operator on H{sub nm}. Under which conditions on the spectrum has A a positive partial transpose (is PPT) with respect to any partition H{sub n} x H{sub m} of the space H{sub nm} as a tensor product of an n-dimensional and an m-dimensional Hilbert space? We show that the necessary and sufficient conditions can be expressed as a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) on the eigenvalues of A.

  4. Discrimination of liver malignancies with 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pence, Isaac J; Patil, Chetan A; Lieber, Chad A; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely demonstrated for tissue characterization and disease discrimination, however current implementations with either 785 or 830 nm near-infrared (NIR) excitation have been ineffectual in tissues with intense autofluorescence such as the liver. Here we report the use of a dispersive 1064 nm Raman system using a low-noise Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs) array to discriminate highly autofluorescent bulk tissue ex vivo specimens from healthy liver, adenocarcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma (N = 5 per group). The resulting spectra have been combined with a multivariate discrimination algorithm, sparse multinomial logistic regression (SMLR), to predict class membership of healthy and diseased tissues, and spectral bands selected for robust classification have been extracted. A quantitative metric called feature importance is defined based on classification outputs and is used to guide the association of spectral features with biological indicators of healthy and diseased liver tissue. Spectral bands with high feature importance for healthy and liver tumor specimens include retinol, heme, biliverdin, or quinones (1595 cm(-1)); lactic acid (838 cm(-1)); collagen (873 cm(-1)); and nucleic acids (1485 cm(-1)). Classification performance in both binary (normal versus tumor, 100% sensitivity and 89% specificity) and three-group cases (classification accuracy: normal 89%, adenocarcinoma 74%, hepatocellular carcinoma 64%) indicates the potential for accurately separating healthy and cancerous tissues and suggests implications for utilizing Raman techniques during surgical guidance in liver resection. PMID:26309739

  5. Discrimination of liver malignancies with 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pence, Isaac J.; Patil, Chetan A.; Lieber, Chad A.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely demonstrated for tissue characterization and disease discrimination, however current implementations with either 785 or 830 nm near-infrared (NIR) excitation have been ineffectual in tissues with intense autofluorescence such as the liver. Here we report the use of a dispersive 1064 nm Raman system using a low-noise Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs) array to discriminate highly autofluorescent bulk tissue ex vivo specimens from healthy liver, adenocarcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma (N = 5 per group). The resulting spectra have been combined with a multivariate discrimination algorithm, sparse multinomial logistic regression (SMLR), to predict class membership of healthy and diseased tissues, and spectral bands selected for robust classification have been extracted. A quantitative metric called feature importance is defined based on classification outputs and is used to guide the association of spectral features with biological indicators of healthy and diseased liver tissue. Spectral bands with high feature importance for healthy and liver tumor specimens include retinol, heme, biliverdin, or quinones (1595 cm−1); lactic acid (838 cm−1); collagen (873 cm−1); and nucleic acids (1485 cm−1). Classification performance in both binary (normal versus tumor, 100% sensitivity and 89% specificity) and three-group cases (classification accuracy: normal 89%, adenocarcinoma 74%, hepatocellular carcinoma 64%) indicates the potential for accurately separating healthy and cancerous tissues and suggests implications for utilizing Raman techniques during surgical guidance in liver resection. PMID:26309739

  6. Spectral analysis on origination of the bands at 437 nm and 475.5 nm of chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lizhang; Wang, Yongqiang; Zhou, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence has been often used as an intrinsic optical molecular probe to study photosynthesis. In this study, the origin of bands at 437 and 475.5 nm in the chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum for emission at 685 nm in Arabidopsis chloroplasts was investigated using various optical analysis methods. The results revealed that this fluorescence excitation spectrum was related to the absorption characteristics of pigment molecules in PSII complexes. Moreover, the excitation band centred at 475.5 nm had a blue shift, but the excitation band at 437 nm changed relatively less due to induction of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Furthermore, fluorescence emission spectra showed that this blue shift occurred when excitation energy transfer from both chlorophyll b (Chl b) and carotenoids (Cars) to chlorophyll a (Chl a) was blocked. These results demonstrate that the excitation band at 437 nm was mainly contributed by Chl a, while the excitation band at 475.5 nm was mainly contributed by Chl b and Cars. The chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum, therefore, could serve as a useful tool to describe specific characteristics of light absorption and energy transfer between light-harvesting pigments. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26358732

  7. Remittance at a single wavelength of 390 nm to quantify epidermal melanin concentration.

    PubMed

    Verkruysse, Wim; Svaasand, Lars O; Franco, Walfre; Nelson, J Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Objective quantification of epidermal melanin concentration (EMC) should be useful in laser dermatology to determine the individual maximum safe radiant exposure (IMSRE). We propose a single-wavelength remittance measurement at 390 nm as an alternative optical method to determine EMC and IMSRE. Remittance spectra (360 to 740 nm), melanin index (MI) measurements and the transient radiometric temperature increase, DeltaT(t), upon skin irradiation with an Alexandrite laser (755 nm, 3-ms pulse duration, 6 Jcm(2)) were measured on 749 skin spots (arm and calf) on 23 volunteers (skin phototypes I to IV). Due to the shallow penetration depth and independence of blood oxygen saturation (isosbestic point), remittance at 390 nm appears to provide better estimates for EMC and IMSRE than MI. PMID:19256693

  8. Chromosomes without a 30-nm chromatin fiber

    PubMed Central

    Joti, Yasumasa; Hikima, Takaaki; Nishino, Yoshinori; Kamada, Fukumi; Hihara, Saera; Takata, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    How is a long strand of genomic DNA packaged into a mitotic chromosome or nucleus? The nucleosome fiber (beads-on-a-string), in which DNA is wrapped around core histones, has long been assumed to be folded into a 30-nm chromatin fiber, and a further helically folded larger fiber. However, when frozen hydrated human mitotic cells were observed using cryoelectron microscopy, no higher-order structures that included 30-nm chromatin fibers were found. To investigate the bulk structure of mitotic chromosomes further, we performed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), which can detect periodic structures in noncrystalline materials in solution. The results were striking: no structural feature larger than 11 nm was detected, even at a chromosome-diameter scale (~1 μm). We also found a similar scattering pattern in interphase nuclei of HeLa cells in the range up to ~275 nm. Our findings suggest a common structural feature in interphase and mitotic chromatins: compact and irregular folding of nucleosome fibers occurs without a 30-nm chromatin structure. PMID:22825571

  9. 810nm, 980nm, 1470nm and 1950nm diode laser comparison: a preliminary "ex vivo" study on oral soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Sozzi, Michele; Selleri, Stefano; Vescovi, Paolo; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of diode lasers in dentistry has several advantages, mainly consisting on the reduced size, reduced cost and possibility to beam delivering by optical fibers. At the moment the two diode wavelengths normally utilized in the dental field are 810 and 980 nm for soft tissues treatments. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of four different diode wavelengths: 810, 980, 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser for the ablation of soft tissues. Several samples of veal tongue were exposed to the four different wavelengths, at different fluences. The internal temperature of the soft tissues, in the area close to the beam, was monitored with thermocouple during the experiment. The excision quality of the exposed samples have been characterized by means of an optical microscope. Tissue damages and the cut regularity have been evaluated on the base of established criteria. The lowest thermal increase was recorded for 1950 nm laser. Best quality and speed of incision were obtained by the same wavelength. By evaluating epithelial, stromal and vascular damages for all the used wavelengths, the best result, in terms of "tissue respect", have been obtained for 1470 and 1950 nm exposures. From the obtained results 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser showed to be the best performer wavelengths among these used in this "ex vivo" study, probably due to their greatest affinity to water.

  10. Radiation Failures in Intel 14nm Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossev, Dobrin P.; Duncan, Adam R.; Gadlage, Matthew J.; Roach, Austin H.; Kay, Matthew J.; Szabo, Carl; Berger, Tammy J.; York, Darin A.; Williams, Aaron; LaBel, K.; Ingalls, James D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the 14 nm Intel Broadwell 5th generation core series 5005U-i3 and 5200U-i5 was mounted on Dell Inspiron laptops, MSI Cubi and Gigabyte Brix barebones and tested with Windows 8 and CentOS7 at idle. Heavy-ion-induced hard- and catastrophic failures do not appear to be related to the Intel 14nm Tri-Gate FinFET process. They originate from a small (9 m 140 m) area on the 32nm planar PCH die (not the CPU) as initially speculated. The hard failures seem to be due to a SEE but the exact physical mechanism has yet to be identified. Some possibilities include latch-ups, charge ion trapping or implantation, ion channels, or a combination of those (in biased conditions). The mechanism of the catastrophic failures seems related to the presence of electric power (1.05V core voltage). The 1064 nm laser mimics ionization radiation and induces soft- and hard failures as a direct result of electron-hole pair production, not heat. The 14nm FinFET processes continue to look promising for space radiation environments.

  11. Raman spectra and optical coherent tomography images of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.; Vazquez-Villa, A.

    2011-03-01

    The optical coherence tomography images are useful to see the internal profile and the structure of material samples. In this work, OCT images were recorded in 10 volunteers with different skin tone which were related to Raman spectra. The areas where we obtained OCT images and Raman spectra were a) index finger nail, b) between index finger and middle finger, c) middle finger tip, d) half of middle finger, e) the thumb finger tip and f) between index finger and thumb, areas measured were for the purpose of finding extracellular fluids with contain triglycerides, cholesterol and glucose that are reported in the literature. The excitation wavelength used for this work was 785 nm, a spectrometer of 6 cm-1 resolution. The spectral region used ranges from 300 to 1800 cm-1. We use an OCT with 930 nm of Central Wavelength, 1.6 mm of Image Depth, 6 mm of image width and 6.2 μm of axial resolution.

  12. Temperature measurement of wood flame based on the double line method of atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiaojian; Liu, Zhenhua; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at the testing requirement of the transient high temperature in explosion field and the bore of barrel weapon, the temperature measurement system of double line of atomic emission spectrum was designed, the method of flame spectrum testing system were used for experimental analysis. The experimental study of wood burning spectra was done with flame spectrum testing system. The measured spectra contained atomic emission spectra of the elements K, Na, and the excitation ease of two kinds atomic emission spectra was analyzed. The temperature was calculated with two spectral lines of K I 766.5nm and 769.9nm. The results show that, compared with Na, the excitation temperature of K atomic emission spectra is lower. By double line method, the temperature of wood burning is 1040K, and error is 3.7%.

  13. [Preparation and spectra of the complexes of the first series transition metals with diphenic acid].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ai-zhi; Wang, Jian-jun; Ren, Yan-wei; Chen, Jing; Li, Jun; Zhang, Feng-xing

    2004-04-01

    The ligand diphenic acid has been synthesized and the corresponding complexes of transition metal Co, Ni and Mn with diphenic acid have been prepared and characterized by the elementary analysis, IR spectra and ultraviolet-visible spectra. The results of IR show that the vas and vs of -CO2- in the complexes are lower than those of ligand diphenic acid, which can be explained by the coordinating between metal and ligand. In addition, compared with the complex IR spectra, the IR spectra of ligand became complicated due to the ligand polymerization through hydrogen bond. The UV-Vis spectra show that the ligand has three absorption peaks at 288, 273 and 270 nm, respectively, and these are slightly shifted in the complexes. Because the metal d-d absorption is weak, only in Co(C14H8O4) x 2H2O there is a d-d absorption at 537 nm. PMID:15766146

  14. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  15. OH(A-X) fluorescence from photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 157.5 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suto, M.; Ye, C.; Mitchell, M. J.; Lee, L. C.

    1988-01-01

    The OH(A-X) fluorescence from photodissociative excitation of HO2 by F2 laser photons (157.5 nm) was observed and compared with the OH fluorescence spectra of H2O2 and the O2+CH3OH mixture. The rotational population distributions of OH(A) were obtained from the fluorescence spectra. The most populated levels are J = 4 for photodissociative excitation of HO2, J = 20 for H2O2, and J = 21 for the O2+CH3OH mixture. The fluorescence from the gas mixture is attributed to the O + H recombination for which the atoms are produced from photodissociation of parent molecules.

  16. Electrochemical exfoliation of carbon dots with the narrowest full width at half maximum in their fluorescence spectra in the ultraviolet region using only water as electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuehua; Zhao, Zhiwei; Pan, Chen

    2016-08-01

    Here, a novel kind of CDs were electrochemically exfoliated from graphite rods using distilled water as the only electrolyte. The as-exfoliated CDs showed two significant features: the narrowest fluorescence spectra with a FWHM of only 10 nm and ultraviolet fluorescence spectra in the region up to 360 nm. PMID:27376467

  17. Interpretation of cathodoluminescence spectra obtained from carbonate gangue minerals and breccias, Right Fork area, central Tennessee zinc district

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, O.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Owen, M.R. . Dept. of Geology); Fuller, E.L. Jr. . Metals and Ceramics Div.)

    1993-03-01

    Spectral patterns (from approximately 350 nm to 750 nm) were obtained for zoned dolomite and unzoned calcite gangue, and dolostone breccia fragments from the Right Fork area in Jackson and Overton Counties, 40 km northeast of the elmwood Mine in the Central Tennessee zinc district. The materials had been analyzed for Fe, Mn, REE, and other trace elements using the synchrotron XRF probe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three distinct zones in dolomite gangue (arbitrarily named zones 4, 5, and 6) could be traced throughout the entire area. The largest number of spectra were obtained for zone 4, which luminesces medium bright red to the eye. The spectra reveal broad peaks in the vicinity of 460 nm and 660 nm; however, spectral deconvolution suggests that the spectra comprise several peaks. The broad peak at 460 nm may consist of overlapping peaks at about 430 nm and 530 nm. Of special interest is the broad peak at 660 nm, which is normally assigned solely to Mn. Shoulders in the range from 700 nm to 725 nm might be due to Fe, which is generally assumed to quench Mn-activated cathodoluminescence. Note that Fe[sup 3+] produces peaks in the vicinity of 550 nm and 710 nm in plagioclase. Intensities determined for zone 4 vary by a factor of 3X and are related to both the Mn concentrations and the Fe/Mn ratios of the individual spots analyzed, even though little, if any, differences in intensity are observed by eye.

  18. Super ACO FEL oscillation at 300 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutarelli, D.; Garzella, D.; Renault, E.; Nahon, L.; Couprie, M. E.

    2000-05-01

    Some recent improvements, involving both the optical cavity mirrors and the positron beam dynamics in the storage ring, have allowed us to achieve a laser oscillation at 300 nm on the Super ACO Storage Ring FEL. The Super ACO storage ring is operated at 800 MeV which is the nominal energy for the usual synchrotron radiation users, and the highest energy for a storage ring FEL. The lasing at 300 nm could be kept during 2 h per injection, with a stored current ranging between 30 and 60 mA. The FEL characteristics are presented here. The longitudinal stability and the FEL optics behaviour are also discussed.

  19. 1550-nm wavelength-tunable HCG VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Christopher; Rao, Yi; Huang, Michael; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate wavelength-tunable VCSELs using high contrast gratings (HCGs) as the top output mirror on VCSELs, operating at 1550 nm. Tunable HCG VCSELs with a ~25 nm mechanical tuning range as well as VCSELs with 2 mW output power were realized. Error-free operation of an optical link using directly-modulated tunable HCG VCSELs transmitting at 1.25 Gbps over 18 channels spaced by 100 GHz and transmitted over 20 km of single mode fiber is demonstrated, showing the suitability of the HCG tunable VCSEL as a low cost source for WDM communications systems.

  20. Comparative study of Nd:KGW lasers pumped at 808 nm and 877 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Ge, Wen-Qi; Zhao, Tian-Zhuo; He, Jian-Guo; Feng, Chen-Yong; Fan, Zhong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The laser performance and thermal analysis of Nd:KGW laser continuously pumped by 808 nm and 877 nm are comparatively investigated. Output power of 670 mW and 1587 mW, with nearly TEM00 mode, are achieved respectively at 808 nm pump and 877 nm pump. Meanwhile, a high-power passively Q-switched Nd:KGW/Cr4+:YAG laser pumped at 877 nm is demonstrated. An average output power of 1495 mW is obtained at pump power of 5.22 W while the laser is operating at repetition of 53.17 kHz. We demonstrate that 877 nm diode laser is a more potential pump source for Nd:KGW lasers.

  1. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  2. Links between two different types of spectra of charged nanometer aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luts, A.; Komsaare, K.; Parts, T.-E.; Hõrrak, U.

    2011-08-01

    We have, since 2007, continuously measured the electrical mobility distribution of small (< 1.5 nm in diameter) corona-generated one-second-aged air ions, using our Small Air Ion Spectrometer (KAIS), in urban area, in the center of the town of Tartu, Estonia. We have simultaneously measured the mobility distributions of natural air ions (0.42-7.4 nm in diameter) with the Balanced Scanning Mobility Analyzer (BSMA). In this work we employ these data to establish certain links between the concurrent spectra of two types, especially for days with new particle formation events. We elaborated and tested an automatic classification method, which selected the spectra according their shape. In the case of the BSMA negative ions, we obtained four classes of the spectra which are associated with the intermediate ion (1.6-7.4 nm in diameter) nucleation burst events and rain-type events. The spectra within these classes are characterized by special shapes and they are called "event-like spectra". The first class demonstrates the strongest increase in the concentration of all ions with the mobilities below 0.8 cm 2V -1 s -1 (above 1.25 nm in diameter), it mainly contains spring and early summer spectra, recorded around midday. In the second class, the events are weaker; it contains a large number of late spring morning time spectra, when relative humidity (RH) tends to decrease. The third and the fourth classes contain many spectra, which resemble to short isolated events. These spectra are excluded from the further analysis. In the first class, the precipitation spectra make about 34% of all the event-like spectra, in the other classes about 10%. In the case of the BSMA positive ions, only the first and second classes were present. The precipitation spectra make about 20% of all event-like classes. About 45% of the event-like spectra are without precipitation, but with RH > 90%, and these spectra are excluded from the further analysis. The spectra with RH < 50% formed 12% of

  3. New Measurements of Doubly Ionized Iron Group Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Smith, Peter L.; Nave, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report new measurements of doubly ionized iron group element spectra, important in the analysis of B-type (hot) stars whose spectra they dominate. These measurements include Co III and Cr III taken with the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer and measurements of Co III taken with the normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at NIST, below 135 nm. We report new Fe III grating spectra measurements to complement our FT spectra. Work towards transition wavelengths, energy levels and branching ratios (which, combined with lifetimes, produce oscillator strengths) for these ions is underway.

  4. RESEARCH PAPER: Automated estimation of stellar fundamental parameters from low resolution spectra: the PLS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Luo, A.-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2009-06-01

    PLS (Partial Least Squares regression) is introduced into an automatic estimation of fundamental stellar spectral parameters. It extracts the most correlative spectral component to the parameters (Teff, log g and [Fe/H]), and sets up a linear regression function from spectra to the corresponding parameters. Considering the properties of stellar spectra and the PLS algorithm, we present a piecewise PLS regression method for estimation of stellar parameters, which is composed of one PLS model for Teff, and seven PLS models for log g and [Fe/H] estimation. Its performance is investigated by large experiments on flux calibrated spectra and continuum normalized spectra at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolutions. The results show that the piecewise PLS method is robust for spectra at the medium resolution of 0.23 nm. For low resolution 0.5 nm and 1 nm spectra, it achieves competitive results at higher SNR. Experiments using ELODIE spectra of 0.23 nm resolution illustrate that our piecewise PLS models trained with MILES spectra are efficient for O ~ G stars: for flux calibrated spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.14 dex, and -0.09 dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.44 dex and 0.38 dex, respectively; for continuum normalized spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.12dex, and -0.13dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.49 dex and 0.41 dex, respectively. The PLS method is rapid, easy to use and does not rely as strongly on the tightness of a parameter grid of templates to reach high precision as Artificial Neural Networks or minimum distance methods do.

  5. Fluorescence-based calculus detection using a 405-nm excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, O.; Schelle, F.; Krueger, S.; Oehme, B.; Dehn, C.; Frentzen, M.; Braun, A.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the difference of fluorescence signals of cement and calculus using a 405 nm excitation wavelength. A total number of 20 freshly extracted teeth was used. The light source used for this study was a blue LED with a wavelength of 405nm. For each tooth the spectra of calculus and cementum were measured separately. Fluorescence light was collimated into an optical fibre and spectrally analyzed using an echelle spectrometer (aryelle 200, Lasertechnik Berlin, Germany) with an additionally bandpass (fgb 67, Edmund Industrial Optics, Karlsruhe, Germany). From these 40 measurements the median values were calculated over the whole spectrum, leading to two different median spectra, one for calculus and one for cementum. For further statistical analysis we defined 8 areas of interest (AOI) in wavelength regions, showing remarkable differences in signal strength. In 7 AOIs the intensity of the calculus spectrum differed statistically significant from the intensity of the cementum spectrum (p < 0.05). A spectral difference could be shown between calculus and cement between 600nm and 700nm. Thus, we can conclude that fluorescence of calculus shows a significant difference to the fluorescence of cement. A differentiation over the intensity is possible as well as over the spectrum. Using a wavelength of 405nm, it is possible to distinguish between calculus and cement. These results could be used for further devices to develop a method for feedback controlled calculus removal.

  6. Microsystem 671 nm light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Martin; Schmidt, Heinar; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef; Tränkle, Günther

    2009-05-20

    We present a compact wavelength stabilized diode laser system at 671 nm on a micro-optical bench as a light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). The laser system consists of two broad-area gain media in separate laser cavities using two reflection Bragg gratings with slightly different center wavelengths. A spectral width below 100 pm and a constant wavelength shift of 0.57 +/- 0.06 nm is obtained up to output powers of 250 mW. The suitability of this light source for SERDS is demonstrated using Raman spectra of ethanol with increasing concentrations of Cresyl Violet as the fluorescent contaminant. PMID:19458726

  7. Kerr-gated picosecond Raman spectroscopy and Raman photon migration of equine bone tissue with 400-nm excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Michael D.; Goodship, Allen E.; Draper, Edward R. C.; Matousek, Pavel; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W.

    2004-07-01

    We show that Raman spectroscopy with visible lasers, even in the deep blue is possible with time-gated Raman spectroscopy. A 4 picosec time gate allows efficient fluorescence rejection, up to 1000X, and provides almost background-free Raman spectra with low incident laser power. The technology enables spectroscopy with better than 10X higher scattering efficiency than is possible with the NIR (785 nm and 830 nm) lasers that are conventionally used. Raman photon migration is shown to allow depth penetration. We show for the first time that Kerr-gated Raman spectra of bone tissue with blue laser excitation enables both fluorescence rejection and depth penetration.

  8. Methane Absorption Coefficients in the 750-940 nm region derived from Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. J.

    2002-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of methane has been recorded in the visible to near-IR region using the intracavity laser spectroscopy technique. Spectra are recorded at high spectral resolution for narrow overlapping intervals in the region for room and 77 K temperature methane samples. After spectra are deconvolved for the instrument function, absorption coefficients are derived. These will be presented (750-940 nm for room temperature methane; 850-920 nm for 77 K methane) and compared with results reported by other workers. Future work in this area also will be indicated. Support from NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program (NAG5-6091 and a Major Equipment Grant) is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Beryllium by Mean Centering of Ratio Spectra.

    PubMed

    Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Samghani, Kobra; Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad Hossein; Heidari, Tahereh

    2016-07-01

    Trace amounts of beryllium has been determined by spectrofluorimetric method that used morin as fluorimetric reagent. Beryllium gives a highly fluorescent complex with morin. The excitation wavelength of morin and Be-morin complex were 410 and 430. The fluorescence spectra of morin and Be-morin complex were overlaped in excitation wavelength of 430 nm. A method based on mean centering of ratio spectra has been performed to remove the interference caused by morin as it overlaps with the Be-morin spectra. The linear range of beryllium concentration is in 0.2-200 ppb range. The parameters of detection limit and RSD were 0.18 ppb and 4.6 % respectively. This method was used for determination of beryllium in copper-beryllium alloy as a real sample. In determination of Be(II), the interference by Cu(II) was very serious, which was eliminated by adding triethanolamine. PMID:27265354

  10. Raman spectra of silicon carbide small particles and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieligor, Monika; Wang, Yuejian; Zerda, T. W.

    2005-04-01

    Two manufacturing protocols of silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires are discussed. The Raman spectra of produced SiC nanowires are compared with spectra of SiC powders of various grain sizes. The temperature and pressure dependence of the Raman spectra for powders is similar to that of bulk crystals, but is different for nanowires. Frequency shifts, band broadenings and the presence of shoulders are discussed in terms of crystal size, character of defects and their population. The concentration of defects in synthesized nanowires depends on the sintering method. Raman intensity enhancement of the LO phonon was observed when the wavelength of the excitation laser was changed from 780 to 514 nm.

  11. Tracking the photodissociation dynamics of liquid nitromethane at 266 nm by femtosecond time-resolved broadband transient grating spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honglin; Song, Yunfei; Yu, Guoyang; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chang; Yang, Yanqiang

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved transient grating (TG) technique was employed to get insight into the photodissociation mechanism of liquid nitromethane (NM). Broadband white-light continuum was introduced as the probe to observe the evolution of electronic excited states of NM molecules and the formation of photodissociation products simultaneously. The reaction channel of liquid NM under 266 nm excitation was obtained that NM molecules in excited state S2 relax through two channels: about 73% relax to low lying S1 state through S2/S1 internal conversion with a time constant of 0.24 ps and then go back to the ground state through S1/S0 internal conversion; the other 27% will dissociate with a time constant of 2.56 ps. NO2 was found to be one of the products from the experimental TG spectra, which confirmed that C-N bond rupture was the primary dissociation channel of liquid NM.

  12. Radiation Tolerance of 65nm CMOS Transistors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Krohn, M.; Bentele, B.; Christian, D. C.; Cumalat, J. P.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Hoff, J.; Shenai, A.; Wagner, S. R.

    2015-12-11

    We report on the effects of ionizing radiation on 65 nm CMOS transistors held at approximately -20°C during irradiation. The pattern of damage observed after a total dose of 1 Grad is similar to damage reported in room temperature exposures, but we observe less damage than was observed at room temperature.

  13. Negative-tone 193-nm resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungseo; Vander Heyden, Anthony; Byers, Jeff D.; Willson, C. Grant

    2000-06-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the design of single layer positive tone resists for 193 nm lithography. Commercial samples of such materials are now available from many vendors. The patterning of certain levels of devices profits from the use of negative tone resists. There have been several reports of work directed toward the design of negative tones resists for 193 nm exposure but, none have performed as well as the positive tone systems. Polymers with alicyclic structures in the backbone have emerged as excellent platforms from which to design positive tone resists for 193 nm exposure. We now report the adaptation of this class of polymers to the design of high performance negative tone 193 nm resists. New systems have been prepared that are based on a polarity switch mechanism for modulation of the dissolution rate. The systems are based on a polar, alicyclic polymer backbone that includes a monomer bearing a glycol pendant group that undergoes the acid catalyzed pinacol rearrangement upon exposure and bake to produce the corresponding less polar ketone. This monomer was copolymerized with maleic anhydride and a norbornene bearing a bis-trifluoromethylcarbinol. The rearrangement of the copolymer was monitored by FT-IR as a function of temperature. The synthesis of the norbornene monomers will be presented together with characterization of copolymers of these monomers with maleic anhydride. The lithographic performance of the new resist system will also be presented.

  14. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  15. Laser Direct Writing of Long Period Fiber Grating by 800 NM Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shuangchen; Huang, Yi; Du, Chenlin; Yu, Yongqin

    Femtosecond laser pulses with ultrashort time duration and ultrahigh peak power can cause the refractive index change in transparent materials and micron scale machining precision. Long period fiber gratings (LPFGs) with different periods and different grating lengths in the standard single mode fiber were fabricated, using laser direct writing method, by femtosecond laser pulses with pulse width of 200 fs at a center wavelength of 800 nm in air. The transmission spectra were studied in the range of 1510 nm to 1610 nm. Two LPFGs with period of 400 μm, and 550 μm, respectively fabricated with same irradiation power of 275 mW, were shown. The loss peak of 1552 nm, the transmission loss of 16 dB and the FWHM of 20 nm were obtained when the period of LPFG was 400 μm, while the loss peak of 1588 nm, the transmission loss of 20 dB and the FWHM of 25 nm were achieved when the period of LPFG was 550 μm. According to the theory of mode field coupling for long period grating, it was indicated that the modulation of refractive index Δn was in the level of 10-2.

  16. New polymer for 157-nm single-layer resist based on fluorine-containing acryl copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Endo, Koutaro; Komano, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Toshimasa

    2001-08-01

    We are reporting on the development of acryl polymer based on novel methacrylate and acrylate monomers with various trifluoromethyl groups for the application to 157nm chemically amplified positive-tone resists. The (alpha) - trifluoromethylation of the alkyl ester in methacrylate or acrylate could employ the reduction of acrylpolymer absorbance at 157nm by spectra analysis with the VUV-200 spectrophotometer by JASCO. Although the trifluoromethyl groups could employ the reduction of base polymer absorbance at 157nm, the homopolymers have issued weak etch resistance as a photoresist base polymer. To take account of this issue, we have developed a novel monomer, trifluoromethyl- iso-adamantylmethacrylate (TFIAdMA) and a new co-polymer system with the combination of fluorinated methacrylate derivatives and substituted p-hydroxystyrene. The absorption coefficient of poly(p-tert-butoxystyren-co- hexafluoro-tert-butyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) incicated to be less than 3 micrometers -1 at 157nm. Patterning results were obtained with a 157nm contact exposure system of VUVES-4500 by LTJ. One of the experimental resists, based on a particular polymer ratio and photo acid generator, has clearly achieved 180nm line and space pattern resolution. At 140nm resist film thickness, the sensitivity was 31 mJ/cm2 when using 0,26N tetrametylammonium hydroxide surfactant type developer.

  17. Absorption coefficients and band strengths for the 703 nm and 727 bands of methane at 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.J.; Singh, K.

    1996-12-31

    The technique of intracavity laser spectroscopy has been used to obtain methane absorption spectra for the vibrational overtone bands that occur around 703 nm and 727 nm. Absorption coefficients for the 690-742 nm range have been obtained for a sample temperature of 77 K at a spectral resolution of <0.02 cm{sup -1}. A new method of data analysis is utilized in obtaining the results. It involves deconvolving the many ILS spectral profiles that comprise the absorption bands and summing the results. Values averaged over 1 cm{sup -1} and 1 {Angstrom} intervals are provided. Band strengths also are obtained. The total intensities of the 703 and 727 nm bands are in reasonable agreement with previous laboratory determinations which were obtained for relatively high pressures of methane at room temperature using lower spectral resolution. The methane bands appear in the reflected sunlight spectra from the outer planets. Results averaged over 1 nm intervals are compared with other laboratory studies and with those derived from observations of the outer planets. The band profiles differ considerably from other laboratory results but are in good accord with the planetary observations. Laboratory spectra of methane at appropriate conditions are required for the proper interpretation of the observational data. Absorption spectra can provide some of the most sensitive diagnostic data on the atmospheres of those bodies.

  18. Estimators of bottom reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, L.; Holloway, J.

    1992-01-01

    Estimators of in situ bottom spectral reflectance are calculated from multi-station optical field data gathered with standard instrumentation from different sites. These spectra are then compared to reflectance spectra measured in the laboratory of the bottom sediments collected in the field for the stations at these different sites. The relative fit of the estimated spectral curves to those measured in the laboratory was measured. The most accurate absolute estimation was provided by the single scattering irradiance model.

  19. Photodecomposition of hexachlorobiphenyl by radiation of a KrCl (222 nm) barrier-discharge excilamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulev, A. A.; Tsvetkov, V. M.

    2010-01-01

    The process of dechlorination of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153) under the action of UV radiation of a KrCl* (222 nm) barrier-discharge excilamp has been studied. The photolysis was performed in PCB 153 solutions in hexane with concentrations of 10 μg/ml (sample 1) and 1 μg/ml (sample 2) and in a PCB 153 film on a silica plate (sample 3). The degree of PCB 153 decomposition was determined using the optical transmission spectra measured in a 185-350 nm wavelength range. An analysis of these spectra showed that chlorine atoms in ortho 2,2'-positions are detached first. At a UV radiation intensity of 3 mW/cm2 on the sample surface, the residual PCB 153 content in samples 1-3 was below 2% (60-min exposure), below 3% (25-min exposure), and below 20% (60-min exposure), respectively.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Thorium spectrum from 250nm to 5500nm (Redman+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, S. L.; Nave, G.; Sansonetti, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    We observed the spectrum of a commercial sealed Th/Ar HCL running at 25mA for almost 15hr starting on 2011 November 2. The region of observation was limited to between 8500/cm and 28000/cm (360nm and 1200nm) by the sensitivity of the silicon photodiode detector. (5 data files).

  1. Adapting Raman spectra from laboratory spectrometers to portable detection libraries.

    PubMed

    Weatherall, James C; Barber, Jeffrey; Brauer, Carolyn S; Johnson, Timothy J; Su, Yin-Fong; Ball, Christopher D; Smith, Barry T; Cox, Rick; Steinke, Robert; McDaniel, Patricia; Wasserzug, Louis

    2013-02-01

    Raman spectral data collected with high-resolution laboratory spectrometers are processed into a format suitable for importing as a user library on a 1064 nm DeltaNu first generation, field-deployable spectrometer prototype. The two laboratory systems used are a 1064 nm Bruker Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectrometer and a 785 nm Kaiser dispersive spectrometer. The steps taken to adapt for device-dependent spectral resolution, wavenumber shifts between instruments, and relative intensity response are described. Effects due to the differing excitation laser wavelengths were found to be minimal, indicating--at least for the near-infrared (NIR)--that data can be ported between different systems, so long as certain measures are taken with regard to the reference and field spectra. PMID:23622433

  2. A principal component analysis of transmission spectra of wine distillates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogovaya, M. V.; Sinitsyn, G. V.; Khodasevich, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    A chemometric method of decomposing multidimensional data into a small-sized space, the principal component method, has been applied to the transmission spectra of vintage Moldovan wine distillates. A sample of 42 distillates aged from four to 7 years from six producers has been used to show the possibility of identifying a producer in a two-dimensional space of principal components describing 94.5% of the data-matrix dispersion. Analysis of the loads into the first two principal components has shown that, in order to measure the optical characteristics of the samples under study using only two wavelengths, it is necessary to select 380 and 540 nm, instead of the standard 420 and 520 nm, to describe the variability of the distillates by one principal component or 370 and 520 nm to describe the variability by two principal components.

  3. Optical properties of human colon tissues in the 350 – 2500 nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Genina, E A; Kochubey, V I; Kolesnikova, E A; Tuchin, V V; Rubtsov, V S

    2014-08-31

    We present the optical characteristics of the mucosa and submucosa of human colon tissue. The experiments are performed in vitro using a LAMBDA 950 spectrophotometer in the 350 – 2500 nm spectral range. The absorption and scattering coefficients and the scattering anisotropy factor are calculated based on the measured diffuse reflectance and total and collimated transmittance spectra using the inverse Monte Carlo method. (laser biophotonics)

  4. Generation and Testing of Autonomous Mineral Detectors for Mars Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, M. D.; Gilmore, M. S.; Castaño, R.; Bornstein, B.; Greenwood, J.

    2004-05-01

    Currently Mars missions can collect more data than can be returned. Autonomous systems for data collection, processing and return will aid future Mars rovers in prioritizing and returning geologically important information. We have created a neural net detector that is able to successfully recognize carbonates from Visible/NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra of rocks collected from Mars analog environments (Gilmore et al. JGR 105, 29,223). In order to characterize and improve the detector's sensitivity, we are evaluating the performance of the detector under more realistic Martian environments: 1) carbonate minerals covered with palagonitic dust, and 2) carbonate minerals intimately mixed with basalt and palagonite. Lessons learned will be applied to the generation of additional detectors for minerals of interest (e.g., hydrothermal minerals). Aliquots of Martian Soil Simulant JSC Mars-1 palagonite were sieved to <45 microns and air fall deposited onto a calcite crystal and an adjacent glass slide. Spectra in the Vis/NIR were taken of the calcite after every layer up to a thickness of 270 microns (35 layers) with an Analytical Spectral Devices Field Spec Pro spectrometer operating from 350-2500 nm. The carbonate detector, operating over the range 2000-2400 nm, has an empirically established detection threshold based on training with thousands of synthetic linear combinations of laboratory mineral spectra designed to simulate expected Martian rocks. The detection threshold was reached in this experiment when the dust layer thickness reached 102 -116 microns (78-85% aerial coverage). This corresponds to a real change in the depth of the 2300 nm carbonate band (continuum depth, D= 1- [reflectance at trough center/reflectance at continuum] = ~0.1), and is similar to the detection threshold of the human experimenter. Very thin (~10-20 microns) coatings of palagonite dust had a large effect on the spectral response of the substrate, exemplifying the nonlinear mixing of the two

  5. Absorption spectra of monolayer MoS2 in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hung-Duen; Her, Jim-Long; Takeyama, Shojiro; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Wang, Kai-Hsuan

    2015-03-01

    We have measured the absorption spectra of monolayer MoS2 film at several temperatures in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 52 T. At room temperature, the observed spectrum dominated by two main peaks, which are located at 660 nm and 606 nm. These peaks are ascribed to excition and trion absorption peaks respectively [1]. At low temperature (4.2 K), two peaks show the blue shift to 633 nm and 588 nm, respectively. Irrespective of the temperature, applying magnetic field does not show pronounced influence on the peaks even in 52 T.

  6. Stratospheric N2O mixing ratio profile from high-resolution balloon-borne solar absorption spectra and laboratory spectra near 1880/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Smith, M. A. H.; Seals, R. K., Jr.; Larsen, J. C.; Rinsland, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A nonlinear least-squares fitting procedure is used to derive the stratospheric N2O mixing ratio profile from balloon-borne solar absorption spectra and laboratory spectra near 1880/cm. The atmospheric spectra analyzed here were recorded during sunset from a float altitude of 33 km with the University of Denver's 0.02/cm resolution interferometer near Alamogordo, N.M. (33 deg N) on Oct. 10, 1979. The laboratory data are used to determine the N2O line intensities. The measurements suggest an N2O mixing ratio of 264 ppbv near 15 km, decreasing to 155 ppbv near 28 km.

  7. Pump bleaching of Tm-doped fiber with 793 nm pump source.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ying-bin; Huang, Hong-qi; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Lei; Li, Jin-yan; Dai, Neng-li

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, the strong recovery of the optical-optical slope efficiency of gamma-ray-irradiated Tm-doped fiber under 793 nm laser diode (LD) pumping. The fiber optical-optical slope efficiency, the fiber cladding absorption spectra, and the fluorescence spectra of the Tm-doped fiber before and after 500 Gy gamma-ray irradiation have been measured for comparison. It is found that the fiber optical-optical slope efficiency had significant degradation from 56.3% to 26.7% after irradiation and recovered to 40.8% after 15 h pump bleaching. Based on comparative analysis of fiber cladding absorption spectra among pristine fiber, irradiation, and bleaching, the reasons for the strong recovery have also been discussed. PMID:25723406

  8. Laser damage database at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, F.; Gonzales, R.P.; Morgan, A.J.

    1990-03-01

    In conjunction with our diversification of laser damage testing capabilities, we have expanded upon a database of threshold measurements and parameter variations at 1064 nm. This includes all tests at low pulse-repetition frequencies (PRF) ranging from single shots to 120 Hz. These tests were conducted on the Reptile laser facility since 1987 and the Variable Pulse Laser (VPL) facility since 1988. Pulse durations ranged from 1 to 16 ns. 10 refs., 14 figs.

  9. Radiation Status of Sub-65 nm Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-scaled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) includes commercial foundry capabilities at and below the 65 nm technology node Radiation evaluations take place using standard products and test characterization vehicles (memories, logic/latch chains, etc.) NEPP focus is two-fold: (1) Conduct early radiation evaluations to ascertain viability for future NASA missions (i.e. leverage commercial technology development). (2) Uncover gaps in current testing methodologies and mechanism comprehension -- early risk mitigation.

  10. Binary 193nm photomasks aging phenomenon study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaye, Félix; Sartelli, Luca; Pogliani, Carlo; Gough, Stuart; Sundermann, Frank; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Hidenori, Yoshioka; Charras, Nathalie; Brochard, Christophe; Thivolle, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    193nm binary photomasks are still used in the semiconductor industry for the lithography of some critical layers for the nodes 90nm and 65nm, with high volumes and over long period. These 193nm binary masks seem to be well-known but recent studies have shown surprising degrading effects, like Electric Field induced chromium Migration (EFM) [1] or chromium migration [2] [3] . Phase shift Masks (PSM) or Opaque MoSi On Glass (OMOG) might not be concerned by these effects [4] [6] under certain conditions. In this paper, we will focus our study on two layers gate and metal lines. We will detail the effects of mask aging, with SEM top view pictures revealing a degraded chromium edge profile and TEM chemical analyses demonstrating the growth of a chromium oxide on the sidewall. SEMCD measurements after volume production indicated a modified CD with respect to initial CD data after manufacture. A regression analysis of these CD measurements shows a radial effect, a die effect and an isolated-dense effect. Mask cleaning effectiveness has also been investigated, with sulphate or ozone cleans, to recover the mask quality in terms of CD. In complement, wafer intrafield CD measurements have been performed on the most sensitive structure to monitor the evolution of the aging effect on mask CD uniformity. Mask CD drift have been correlated with exposure dose drift and isolated-dense bias CD drift on wafers. In the end, we will try to propose a physical explanation of this aging phenomenon and a solution to prevent from it occurring.

  11. Selection of Portable Spectrometers for Planetary Exploration: A Comparison of 532 nm and 785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of Reduced Carbon in Archean Cherts.

    PubMed

    Harris, Liam V; Hutchinson, Ian B; Ingley, Richard; Marshall, Craig P; Marshall, Alison Olcott; Edwards, Howell G M

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge and understanding of the martian environment has advanced greatly over the past two decades, beginning with NASA's return to the surface of Mars with the Pathfinder mission and its rover Sojourner in 1997 and continuing today with data being returned by the Curiosity rover. Reduced carbon, however, is yet to be detected on the martian surface, despite its abundance in meteorites originating from the planet. If carbon is detected on Mars, it could be a remnant of extinct life, although an abiotic source is much more likely. If the latter is the case, environmental carbonaceous material would still provide a source of carbon that could be utilized by microbial life for biochemical synthesis and could therefore act as a marker for potential habitats, indicating regions that should be investigated further. For this reason, the detection and characterization of reduced or organic carbon is a top priority for both the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars rover, currently due for launch in 2018, and for NASA's Mars 2020 mission. Here, we present a Raman spectroscopic study of Archean chert Mars analog samples from the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. Raman spectra were acquired with a flight-representative 532 nm instrument and a 785 nm instrument with similar operating parameters. Reduced carbon was successfully detected with both instruments; however, its Raman bands were detected more readily with 785 nm excitation, and the corresponding spectra exhibited superior signal-to-noise ratios and reduced background levels. PMID:26060980

  12. AIMS mask qualification for 32nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Rigo; Thaler, Thomas; Seitz, Holger; Stroessner, Ulrich; Scheruebl, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Moving forward to 32nm node and below optical lithography using 193nm is faced with complex requirements to be solved. Mask makers are forced to address both Double Patterning Techniques and Computational Lithography approaches such as Source Mask Optimizations and Inverse Lithography. Additionally, lithography at low k1 values increases the challenges for mask repair as well as for repair verification and review by AIMSTM. Higher CD repeatability, more flexibility in the illumination settings as well as significantly improved image performance must be added when developing the next generation mask qualification equipment. This paper reports latest measurement results verifying the appropriateness of the latest member of AIMSTM measurement tools - the AIMSTM 32-193i. We analyze CD repeatability measurements on lines and spaces pattern. The influence of the improved optical performance and newly introduced interferometer stage will be verified. This paper highlights both the new Double Patterning functionality emulating double patterning processes and the influence of its critical parameters such as overlay errors and resist impact. Beneficial advanced illumination schemes emulating scanner illumination document the AIMSTM 32-193i to meet mask maker community's requirements for the 32nm node.

  13. The composite load spectra project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H.; Kurth, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic methods and generic load models capable of simulating the load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components are being developed. Four engine component types (the transfer ducts, the turbine blades, the liquid oxygen posts and the turbopump oxidizer discharge duct) were selected as representative hardware examples. The composite load spectra that simulate the probabilistic loads for these components are typically used as the input loads for a probabilistic structural analysis. The knowledge-based system approach used for the composite load spectra project provides an ideal environment for incremental development. The intelligent database paradigm employed in developing the expert system provides a smooth coupling between the numerical processing and the symbolic (information) processing. Large volumes of engine load information and engineering data are stored in database format and managed by a database management system. Numerical procedures for probabilistic load simulation and database management functions are controlled by rule modules. Rules were hard-wired as decision trees into rule modules to perform process control tasks. There are modules to retrieve load information and models. There are modules to select loads and models to carry out quick load calculations or make an input file for full duty-cycle time dependent load simulation. The composite load spectra load expert system implemented today is capable of performing intelligent rocket engine load spectra simulation. Further development of the expert system will provide tutorial capability for users to learn from it.

  14. Analysis of laser produced plasmas of gold in the 1-7 nm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Yugami, Noboru; Dunne, Padraig; Kilbane, Deirdre; Sokell, Emma; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2014-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from gold laser produced plasmas were recorded in the 1-7 nm region using two Nd:YAG lasers with pulse lengths of 150 ps and 10 ns, respectively, operating at a range of power densities. The maximum focused peak power density was 9.5 × 1013 W cm-2 for the former and 5.3 × 1012 W cm-2 for the latter. Two intense quasicontinuous intensity bands resulting from n = 4-n = 4 and n = 4-n = 5 unresolved transition arrays dominate the 4-5.5 and 1.5-3.6 nm regions of both spectra. Comparison with atomic structure calculations performed with the Cowan suite of atomic structure codes as well as consideration of previous experimental and theoretical results aided identification of the most prominent features in the spectra. For the ns spectrum, the highest ion stage that could be identified from the n = 4-n = 5 arrays was Au28+ while for the ps plasma the presence of significantly higher stages was deduced and lines due to 4d104f-4d94f2 transitions in Ag-like Au32+ give rise to the strongest observed features within the n = 4-n = 4 array while in the n = 4-n = 5 array it was possible to identify a number of previously unidentified spectral features as resulting from 4f-5g transitions in the spectra of Au XX to Au XXXIII.

  15. Fluorescence spectra decomposition by asymmetric functions: Laurdan spectrum revisited.

    PubMed

    Bacalum, Mihaela; Zorilă, Bogdan; Radu, Mihai

    2013-09-15

    Due to their asymmetric nature, complex fluorescence spectra of molecules can be analyzed much better by log-normal distributions than by Gaussian ones. So far, the log-normal function has been used for deconvolution of emission spectra of different fluorescent molecules, such as Tryptophan and Prodan, but to our knowledge it is far less used for Laurdan (2-dimethylamino-6-lauroylnaphthalene). In this article, we present the decomposition of Laurdan emission spectra in large unilamellar vesicles using a procedure that relies on the log-normal asymmetric function. The procedure was calibrated using Laurdan spectra in homogeneous solutions of various solvents. Comparing our results with the ones obtained from a Gaussian fit, we show that (i) the position of the elementary peaks (~440 and 490 nm) is preserved in a large range of temperatures that include the main phase transition of lipid bilayer and (ii) the bilayer hydration, as reported by Laurdan, increases approximately 8 times from the gel phase to the liquid crystalline one, a result that fits with other reports, providing a more realistic description. In addition, we propose a new parameter to globally evaluate Laurdan emission spectra with the prospect of acquiring a larger range of values than the classical "generalized polarization". PMID:23747535

  16. A flow cytometer for the measurement of Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Watson, Dakota A; Brown, Leif O; Gaskill, Daniel F; Naivar, Mark; Graves, Steven W; Doorn, Stephen K; Nolan, John P

    2008-02-01

    Multiparameter measurements in flow cytometry are limited by the broad emission spectra of fluorescent labels. By contrast, Raman spectra are notable for their narrow spectral features. To increase the multiparameter analysis capabilities of flow cytometry, we investigated the possibility of measuring Raman signals in a flow cytometry-based system. We constructed a Raman Spectral Flow Cytometer, substituting a spectrograph and CCD detector for the traditional mirrors, optical filters, and photomultiplier tubes. Excitation at 633 nm was provided by a HeNe laser, and forward-angle light scatter is used to trigger acquisition of complete spectra from individual particles. Microspheres were labeled with nanoparticle surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags and measured using the RSFC. Fluorescence and Raman spectra from labeled microspheres were acquired using the Raman Spectral Flow Cytometer. SERS spectral intensities were dependent on integration time, laser power, and detector pixel binning. Spectra from particles labeled with one each of four different SERS tags could be distinguished by either a virtual bandpass approach using commercial flow cytometry data analysis software or by principal component analysis. Raman flow cytometry opens up new possibilities for highly multiparameter and multiplexed measurements of cells and other particles using a simple optical design and a single detector and light source. PMID:18189283

  17. Analysis of photometric spectra of 17 meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The initial phase of the photometry which involved 17 meteor spectra consisting of eight Geminid spectra, six Orionid spectra and three Eta Aquarid spectra is discussed. Among these 17 spectra it is found that the Geminid spectra are of the best quality and are used for the identification of the atomic lines and molecular bands that normally appear on video tape spectra. The data from the Geminid records are used for developing calibration techniques in photometry. The Orionid and Eta Aquarid spectra are chosen for early analysis because of the current interest in all physical and chemical data relating to Comet Halley.

  18. Sub-50nm extreme ultraviolet holographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Marconi, M. C.; Bartels, R. A.; Menoni, C. S.; Rocca, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    Imaging tools for nanoscicence involving sub-100-nm scale objects have been dominated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). These imaging techniques have contributed substantially to the development of nanoscience, providing a very powerful diagnostic tool capable of obtaining images with atomic resolution or as a subsidiary mechanism to arrange or modify surfaces also at the atomic scale [1,2]. However, some important problems have persisted traditional nanoscale imaging techniques. For example when scanning a nanometer size object that is not attached rigidly to a surface the interaction with the tip significantly perturbs the specimen degrading or eventually precluding the image acquisition. Electron microscopy often requires surface preparation, consisting of metallization of the sample to avoid surface charging. Additionally the metallization of the sample may alter its characteristics and also limits the resolution. In both cases, if the sample is large (millimeters in size) due to the limited field of view, the image obtained with these conventional methods is only representative of a very small portion of the object. Wavelength-limited holographic imaging using carbon nanotubes as the test object with a table-top extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser operating at 46.9 nm will be discussed. The resolution achieved in this imaging is evaluated with a rigorous correlation image analysis and confirmed with the conventional knife-edge test. The nano-holography presented requires no optics or critical beam alignment; thus the hologram recording scheme is very simple and does not need special sample preparation. In holography, image contrast requires absorption to provide scattering by the illuminating beam. The EUV laser wavelength employed in this experiment (46.9nm) is advantageous because carbon based materials typically exhibit very small attenuation lengths, around 25 nm. The high absorption of

  19. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  20. Visible/near-infrared spectra of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.

    2003-01-01

    High shock pressures cause structural changes in plagioclase feldspars such as mechanical fracturing and disaggregation of the crystal lattice at submicron scales, the formation of diaplectic glass (maskelynite), and genuine melting. Past studies of visible/ near-infrared spectra of shocked feldspars demonstrated few spectral variations with pressure except for a decrease in the depth of the absorption feature near 1250-1300 nm and an overall decrease in reflectance. New visible/near-infrared spectra (400-2500 nm) of experimentally shocked (17-56 GPa) albite- and anorthite-rich rock powders demonstrate similar trends, including the loss of minor hydrated mineral bands near 1410, 1930, 2250, and 2350 nm. However, the most interesting new observations are increases in reflectance at intermediate pressures, followed by subsequent decreases in reflectance at higher pressures. The amount of internal scattering and overall sample reflectance is controlled by the relative proportions of micro-fractures, submicron grains, diaplectic glass, and melts formed during shock metamorphism. We interpret the observed reflectance increases at intermediate pressures to result from progressively larger proportions of submicron feldspar grains and diaplectic glass. The ensuing decreases in reflectance occur after diaplectic glass formation is complete and the proportion of genuine melt inclusions increases. The pressure regimes over which these reflectance variations occur differ between albite and anorthite, consistent with thermal infrared spectra of these samples and previous studies of shocked feldspars. These types of spectral variations associated with different peak shock pressures should be considered during interpretation and modeling of visible/near-infrared remotely sensed spectra of planetary and asteroidal surfaces.

  1. Visible/near-infrared spectra of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Hörz, Friedrich

    2003-11-01

    High shock pressures cause structural changes in plagioclase feldspars such as mechanical fracturing and disaggregation of the crystal lattice at submicron scales, the formation of diaplectic glass (maskelynite), and genuine melting. Past studies of visible/near-infrared spectra of shocked feldspars demonstrated few spectral variations with pressure except for a decrease in the depth of the absorption feature near 1250-1300 nm and an overall decrease in reflectance. New visible/near-infrared spectra (400-2500 nm) of experimentally shocked (17-56 GPa) albite- and anorthite-rich rock powders demonstrate similar trends, including the loss of minor hydrated mineral bands near 1410, 1930, 2250, and 2350 nm. However, the most interesting new observations are increases in reflectance at intermediate pressures, followed by subsequent decreases in reflectance at higher pressures. The amount of internal scattering and overall sample reflectance is controlled by the relative proportions of micro-fractures, submicron grains, diaplectic glass, and melts formed during shock metamorphism. We interpret the observed reflectance increases at intermediate pressures to result from progressively larger proportions of submicron feldspar grains and diaplectic glass. The ensuing decreases in reflectance occur after diaplectic glass formation is complete and the proportion of genuine melt inclusions increases. The pressure regimes over which these reflectance variations occur differ between albite and anorthite, consistent with thermal infrared spectra of these samples and previous studies of shocked feldspars. These types of spectral variations associated with different peak shock pressures should be considered during interpretation and modeling of visible/near-infrared remotely sensed spectra of planetary and asteroidal surfaces.

  2. Scatterometry measurement precision and accuracy below 70 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendelbach, Matthew; Archie, Charles N.

    2003-05-01

    Scatterometry is a contender for various measurement applications where structure widths and heights can be significantly smaller than 70 nm within one or two ITRS generations. For example, feedforward process control in the post-lithography transistor gate formation is being actively pursued by a number of RIE tool manufacturers. Several commercial forms of scatterometry are available or under development which promise to provide satisfactory performance in this regime. Scatterometry, as commercially practiced today, involves analyzing the zeroth order reflected light from a grating of lines. Normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry, 2-theta fixed-wavelength ellipsometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry are among the optical techniques, while library based spectra matching and realtime regression are among the analysis techniques. All these commercial forms will find accurate and precise measurement a challenge when the material constituting the critical structure approaches a very small volume. Equally challenging is executing an evaluation methodology that first determines the true properties (critical dimensions and materials) of semiconductor wafer artifacts and then compares measurement performance of several scatterometers. How well do scatterometers track process induced changes in bottom CD and sidewall profile? This paper introduces a general 3D metrology assessment methodology and reports upon work involving sub-70 nm structures and several scatterometers. The methodology combines results from multiple metrologies (CD-SEM, CD-AFM, TEM, and XSEM) to form a Reference Measurement System (RMS). The methodology determines how well the scatterometry measurement tracks critical structure changes even in the presence of other noncritical changes that take place at the same time; these are key components of accuracy. Because the assessment rewards scatterometers that measure with good precision (reproducibility) and good accuracy, the most precise

  3. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  4. Spectroscopy and decay kinetics of Pr{sup 3+}-doped chloride crystals for 1300-nm optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Wilke, G.D.

    1995-03-09

    Several Pr{sup 3+}-doped chloride crystals have been tested spectroscopically for suitability as 1300-nm optical amplifiers operating on the {sup 1}G{sub 4} - {sup 3}H{sub 5} transition. {sup 1}G{sub 4} lifetimes are much longer than in fluoride hosts, ranging up to 1300 {mu}sec and suggesting a near-unity luminescence quantum yield. Emission spectra are typically broad (FWHM {approximately} 70 nm) and include the 1310-nm zero-dispersion wavelength of standard telecommunications fiber.

  5. [Experimental study on the size spectra and emission factor of ultrafine particle from coal combustion].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zai; Yang, Wen-jun; Xie, Xiao-fang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Cai, Zhi-liang

    2014-12-01

    The emission characteristics of ultrafine particles released from pulverized coal combustion were studied, the size spectra of ultrafine particles (5.6-560 nm) were measured with FMPS (fast mobility particle sizer) on a self-built aerosol experiment platform. Meanwhile, a particle dynamic evolution model was established to obtain the particle deposition rate and the emission rate through the optimized algorithm. Finally, the emission factor was calculated. The results showed that at the beginning of particle generation, the size spectra were polydisperse and complex, the initial size spectra was mainly composed of three modes including 10 nm, 30-40 nm and 100-200 nm. Among them, the number concentration of mode around 10 nm was higher than those of other modes, the size spectrum of around 100-200 nm was lognormal distributed, with a CMD (count median diameter) of around 16 nm. Then, as time went on, the total number concentration was decayed by exponential law, the CMD first increased and then tended to be stable gradually. The calculation results showed that the emission factor of particles from coal combustion under laboratory condition was (5.54 x 10(12) ± 2.18 x 10(12)) unit x g(-1). PMID:25826918

  6. Action spectra for validation of pathogen disinfection in medium-pressure ultraviolet (UV) systems.

    PubMed

    Beck, Sara E; Wright, Harold B; Hargy, Thomas M; Larason, Thomas C; Linden, Karl G

    2015-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) reactors used for disinfecting water and wastewater must be validated and monitored over time. The validation process requires understanding the photochemical properties of the pathogens of concern and the challenge microorganisms used to represent them. Specifically for polychromatic UV systems, the organisms' dose responses to UV light and their sensitivity across the UV spectrum must be known. This research measured the UV spectral sensitivity, called action spectra, of Cryptosporidium parvum, and MS2, T1UV, Q Beta, T7, and T7m Coliphages, as well as Bacillus pumilus spores. A tunable laser from the National Institute of Standards and Technology was used to isolate single UV wavelengths at 10 nm intervals between 210 and 290 nm. Above 240 nm, all bacteria and viruses tested exhibited a relative peak sensitivity between 260 and 270 nm. Of the coliphage, MS2 exhibited the highest relative sensitivity below 240 nm, relative to its sensitivity at 254 nm, followed by Q Beta, T1UV, T7m and T7 coliphage. B. pumilus spores were more sensitive to UV light at 220 nm than any of the coliphage. These spectra are required for calculating action spectra correction factors for medium pressure UV system validation, for matching appropriate challenge microorganisms to pathogens, and for improving UV dose monitoring. Additionally, understanding the dose response of these organisms at multiple wavelengths can improve polychromatic UV dose calculations and enable prediction of pathogen inactivation from wavelength-specific disinfection technologies such as UV light emitting diodes (LEDs). PMID:25506761

  7. [Fluorescence spectra study of a new toxic protein from Malania oleifera].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yan; Xiao, Han; Kang, Hong-Jun; Chen, Rui-Yan; Dai, Xiao-Chang

    2009-03-01

    A new toxic protein named malanin was isolated from seeds of Malania olei fera by hydrophobic chromatography, whose cytotoxic activities against carcinoma cells were very strong. The conformational changes of malanin at various temperatures, pH, organic solvents, surfactant, denaturant and fluorescence quenching solvents were studied by fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence spectra of malanin excited at 280 nm and 295 nm showed a maximum at 340 nm. The emission spectra of malanin showed that Trp residues were located by a great degree in the hydrophobic area. Addition of SDS, CH5N3 x HSCN, acrylamide and KI led to changes in the molecular conformation of malanin, and caused the fluorescence quenching of Trp residues. The red-shifted emission band of malanin after adding CH5 N3 x HSCN showed that Trp residues were exposed in polar solvents. PMID:19455822

  8. AVIRIS spectra of California wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Michael F.; Ustin, Susan L.; Klemas, Vytautas

    1988-01-01

    Spectral data gathered by the AVIRIS from wetlands in the Suisun Bay area of California on 13 October 1987 were analyzed. Spectra representing stands of numerous vegetation types (including Sesuvium verrucosum, Scirpus acutus and Scirpus californicus, Xanthium strumarium, Cynadon dactylon, and Distichlis spicata) and soil were isolated. Despite some defects in the data, it was possible to detect vegetation features such as differences in the location of the chlorophyll red absorption maximum. Also, differences in cover type spectra were evident in other spectral regions. It was not possible to determine if the observed features represent noise, variability in canopy architecture, or chemical constituents of leaves.

  9. Size and Purity Control of HPHT Nanodiamonds down to 1 nm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) nanodiamonds originate from grinding of diamond microcrystals obtained by HPHT synthesis. Here we report on a simple two-step approach to obtain as small as 1.1 nm HPHT nanodiamonds of excellent purity and crystallinity, which are among the smallest artificially prepared nanodiamonds ever shown and characterized. Moreover we provide experimental evidence of diamond stability down to 1 nm. Controlled annealing at 450 °C in air leads to efficient purification from the nondiamond carbon (shells and dots), as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Annealing at 500 °C promotes, besides of purification, also size reduction of nanodiamonds down to ∼1 nm. Comparably short (1 h) centrifugation of the nanodiamonds aqueous colloidal solution ensures separation of the sub-10 nm fraction. Calculations show that an asymmetry of Raman diamond peak of sub-10 nm HPHT nanodiamonds can be well explained by modified phonon confinement model when the actual particle size distribution is taken into account. In contrast, larger Raman peak asymmetry commonly observed in Raman spectra of detonation nanodiamonds is mainly attributed to defects rather than to the phonon confinement. Thus, the obtained characteristics reflect high material quality including nanoscale effects in sub-10 nm HPHT nanodiamonds prepared by the presented method. PMID:26691647

  10. Gd plasma source modeling at 6.7 nm for future lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Jiang, Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2011-12-05

    Plasmas containing gadolinium have been proposed as sources for next generation lithography at 6.x nm. To determine the optimum plasma conditions, atomic structure calculations have been performed for Gd{sup 11+} to Gd{sup 27+} ions which showed that n = 4 - n = 4 resonance transitions overlap in the 6.5-7.0 nm region. Plasma modeling calculations, assuming collisional-radiative equilibrium, predict that the optimum temperature for an optically thin plasma is close to 110 eV and that maximum intensity occurs at 6.76 nm under these conditions. The close agreement between simulated and experimental spectra from laser and discharge produced plasmas indicates the validity of our approach.

  11. Photoinduced absorption and refractive-index induction in phosphosilicate fibres by radiation at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rybaltovsky, A A; Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Lanin, Aleksei V; Semenov, S L; Dianov, Evgenii M; Gur'yanov, A N; Khopin, V F

    2007-04-30

    The photoinduced room-temperature-stable increase in the refractive index by {approx}5x10{sup -4} at a wavelength of 1.55 {mu}m was observed in phosphosilicate fibres without their preliminary loading with molecular hydrogen. It is shown that irradiation of preliminary hydrogen-loaded fibres by an ArF laser at 193 nm enhances the efficiency of refractive-index induction by an order of magnitude. The induced-absorption spectra of preforms with a phosphosilicate glass core and optical fibres fabricated from them are studied in a broad spectral range from 150 to 5000 nm. The intense induced-absorption band ({approx}800 cm{sup -1}) at 180 nm is found, which strongly affects the formation of the induced refractive index. The quantum-chemical model of a defect related to this band is proposed. (optical fibres)

  12. White-Light Emission from Silicone Rubber Modified by 193 nm ArF Excimer Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoshi, Masayuki; Sekine, Daisuke; Inoue, Narumi; Yamashita, Tsugito

    2007-04-01

    The photochemical surface modification of silicone ([SiO(CH3)2]n) rubber has been successfully demonstrated using a 193 nm ArF excimer laser, and white light of strong intensity was emitted upon exposure to a 325 nm He-Cd laser. The photoluminescence spectra of the modified silicone showed broad peaks centered at 410, 550, and 750 nm wavelengths. The modified surface was carbon-free silicon oxide, and the chemical composition ratio of O/Si was approximately 2. However, the surface was not silica glass (SiO2), as clarified by IR spectroscopy. Instead, nanometer-size particles of silicon oxide were formed on the surface of the modified silicone rubber.

  13. Scaling of laser-induced contamination growth at 266nm and 355nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ließmann, M.; Jensen, L.; Balasa, I.; Hunnekuhl, M.; Büttner, A.; Weßels, P.; Neumann, J.; Ristau, D.

    2015-11-01

    The growth of laser-induced contamination (LIC) on optical components in extraterrestrial missions is a known issue especially for the UV spectral region. The Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. is responsible for the development of a pulsed laser-system operating at a wavelength of 266 nm for the ExoMars mission and for the qualification of used optics and materials regarding LIC. In this context, toluene was utilized which is an often used model contaminant in LIC studies. Test cycles based on the application of the two UV wavelengths 355 nm and 266 nm on fused silica substrates and ARcoated optics are conducted and the observed contamination effects are compared. This scaling allows for a rough estimate of the destructive influence of LIC on space optics degradation at 266 nm. Further tests will be performed with materials integrated into the ExoMars-laser-head under near-operation environmental conditions.

  14. An 885-nm Direct Pumped Nd:CNGG 1061 nm Q-Switched Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi-Nan; Zhang, Tao; Feng, Bao-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Huai-Jin; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2014-07-01

    The 885 nm direct pumping method, directly into the 4F3/2 emitting level of Nd3+ ion, is used to a Nd:CNGG crystal to product passive Q-switched 1061 nm laser pulses, for the first time to the best of our knowledge. A maximum average output power of 1.16 W for 1061 nm Q-switched pulses and a repetition rate of 12.54 kHz are obtained. The pulse width is measured to be 24 ns and the peak power is 3.843 kW. A high-quality fundamental transverse mode can be observed owing to the reduction of the thermal effect for Nd:CNGG crystal by 885 nm direct pumping.

  15. Theoretical investigation of the lithium 2p←2s photoabsorption spectra perturbed by atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoudi, N.; Bouledroua, M.; Alioua, K.; Allouche, A.-R.; Aubert-Frécon, M.

    2013-05-01

    This work proposes a theoretical study of the Li(2p←2s) photoabsorption spectra perturbed by ground hydrogen atoms. The temperature effect on the far-wing spectra is examined in the temperature range 4000-20000K. For this purpose, the ground and excited LiH potential curves and the transition dipole moments that connect them are constructed from ab initio data. The investigation shows that the profile spectra are dominated at all temperatures by the singlet A←X transitions and exhibit in the red wing a satellite structure near the wavelength 1000nm. The spectra revealed also the appearance beyond 14000K of a second satellite structure in the blue wing close to the wavelength 510nm originating from the triplet c←a transitions.

  16. Estimation of crude oil grade using time-resolved fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, E; Hamdan, A

    2002-04-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) spectra of six crude oils from the eastern province of Saudi Arabia were excited using a pulsed laser radiation at 250 nm and measured at specific time gates (TG) within the leading and trailing edges of the laser temporal pulse. The spectra showed the presence of a shoulder near 380 nm that systematically decreased in intensity from high-grade to low-grade crudes, and also from earlier to later TGs. The intensities of these shoulders are shown to be useful in estimating the grades of crude oils, particularly when the TRF spectra are measured at TGs within the leading edge of the laser temporal pulse. Contour diagrams depicting the shapes of the TRF spectra as function of TG (within the leading and trailing edges) are also presented to serve as true fingerprints of the crudes. PMID:18968578

  17. 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser intracavity pumped at 946 nm and sum-frequency mixing for an emission at 501 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Y. F.; Zhang, X. H.; Xia, J.; Jin, G. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Yin, X. D.; Zhang, A. F.

    2010-05-01

    We present for the first time a Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm intracavity pumped by a 946 nm diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser. A 809 nm laser diode is used to pump the first Nd:YAG crystal emitting at 946 nm, and the second Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm intracavity pumped at 946 nm. Intracavity sum-frequency mixing at 946 and 1064 nm was then realized in a LBO crystal to reach the cyan range. We obtained a continuous-wave output power of 485 mW at 501 nm with a pump laser diode emitting 25.4 W at 809 nm.

  18. Resolution of overlapped spectra for the determination of ternary mixture using different and modified spectrophotometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Bahia Abbas; El-Zaher, Asmaa Ahmed; Mahrouse, Marianne Alphonse; Ahmed, Maha Said

    2016-08-01

    Four new spectrophotometric methods were developed, applied to resolve the overlapped spectra of a ternary mixture of [aliskiren hemifumarate (ALS)-amlodipine besylate (AM)-hydrochlorothiazide (HCT)] and to determine the three drugs in pure form and in combined dosage form. Method A depends on simultaneous determination of ALS, AM and HCT using principal component regression and partial least squares chemometric methods. In Method B, a modified isosbestic spectrophotometric method was applied for the determination of the total concentration of ALS and HCT by measuring the absorbance at 274.5 nm (isosbestic point, Aiso). On the other hand, the concentration of HCT in ternary mixture with ALS and AM could be calculated without interference using first derivative spectrophotometric method by measuring the amplitude at 279 nm (zero crossing of ALS and zero value of AM). Thus, the content of ALS was calculated by subtraction. Method C, double divisor first derivative ratio spectrophotometry (double divisor 1DD method), was based on that for the determination of one drug, the ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectra of its different concentrations by the sum of the absorption spectra of the other two drugs as a double divisor. The first derivative of the obtained ratio spectra were then recorded using the appropriate smoothing factor. The amplitudes at 291 nm, 380 nm and 274.5 nm were selected for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT in their ternary mixture, respectively. Method D was based on mean centering of ratio spectra. The mean centered values at 287, 295.5 and 269 nm were recorded and used for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT, respectively. The developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines and proved to be accurate, precise and selective. Satisfactory results were obtained by applying the proposed methods to the analysis of pharmaceutical dosage form.

  19. Resolution of overlapped spectra for the determination of ternary mixture using different and modified spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Bahia Abbas; El-Zaher, Asmaa Ahmed; Mahrouse, Marianne Alphonse; Ahmed, Maha Said

    2016-08-01

    Four new spectrophotometric methods were developed, applied to resolve the overlapped spectra of a ternary mixture of [aliskiren hemifumarate (ALS)-amlodipine besylate (AM)-hydrochlorothiazide (HCT)] and to determine the three drugs in pure form and in combined dosage form. Method A depends on simultaneous determination of ALS, AM and HCT using principal component regression and partial least squares chemometric methods. In Method B, a modified isosbestic spectrophotometric method was applied for the determination of the total concentration of ALS and HCT by measuring the absorbance at 274.5nm (isosbestic point, Aiso). On the other hand, the concentration of HCT in ternary mixture with ALS and AM could be calculated without interference using first derivative spectrophotometric method by measuring the amplitude at 279nm (zero crossing of ALS and zero value of AM). Thus, the content of ALS was calculated by subtraction. Method C, double divisor first derivative ratio spectrophotometry (double divisor (1)DD method), was based on that for the determination of one drug, the ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectra of its different concentrations by the sum of the absorption spectra of the other two drugs as a double divisor. The first derivative of the obtained ratio spectra were then recorded using the appropriate smoothing factor. The amplitudes at 291nm, 380nm and 274.5nm were selected for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT in their ternary mixture, respectively. Method D was based on mean centering of ratio spectra. The mean centered values at 287, 295.5 and 269nm were recorded and used for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT, respectively. The developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines and proved to be accurate, precise and selective. Satisfactory results were obtained by applying the proposed methods to the analysis of pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:27128521

  20. Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2011-10-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A/cm2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated.

  1. Fluorinated dissolution inhibitors for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Alyssandrea H.; Bae, Young C.; Liu, Xiang-Qian; Ober, Christopher K.; Houlihan, Francis M.; Dabbagh, Gary; Novembre, Anthony E.

    2002-07-01

    Fluorinated dissolution inhibitors (DIs) for 157 nm lithography were designed and synthesized as part of an ongoing study on the structure/property relationships of photoresist additives. The problem of volatilization of small DI candidates was observed from matrices such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(hexafluorohydroxy-isopropyl styrene) (PHFHIPS) during post-apply bake cycles using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). To avoid this problem, low volatility fluorinated inhibitors were designed and synthesized. Three fluorinated DIs, perfluorosuberic acid bis-(2,2,2,-trifluoro-1-phenyl-1-trifluoromethyl-ethyl) ester (PFSE1), perfluorosuberic acid bis-[1-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-ethyl] ester (PFSE2) and a fluorinated phenylmethanediol diester (FPMD1), largely remained in a PHFHIPS film during the post-apply bake. The dissolution behavior of the two fluorinated diesters was studied and found to slow down the dissolution rate of PHFHIPS with inhibition factors of 1.9 and 1.6, respectively. The absorbance of PHFHIPS films containing 10 wt% of the diester inhibitors is 3.6 AU/micron compared with an absorbance of 3.3 AU/micron for the polymer itself. The absorbance of 10% FPMD1 in PHFHIPS was measured as 3.5 AU/micron compared with an absorbance of 3.4 AU/micron for the polymer itself. Thus, the non-volatility and transparency of the fluorinated inhibitors at 157 nm as well as their ability to reduce the development rate of fluorinated polymers make them suitable for use in a 157 nm resist system.

  2. Quantitative comparison of the OCT imaging depth at 1300 nm and 1600 nm

    PubMed Central

    Kodach, V. M.; Kalkman, J.; Faber, D. J.; van Leeuwen, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    One of the present challenges in optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the visualization of deeper structural morphology in biological tissues. Owing to a reduced scattering, a larger imaging depth can be achieved by using longer wavelengths. In this work, we analyze the OCT imaging depth at wavelengths around 1300 nm and 1600 nm by comparing the scattering coefficient and OCT imaging depth for a range of Intralipid concentrations at constant water content. We observe an enhanced OCT imaging depth for 1600 nm compared to 1300 nm for Intralipid concentrations larger than 4 vol.%. For higher Intralipid concentrations, the imaging depth enhancement reaches 30%. The ratio of scattering coefficients at the two wavelengths is constant over a large range of scattering coefficients and corresponds to a scattering power of 2.8 ± 0.1. Based on our results we expect for biological tissues an increase of the OCT imaging depth at 1600 nm compared to 1300 nm for samples with high scattering power and low water content. PMID:21258456

  3. Photolysis of formic acid at 355 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Denhi; Bautista, Teonanacatl; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2015-05-01

    Formic acid is well known as a food additive and recently an application on fuel cell technology has emerged. In this work we have studied the dissociative ionization process by multiphoton absorption of formic acid molecules at 355nm wavelength photons, using TOF spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the most abundant ionic fragments produced are studied at different settings of the laser harmonic generator. The dependence of the products on these conditions is reported. This work was supported by CONACYT Project 165410 and PAPIIT IN102613 and IN101215.

  4. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-01

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  5. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    SciTech Connect

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-15

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  6. Polarization effects in cutaneous autofluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Genova, Ts.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    Used polarized light for fluorescence excitation one could obtain response related to the anisotropy features of extracellular matrix. The fluorophore anisotropy is attenuated during lesions' growth and level of such decrease could be correlated with the stage of tumor development. Our preliminary investigations are based on in vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from healthy volunteers skin on different ages and from different anatomical places using linear polarizer and analyzer for excitation and emission light detected. Measurements were made using spectrofluorimeter FluoroLog 3 (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) with fiber-optic probe in steady-state regime using excitation in the region of 280-440 nm. Three different situations were evaluated and corresponding excitation-emission matrices were developed - with parallel and perpendicular positions for linear polarizer and analyzer, and without polarization of excitation and fluorescence light detected from a forearm skin surface. The fluorescence spectra obtained reveal differences in spectral intensity, related to general attenuation, due to filtering effects of used polarizer/analyzer couple. Significant spectral shape changes were observed for the complex autofluorescence signal detected, which correlated with collagen and protein cross-links fluorescence, that could be addressed to the tissue extracellular matrix and general condition of the skin investigated, due to morphological destruction during lesions' growth. A correlation between volunteers' age and the fluorescence spectra detected was observed during our measurements. Our next step is to increase developed initial database and to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescent polarization effects and found if they are significantly altered from normal skin to cancerous state of the tissue, this way to develop a non-invasive diagnostic tool for dermatological practice.

  7. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  8. 1085 nm Nd:YVO4 laser intracavity pumped at 914 nm and sum-frequency mixing to reach cyan laser at 496 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Y. F.; Xia, J.; Yin, X. D.; Wang, D.; Zhang, X. H.

    2010-01-01

    We present for the first time a Nd:YVO4 laser at 1085 nm intracavity pumped at 914 nm by a Nd:YVO4 laser. We obtained intracavity powers of 57 W at 914 nm and 62 W at 1085 nm. Using type-I critical phase-matching LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal, a cyan laser at 496 nm is obtained by 914 and 1085 nm intracavity sum-frequency mixing. The maximum laser output power of 142 mW is obtained when an incident pump laser of 19.6 W is used.

  9. Cloud Processing of CCN Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud processing often makes bimodal aerosol spectra from which size at minimal concentration infers cloud effective supersaturation (Seff) (Hoppel et al. 1986). Particle hygroscopicity (κ) converts this Hoppel minimum to critical S, Sc. Only lower Sc particles that produce cloud droplets are physically (coalescence) or chemically (gas-to-particle conversion) processed, which increases soluble content so that upon evaporation, these CCN have even lower Sc whereas the unactivated CCN do not change size or Sc. This results in the size gap at Seff. DRI CCN spectrometers have revealed bimodality in 6 projects for which Seff can be obtained without κ. However in 2 projects, MASE and ICE-T, simultaneous DMA measurements also provided κ by transposing DMA sizes to Sc; the κ that makes the DMA spectra agree with simultaneous CCN spectra (Fig). There was DMA-CCN agreement for 227 MASE and 50 ICE-T measurements. Since unlike Fig. a mean κ of the processed modes was greater than mean κ of the unprocessed modes, chemical processing was indicated; since most κ were lower than ammonium sulfate κ (0.61) chemical processing should move processed κ closer to 0.61. Chemical processing was also indicated in MASE by greater sulfate and nitrate concentrations for bimodal spectra and greater sulfur dioxide and ozone concentrations for monomodal spectra. MASE above cloud measurements showed higher κ and less bimodality than below cloud measurements, this is consistent with the higher above cloud NCCN, that κ is lower in pollution and for these less cloud interacted samples. Interspersed bimodal and monomodal CCN spectra under the ubiquitous MASE stratus suggested less than well-mixed boundary layers. Somewhat surprisingly there was more bimodality for the cumulus ICE-T clouds than the MASE stratus. ICE-T indicated more physical than chemical cloud processing. Cloud-processing of CCN spectra is as important as CCN sources; it alters Seff, cloud droplet concentrations, mean

  10. Instrumentation and action spectra in light-associated diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cripps, D.J.

    1981-07-01

    Instrumentation for studying action spectra in controls and various light-associated diseases is described. This study summarizes tests performed with a prism grating monochromator during the last 10 yr. There were 68 photodermatoses studied: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) (1), lupus erythematosus (LE) (12), polymorphous light eruption (PLE) (23), solar urticaria (4), actinic reticuloid (2), halogenated salicylanilide photosensitivity and persistent light reactors (11), psoralen photosensitivity (6), and porphyria (9). A normal minimal erythema dose in the UVB (below 320 nm) was generally observed in polymorphous light eruption and lupus erythematosus. The most exquisite photosensitivity for delayed erythema was observed in actinic reticuloid, which in one case was 25-35 times more sensitive in the UVB range which was also observed but to a lesser extent in XP and in persistent light reactors. Persistence of erythema and edema at test sites was observed in XP, PLE, LE, and actinic reticuloid. A delay in development of erythema reaching a maximum at 72 hr was observed in XP and psoralen phototoxicity. Maximum photosensitivity occurred in solar urticaria. Three patients had peak sensitivity in the range of 310-313 nm and the 4th at 460 nm. Photosensitivity in the visible range was detected in 2 patients with solar urticaria, one with actinic reticuloid, and confirmed in 9 patients with porphyria (405 nm). Photosensitivity in the UVA (above 320 nm) occurred to some degree in all groups.

  11. [Application of Raman spectrometer (785 nm) to jadeite test].

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian-liang; Guo, Shou-guo; Liu, Xue-liang

    2007-10-01

    Jadeite is a greatly appreciated gemstone and often referred to as "the king of jade". Because of the advances in processing the treated jadeite is becoming more and more difficult for identification. NIR (785 nm) Raman spectrometer exhibits advantage of non-destruction, quickness, accurateness, and weak fluorescence interferences. This work reports such a research conducted using a NIR Raman spectrometer for a large number of jadeite samples. Based on the spectra collected and analysis there after performed, it is evident that the instrumentation and analysis methodology used have provided great information and assessment assistance in the application. It was found that the spectral response in the green area of a natural jadeite is much stronger in intensity than that in the white area. This is attributed to the key factor, the content of Cr3+ in the area. In contrast the spectral response in the green area of a treated jadeite is much weaker and additional Raman peaks start to show up on the high Raman shift side. This is the evidence of added fluorescence phenomenon and epoxyresin. It was also discovered that certain Raman features disappear compared to a natural sample. This indicates that the jadeite has been treated with acid and filled with colorless glue, which io turn destroyed the original exterior structure of a jadeite. PMID:18306795

  12. Electrically-pumped 850-nm micromirror VECSELs.

    SciTech Connect

    Geib, Kent Martin; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Mar, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) combine high optical power and good beam quality in a device with surface-normal output. In this paper, we describe the design and operating characteristics of an electrically-pumped VECSEL that employs a wafer-scale fabrication process and operates at 850 nm. A curved micromirror output coupler is heterogeneously integrated with AlGaAs-based semiconductor material to form a compact and robust device. The structure relies on flip-chip bonding the processed epitaxial material to an aluminum nitride mount; this heatsink both dissipates thermal energy and permits high frequency modulation using coplanar traces that lead to the VECSEL mesa. Backside emission is employed, and laser operation at 850 nm is made possible by removing the entire GaAs substrate through selective wet etching. While substrate removal eliminates absorptive losses, it simultaneously compromises laser performance by increasing series resistance and degrading the spatial uniformity of current injection. Several aspects of the VECSEL design help to mitigate these issues, including the use of a novel current-spreading n type distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). Additionally, VECSEL performance is improved through the use of a p-type DBR that is modified for low thermal resistance.

  13. Upper-troposphere and lower-stratosphere water vapor retrievals from the 1400 and 1900 nm water vapor bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, K. S.; Thornberry, T.; Rollins, A.; Bui, T.

    2015-03-01

    Measuring water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere is difficult due to the low mixing ratios found there, typically only a few parts per million. Here we examine near-infrared spectra acquired with the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) during the first science phase of the NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX). From the 1400 and 1900 nm absorption bands we infer water vapor amounts in the tropical tropopause layer and adjacent regions between altitudes of 14 and 18 km. We compare these measurements to solar transmittance spectra produced with the MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission (MODTRAN) radiative transfer model, using in situ water vapor, temperature, and pressure profiles acquired concurrently with the SSFR spectra. Measured and modeled transmittance values agree within 0.002, with some larger differences in the 1900 nm band (up to 0.004). Integrated water vapor amounts along the absorption path lengths of 3 to 6 km varied from 1.26 × 10-4 to 4.59 × 10-4 g cm-2. A 0.002 difference in absorptance at 1367 nm results in a 3.35 × 10-5 g cm-2 change of integrated water vapor amounts; 0.004 absorptance change at 1870 nm results in 5.50 × 10-5 g cm-2 of water vapor. These are 27% (1367 nm) and 44% (1870 nm) differences at the lowest measured value of water vapor (1.26 × 10-4 g cm-2) and 7% (1367 nm) and 12% (1870 nm) differences at the highest measured value of water vapor (4.59 × 10-4 g cm-2). A potential method for extending this type of measurement from aircraft flight altitude to the top of the atmosphere is discussed.

  14. Upper-troposphere and lower-stratosphere water vapor retrievals from the 1400 and 1900 nm water vapor bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, K. S.; Thornberry, T.; Rollins, A.; Bui, T.

    2014-10-01

    Measuring water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere is difficult due to the low mixing ratios found there, typically only a few parts per million. Here we examine near infrared spectra acquired with the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer during the first science phase of the NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause EXperiment. From the 1400 and 1900 nm absorption bands, we infer water vapor amounts in the tropical tropopause layer and adjacent regions between 14 and 18 km altitude. We compare these measurements to solar transmittance spectra produced with the MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission (MODTRAN) radiative transfer model, using in situ water vapor, temperature, and pressure profiles acquired concurrently with the SSFR spectra. Measured and modeled transmittance values agree within 0.002, with some larger differences in the 1900 nm band (up to 0.004). Integrated water vapor amounts along the absorption path lengths of 3 to 6 km varied from 1.26 × 10-4 to 4.59 × 10-4 g cm-2. A 0.002 difference in absorptance at 1367 nm results in a 3.35 × 10-5 g cm-2 change of integrated water vapor amount, 0.004 absorptance change at 1870 nm results in 5.5 × 10-5 g cm-2 of water vapor. These are 27% (1367 nm) and 44% (1870 nm) differences at the lowest measured value of water vapor (1.26 × 10-4 g cm-2) and 7% (1367 nm) and 12% (1870 nm) differences at the highest measured value of water vapor (4.59 × 10-4 g cm-2). A potential method for extending this type of measurement from aircraft flight altitude to the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is discussed.

  15. Novel spectrophotometric method for selective determination of compounds in ternary mixtures (dual wavelength in ratio spectra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Ahmed S.

    2015-08-01

    A simple selective spectrophotometric method for determination of compounds in ternary mixture was developed by combining the resolution power of two well-known methods that are commonly used for binary mixtures; namely ratio difference method and dual wavelength. The new method (dual wavelength in ratio spectra) was successfully applied for the determination of a ternary mixture of betamethasone dipropionate (BM), clotrimazole (CT) and benzyl alcohol (BA) in pure powder form and in their pharmaceutical preparation. The difference in amplitudes (ΔP) in the ratio spectra at 252.0 and 258.0 nm (ΔP252.0-258.0nm) corresponds to BM, while ΔP266.8-255.4nm and ΔP254.2-243.5nm corresponds to CT and BA, respectively. The method was validated as per the USP 2005 guidelines. The developed method can be used in quality control laboratories for routine analysis of compounds in ternary mixtures.

  16. Time resolved EUV spectra from Zpinching capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancarek, Alexandr; Nevrkla, Michal; Nawaz, Fahad

    2015-09-01

    We developed symmetrically charged driver to obtain high voltage, high current Z-pinching capillary discharge. Plasma is created by up to 70 kA, 29 ns risetime current pulse passing through a 5 mm inner diameter, 224 mm long capillary filled with gas to initial pressure in the range of 1 kPa. Due to the low inductance design of the driver, the pinch is observable directly from the measured current curve. Time-integrated and time-resolved spectra of discharge plasma radiation are recorded together with the capillary current and analyzed. The most encouraging spectra were captured in the wavelength range 8.3 ÷ 14 nm. This spectral region contains nitrogen Balmer series lines including potentially lasing NVII 2 - 3 transition. Spectral lines are identified in the NIST database using the FLY kinetic code. The line of 13.38 nm wavelength, transition NVII 2 - 3, was observed in gated, and also in time-integrated spectra for currents >60 kA. This work has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic grants LG13029.

  17. Laser Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Spectra of Cajanus Cajan L Plant Growing Under Cadmium Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ram; Pandey, J. K.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-induced Chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) spectra of Cajanus cajan L leaves treated with different concentrations of Cd (0.05, 0.5 and 1 mM) are recorded at 10 and 20 days after first treatment of cadmium. LICF spectra are recorded in the region of 650-780 nm using violet diode laser (405 nm). LICF spectra of plant leaves show two maxima near 685 and 730nm. Fluorescence induction kinetics (FIK) curve are recorded at 685 and 730 nm with red diode laser (635 nm) for excitation. The fluorescence intensity ratios (FIR) F685/F730 are calculated from LICF spectra and vitality index (Rfd) are determined from FIK curve. FIR and Rfd value are good stress indicator of plant health. These parameters along with chlorophyll content are used to analyze the effect of Cd on wheat plants. The result indicates that higher concentrations of Cd hazardous for photosynthetic activity and health of Arhar plants. The lower concentration of 0.05 mM shows stimulatory response up to 10 days while after 20 days this concentration also shows inhibitory response. R. Gopal, K. B. Mishra, M. Zeeshan, S. M. Prasad, and M. M. Joshi Curr. Sci., 83, 880, 2002 K. B. Mishra and R. Gopal Int. J. Rem. Sen., 29, 157, 2008 R. Maurya, S. M. Prasad, and R. Gopal J. Photochem. Photobio. C: Photochem. Rev., 9, 29, 2008

  18. TCSPC FLIM in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1700 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavsky, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    Excitation and detection in the wavelength range above 800nm is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to increase the penetration depth in optical microscopy. Moreover, detection at long wavelength avoids the problem that tissue autofluorescence contaminates the signals from endogenous fluorescence probes. FLIM at NIR wavelength may therefore be complementary to multiphoton microscopy, especially if the lifetimes of NIR fluorophores report biological parameters of the tissue structures they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the excitation sources nor the detectors of standard confocal and multiphoton laser scanning systems are directly suitable for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. Most of these problems can be solved, however, by using ps diode lasers or Ti:Sapphire lasers at their fundamental wavelength, and NIR-sensitive detectors. With NIR-sensitive PMTs the detection wavelength range can be extended up to 900 nm, with InGaAs SPAD detectors up to 1700 nm. Here, we demonstrate the use of a combination of laser scanning, multi-dimensional TCSPC, and advanced excitation sources and detectors for FLIM at up to 1700 nm. The performance was tested at tissue samples incubated with NIR dyes. The fluorescence lifetimes generally get shorter with increasing absorption and emission wavelengths of the dyes. For the cyanine dye IR1061, absorbing around 1060 nm, the lifetime was found to be as short as 70 ps. Nevertheless the fluorescence decay could still be clearly detected. Almost all dyes showed clear lifetime changes depending on the binding to different tissue constituents.

  19. Comparison of 980-nm and 1070-nm in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaloglu, Nermin; Tabakoglu, Ozgur; Ergenoglu, Mehmet U.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2009-07-01

    The use of endovenous laser treatment for varicose veins has been increasing in recent years. It is a safer technique than surgical vein stripping. Its complications (e.g. bruising, pain) are less than the complications of surgical vein stripping. But best parameters such as optimum wavelength, power, and application duration are still under investigation to clarify uncertainties about this technique. To prevent its complications and improve its clinical outcomes, the exact mechanism of it has to be known. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different laser wavelengths on endovenous laser therapy. In this study 980-nm diode laser and 1070-nm fiber laser were used. Human veins were irradiated with 980-nm and 1070-nm lasers at 8 W and 10 W to find the optimal power and wavelength. After laser application, remarkable shrinkage was observed. Inner and outer diameters of the veins also narrowed for both of the laser types. 10 W of 980-nm laser application led to better shrinkage results.

  20. High power diode lasers emitting from 639 nm to 690 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, L.; Grimshaw, M.; DeVito, M.; Kanskar, M.; Dong, W.; Guan, X.; Zhang, S.; Patterson, J.; Dickerson, P.; Kennedy, K.; Li, S.; Haden, J.; Martinsen, R.

    2014-03-01

    There is increasing market demand for high power reliable red lasers for display and cinema applications. Due to the fundamental material system limit at this wavelength range, red diode lasers have lower efficiency and are more temperature sensitive, compared to 790-980 nm diode lasers. In terms of reliability, red lasers are also more sensitive to catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) due to the higher photon energy. Thus developing higher power-reliable red lasers is very challenging. This paper will present nLIGHT's released red products from 639 nm to 690nm, with established high performance and long-term reliability. These single emitter diode lasers can work as stand-alone singleemitter units or efficiently integrate into our compact, passively-cooled Pearl™ fiber-coupled module architectures for higher output power and improved reliability. In order to further improve power and reliability, new chip optimizations have been focused on improving epitaxial design/growth, chip configuration/processing and optical facet passivation. Initial optimization has demonstrated promising results for 639 nm diode lasers to be reliably rated at 1.5 W and 690nm diode lasers to be reliably rated at 4.0 W. Accelerated life-test has started and further design optimization are underway.

  1. Dual illumination OCT at 1050nm and 840nm for whole eye segment imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui; Qin, Lin; Dai, Cuixia; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-11-01

    We presented an improved dual channel dual focus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with two illuminations at 840 nm and 1050 nm for whole eye segment imaging and biometry in vivo. The two light beams were coupled and optically optimized to scan the anterior and posterior segment of the eye simultaneously. This configuration with dichroic mirrors integrated in the sample arm enables us to acquire images from the anterior segment and retina effectively with minimum loss of sample signal. In addition, the full resolved complex (FRC) method was applied to double the imaging depth for the whole anterior segment imaging by eliminating the mirror image. The axial resolution for 1050 nm and 840 nm OCT was 14 μm and 8 μm in air, respectively. Finally, the system was successfully tested in imaging the unaccommodated and accommodated eyes. The preliminary results demonstrated the significant improvements comparing with our previous dual channel SD-OCT configuration in which the two probing beams had the same central wavelength of 840 nm.

  2. NIST Databases on Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, J.; Wiese, W. L.; Martin, W. C.; Musgrove, A.; Fuhr, J. R.

    2002-11-01

    The NIST atomic and molecular spectroscopic databases now available on the World Wide Web through the NIST Physics Laboratory homepage include Atomic Spectra Database, Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms, Spectrum of Platinum Lamp for Ultraviolet Spectrograph Calibration, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Transition Probabilities, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Spectral Line Broadening, and Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database. The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) [1] offers evaluated data on energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities for atoms and atomic ions. Data are given for some 950 spectra and 70,000 energy levels. About 91,000 spectral lines are included, with transition probabilities for about half of these. Additional data resulting from our ongoing critical compilations will be included in successive new versions of ASD. We plan to include, for example, our recently published data for some 16,000 transitions covering most ions of the iron-group elements, as well as Cu, Kr, and Mo [2]. Our compilations benefit greatly from experimental and theoretical atomic-data research being carried out in the NIST Atomic Physics Division. A new compilation covering spectra of the rare gases in all stages of ionization, for example, revealed a need for improved data in the infrared. We have thus measured these needed data with our high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer [3]. An upcoming new database will give wavelengths and intensities for the stronger lines of all neutral and singly-ionized atoms, along with energy levels and transition probabilities for the persistent lines [4]. A critical compilation of the transition probabilities of Ba I and Ba II [5] has been completed and several other compilations of atomic transition probabilities are nearing completion. These include data for all spectra of Na, Mg, Al, and Si [6]. Newly compiled data for selected ions of Ne, Mg, Si and S, will form the basis for a new

  3. 308-nm excimer laser in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesenhoff, Tim

    1992-06-01

    Root canal preparation was performed on 20 extracted human teeth. After opening the coronal pulp, the root canals were prepared by 308 nm excimer laser only. All root canals were investigated under SEM after separation in the axial direction. By sagittal separation of the mandibles of freshly slaughtered cows, it was possible to get access to the tissues and irradiate under optical control. Under irradiation of excimer laser light, tissue starts to fluoresce. It was possible to demonstrate that each tissue (dentin, enamel, bone, pulpal, and connective tissue) has a characteristic spectral pattern. The SEM analyses showed that it is well possible to prepare root canals safely. All organic soft tissue has been removed by excimer laser irradiation. There was no case of via falsa. The simultaneous spectroscopic identification of the irradiated tissue provides a safe protection from overinstrumentation. First clinical trials on 20 patients suffering of chronical apical parodontitis have been carried out successfully.

  4. 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser nucleotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Snyder, Wendy J.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1993-07-01

    The high incidence of patients with clinical and neurological symptoms of lumbar disc herniation has spurred the development of less invasive and more cost efficient methods to treat patients. In this study we evaluated pulsed and continuous wave (cw) 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation and induced thermal damage in sheep intervertebral disc. We used the Heraeus LaserSonics Hercules 5040 (Nd:YAG) laser system and 400 micrometers bare and 600 micrometers ball-tipped fibers in cw and pulsed mode. For the laser parameters and fibers used in this study, ablation of the intervertebral disc was successful and thermal damage did not exceed 0.5 mm. Varying beam diameters and focusing abilities (i.e., bare and ball) did not produce any difference in the coagulation thermal effect.

  5. Outdoor ultraviolet polychromatic action spectra for growth responses of Bellis perennis and Cynosurus cristatus.

    PubMed

    Cooley, N M; Truscott, H M; Holmes, M G; Attridge, T H

    2000-12-01

    Polychromatic ultraviolet (UV) action spectra for various growth responses of the dicotyledon Bellis perennis L. (daisy) and the grass Cynosurus cristatus L. (crested dog's-tail) have been measured. The plants were grown in the natural environment and ambient daylight was supplemented with five different UV irradiances centred at eight different wavelengths (313, 318, 320, 322, 339, 348, 356 and 377 nm). Destructive growth analysis was performed on B. perennis and C. cristatus after 300 and 122 days respectively. Dose response curves were created to construct action spectra for individual responses. Different spectral responses were observed in these two plant types. B. perennis exhibited a substantial action maximum at 313 nm for the inhibition of aerial, root and total dry weight; a similar action maximum at 313 nm for the inhibition of leaf expansion was observed. Longer wavelengths were relatively ineffective on these growth parameters, with the exception of a small but statistically significant (P < 0.05) response to 320 nm radiation. By contrast, C. cristatus showed negligible response to 313 nm radiation, for inhibition of aerial, root and total dry weight but substantial responses to longer wavelengths, especially at 339 and 348 nm. These action spectra add weight to suggestions in the literature that UV-A has a role to play in responses in this region of the spectrum. The possible implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:11332892

  6. [An Effective Wavelength Detection Method Based on Echelle Spectra Reduction].

    PubMed

    Yin, Lu; Bayanheshig; Cui, Ji-cheng; Yang, Jin; Zhu, Ji-wei; Yao, Xue-feng

    2015-03-01

    Echelle spectrometer with high dispersion, high resolution, wide spectral coverage, full spectrum transient direct-reading and many other advantages, is one of the representative of the advanced spectrometer. In the commercialization trend of echelle spectrometer, the method of two-dimension spectra image processing is becoming more and more important. Currently, centroid extraction algorithm often be used first to detect the centroid position of effective facula and then combined with echelle spectrum reduction method to detect the effective wavelength, but this method is more difficult to achieve the desired requirements. To improve the speed, accuracy and the ability of imaging error correction during detecting the effective wavelength, an effective wavelength detection method based on spectra reduction is coming up. At the beginning, the two-dimension spectra will be converted to a one-dimension image using echelle spectra reduction method instead of finding centroid of effective facula. And then by setting appropriate threshold the one-dimension image is easy to be dealing with than the two-dimension spectra image and all of the pixel points stand for effective wavelength can be detected at one time. Based on this new idea, the speed and accuracy of image processing have been improved, at the same time a range of imaging errors can be compensated. Using the echelle spectrograph make a test applying this algorithm for data processing to check whether this method is fit for the spectra image processing or not. Choosing a standard mercury lamp as a light source during the test because the standard mercury lamp have a number of known characteristic lines which can be used to examine the accuracy of wavelength detection. According to experimental result, this method not only increase operation speed but improve accuracy of wavelength detection, also the imaging error lower than 0.05 mm (two pixel) can be corrected, and the wavelength accuracy would up to 0.02 nm

  7. Electronic and Vibrational Spectra of InP Quantum Dots Formed by Sequential Ion Implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    We have performed sequential ion implantation of indium and phosphorus into silica combined with controlled thermal annealing to fabricate InP quantum dots in a dielectric host. Electronic and vibrational spectra were measured for the as-implanted and annealed samples. The annealed samples show a peak in the infrared spectra near 320/cm which is attributed to a surface phonon mode and is in good agreement with the value calculated from Frolich's theory of surface phonon polaritons. The electronic spectra show the development of a band near 390 nm that is attributed to quantum confined InP.

  8. Determination of phytoplankton composition using absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guijarro, R; Romero, I; Pachés, M; Del Río, J G; Martí, C M; Gil, G; Ferrer-Riquelme, A; Ferrer, J

    2009-05-15

    Characterisation of phytoplankton communities in aquatic ecosystems is a costly task in terms of time, material and human resources. The general objective of this paper is not to replace microscopic counts but to complement them, by fine-tuning a technique using absorption spectra measurements that reduces the above-mentioned costs. Therefore, the objective proposed in this paper is to assess the possibility of achieving a qualitative determination of phytoplankton communities by classes, and also a quantitative estimation of the number of phytoplankton cells within each of these classes, using spectrophotometric determination. Samples were taken in three areas of the Spanish Mediterranean coast. These areas correspond to estuary systems that are influenced by both continental waters and Mediterranean Sea waters. 139 Samples were taken in 7-8 stations per area, at different depths in each station. In each sample, the absorption spectrum and the phytoplankton classes (Bacyllariophyceae (diatoms), Cryptophyceae, Clorophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Prasynophyceae, Prymnesophyceae, Euglenophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Dynophyceae and the Synechococcus sp.) were determined. Data were analysed by means of the Partial Least Squares (PLS) multivariate statistical technique. The absorbances obtained between 400 and 750 nm were used as the independent variable and the cell/l of each phytoplankton class was used as the dependent variable, thereby obtaining models which relate the absorbance of the sample extract to the phytoplankton present in it. Good results were obtained for diatoms (Bacillarophyceae), Chlorophyceae and Cryptophyceae. PMID:19269434

  9. Polarized Matrix Infrared Spectra of Cyclopentadienone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormond, Thomas K.; Scheer, Adam M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Nimlos, Mark R.; Daily, John W.; Stanton, John F.

    2012-06-01

    We are developing a resistively-heated SiC μtubular reactor with a 100 μsec residence time to study the thermal cracking of biomass monomers. The decomposition products are identified by two independent techniques: 118.2 nm VUV photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) and matrix infrared spectroscopy. Many lignins thermally crack to produce cyclopentadienone (m/z 80) and its derivatives. Subsequent decomposition of these cyclopentadienones results in formation of substituted acetylenes which are known precursors to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soot. Due to its anitaromatic character, cyclopentadienone is highly reactive and presents an interesting spectroscopic system. Pyrolysis of {o}-phenylene sulfite (m/z 156) is a convenient precursor for cyclopentadienone. In this work we report the polarized matrix infrared absorption spectra of cyclopentadienone and d_4-cyclopentadienone. The PIMS results corroborate the thermal decomposition steps of phenylene sulfite. {Ab initio} coupled-cluster anharmonic force field calculations are used to guide the vibrational assignments. A. M. Scheer, C. Murkarakate, D. J. Robichaud, M. R. Nimlos, and G. B. Ellison J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 13381 (2011)

  10. Surface micromachined MEMS tunable VCSEL at 1550 nm with > 70 nm single mode tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierl, Christian; Gründl, Tobias; Debernardi, Pierluigi; Zogal, Karolina; Davani, Hooman A.; Grasse, Christian; Böhm, Gerhard; Meissner, Peter; Küppers, Franko; Amann, Markus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    We present surface micro-machined tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating around 1550nm with tuning ranges up to 100nm and side mode suppression ratios beyond 40 dB. The output power reaches 3.5mW at 1555 nm. The electro-thermal and the electro-statical actuation of a micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) movable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) membrane increases/decreases the cavity length which shifts the resonant wavelength of the cavity to higher/lower values. The wavelength is modulated with 200 Hz/120 kHz. Both tuning mechanisms can be used simultaneously within the same device. The newly developed surface micro-machining technology uses competitive dielectric materials for the MEMS, deposited with low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), which is cost effective and capable for on wafer mass production.

  11. Determination Of The Elements In The Olive Oil Responsible For The Luminescence Spectra Using A Green Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawaz, Saiof; Mahmod, Al-gafary; Lamia, Al-mamouly

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we were able to record luminescence spectra of olive, sunflower, corn, gourd and laurel oils, chlorophyll and carotene by using an argon laser (488-514 nm) and second harmonic Nd-YAG laser (532 nm) along with a monochromator whose spectral range is 400-900 nm. Only when the luminescence light is vertical to laser light, two new peaks 540 nm and 673 nm have been detected with the latter one is more intense. In discussing our results, we succeeded in determining which materials in olive oil are responsible for producing the luminescence spectral peak; 673 nm. The experimental data has shown that the chlorophyll is the main part of the olive components which gives the olive oil luminescence spectral peak; 673 nm. The other luminescence spectral peak; 540 nm was common to all different kinds of oil in general.

  12. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  13. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to 10 mm. Methods: Parallel double-station video observations allowed us to compute heliocentric orbits for all meteors. Most observations were performed during the periods of activity of major meteor showers in the years between 2006 and 2012. Spectra are classified according to relative intensities of the low-temperature emission lines of Mg, Na, and Fe. Results: Shower meteors were found to be of normal composition, except for Southern δ Aquariids and some members of the Geminid shower, neither of which have Na in the meteor spectra. Variations in Na content are typical for the Geminid shower. Three populations of Na-free mereoroids were identified. The first population are iron meteorites, which have an asteroidal-chondritic origin, but one meteoroid with low perihelion (0.11 AU) was found among the iron meteorites. The second population were Sun-approaching meteoroids in which sodium is depleted by thermal desorption. The third population were Na-free meteoroids of cometary origin. Long exposure to cosmic rays on the surface of comets in the Oort cloud and disintegration of this crust might be the origin of this population of meteoroids. Spectra (Figs. 17-30) are only, Tables 4-6 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A67

  14. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15–30 labels simultaneously.

  15. Vibrational spectra of fluorohafnate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendow, Bernard; Drexhage, Martin G.; Banerjee, Pranab K.; Goltman, John; Mitra, Shashanka S.; Moynihan, Cornelius T.

    1981-02-01

    We report the first detailed measurements of fundamental vibrational spectra in fluorohafnate glass. The Raman spectrum is dominated by a single relatively broad peak in the vicinity of 570-590 cm -1 attributed to Hf-F stretching modes, while the infrared spectrum displays two prominent broad peaks. The location of the high frequency peaks is shown to be consistent with the observed position of the infrared absorption edge.

  16. Absorption Measurements of Periodically Poled Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (PPKTP) at 775 nm and 1550 nm

    PubMed Central

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Ast, Stefan; Krüger, Christoph; Singh, Amrit Pal; Eberle, Tobias; Händchen, Vitus; Schnabel, Roman

    2013-01-01

    The efficient generation of second-harmonic light and squeezed light requires non-linear crystals that have low absorption at the fundamental and harmonic wavelengths. In this work the photo-thermal self-phase modulation technique is exploited to measure the absorption coefficient of periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP) at 1,550 nm and 775 nm. The measurement results are (84±40) ppm/cm and (127±24) ppm/cm, respectively. We conclude that the performance of state-of-the-art frequency doubling and squeezed light generation in PPKTP is not limited by absorption. PMID:23291574

  17. The Doubling of 846 nm Light to Produce 423 nm Light for use in Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, James; Birrell, Jeremey; Tang, Rebecca; Erickson, Chris; Goggins, Landon; Durfee, Dallin

    2009-10-01

    We present progress on a 423 nm fluorescence probe/cooling laser for use in our neutral calcium atom interferometer. The finished system will include an 846 nm diode laser that is coupled to a tapered amplifier. This light will be sent to a buildup cavity where we will achieve second-harmonic generation (SHG) using either a BBO non-linear crystal or a periodically-poled KTP crystal. We will discuss the theoretical considerations relating to the doubling of light in a crystal and the construction of our buildup cavity. We will also discuss its proposed application for use in atom interferometry.

  18. Measurement of 100 nm and 60 nm Particle Standards by Differential Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, George W.; Donnelly, Michelle K.; Hagwood, Charles R.; Kukuck, Scott R.; Hackley, Vincent A.; Pui, David Y. H.

    2006-01-01

    The peak particle size and expanded uncertainties (95 % confidence interval) for two new particle calibration standards are measured as 101.8 nm ± 1.1 nm and 60.39 nm ± 0.63 nm. The particle samples are polystyrene spheres suspended in filtered, deionized water at a mass fraction of about 0.5 %. The size distribution measurements of aerosolized particles are made using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) system calibrated using SRM® 1963 (100.7 nm polystyrene spheres). An electrospray aerosol generator was used for generating the 60 nm aerosol to almost eliminate the generation of multiply charged dimers and trimers and to minimize the effect of non-volatile contaminants increasing the particle size. The testing for the homogeneity of the samples and for the presence of multimers using dynamic light scattering is described. The use of the transfer function integral in the calibration of the DMA is shown to reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of the peak particle size compared to the approach based on the peak in the concentration vs. voltage distribution. A modified aerosol/sheath inlet, recirculating sheath flow, a high ratio of sheath flow to the aerosol flow, and accurate pressure, temperature, and voltage measurements have increased the resolution and accuracy of the measurements. A significant consideration in the uncertainty analysis was the correlation between the slip correction of the calibration particle and the measured particle. Including the correlation reduced the expanded uncertainty from approximately 1.8 % of the particle size to about 1.0 %. The effect of non-volatile contaminants in the polystyrene suspensions on the peak particle size and the uncertainty in the size is determined. The full size distributions for both the 60 nm and 100 nm spheres are tabulated and selected mean sizes including the number mean diameter and the dynamic light scattering mean diameter are computed. The use of these particles for calibrating DMAs and for

  19. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  20. Portable Raman spectroscopy using retina-safe (1550 nm) laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouillette, Carl; Smith, Wayne; Donahue, Michael; Huang, Hermes; Shende, Chetan; Sengupta, Atanu; Inscore, Frank; Patient, Michael; Farquharson, Stuart

    2012-06-01

    The use of portable Raman analyzers to identify unknown substances in the field has grown dramatically during the past decade. Measurements often require the laser beam to exit the confines of the sample compartment, which increases the potential of eye or skin damage. This is especially true for most commercial analyzers, which use 785 nm laser excitation. To overcome this safety concern, we have built a portable FT-Raman analyzer using a 1550 nm retina-safe excitation laser. Excitation at 1550 nm falls within the 1400 to 2000 nm retina-safe range, so called because the least amount of damage to the eye occurs in this spectral region. In contrast to wavelengths below 1400 nm, the retina-safe wavelengths are not focused by the eye, but are absorbed by the cornea, aqueous and vitreous humor. Here we compare the performance of this system to measurements of explosives at shorter wavelengths, as well as its ability to measure surface-enhanced Raman spectra of several chemicals, including the food contaminant melamine.

  1. Spectra-selective PbS quantum dot infrared photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Keke; Deng, Hui; Yang, Xiaokun; Dong, Dongdong; Li, Min; Hu, Long; Liu, Huan; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2016-03-24

    Traditional photoconductive photodetectors (PDs) commonly respond to higher energy photons compared with the bandgaps of PD active materials. Different from the wide detection spectra of traditional PDs, the present reported PbS quantum dot (QD) PDs can detect the spectra-selective light source. Spectra-selective PDs (ss-PDs) of perovskite/QDs and QD/QDs were respectively implemented by integrating two functional layers. The top layer (facing the light) was utilized to filter the non-target spectra and the bottom layer was used for detection. The response spectrum wavelength and the range of ss-PDs can be conveniently tailored by tuning the QD size. The obtained selectivity factor and normalized detectivity ratio from target and non-target illumination can reach at least 10. A narrow detection range with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) ∼100 nm was applied by typical QD/QD based ss-PDs. The prototype ss-PDs were successfully applied in identifying an unknown light source. The convenient tuning and identification capabilities of the present QD based ss-PDs may provide a versatile route to obtain highly spectrum-selective PDs in order to meet the demands for special fields. PMID:26965641

  2. Pulsed remote Raman system for daytime measurements of mineral spectra.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Chio, Chi Hong; Lucey, Paul G; Lienert, Barry

    2005-08-01

    A remote Raman system has been developed utilizing a 532nm pulsed laser and gated intensified charged couple device (ICCD) detector in the oblique geometry. When the system is set for 50m sample distance it is capable of measuring Raman spectra of minerals located at distances in the range of 10-65m from the telescope. Both daytime and nighttime operations are feasible and the spectra of minerals can be measured in a short period of time, of the order of a few seconds. In oblique geometry, measured sampling depth is more than 30m, during which the system maintains very high performance without any adjustments. Much longer sampling depth (0.1-120m) has been observed when the system is configured in the coaxial geometry. Clear advantages of using a gated detection mode over the continuous (CW) mode of operation in reducing the background signal and eliminating long-lived fluorescence signals from the Raman spectra are presented. The performance of the pulsed Raman system is demonstrated by measuring spectra of Raman standards including benzene (C(6)H(6)) and naphthalene (C(10)H(8)), a low Raman cross section silicate mineral muscovite (KAl(2)(Si(3)Al)O(10)(OH)(2)), and a medium Raman cross section mineral calcite (CaCO(3)). PMID:16029850

  3. Principal Component Analysis of Arctic Solar Irradiance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the FIRE (First ISCPP Regional Experiment) Arctic Cloud Experiment and coincident SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) campaign, detailed moderate resolution solar spectral measurements were made to study the radiative energy budget of the coupled Arctic Ocean - Atmosphere system. The NASA Ames Solar Spectral Flux Radiometers (SSFRs) were deployed on the NASA ER-2 and at the SHEBA ice camp. Using the SSFRs we acquired continuous solar spectral irradiance (380-2200 nm) throughout the atmospheric column. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to characterize the several tens of thousands of retrieved SSFR spectra and to determine the number of independent pieces of information that exist in the visible to near-infrared solar irradiance spectra. It was found in both the upwelling and downwelling cases that almost 100% of the spectral information (irradiance retrieved from 1820 wavelength channels) was contained in the first six extracted principal components. The majority of the variability in the Arctic downwelling solar irradiance spectra was explained by a few fundamental components including infrared absorption, scattering, water vapor and ozone. PCA analysis of the SSFR upwelling Arctic irradiance spectra successfully separated surface ice and snow reflection from overlying cloud into distinct components.

  4. Spectra-selective PbS quantum dot infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Keke; Deng, Hui; Yang, Xiaokun; Dong, Dongdong; Li, Min; Hu, Long; Liu, Huan; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Traditional photoconductive photodetectors (PDs) commonly respond to higher energy photons compared with the bandgaps of PD active materials. Different from the wide detection spectra of traditional PDs, the present reported PbS quantum dot (QD) PDs can detect the spectra-selective light source. Spectra-selective PDs (ss-PDs) of perovskite/QDs and QD/QDs were respectively implemented by integrating two functional layers. The top layer (facing the light) was utilized to filter the non-target spectra and the bottom layer was used for detection. The response spectrum wavelength and the range of ss-PDs can be conveniently tailored by tuning the QD size. The obtained selectivity factor and normalized detectivity ratio from target and non-target illumination can reach at least 10. A narrow detection range with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) ~100 nm was applied by typical QD/QD based ss-PDs. The prototype ss-PDs were successfully applied in identifying an unknown light source. The convenient tuning and identification capabilities of the present QD based ss-PDs may provide a versatile route to obtain highly spectrum-selective PDs in order to meet the demands for special fields.

  5. Visible/Near-Infrared Spectra of Experimentally Shocked Plagioclase Feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Minerals subjected to high shock pressures exhibit structural changes with increasing pressure (e.g., fractures, deformations, formation of diaplectic glass, and complete melting [1-6]). Petrologic and thermal infrared spectroscopic studies have shown that diaplectic glass (maskelynite) formation in feldspars occurs between 25-45 GPa, while significant melting occurs above 45 GPa [7- 12]. Past studies of visible/near-infrared spectra of shocked plagioclase feldspars demonstrated few variations in spectral features with pressure except for a decrease in the absorption feature near 1250 nm and an overall decrease in albedo [13-17]. We report new visible/near-infrared spectra of albite- and anorthiterich rocks experimentally shocked from 17-56 GPa.

  6. Evaluation of Raman spectra of human brain tumor tissue using the learning vector quantization neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tuo; Chen, Changshui; Shi, Xingzhe; Liu, Chengyong

    2016-05-01

    The Raman spectra of tissue of 20 brain tumor patients was recorded using a confocal microlaser Raman spectroscope with 785 nm excitation in vitro. A total of 133 spectra were investigated. Spectra peaks from normal white matter tissue and tumor tissue were analyzed. Algorithms, such as principal component analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and the support vector machine, are commonly used to analyze spectral data. However, in this study, we employed the learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which is typically used for pattern recognition. By applying the proposed method, a normal diagnosis accuracy of 85.7% and a glioma diagnosis accuracy of 89.5% were achieved. The LVQ neural network is a recent approach to excavating Raman spectra information. Moreover, it is fast and convenient, does not require the spectra peak counterpart, and achieves a relatively high accuracy. It can be used in brain tumor prognostics and in helping to optimize the cutting margins of gliomas.

  7. Creation and testing of an artificial neural network based carbonate detector for Mars rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, Benjamin; Castano, Rebecca; Gilmore, Martha S.; Merrill, Matthew; Greenwood, James P.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an artificial neural network (ANN) based carbonate detector capable of running on current and future rover hardware. The detector can identify calcite in visible/NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra of both laboratory specimens covered by ferric dust and rocks in Mars analogue field environments. The ANN was trained using the Backpropagation algorithm with sigmoid activation neurons. For the training dataset, we chose nine carbonate and eight non-carbonate representative mineral spectra from the USGS spectral library. Using these spectra as seeds, we generated 10,000 variants with up to 2% Gaussian noise in each reflectance measurement. We cross-validated several ANN architectures, training on 9,900 spectra and testing on the remaining 100. The best performing ANN correctly detected, with perfect accuracy, the presence (or absence) of carbonate in spectral data taken on field samples from the Mojave desert and clean, pure marbles from CT. Sensitivity experiments with JSC Mars-1 simulant dust suggest the carbonate detector would perform well in aeolian Martian environments.

  8. Prediction of earthquake response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical equations for predicting earthquake response spectra in terms of magnitude, distance, and site conditions, using a two-stage regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity. We analyzed horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5 percent damping for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in Western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. We developed predictive equations for 12 different periods between 0.1 and 4.0 s, both for the larger of two horizontal components and for the random horizontal component. The resulting spectra show amplification at soil sites compared to rock sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.3 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 2.0 s. For periods less than 0.3 s there is slight deamplification at the soil sites. These results are generally consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predicted spectra is the change of shape with magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Irifunac and Anderson). This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficient for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 7 km of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake and within about 15 km of a magnitude 7.5 event. The amount by

  9. Comparison of reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Mostafa; Ando, Masatoshi; Stookey, George K.

    2000-03-01

    Development of dental caries is associated with the loss of minerals and change in the enamel structure. In this study, we have measured and compared reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel, to investigate its utility in detection and analysis of dental caries. One hundred twenty, 3-mm diameter human enamel cores, with no sign of fluorosis, tetracycline stain, hypoplasia, fracture and restorations, were prepared. The enamel surfaces then were ground and polished. Specimens were placed on a fitted holder with either black or white color for background, with no fluorescence. The baseline spectra were measured using a spectrophotometer with enclosed diffused illumination. Spectra measured from 380 to 780 nm at 5 nm intervals. All measurements were corrected to compensate for the spectrum of illumination. The specimens were divided into two groups and exposed to a demineralizing solution, for 48 and 96 hours, respectively. Reflectance spectra of specimens were measured following lesion induction. All specimens were sectioned and analyzed by transverse microradiography (TMR), where lesion depth and mineral loss ((Delta) Z) were measured. Dimensionality of multi-spectral data was reduced through its conversion to L*a*b* color coordinates and principal component analysis (PCA). Multiple linear regression analysis showed low correlation between L*a*b* and lesion depth and mineral loss. PCA analysis showed higher correlation coefficient, compared to L*a*b*. Preliminary results of this study suggest that multi-spectral measurement and analysis of the tooth surface could be useful in predicting the depth and severity of an early carious lesion.

  10. Detection of methyl mercaptan with a 3393-nm distributed feedback interband cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenhui; Zhen, Weimeng; Zhang, Zheyuan; Li, Jinyi; Gao, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Attention has been focused recently on the harmful effects and malodor of methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), so it is desired to detect CH3SH in situ, sensitively, and selectively. We detected methyl mercaptan via tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) with a room-temperature distributed feedback interband cascade laser emitting around 3393 nm and a hollow waveguide gas cell with 5 m length. The fundamental characteristic fingerprint absorptions of CH3SH from 3260 to 3400 nm were examined, and the spectral line 3393.584 nm (corresponding to the ν 2 C-H symmetric stretch) was determined to be the optimum for CH3SH detection. The response characteristics of the TLAS system were established by implementing a set of CH3SH concentration gradient experiments with wavelength-scanned direct absorption spectroscopy. The results show that CH3SH TLAS spectra are in excellent agreement with spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory database; the TLAS response linearity is 0.987, and the detection limit is as low as 25 ppbv (parts per billion by volume, 10-9) with integrated time 1.84 s, corresponding to an absorbance of 1.34 × 10-4 (near the theoretical detection limit). Overall, the TLAS system is a robust method for CH3SH monitoring of industrial waste gas emissions.

  11. Optical absorption and scattering spectra of pathological stomach tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Lakhina, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Diffuse reflection spectra of biotissues in vivo and transmission and reflection coefficients for biotissues in vitro are measured over 300-800 nm. These data are used to determine the spectral absorption and scattering indices and the scattering anisotropy factor for stomach mucous membranes under normal and various pathological conditions (chronic atrophic and ulcerous defects, malignant neoplasms). The most importan tphysiological (hemodynamic and oxygenation levels) and structural-morphological (scatterer size and density) parameters are also determined. The results of a morphofunctional study correlate well with the optical properties and are consistent with data from a histomorphological analysis of the corresponding tissues.

  12. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  13. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  14. Characterization of LANDSAT Panels Using the NIST BRDF Scale from 1100 nm to 2500 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Tsai, Benjamin K.; Allen, David W.; Cooksey, Catherine; Yoon, Howard; Hanssen, Leonard; Zeng, Jinan; Fulton, Linda; Biggar, Stuart; Markham, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Many earth observing sensors depend on white diffuse reflectance standards to derive scales of radiance traceable to the St Despite the large number of Earth observing sensors that operate in the reflective solar region of the spectrum, there has been no direct method to provide NIST traceable BRDF measurements out to 2500 rim. Recent developments in detector technology have allowed the NIST reflectance measurement facility to expand the operating range to cover the 250 nm to 2500 nm range. The facility has been modified with and additional detector using a cooled extended range indium gallium arsenide (Extended InGaAs) detector. Measurements were made for two PTFE white diffuse reflectance standards over the 1100 nm to 2500 nm region at a 0' incident and 45' observation angle. These two panels will be used to support the OLI calibration activities. An independent means of verification was established using a NIST radiance transfer facility based on spectral irradiance, radiance standards and a diffuse reflectance plaque. An analysis on the results and associated uncertainties will be discussed.

  15. THE SPECTRUM OF THORIUM FROM 250 nm TO 5500 nm: RITZ WAVELENGTHS AND OPTIMIZED ENERGY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm{sup –1} to 1800 cm{sup –1}). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer and Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis and Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  16. Faster qualification of 193-nm resists for 100-nm development using photo cell monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris M.; Kallingal, Chidam; Zawadzki, Mary T.; Jeewakhan, Nazneen N.; Kaviani, Nazila N.; Krishnan, Prakash; Klaum, Arthur D.; Van Ess, Joel

    2003-05-01

    The development of 100-nm design rule technologies is currently taking place in many R&D facilities across the world. For some critical alyers, the transition to 193-nm resist technology has been required to meet this leading edge design rule. As with previous technology node transitions, the materials and processes available are undergoing changes and improvements as vendors encounter and solve problems. The initial implementation of the 193-nm resits process did not meet the photolithography requirements of some IC manufacturers due to very high Post Exposure Bake temperature sensitivity and consequently high wafer to wafer CD variation. The photoresist vendors have been working to improve the performance of the 193-nm resists to meet their customer's requirements. Characterization of these new resists needs to be carried out prior to implementation in the R&D line. Initial results on the second-generation resists evaluated at Cypress Semicondcutor showed better CD control compared to the aelrier resist with comparable Depth of Focus (DOF), Exposure Latitute, Etch Resistance, etc. In addition to the standard lithography parameters, resist characterization needs to include defect density studies. It was found that the new resists process with the best CD control, resulted in the introduction of orders of magnitude higher yield limiting defects at Gate, Contact adn Local Interconnect. The defect data were shared with the resists vendor and within days of the discovery the resist vendor was able to pinpoint the source of the problem. The fix was confirmed and the new resists were successfully released to production. By including defect monitoring into the resist qualification process, Cypress Semiconductor was able to 1) drive correction actions earlier resulting in faster ramp and 2) eliminate potential yield loss. We will discuss in this paper how to apply the Micro Photo Cell Monitoring methodology for defect monitoring in the photolithogprhay module and the

  17. THE 217.5 nm BAND, INFRARED ABSORPTION, AND INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Duley, W. W.; Hu, Anming E-mail: a2hu@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-12-20

    We report on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ''slow'' deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility. The initial chemistry leads to the formation of carbon chains, together with a limited range of small aromatic ring molecules, and eventually results in carbon nanoparticles having an sp {sup 2}/sp {sup 3} ratio Almost-Equal-To 0.4. Spectroscopic analysis of particle composition indicates that naphthalene and naphthalene derivatives are important constituents of this material. We suggest that carbon nanoparticles with similar composition are responsible for the appearance of the interstellar 217.5 nm band and outline how these particles can form in situ under diffuse cloud conditions by deposition of carbon on the surface of silicate grains. Spectral data from carbon nanoparticles formed under these conditions accurately reproduce IR emission spectra from a number of Galactic sources. We provide the first detailed fits to observational spectra of Type A and B emission sources based entirely on measured spectra of a carbonaceous material that can be produced in the laboratory.

  18. Characteristics of 308 nm excimer laser activated arterial tissue photoemission under ablative and non-ablative conditions.

    PubMed

    Laufer, G; Wollenek, G; Rüeckle, B; Buchelt, M; Kuckla, C; Ruatti, H; Buxbaum, P; Fasol, R; Zilla, P

    1989-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the characteristics of tissue photoemission obtained from normal and atherosclerotic segments of human postmortem femoral arteries by 308 nm excimer laser irradiation of 60 ns pulsewidth. Three ablative (20, 30, and 40 mJ/pulse) and three non-ablative (2.5, 5, and 10 mJ/pulse) energy fluences were employed. Both the activating laser pulses and the induced photoemission were guided simultaneously over one and the same 1,000 micron core optical fiber that was positioned in direct tissue contact perpendicular to the vascular surface. The spectral lineshape of normal arterial and noncalcified atherosclerotic structures was characterized by a broad-continuum, double-peak emission of relevant intensity between wavelengths of 360 and 500 nm, with the most prominent emission in the range of 400-415 (407 nm peak) and 430-445 nm (437 nm peak). Fibrous and lipid atherosclerotic lesions, however, exhibited a significantly reduced intensity at 437 nm compared to normal artery layers (P less than 0.001), expressed as a 407/437 nm ratio of 1.321 +/- 0.075 for fibrous and 1.392 +/- 0.104 for lipid lesions. Normal artery components presented with approximately equal intensity at both emission peaks (407/437 nm ratio: intima, 1.054 +/- 0.033; media, 1.024 +/- 0.019; adventitia, 0.976 +/- 0.021). Comparison of spectral lineshape obtained under various energy fluences within a group of noncalcified tissues disclosed no substantial difference using the 407/437 nm ratio (P greater than 0.05). In contrast, calcified lesions revealed high-intensity multiple-line (397, 442, 461, and 528 nm) emission spectra under ablative energy fluences, whereas a low-intensity broad-continuum, single-peak spectrum resulted from irradiation beyond the ablation threshold. Thus, these findings suggest fluorescence phenomena for broad-continuum spectra, and plasma emission for multiple-line spectra as an underlying photodynamic process. Regardless of the activating

  19. Classification and radiative-transfer modeling of meteorite spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentikäinen, H.; Penttilä, A.; Peltoniemi, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    The interpretation of asteroid spectra is closely tied to surface structure and composition. Asteroid surfaces are usually assumed to be covered with a regolith, which is a mixture of mineral grains ranging from micrometers to centimeters in size. The inverse problem of deducing the characteristics of the grains from the scattering of light (e.g., using photometric and polarimetric observations) is difficult. Meteorite spectroscopy can be a valuable alternative source of information considering that unweathered meteoritic ''falls'' are almost pristine samples of their parent bodies. Reflectance spectra of 18 different meteorite samples were measured with the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO) covering a wavelength range of 450--2250 nm [1,2]. The measurements expand the database of reflectance spectra obtained by Paton et al. [3] and Gaffey [4]. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) performed on the spectra indicates a separation of the undifferentiated ordinary chondrites and the differentiated achondrites. The principal components also suggest a discrimination between the spectra of ordinary chondrites with petrologic grades 5 and 6. The distinction is not present when the data are supplemented with the spectra from the two other data sets obtained with differing measuring techniques. To further investigate the different classifications, the PCA is implemented with selected spectral features contrary to the previous analyses, which encompassed the complete spectra. Single-scattering albedos for meteoritic fundamental scatterers were derived with a Monte Carlo radiative-transfer model [1]. In the derivation, realistic scattering phase functions were utilized. The functions were obtained by fitting triple Henyey-Greenstein functions to the measured scattering phase functions of olivine powder for two different size distributions [5,6]. The simulated reflectances for different scattering phase functions were matched to the measured meteorite

  20. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  1. Satellite spectra of heliumlike nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsuan, H.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; von Goeler, S. Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Johnson, L.C.; Sesnic, S.; Bhalla, C.P.; Karim, K.R.

    1987-02-01

    Spectra of heliumlike nickel, NiXXVII, have been observed from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas with a high resolution crystal spectrometer. The experimental arrangement permits simultaneous observation of the heliumlike resonance line, the intercombination and forbidden lines, and all the associated satellites due to transitions 1s/sup 2/nl - 1s2l'nl'' with N greater than or equal to 2. Relative wavelengths and line intensities can thus be determined very accurately. The observed spectral data are in good agreement with results from the present Hartree-Fock-Slater atomic model calculations and predictions from the Z-expansion method.

  2. Identified hadron spectra from PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Gábor I.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wyslouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-08-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons and protons, as well as antiparticle to particle ratios near mid-rapidity from d+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = 200\\,{\\rm GeV} have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC. The transverse momentum range of particle identification was extended to beyond 3 GeV/c using the TOF detector and a new trigger system. The pseudorapidity dependence of the nuclear modification factor for charged hadrons in d+Au collisions is presented.

  3. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  4. Planetary spectra for anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Some of the effects on planetary spectra that would be produced by departures from isotropic scattering are examined. The phase function is the simplest departure to handle analytically and the only phase function, other than the isotropic one, that can be incorporated into a Chandrasekhar first approximation. This approach has the advantage of illustrating trends resulting from anisotropies while retaining the simplicity that yields physical insight. An algebraic solution to the two sets of anisotropic H functions is developed in the appendix. It is readily adaptable to progammable desk calculators and gives emergent intensities accurate to 0.3 percent, which is sufficient even for spectroscopic analysis.

  5. An Inverse Modeling Approach to Estimating Phytoplankton Pigment Concentrations from Phytoplankton Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moisan, John R.; Moisan, Tiffany A. H.; Linkswiler, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton absorption spectra and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigment observations from the Eastern U.S. and global observations from NASA's SeaBASS archive are used in a linear inverse calculation to extract pigment-specific absorption spectra. Using these pigment-specific absorption spectra to reconstruct the phytoplankton absorption spectra results in high correlations at all visible wavelengths (r(sup 2) from 0.83 to 0.98), and linear regressions (slopes ranging from 0.8 to 1.1). Higher correlations (r(sup 2) from 0.75 to 1.00) are obtained in the visible portion of the spectra when the total phytoplankton absorption spectra are unpackaged by multiplying the entire spectra by a factor that sets the total absorption at 675 nm to that expected from absorption spectra reconstruction using measured pigment concentrations and laboratory-derived pigment-specific absorption spectra. The derived pigment-specific absorption spectra were further used with the total phytoplankton absorption spectra in a second linear inverse calculation to estimate the various phytoplankton HPLC pigments. A comparison between the estimated and measured pigment concentrations for the 18 pigment fields showed good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.5) for 7 pigments and very good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.7) for chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin. Higher correlations result when the analysis is carried out at more local geographic scales. The ability to estimate phytoplankton pigments using pigment-specific absorption spectra is critical for using hyperspectral inverse models to retrieve phytoplankton pigment concentrations and other Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) from passive remote sensing observations.

  6. Selection of Portable Spectrometers for Planetary Exploration: A Comparison of 532 nm and 785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of Reduced Carbon in Archean Cherts

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Ian B.; Ingley, Richard; Marshall, Craig P.; Olcott Marshall, Alison; Edwards, Howell G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge and understanding of the martian environment has advanced greatly over the past two decades, beginning with NASA's return to the surface of Mars with the Pathfinder mission and its rover Sojourner in 1997 and continuing today with data being returned by the Curiosity rover. Reduced carbon, however, is yet to be detected on the martian surface, despite its abundance in meteorites originating from the planet. If carbon is detected on Mars, it could be a remnant of extinct life, although an abiotic source is much more likely. If the latter is the case, environmental carbonaceous material would still provide a source of carbon that could be utilized by microbial life for biochemical synthesis and could therefore act as a marker for potential habitats, indicating regions that should be investigated further. For this reason, the detection and characterization of reduced or organic carbon is a top priority for both the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars rover, currently due for launch in 2018, and for NASA's Mars 2020 mission. Here, we present a Raman spectroscopic study of Archean chert Mars analog samples from the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. Raman spectra were acquired with a flight-representative 532 nm instrument and a 785 nm instrument with similar operating parameters. Reduced carbon was successfully detected with both instruments; however, its Raman bands were detected more readily with 785 nm excitation, and the corresponding spectra exhibited superior signal-to-noise ratios and reduced background levels. Key Words: Raman spectroscopy—Archean—Organic matter—Planetary science—Mars. Astrobiology 15, 420–429. PMID:26060980

  7. Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes: fluorescent and absorption spectroscopy under two-photon (1200-1500 nm) and one-photon (600-750 nm) excitation by laser femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, Il'ya A.; Kompanets, Viktor O.; Chekalin, Sergey V.; Makhneva, Zoya K.; Moskalenko, Andrey A.; Razjivin, Andrei P.

    2010-09-01

    The pathways of excitation energy transfer (EET) via pigments of the light-harvesting antenna are still in discussion. The bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence of peripheral light-harvesting complexes (LH2) from purple bacteria can be observed upon two-photon excitation (TPE) within 1200-1500 nm spectral range (a broad band near 1300 nm). Earlier the occurrence of this band was taken as an evidence for the participation of "dark" carotenoid S1 state in EET processes (see [Walla et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 10808-10813 (2000)] and references in it). However we showed that TPE spectrum of LH2 fluorescence within 1200-1500 nm is not associated with carotenoids [Stepanenko et al., J. Phys. Chem. B. 113(34), 11720-11723 (2009)]. Here we present TPE spectra of fluorescence for chromatophores and lightharvesting complexes LH2 and LH1 from wild-type cells and from carotenoid-depleted or carotenoidless mutant cells of several purple bacteria. The broad band within 1300-1400 nm was found for all preparations. Absorption pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy applied to LH2 complex from Rb. sphaeroides revealed the similar spectral and kinetic patterns for TPE at 1350 nm and one-photon excitation at 675 nm. Analysis of pigment composition of this complex by high-pressure liquid chromatography showed that even under mild isolation conditions some bacteriochlorophyll molecules were oxidized to 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules having the long-wavelength absorption peak in the 650-700 nm range. It is proposed that these 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules are responsible for the broad band in TPE spectra within the 1200-1500 nm region.

  8. Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes: fluorescent and absorption spectroscopy under two-photon (1200-1500 nm) and one-photon (600-750 nm) excitation by laser femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, Il'ya A.; Kompanets, Viktor O.; Chekalin, Sergey V.; Makhneva, Zoya K.; Moskalenko, Andrey A.; Razjivin, Andrei P.

    2011-02-01

    The pathways of excitation energy transfer (EET) via pigments of the light-harvesting antenna are still in discussion. The bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence of peripheral light-harvesting complexes (LH2) from purple bacteria can be observed upon two-photon excitation (TPE) within 1200-1500 nm spectral range (a broad band near 1300 nm). Earlier the occurrence of this band was taken as an evidence for the participation of "dark" carotenoid S1 state in EET processes (see [Walla et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 10808-10813 (2000)] and references in it). However we showed that TPE spectrum of LH2 fluorescence within 1200-1500 nm is not associated with carotenoids [Stepanenko et al., J. Phys. Chem. B. 113(34), 11720-11723 (2009)]. Here we present TPE spectra of fluorescence for chromatophores and lightharvesting complexes LH2 and LH1 from wild-type cells and from carotenoid-depleted or carotenoidless mutant cells of several purple bacteria. The broad band within 1300-1400 nm was found for all preparations. Absorption pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy applied to LH2 complex from Rb. sphaeroides revealed the similar spectral and kinetic patterns for TPE at 1350 nm and one-photon excitation at 675 nm. Analysis of pigment composition of this complex by high-pressure liquid chromatography showed that even under mild isolation conditions some bacteriochlorophyll molecules were oxidized to 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules having the long-wavelength absorption peak in the 650-700 nm range. It is proposed that these 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules are responsible for the broad band in TPE spectra within the 1200-1500 nm region.

  9. Photomovement in Dunaliella salina: fluence rate-response curves and action spectra.

    PubMed

    Wayne, R; Kadota, A; Watanabe, M; Furuya, M

    1991-01-01

    We determined the action spectra of the photophobic responses as well as the phototactic response in Dunaliella salina (Volvocales) using both single cells and populations. The action spectra of the photophobic responses have maxima at 510 nm, the spectrum for phototaxis has a maximum at 450-460 nm. These action spectra are not compatible with the hypothesis that flavo-proteins are the photoreceptor pigments, and we suggest that carotenoproteins or rhodopsins act as the photoreceptor pigments. We also conclude that the phototactic response in Dunaliella is an elementary response, quite independent of the step-up and step-down photophobic responses. We also determined the action spectra of the photoaccumulation response in populations of cells adapted to two different salt conditions. Both action spectra have a peak at 490 nm. The photoaccumulation response may be a complex response composed of the phototactic and photophobic responses. Blue or blue-green light does not elicit a photokinetic response in Dunaliella. PMID:11538118

  10. Spectral emission properties of a LPP light source in the sub-200nm range for wafer inspection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Hudgins, Duane; Abhari, Reza; Abreau, F.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the spectral emission proprieties of a droplet-based laser-produced plasma are investigated in the VUV range. These studies are performed with a spectrograph operating from 30 nm to 180 nm at a spectral resolution of 0.1 nm. The emission spectra are recorded for different droplet-based metal fuels such as tin, indium and gallium in the presence of different background gas pressure levels. The experimental results are relevant for alternative light sources that would be needed for future wafer inspection tools. In addition, the experimental results help to determine the Out- Of-Band (OOB) radiation emission of the EUV source. By tuning the type of fuel, the laser energies and the background gas, the LPP light source shows good capabilities to be operated as a tunable light source that covers a spectral emission range from the EUV to the sub-200 nm range.

  11. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON, J W; DROBSHOFF, A D; BEACH, R J; MESSERLY, M J; PAYNE, S A; BROWN, A; PENNINGTON, D M; BAMFORD, D J; SHARPE, S J; COOK, D J

    2006-01-19

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the competing 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  12. Infrared Luminescence at 1010 nm and 1500 nm in LiNbO3:Er3+ Excitted by Short Pulse Radiation at 980 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokanyan, E. P.; Demirkhanyan, G. G.; Steveler, E.; Rinnert, H.; Aillerie, M.

    Luminescence of LiNbO3:Er3+ crystal at a wavelength of 1010 nm and 1500 nm under pulsed excitation of different power at a wavelength of 980 nm are experimentally and theoretically studied. It is revealed, that the main part of the absorbed energy gives rise to the luminescence at 1500 nm. Considered concentrations of Er3+ impurity ions allow to exclude cooperative processes in the impurity subsystem. The experimental results are interpreted in the framework of a three electronic levels system, assuming that the population of the higher lasing level 4I13/2 in the crystal under study is caused by relaxation processes from the excited level. It is shown that for obtaining of a laser radiation at about 1500 nm one can effectively use a pulse-pumping at 980 nm with a power density in a range of 50 ÷ 60 MW/cm2.

  13. Fast dispersion encoded full range OCT for retinal imaging at 800 nm and 1060 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Bernd; Považay, Boris; Unterhuber, Angelika; Wang, Ling; Hermann, Boris; Rey, Sara; Matz, Gerald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    The dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arm in frequency-domain OCT can be used to iteratively suppress complex conjugate artifacts and thereby increase the imaging range. We propose a fast dispersion encoded full range (DEFR) algorithm that detects multiple signal components per iteration. The influence of different dispersion levels on the reconstruction quality is analyzed for in vivo retinal tomograms at 800 nm. Best results have been achieved with about 30 mm SF11, with neglectable resolution decrease due to finite resolution of the spectrometer. Our fast DEFR algorithm achieves an average suppression ratio of 55 dB and converges within 5 to 10 iterations. The processing time on non-dedicated hardware was 5 to 10 seconds for tomograms with 512 depth scans and 4096 sampling points per depth scan. Application of DEFR to the more challenging 1060 nm wavelength region is demonstrated by introducing an additional optical fibre in the sample arm.

  14. Polarization properties of lidar scattering from clouds at 347 nm and 694 nm.

    PubMed

    Pal, S R; Carswell, A I

    1978-08-01

    The polarization characteristics of lidar scattering from cumulus and low-lying shower clouds have been measured with a system operating at 694 nm (red) and 347 nm (blue). The backscatter profiles of the polarization components as well as of the total intensity of the return are presented and discussed for the two wavelengths. The linear depolarization ratio delta, which can be used as a measure of the unpolarized multiple scattering, has been obtained at both wavelengths. This quantity has a very low value at cloud base for both wavelengths and increases with pulse penetration. The blue registers generally higher values of a within the cloud. The measured total intensity backscatter functions for both wavelengths are presented and discussed in relation to theoretical calculations of cloud models. PMID:20203781

  15. Titan Reveals Transit Spectra of a Definitively Hazy World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-11-01

    Hazes dramatically influence exoplanet observations by obscuring deeper atmospheric layers. This effect is especially pronounced in transit spectroscopy, which probes large pathlengths through an exoplanet atmosphere as it crosses the disk of its host star. While hazes are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra, it is difficult to make inferences from the observations because of the need to disentangle effects of noise, gas absorption, and haze extinction. Here, we turn to Titan, an extremely well studied world with a hazy atmosphere, to better understand how high altitude hazes can impact exoplanet transit observations. We use solar occultation observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. The data, which span 0.88-5 microns at a resolution of 12-18 nm, show strong methane absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases, including acetylene and carbon monoxide. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is neither flat nor has a pure Rayleigh slope, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous absorption features. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum, and demonstrate how high altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding our observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Overall, these new data challenge our understanding of how hazes influence exoplanet transit observations, and provide a means of testing proposed approaches for exoplanet characterization

  16. Transit Spectra of a Hazy World Revealed by Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Hazes dramatically influence exoplanet observations by obscuring deeper atmospheric layers. This effect is especially pronounced in transit spectroscopy, which probes large pathlengths through an exoplanet atmosphere as it crosses the disk of its host star. While hazes are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra, it is difficult to make inferences from the observations because of the need to disentangle effects of noise, gas absorption, and haze extinction. Here, we turn to Titan, an extremely well studied world with a hazy atmosphere, to better understand how high altitude hazes can impact exoplanet transit observations. We use solar occultation observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. The data, which span 0.88-5 microns at a resolution of 12-18 nm, show strong methane absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases, including acetylene and carbon monoxide. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous absorption features. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum, and demonstrate how high altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding our observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Overall, these new data challenge our understanding of how hazes influence exoplanet transit observations, and provide a means of testing proposed approaches for exoplanet characterization. Additionally, our findings will

  17. All-weather ultraviolet solar spectra retrieved at a 0.5-Hz sampling rate.

    PubMed

    Thorseth, T M; Kjeldstad, B

    1999-10-20

    A measurement scheme and an algorithm have been developed to retrieve global irradiance ultraviolet solar spectra (290-400 nm) at a sampling rate of 0.5 Hz. The algorithm combines spectral irradiance measurements performed with a slow (a few minutes) scanning spectroradiometer (Optronic Model OL752) and a moderate bandwidth multichannel radiometer (Biospherical ground-based ultraviolet radiometer Model 541). The filter radiometer instrument allows for continuous observations of global UV radiation at five channels (approximately 10-nm bandwidth), performed simultaneously with spectral measurements. Information about changing cloud conditions during a spectral scan was retrieved from filter measurements and applied to spectral data, hence estimated spectra without cloud variations could be constructed. The quality of the estimated spectra depends on data quality from both instruments. The method works well in all kinds of weather conditions, as long as the Sun is above the horizon and none of the instruments are hampered by measurement errors. PMID:18324148

  18. Energy spectra and LET spectra of protons behind shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Sari; Barak, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    With the advent of devices sensitive to SEU due to direct ionization by protons, it became important to know the flux and energies of protons behind aluminum shielding or within satellites. We present new analytically derived expressions for the energy distribution of incident protons, after passing the shielding, and of secondary protons emitted within the shielding. The results are compared with those of the MULASSIS code. In some cases, like a satellite in a GCR orbit, the contribution of the secondary protons to SEU might be the dominant one. Proton energy-distributions behind shielding are proportional, at low energy values, to inverse proton-LET in aluminum. Their calculated LET-spectra in silicon can be used for evaluating SEU-rate in space. The analytic expressions presented here can be useful in calculating the influence of shielding on other incident ions and secondary ions.

  19. Analysis of multi-mode to single-mode conversion at 635 nm and 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Bogatzki, Angelina; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Hofmann, Jens; Schröder, Henning

    2016-03-01

    We propose two low-cost and robust optical fiber systems based on the photonic lantern (PL) technology for operating at 635 nm and 1550 nm. The PL is an emerging technology that couples light from a multi-mode (MM) fiber to several single-mode (SM) fibers via a low-loss adiabatic transition. This bundle of SM fibers is observed as a MM fiber system whose spatial modes are the degenerate supermodes of the bundle. The adiabatic transition allows that those supermodes evolve into the modes of the MM fiber. Simulations of the MM fiber end structure and its taper transition have been performed via functional mode solver tools in order to understand the modal evolution in PLs. The modelled design consists of 7 SM fibers inserted into a low-index capillary. The material and geometry of the PLs are chosen such that the supermodes match to the spatial modes of the desired step-index MM fiber in a moderate loss transmission. The dispersion of materials is also considered. These parameters are studied in two PL systems in order to reach a spectral transmission from 450 nm to 1600 nm. Additionally, an analysis of the geometry and losses due to the mismatching of modes is presented. PLs are typically used in the fields of astrophotonics and space photonics. Recently, they are demonstrated as mode converters in telecommunications, especially focusing on spatial division multiplexing. In this study, we show the use of PLs as a promising interconnecting tool for the development of miniaturized spectrometers operating in a broad wavelength range.

  20. Retinal Oximetry with 510-600 nm Light Based on Partial Least-Squares Regression Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Hidenobu; Furukawa, Hiromitsu

    2010-11-01

    The oxygen saturation distribution in the retinal blood stream is estimated by measuring spectral images and adopting the partial-least squares regression. The wavelengths range used for the calculation is from 510 to 600 nm. The regression model for estimating the retinal oxygen saturation is built on the basis of the arterial and venous blood spectra. The experiment is performed using an originally designed spectral ophthalmoscope. The obtained two-dimensional (2D) oxygen saturation indicates the reasonable oxygen level across the retina. The measurement quality is compared with those obtained using other wavelengths sets and data processing methods.

  1. Revised Classification for SN 2007nm/PQT 071008:224527+103932

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A. J.; Mahabal, A.; Donalek, C.; Glikman, E.; Graham, M. J.; Williams, R.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Bauer, A.; Scalzo, R.; Ellman, N.; Jerke, J.; Thomas, R. C.; Nugent, P.; Hennawi, J.; Myers, A.; Allan, A.; Steele, I.; Brown, T.; PQ Survey Team

    2007-10-01

    We report a revised classification of SN 2007nm (Palomar-QUEST transient PQT 071008:224527+103932, Drake et al. ATEL#1234) based on additional spectroscopy beyond that reported by Djorgovski et al. (ATEL#1240). Using spectra obtained by the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph on the 2.2-meter University of Hawaii Telescope, the Nearby Supernova Factory has observed that strong a Si II 6355 feature has not developed, and that the spectrum is more similar to that of a Type Ic supernova at an approximate redshift of z = 0.04.

  2. 322 W single-mode Yb-doped all-fiber laser operated at 1120 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanwei; Xiao, Hu; Zhou, Pu; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2014-05-01

    An all-fiber, high-power, spectrally clean, single-mode Yb-doped fiber oscillator at 1120 nm wavelength is demonstrated. By optimizing the reflectivity of the output coupler and the length of the gain fiber, an output power of 322 W and an optical efficiency of 71% have been achieved. The output power, spectra, and bandwidth broadening are presented and briefly discussed. The power scaling capability of the cavity is analyzed on the basis of the thermal effect, and a maximal thermal-damage-free output power of 450 W could be expected.

  3. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Funkhouser, E. D.; King, M. P.; Narasimham, B.; Bartz, B.; Baumann, R.; et al

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environmentsmore » for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.« less

  4. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Funkhouser, E. D.; King, M. P.; Narasimham, B.; Bartz, B.; Baumann, R.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Labello, R.; Nichols, J.; Weeden-Wright, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environments for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.

  5. Demonstration of a high output power 1533nm optical parametric oscillator pumped at 1064nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltynowicz, Robert J.; Wojcik, Michael D.

    2010-10-01

    A high output power, eye-safe, LIDAR transmitter based on a KTA optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was demonstrated. The OPO was based on a two crystal, NCPM, KTA ring cavity which was doubly resonant. A 7ns, 30Hz, flashlamp-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was injection seeded and used to pump the OPO. The OPO converted the 1064 nm pump beam into a 1533 nm signal wave and 3475 nm idler wave. In addition to demonstrating a high power OPO system, we investigated the effects of seeding the pump laser on the OPO's conversion efficiency, oscillation threshold, maximum signal power, and beam quality. The power conversion efficiency between the signal and the injection seeded pump was 22% with an oscillation threshold of 104 MW/cm2 (500 mJ) and a maximum signal power of 6.44 W (215 mJ). The power conversion efficiency between the signal and the unseeded pump was 24% with an oscillation threshold of 77 MW/cm2 (367mJ) and a maximum signal power of 7 W (233 mJ). The beam quality of the signal beam was produced an M2 =15. When the pump laser was seeded, the full angle divergence improved by nearly a factor of five.

  6. Threshold and efficiency for perforation of 1 nm thick carbon nanomembranes with slow highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Gruber, Elisabeth; Ritter, Robert; Heller, René; Beyer, André; Turchanin, Andrey; Klingner, Nico; Hübner, René; Stöger-Pollach, Michael; Vieker, Henning; Hlawacek, Gregor; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2015-09-01

    Cross-linking of a self-assembled monolayer of 1,1‧-biphenyl-4-thiol by low energy electron irradiation leads to the formation of a carbon nanomembrane, that is only 1 nm thick. Here we study the perforation of these freestanding membranes by slow highly charged ion irradiation with respect to the pore formation yield. It is found that a threshold in potential energy of the highly charged ions of about 10 keV must be exceeded in order to form round pores with tunable diameters in the range of 5-15 nm. Above this energy threshold, the efficiency for a single ion to form a pore increases from 70% to nearly 100% with increasing charge. These findings are verified by two independent methods, namely the analysis of individual membranes stacked together during irradiation and the detailed analysis of exit charge state spectra utilizing an electrostatic analyzer.

  7. Analysis of excited-state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter at 1529 nm.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Junyu; Yin, Longfei; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-27

    In this work, a detailed theoretical analysis of 1529 nm ES-FADOF (excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter) based on rubidium atoms pumped by 780 nm laser is introduced, where Zeeman splitting, Doppler broadening, and relaxation processes are considered. Experimental results are carefully compared with the derivation. The results prove that the optimal pumping frequency is affected by the working magnetic field. The population distribution among all hyperfine Zeeman sublevels under the optimal pumping frequency has also been obtained, which shows that 85Rb atoms are the main contribution to the population. The peak transmittance above 90% is obtained, which is in accordance with the experiment. The calculation also shows that the asymmetric spectra observed in the experiment are caused by the unbalanced population distribution among Zeeman sublevels. This theoretical model can be used for all kinds of calculations for FADOF. PMID:27410643

  8. The effect of viewing angle on the spectral behavior of a Gd plasma source near 6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect

    O'Gorman, Colm; Li Bowen; Cummins, Thomas; Dunne, Padraig; Sokell, Emma; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Yugami, Noboru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Jiang Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2012-04-02

    We have demonstrated the effect of viewing angle on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission spectra of gadolinium (Gd) near 6.7 nm. The spectra are shown to have a strong dependence on viewing angle when produced with a laser pulse duration of 10 ns, which may be attributed to absorption by low ion stages of Gd and an angular variation in the ion distribution. Absorption effects are less pronounced at a 150-ps pulse duration due to reduced opacity resulting from plasma expansion. Thus for evaluating source intensity, it is necessary to allow for variation with both viewing angle and target orientation.

  9. Effects of ozone and relative humidity on fluorescence spectra of octapeptide bioaerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Coleman, Mark; Bare, Christopher; Kinahan, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ozone and relative humidity (RH) at common atmospheric levels on the properties of single octapeptide bioaerosol particles were studied using an improved rotating reaction chamber, an aerosol generator, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS), an improved single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS), and equipments to generate, monitor and control the ozone and RH. Aerosol particles (mean diameter ~2 μm) were generated from a slurry of octapeptide in phosphate buffered saline, injected into the rotating chamber, and kept airborne for hours. Bioaerosols were sampled from the chamber hourly for the measurements of particle-size distribution, concentration, total fluorescence excited at 355-nm, and single particle fluorescence spectra excited at 266-nm and 351-nm under different controlled RH (20%, 50%, or 80%) and ozone concentration (0 or 150 ppb). The results show that: (1) Particle size, concentration, and the 263-nm-excited fluorescence intensity decrease at different rates under different combinations of the RH and ozone concentrations used. (2) The 263-nm-excited UV fluorescence (280-400 nm) decreased more rapidly than the 263-nm-excited visible fluorescence (400-560 nm), and decreased most rapidly when ozone is present and RH is high. (3) The UV fluorescence peak near 340 nm slightly shifts to the shorter wavelength (blue-shift), consistent with a more rapid oxidation of tryptophan than tyrosine. (4) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence (430-580 nm/380-700 nm) increases when ozone is present, especially when the RH is high. (5) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence increase that occurs as the tryptophan emission in the UV decreases, and the observation that these changes occur more rapidly at higher RH with the present of ozone, are consistent with the oxidation of tryptophan by ozone and the conversion of the resulting ozonides to N-formyl kynurenine and kynurenine.

  10. Solar Irradiance Reference Spectra (SIRS) for the 2008 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Harder, Jerald W.; Hock, Rachel A.; Snow, Martin; Eparvier, Francis G.; Fontenla, Juan; McClintock, William E.; Richard, Erik C.

    2009-01-01

    The IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) for solar Carrington Rotation 2068 (20 March to 16 April 2008) has been very successful in obtaining a wide variety of solar, heliospheric, and planetary observations during times of solar cycle minimum conditions. One of these efforts is the generation of solar irradiance reference spectra (SIRS) from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm using a combination of satellite and sounding rocket observations. These reference spectra include daily satellite observations from TIMED Solar Extreme ultraviolet Experiment (SEE) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments. The extreme ultraviolet range is also improved with higher spectral resolution observations using the prototype SDO Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard a sounding rocket launched on 14 April 2008. The SIRS result is an important accomplishment in that it is the first data set to have simultaneous measurements over the full spectral coverage up to 2400 nm during solar cycle minimum conditions.

  11. Effects of organic moieties on the photoluminescence spectra of perovskite-type tin bromide based compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papavassiliou, George C.; Vidali, Maria-Sofia; Pagona, Georgia; Mousdis, George A.; Karousis, Nikolaos; Koutselas, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) and optical absorption (OA) spectra of some compounds of the type (SC)SnBr3, (BC)2SnBr4, and (SC)(BC)2Sn2Br7 (where SC is CH3NH3 + or Cs+; BC is C4H9NH3 + ,CH3C6H4CH2NH3 + ,C12H25NH3 + ,C18H37NH3 + and 1-naphthylmethyl ammonium group), in the forms of thin deposits on several substrates, are investigated. Generally, using the 350 nm as excitation line, the obtained PL spectra of compounds of the type (BC)2SnBr4 with short alkyl chain-length in the alkyl ammonium moiety, show broad and strong bands. For example, the PL spectra of compound (C4H9NH3)2SnBr4 exhibit a weak band at ca 475 nm, attributed to free-excitons and a broad and strong band at ca 570 nm, attributed to radiative decay of self-trapped excitons in the inorganic moiety. This is a bright yellow-orange emission, which can be seen by naked eye, even at room temperature. In the case of the compounds with long alkyl chain-length in the alkyl ammonium moiety, the PL spectra are dominated by an excitonic band, which occurs close to the corresponding fundamental OA edge. The PL spectrum of (1-naphthylmethyl ammonium)2SnBr4 shows the strong red band with main maxima at ca 603 and 642 nm, arising from tetramers of naphthyl moieties. Also, the PL spectra of the compounds of the type (SC)SnBr3 and (SC)(BC)2Sn2Br7, after grinding, show strong bands at 600-620 nm.

  12. [Instantaneous emission spectra of epoxypropane in the process of deflagration to detonation transition].

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Yuan, Chang-ying; Hu, Dong; Liu, Jun-chao; Zhu-mei, Sun; Dong, Shi; Xiao, Hai-bo

    2004-07-01

    Using an intensified CCD spectroscopic detector (Princeton Instruments, ICCD PI-Max 1024 RB) which can be gated in as little as 5 ns, the synchronization of the measuring system was controlled by a digital delay generator (Stanford Research Systems, DG535), the DG535 was triggered externally by a lab-made electrical pulse generator which transformed the optical trigger signal to an electrical signal, and the light signal from the end window of an explosion shock tube was delivered by an 1 mm in diameter plastic optical fiber to the entrance slit of the spectrometer (grating of 150 g x mm(-1) , central wavelength of 550 nm). The spectrum measurement of the epoxypropane in the process of deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) was then made. The instantaneous emission spectra of epoxypropane at different time of the DDT process with an exposure time of several microseconds were acquired. Results show that at the beginning of the DDT process, the emitted light was very weak and the line spectra of atoms were observed mainly; in the middle process of the DDT, the emitted light became strong and the spectra observed consisted of line spectra of atoms, band spectra of molecules plus continuous spectrum of the thermal radiation; when the detonation was formed, the emitted light got very strong, and the spectra acquired consisted of both line spectra of atoms and band spectra of molecules superimposed on the strong continuum of the thermal radiation. PMID:15766070

  13. Photochromic kinetic spectra and intermediates of BR-D96N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuan; Yao, Baoli; Wang, Yingli; Lei, Ming; Chen, Guofu; Hampp, Norbert

    2003-02-01

    BR-D96N is a kind of genetically site-specific mutant of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) with obvious photochromic effect. Compared to the wild type BR, the lifetime of M state of BR-D96N is prolonged to several minutes so that the photochromic kinetics and the intermediates formation can be studied by the conventional spectra analysis. In the experiment, the absorption spectra of the sample at different time after light illumination are measured with spectrophotometer. By fitting and analyzing the variation of the spectra, we suppose there are three main states in the photochromic process, i.e. B state (light-adapted state), M state and D state (dark-adapted state). The absorption spectra of the B state, M state and D state are extracted from the experimental data based on this three-state model and the spectra at various time are fitted with the least square method. So, the variations of population percentages of the M state, B state and D state are obtained and the M state and B state lifetimes are estimated. In another way, from measuring the absorption dynamics at 407 nm and 568 nm, the M state and B state lifetimes are also obtained by two exponential data fitting, which give coincident results with those of the spectra analysis.

  14. Uncertainties of the Intensity of the 1130 nm Band of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, L. P.; Pilewskie, P.; Gore, W. J.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Freedman, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    Belmiloud, et al have recently suggested that the HITRAN line intensities in the 1130 nm water vapor band are much too weak. Giver, et at corrected unit conversion errors to make the HITRAN intensities compatible with the original measurements of Mandin, et al, but Belmiloud, et al believe that many of those line intensity measurements were too weak, and they propose the total intensity of the 1130 nm water vapor band is 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. We have made independent assessments of this proposal using 2 spectra obtained with the Ames 25 meter base path White cell. The first was made using the moderate resolution (8 nm) solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with a White cell absorbing path of 506 meters and 10 torr water vapor pressure. Modeling this spectrum using the HITRAN linelist gives a reasonable match, and the model is not compatible when the HITRAN line intensities are increased by 38%. The second spectrum was obtained with a White cell path of 1106 meters and 12 torr water vapor pressure, using a Bomem FTIR with near Doppler width resolution. This spectrum is useful for measuring intensities of isolated weak lines to compare with the measurements of Mandin, et al. Unfortunately, as Belmiloud et al point out, at these conditions the strong lines are much too saturated for good intensity measurements. Our measurements of the weak lines are in reasonable agreement with those of Mandin, et al. Neither of our spectra supports the proposal of Belmiloud et al for a general 38% increase of the absorption intensity in the 1130 nm water vapor band.

  15. Absolute spectral irradiance measurements of lightning from 375 to 880 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orville, R. E.; Henderson, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The time-integrated emissions from cloud-to-ground lightning have been recorded in the 375-880 nm region, using a spectrometer-detector and multichannel analyzer system capable of absolute spectral irradiance measurements. A schematic drawing of the detector-analyzer system is presented, and the experimental setup is described. A total of ten flashes containing 46 individual strikes were recorded and compared to recordings of 500 flashes from 1981. The average spectral irradiance from 375 to 695 nm for flashes at about 15 km was 3.5 x 10 to the -5th J/sq m per stroke with a standard deviation of 2.0 x 10 to the -5th and a range from 0.7 x 10 to the 0.7-6.8 x 10 to the -5th J/sq m per stroke. The average stroke spectra irradiance from 650 to 880 nm for the same strokes was 1.2 x 10 to the -5th, with a standard deviation of 0.7 x 10 to the -5th and a range from 0.5 to 3.2 x 10 to the -5th J/sq m per stroke. A summary table of spectral irradiance values in 50 nm increment is presented. Analysis of the spectral emission data show that unresolved neutral hydrogen lines (NI) at 744.2 nm were more intense than H-alpha emission at 656.3 nm. The strong emission of a flash with a continuing current was identified as cyanogen (CN) emission.

  16. Crystallization of confined water pools with radii greater than 1 nm in AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akira; Yui, Hiroharu

    2014-07-01

    Freezing of water pools inside aerosol sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles has been investigated. Previous freezing experiments suffer from collision and fusion of AOT micelles and resultant loss of water from the water pool by shedding out during the cooling process. These phenomena have restricted the formation of ice to only when the radius of the water pool (Rw) is below 1 nm, and only amorphous ice has been observed. To overcome the size limitation, a combination of rapid cooling and a custom-made cell allowing thin sample loading is applied for instantaneous and homogeneous freezing. The freezing process is monitored with attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) measurements. A cooling rate of ca. -100 K/min and a sample thickness of ca. 50 μm overcomes the limitations mentioned above and allows the crystallization of water pools with larger radii (Rw > 1 nm). The corresponding ATR-IR spectra of the frozen water pools with Rw < 2.0 nm show similar features to the spectrum of metastable cubic ice (Ic). Further increase of the radius of the water pool (Rw > 2.0 nm), unfortunately, drastically decreased the integrated area of the ν(OH) band observed just after freezing, indicating the breakup of the micellar structure and shedding out of the water pool. In addition, it was revealed that Ic ice can also be formed in flexible organic self-assembled AOT reverse micelles for at least Rw ≤ ca. 2 nm, as well as in inorganic and solid materials with a pore radius of ca. 2 nm. The dependence of the phase transition temperature on the curvature of the reverse micelles is discussed from the viewpoint of the Gibbs-Thomson effect. PMID:24885023

  17. NOTE: Visible absorption spectra of radiation exposed SIRAD dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2006-12-01

    SIRAD badge dosimeters are a new type of personal dosimeter designed to measure radiation exposure up to 200 R and give a visual qualitative measurement of exposure. This is performed using the active dosimeter window, which contains a radiochromic material amalgamated in the badge assembly. When irradiated, the badges active window turns blue, which can be matched against the given colour chart for a qualitative assessment of the exposure received. Measurements have been performed to analyse the absorption spectra of the active window, and results show that the window automatically turns a blue colour upon irradiation and produces two peaks in the absorption spectra located at 617 nm and 567 nm. When analysed with a common computer desktop scanner, the optical density response of the film to radiation exposure is non-linear but reproducible. The net OD of the film was 0.21 at 50 R exposure and 0.31 at 200 R exposure when irradiated with a 6 MV x-ray energy beam. When compared to the calibration colour strips at 6 MV x-ray energy the film's OD response matches relatively well within 3.5%. An approximate 8% reduction in measured OD to exposure was seen for 250 kVp x-rays compared to 6 MV x-rays. The film provides an adequate measurement and visually qualitative assessment of radiation exposure for levels in the range of 0 to 200 R.

  18. Mapping Agricultural Crops with AVIRIS Spectra in Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert; Pavri, Betina; Roberts, Dar; Ustin, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Spectroscopy is used in the laboratory to measure the molecular components and concentrations of plant constituents to answer questions about the plant type, status, and health. Imaging spectrometers measure the upwelling spectral radiance above the Earth's surface as images. Ideally, imaging spectrometer data sets should be used to understand plant type, plant status, and health of plants in an agricultural setting. An Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data set was acquired over agricultural fields near Wallula, Washington on July 23rd, 1997. AVIRIS measures upwelling radiance spectra through 224 spectral channels with contiguous 10-nm sampling from 400 to 2500 nm in the solar-reflected spectrum. The spectra are measured as images of 11 by up to 800 km with 20-m spatial resolution. The spectral images measured by AVIRIS represent the integrated signal resulting from: the solar irradiance; two way transmittance and scattering of the atmosphere; the absorptions and scattering of surface materials; as well as the spectral, radiometric and spatial response functions of AVIRIS. This paper presents initial research to derive properties of the agricultural fields near Wallula from the calibrated spectral images measured by AVIRIS near the top of the atmosphere.

  19. C-doped mesoporous anatase TiO2 comprising 10nm crystallites.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chong; Yang, Shenghui; Li, Beibei; Wang, Hongkong; Shi, Jian-Wen; Li, Guodong; Niu, Chunming

    2016-08-15

    We report a C-doped mesoporous anatase TiO2 with high surface area synthesized using multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) mat as a "rigid" template and carbon doping source. The characterization by SEM, HRTEM, X-ray diffraction and nitrogen adsorption revealed that TiO2 samples have a porous structure which are figuratively a inverse copy of MWCNT network and pore walls are formed by interconnected TiO2 nanoparticles with average diameter of ∼10nm. We found that annealing temperatures from 400 to 1000°C before MWCNT template removal had very limited effect on particle size (∼10nm), surface area (112-129m(2)/g) and total pore volume (0.74-0.85m(2)/g) of the samples through a significantly delayed phase transition from anatase to rutile started at 800°C, resulting in only ∼9.1% conversion at 1000°C. The pore size distribution is in mesopore range from 6 to 60nm peaked at ∼24nm. XPS analysis showed a relatively strong C1s peak at 288.4eV, indicating C doping at Ti sites, which is responsible for red shift of adsorption edge of UV-vis spectra and photocatalytic activity in visible-light region. PMID:27179173

  20. Spin wave eigenmodes in single and coupled sub-150 nm rectangular permalloy dots

    SciTech Connect

    Carlotti, G. Madami, M.; Tacchi, S.; Gubbiotti, G.; Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Porod, W.

    2015-05-07

    We present the results of a Brillouin light scattering investigation of thermally excited spin wave eigenmodes in square arrays of either isolated rectangular dots of permalloy or twins of dipolarly coupled elements, placed side-by-side or head-to-tail. The nanodots, fabricated by e-beam lithography and lift-off, are 20 nm thick and have the major size D in the range between 90 nm and 150 nm. The experimental spectra show the presence of two main peaks, corresponding to modes localized either at the edges or in the center of the dots. Their frequency dependence on the dot size and on the interaction with adjacent elements has been measured and successfully interpreted on the basis of dynamical micromagnetic simulations. The latter enabled us also to describe the spatial profile of the eigenmodes, putting in evidence the effects induced by the dipolar interaction between coupled dots. In particular, in twinned dots the demagnetizing field is appreciably modified in proximity of the “internal edges” if compared to the “external” ones, leading to a splitting of the edge mode. These results can be relevant for the exploitation of sub-150 nm magnetic dots in new applications, such as magnonic metamaterials, bit-patterned storage media, and nano-magnetic logic devices.

  1. Quantum confinement in metal nanofilms: Optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir I.

    2016-05-01

    We report optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of Au, Fe, Co and Ni polycrystalline nanofilms in the UV-vis-NIR range, featuring discrete bands resulting from transverse quantum confinement. The film thickness ranged from 1.1 to 15.6 nm, depending on the material. The films were deposited on fused silica substrates by sputtering/thermo-evaporation, with Fe, Co and Ni protected by a SiO2 film deposited on top. The results are interpreted within the particle-in-a-box model, with the box width equal to the mass thickness of the nanofilm. The transverse-quantized energy levels and transition energies scale as the inverse square of the film thickness. The calculated values of the effective electron mass are 0.93 (Au), 0.027 (Fe), 0.21 (Co) and 0.16 (Ni), in units of mo - the mass of the free electron, being independent on the film thickness. The uncertainties in the effective mass values are ca. 2.5%, determined by the film thickness calibration. The second calculated model parameter, the quantum number n of the HOMO, was thickness-independent in Au (5.00) and Fe (6.00), and increased with the film thickness in Co (from 7 to 9) and Ni (from 7 to 11). The transitions observed in the absorbance all start at the level n and correspond to Δn=+1, +2, +3, etc. The photoluminescence bands exhibit large Stokes shifts, shifting to higher energies with the increased excitation energy. The photoluminescence quantum yields grow linearly with the excitation energy, showing evidence of multiple exciton generation. A prototype Fe-SnO2 nanofilm photovoltaic cell demonstrated at least 90% quantum yield of photoelectrons at 77 K.

  2. Designing dual-trench alternating phase-shift masks for 140-nm and smaller features using 248-nm KrF and 193-nm ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, John S.; Socha, Robert J.; Naderi, Alex R.; Baker, Catherine A.; Rizvi, Syed A.; Van Den Broeke, Douglas J.; Kachwala, Nishrin; Chen, J. Fung; Laidig, Thomas L.; Wampler, Kurt E.; Caldwell, Roger F.; Takeuchi, Susumu; Yamada, Yoshiro; Senoh, Takashi; McCallum, Martin

    1998-09-01

    One method for making the alternating phase-shift mask involves cutting a trench into the quartz of the mask using an anisotropic dry etch, followed by an isotropic etch to move the corners of the trench underneath the chrome to minimize problems caused by diffraction at the bottom corners of the phase-trench. This manufacturing method makes the addition of subresolution scattering bars and serifs problematic, because the amount of the undercut causes chrome lifting of these small features. Adding an additional anisotropically etched trench to both cut and uncut regions is helpful, but the etch does not move the trench corners under the chrome and result in a loss to intensity and image contrast. At 248 nm illumination and 4X magnification, our work shows that a combination of 240 nm dual-trench and 5 nm to 10 nm undercut produces images with equal intensity between shifted and unshifted regions without loss of image contrasts. This paper demonstrates optical proximity correction for doing 100 nm, 120 nm, 140 nm and 180 nm lines of varying pitch for a simple alternating phase-shift mask, with no dual-trench or undercut. Then the electromagnetic field simulator, TEMPEST, is used to find the best combination of dual-trench depth and amount of undercut for an alternating phase-shift mask. Phase measurement using 248 nm light and depth measurement of thirty-six unique combinations of dual-trench and phase-shift trench are shown. Based on modeling and experimental results, recommendations for making a fine tuned dual-trench 248 nm mask, as well as an extension of the dual-trench alternating phase-shift technique to 193 nm lithography, are made.

  3. Method of Express Analysis of Temporal Evolution of the Spectral and Angular Distributions of Seps during Gles Using NM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishev, Alexander; Usoskin, Ilya

    It is important for space weather studies to be estimate radiation environment during major SEP (solar energetic particle) events. For this purpose, the main characteristics, viz. spectra and anisotropy of SEPs, should be derived in near real time. Here we present a method for a quasi-real time analysis of ground level enhancements using neutron monitor (NM) data. The method is based on a precise computations of SEP propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere, namely the assymptotic cones of acceptance of NM, application of the new computed neutron monitor yield function and non-linear optimization. Several examples and a comparison with previously obtained results as well with full scale modeling are demonstrated.

  4. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  5. Energy spectra in bubbly turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Stefan; van den Berg, Thomas H.; Rensen, Judith; Lohse, Detlef

    2004-11-01

    The energy spectrum of single phase turbulent flow - apart from intermittency corrections - has been known since Kolomogorov 1941, E(k) ∝ k-5/3. How do bubbles modify this spectrum? To answer this question, we inject micro bubbles (radius 100 μm) in fully turbulent flow (Re_λ=200) up to volume concentrations of 0.3 %. Energy spectra and velocity structure functions are measured with hot-film anemometry. Under our experimental conditions, we find an enhancement of energy on small scales confirming numerical predictions by Mazzitelli, Lohse, and Toschi [Phys. Fluids 15, L5 (2003)]. They propose a mechanism in which bubbles are clustering most likely in downflow regions. This clustering is a lift force effect suppressing large vortical structures, while enhancing energy input on small scales.

  6. Reflectance spectra of primitive chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.

    2013-05-01

    We are studying a wide sample of pristine carbonaceous chondrites from the NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the physico-chemical processes occurred in the parent bodies of these meteorites. We are obtaining laboratory reflectance spectra of different groups of carbonaceous chondrites, but here we focus in CM and CI chondrites. We discuss the main spectral features that can be used to identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids by remote sensing techniques. Two different spectrometers were used covering the entire 0.3 to 30 μm electromagnetic window. Only a handful of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) exhibit bands or features clearly associated with aqueous alteration. Among them are the target asteroids of Osiris Rex and Marco Polo-R missions.

  7. Optimal Extraction of Echelle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskunov, Nikolai

    The extraction of the echelle spectra registered with a CCD detector represents a big challenge because of three reasons: (1) the pixel sampling is often close or worse then optimal, (2) spectral orders are curved and tilted with respect to the CCD rows (or columns) and (3) every pixel contains additional noise coming from various sources as illustrated in Figure 1. The main goal of an optimal extraction is to recover as much of the science signal while minimizing the contribution of the noise. Here we present the Slit Function Decomposition algorithm which replaces the summation in a sliding window with a reconstruction of the slit illumination profile. The reconstruction is formulated as an inverse problem solved by iterations and it is robust against most of the systematic problems including cosmic rays and cosmetic defects.

  8. Graviton Spectra in String Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Galluccio, M.; Occhionero, F.; Litterio, M.

    1997-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an {omega}{sup 3} increase and initiates an {omega}{sup {minus}7} decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre{endash}big bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post{endash}big bang). The frequency and the intensity of the peak may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak, at variance with ordinarily monotonic graviton spectra, would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Graviton spectra in string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Galluccio, Massimo; Litterio, Marco; Occhionero, Franco

    1996-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an ω³ increase and initiates an ω⁻⁷ decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre-Big Bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post-Big Bang). We evaluate both analytically and numerically the frequency and the intensity of the peak and we show that they may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak is at variance with ordinarily monotonic (either increasing or decreasing) graviton spectra of canonical cosmologies; its detection would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology.

  10. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  11. Phase-matched frequency conversion below 150 nm in KBe2BO3F2.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Tomoharu; Ito, Isao; Kobayashi, Yohei; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chuangtian; Watanabe, Shuntaro

    2016-07-25

    Sum frequency mixing has been demonstrated below 150 nm in KBeBO3F2 by using the fundamental with its fourth harmonic of a 6 kHz Ti: sapphire laser system. The wavelength of 149.8 nm is the shortest ever obtained to our knowledge by phase matching in nonlinear crystals. The output powers were 3.6 μW at 149.8 nm and 110 μW at 154.0 nm, respectively. The phase matching angles measured from 149.8 to 158.1 nm are larger by 3-4 degrees than those expected from the existing Sellmeier equation. The measured transmission spectra of KBeBO3F2 crystals support the generation of coherent radiation below 150 nm. PMID:27464165

  12. Fluorescence excitation spectra of all-trans-1,6-diphenylhexatriene conformers: Adiabatic conformer equilibration in the 21Ag state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, Andrzej M.; Krishna, Tallapragada S. R.; Brela, Mateusz; Saltiel, Jack

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence spectra of all-trans-1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene were measured in n-hexadecane at 99 °C by varying λexc in the 294-404 nm range. Resolution of this spectral matrix into s-trans,s-trans and s-cis,s-trans conformer fluorescence spectra yields the λexc dependence of fractional contributions which are converted to conformer specific fluorescence excitation spectra. Conformer absorption spectra obtained from the fluorescence excitation spectra are remarkably similar, but differ significantly from absorption spectra derived from a spectrothermal absorption spectral matrix measured in n-alkanes under isopolarizability conditions. The results reveal substantial conformer equilibration in the excited state. Theory is consistent with adiabatic conformer equilibration in the 21Ag state.

  13. First principles study on the interfacial properties of NM/graphdiyne (NM = Pd, Pt, Rh and Ir): The implications for NM growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhansheng; Li, Shuo; Lv, Peng; He, Chaozheng; Ma, Dongwei; Yang, Zongxian

    2016-01-01

    Based on the dispersion-corrected density functional calculations (DFT-D), we systematically studied the adsorption of noble metals (NM), Pd, Pt, Rh and Ir, on graphdiyne (GDY). We present a systematic study on the geometry, embedded adsorption energy and electronic structure of four different adatoms adsorbed on the GDY. The strong interaction between the NM adatoms and the GDY substrate is found with the NM embedded in the 18C-hexagon of the GDY. We investigated the mobility of the NM adatoms on the GDY, and found that the mobility barrier energy increases along with the increasing of the embedded adsorption energy. We present the NM adatoms growth of high concentrations on the GDY. Upon the analysis of the electronic structure and the frontier molecular orbitals, Rh and Ir adatoms of low concentrations (about 1.37 at%) on the GDY have the potential to be applied as single metal catalysts or gas molecule sensors.

  14. Picosecond laser texturization of mc-silicon for photovoltaics: A comparison between 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm radiation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binetti, Simona; Le Donne, Alessia; Rolfi, Andrea; Jäggi, Beat; Neuenschwander, Beat; Busto, Chiara; Frigeri, Cesare; Scorticati, Davide; Longoni, Luca; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    Self-organized surface structures were produced by picosecond laser pulses on multi-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. Three different laser wavelengths were employed (i.e. 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm) and the resulting morphologies were observed to effectively reduce the reflectivity of the samples after laser irradiation. Besides, a comparative study of the laser induced subsurface damage generated by the three different wavelengths was performed by confocal micro-Raman, photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy. The results of both the structural and optical characterization showed that the mc-Si texturing performed with the laser at 355 nm provides surface reflectivity between 11% and 8% over the spectral range from 400 nm to 1 μm, while inducing the lowest subsurface damage, located above the depletion region of the p-n junction.

  15. Automated identification of basalt spectra in Clementine lunar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonenko, I.; Osinski, G. R.

    2011-06-01

    The identification of fresh basalt spectra plays an important role in lunar stratigraphic studies; however, the process can be time consuming and labor intensive. Thus motivated, we developed an empirically derived algorithm for the automated identification of fresh basalt spectra from Clememtine UVVIS data. This algorithm has the following four parameters and limits: BC Ratio=3(R950-R900)/(R900-R750)<1.1, CD Delta=(R1000-R950)/R750-1.09(R950-R900)/R750>0.003 and <0.06, B Slope=(R900-R750)/(3R750)<-0.012, and Band Depth=(R750-R950)/(R750-R415)>0.1, where R750 represents the unnormalized reflectance of the 750 nm Clementine band, and so on. Algorithm results were found to be accurate to within an error of 4.5% with respect to visual classification, though olivine spectra may be under-represented. Overall, fresh basalts identified by the algorithm are consistent with expectations and previous work in the Mare Humorum area, though accuracy in other areas has not yet been tested. Great potential exists in using this algorithm for identifying craters that have excavated basalts, estimating the thickness of mare and cryptomare deposits, and other applications.

  16. Cycloolefin/cyanoacrylate (COCA) copolymers for 193-nm and 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammel, Ralph R.; Sakamuri, Raj; Lee, Sang-Ho; Rahman, Dalil; Kudo, Takanori; Romano, Andrew R.; Rhodes, Larry F.; Lipian, John-Henry; Hacker, Cheryl; Barnes, Dennis A.

    2002-07-01

    The copolymerization reaction between methyl cyanoacrylate (MCA) and a variety of cycloolefins (CO) was investigated. Cycololefin/cyanoacrylate (COCA) copolymers were obtained in good yields and with lithographically interesting molecular weights for all cycoolefins studied. Anionic MCA homopolymerization could be largely suppressed using acetic acid. Based on NMR data, the copolymerization may tend to a 1:1 CO:MCA incorporation ratio but further work with better suppression of the anionic component is needed to confirm this. Lithographic tests on copolymers of appropriately substituted norbornenes and MCA showed semi-dense and isolated line performance down to 90 nm.

  17. Flattened supercontinuum generation in tellurite-phosphate and chalcogenide-tellurite hybrid microstructured optical fibers with tailored chromatic dispersion spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hoang Tuan; Kawashima, Hiroyasu; Asano, Koji; Duan, Zhongchao; Xue, Xiaojie; Cheng, Tonglei; Deng, Dinghuan; Matsumoto, Morio; Tezuka, Hiroshige; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2015-03-01

    We report here flattened supercontinuum (SC) generated in tellurite-phosphate and chalcogenide-tellurite hybrid microstructured optical fibers (HMOFs) whose chromatic dispersion spectra are tailored with high freedom due to large refractive index difference (Δn) between the core and cladding glasses. It is shown in the simulation that the tellurite-phosphate HMOF whose chromatic dispersion spectrum is near-zero and flattened with three zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs) over a wide wavelength range from 1000 to 4000 nm is beneficial to obtain broad and flattened SC spectra. By using a large Δn of 0.49, the tellurite-phosphate HMOF which has flattened chromatic dispersion and three ZDWs is successfully fabricated. When a 20-cm-long tellurite-phosphate HMOF is pumped at 1550 nm with a 1560-W peak power, an SC extended from ~800 to 2400 nm where ~5-dB spectral flatness in the wavelength ranges from 890 to 1425 nm and from 1875 to 2400 nm (~1060-nm bandwidth in total) is observed. In addition, a flattened SC spectrum with ~6-dB spectral flatness over a broad wavelength range from 950 to 3350 nm (2400-nm bandwidth in total) is generated by pumping a 1-cm-long chalcogenide-tellurite HMOF at 2300 nm with a 40-MW peak power.

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet reflectance spectra of groups L, LL, and E chondrites and of achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. K.; Cohen, A. J.; Hapke, B. W.; Partlow, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of individual meteorites of all classes are being measured in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral wavelength region from 89 to 248 nm to evaluate the potential of VUV spectroscopy as a remote sensing method for planetary studies. In the present investigation, specimens of 15 group L chondrites, 13 group LL chondrites, 7 group E chondrites, and 18 achondrites were studied. Spectra were measured of both polished thin sections and powders of the meteorites, where both were available. Attention is given to measurements of mineral standards, shock effects, and meteorite data. It is concluded that the VUV spectra of meteorites should provide a useful basis for comparisons with spectra of asteroids and comet nuclei taken from spacecraft. VUV spectroscopy should make it possible to identify the major minerals present in a meteorite or asteroid.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Atlas of Synthetic Spectra (Chavez+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, M.; Malagnini, M. L.; Morossi, C.

    1997-10-01

    A library of 711 cool star synthetic spectra in the wavelength range 485-540nm is presented. The coverage in the parameter space span in surface gravity from 1.0 to 5.0dex at a step of 0.5dex. The range in effective temperature covers from 4000 to 6000K at a step of 250K plus the spectra for 7000 and 8000K. The global chemical compositions are [M/H]=-1.0, -0.5, 0.0, +0.1, +0.2, +0.3 and +0.5. The adopted value of microturbulent velocity is 2km/s but for two sets of nine spectra each. All the spectra are computed at a resolving power =250,000. For each wavelength point the continuum and line blanketed absolute fluxes per unit frequency are given. (1 data file).

  20. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  1. Electroluminescence spectra of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes based on p-n-heterostructures coated with phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Gal'china, N. A.; Kogan, L. M.; Soshchin, N. P.; Shirokov, S. S.; Yunovich, A. E.

    2007-09-15

    The electroluminescence spectra of light-emitting diodes based on p-n heterostructures of the InGaN/AlGaN/GaN type are studied in the near-ultraviolet spectral region (360-405 nm). The spectra are peaked at the wavelengths 385 and 395 nm, and the intensity of emission falls exponentially with the photon energy in the shorter-wavelength and longer-wavelength regions. The emitters in the green and yellow spectral regions based on these light-emitting diodes coated with silicate phosphors are studied. The luminescence spectra of phosphors have the Gaussian shape and maximums in the range from 525 to 560 nm. The color characteristics of emitters depend on the ratios of intensities of the ultraviolet and yellow-green bands. The possibilities of fabrication of light-emitting diodes of visible luminescence based on ultraviolet light-emitting diodes that excite colored phosphors are discussed.

  2. Suppression of high-order-harmonic intensities observed in aligned CO2 molecules with 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kosaku; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi

    2011-08-01

    High-order-harmonic generation from aligned N2, O2, and CO2 molecules is investigated by 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses. The harmonic intensities of 1300-nm pulses from aligned molecules show harmonic photon energy dependence similar to those of 800-nm pulses. Suppression of harmonic intensity from aligned CO2 molecules is observed for both 1300- and 800-nm pulses over the same harmonic photon energy range. As the dominant mechanism for the harmonic intensity suppression from aligned CO2 molecules, the present results support the two-center interference picture rather than the dynamical interference picture.

  3. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  4. Intensity Ratio of Resonant Raman Modes for (n,m) Enriched Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Yanmei; Simpson, Jeffrey R; Streit, Jason K; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Hight Walker, Angela R

    2016-05-24

    Relative intensities of resonant Raman spectral features, specifically the radial breathing mode (RBM) and G modes, of 11, chirality-enriched, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) species were established under second-order optical transition excitation. The results demonstrate an under-recognized complexity in the evaluation of Raman spectra for the assignment of (n,m) population distributions. Strong chiral angle and mod dependencies affect the intensity ratio of the RBM to G modes and can result in misleading interpretations. Furthermore, we report five additional (n,m) values for the chirality-dependent G(+) and G(-) Raman peak positions and intensity ratios; thereby extending the available data to cover more of the smaller diameter regime by including the (5,4) second-order, resonance Raman spectra. Together, the Raman spectral library is demonstrated to be sufficient for decoupling G peaks from multiple species via a spectral fitting process, and enables fundamental characterization even in mixed chiral population samples. PMID:27128733

  5. Synthesis of gold nanorods with a longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peak of around 1250 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi Nhat Hang; Le Trinh Nguyen, Thi; Thanh Tuyen Luong, Thi; Thang Nguyen, Canh Minh; Nguyen, Thi Phuong Phong

    2016-03-01

    We prepared gold nanorods and joined them to chemicals such as tetrachloauric (III) acid trihydrate, silver nitrate, hydroquinone, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, sodium hydroxide and sodium borohydride using the seed-mediated method. The combination of hydroquinone, with or without salicylic acid, influences the size of the gold nanorods, and this is demonstrated by the results of TEM images, UV-vis spectra and the value of the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peak with respect to the UV-vis spectra. By changing the Ag+ ion and hydroquinone concentration and the combination of hydroquinone and salicylic acid, the size of the gold nanorods can be controlled and this is manifested by longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks forming between 875 and 1278 nm. In particular, sample E2 achieved a longitudinal surface plasmon peak at 1273 nm and an aspect ratio of more than 10 by modifying the hydroquinone to 2.5 mM and salicylic acid to 0.5 mM concentration in the growth solution.

  6. Study of absorption spectra of gasolines and other hydrocarbon mixtures in the second overtone region of the CH3, CH2, CH groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradov, V. G.; Sannikov, D. G.

    2007-03-01

    We have obtained experimental and model absorption spectra for individual hydrocarbons (toluene, benzene, n-heptane, and iso-octane) and their mixtures in the near IR range (λ = 1080 1220 nm). We model the spectra of nonsynthetic gasolines obtained under the same conditions by combining the spectra of three pure hydrocarbons. We show that the octane number of the studied gasoline is linearly related to the toluene (or benzene) concentrations in the model mixture.

  7. Dual spectra well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, T.W.

    1982-09-07

    A dual spectra well logging system includes a well logging tool which is adapted to pass through a bore hole in an earth formation. The well logging tool includes at least two sensors which sense at least one condition of the earth formation and provides corresponding pulse signals. A circuit connected to the sensors provides a combined pulse signal wherein the pulses of the pulse signal from one sensor has one polarity and the pulses of the pulse signal from the other sensor has pulses of an opposite polarity. A circuit applies the combined pulse signal to a well logging cable which conducts the combined pulse signal to the surface of the earth formation. Surface apparatus includes a network connected to the cable which provides control signals in accordance with the polarity of the pulses in the combined pulse signal. A network connected to the cable inverts the combined pulse signal and provides a combined pulse signal and an inverted combined pulse signal. A first switching network receiving the combined pulse signal passes the pulses derived from the pulses of the one polarity in acccordance with the control signals to provide a first pulse signal while a second switching network receiving the inverted combined pulse signal passes the pulses derived from the pulses of the opposite polarity in accordance with the control signals to provide a second pulse signal. An output network processes the two pulse signals to provide an indication of the earth's condition in accordance with the processed pulse signals.

  8. Infrared spectra of protostellar collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David J.; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Neufeld, David A.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical models of the formation of low mass stars by cloud collapse predict that OI(63 micrometers) and IR rotational lines of CO and H2O dominate the cooling in the freefalling region 10-1000 AU from the protostar. The freefalling gas supersonically hits the protoplanetary disk orbiting the protostar, forming an accretion shock with strong IR emission in rotational lines of H2O and OH, and OI(63 microns). The accretion shock spectra and line profiles depend on the mass flux through the shock and the typical distance r-bar at which the freefalling gas strikes the disk. The line widths are of order the Keplerian speed, or approx. 10(r-bar/10AU)(exp -0.5) km/s, for the accretion shock lines, and less for the lines from the infalling gas. Measurements of the IR line fluxes and profiles from the freefalling gas and the accretion shock diagnoses how a protostar and disk are formed and requires high sensitivity and high spectral and spatial resolving power. SOFIA will be the optimum observatory for many of these lines, although ISO will contribute and the KAO may make a few pioneering detections.

  9. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  10. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  11. Overcoming Degeneracies in Exoplanet Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benneke, Björn

    2015-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets can provide invaluable insights into the planets’ compositions, their formation and evolution histories, and even their habitability. Obtaining exoplanet spectra is observationally challenging; however, and we are generally limited to relatively low signal-to-noise, low spectral resolution, disk-integrated observations , often with relatively narrow wavelength coverage. This low data situation results in strong correlations and degeneracies between the different planet and atmospheric parameters of interest. In this talk, I will present a conceptual picture of how vital information about the planet is encoded in its observable spectrum. I will then give an overview about the wide range of correlations and degeneracies relevant to today’s exoplanet observations. Finally, I will demonstrate how some degeneracies can be overcome and improved constraints can be obtained by including prior knowledge of atmospheric chemistry and physics in the retrieval. I present a new atmospheric retrieval framework, SCARLET, that combines observational data and our prior (limited) knowledge of atmospheric processes in a statistical robust Bayesian framework. New results for hot Jupiters will be presented.

  12. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  13. Infrared spectra of natural and synthetic malachites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuiskii, A. V.; Zorina, M. L.

    2013-09-01

    IR absorption and reflection spectra of dark and light samples of natural and synthetic malachite over 400-4000 cm-1 are studied for the purpose of improving the synthesis technique and in order to distinguish between natural malachite and malachite grown from ammonia solutions. Nitrogen was not detected in the IR spectra or in microprobe analyses of the synthetic material. The differences found in the IR spectra were insignificant and cannot be regarded as distinctive indicators of these materials.

  14. Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy Analysis of Sub-30 nm Magnetic Tunnel Junction Nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evarts, Eric R.

    2011-12-01

    At the nanoscale, physical processes can be found that do not have a macroscopic counterpart. The electrical manipulation of nanomagnets is an example of one such process that has no measurable effect in structures larger than a few micrometers. For nanomagnets less than 50 nm across, there was no existing technique that could reliably detect and manipulate these nanomagnets. I present here a conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) technique that can deliver greater than 10 mA of current to a magnetic nanopillar as small as 10 nm in diameter. Using magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) nanopillars with two thin ferromagnetic layers separated by a thin insulator, two different electrical resistances are measured for the parallel and antiparallel relative magnetic orientations. Using this technique, I demonstrated spin torque transfer (STT) switching of MTJ nanopillars. Using nanoparticle masking, I fabricated smaller MTJ nanopillars than previously reported. These 26 nm diameter MTJ nanopillars showed an increased switching current density of 10 × 10 6 A/cm2 compared to the 1-3 × 106 A/cm2 observed on 200 nm × 100 nm nanopillars. As these small nanopillars were cycled multiple times, the electrical and magnetic properties changed showing a decrease in the ΔR between the two states and an overall increase in the resistance indicating a shrinking effective nanopillar diameter due to oxidation. The low frequency noise power spectrum was recorded as a function of applied current density. These spectra indicate a small magnetic noise component that depends on the STT effect that can be suppressed with an applied magnetic field.

  15. Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves photoexcited by sunlight measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Saeka; Yano, Ayako; Ishii, Hiroshi; Satoh, Chikahiro; Akai, Nobuyuki; Nakata, Munetaka

    2013-06-01

    Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves of Green pak choi (Brassica rapa var. chinensis) were measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer, which we developed recently. The intact samples, photoexcited by sunlight without artificial light sources, showed delayed fluorescence around 740 nm with a lifetime of ˜6 s. The observed spectra were deconvoluted into two Gaussian bands: the delayed fluorescence from photosystem II and photosystem I complexes. Their relative intensities depended on the chlorophyll concentration, but their wavelengths were unchanged.

  16. Raman spectra from Symmetric Hydrogen Bonds in Water by High-intensity Laser-induced Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Men, Zhiwei; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Dongfei; Li, Zhanlong; Sun, Chenglin

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectra of ice VII and X were investigated using strong plasma shockwave generated by laser-induced breakdown (LIB) in liquid water. Simultaneously, the occurrence of the hydrogen emission lines of 656 nm (Hα), 486 nm (Hβ), 434 nm (Hγ) and 410 nm (Hδ) was observed. At 5 × 1012 W/cm2 optical power density, the O-H symmetric stretching, translational and librational modes of ice VII and a single peak at 785 cm−1 appeared in the spectra. The band was assigned to the Raman-active O-O mode of the monomolecular phase, which was the symmetric hydrogen bond of cuprite ice X. The spectra indicated that ice VII and X structure were formed, as the trajectory of the strong plasma shockwave passes through the stable Pressure-Temperature range of ice VII and X. The shockwave temperature and pressure were calculated by the Grüneisen model. PMID:24709652

  17. Leaf color is fine-tuned on the solar spectra to avoid strand direct solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Kume, Atsushi; Akitsu, Tomoko; Nasahara, Kenlo Nishida

    2016-07-01

    The spectral distributions of light absorption rates by intact leaves are notably different from the incident solar radiation spectra, for reasons that remain elusive. Incident global radiation comprises two main components; direct radiation from the direction of the sun, and diffuse radiation, which is sunlight scattered by molecules, aerosols and clouds. Both irradiance and photon flux density spectra differ between direct and diffuse radiation in their magnitude and profile. However, most research has assumed that the spectra of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) can be averaged, without considering the radiation classes. We used paired spectroradiometers to sample direct and diffuse solar radiation, and obtained relationships between the PAR spectra and the absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments and organs. As monomers in solvent, the spectral absorbance of Chl a decreased with the increased spectral irradiance (W m(-2) nm(-1)) of global PAR at noon (R(2) = 0.76), and was suitable to avoid strong spectral irradiance (λmax = 480 nm) rather than absorb photon flux density (μmol m(-2) s(-1) nm(-1)) efficiently. The spectral absorption of photosystems and the intact thallus and leaves decreased linearly with the increased spectral irradiance of direct PAR at noon (I dir-max), where the wavelength was within the 450-650 nm range (R(2) = 0.81). The higher-order structure of photosystems systematically avoided the strong spectral irradiance of I dir-max. However, when whole leaves were considered, leaf anatomical structure and light scattering in leaf tissues made the leaves grey bodies for PAR and enabled high PAR use efficiency. Terrestrial green plants are fine-tuned to spectral dynamics of incident solar radiation and PAR absorption is increased in various structural hierarchies. PMID:26943164

  18. Novel high refractive index fluids for 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, Julius; Otoguro, Akihiko; Itani, Toshiro; Fujii, Kiyoshi; Kagayama, Akifumi; Nakano, Takashi; Nakayama, Norio; Tamatani, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Shin

    2006-03-01

    Despite the early skepticism towards the use of 193-nm immersion lithography as the next step in satisfying Moore's law, it continuous to meet expectations on its feasibility in achieving 65-nm nodes and possibly beyond. And with implementation underway, interest in extending its capability for smaller pattern sizes such as the 32-nm node continues to grow. In this paper, we will discuss the optical, physical and lithographic properties of newly developed high index fluids of low absorption coefficient, 'Babylon' and 'Delphi'. As evaluated in a spectroscopic ellipsometer in the 193.39nm wavelength, the 'Babylon' and 'Delphi' high index fluids were evaluated to have a refractive index of 1.64 and 1.63 with an absorption coefficient of 0.05/cm and 0.08/cm, respectively. Lithographic evaluation results using a 193-nm 2-beam interferometric exposure tool show the imaging capability of both high index fluids to be 32-nm half pitch lines and spaces.

  19. Temperature characteristic of 808nm VCSELs with large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuan; Feng, Dawei; Hao, Yongqin; Wang, Yong; Yan, Changling; Lu, Peng; Li, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In order to study the output characteristics of 808nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser(VCSEL) with large aperture at different temperature, 808nm VCSEL with 500μm emitting diameter are fabricated with Reticular Electrode Structure(RES). Lasing wavelength, optical power and the threshold current are measured by changing the temperature of heat sink. And an output power of 0.42W is achieved at 1.3A at room temperature under continuous wave operation. The central wavelength is 803.32nm, and the full width at half maximum is 0.16nm, the temperature shift is 0.06nm/°, the thermal resistance is 0.098°/mW. The testing results show that 808nm VCSEL with large aperture is good temperature characteristic.

  20. ALIEN: A nebular spectra analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, R.; Vazquez, R.

    2000-11-01

    A new C-coded software, designed to analyze nebular spectra, is presented. T his software is able to read the fluxes of the most important ions directly from IRAF's output file (splot.log). Spectra can be dereddened using the Balmer lines ratio and the Seaton's extinction law. Electron temperature and density, as well as ionic abundances by number are estimated by means of numeric calculations based on the five-level atom model. The dereddened spectra and the table containing the ionic abundances can be saved in a LaTex formatted file. This software has been initially designed to work with a low dispersion spectra.

  1. Infrared spectra of thyroid tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Butra, V. A.

    2010-07-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study thyroid tumor tissues removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, the spectra of proteins in the region of C=O vibrations are different from the spectra of these substances in benign tumors and in tissues outside the pathological focus at a distance >1 cm from the margin of the tumor. The differences in the spectra are due to changes in the supermolecular structure of the proteins, resulting from rearrangement of the system of hydrogen bonds. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathologies.

  2. Segmentation of the macular choroid in OCT images acquired at 830nm and 1060nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sieun; Beg, Mirza F.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-06-01

    Retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT) has rapidly advanced in ophthalmic applications with the broad availability of Fourier domain (FD) technology in commercial systems. The high sensitivity afforded by FD-OCT has enabled imaging of the choroid, a layer of blood vessels serving the outer retina. Improved visualization of the choroid and the choroid-sclera boundary has been investigated using techniques such as enhanced depth imaging (EDI), and also with OCT systems operating in the 1060-nm wavelength range. We report on a comparison of imaging the macular choroid with commercial and prototype OCT systems, and present automated 3D segmentation of the choroid-scleral layer using a graph cut algorithm. The thickness of the choroid is an important measurement to investigate for possible correlation with severity, or possibly early diagnosis, of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  3. 337 nm matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization of single aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    He, L; Murray, K K

    1999-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra were obtained from single particles injected directly into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Aerosol particles were generated at atmospheric pressure using a piezoelectric single-particle generator or a pneumatic nebulizer and introduced into the mass spectrometer through a series of narrow-bore tubes. Particles were detected by light scattering that was used to trigger a 337 nm pulsed nitrogen laser and the ions produced by laser desorption were mass separated in a two-stage reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. MALDI mass spectra of single particles containing bradykinin, angiotensin II, gramicidin S, vitamin B(12) or gramicidin D were obtained at mass resolutions greater than 400 FWHM. For the piezoelectric particle generator, the efficiency of particle delivery was estimated to be approximately 0.02%, and 50 pmol of sample were consumed for each mass spectrum. For the pneumatic nebulizer, mass spectra could be obtained from single particles containing less than 100 amol of analyte, although the sample consumption for a typical mass spectrum was over 400 pmol. PMID:10491586

  4. LINE PARAMETERS OF THE 782 nm BAND OF CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Liu, A.-W.; Li, X.-F.; Wang, J.; Cheng, C.-F.; Sun, Y. R.; Lambo, R.; Hu, S.-M.

    2013-09-20

    The 782 nm band of CO{sub 2}, in a transparent window of Earth's atmosphere, was the first CO{sub 2} band observed 80 yr ago in the spectra of Venus. The band is very weak and therefore not saturated by the thick atmosphere of Venus, but its spectral parameters are still very limited due to the difficulty of detecting it in the laboratory. It is the highest overtone (ν{sub 1} + 5ν{sub 3}) of CO{sub 2} given in widely used spectroscopy databases such as HITRAN and GEISA. In the present work, the band is studied using a cavity ring-down spectrometer with ultra-high sensitivity as well as high precision. The positions of 55 lines in the band were determined with an absolute accuracy of 3 × 10{sup –5} cm{sup –1}, two orders of magnitude better than previous studies. The line intensities, self-induced pressure broadening coefficients, and the shift coefficients were also derived from the recorded spectra. The obtained spectral parameters can be applied to model the spectra of the CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheres of planets like Venus and Mars.

  5. Versatile 1 W narrow band 976 nm and 1064 nm light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrdiek, S.; Pfeiffer, H.-U.; Zibik, E. A.; Sverdlov, B.; Pliska, T.; Lichtenstein, N.

    2011-02-01

    We report on development of novel curved waveguide (CWG) laser devices, where the emission wavelength centered at ~976 nm is stabilized to a 20 dB bandwidth of less than 100 picometer by using fiber Bragg gratings (FBG). Radiation from the curved waveguide laser is coupled using an anamorphic fiber lens into a single mode polarization maintaining fiber containing the FBG, the latter acting as a front reflector. The high power gain chip is based on Oclaro's InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum well laser. Use of the curved waveguide geometry allows to eliminate residual reflections in the optical path of the cavity, which is formed by the rear chip facet and the FBG. It is well known that additional reflections lead to significant deterioration of the spectral and power stability. The devices, assembled in telecom type housings, provide up to 1 W of low-noise and kink-free CW power. In addition pulse operation in nanosecond range is also investigated. The spectral stabilization time to the wavelength of the FBG is limited by the external cavity roundtrip of ~2 ns. A side mode suppression ratio of about 40 dB and higher is achieved for pulsed and CW operation. Results are also presented for a device at 1064 nm. Numerous applications can be envisioned for these devices. For instance devices with high power and ultranarrow spectral bandwidth allow greater flexibility in the choice of parameters for frequency conversion applications. In pulsed mode the device can be used in the special sensing applications where spectral stability is crucial.

  6. Time-resolved K-shell line spectra measurement of z-pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingguo; Zhou, Shaotong; Chen, Guanhua; Huang, Xianbin; Cai, Hongchun; Li, Zeren

    2013-11-01

    A Johann-type crystal spectrometer integrated with x-ray PIN diodes has been developed for measuring the time-resolved K-shell line spectra of the imploding Al wire array. In this spectrometer, the PIN diodes are mounted on the Rowland circle of the cylindrical bent crystal with an appointed position to collect the line emissions from z-pinch plasmas. The spectrometer with four typical channels, which are keyed to the Al ion hydrogen-like (Hα, 0.7171 nm and Hβ, 0.6052 nm) and helium-like (Heα, 0.7757 nm and Heβ, 0.6634 nm) resonance lines is designed and fabricated. Example data from the experiment on the Yang accelerator are shown and the time-dependent electron temperature is determined from the signal ratios of Al ion Hα line to Heα line using the collisional and radiative model.

  7. Non-Destructive Observation of the Laser Treatment Effect on Historical Paper via the Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, K.; Sliwinski, G.

    The fluorescence spectra of historical and model paper samples, previously irradiated with the laser beam at wavelengths of 1,064, 532, 355, and 266 nm, are recorded under excitation at 266 nm, and the nonirradiated samples are used for reference. The spectral profiles obtained for the laser-treated model papers made of cotton and/or linen only reveal differences compared to the reference ones. After irradiation at 532 and 1,064 nm, a decrease of the band intensities of the entire spectral profile is observed. In contrary, the UV irradiation at 355nm of the same samples results in the increase of bands centered at 341 and 370nm compared to the visible region only. Prolonged treatment at 266nm results in the marked increase of band intensities in the visible region and corresponds to the independently observed yellowing.

  8. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  9. Manipulating Ratio Spectra for the Spectrophotometric Analysis of Diclofenac Sodium and Pantoprazole Sodium in Laboratory Mixtures and Tablet Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Nejal M.; Chavada, Vijay D.; Sanyal, Mallika; Shrivastav, Pranav S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Three sensitive, selective, and precise spectrophotometric methods based on manipulation of ratio spectra, have been developed and validated for the determination of diclofenac sodium and pantoprazole sodium. Materials and Methods. The first method is based on ratio spectra peak to peak measurement using the amplitudes at 251 and 318 nm; the second method involves the first derivative of the ratio spectra (Δλ = 4 nm) using the peak amplitudes at 326.0 nm for diclofenac sodium and 337.0 nm for pantoprazole sodium. The third is the method of mean centering of ratio spectra using the values at 318.0 nm for both the analytes. Results. All the three methods were linear over the concentration range of 2.0–24.0 μg/mL for diclofenac sodium and 2.0–20.0 μg/mL for pantoprazole sodium. The methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability, and robustness are found to be within the acceptable limit. The results of single factor ANOVA analysis indicated that there is no significant difference among the developed methods. Conclusions. The developed methods provided simple resolution of this binary combination from laboratory mixtures and pharmaceutical preparations and can be conveniently adopted for routine quality control analysis. PMID:24701171

  10. Fluorescence spectra of blood plasma treated with ultraviolet irradiation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Maslova, T. O.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the fluorescence spectra of blood plasma from patients with acute coronary syndrome, and also the effect of therapeutic doses of in vivo ultraviolet blood irradiation (UBI) on the spectra. We have established that the maxima in the fluorescence spectra of the original plasma samples, obtained from unirradiated blood, are located in the wavelength interval 330-340 nm, characteristic for the fluorescence of tryptophan residues. In extracorporeal UBI ( λ = 254 nm), we observed changes in the shape and also both a blue and a red shift in the maxima of the fluorescence spectra, differing in magnitude for blood plasma samples from different patients in the test group. We show that UBI-initiated changes in the fluorescence spectra of the plasma depend on the original pathological disturbances of metabolite levels, and also on the change in the oxygen-transport function of the blood and the acid-base balance, affecting the oxidative stability of the plasma. We have concluded that UV irradiation, activating buffer systems in the blood, has an effect on the universal and specific interactions of the tryptophan residue with the amino acid residues and water surrounding it.

  11. [Application of fluorescence spectra and parallel factor analysis in the classification of edible vegetable oils].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi-jun; Pan, Zhao; Zhao, Yan-peng; Liu, Hai-long; Zheng, Long-jiang

    2014-08-01

    The fluorescence spectra of 22 samples of 8 kinds of edible vegetable oils (soybean oil, maize oil, olive oil, rice oil, peanut oil, walnut oil, sunflower oil and sesame oil) were measured with FS920 fluorescence spectrometer and the fluorescence matrixs (EEMs) were analyzed with parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis model. To synthesize the capabilities of material characterization and component identification, fluorescence spectra combined with PARAFAC fulfill the classification of vegetable oils. The map feature (peak position, peak value and peak number) was obtained by analyzing three dimensional spectra and con tour maps in the range of emission wavelength from 260 to 750 nm, and excitation wavelengths from 250 to 550 nm. The fluorescent substances (unsaturated fatty acids, vitamin E and its derivatives, chlorophyll and carotenoid) corresponding to spectrum peaks were determined. The factor-number was selected and the components (vitamin E and its derivatives, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, fatty acid oxidation products, vegetable oil oxidation products) corresponding to each factor were ascertained. The four-factor excitation and emission profiles and projection score plots of PARAFAC model were plotted. Different vegetable oils can be characterized and distinguished with the map features of fluorescence spectra and sample projection plots of PARAFAC model. The results demonstrate the capability of the combination of fluorescence spectra technology and four-factor PARAFAC model for differentiating and characterizing vegetable oils. PMID:25474950

  12. Two-Component Fitting of Coronal-Hole and Quiet-Sun He I 1083 Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.; Malanushenko, Elena V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present reduction techniques and first results for detailed fitting of solar spectra obtained with the NASA/National Solar Observatory Spectromagnetograph (NASA/NSO SPM over a 2 nm bandpass centered on the He 1 1083 nm line. The observation for this analysis was a spectra-spectroheliogram obtained at the NSO/Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope (KPVT) on 00 Apr 17 at 21:46 UT spanning an area of 512 x 900 arc-seconds; the field of view included a coronal hole near disk center as well as surrounding quiet sun. Since the He I line is very weak and blended with nearby solar and telluric lines, accurate determination of the continuum intensity as a function of wavelength is crucial. We have modified the technique of Malanushenko {\\it et al.) (1992; {\\it AA) (\\bf 259), 567) to tie regions of continuua and the wings of spectral lines which show little variation over the image to standard reference spectra such as the NSO Fourier Transform Spectrometer atlas (Wallace {\\it et al). 1993; NSO Tech Report \\#93-001). We performed detailed least-squares fits of spectra from selected areas, accounting for all the known telluric and solar absorbers in the spectral bandpass. The best physically consistent fits to the Helium lines were obtained with Gaussian profiles from two components (one ''cool'', characteristic of the upper chromosphere; one ''hot'', representing the cool transition region at 2-3 x 10$^{4)$ K). In the coronal hole, the transition-region component, shifted by 6-7 km/s to the blue, is mildly dominant, consistent with mass outflow as suggested by Dupree {\\it et all. (1996; {\\it Ap. J.}-{\\bf 467), 121). In quiet-sun spectra there is less evidence of outward flow, and the chromospheric component is more important. All our fitted spectra show a very weak unidentified absorption feature at 1082.880 nm in the red wing of the nearby Si I line.

  13. 40nm tunable multi-wavelength fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingsong; Wang, Tianshu; Zhang, Peng; Dong, Keyan; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-12-01

    A Brillouin-Erbium multi-wavelength tunable fiber laser at C-band is demostrated. A 10 km long singlemode fiber(SMF), a 6 m long Erbium-doped fiber, two couplers, a wavelength division multiplexer, a isolator, an optical circulator, a 980nm pump laser and a narrow linewidth tunable laser are included in the structure. A segment of 10 km-long single-mode fiber (SMF) between the two ports of a 1×2 coupler is used as Brillouin gain. Ebiumdoped fiber amplifier (EDFA) consists of a segment of 6m er-doped fiber pumped by 980nm laser dioder . A narrow linewidth tunable laser from 1527 to 1607 nm as Brillouin bump, At the Brillouin pump power of 8mW and the 980 nm pump power of 400 mw, 16 output channels with 0.08 nm spacing and tuning range of 40 nm from 1527 nm to 1567 nm are achieved. We realize the tunable output of wavelength by adjusting the 980 nm pump power and the Brillouin pump wavelength. Stability of the multiwavelength fiber laser is also observed.

  14. 7nm logic optical lithography with OPC-Lite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Axelrad, Valery; Nakayama, Ryo; Oyama, Kenichi; Yamauchi, Shohei; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji

    2015-03-01

    The CMOS logic 22nm node was the last one done with single patterning. It used a highly regular layout style with Gridded Design Rules (GDR). Smaller nodes have required the same regular layout style but with multiple patterning for critical layers. A "line/cut" approach is being used to achieve good pattern fidelity and process margin.[1] As shown in Fig. 1, even with "line" patterns, pitch division will eventually be necessary. For the "cut" pattern, Design-Source-Mask Optimization (DSMO) has been demonstrated to be effective at the 20nm node and below.[2,3,4] Single patterning was found to be suitable down to 16nm, while double patterning extended optical lithography for cuts to the 10-12nm nodes. Design optimization avoided the need for triple patterning. Lines can be patterned with 193nm immersion with no complex OPC. The final line dimensions can be achieved by applying pitch division by two or four.[5] In this study, we extend the scaling using simplified OPC to the 7nm node for critical FEOL and BEOL layers. The test block is a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops, scaled from previous experiments. Simulation results show that for cuts at 7nm logic dimensions, the gate layer can be done with single patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, possibly some of the 1x metal layers can be done with double patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, and the contact layer will require triple patterning whose minimum pitch is 68nm. These pitches are less than the resolution limit of ArF NA=1.35 (72nm). However these patterns can be separated by a combination of innovative SMO for less than optical resolution limit and a process trick of hole-repair technique. An example of triple patterning coloring is shown in Fig 3. Fin and local interconnect are created by lines and trims. The number of trim patterns are 3 times (min. pitch=90nm) and twice (min. pitch=120nm), respectively. The small number of masks, large pitches, and

  15. Polarization-dependent aluminum metasurface operating at 450 nm.

    PubMed

    Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Zhu, Xiaolong; Carstensen, Marcus S; Sørensen, Michael K; Vannahme, Christoph; Asger Mortensen, N; Kristensen, Anders

    2015-11-01

    We report on a polarization-dependent plasmonic aluminum-based high-density metasurface operating at blue wavelengths. The fabricated sub-wavelength structures, tailored in size and geometry, possess strong, localized, plasmonic resonances able to control linear polarization. Best performance is achieved by rotating an elongated rectangular structure of length 180 nm and width 110 nm inside a square lattice of period 250 nm. In the case of 45 degrees rotation of the structure with respect to the lattice, the normal-incidence reflectance drops around the resonance wavelength of 457 nm from about 60 percent to below 2 percent. PMID:26561151

  16. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  17. Incorporating Spectra Into Periodic Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Alanna; Hong, J.; Protopapas, P.; Kashyap, V.

    2011-09-01

    The Chandra surveys have resulted in a wealth of data on low-luminosity X-ray sources (Lx 1030-34 erg/s) of Galactic scales beyond the local solar neighborhood. Many of these are compact binaries, in particular, cataclysmic variables, often identified by their periodic X-ray variability and spectra. Hong et al. (2009, 2011) have used energy quantiles (Hong, Schlegel & Grindlay, 2004) as a fast, robust indicator of spectral hardness and absorption of the X-ray sources. Energy quantiles also enable a simple but effective illustration of spectral changes with phase in these periodic systems: e.g. absorption by the accreting material is understood to drive the periodic light-curves. An interesting question is how to best make use of the information encapsulated in the periodic change in energy spectrum, along with the periodic change in intensity, especially for cases of ambiguous period determination? And, how to do it computationally efficiently? A first approach is to do the period search in intensity, as is standard; and then use a criterion of spectral variation to verify possible periods. Huijse, Zegers & Protopapas (2011) recently demonstrated a powerful period estimation technique using information potential and correntropy embedded in the light curve. Similar quantities based on energies (or energy quantiles) of X-ray photons can serve as criteria of spectral variation. A different approach treats the spectrum variations and intensity variations completely independently, searching through period-space in each, and then combining the results. A more general method would include both at the same time, looking for statistically significant variations above what is expected for a constant (in intensity and spectrum).

  18. Flash-lamp pumped Pr:YAP laser operated at wavelengths of 747 nm and 662 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibrich, Martin; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Nejezchleb, Karel; Škoda, Václav

    2009-02-01

    Successful room-temperature generation of Pr:YAP laser radiation at wavelengths of 747 nm and 662 nm was demonstrated. A flash-lamp pumped Pr:YAP laser was operated in free-running pulsed regime at room temperature. Permanent laser action was reached by means of a special UV color glass plate filter placed directly into the laser cavity. The maximum output energy and pulse length reached at wavelengths of 747 nm and 662 nm were 102 mJ, 92 μs and 6.1 mJ, 47.5 μs, respectively. The laser beam parameter M2 ~ 1.5 was measured when the 662 nm wavelength was generated. In the case of 747 nm wavelength generation, M2 ~ 1.2 was reached with a diaphragm inside the resonator. For different pumped energy values, the line shape and linewidth remained stable for both cases.

  19. Supercontinuum generation at 800 nm in all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Sukhoivanov, Igor A; Iakushev, Sergii O; Shulika, Oleksiy V; AndradeLucio, Jose Amparao; Díez, Antonio; Andrés, Miguel

    2014-12-01

    We have numerically investigated the supercontinuum generation and pulse compression in a specially designed all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber with a flat-top dispersion curve, pumped by typical pulses from state of the art Ti:Sapphire lasers at 800 nm. The optimal combination of pump pulse parameters for a given fiber was found, which provides a wide octave-spanning spectrum with superb spectral flatness (a drop in spectral intensity of ~1.7 dB). With regard to the pulse compression for these spectra, multiple-cycle pulses (~8 fs) can be obtained with the use of a simple quadratic compressor and nearly single-cycle pulses (3.3 fs) can be obtained with the application of full phase compensation. The impact of pump pulse wavelength-shifting relative to the top of the dispersion curve on the generated SC and pulse compression was also investigated. The optimal pump pulse wavelength range was found to be 750 nm < λp < 850 nm, where the distortions of pulse shape are quite small (< -3.3 dB). The influences of realistic fiber fabrication errors on the SC generation and pulse compression were investigated systematically. We propose that the spectral shape distortions generated by fiber fabrication errors can be significantly attenuated by properly manipulating the pump. PMID:25606954

  20. The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Drozdov, L. A. Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V.; Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A.

    2011-12-15

    The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

  1. [Spectra characteristics of LiM (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) BO3 : Tb3+ phosphor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; Li, Pan-Lai; Yang, Zhi-Ping; Guo, Qing-Lin

    2009-11-01

    LiM (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) BO3 : Tb3+ phosphors were synthesized by solid state reaction. The starting materials CaCO3, SrCO3, BaCO3, H3 BO3, Li2 CO3, Na2 CO3, K2 CO3 and Tb4 O7 (99.99% in mass) in appropriate stoichiometric ratio were mixed in the alumina crucible, then the mixed powders were calcined at 700 degrees C for 2 h, and LiCaBO3 : Tb3+, LiSrBO3 : Tb3+ and LiB-aBO3 : Tb3+ phosphors were obtained. The emission and excitation spectra were measured by a Shimadzu RF-540 ultraviolet spectrophotometer. All the photoluminescence properties of these phosphors were measured at room temperature. The emission spectra of LiM (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) BO3 : Tb3+ phosphors show several bands, and the main emission peaks correspond to the 5D4 --> 7F6(486, 486, 488 nm), 5D4 --> F5 (544, 544, 544 nm), 5D4 --> 7F4 (590, 595, 593 nm) and 5D4 --> 7F3 (620, 620, 616 nm) typical transitions of Tb3+, and the typical transitions of Tb3+ happens to split because of the effects of LiM (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) BO3 crystals field. The excitation spectra for the 544 nm green emission of LiM (M = Ca, Sr, Ba)BO3 : Tb3+ phosphors illuminate that these kinds of phosphors can be effectively excited by ultraviolet (350-410 nm) light, and emit green light, therefore, they are promising phosphors for white light emitting diodes. Effects of activation and charge compensation on the luminescence intensities of LiM (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) BO3 : Tb3+ phosphors were studied, and the results show that the intensities were obviously effected. PMID:20101952

  2. Spectra of the Jovian ring and Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Jewitt, D. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Terrile, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements made between 0.887 and 2.4 microns demonstrate that the Jovian ring and Amalthea have similar reflection spectra. The spectra, in particular the ratio of the 0.9- to 2.2-micron reflectivities, are inconsistent with those expected from water, ammonia, or methane frosts, but are consistent with reflection from large rock bodies.

  3. Heavy primary spectra observed by RUNJOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apanasenko, A. V.; Beresovskaya, V. A.; Fujii, M.; Galkin, V. I.; Hareyama, M.; Ichimura, M.; Ito, S.; Kamioka, E.; Kitami, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Kopenkin, V. V.; Kuramata, S.; Kuriyama, T.; Lapshin, V. I.; Managadze, A. K.; Matsutani, H.; Mikami, H.; Misnikova, N. P.; Mukhamedshin, R. A.; Namiki, M.; Nanjo, H.; Nazarov, S. N.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Oe, T.; Ohta, S.; Osedlo, V. I.; Oshuev, D. S.; Publichenko, P. A.; Rakobolskaya, I. V.; Roganova, T. M.; Saito, M.; Sazhina, G. P.; Semba, H.; Shabanova, Yu. N.; Shibata, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Sveshnikova, L. G.; Takahashi, K.; Tsutiya, T.; Taran, V. M.; Yajima, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Yashin, I. V.; Zamchalova, E. A.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2001-08-01

    RUssian Nippon JOint Balloon (RUNJOB) has been observing the primary spectra of cosmic ray nuclei since 1995. Data from 6 out of 10 succesful flights will be used to report the spectra of heavy primaries up to iron nucleus with the energy range more than 1014 eV/particle. The details of analysis like charge and energy determinations will be also given.

  4. (abstract) Spectra of Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, M. S.; Hayward, T. L.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    The spectra of Hale-Bopp were acquired in mid-1996 at R > 3.5 AU. Strong silicate emission is present in all the spectra. The shape of the feature is very similar to that seen in comet P/Halley. This is the first time that a strong silicate feature has been detected in a comet beyond 2 AU.

  5. COMPUTER INTERPRETATION OF POLLUTANT MASS SPECTRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to improve systems for computer examination of the mass spectra of unknown pollutants. For this we have developed a new probability based matching (PBM) system for the retrieval of mass spectra from a large data base, and have substantially impr...

  6. 1319 nm and 1356 nm dual-wavelength operation of diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Zhi-chao; Zhang, Shen-jin; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Feng-feng; Yuan, Lei; He, Miao; Li, Jia-jia; Zhang, Xiao-wen; Zong, Nan; Wang, Zhi-min; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qin-jun; Cui, Da-fu; Xu, Zu-yan

    2016-05-01

    We report the first demonstration on a diode-side-pumped quasi continuous wave (QCW) dual-wavelength Nd:YAG laser operating at 1319 nm and 1356 nm. The resonator adopts symmetrical L-shaped flat-flat structure working in a thermally near unstable cavity. By precise coating on the cavity mirrors, the simultaneous oscillation at 1319 nm and 1356 nm is delivered. A maximum dual-wavelength output power of 9.4 W is obtained. The beam quality factor M2 is measured to be 1.9.

  7. Evaluation of dental pulp repair using low level laser therapy (688 nm and 785 nm) morphologic study in capuchin monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretel, H.; Oliveira, J. A.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Ramalho, L. T. O.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) 688 nm and 785 nm accelerate dentin barrier formation and repair process after traumatic pulp exposure. The sample consisted of 45 premolars of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) with pulp exposure Class V cavities. All premolars were treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), divided in groups of 15 teeth each, and analyzed on 7th, 25th, and 60th day. Group GI - only Ca(OH)2, GII - laser 688 nm, and GIII - laser 785 nm. Laser beam was used in single and punctual dose with the parameters: continuous, 688 nm and 785 nm wavelength, tip's area of 0.00785 cm2, power 50 mW, application time 20 s, dose 255 J/cm2, energy 2 J. Teeth were capped with Ca(OH)2, Ca(OH)2 cement and restored with amalgam. All groups presented pulp repair. On 25th day the thickness of the formed dentin barrier was different between the groups GI and GII (p < 0.05) and between groups GI and GIII (p < 0.01). On 60th day there was difference between GI and GIII (p < 0.01). It may be concluded that, LLLT 688 nm and 785 nm accelerated dentin barrier formation and consequently pulp repair process, with best results using infrared laser 785 nm.

  8. Demonstration of miniaturized 20mW CW 280nm and 266nm solid-state UV laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landru, Nicolas; Georges, Thierry; Beaurepaire, Julien; Le Guen, Bruno; Le Bail, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Visible 561 nm and 532 nm laser emissions from 14-mm long DPSS monolithic cavities are frequency converted to deep UV 280 nm and 266 nm in 16-mm long monolithic external cavities. Wavelength conversion is fully insensitive to mechanical vibrations and the whole UV laser sources fit in a miniaturized housing. More than 20 mW deep UV laser emission is demonstrated with high power stability, low noise and good beam quality. Aging tests are in progress but long lifetimes are expected thanks to the cavity design. Protein detection and deep UV resonant Raman spectroscopy are applications that could benefit from these laser sources.

  9. Model-based scattering bars implementation for 65nm and 45nm nodes using IML technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Michael; Van Den Broeke, Doug; Laidig, Tom; Wampler, Kurt E.; Hollerbach, Uwe; Socha, Robert; Chen, J. F.; Hsu, Stephen; Shi, Xuelong

    2005-06-01

    Scattering Bars (SB) OPC, together with optimized illumination, is no doubt one of the critical enablers for low k1 lithography manufacturing. The manufacturing implementation of SB so far has been mainly based on rule-based approach. While this has been working well, a more effective model-based approach is much more desired lithographically for manufacturing at 65nm and 45nm nodes. This is necessary to ensure sufficient process margin using hyper NA for patterning random IC design. In our model-based SB (M-SB) OPC implementation, we have based on the patented IML Technology from ASML MaskTools. In this report, we use both dark field contact hole and clear field poly gate mask to demonstrate this implementation methodology. It is also quite applicable for dark field trench masks, such as local interconnect mask with damascene metal. For our full-chip implementation flow, the first step is to determine the critical design area and then to proceed with NA and illumination optimization. We show that, using LithoCruiser, we are able to select the best NA in combination with optimum illumination via a Diffraction Optical Element (DOE). The decision to use a custom DOE or one from the available DOE library from ASML can be made based on predicted process performance and cost effectiveness. With optimized illumination, it is now possible to construct an interference map for the full-chip mask pattern. Utilizing the interference map, M-SB OPC is generated. Next, model OPC can be applied with the presence of M-SB for the entire chip. It is important to note here, that from our experience, the model OPC must be calibrated with the presence of SB in order to achieve the desired accuracy. We report the full-chip processing benchmark using MaskWeaver to apply both M-SB and model OPC. For actual patterning performance, we have verified the full chip OPC treatment using SLiC, a DFM tool from Cadence. This implementation methodology can be applied to binary chrome mask

  10. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  11. Investigation of absorption spectra of Gafchromic EBT2 film's components and their impact on UVR dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydarous, Abdulkadir

    2016-05-01

    The absorption spectra of the EBT2 film's components were investigated in conjunction with its use for UVA dosimetry. The polyester (topside) and adhesive layers of the EBT2 film have been gently removed. Gafchromic™ EBT2 films with and without the protected layers (polyester and adhesive) were exposed to UVR of 365 nm for different durations. Thereafter, the UV-visible spectra were measured using a UV-visible spectrophotometer (Model Spectro Dual Split Beam, UVS-2700). Films were digitized using a Nikon CanoScan 9000F Mark II flatbed scanner. The dosimetric characteristics including film's uniformity, reproducibility and post-irradiation development were investigated. The color development of EBT2 and new modified EBT2 (EBT2-M) films irradiated with UVA was relatively stable (less than 1%) immediately after exposure. Based on this study, the sensitivity of EBT2 to UVR with wavelength between ~350 nm and ~390 nm can significantly be enhanced if the adhesive layer (~25 μm) is removed. The polyester layer plays almost no part on absorbing UVR with wavelength between ~320 nm and ~390 nm. Furthermore, various sensitivities for the EBT2-M film has been established depending on the wavelength of analysis.

  12. Polarized absorption spectra of single crystals of lunar pyroxenes and olivines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.; Huggins, F. E.; Abu-Eid, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the polarized absorption spectra (360-2200 nm) of compositionally zoned pyroxene minerals in rocks 10045, 10047 and 10058 and olivines in rocks 10020 and 10022. The Apollo 11 pyroxenes with relatively high Ti/Fe ratios were chosen initially to investigate the presence of crystal field spectra of Fe(2+) and Ti(3+) ions in the minerals. Broad intense bands at about 1000 and 2100 nm arise from spin-allowed, polarization-dependent transitions in Fe(2+) ions in pyroxenes. Several weak sharp peaks occur in the visible region. Peaks at 402, 425, 505, 550, and 585 nm represent spin-forbidden transitions in Fe(2+) ions, while broader bands at 460-470 nm and 650-660 nm are attributed to Ti(3+) ions. Charge transfer bands, which in terrestrial pyroxenes often extend into the visible region, are displaced to shorter wavelengths in lunar pyroxenes. This feature correlates with the absence of Ti(3+) ions in these minerals.

  13. High-resolution Visible Spectra of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Chae Kyung; Kim, S.

    2006-09-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (R 30,000) spectra of Titan between 4,000 and 10,000 A on Feb. 23, 2005 (UT) using an optical echelle spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8-m telescope at Bohyunsan Observatory, Korea. The raw Titan spectra contain telluric and solar absorption/emission lines. We used Kitt Peak solar atlases to remove the solar lines effectively. We also constructed synthetic spectra for the atmosphere of Titan including haze layers and utilizing laboratory spectra of CH4 available in literature. Preliminary results on the identifications of weak CH4 lines and on the derived opacities of the haze layers will be presented. Since the observations were carried out near the activities of Cassini observations of Titan, these high-resolution visible spectra are complementary to Cassini/VIMS imagery.

  14. Electron beam inspection of 16nm HP node EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Narukawa, Shogo; Abe, Tsukasa; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Lin, Chia-Wen; Zhao, Yan; Kuan, Chiyan; Jau, Jack

    2012-11-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is the most promising solution for 16nm HP node semiconductor device manufacturing and beyond. The fabrication of defect free EUV mask is one of the most challenging roadblocks to insert EUVL into high volume manufacturing (HVM). To fabricate and assure the defect free EUV masks, electron beam inspection (EBI) tool will be likely the necessary tool since optical mask inspection systems using 193nm and 199nm light are reaching a practical resolution limit around 16nm HP node EUV mask. For production use of EBI, several challenges and potential issues are expected. Firstly, required defect detection sensitivity is quite high. According to ITRS roadmap updated in 2011, the smallest defect size needed to detect is about 18nm for 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Secondly, small pixel size is likely required to obtain the high sensitivity. Thus, it might damage Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer due to accumulated high density electron beam bombardments. It also has potential of elevation of nuisance defects and reduction of throughput. These challenges must be solved before inserting EBI system into EUV mask HVM line. In this paper, we share our initial inspection results for 16nm HP node EUV mask (64nm HP absorber pattern on the EUV mask) using an EBI system eXplore® 5400 developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). In particularly, defect detection sensitivity, inspectability and damage to EUV mask were assessed. As conclusions, we found that the EBI system has capability to capture 16nm defects on 64nm absorber pattern EUV mask, satisfying the sensitivity requirement of 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Furthermore, we confirmed there is no significant damage to susceptible Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer. We also identified that low throughput and high nuisance defect rate are critical challenges needed to address for the 16nm HP node EUV mask inspection. The high nuisance defect rate could be generated by poor LWR and stitching errors during EB writing

  15. Next-generation 193-nm laser for sub-100-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, Thomas P.; Blumenstock, Gerry M.; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Pan, Xiaojiang; Newman, Peter C.; Glatzel, Holger; Watson, Tom A.; Erxmeyer, J.; Kuschnereit, Ralf; Weigl, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    The next generation 193 nm (ArF) laser has been designed and developed for high-volume production lithography. The NanoLithTM 7000, offering 20 Watts average output power at 4 kHz repetition rates is designed to support the highest exposure tool scan speeds for maximum productivity and wafer throughput. Fundamental design changes made to the laser core technologies are described. These advancements in core technology support the delivery of highly line-narrowed light with

  16. Scattering matrices of martian dust analogs at 488 nm and 647 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska, Dominika D.; Muñoz, Olga; Moreno, Fernando; Ramos, José L.; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Wurm, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    We present measurements of the complete scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle of five martian dust analogs, namely montmorillonite, two palagonite (JSC-1) samples, basalt, and calcite. The measurements are performed at 488 and 647 nm, covering the scattering angle range from 3° to 177°. The experimental scattering matrices are compared with results of Lorenz-Mie calculations performed for the same size distributions and refractive indices as our analog samples. As expected, we find that scattering matrices of realistic polydispersions of dust particles cannot be replaced by such calculated matrices. In contrast, the measured phase functions for our martian dust analogs may be considered a good approximation for martian dust at the studied wavelengths. Further, because of the sensitivity of polarimetry to particle microphysics, spectro-polarimetric observations from the martian surface appear to be a powerful diagnostic tool to infer the composition of the dust in the martian atmosphere. To facilitate the use of the experimental matrices for multiple-scattering calculations with polarization included, we compute the corresponding synthetic scattering matrices based on the measurements and defined in the full angle range from 0° to 180°.

  17. Tailoring 10 nm scale suspended graphene junctions and quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tayari, Vahid; McRae, Andrew C; Yiğen, Serap; Island, Joshua O; Porter, James M; Champagne, Alexandre R

    2015-01-14

    The possibility to make 10 nm scale, and low-disorder, suspended graphene devices would open up many possibilities to study and make use of strongly coupled quantum electronics, quantum mechanics, and optics. We present a versatile method, based on the electromigration of gold-on-graphene bow-tie bridges, to fabricate low-disorder suspended graphene junctions and quantum dots with lengths ranging from 6 nm up to 55 nm. We control the length of the junctions, and shape of their gold contacts by adjusting the power at which the electromigration process is allowed to avalanche. Using carefully engineered gold contacts and a nonuniform downward electrostatic force, we can controllably tear the width of suspended graphene channels from over 100 nm down to 27 nm. We demonstrate that this lateral confinement creates high-quality suspended quantum dots. This fabrication method could be extended to other two-dimensional materials. PMID:25490053

  18. High-efficency stable 213-nm generation for LASIK application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenglin; Alameh, Kamal; Zheng, Rong

    2005-01-01

    213nm Solid-state laser technology provides an alternative method to replace toxic excimer laser in LASIK system. In this paper, we report a compact fifth harmonic generation system to generate high pulse energy 213nm laser from Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for LASIK application based on three stages harmonic generation procedures. A novel crystal housing was specifically designed to hold the three crystals with each crystal has independent, precise angular adjustment structure and automatic tuning control. The crystal temperature is well maintained at ~130°C to improve harmonic generation stability and crystal operation lifetime. An output pulse energy 35mJ is obtained at 213nm, corresponding to total conversion efficiency ~10% from 1064nm pump laser. In system verification tests, the 213nm output power drops less than 5% after 5 millions pulse shots and no significant damage appears in the crystals.

  19. Methods to achieve sub-100-nm contact hole lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Tracy K.; Kavanagh, Robert J.; Pohlers, Gerd; Kanno, Takafumi; Bae, Young C.; Barclay, George G.; Kanagasabapathy, Subbareddy; Mattia, Joseph

    2003-06-01

    There are numerous methods being explored by lithographers to achieve contact holes below 100nm. Regarding optical impact on contact hole imaging, very high numerical aperture tools are becoming available at 193nm (as high as 0.9) and various optical extension techniques such as assist features, focus drilling, phase shift masks, and off-axis illumination are being employed to improve the aerial image. In this paper, the impact of the ArF photoresist is investigated. Polymers capable of thermal reflow of larger (~140nm) to smaller (90nm and below) contact holes are presented. Improved materials to achieve the properties necessary for good contact hole imaging for standard single layer resist (SLR) processing are also discussed. State-of-the-art ultra-thin resists (UTR) for contact holes and 193nm bi-layer resist systems are also studied as viable techniques to achieving very small contact holes.

  20. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  1. Spatially and momentum resolved energy electron loss spectra from an ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinyanjui, M. K. Kaiser, U.; Benner, G.; Pavia, G.; Boucher, F.; Habermeier, H.-U.; Keimer, B.

    2015-05-18

    We present an experimental approach which allows for the acquisition of spectra from ultra-thin films at high spatial, momentum, and energy resolutions. Spatially and momentum (q) resolved electron energy loss spectra have been obtained from a 12 nm ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer using a nano-beam electron diffraction based approach which enabled the acquisition of momentum resolved spectra from individual, differently oriented nano-domains and at different positions of the PrNiO{sub 3} thin layer. The spatial and wavelength dependence of the spectral excitations are obtained and characterized after the analysis of the experimental spectra using calculated dielectric and energy loss functions. The presented approach makes a contribution towards obtaining momentum-resolved spectra from nanostructures, thin film, heterostructures, surfaces, and interfaces.

  2. Design of 200-nm, 170-nm, and 140-nm DUV contact sweeper high-transmission attenuating phase-shift mask: II. Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socha, Robert J.; Shi, Xuelong; Holman, Ken C.; Dusa, Mircea V.; Conley, Will; Petersen, John S.; Chen, J. Fung; Laidig, Thomas L.; Wampler, Kurt E.; Caldwell, Roger F.; Chu, M. C.; Su, Chung Jen; Hung, Kuei-Chun; Chen, C.; Wang, F.; Le, C.; Pierrat, Christophe; Su, Bo

    1999-07-01

    Experiments for 140nm and 160nm contacts were optimized through simulation on an 18 percent transmitting phase shift mask for KrF lithography. A transmission of 18 percent is shown to have the most linear aerial image behavior through focus. The simulations were run using a primitive positive photoresist model in order to predict trends in resolution and to predict when side lobes begin printing. Experiments show that the 140nm and 160nm contact holes resolve without side lobe printing through focus and through exposure. Reticle SEMs verify that a ternary contact hole mask is capable of manufacture. By adding both opaque and clear sub- resolution assist features, the experiments show contacts as small as 140nm resolve with 0.50 micrometers focus latitude with 10 percent exposure latitude through pitch. Cross sectional SEMs verify that contact holes are larger due to the addition of zero order light as suggested by theory and show that side lobes begin to print. Experiments also prove that NA has the largest impact on resolution and exposure latitude and that (sigma) has the largest impact on depth of focus.

  3. Near infrared Raman spectra of human brain lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Christoph; Neudert, Lars; Simat, Thomas; Salzer, Reiner

    2005-05-01

    Human brain tissue, in particular white matter, contains high lipid content. These brain lipids can be divided into three principal classes: neutral lipids including the steroid cholesterol, phospholipids and sphingolipids. Major lipids in normal human brain tissue are phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid, sphingomyelin, galactocerebrosides, gangliosides, sulfatides and cholesterol. Minor lipids are cholesterolester and triacylglycerides. During transformation from normal brain tissue to tumors, composition and concentration of lipids change in a specific way. Therefore, analysis of lipids might be used as a diagnostic parameter to distinguish normal tissue from tumors and to determine the tumor type and tumor grade. Raman spectroscopy has been suggested as an analytical tool to detect these changes even under intra-operative conditions. We recorded Raman spectra of the 12 major and minor brain lipids with 785 nm excitation in order to identify their spectral fingerprints for qualitative and quantitative analyses.

  4. Absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashko, Pavlo; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Alonova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  5. Ultraviolet spectra of quenched carbonaceous composite derivatives: Comparison to the '217 nanometer' interstellar absorption feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, Akira; Wada, Setsuko; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Narisawa, Takatoshi; Nakagawa, Hidehiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    QCCs (quenched carbonaceous composite) are amorphus carbonaceous material formed from a hydrocarbon plasma. We present the UV-visible spectra of 'filmy QCC; (obtained outside of the beam ejected from the hydrocarbon plasma) and 'dark QCC' (obtained very near to the beam) for comparison to the stellar extinction curve. When filmy QCC is heated to 500-700 C (thermally altered), the wavelength of the absorption maximum increases form 204 nm to 220-222 nm. The dark QCC has an absorption maximum at 217-222 nm. In addition, the thermally altered filmy QCC has a slope change at about 500 nm which resmbles that in the interstellar extinction curve. The resemblance of the extinction curve of the QCCs to that of the interstellar medium suggests that QCC derivatives may be representative of the type of interstellar material that produces the 217 nm interstellar medium feature. The peak extinction of the dark QCC is higher than the average interstellar extinction curve while that of the thermally altered filmy QCC is lower, so that a mixture of dark and thermally altered filmy QCC can match the peak extinction observed in the interstellar medium. It is shown from electron micrographs that most of the thermally altered flimy QCC is in the form of small grainy structure less than 4 nm in diameter. This shows that the structure unit causing the 217-222 nm feature in QCC is very small.

  6. Single particle size and fluorescence spectra from emissions of burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate burn pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Houck, Joshua D. T.; Clark, Pamela A.; Pinnick, Ronald G.

    2013-08-01

    A single-particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer were used to measure the fluorescence spectra and particle size distribution from the particulate emissions of 12 different burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate open-air burning of garbage. Although the particulate emissions are likely dominated by particles <1 μm diameter, only the spectra of supermicron particles were measured here. The overall fluorescence spectral profiles exhibit either one or two broad bands peaked around 300-450 nm within the 280-650 nm spectral range, when the particles are illuminated with a 263-nm laser. Different burning materials have different profiles, some of them (cigarette, hair, uniform, paper, and plastics) show small changes during the burning process, and while others (beef, bread, carrot, Styrofoam, and wood) show big variations, which initially exhibit a single UV peak (around 310-340 nm) and a long shoulder in visible, and then gradually evolve into a bimodal spectrum with another visible peak (around 430-450 nm) having increasing intensity during the burning process. These spectral profiles could mainly derive from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with the combinations of tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, and other humic-like substances. About 68 % of these single-particle fluorescence spectra can be grouped into 10 clustered spectral templates that are derived from the spectra of millions of atmospheric aerosol particles observed in three locations; while the others, particularly these bimodal spectra, do not fall into any of the 10 templates. Therefore, the spectra from particulate emissions of burning materials can be easily discriminated from that of common atmospheric aerosol particles. The SFFS technology could be a good tool for monitoring burning pit emissions and possibly for distinguishing them from atmospheric aerosol particles.

  7. Optimum conditions of the distributed bragg reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Su-Chang; Lee, Byung-Teak; An, Won-Chan; Kim, Dae-Kwang; Jang, In-Kyu; So, Jin-Su; Lee, Hyung-Joo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) for a bottom reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes (Ir-LEDs) was developed and optimized. At an 850-nm wavelength, markedly improved reflection spectra were observed from DBRs consisting of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs materials. In addition, the reflection spectra of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs-based DBRs was found to increase with increasing difference between the high and the low refractive indices. At multiple layers of 10 pairs, maximal reflection spectra having about a 92% reflectivity were obtained from DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. At 20 pairs, however, outstanding reflection spectra having a higher reflectivity and broader width were clearly observed from DBRs consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As. Some incident light appears to have been absorbed and confined by the narrow bandgap of the GaAs material used in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. This fact could be supported by the decrease in the reflectivity of the shorter wavelength region in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. For this reason, a remarkable output power could be obtained from the 850-nm GaAs Ir-LED chip having a DBR consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As.

  8. Climatic Spectra of Extreme Sea States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhanovsky, A.; Lopatoukhin, L.; Sas'kov, K.

    Climatic variability of sea waves is described in the terms of statistical ensemble of directional spectra, dependent from spatial coordinates (x,y) and time t. The major probabilistic characteristics of the ensemble are the climatic spectra, i.e. spectra ap- propriate to certain wavemaking conditions with certain probability. Traditionally the definition of climatic wave spectra is based on a buoy measurements in a point. How- ever such data are restricted, and are unsuitable for estimation of climatic spectra of extreme waves with return period up to 100 years or longer. Hindcasting of statistical ensemble of spectra by mean of some numerical model allows to expand the informa- tion base significantly. In this report the approach to analysis and synthesis of climatic spectra, corresponding to extreme sea states, is proposed. The Barents sea is consid- ered as an example. A set of 43800 directional spectra of wind sea and swell (1970- 1999, every 6 hours) for any of 565 points of regular grid 0.50x1.50 are calculated. Numerical wave model Wave Watch III for computation on the parallel supercomputer Parsytec CC/20 was used. The NCEP/NCAR reanalysis wind fields were used as input data. Statistical analysis of computed spectra allows to separate a set of genetic types appropriate to various stable sea states. For each of types the system of parameters as discriminant variables are proposed. Probabilistic values of these parameters allows to approximate the probabilistic characteristic of all the spectra ensemble in terms of non-random function of random arguments. It allows to synthesize the results of the analysis in terms of multiscale stochastic model of spectral wave climate, with tak- ing into account the temporal nonstationary and spatial inhomogeneity of wave fields. The Monte-Carlo approach is employed for stochastic simulation. Stochastic simu- lation proves the extrapolation procedure for climatic spectra of rare (extreme) sea states. Specific climatic wave

  9. The Soil Spectroscopy Group and the development of a global soil spectral library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossel, R. Viscarra Rossel; Soil Spectroscopy Group

    2009-04-01

    This collaboration aims to develop a global soil spectral library and to establish a community of practice for soil spectroscopy. This will help progress soil spectroscopy from an almost purely research tool to a more widely adopted and useful technique for soil analysis, proximal soil sensing, soil monitoring and digital soil mapping. The initiative started in April 2008 with a proposal for the project to be conducted in a number of stages to investigate the following topics: Global soil diversity and variation can be characterised using diffuse reflectance spectra. Soil spectral calibrations can be used to predict soil properties globally. Soil spectroscopy can be a useful tool for digital soil mapping. Currently, the soil spectral library is being developed using legacy soil organic carbon (OC) and clay content data and vis-NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra, but in future we aim to include other soil properties and mid-IR (2500-25000 nm) spectra. The group already has more than 40 collaborators from six continents and 20 countries and the library consists of 5223 spectra from 43 countries. The library accounts for spectra from approximately only 22% of the world's countries, some of which are poorly represented with only very few spectra. We would like to encourage participation from as many countries as possible, particularly, we would like contributions from counties in Central and South America, Mexico, Canada, Russia and countries in Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. We are missing a lot of countries and for some, e.g. China we have only very few data! Do you want to join the group and contribute spectra to the global library? The requirements for contributing spectra to the global library are as follows: Spectra collected in the 350-2500 nm range every 1 nm. At least soil OC and clay content data but also any other soil chemical, physical, biological and mineralogical data, noting which analytical techniques were used. Coordinates (in WGS84 format) for each sample

  10. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  11. 1064 nm laser emission of highly doped Nd: Yttrium aluminum garnet under 885 nm diode laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupei, V.; Pavel, N.; Taira, T.

    2002-06-01

    Highly efficient 1064 nm continuous-wave laser emission under 885 nm diode pumping in concentrated Nd: Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystals (up to 3.5 at. % Nd) and ceramics (up to 3.8 at. % Nd) is reported. A highly doped (2.4 at. %) Nd:YAG laser, passively Q switched by a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber, is demonstrated.

  12. Medium Resolution Spectra of Solar Illuminated Sounding Rocket Samarium Vapor Releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Miller, D.; Caton, R.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Samarium spectra in the visible wavelengths (400-900 nm) are presented from the Metal Oxide Space Clouds (MOSC) sounding rocket launches of 2014 May 01 and 09. The two releases occurred in twilight at the ground, but with distinctly different solar elevation angles. Resonance-fluorescence spectral lines are identified throughout this wavelength range, and are attributed to Sm, Sm+, SmO and SmO+. Even given the wide spectral range of the instrument, the spectral resolution throughout the range was 1.5 nm or better. The time variation of spectral line intensity from various neutral and ionized atomic and molecular products are compared with a time dependent model of the samarium release, yielding estimates of photoionization rates, autoionization rates (reaction with O to form SmO+), and relative populations of energy levels giving rise to the spectra.

  13. Extinction spectra of quasi-spherical silver sub-micron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malynych, S.; Chumanov, G.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the experimental data on the extinction spectra of aqueous suspensions of silver sub-micron particles as well as those for planar arrays of particles. The spectra of noninteracting silver particles, i.e. colloidal suspension consist of two characteristic bands: dipole at 545 nm and quadrupole at 430 nm components of the surface plasmon resonance. Presence of some fraction of silver whiskers in colloids causes broadening and tailing of the dipole component. Coating of Ag particles with Si mantle shifts plasmon resonances to the longer wavelengths. The extinction spectrum of planar array of Ag sub-micron particles self-assembled on a glass substrate drastically differs from that for colloidal suspension. The effect may arise from coherent coupling of surface plasmons associated with the particles.

  14. Use of mutation spectra analysis software.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, I; Kondrashov, F; Glazko, G

    2001-02-01

    The study and comparison of mutation(al) spectra is an important problem in molecular biology, because these spectra often reflect on important features of mutations and their fixation. Such features include the interaction of DNA with various mutagens, the function of repair/replication enzymes, and properties of target proteins. It is known that mutability varies significantly along nucleotide sequences, such that mutations often concentrate at certain positions, called "hotspots," in a sequence. In this paper, we discuss in detail two approaches for mutation spectra analysis: the comparison of mutation spectra with a HG-PUBL program, (FTP: sunsite.unc.edu/pub/academic/biology/dna-mutations/hyperg) and hotspot prediction with the CLUSTERM program (www.itba.mi.cnr.it/webmutation; ftp.bionet.nsc.ru/pub/biology/dbms/clusterm.zip). Several other approaches for mutational spectra analysis, such as the analysis of a target protein structure, hotspot context revealing, multiple spectra comparisons, as well as a number of mutation databases are briefly described. Mutation spectra in the lacI gene of E. coli and the human p53 gene are used for illustration of various difficulties of such analysis. PMID:11180592

  15. Modeling the distributed gain of single--(1050 or 1410 nm) and dual-wavelength--(800 + 1050 nm or 800 + 1410 nm) pumped thulium-doped fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Floridia, Claudio; Carvalho, M T; Lüthi, S R; Gomes, A S L

    2004-09-01

    The distributed gain of single- and dual-wavelength-pumped thulium-doped fiber amplifiers is modeled. The excellent agreement between the model and coherent optical frequency domain reflectometry measurements enables us to estimate intrinsic loss, branching ratios of fluorescence originating from the 3H4 level, and cross sections of upconversion pumping at 1050 and 1410 nm for the Tm3+ ions in the fiber. With the branching ratios obtained it is possible to describe induced signal absorption when pumping at 800 nm. PMID:15455754

  16. induced by 1,540-nm laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Wang, X. F.; He, W. Y.; Bu, Y. Y.; Yan, X. H.

    2014-06-01

    The multi-photon ultraviolet upconversion emission properties and synergistic effect are investigated in BaSr2Y6O12:Er3+ phosphor. The deep-ultraviolet emissions centered at 274, 297 and 324-nm are observed under the 1,540-nm excitation, which results from a seven-, six- and six-photon upconversion process, respectively. A synergistic effect is found, which shows that the red emission intensity under 351- and 1,540-nm dual excitation is 4.7 % time stronger than the sum of red emission intensities under the 351 and 1,540-nm single excitation. This phenomenon is attributed to the 4I13/2 and 4I11/2 levels of Er3+ from non-radiative transition process under the 351-nm excitation are excited again to 4F9/2 level by absorbing 1,540-nm photon in the 351- and 1,540-nm dual-excitation process.

  17. Broad-range neutron spectra identification in ultraintense laser interactions with carbon-deuterated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Habara, H.; Tanaka, K.A.; Sentoku, Y.; Tampo, M.; Toyama, Y.

    2005-11-15

    Detailed neutron energy spectra produced from a CD2 target irradiated by a 450 fs, 20 J, 1053 nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been studied. Wide-ranging neutron spectra were observed from two different observation angles 20 deg. and 70 deg. relative to the rear-side target normal. The experiment and numerically calculated spectra, by a three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, indicate that the range of the measured spectra is larger than that produced by the D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction. An interpretation for the measured spectra is introduced by considering the {sup 12}C(d,n){sup 13}N and D({sup 12}c,n){sup 13}N reactions. In addition, the study revealed that the neutron spectra produced by the D-C and C-D reactions can overlap that produced by the D-D reaction, and due to their high cross sections, comparing to the D-D reaction, both of them effectively participate in the neutron yield.

  18. Study of 193-nm resist degradation under various etch chemistries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Arnaud; May, Michael; Pargon, Erwine; Mortini, Benedicte; Joubert, Olivier

    2007-03-01

    The effectivity of 193nm photoresists as dry etch masks is becoming more and more critical as the size of integrated devices shrinks. 193nm resists are known to be much less resistant to dry etching than 248nm resists based on a poly(hydroxystyrene) polymer backbone. The decrease in the resist film budget implies a better etch resistance to use single layer 193nm photoresists for the 65nm node and beyond. In spite of significant improvements made in the past decade regarding the etch resistance of photoresists, much of the fundamental chemistry and physics that could explain the behaviour of these materials has to be better understood. Such knowledge is necessary in order to propose materials and etch processes for the next technology nodes (45nm and below). In this paper, we report our studies on the etch behaviour of different 193nm resist materials as a function of etch chemistry. In a first step, we focus our attention on the interactions between photoresists and the reactive species of a plasma during a dry etch step. Etch experiments were carried out in a DPS (Decoupled Plasma Source) high density chamber. The gas chemistry in particular was changed to check the role of the plasma reactive species on the resist. O II, Cl II, CF 4, HBr and Ar gas were used. Etch rates and chemical modifications of different materials were quantified by ellipsometry, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-Ray Photoelectrons Spectroscopy (XPS). We evaluated different materials including 248nm model polymer backbones (pure PHS or functionalized PHS), and 193nm model polymers (PMMA and acrylate polymers) or resist formulations. Besides the influence of resist chemistry, the impact of plasma parameters was addressed.

  19. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  20. Resonance Raman spectra of. cap alpha. -copper phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bovill, A.J.; McConnell, A.A.; Nimmo, J.A.; Smith, W.E.

    1986-02-13

    Raman spectra of ..cap alpha..-copper phthalocyanine (..cap alpha..-CuPc) were recorded at room temperature and at 10 K with excitation wavelengths between 457 and 714 nm. Resonance enhancement was greatest for modes for which the largest displacements were on either the inner five-membered ring of the isoindole groups or the inner macrocycle and consequently assignment of the bands to modes of the entire molecule was possible by comparison with nickel octaethylporphyrin. Four out of five bands resonant in the Q band region and preresonant near the B band absorption region are totally symmetric modes. B band preresonance occurs more strongly with high-frequency modes. At low temperatures, multimode interactions are reduced and profiles were obtained which can be compared with solution profiles of porphyrins. Both Q/sub x/ and Q/sub y/ 0-0 scattering can be identified and a helper mode is evident. A term enhancement predominates, with B/sub 1g/ and B/sub 2g/ modes enhanced because of a Jahn-Teller distortion of the excited state. The resonance studies, together with electronic absorption spectra and published theoretical studies, confirm that the Q band in ..cap alpha..-CuPc is largely due to an allowed ..pi..-..pi..* transition associated mainly with the macrocycle and inner five-membered rings of the isoindole groups. 25 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Analyzing reflectance spectra of human skin in legal medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenki, Liudmila; Sterzik, Vera; Schulz, Katharina; Bohnert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Our current research in the framework of an interdisciplinary project focuses on modelling the dynamics of the hemoglobin reoxygenation process in post-mortem human skin by reflectance spectrometry. The observations of reoxygenation of hemoglobin in livores after postmortem exposure to a cold environment relate the reoxygenation to the commonly known phenomenon that the color impression of livores changes from livid to pink under low ambient temperatures. We analyze the spectra with respect to a physical model describing the optical properties of human skin, discuss the dynamics of the reoxygenation, and propose a phenomenological model for reoxygenation. For additional characterization of the reflectance spectra, the curvature of the local minimum and maximum in the investigated spectral range is considered. There is a strong correlation between the curvature of specra at a wavelength of 560 nm and the concentration of O2-Hb. The analysis is carried out via C programs, as well as MySQL database queries in Java EE, JDBC, Matlab, and Python.

  2. Temperature dependence of resonance Raman spectra of carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, A.; Apostolova, I.; Velitchkova, M.

    2011-04-01

    To understand the mechanism of the photoprotective and antioxidative functions of carotenoids, it is essential to have a profound knowledge of their excited electronic and vibronic states. In the present study we investigate the most powerful antioxidants: β-carotene and lutein by means of resonance Raman spectroscopy. The aim was to study in detail their Raman spectra in solution at room temperature and their changes as a function of temperature. To measure the spectra in their natural environment pyridine has been used as a solvent. It has been chosen because of its polarizability ( n = 1.5092) which is close to that of membrane lipids and proteins. The temperature dependence of the most intensive ν1 band in the range from 77 K to 295 K at 514.5 nm excitation has been obtained. It was found that in pyridine the C dbnd C stretching frequency, its intensity, line shape, and line width are very sensitive to the temperature (the sensitivity being different for the two studied carotenoids). The observed linear temperature dependence of the C dbnd C stretching frequency is explained by a mechanism involving changes of the vibronic coupling and the extent of π-electron delocalization. The different behavior of the temperature-induced broadening of the ν1 band and its intensity for the two studied carotenoids can be associated with the different nature of their solid matrices: glassy for β-carotene and crystalline-like for lutein, owing to their different chemical structures.

  3. The Infrared Spectra and Absorption Intensities of Amorphous Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Our research group is carrying out new IR measurements of icy solids relevant to the outer solar system and to the interstellar medium, with an emphasis on amorphous and crystalline ices below ~ 120 K. Our goal is to update and add to the relatively meager literature on this subject and to provide electronic versions of state-of-the-art data, since the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate reference spectra and IR band strengths. In the past year, we have focused on three of the simplest and most abundant components of interstellar and solar-system ices: methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methanol (CH3OH). Infrared spectra from ∼ 4500 to 500 cm-1 have been measured for each of these molecules in μm-thick films at temperatures from 10 to 120 K. All known amorphous and crystalline phases have been reproduced and, for some, presented for the first time. We also report measurements of the index of refraction at 670 nm and the mass densities for each ice phase. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible. Electronic versions of our new results are available at http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/691/cosmicice/ constants.html.

  4. Mapping Agricultural Crops with AVIRIS Spectra in Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Pavri, Betina; Roberts, Dar; Ustin, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Spectroscopy is used in the laboratory to measure the molecular components and concentrations of plant constituents to answer questions about the plant type, status, and health. Imaging spectrometers measure the upwelling spectral radiance above the Earth's surface as images. Ideally, imaging spectrometer data sets should be used to understand plant type, plant status, and health of plants in an agricultural setting. An Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data set was acquired over agricultural fields near Wallula, Washington on July 23rd, 1997. AVIRIS measures upwelling radiance spectra through 224 spectral channels with contiguous 10-nm sampling from 400 to 2500 run in the solar-reflected spectrum. The spectra are measured as images of 11 by up to 800 km with 20-m spatial resolution. The spectral images measured by AVIRIS represent the integrated signal resulting from: the solar irradiance; two way transmittance and scattering of the atmosphere; the absorptions and scattering of surface materials; as well as the spectral, radiometric and spatial response functions of AVIRIS. This paper presents initial research to derive properties of the agricultural fields near Wallula from the calibrated spectral images measured by AVIRIS near the top of the atmosphere.

  5. SCALING PROPERTIES OF THE TRANSVERSE MASS SPECTRA.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFFNER-BIELICH,J.; KHARZEEV,D.; MCLERRAN,L.; VENUGOPALAN,R.

    2002-01-13

    Motivated from the formation of an initial state of gluon-saturated matter, we discuss scaling relations for the transverse mass spectra at BNL's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). We show on linear plots, that the transverse mass spectra for various hadrons can be described by an universal function in m{sub t}. The transverse mass spectra for different centralities can be rescaled into each other. Finally, we demonstrate that m{sub t}-scaling is also present in proton-antiproton collider data and compare it to m{sub t}-scaling at RHIC.

  6. Analysis of atmospheric spectra for trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Seals, Robert K., Jr.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, David G.; Murcray, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the comprehensive analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra recorded in the middle-infrared region to obtain simultaneous measurements of coupled parameters (gas concentrations of key trace constituents, total column amounts, pressure, and temperature) in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.002 and 0.02 cm exp -1 resolutions with the University of Denver group's balloon-borne, aircraft borne, and ground-based interferometers and 0.005 to 0.01 cm exp -1 resolution solar spectra from Kitt Peak are used in the analyses.

  7. Electronic absorption spectra of imidazolium-based ionic liquids studied by far-ultraviolet spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Ichiro; Kurawaki, Yuji; Morisawa, Yusuke; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-08-10

    Electronic absorption spectra of imidazolium-based ionic liquids were studied by far- and deep-ultraviolet spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The absorption spectra in the 145-300 nm region of imidazolium-based ionic liquids, [Cnmim](+)[BF4](-) (n = 2, 4, 8) and [C4mim](+)[PF6](-), were recorded using our original attenuated total reflectance (ATR) system spectrometer. The obtained spectra had two definitive peaks at ∼160 and ∼210 nm. Depending on the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl side chain, the peak wavelength around 160 nm changed, while that around 210 nm remained at almost the same wavelength. Quantum chemical calculation results based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) also showed the corresponding peak shifts. In contrast, there was almost no significant difference between [C4mim](+)[BF4](-) and [C4mim](+)[PF6](-), which corresponded with our calculations. Therefore, it can be concluded that the absorption spectra in the 145-300 nm region are mainly determined by the cations when fluorine-containing anions are adopted. In addition, upon addition of organic solvent (acetonitrile) to [C4mim](+)[BF4](-), small peak shifts to the longer wavelength were revealed for both peaks at ∼160 and ∼210 nm. The peak shift in the deep-ultraviolet region (≤200 nm) in the presence of the solvent, which indicates the change of electronic states of the ionic liquid, was experimentally observed for the first time by using the ATR spectrometer. PMID:27471106

  8. Sub-100 nm patterning of supported bilayers by nanoshaving lithography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinjun; Chen, Jixin; Cremer, Paul S

    2008-03-01

    Sub-100 nm wide supported phospholipid bilayers (SLBs) were patterned on a planar borosilicate substrate by AFM-based nanoshaving lithography. First, a bovine serum albumin monolayer was coated on the glass and then selectively removed in long strips by an AFM tip. The width of vacant strips could be controlled down to 15 nm. Bilayer lines could be formed within the vacant strips by vesicle fusion. It was found that stable bilayers formed by this method had a lower size limit of approximately 55 nm in width. This size limit stems from a balance between a favorable bilayer adhesion energy and an unfavorable bilayer edge energy. PMID:18257567

  9. 80 nm tunable DBR-free semiconductor disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Albrecht, A. R.; Cederberg, J. G.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report a widely tunable optically pumped distributed Bragg reflector (DBR)-free semiconductor disk laser with 6 W continuous wave output power near 1055 nm when using a 2% output coupler. Using only high reflecting mirrors, the lasing wavelength is centered at 1034 nm and can be tuned up to a record 80 nm by using a birefringent filter. We attribute such wide tunability to the unique broad effective gain bandwidth of DBR-free semiconductor disk lasers achieved by eliminating the active mirror geometry.

  10. All-fibre ytterbium laser tunable within 45 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullina, S R; Babin, S A; Vlasov, A A; Kablukov, S I; Shelemba, I S; Kurkov, A S

    2007-12-31

    A tunable ytterbium-doped fibre laser is fabricated. The laser is tuned by using a tunable fibre Bragg grating (FBG) as a selecting intracavity element. The laser is tunable within 45 nm (from 1063 to 1108 nm) and emits {approx}6 W in the line of width {approx}0.15 nm, the output power and linewidth being virtually invariable within the tuning range. The method is proposed for synchronous tuning the highly reflecting and output FBGs, and a tunable ytterbium all-fibre laser is built. (lasers)

  11. Theoretical investigations of absorption and fluorescence spectra of protonated pyrene.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2016-05-25

    The equilibrium geometry and 75 vibrational normal-mode frequencies of the ground and first excited states of protonated pyrene isomers were calculated and characterized in the adiabatic representation by using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method. Electronic absorption spectra of solid neon matrixes in the wavelength range 495-415 nm were determined by Maier et al. and they were analyzed using time-dependent density functional theory calculations (TDDFT). CASSCF calculations and absorption and emission spectra simulations by one-photon excitation equations were used to optimize the excited and ground state structures of protonated pyrene isomers. The absorption band was attributed to the S0 → S1 electronic transition in 1H-Py(+), and a band origin was used at 20580.96 cm(-1). The displaced harmonic oscillator approximation and Franck-Condon approximation were used to simulate the absorption spectrum of the (1) (1)A' ← X[combining tilde](1)A' transition of 1H-Py(+), and the main vibronic transitions were assigned for the first ππ* state. It shows that the vibronic structures were dominated by one of the eight active totally symmetric modes, with ν15 being the most crucial. This indicates that the electronic transition of the S1((1)A') state calculated in the adiabatic representation effectively includes a contribution from the adiabatic vibronic coupling through Franck-Condon factors perturbed by harmonic oscillators. The present method can adequately reproduce experimental absorption and fluorescence spectra of a gas phase. PMID:27181017

  12. Absorption and electroabsorption spectra of carotenoid cation radical and dication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Stanisław

    1998-05-01

    Radical cations and dications of two carotenoids astaxanthin and canthaxanthin were prepared by oxidation with FeCl 3 in fluorinated alcohols at room temperature. Absorption and electroabsorption (Stark effect) spectra were recorded for astaxanthin cations in mixed frozen matrices at temperatures about 160 K. The D 0→D 2 transition in cation radical is at 835 nm. The electroabsorption spectrum for the D 0→D 2 transition exhibits a negative change of molecular polarizability, Δ α=-1.2·10 -38 C·m 2/V (-105 A 3), which seems to originate from the change in bond order alternation in the ground state rather than from the electric field-induced interaction of D 1 and D 2 excited states. Absorption spectrum of astaxanthin dication is located at 715-717 nm, between those of D 0→D 2 in cation radical and S 0→S 2 in neutral carotenoid. Its shape reflects a short vibronic progression and strong inhomogeneous broadening. The polarizability change on electronic excitation, Δ α=2.89·10 -38 C·m 2/V (260 A 3), is five times smaller than in neutral astaxanthin. This value reflects the larger energetic distance from the lowest excited state to the higher excited states than in the neutral molecule.

  13. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  14. Plastocyanin conformation: an analysis of its near ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Draheim, J.E.; Anderson, G.P.; Duane, J.W.; Gross, E.L.

    1986-04-01

    The near-ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroic spectra of plastocyanin are dependent upon the redox state, solution pH, and ammonium sulfate concentration. This dependency was observed in plastocyanin isolated from spinach, poplar, and lettuce. Removal of the copper atom also perturbed the near-ultraviolet spectra. Upon reduction there are increases in both extinction and ellipticity at 252 nm. Further increases at 252 nm were observed upon formation of apo plastocyanin eliminating charge transfer transitions as the cause. The spectral changes in the near-ultraviolet imply a flexible tertiary conformation for plastocyanin. There are at least two charge transfer transitions at approx.295-340 nm. One of these transitions is sensitive to low pH's and is attributed to the His 87 copper ligand. The redox state dependent changes observed in the near-ultraviolet spectra of plastocyanin are attenuated either by decreasing the pH to 5 or by increasing the ammonium sulfate concentration to 2.7 M. This attenuation cannot be easily explained by simple charge screening. Hydrophobic interactions probably play an important role in this phenomenon. The pH and redox state dependent conformational changes may play an important role in regulating electron transport.

  15. Rapid assessment of soluble solids content in navel orange by near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yande; Luo, Ji; Chen, Xingmiao; Ying, Yibin

    2006-10-01

    The potential of using Near Infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to assess soluble solids content (SSC) of intact navel orange was examined. A total 40 samples were used to develop the calibration and prediction models. NIR spectral data were collected in the spectral region between 350 nm and 2500 nm and its second derivative spectra was used for this study. Different scattering correction algorithms (no preprocessing and multiplicative scattering correction (MSC) were compared. Calibration models based on different spectral ranges, different derivatives and different kinds of statistical models including partial least square (PLS) and principle component regression (PCR) were also compared in this research. The best results of PLS models with the second derivative spectra are r=0.929, RMSEC=0.517 and RMSEP=0.592, in the wavelength range of 361-2488 nm. The segment length used to derivate the spectra influences the calibration model and the results are better when the segment lengths and gap sizes are lower in Norris derivate filter. The results show that this method is feasible for rapid assessing SSC of the navel orange.

  16. Microwave Spectra and Structures of H_2O\\cdotsAgF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, S. L.; Walker, N. R.; Tew, D. P.; Legon, A. C.

    2011-06-01

    A Balle-Flygare FT-MW spectrometer coupled to a laser ablation source has been used to measure the pure rotational spectra of H2O\\cdotsAgF. Generation is via laser ablation (532 nm) of a silver rod in the presence of SF6, argon, a low partial pressure of H2O and the molecules are stabilized by supersonic expansion. The spectra of eight isotopologues have been measured. Rotational constants, B0 and C0, and the centrifugal distortion constant, Δ _J have been determined. Isotopic substitutions are available at the silver, oxygen and hydrogen atoms. The spectra are consistent with a linear arrangement of oxygen, silver and fluorine atoms and the structure is either C2v planar at equilibrium or CS pyramidal but with a low potential-energy barrier to planarity such that the v = 0 and 1 states associated with the motion that inverts the configuration at the O atom are well separated.

  17. How to build a low cost spectrometer with Tracker for teaching light spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Marques, M. B.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2016-01-01

    Optics is probably one on the most exciting topics in physics. However, it also contains some of the less understood phenomena by students—the light spectra obtained from the diffraction of light. The experimental study of light spectra for studying radiating bodies, usually requests sophisticated and expensive equipment that is not normaly affordable for schools, and only a few teachers know how to measure the wavelength of light in a spectrum. In this work we present a simple and inexpensive setup, with enough accuracy for measuring light spectra to be used both in physics and chemistry classes. We show how freeware software Tracker, commonly used for teaching mechanics, can serve to measure wavelengths with about 2 nm of resolution. Several approaches to the calibration of different setups are also provided, depending on the degree of accuracy demanded.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectrophotometric Atlas of Standard Stellar Spectra (Pickles 1985)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickles, A. J.

    1997-08-01

    Continuous spectrophotometry has been obtained for 200 objects at a resolution of 10-17 A over the wavelength region 360-1000nm. Kron-Cousins BVRI colors are computed for the spectra and compared with published photoelectric photometry. The (V-R)_C color index is used to group the individual observations to form standard spectra types by stellar class. The standard groups include a solar abundance sequence of most spectral types and luminosity classes, metal-rich and metal weak G-K giant-branch sequences, and horizontal-branch giants. The standard spectra are presented in FITS files, of which a summary is contained in the "list.dat" file. (1 data file).

  19. Subpicosecond resonance Raman spectra of the early intermediates in the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, R.; Du-Jeon-Jang; Bitting, Herbert C.; El-Sayed, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectra are presented for the species formed during the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) on a timescale of 800-900 fs. In the ethylenic stretch region two intermediates were found with frequencies of 1,510 and 1,518 cm-1, corresponding to species with optical absorption maxima at 660 and 625 nm, respectively. This leads to the assignment of the 1,518 cm-1 band to the J625 intermediate. In the fingerprint region, the appearance of a vibration at 1,195 cm-1 strongly suggests that the isomerization indeed has taken place in a time less than the pulsewidth of our laser. This supports the previous proposals made on the basis of the optical spectra. The spectra are compared with those observed in tens of picoseconds up to nanoseconds. PMID:19431759

  20. Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectra of Diborane(6): B2H6 and B2D6.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu-Chain; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Lo, Jen-Iu; Lin, Meng-Yeh; Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Ogilvie, J F

    2016-07-21

    We recorded absorption spectra of diborane(6), B2H6 and B2D6, dispersed in solid neon near 4 K in both mid-infrared and ultraviolet regions. For gaseous B2H6 from 105 to 300 nm, we report quantitative absolute cross sections; for solid B2H6 and for B2H6 dispersed in solid neon, we measured ultraviolet absorbance with relative intensities over a wide range. To assign the mid-infrared spectra to specific isotopic variants, we applied the abundance of (11)B and (10)B in natural proportions; we undertook quantum-chemical calculations of wavenumbers associated with anharmonic vibrational modes and the intensities of the harmonic vibrational modes. To aid an interpretation of the ultraviolet spectra, we calculated the energies of electronically excited singlet and triplet states and oscillator strengths for electronic transitions from the electronic ground state. PMID:27351464

  1. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Corn and Soybean Plants Under Nitrogen Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    We are investigating the use of spectral indices derived from actively induced fluorescence spectra and passive optical spectra. We examined the influence of photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content on the spectral fluorescence and passive optical property characteristics of mature, upper leaves from plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of recommended N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight. Steady state laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra (5 nm resolution) were obtained from adaxial and abaxial surfaces resulting from excitation at single wavelengths (280, 380 or 360, and 532 nm). For emission spectra produced by each of these excitation wavelengths, ratios of emission peaks were calculated, including the red far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) ratio (F685/F740) and the far-red/green (F740/F525) ratio. High resolution (< 3 nm) optical spectra (350-2500 nm) of reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance were also acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces. Species differences were demonstrated for several optical parameters. A 'red edge' derivative ratio determined from transmittance spectra [as the maximum first deivative, between 650-750 nm, normalized to the value at 744 nm, or Dmax/D744], was strongly associated with the C/N ratio (r(exp 2) = 0.90, P +/- 0.001). This ratio, calculated from reflectance spectra, was inversely related to chlorophyll b content (r(exp 2) = 0.91, P +/- 0.001) as was the ChlF (F685/F740) ratio obtained with 532 nm excitation (r(exp 2) = 0.76, P +/- 0.01). Discrimination of N treatment groups was possible with specific fluorescence band ratios (e.g., F740/F525 obtained with 380 nm excitation). Higher ChlF and blue-green emissions were measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces

  2. Measurement of Gas and Aerosol Phase Absorption Spectra across the Visible and Near-IR Using Supercontinuum Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Radney, James G; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2015-07-21

    We demonstrate a method to measure the absorption spectra of gas and aerosol species across the visible and near-IR (500 to 840 nm) using a photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer and a pulsed supercontinuum laser source. Measurements of gas phase absorption spectra were demonstrated using H2O(g) as a function of relative humidity (RH). The measured absorption intensities and peak shapes were able to be quantified and compared to spectra calculated using the 2012 High Resolution Transmission (HITRAN2012) database. Size and mass selected nigrosin aerosol was used to measure absorption spectra across the visible and near-IR. Spectra were measured as a function of aerosol size/mass and show good agreement to Mie theory calculations. Lastly, we measured the broadband absorption spectrum of flame generated soot aerosol at 5% and 70% RH. For the high RH case, we are able to quantifiably separate the soot and water absorption contributions. For soot, we observe an enhancement in the mass specific absorption cross section ranging from 1.5 at 500 nm (p < 0.01) to 1.2 at 840 nm (p < 0.2) and a concomitant increase in the absorption Ångström exponent from 1.2 ± 0.4 (5% RH) to 1.6 ± 0.3 (70% RH). PMID:26098142

  3. Removal of copper oxide from copper surfaces using Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 266 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Aileen; Fischer, C.; Watkins, Kenneth G.; Glasmacher, Mathias; Steen, William M.; Kheyrandish, H.; Brown, A.

    1997-08-01

    During electronic device fabrication it is necessary to remove the oxides from copper surfaces prior to soldering in order to improve the surface wetability and achieve a good quality solder joint. The usual method of achieving this is by using acids in a flux. The work reported here explores the possibility of removing these oxides by laser cleaning using the harmonics of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, a technique which could be incorporated into a industrial laser soldering process. The effect of Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation (5 - 10 ns pulses), at 1064 nm, 532 nm and 266 nm, on the oxidized surface of a copper alloy foil is studied with increasing fluence. In order to successfully compare the effect of increasing fluence at the three wavelengths each area treated was only subjected to one laser pulse. The laser treated surfaces were characterized using optical microscopy, SEM, and surface analysis performed by static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SSIMS). SSIMS and SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry) with mechanical depth profilometry were used to characterize the oxide layer. The reflectivity of the oxidized plates for the three wavelengths was ascertained using a reflectivity spectrometer. Successful cleaning was achieved at all wavelengths, above certain threshold values which defined the lower end of the process operating window for single pulse operation. The threshold for the cleaning process decreased with laser wavelength. Surface melting was evident at the lowest fluences examined for all the wavelengths (< .5 J/cm2). This value is well below the lower end of the process windows of all wavelengths. Microscopic `explosive' features were found at the onset of copper oxide removal possibly resulting from ionization or a plasma induced shock waves. There was some possible evidence of mechanical effects at 1064 nm and 532 nm. Large amounts of sputtered debris was found around the 266 nm craters. A SSIMS analysis was performed on the 532 nm spots. The

  4. Cooperative Interaction Within RNA Virus Mutant Spectra.

    PubMed

    Shirogane, Yuta; Watanabe, Shumpei; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses usually consist of mutant spectra because of high error rates of viral RNA polymerases. Growth competition occurs among different viral variants, and the fittest clones predominate under given conditions. Individual variants, however, may not be entirely independent of each other, and internal interactions within mutant spectra can occur. Examples of cooperative and interfering interactions that exert enhancing and suppressing effects on replication of the wild-type virus, respectively, have been described, but their underlying mechanisms have not been well defined. It was recently found that the cooperation between wild-type and variant measles virus genomes produces a new phenotype through the heterooligomer formation of a viral protein. This observation provides a molecular mechanism underlying cooperative interactions within mutant spectra. Careful attention to individual sequences, in addition to consensus sequences, may disclose further examples of internal interactions within mutant spectra. PMID:26162566

  5. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  6. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  7. Ultraviolet Spectra of Globular Clusters in Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. C.

    1999-05-01

    As part of a NASA-funded effort with Ben Dorman of Goddard Space Flight Center, I am engaged in calculating spectra from first principles of solar-type stars of a wide range of metallicity. This paper reports on an extension of this work funded by the Hubble Space Telescope archival program, the derivation of fundamental parameters for several globular clusters in Andromeda (M31). Properties of the underlying stellar population are derived by matching archival HST spectra with composite spectra constructed by weighted coaddition of the calculated spectra for stars of appropriate spectral types. Armed with these ab initio calculations, this work explores the degeneracy in age and metallicity in the ultraviolet, and the affect of unknowns such as the relative abundance of light elements versus iron and the possible presence of blue stragglers or blue horizontal branch stars.

  8. Dynamic radio spectra from two fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, K. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Lin, C. S.; Dowell, J.; Schinzel, F. K.; Stovall, K.

    2015-11-01

    We present dynamic spectra from the Long Wavelength Array telescope of two large meteors (fireballs) observed to emit between 37 and 54 MHz. These spectra show the first ever recorded broadband measurements of this newly discovered VHF emission. The spectra show that the emission is smooth and steep, getting very bright at lower frequencies. We suggest that this signal is possibly emission of Langmuir waves and that these waves could be excited by a bump-on-tail instability within the trail. The spectra of one fireball display broadband temporal frequency sweeps. We suggest that these sweeps are evidence of individual expanding clumps of emitting plasma. While some of these proposed clumps may have formed at the very beginning of the fireball event, others must have formed seconds after the initial event.

  9. Study on Raman spectra of synthetic celluloses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Na; Zhu, Changjun; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of aliphatic polyamide fiber and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The results show that Raman peaks beyond 1200 cm-1 appear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sodium hydroxide, while the Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sulfuric acid. Raman peaks beyond 1750 cm-1 decrease for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sodium hydroxide, while Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear, except weak peaks around 3000 cm-1 , for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sulfuric acid. The variations of the Raman spectra are primarily related to the changes of chemical bonds and molecular structures.

  10. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  11. Comparing Ultraviolet Spectra Against Calculations: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2003-01-01

    The five-year goal of this effort is to calculate high fidelity mid-UV spectra for individual stars and stellar systems for a wide range of ages, abundances, and abundance ratios. In this first year, the emphasis was placed on revising the list of atomic line parameters used to calculate mid-UV spectra. First, new identifications of atomic lines and measurements of their transition probabilities were obtained for lines of the first and second ionization stages of iron-peak elements. Second, observed mid-UV and optical spectra for standard stars were re-analyzed and compared to new calculations, to refine the determination of transition probabilities and to estimate the identity of lines still missing from the laboratory lists. As evidenced by the figures, a dramatic improvement has resulted in the reproduction of the spectra of standard stars by the calculations.

  12. Synthesis and Spectra of Vanadium Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.; Stupgia, Sean

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates simple synthetic techniques, redox principles in synthesis reactions, interpretation of visible spectra using Orgel diagrams, and the spectrochemical series. The experiment is suitable for the advanced undergraduate inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  13. [Spectra of dark green jade from Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chai, Lin-Tao; Guo, Shou-Guo; Fan, Jian-Liang; Bao, Feng

    2013-05-01

    Chemical compositions and spectral characteristics of one type of dark green jades assumed from omphacite jadeite from Myanmar jadeite mining area were studied by X-ray powder diffraction(XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectra(XRF), Raman spectra(RM) and UV-Vis Spectroscopy, etc. Based on testing by XRD and XRF, it was shown that it belongs to iron-enriched plagioclase, including albite and anorthite. The compositions range is between Ab0.731 An0.264 Or0.004 and Ab0.693 An0.303 Or0.004. Raman spectra of samples, albite jade and anorthite were collected and analyzed. Additionally, the distributions of Si, Al in the crystal structure were also discussed. UV-Vis spectra showed that dark green hue of this mineral is associated with d--d electronic transition of Fe3+ and Cr3+. PMID:23905358

  14. H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} in intense sub-picosecond laser pulses: Photoelectron spectroscopy at 1053 and 527 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rottke, H.; Ludwig, J.; Sandner, W.

    1996-09-01

    We report multiphoton ionization experiments on H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} molecules at 1053- and 526.5-nm excitation wavelengths in the intensity range 5{times}10{sup 13}{endash}5{times}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The intensity dependence of the total ion yield, the dissociation fraction, and the photoelectron spectrum is investigated. At 1053 nm we find a strong isotope effect in the dissociation fraction, whereas at 526.5 nm no such effect is observed. Up to 1{times}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} the photoelectron spectrum at 526.5 nm is dominated by resonant ionization processes via Rydberg states of the molecules. They are shifted into resonance at intensities above {approximately}10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The spectra show that the potential energy curves of the resonant states must have a shape very similar to the corresponding ionic ones. They are therefore mainly determined by the dipole coupling between the ion core orbitals 1{ital s}{sigma}{sub {ital g}} and 2{ital p}{sigma}{sub {ital u}}. At 1053 nm two photoionization regimes are observed: the multiphoton regime with Keldysh parameter {gamma}{gt}1 showing resonance ionization structures, and the tunnel regime ({gamma}{lt}1) at high intensity. The isotope effect in the dissociation fraction at 1053 nm has no influence on the shape of the corresponding photoelectron spectra at this wavelength. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Metastasis suppressors Nm23H1 and Nm23H2 differentially regulate neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yao; Yung, Lisa Y; Wong, Yung H

    2015-06-01

    Nm23H1 and H2 are prototypical metastasis suppressors with diverse functions, but recent studies suggest that they may also regulate tumorigenesis. Here, we employed both cellular and in vivo assays to examine the effect of Nm23H1 and H2 on tumorigenesis induced by oncogenic Ras and/or p53 deficiency. Co-expression of Nm23H1 but not H2 in NIH3T3 cells effectively suppressed neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis induced by the oncogenic H-Ras G12V mutant. Overexpression of Nm23H1 but not H2 also inhibited tumorigenesis by human cervical cancer HeLa cells with p53 deficiency. However, in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma H1299 cells harboring N-Ras Q61K oncogenic mutation and p53 deletion, overexpression of Nm23H1 did not affect tumorigenesis in nude mice assays, while overexpression of Nm23H2 enhanced tumor growth with elevated expression of the c-Myc proto-oncogene. Collectively, these results suggest that Nm23H1 and H2 have differential abilities to modulate tumorigenesis. PMID:25748386

  16. Efficient laser operation of Nd3+:Lu2O3 at various wavelengths between 917 nm and 1463 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brunn, P.; Heuer, A. M.; Fornasiero, L.; Huber, G.; Kränkel, C.

    2016-08-01

    Even though the first Nd3+-doped sesquioxide lasers have been realized more than 50 years ago, up to now no reports on efficient laser operation of Nd3+:doped sesquioxides can be found. In this work, we review the favorable spectroscopic properties of the sesquioxide Nd3+:Lu2O3 in terms of ground state absorption, stimulated emission, and excited state absorption cross sections as well as the upper level lifetime. Making use of these properties, we achieved efficient laser performance on eight different laser transitions in the wavelength range between 917 nm and 1463 nm under Ti:sapphire laser pumping using state-of-the-art HEM-grown Nd3+:Lu2O3 crystals with good optical quality. At the strongest transition around 1076 nm we determined a slope efficiency of 69%, which represents the highest efficiency ever obtained for a Nd3+-doped sesquioxide. Furthermore, we could generate watt level output powers and high slope efficiencies for seven other transitions. Lasers at 917 nm, 1053 nm, 1108 nm and 1463 nm were realized for the first time and the latter represents one of the longest laser wavelengths obtained on the 4F3/2  →  4I13/2 transition in Nd3+-doped materials.

  17. Compact frequency-quadrupled pulsed 1030nm fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chris; Goldberg, Lew; Cole, Brian; DiLazaro, Tom; Hays, Alan D.

    2016-03-01

    A compact 1030nm fiber laser for ultraviolet generation at 257.5nm is presented. The laser employs a short length of highly-doped, large core (20μm), coiled polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber pumped by a wavelength-stabilized 975nm diode. It is passively Q-switched via a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber and generates 2.4W at 1030nm in a 110μJ pulse train. Lithium triborate (LBO) and beta-barium borate (BBO) are used to achieve 325mW average power at the fourth harmonic. The laser's small form factor, narrow linewidth and modest power consumption are suitable for use in a man-portable ultraviolet Raman explosives detection system.

  18. Fiber-integrated 780 nm source for visible parametric generation.

    PubMed

    Hu, D J J; Murray, R T; Legg, T; Runcorn, T H; Zhang, M; Woodward, R I; Lim, J L; Wang, Y; Luan, F; Gu, B; Shum, P P; Kelleher, E J R; Popov, S V; Taylor, J R

    2014-12-01

    We report the development of a fully fiber-integrated pulsed master oscillator power fibre amplifier (MOPFA) source at 780 nm, producing 3.5 W of average power with 410 ps pulses at a repetition rate of 50 MHz. The source consists of an intensity modulated 1560 nm laser diode amplified in an erbium fiber amplifier chain, followed by a fiber coupled periodically poled lithium niobate crystal module for frequency doubling. The source is then used for generating visible light through four-wave mixing in a length of highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber: 105 mW at 668 nm and 95 mW at 662 nm are obtained, with pump to anti-Stokes conversion slope efficiencies exceeding 6% in both cases. PMID:25606903

  19. Photorefractive effect at 775 nm in doped lithium niobate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, G.; Minzioni, P.; Cristiani, I.; Degiorgio, V.; Argiolas, N.; Bazzan, M.; Ciampolillo, M. V.; Pozza, G.; Sada, C.

    2013-07-15

    The photorefractive effect induced by 775-nm laser light on doped lithium niobate crystals is investigated by the direct observation in the far field of the transmitted-beam distortion as a function of time. Measurements performed at various Zr-doping concentrations and different light intensities show that the 775-nm light beam induces a steady-state photorefractive effect comparable to that of 532-nm light, but the observed build-up time of the photovoltaic field is longer by three-orders of magnitude. The 775-nm photorefractivity of lithium niobate crystals doped with 3 mol. % ZrO{sub 2} or with 5.5 mol. % MgO is found to be negligible.

  20. 100-nm node lithography with KrF?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze, Michael; Tyrrell, Brian; Astolfi, David K.; Yost, Donna; Davis, Paul; Wheeler, Bruce; Mallen, Renee D.; Jarmolowicz, J.; Cann, Susan G.; Liu, Hua-Yu; Ma, M.; Chan, David Y.; Rhyins, Peter D.; Carney, Chris; Ferri, John E.; Blachowicz, B. A.

    2001-09-01

    We present results looking into the feasibility of 100-nm Node imaging using KrF, 248-nm, exposure technology. This possibility is not currently envisioned by the 1999 ITRS Roadmap which lists 5 possible options for this 2005 Node, not including KrF. We show that double-exposure strong phase- shift, combined with two mask OPC, is capable of correcting the significant proximity effects present for 100-nm Node imaging at these low k1 factors. We also introduce a new PSM Paradigm, dubbed 'GRATEFUL,' that can image aggressive 100-nm Node features without using OPC. This is achieved by utilizing an optimized 'dense-only' imaging approach. The method also allows the re-use of a single PSM for multiple levels and designs, thus addressing the mask cost and turnaround time issues of concern in PSM technology.

  1. Absolute measurement of F2-laser power at 157 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, Stefan; Brandt, Friedhelm; Kremling, Hans-Albert; Gottwald, Alexander; Hoehl, Arne; Richter, Mathias

    2006-05-10

    We report a comparison of laser power measurements at the F2-laser wavelength oaf nm made at two facilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute. At the PTB laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II in Berlin, the scale for laser power was directly traced to a cryogenic radiometer operating at 157 nm, whereas at the PTB laser radiometry facility in Braunschweig the calibration of transfer detectors was performed with a newly developed standard for laser power at 157 nm, which is traceable in several steps to a cryogenic radiometer operating at 633 nm. The comparison was performed under vacuum conditions with laser pulse energies of?10 {mu}J, however with different average powers because different primary standard radiometers were used. The relative deviation for the responsivity of the transfer detector was 4.8% and thus within the combined standard uncertainty.

  2. 980 nm narrow linewidth Yb-doped phosphate fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingxue; Yao, Yifei; Hu, Haowei; Chi, Junjie; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Ziqiang; Zhang, Guangju

    2014-12-01

    A narrow-linewidth ytterbium (Yb)-doped phosphate fiber laser based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) operating around 980 nm is reported. Two different kinds of cavity are applied to obtain the 980 nm narrow-linewidth output. One kind of the cavity consists of a 0.35 nm broadband lindwidth high-reflection FBG and the Yb-doped phosphate fiber end with 0° angle, which generates a maximum output power of 25 mW. The other kind of resonator is composed of a single mode Yb-doped phosphate fiber and a pair of FBGs. Over 10.7 mW stable continuous wave are obtained with two longitudinal modes at 980 nm. We have given a detailed analysis and discussion for the results.

  3. POLLUX: a database of synthetic stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Gebran, M.; Josselin, E.; Martins, F.; Plez, B.; Belmas, M.; Lèbre, A.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: Synthetic spectra are needed to determine fundamental stellar and wind parameters of all types of stars. They are also used for the construction of theoretical spectral libraries helpful for stellar population synthesis. Therefore, a database of theoretical spectra is required to allow rapid and quantitative comparisons to spectroscopic data. We provide such a database offering an unprecedented coverage of the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Methods: We present the POLLUX database of synthetic stellar spectra. For objects with Teff ≤ 6000 K, MARCS atmosphere models are computed and the program TURBOSPECTRUM provides the synthetic spectra. ATLAS12 models are computed for stars with 7000 K ≤ Teff ≤ 15 000 K. SYNSPEC gives the corresponding spectra. Finally, the code CMFGEN provides atmosphere models for the hottest stars (Teff > 25 000 K). Their spectra are computed with CMF_FLUX. Both high resolution (R > 150 000) optical spectra in the range 3000 to 12 000 Å and spectral energy distributions extending from the UV to near-IR ranges are presented. These spectra cover the HR diagram at solar metallicity. Results: We propose a wide variety of synthetic spectra for various types of stars in a format that is compliant with the Virtual Observatory standards. A user-friendly web interface allows an easy selection of spectra and data retrieval. Upcoming developments will include an extension to a large range of metallicities and to the near-IR high resolution spectra, as well as a better coverage of the HR diagram, with the inclusion of models for Wolf-Rayet stars and large datasets for cool stars. The POLLUX database is accessible at http://pollux.graal.univ-montp2.fr/ and through the Virtual Observatory. Copy of database is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb

  4. Photodissociation of HCl at 193.3 nm: Spin{endash}orbit branching ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Dulligan, M.; Wittig, C.

    1997-08-01

    HCl was photodissociated by ultraviolet (uv) radiation at 193.3 nm. Time-of-flight spectra of the hydrogen atom fragment provided the spin{endash}orbit state distribution of the chlorine fragment, [Cl({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})]/[Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})]=0.69{plus_minus}0.02, in excellent agreement with recent theoretical studies. The H atom angular distribution studied by changing the uv photolysis laser polarization confirmed a dominant A{sup 1}{Pi}{l_arrow}X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} electronic transition in the photoexcitation process ({beta}={minus}1.01{plus_minus}0.04 and {beta}{sup {asterisk}}={minus}0.94{plus_minus}0.07). {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. RADIATION SPECTRUM STATISTICS IN A HIGH-GAIN FREE-ELECTRON LASER AT 266NM.

    SciTech Connect

    STAFTAN, T.; SHEEHY, B.; LOOS, H.; YU, L.H.; MURPHY, J.B.; KRINSKY, S.; ROSE, J.; WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; WANG, X.J.

    2005-08-21

    High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL is in operations at the DUV-FEL facility (BNL). During HGHG FEL characterization we have measured a set of data demonstrating basic properties of the FEL radiation and compared them with analytic calculations [1]. This paper describes continuation of characterization of the HGHG FEL radiation output, based on the spectral measurements. We discuss analysis of an experiment at which the tunability concept of a seeded FEL with a fixed seed wavelength has been verified [2]. During the experiment we recorded about 200 radiation spectra corresponding to different energy chirps in the electron beam. We have analyzed this set of spectral data to obtain statistical properties of HGHG radiation. Correlations and trends in the radiation spectrum at 266 nm have been observed and studied.

  6. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba-Son; Lin, Jen-Fin

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750 °C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750 °C. At 800 °C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  7. Parallel-type C+L band hybrid amplifier pumped by 1480 nm laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, S.-K.; Huang, C.-K.; Hsiao, Y.-L.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel-type, dispersion compensating C+L band erbium-doped fiber amplifier/Raman fiber amplifier is constructed by sharing a common 1480-nm pump source. The gain spectra of C+L band are flattened by optimally dividing the pump power ratio to 1:29 for EDFA and RFA, respectively. In a signal input power of -20 dBm, the average gain is 14 dB for the C-band EDFA and 13.6 dB for the L-band RFA when a pump reflector is used to recycle the residual pump power in L-band. The noise figure value ranges from 4.6 to 6.5 dB and the polarization dependent gain is less than 0.14 dB.

  8. Surface modification during Nd:YAG (1064 nm) pulsed laser cleaning of organic fibrous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strlič, Matija; Kolar, Jana; Šelih, Vid-Simon; Marinček, Marko

    2003-02-01

    Formation of yellow chromophores on artificially soiled surfaces of cellulose sheets, rag paper, linen, cotton, wool and silk during Nd:YAG (1064 nm) pulsed laser cleaning was followed using Vis and FTIR diffuse reflectance spectrometry. Content of reducing carbonyl groups and changes in FTIR reflectance spectra of cellulose are indicative of surface chemical modifications typical of thermal degradation at elevated temperatures. Two types of soiling were used: well-characterised natural dust and carbon powder and no difference in laser-induced formation of chromophores on material surface was observed at low deposit densities. The influence of laser fluence and number of repetitions was studied and a single pulse of a higher fluence (1 J cm -1) is in general more advisable. No bleaching of the chromophores formed was noticed after repeated treatments.

  9. The Missing Solar Irradiance Spectrum: 1 to 7 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Lewis, M.; David, M.; Schunk, R. W.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    During large X-class flares the Earth's upper atmospheric E-region responds immediately to solar photons in the 1 to 7 nm range. The response can change the E-region density by factors approaching 10, create large changes in conductivity, and plague HF communications. GOES-XRS provide 0.1 to 0.8 nm and a 0.05 to 0.4 nm integral channels; SOHO-SEM provided a 0 to 50 nm irradiance; TIMED and SORCE-XPS diode measurements also integrated down to 0.1 nm; and most recently SDO-EVE provided a 0.1 to 7 nm irradiance. For atmospheric response to solar flares the cadence is also crucial. Both GOES and SDO provided integral measurements at 10 seconds or better. Unfortunately these measurements have failed to capture the 1 to 7 nm spectral changes that occur during flares. It is these spectral changes that create the major impact since the ionization cross-section of the dominant atmospheric species, N2 and O2, both contain step function changes in the cross-sections. Models of the solar irradiance over this critical wavelength regime have suffered from the need to model the spectral variability based on incomplete measurements. The most sophisticated empirical model FISM [Chamberlin et al., 2008] used 1 nm spectral binning and various implementations of the above integral measurements to describe the 1 to 7 nm irradiance. Since excellent solar observations exist at other wavelengths it is possible to construct an empirical model of the solar atmosphere and then use this model to infer the spectral distribution at wavelengths below 5 nm. This differential emission measure approach has been used successfully in other contexts [e.g., Warren, 2005, Chamberlin et al., 2009]. This paper contrasts the broadband versus spectrally resolved descriptions of the incoming irradiance that affects the upper atmospheric E-layer. The results provide a prescription of what wavelength resolution would be needed to adequately measure the incoming solar irradiance in the 1 to 7 nm range.

  10. Low-k/copper integration scheme suitable for ULSI manufacturing from 90nm to 45nm nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, T.; Lane, S.; Fukasawa, M.; Ida, K.; Angyal, M.; Chanda, K.; Chen, F.; Christiansen, C.; Cohen, S.; Cullinan, M.; Dziobkowski, C.; Fitzsimmons, J.; Flaitz, P.; Grill, A.; Gill, J.; Inoue, K.; Klymko, N.; Kumar, K.; Labelle, C.; Lane, M.; Li, B.; Liniger, E.; Madon, A.; Malone, K.; Martin, J.; McGahay, V.; McLaughlin, P.; Melville, I.; Minami, M.; Molis, S.; Nguyen, S.; Penny, C.; Restaino, D.; Sakamoto, A.; Sankar, M.; Sherwood, M.; Simonyi, E.; Shimooka, Y.; Tai, L.; Widodo, J.; Wildman, H.; Ono, M.; McHerron, D.; Nye, H.; Davis, C.; Sankaran, S.; Edelstein, D.; Ivers, T.

    2005-11-01

    This paper discusses low-k/copper integration schemes which has been in production in the 90 nm node, have been developed in the 65 nm node, and should be taken in the 45 nm node. While our baseline 65 nm BEOL process has been developed by extension and simple shrinkage of our PECVD SiCOH integration which has been in production in the 90 nm node with our SiCOH film having k=3.0, the 65 nm SiCOH integration has two other options to go to extend to lower capacitance. One is to add porosity to become ultra low-k (ULK). The other is to stay with low-k SiCOH, which is modified to have a "lower-k". The effective k- value attained with the lower-k (k=2.8) SiCOH processed in the "Direct CMP" scheme is very close to that with an ULK (k=2.5) SiCOH film built with the "Hard Mask Retention" scheme. This paper first describes consideration of these two damascene schemes, whose comparison leads to the conclusion that the lower-k SiCOH integration can have more advantages in terms of process simplicity and extendibility of our 90 nm scheme under certain assumptions. Then describing the k=2.8 SiCOH film development and its successful integration, damascene schemes for 45nm nodes are discussed based on our learning from development of the lower-k 65nm scheme. Capability of modern dry etchers to define the finer patterns, non-uniformity of CMP, and susceptibility to plasma and mechanical strength and adhesion of ULK are discussed as factors to hamper the applicability of ULK.

  11. Absorption spectra of riboflavin--a difficult case for computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Eriksson, Leif A

    2010-09-23

    Computing accurate absorption spectra of riboflavin (RBF) has proven a difficult task for computational chemistry. Time-dependent density functional theory have herein been employed using a wide range of recent range-separated and hybrid meta functionals to investigate ultraviolet and visible spectra of RBF to determine if any progress has been made through recent developments. It is concluded that B3LYP and PBE0 perform the best throughout the entire test set. However, since all methods deviate from experimental results by at least 40 nm when computing the spectra in vacuum, two approaches to describe aqueous solution are implemented together with the MPWB1K, B3LYP, and PBE0 functionals: implicitly using integral equation formulation of the polarized continuum model (minor improvement) and explicitly through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the molecule embedded in a water cluster whereafter snapshots of RBF-water clusters are extracted and time-dependent density functional theory calculations performed. The resulting averaged spectra from the MD-simulated clusters show a constant blue-shift for all peaks by ∼20 nm compared to experimental data at the TD-B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. PMID:20718485

  12. Analysis of reflectance spectra from hyperspectral images of poultry carcasses for fecal and ingesta detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windham, William R.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Park, Bosoon; Smith, Doug P.; Poole, Gavin

    2002-11-01

    Identification and separation of poultry carcasses contaminated by feces and/or crop ingesta are very important to protect the consumer from a potential source of food poisoning. A transportable hyperspectral imaging system was developed to detect fecal and ingesta contamination on the surface of poultry carcasses. Detection algorithms used with the imaging system were developed from visible/near infrared monochromator spectra and with contaminates from birds fed a corn/soybean meal diet. The objectives of this study were to investigate using regions of interest reflectance spectra from hyperspectral images to determine optimal wavelengths for fecal detection algorithms from images of birds fed corn, wheat and milo diets. Spectral and spatial data between 400 and 900 nm with a 1.0 nm spectral resolution were acquired from uncontaminated and fecal and ingesta contaminated poultry carcasses. Regions of interest (ROIs) were defined for fecal and ingesta contaminated and uncontaminated skin (i.e. breast, thigh, and wing). Average reflectance spectra of the ROIs were extracted for analysis. Reflectance spectra of contaminants and uncontaminated skin differed. Spectral data pre-processing treatments with a single-term, linear regression program to select wavelengths for optimum calibration coefficients to detect contamination were developed. Fecal and ingesta detection models, specifically a quotient of 2 and/or 3-wavelengths was 100% successful in classification of contaminates.

  13. Retrieval of chlorophyll content in maize from leaf reflectance spectra using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jie; Yan, Zhenguo

    2014-11-01

    Chlorophyll plays an important role in crop photosynthesis, and it is an indicator of crop growth and stress state. Estimation of leaf chlorophyll content of maize from remote sensing data was investigated using radiative transfer model inversion and wavelet analysis. Hyperspectral data of maize were measured in two natural fields using ASD field spectrometer, chlorophyll content was collected with a SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter. The bands between 350-1300nm spectra region were selected for the preprocessing, 10 spectra of each sampling point measurements of maize were averaged for smoothing. PROSPECT was used to generate very large spectral data sets, with which spectra region was set to 350-1300nm. The original hyperspectral of maize were applied wavelet transform with wavelet function of Haar, DB9, sym6, coif3, bior4.4, dmey to get transform coefficients, spectral reflectance of maize were obtained after the de-noising processing. Support vector machine was trained the training data set, in order to establish hyperspectral estimation model of chlorophyll content. A validation data set was established based on hyperspectral data, and the leaf chlorophyll content estimation model was applied to the validation data set to estimate leaf chlorophyll content of maize. The hyperspectral estimation model yielded results with a coefficient of determination of 0.8712 and a mean square error (MSE) of 76.1786. The results indicated that by decomposing leaf spectra, the wavelet analysis can be used to a fast and accurate method for estimations of chlorophyll content.

  14. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  15. Electron spectra derived from depth dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Faddegon, B A; Blevis, I

    2000-03-01

    The technique of extracting electron energy spectra from measured distributions of dose along the central axis of clinical electron beams is explored in detail. Clinical spectra measured with this simple spectroscopy tool are shown to be sufficient in accuracy and resolution for use in Monte Carlo treatment planning. A set of monoenergetic depth dose curves of appropriate energy spacing, precalculated with Monte Carlo for a simple beam model, are unfolded from the measured depth dose curve. The beam model is comprised of a point electron and photon source placed in vacuum with a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm. Systematic error introduced by this model affects the calculated depth dose curve by no more than 2%/2 mm. The component of the dose due to treatment head bremsstrahlung, subtracted prior to unfolding, is estimated from the thin-target Schiff spectrum within 0.3% of the maximum total dose (from electrons and photons) on the beam axis. Optimal unfolding parameters are chosen, based on physical principles. Unfolding is done with the public-domain code FERDO. Comparisons were made to previously published spectra measured with magnetic spectroscopy and to spectra we calculated with Monte Carlo treatment head simulation. The approach gives smooth spectra with an average resolution for the 27 beams studied of 16+/-3% of the mean peak energy. The mean peak energy of the magnetic spectrometer spectra was calculated within 2% for the AECL T20 scanning beam accelerators, 3% for the Philips SL25 scattering foil based machine. The number of low energy electrons in Monte Carlo spectra is estimated by unfolding with an accuracy of 2%, relative to the total number of electrons in the beam. Central axis depth dose curves calculated from unfolded spectra are within 0.5%/0.5 mm of measured and simulated depth dose curves, except near the practical range, where 1%/1 mm errors are evident. PMID:10757603

  16. New atlas of IR solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Vanallen, J. W.; Bradford, C. M.; Cook, G. R.; Murcray, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Over 4500 absorption lines have been marked on the spectra and the corresponding line positions tabulated. The associated absorbing telluric or solar species for more than 90% of these lines have been identified and only a fraction of the unidentified lines have peak absorptions greater than a few percent. The high resolution and the low Sun spectra greatly enhance the sensitivity limits for identification of trace constituents.

  17. Trigonometric Polynomials For Estimation Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Orthogonal sets of trigonometric polynomials used as suboptimal substitutes for discrete prolate-spheroidal "windows" of Thomson method of estimation of spectra. As used here, "windows" denotes weighting functions used in sampling time series to obtain their power spectra within specified frequency bands. Simplified windows designed to require less computation than do discrete prolate-spheroidal windows, albeit at price of some loss of accuracy.

  18. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Song, Inseok

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  19. Applications of combination wavelength (1060-nm and 530-nm) and pulsed Nd:YAG laser for contact laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, K R; Peyman, G A; Myers, J D; Hamlin, S A; Katoh, N

    1989-01-01

    Two pulsed neodimium yittrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser systems were evaluated for contact surgery through a fiberoptic system with a sapphire tip. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1060 nm was as effective as continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser in producing tissue incisions. A combination of 1060-nm and 530-nm wavelengths achieved smooth cutting at lower energy levels. Corneal endothelial cell damage occurred at the high power level (7 watts) required for smooth underwater incisions with both continuous wave and pulsed lasers. PMID:2733255

  20. Trends in nanosecond melanosome microcavitation up to 1540 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Vincelette, Rebecca L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2015-09-01

    Thresholds for microcavitation of bovine and porcine melanosomes were previously reported, using single nanosecond (ns) laser pulses in the visible (532 nm) and the near-infrared (NIR) from 1000 to 1319 nm. Here, we report average radiant exposure thresholds for bovine melanosome microcavitation at additional NIR wavelengths up to 1540 nm, which range from ˜0.159 J/cm2 at 800 nm to 4.5 J/cm2 at 1540 nm. Melanosome absorption coefficients were also estimated, and decreased with increasing wavelength. These values were compared to retinal pigment epithelium coefficients, and to water absorption, over the same wavelength range. Corneal total intraocular energy retinal damage threshold values were estimated and compared to the previous (2007) and recently changed (2014) maximum permissible exposure (MPE) safe levels. Results provide additional data that support the recent changes to the MPE levels, as well as the first microcavitation data at 1540 nm, a wavelength for which melanosome microcavitation may be an ns-pulse skin damage mechanism.