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Sample records for 350-2500 nm spectra

  1. Optical properties of peritoneal biological tissues in the spectral range of 350-2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Kozintseva, M. D.; Kochubei, V. I.; Gorodkov, S. Yu.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The optical characteristics of biological tissues sampled from the anterior abdominal wall of laboratory rats are for the first time experimentally studied in a wide wavelength range (350-2500 nm). The experiments have been performed in vitro using a LAMBDA 950 (PerkinElmer, United States) spectrophotometer. Inverse Monte Carlo simulation is used to restore the spectral dependences for scattering and absorption coefficients, as well as the scattering anisotropy factor for biological tissue based on the recorded spectra of diffuse reflection and total and collimated transmissions.

  2. Reflectance spectroscopy (350-2500 nm) of solid-state polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, M. R. M.; Applin, D. M.; Norman, L.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2014-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic compounds based on fused aromatic rings, and are formed in a variety of astrophysical, solar nebula and planetary processes. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are known or suspected to occur in a wide variety of planetary settings including icy satellites, Titan’s hazes, carbonaceous meteorites, comet nuclei, ring particles; and terrestrial organic-rich lithologies such as coals, asphaltites, and bituminous sands. Relatively few measurements of the visible and near-infrared spectra of PAHs exist, yet this wavelength region (350-2500 nm) is widely used for remote sensing. This study presents detailed analyses of the 350-2500 nm reflectance spectra of 47 fine-grained powders of different high-purity solid-state PAHs. Spectral properties of PAHs change with variations in the number and connectivity of linked aromatic rings and the presence and type of side-groups and heterocycles. PAH spectra are characterized by three strong features near ∼880 nm, ∼1145 nm, and ∼1687 nm due to overtones of νCH fundamental stretching vibrations. Some PAHs are amenable to remote detection due to the presence of diagnostic spectral features, including: Nsbnd H stretching overtones at 1490-1515 nm in NH- and NH2-bearing PAHs, aliphatic or saturated bond Csbnd H overtone vibrations at ∼1180-1280 nm and ∼1700-1860 nm; a broad asymmetric feature between ∼1450 nm and ∼1900 nm due to Osbnd H stretching overtones in aromatic alcohols, Csbnd H and Cdbnd O combinations near ∼2000-2010 nm and ∼2060-2270 nm in acetyl and carboxyl-bearing PAHs. Other substituents such as sulphonyl, thioether ether and carboxyl heterocycles, or cyano, nitrate, and aromatic side groups, do not produce well-resolved diagnostic spectral features but do cause shifts in the positions of the aromatic Csbnd H vibrational overtone features. Fluorescence is commonly suppressed by the presence of heterocycles, side-groups and in many non-alternant PAHs

  3. Use of the Moon for spacecraft calibration over 350-2500 nm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Anderson, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Moon is the only natural object outside the Earth's atmosphere that is within the dynamic range of most imaging instruments on Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The excellent photometric stability of the Lunar surface will allow its use as a long-term instrument calibration source once the dependence of Lunar spectral radiance on phase and libration angles are well characterized. A program to provide this characterization is underway. Observations are being made in 23 bands within 350-950 nm, 7 of which correspond closely with spacecraft instrument bands. Observations in nine bands within 950-2500 nm began recently. Although at this time the absolute Lunar radiance model is preliminary and uncertainties are larger than most instrument calibration goals, changes in spacecraft instrument sensitivity can be precisely monitored and absolute calibration can be applied retroactively as the accuracy of the Lunar spectral radiance model improves. Several space-based imaging systems have already begun using the Moon for calibration and the EOS AM-1 platform will make periodic attitude maneuvers for Lunar and space calibration.

  4. Chemical Effects on Vegetation Detectable in Optical Bands 350-2500 nm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-31

    analysis of the data using vegetation indices, which focus on key spectral bands associated with chlorophyll, pigments and water content, showed that the...For this analysis we chose a number of commonly used vegetation indices that focus on bands related to pigments and water content of leaves. Table...chlorophyll (A, B), pigments (ß-carotene, pycoerythrin and phycocyanin), cellulose and lignin, and water common to vegetation . Table 7. Spectral

  5. DEIMOS: a beamline dedicated to dichroism measurements in the 350-2500 eV energy range.

    PubMed

    Ohresser, P; Otero, E; Choueikani, F; Chen, K; Stanescu, S; Deschamps, F; Moreno, T; Polack, F; Lagarde, B; Daguerre, J-P; Marteau, F; Scheurer, F; Joly, L; Kappler, J-P; Muller, B; Bunau, O; Sainctavit, Ph

    2014-01-01

    The DEIMOS (Dichroism Experimental Installation for Magneto-Optical Spectroscopy) beamline was part of the second phase of the beamline development at French Synchrotron SOLEIL (Source Optimisée de Lumière à Energie Intermédiaire du LURE) and opened to users in March 2011. It delivers polarized soft x-rays to perform x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and x-ray linear dichroism in the energy range 350-2500 eV. The beamline has been optimized for stability and reproducibility in terms of photon flux and photon energy. The main end-station consists in a cryo-magnet with 2 split coils providing a 7 T magnetic field along the beam or 2 T perpendicular to the beam with a controllable temperature on the sample from 370 K down to 1.5 K.

  6. Effect of Palagonite Dust Deposition on the Automated Detection of Carbonate Vis/NIR Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, Martha S.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Castano, Rebecca; Bornstein, Benjamin; Greenwood, James

    2004-01-01

    Currently Mars missions can collect more data than can be returned. Future rovers of increased mission lifetime will benefit from onboard autonomous data processing systems to guide the selection, measurement and return of scientifically important data. One approach is to train a neural net to recognize spectral reflectance characteristics of minerals of interest. We have developed a carbonate detector using a neural net algorithm trained on 10,000 synthetic Vis/NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra. The detector was able to correctly identify carbonates in the spectra of 30 carbonate and noncarbonate field samples with 100% success. However, Martian dust coatings strongly affect the spectral characteristics of surface rocks potentially masking the underlying substrate rock. In this experiment, we measure Vis/NIR spectra of calcite coated with different thicknesses of palagonite dust and evaluate the performance of the carbonate detector.

  7. [Absorption spectra of nucleic acids and related compounds in the spectral region 120--280 nm].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, M N; Zarochentseva, E P; Dodonova, N Ia

    1975-01-01

    The absorption spectra of thin films of nucleic acids, nucleosides, nucleotides, D-ribose, Na3PO4 in vacuum ultraviolet region are measured. In the spectral region 280--160 nm the absorption spectra consist of the bands of nucleic acid bases. In the range shorter than 160 nm the absorption is determined by phosphate and D-ribose groups. The methods of thin films preparation are discussed.

  8. Ultra-broadband gain spectra of Co2+-doped fiber pumped at 1200 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guishun; Zhang, Chaomin; Zhu, Pengfei; Jiang, Chun; Song, Pei; Zhu, Kun

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the energy levels, transition configuration and numerical model of Co2+-doped glass-ceramics fiber. A quasi-three-level system is employed to model the gain spectra of the doped fiber, and the rate and the power propagation equations are solved to analyze the effect of the fiber length, active ion concentration, pumping power as well as ambient temperature on the spectra. It is shown that the fiber has ultra-broadband gain spectra in 1.25-2.00 μm range via the 1200 nm pump, which is promising for full-band fiber amplifiers.

  9. Daylight spectra of individual lightning flashes in the 370-690 nm region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orville, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    An optical multichannel analyzer slit spectrometer coupled to a minicomputer was used to record lightning spectra. This is the first successful application of a slit spectrometer to the study of individual lightning flashes and it was accomplished in the daytime. Over 300 spectra were obtained in 1978 and 1979 and are correlated with other experiments in the Thunderstorm Research International Program (TRIP). The spectra duplicate previously published nighttime data but reveal for the first time the relative intensity of H-alpha (656.3 nm) and H-beta (486.1 nm) emissions above their daytime absorption features. These are the characteristic Fraunhofer C and F lines in the solar spectrum. This result suggests that the observation of lightning from space may be accomplished by monitoring the hydrogen emissions from lightning which occur on earth, or on other planets with hydrogen in their atmospheres, such as Jupiter and Venus where lightning recently has been reported.

  10. Reinvestigation of the Emission Spectra Following the 266 NM Photolysis of Iodomethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Cian-Ping; Cheng, Hsin-I.; Chang, Bor-Chen

    2013-06-01

    Nascent emission spectra following the 266 nm photolysis of iodomethanes (CHI_3, CH_2I_2, CH_3I, and CH_2ICl) were recorded in a slow flow system, and are similar to those following the 266 nm photolysis of bromomethanes except a number of unknown bands that appear between 520 nm and 820 nm. Interestingly, there are no isotopic shifts in these unknown bands even when the precursors were replaced by the deuterated or ^{13}C-substituted isotopomers (CD_2I_2, CD_3I, and ^{13}CH_2I_2). This indicates that the carrier of these unknown bands does not contain any hydrogen or carbon atoms. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation and dispersed-fluorescence (DF) spectra were recorded, but these spectra show different vibrational structures than those of the unknown bands. While the LIF and DF spectra can be well described by the I_2 b^3 Π _{0,u} ^+ - X^1 Σ _g ^+ transition, there exist systematic deviations between the unknown bands and the I_2 b-X transition. We have improved the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios and the resolution for these unknown bands. Our new analysis shows that the unknown bands consist of several band systems including the I_2 b-X transition. Moreover, the excited state iodine atom was found in the nascent emission spectra, but its formation mechanism still remains unsolved. The details of our current progress will be presented. S.-X. Yang, G.-Y. Hou, J.-H. Dai, C-.H. Chang, and B.-C. Chang, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4785 (2010). J.-J. Du, C.-H. Chen, and B.-C. Chang, 67^{th} OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, WG04 (2012).

  11. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  12. Remote Raman spectra of benzene obtained from 217 meters using a single 532 nm laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng; Madey, John M J; Price, Frank M; Sharma, Shiv K; Lienert, Barry

    2007-06-01

    This report describes a mobile Raman lidar system that has been developed for spectral measurements of samples located remotely at ranges of hundreds of meters. The performance of this system has been quantitatively verified in a lidar calibration experiment using a hard target of standardized reflectance. A new record in detection range was achieved for remote Raman systems using 532 nm laser excitation. Specifically, Raman spectra of liquid benzene were measured with an integration time corresponding to a single 532 nm laser pulse at a distance of 217 meters. The single-shot Raman spectra at 217 meters demonstrated high signal-to-noise ratio and good resolution sufficient for the unambiguous identification of the samples of interest. The transmitter consists of a 20 Hz Nd:YAG laser emitting at 532 nm and 1064 nm and a 178 mm telescope through the use of which allows the system to produce a focused beam at the target location. The receiver consists of a large custom telescope (609 mm aperture) and a Czerny-Turner monochromator equipped with two fast photomultiplier tubes.

  13. New rotationally resolved spectra of Pluto-Charon from 350 - 900 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, Henry B.; Grundy, Will; Olkin, Cathy B.; Young, Leslie A.; Sickafoose, Amanda A.

    2015-11-01

    We are using the 11-meter Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) to acquire high-resolution rotationally resolved visible spectra of Pluto-Charon. We use the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) to observe Pluto-Charon from 350 nm to 900 nm. At 500 nm, resolution is 0.05 nm (R ~ 10,0000) and SNR per spectral resolution element is ~ 500.We planned observations for 13 dates during June-September 2014, and 13 more dates during June-September 2015. The observations for each season were spaced so as to equally sample Pluto's 6.5-day rotational period. As of the abstract submission, we have data from 11 nights (2014) and 9 nights (2015) in hand. Most of the observations were taken with observations of solar-type star HD 146233 to determine the surface reflectivity.Our results will provide constraint on the composition and spatial distribution of material on Pluto's surface, enabling comparison to previous epochs and near-infrared results, and giving a ground-truth for New Horizons' July 2015 flyby. In addition, our data will allow us to search for new spectral features in the range 350 nm to 600 nm, at a sensitivity substantially higher than previously published searches.

  14. Sensitivity of Raman spectra excited at 325 nm to surface treatments of undoped polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodbane, S.; Deneuville, A.; Tromson, D.; Bergonzo, P.; Bustarret, E.; Ballutaud, D.

    2006-08-01

    About 20 m thick films were deposited in the same run by MPCVD at 900 °C on Si substrates and then hydrogenated in situ during 30 min with a hydrogen plasma at the same temperature. Their surfaces were kept as prepared or more or less strongly oxidized by annealing at 600 °C under ambient atmosphere or by sulphochromic acid or aqua regia treatments. Raman spectra were excited at 325 and 632.8 nm. Spectra of the as-prepared sample exhibit structures around 2835 and 2895 cm-1 from monohydride carbon-hydrogen ascribed to the atomically flat (111) and (100) areas, respectively, on the facets of the sample surface crystallites. The decrease of these structures in the normalized spectra after the various oxidation treatments confirms these assignments. The decrease is smaller for the aqua regia treatment than for the two other treatments which give similar effects. Other Raman signals from sp2 C around 1589 cm-1 and CHx bonds around 2930, 2952, 3025 and 3050 cm-1 originate from species at the surface and within the films. Their variation with the oxidizing treatments indicates a significant contribution from the surface species.

  15. Fluorescence and Raman spectra on surface of K9 glass by high fluence ultraviolet laser irradiation at 355 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Geng, Feng; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Feng, Shiquan; Ren, Dahua; Cheng, Xinlu; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo; Tang, Yongjian

    2013-11-01

    In order to explore the damage mechanisms of K9 glass irradiated by high energy density ultraviolet laser, laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectra were investigated. Compared the fluorescence spectra of damaged area, undamaged area and sub-damaged area, it can be conclude that the fluorescence spectrum of sub-damaged area is different from the structure of the other two areas. Especially, the main peak of the spectra at 415 nm reveals the unique characteristics of K9 glass. The structure at the sub-damaged area enhances intensity of the Raman scattering spectra. Three peaks of the spectra at about 500 nm and two characteristic peaks at about 550 nm exhibit the characterization of damaged area. A peak of the Raman scattering spectra at 350 nm which related to water can be observed. The relationship between intensity of Raman scattering and laser intensity at 355 nm is investigated by confocal Raman microscopy. At sub-damage area, signal of Raman scattering is rather high and decreased dramatically with respect to energy density. The major band at about 1470 cm-1 sharpened and moved to higher frequency with densification. These phenomena demonstrate that the structure of sub-damaged area has some characterization compared with the damaged area. The investigation of defect induced fluorescence and Raman spectra on surface of K9 glass is important to explore the damage mechanisms of optical materials irradiated by ultraviolet laser irradiation at 355 nm.

  16. An investigation of the 661.3 nm diffuse interstellar band in Cepheid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuba, S. V.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Chekhonadskikh, F. A.; Luck, R. E.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Korotin, S. A.; Krełowski, J.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) at 661.3 nm seen in the spectra of Cepheid stars. After removal of the blending lines of ionized yttrium and neutral iron, we determined the equivalent widths (EWs) of the DIB and used these values to investigate the E(B - V)-DIB EW relation. The relation found from Cepheids matches that found in B stars. This relation can help to find the reddening for newly discovered Cepheids without extensive photometric data, and thus determine their distances. The relation between E(B - V) and the DIB EW does not yield precise reddening values. It is not a substitute for better photometric or spectroscopic methods. At best, it is indicative, but it provides some information that may not be otherwise available. Defining R* = E(B - V)/DIB EW, which we consider to be the analogue of R = E(B - V)/Av, we investigated the Galactic longitudinal dependence of R* assuming that the DIB EW value is representative of the interstellar absorption Av. We found that there is an apparent increase of the R* value that corresponds to the abnormal absorption seen towards Cygnus constellation. Finally, we constructed a 2D map of the DIB EW distribution in the Galactic disc basing on our rather limited sample of 253 spectra of 176 Cepheids.

  17. The red edge in arid region vegetation: 340-1060 nm spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Murray, Bruce C.; Chehbouni, A.; Njoku, Eni

    1993-01-01

    -cellulose absorptions at 2090 nm and 2300 nm. Ray et al. detected absorption at 2100 nm in AVIRIS spectra of an abandoned field known to be covered by a great deal of dead plant litter. In order to better study arid region vegetation remote sensing data, it is necessary to better characterize the reflectance spectra of in situ, living, arid region plants.

  18. Absolutely Calibrated Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectra in the 150 nm to 250 nm Range from Plasmas Generated by the NIKE KrF Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-25

    BN, Al, Si, S, Ti, Pd, and Au. Titanium-doped silica aerogels in pyrex cylinders were also irradiated. Spectra of the target elements were observed...silica aerogel targets at 248 nm was typically 6x10-6 the incident NIKE laser energy, and the spectral broadening corresponded to the 1 THz bandwidth of...targets consisted of planar foils of CH, BN, Al, Si, S, Ti, Pd, and Au. Titanium-doped silica aerogels in pyrex cylinders were also irradiated. Spectra of

  19. Study of the emission spectra of a 1320-nm semiconductor disk laser and its second harmonic

    SciTech Connect

    Gochelashvili, K S; Derzhavin, S I; Evdokimova, O N; Zolotovskii, I O; Podmazov, S V

    2016-03-31

    The spectral characteristics of an optically pumped external-cavity semiconductor disk laser near λ = 1320 nm are studied experimentally. Intracavity second harmonic generation is obtained using an LBO nonlinear crystal. The output power at a wavelength of 660 nm in the cw regime was 620 mW, and the peak power in the pulsed regime was 795 mW. (lasers)

  20. Comparison of HITRAN Calculated Spectra with Laboratory Measurements of the 820, 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Pilewskie, P.; Gore, Warren J.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    Several groups have recently been working to improve the near-infrared spectrum of water vapor on HITRAN. The unit-conversion errors found by Giver, et al have now been corrected on the recently released HITRAN-2000. The most important aspect of this article for atmospheric absorption was increasing all the HITRAN-1996 intensities of the 940 nm band by nearly 15%. New intensity measurements of this band by Brown, et al (submitted to J. Mol. Spec.) have now been included in the latest HITRAN. However, Belmiloud, et al discuss new data in the 633-1175 nm region which they expect will substantially increase the calculated absorption of solar radiation by water vapor. They suggest the 4 bands at 725, 820, 940, and 1130 nm are all stronger than the sum of the line intensities currently on HITRAN. For the 725 and 820 nm bands, their recommended intensity increases are 10% and 15%, about the same as previously noted by Grossmann and Browell and Ponsardin and Browell. Belmiloud, et al only suggest a 6% increase for the 940 nm. band over the corrected HITRAN-1996 intensities, but a large 38% increase for the 1130 nm band. The new data discussed by Belmiloud, et al have now been published in greater detail by Schermaul, et al. The intensity increase for the 1130 nm band discussed by Belmiloud, et al is very substantial; it is important to quickly determine if the HITRAN intensity values are in error by as much as they claim. Only intensity errors for the strong lines could result in the total band intensity being in error by such a large amount. To quickly get a number of spectra of the entire near-infrared region from 650 to 1650 nm, we used the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer with our 25-meter base path White absorption cell. This moderate resolution spectrometer is a flight instrument that has flown on the Sandia Twin Otter for the ARESE 11 experiment. The measured band profiles were then compared to calculated spectra using the latest HITRAN line intensities, convolved

  1. Experimental and simulated argon spectra in the 2.3-3.4 nm region from tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, M.; Fournier, K. B.; Carraro, L.; Coffey, I.; Giroud, C.; Lawson, K.; Monier-Garbet, P.; O'Mullane, M.; Ongena, J.; Puiatti, M. E.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental argon spectra in the 2.3-3.4 nm region from the Jet tokamak on a single null divertor configuration have been simulated. The spectra include lines from five ionization states, namely from Ar15+ Li-like to Ar11+ N-like ions. Collisional-radiative models have been constructed for these five Ar ions, considering electron collisional excitation and radiative decay as the populating processes of the excited states. These models give photon emission coefficients for the emitted lines at electron density and temperature values corresponding to the experimental situations. Impurity modelling is performed using a one-dimensional (1D) impurity transport code, calculating the steady-state radial distribution of the Ar ions. The Ar line brightnesses are evaluated in a post-processing subroutine and simulated spectra are obtained. The parts of the spectra corresponding to a single-ionization state do not depend on the experimental conditions and show good agreement except for the amplitude of the simulated 2s-3p Ar XVI line and the shape of the simulated 2.50 nm feature (composed of Ar XVI and Ar XV lines). On the other hand, the superposition of these spectra depends on the experimental conditions, as a consequence of the fact that the ion charge distribution depends not only on the radial profiles of the electron density and temperature, but also of the impurity transport coefficients. Simulations of the Ar spectra (including transport) give confidence in the atomic physics calculations; moreover, they allow the determination of the transport coefficients in the plasma region emitting the considered ionization states, i.e. at the interior of the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS). For a correct simulation of the amplitudes of the spectral features it is necessary to include a transport barrier inside the LCMS. As far as the atomic physics is concerned, we report improved wavelengths for Ar XV transitions and we benchmark photon emission coefficients for XUV

  2. Atlas of reflectance spectra of terrestrial, lunar and meteoritic powders and frosts from 92 to 1800 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Jeffrey; Hapke, Bruce; Wells, Eddie

    1987-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of powdered samples of selected minerals, meteorites, lunar materials and frosts are presented as an aid in the interpretation of present and future remote sensing data of solar system objects. Spectra obtained in separate wavelength regions have been combined and normalized, yielding coverage from 92 to 1800 nm. Spectral features include reflectance maxima in the far UV region produced by valence-conduction interband transitions, and reflectance minima in the near UV, visible and near IR regions, produced by charge transfer and crystal field transitions. Specific maxima and minima are diagnostic of mineral type and composition; additionally, the minerals present in mixtures such as meteorites and lunar samples can be determined.

  3. Atlas of reflectance spectra of terrestrial, lunar, and meteoritic powders and frosts from 92 to 1800 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Jeffrey K.; Hapke, Bruce W.; Wells, Eddie N.

    1987-01-01

    The spectra of samples of several powder and frost materials are presented to serve in a reference database for future far-UV scans of solar system bodies. The spectra cover in the 92-1800 nm wavelengths, i.e., wavenumbers 110,000-5600/cm and photon energies from 13.5-1.5 eV. Preparation procedures for the particulates are delineated. The survey includes feldspars, orthopyroxenes, clinopyroxenes, olivines, assorted minerals, achondrites, carbonaceous chondrites and ordinary chondrites, lunar soils and rocks. Frosts of H2O, CO2, NH3 and SO2 gases were also examined. The data are expected to aid in obtaining spectral matches for asteroids and meteoroids when far-UV telescopy of solar system bodies is performed.

  4. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. I. Full-disk properties: 350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Bellucci, G.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Formisano, V.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbitts, K.; Showalter, M.; Newman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Saturn's icy satellites are among the main scientific objectives of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment. This paper contains a first systematic and comparative analysis of the full-disk spectral properties of Dione, Enceladus, Epimetheus, Hyperion, Iapetus, Mimas, Phoebe, Rhea and Tethys as observed by VIMS from July 2004 to June 2005. The disk integrated properties (350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves at 550-2232 nm) and images of satellites are reported and discussed in detail together with the observed geometry. In general, the spectra in the visible spectral range are almost featureless and can be classified according to the spectral slopes: from the bluish Enceladus and Phoebe to the redder Iapetus, Hyperion and Epimetheus. In the 1000-1300 nm range the spectra of Enceladus, Tethys, Mimas and Rhea are characterized by a negative slope, consistent with a surface largely dominated by water ice, while the spectra of Iapetus, Hyperion and Phoebe show a considerable reddening pointing out the relevant role played by darkening materials present on the surface. In between these two classes are Dione and Epimetheus, which have a flat spectrum in this range. The main absorption bands identified in the infrared are the 1520, 2020, 3000 nm H2O/OH bands (for all satellites), although Iapetus dark terrains show mostly a deep 3000 nm band while the 1520 and 2020 nm bands are very faint. In this spectral range, the Iapetus spectrum is characterized by a strong reddening. The CO2 band at 4260 nm and the Fresnel ice peak around 3100 nm are evident only on Hyperion, Phoebe and Iapetus. The phase curves at 550 and at 2232 nm are reported for all the available observations in the 0??-144?? range; Rhea shows an opposition surge at visible wavelengths in the 0.5??-1.17?? interval. The improvement on the retrieval of the full-disk reflectance spectra can be appreciated by a direct comparison with ground-based telescopic data available

  5. Detection of water vapour absorption around 363nm in measured atmospheric absorption spectra and its effect on DOAS evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Johannes; Polyansky, Oleg. L.; Kyuberis, Alexandra A.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Lodi, Lorenzo; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour is known to absorb light from the microwave region to the blue part of the visible spectrum at a decreasing magnitude. Ab-initio approaches to model individual absorption lines of the gaseous water molecule predict absorption lines until its dissociation limit at 243 nm. We present first evidence of water vapour absorption at 363 nm from field measurements based on the POKAZATEL absorption line list by Polyansky et al. (2016) using data from Multi-Axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and Longpath (LP)-DOAS measurements. The predicted absorptions contribute significantly to the observed optical depths with up to 2 × 10-3. Their magnitude correlates well (R2 = 0.89) to simultaneously measured well-established water vapour absorptions in the blue spectral range from 452-499 nm, but is underestimated by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 in the ab-initio model. At a spectral resolution of 0.5nm this leads to a maximum absorption cross-section value of 5.4 × 10-27 cm2/molec at 362.3nm. The results are independent of the employed cross-section data to compensate for the overlayed absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. The newly found absorption can have a significant impact on the spectral retrieval of absorbing trace-gas species in the spectral range around 363 nm. Its effect on the spectral analysis of O4, HONO and OClO are discussed.

  6. Power scaling of mini-bar-based high-power 780-980nm pump modules at Spectra-Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Daming; Cutillas, Serge; Jin, Xu; Park, Sang-Ki; Johnson, Kelly; Li, Hanxuan; Truchan, Tom; Wolak, Ed; Towe, Terry; Chyr, Irving; Miller, Robert; Meissner, Arne; Lenarduzzi, Dino; Bullock, Robert; Mott, Jeff; Harrison, James

    2009-02-01

    Continued advances in high power diode laser technology enable new applications and enhance existing ones. Recently, mini-bar based modules have been demonstrated which combine the advantages of independent emitter failures previously shown in single-stripe architectures with the improved brightness retention enabled by multi-stripe architectures. In this work we highlight advances in a family of compact, environmentally rugged mini-bar based fiber coupled Orion modules. Advances in PCE (power conversion efficiency) and reliable operating power from a 9xx nm wavelength unit are shown from such modules. Additionally, highly reliable fiber coupled operation and performance data is demonstrated in other wavelengths in the 780 - 980 nm range. Data demonstrating the scaling this technology to 25W and higher power levels will be given.

  7. The optimum measurement precision evaluation for blood components using near-infrared spectra on 1000-2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyang; Sun, Di; Han, Tongshuai; Guo, Chao; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    In the non-invasive blood components measurement using near infrared spectroscopy, the useful signals caused by the concentration variation in the interested components, such as glucose, hemoglobin, albumin etc., are relative weak. Then the signals may be greatly disturbed by a lot of noises in various ways. We improved the signals by using the optimum path-length for the used wavelength to get a maximum variation of transmitted light intensity when the concentration of a component varies. And after the path-length optimization for every wavelength in 1000-2500 nm, we present the detection limits for the components, including glucose, hemoglobin and albumin, when measuring them in a tissue phantom. The evaluated detection limits could be the best reachable precision level since it assumed the measurement uses a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) signal and the optimum path-length. From the results, available wavelengths in 1000-2500 nm for the three component measurements can be screened by comparing their detection limit values with their measurement limit requirements. For other blood components measurement, the evaluation their detection limits could also be designed using the method proposed in this paper. Moreover, we use an equation to estimate the absorbance at the optimum path-length for every wavelength in 1000-2500 nm caused by the three components. It could be an easy way to realize the evaluation because adjusting the sample cell's size to the precise path-length value for every wavelength is not necessary. This equation could also be referred to other blood components measurement using the optimum path-length for every used wavelength.

  8. Correlated Two-Electron Momentum Spectra for Strong-Field Nonsequential Double Ionization of He at 800 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Jesus, V. L. B. de

    2007-12-31

    We report on a kinematically complete experiment on nonsequential double ionization of He by 25 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 1.5 PW/cm{sup 2}. The suppression of the recollision-induced excitation at this high intensity allows us to address in a clean way direct (e,2e) ionization by the recolliding electron. In contrast with earlier experimental results, but in agreement with various theoretical predictions, the two-electron momentum distributions along the laser polarization axis exhibit a pronounced V-shaped structure, which can be explained by the role of Coulomb repulsion and typical (e,2e) kinematics.

  9. High-power diode lasers at 1178  nm with high beam quality and narrow spectra.

    PubMed

    Paschke, K; Bugge, F; Blume, G; Feise, D; Erbert, G

    2015-01-01

    High-power distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers (DBR-TPLs) at 1180 nm were developed based on highly strained InGaAs quantum wells. The lasers emit a nearly diffraction-limited beam with more than two watts with a narrow spectral width. These features are believed to make this type of diode laser a key component for the manufacturing of miniaturized laser modules in the yellow and orange spectral range by second-harmonic generation to cover a spectral region currently not accessible with direct emitting diode lasers. Future applications might be the laser-cooling of sodium, high-resolution glucose-content measurements, as well as spectroscopy on rare earth elements.

  10. Properties of jet engine combustion particles during the PartEmis experiment: Particle size spectra (d > 15 nm) and volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyeki, S.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Hitzenberger, R.; Petzold, A.; Wilson, C. W.

    2004-09-01

    Size distributions (d > 15 nm) and volatile properties of combustion particles were measured during test-rig experiments on a jet engine, consisting of a combustor and three simulated turbine stages (HES). The combustor was operated to simulate legacy (inlet temperature 300°C) and contemporary (500°C) cruise conditions, using kerosene with three different fuel sulfur contents (FSC; 50, 400 and 1300 μg g-1). Measurements found that contemporary cruise conditions resulted in lower number emission indices (EIN15) and higher geometric mean particle diameter (dG) than for legacy conditions. Increasing FSC resulted in an overall increase in EIN15 and decrease in dG. The HES stages or fuel additive (APA101) had little influence on EIN15 or dG, however, this is uncertain due to the measurement variability. EIN15 for non-volatile particles was largely independent of all examined conditions.

  11. Sounding Rocket Observations of Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra Between 0.5 and 2.5 nm Using a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Seth; Didkovsky, Leonid; Woods, Thomas; Jones, Andrew; Moore, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Spectrally resolved measurements of individual solar active regions (ARs) in the soft X-ray (SXR) range are important for studying dynamic processes in the solar corona and their associated effects on the Earth's upper atmosphere. They are also a means of evaluating atomic data and elemental abundances used in physics-based solar spectral models. However, very few such measurements are available. We present spectral measurements of two individual ARs in the 0.5 to 2.5 nm range obtained on the NASA 36.290 sounding rocket flight of 21 October 2013 (at about 18:30 UT) using the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a channel of the Extreme Ultaviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) payload designed for underflight calibrations of the orbital EVE on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The EVE rocket instrument is a duplicate of the EVE on SDO, except the SAM channel on the rocket version was modified in 2012 to include a freestanding transmission grating to provide spectrally resolved images of the solar disk with the best signal to noise ratio for the brightest features, such as ARs. Calibrations of the EVE sounding rocket instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (NIST/SURF) have provided a measurement of the SAM absolute spectral response function and a mapping of wavelength separation in the grating diffraction pattern. We discuss techniques (incorporating the NIST/SURF data) for determining SXR spectra from the dispersed AR images as well as the resulting spectra for NOAA ARs 11877 and 11875 observed on the 2013 rocket flight. In comparisons with physics-based spectral models using the CHIANTI v8 atomic database we find that both AR spectra are in good agreement with isothermal spectra (4 MK), as well as spectra based on an AR differential emission measure (DEM) included with the CHIANTI distribution, with the exception of the relative intensities of strong Fe xvii lines associated with 2p6-2p53{s} and 2p6-2p

  12. HST Multicolor (255-1042 nm) Photometry of Saturn's Main Rings. 1; Radial Profiles, Phase and Opening Angle Variations, and Regional Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; French, Richard G.; Dones, Luke; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The main rings of Saturn were observed with the Planetary Camera of the WFPC2 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) from September 1996 to August 2000 as the'ring opening angle to Earth and Sun increased from 4 deg to 24 deg, with a spread of phase angles between 0.3 deg and 6 deg at each opening angle. The rings were routinely observed in the five HST wideband UBVRI filters (F336W, F439W, F555W, F675W, and F814W) and occasionally in the F255W, F785LP, and F1042M filters. The emphasis in this series of papers will be on radial color (implying compositional) variations. In this first paper we describe the analysis technique and calibration procedure, note revisions in a previously published Voyager ring color data analysis, and present new results based on over 100 HST images. In the 300-600 nm spectral range where the rings are red, the 555nm/336nm ratio increases by about 14% as the phase angle increases from 0.3 deg to 6 deg. This effect, never reported previously for the rings, is significantly larger than the phase reddening which characterizes other icy objects, primarily because of the redness of the rings. However, there is no discernible tendency for color to vary with ring opening angle at a given phase angle, and there is no phase variation of color where the spectrum is flat. We infer from this combination of facts that multiple intraparticle scattering, either in a regolith or between facets of an unusually rough surface, is important in these geometries, but that multiple interparticle scattering in a vertically extended layer is not. Voyager color ratios at a phase angle of 14 deg are compatible with this trend, but calibration uncertainties prevent their use in quantitative modeling. Overall ring-average spectra are compatible with those of earlier work within calibration uncertainties, but ring spectra vary noticeably with region. We refine and subdivide the regions previously defined by others. The variation seen between radial profiles of

  13. Field test of a new instrument to measure UV/Vis (300-700 nm) ambient aerosol extinction spectra in Colorado during DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R.; Scheuer, E. M.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Troop, D.; Winstead, E.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    An optical instrument has been developed to investigate aerosol extinction spectra in the ambient atmosphere. Based on a White-type cell design and using a differential optical approach, aerosol extinction spectra over the 300-700 nm ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) wavelength range are obtained. Laboratory tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) in March 2014 showed good agreement with Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS PMex, Aerodyne Research) extinction measurements (at 450, 530, and 630 nm) for a variety of aerosols, e.g., scatterers such as polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate; absorbers such as dust (including pigmented minerals), smoke (generated in a miniCAST burning propane) and laboratory smoke analogs (e.g., fullerene soot and aquadag). The instrument was field tested in Colorado in July and August 2014 aboard the NASA mobile laboratory at various ground sites during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. A description of the instrument, results from the laboratory tests, and summer field data will be presented. The instrument provides a new tool for probing in situ aerosol optical properties that may help inform remote sensing approaches well into the UV range.

  14. Mapping iron oxides and the color of Australian soil using visible-near-infrared reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscarra Rossel, R. A.; Bui, E. N.; de Caritat, P.; McKenzie, N. J.

    2010-12-01

    Iron (Fe) oxide mineralogy in most Australian soils is poorly characterized, even though Fe oxides play an important role in soil function. Fe oxides reflect the conditions of pH, redox potential, moisture, and temperature in the soil environment. The strong pigmenting effect of Fe oxides gives most soils their color, which is largely a reflection of the soil's Fe mineralogy. Visible-near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy can be used to identify and measure the abundance of certain Fe oxides in soil, and the visible range can be used to derive tristimuli soil color information. The aims of this paper are (1) to measure the abundance of hematite and goethite in Australian soils from their vis-NIR spectra, (2) to compare these results to measurements of soil color, and (3) to describe the spatial variability of hematite, goethite, and soil color and map their distribution across Australia. We measured the spectra of 4606 surface soil samples from across Australia using a vis-NIR spectrometer with a wavelength range of 350-2500 nm. We determined the Fe oxide abundance for each sample using the diagnostic absorption features of hematite (near 880 nm) and goethite (near 920 nm) and derived a normalized iron oxide difference index (NIODI) to better discriminate between them. The NIODI was generalized across Australia with its spatial uncertainty using sequential indicator simulation, which resulted in a map of the probability of the occurrence of hematite and goethite. We also derived soil RGB color from the spectra and mapped its distribution and uncertainty across the country using sequential Gaussian simulations. The simulated RGB color values were made into a composite true color image and were also converted to Munsell hue, value, and chroma. These color maps were compared to the map of the NIODI, and both were used to interpret our results. The work presented here was validated by randomly splitting the data into training and test data sets, as well as by comparing

  15. Quantitative spectroscopic and theoretical study of the optical absorption spectra of H2O, HOD, and D2O in the 125-145 nm region.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bing-Ming; Chung, Chao-Yu; Bahou, Mohammed; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lee, L C; van Harrevelt, Rob; van Hemert, Marc C

    2004-01-01

    The room temperature absorption spectra of water and its isotopomers D2O and HOD have been determined in absolute cross section units in the 125 to 145 nm wavelength region using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results for these B band spectra are compared with results from quantum mechanical calculations using accurate diabatic ab initio potentials. A Monte Carlo sampling over the initial rotational states of the molecules is applied in order to calculate the cross sections at a temperature of 300 K. The overall rotation of the water molecule is treated exactly. Both for the experimental and for the theoretical spectrum an analysis is made in terms of a component attributed to rapid direct dissociation processes and a component attributed to longer-lived resonances. The agreement between the results from experiment and theory is excellent for H2O and D2O. In the case of HOD in the results of theory two more resonances are found at low energy. It is demonstrated that the width of the resonances of 0.04 eV is the result of overlapping and somewhat narrower resonances in the spectra of molecules differing in rotational ground state.

  16. Absorption spectra and nonlinear transmission (at λ = 2940 nm) of a diffusion-doped Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Bufetova, G A; Gulyamova, E S; Il'ichev, N N; Pashinin, P P; Shapkin, P V; Nasibov, A S

    2015-06-30

    Transmission spectra of a ZnSe sample diffusion-doped with Fe{sup 2+} ions have been measured in the wavelength range 500 – 7000 nm. A broad absorption band in the range 500 – 1500 nm has been observed in both doped and undoped regions of the sample. This band is possibly due to deviations from stoichiometry in the course of diffusion doping. The transmission of the Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe sample at a wavelength of 2940 nm has been measured at various dopant concentrations and high peak pulse intensities (up to 8 MW cm{sup -2}). The samples have been shown to be incompletely bleached: during a laser pulse, the transmission first increases, reaches a maximum, and then falls off. Our results suggest that the incomplete bleaching cannot be accounted for by excited-state absorption. The incomplete bleaching (as well as the transmission maximum) is due to the heating of the sample, which leads to a reduction in upper level lifetime and, accordingly, to an increase in absorption saturation intensity. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  17. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: L spectra of zinc ions in the wavelength region 0.65-1.18 nm observed in a plasma heated by a Nd laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, J.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Khakhalin, S. Ya; Khabibulaev, B. K.; Érmatov, Sh A.

    1993-12-01

    A study has been made of the x-ray emission spectra of zinc ions (λ ~0.65-1.18 nm) excited in a plasma produced by the beam from a Nd laser. The wavelengths were measured within ±0.3 pm. The observed spectra have been identified. Detailed calculations have made it possible to identify, for the first time, some spectra lines due to the radiative decal of autoionizing states of Na-like zinc ions.

  18. [Formation of maxima in the absorption spectrum of carotenoids in the region around 370 nm; consequences for the interpretation of certain action spectra].

    PubMed

    Hager, A

    1970-03-01

    similarity of some action spectra to certain 4-peak, carotenoid spectra is striking. This is true particularly for the action spectrum of the first positive curvature of Avena coleoptile (Fig. 10). On the basis of the described abilities of the carotenoids to form an absorption peak in the wave uv, the appearance of such a maximum in an action spectrum (in the region about 370 nm) can no longer be considered to be sufficient proof for the participation of a flavin as light-acceptor.

  19. Remote sensing of Mercury-contaminated soils through plant reflection spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunagan, S. C.; Gilmore, M. S.; Varekamp, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    The spatial extent of Hg contamination is often poorly known because current methods used to identify and map Hg soil contamination on a regional scale are time consuming and expensive. Here we test whether vegetation growing in Hg-contaminated soils has discernible characteristics in visible/near-infrared (VNIR, 350-2500nm) spectra. Previous work indicates that Hg can cause chemical and structural changes in plant tissue, including chlorophyll substitution and cell damage, which we predict may alter the reflectance spectra of plants in a measurable way. To test this hypothesis, Mustard Spinach plants (n=21) were grown in mercury-spiked soils and in Hg-contaminated soils collected in the field. The plants were grown under controlled laboratory conditions over a full growth cycle. Foliar Hg concentrations (0.174-3.993ppm) of the Mustard Spinach plants were positively correlated with Hg concentrations of soils (0.091-39.35ppm). Leaf Hg increased throughout the growth cycle but decreased in the plants grown in the Hg-spiked and field-contaminated soil at the end of the growth cycle. Leaf Hg uptake appears to occur through both roots and leaves and may vary as a function of bioavailability of Hg in the soils. Reflectance spectra of leaves were measured under artificial light in the laboratory. The potential spectral effects of Hg on the plants were quantified with selected vegetation indices (VIs) including Ratio Vegetation Index (RVI), Red Edge Position (REP) and Amplitude (REA) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and compared to foliar Hg concentrations. Correlations between VIs and foliar Hg concentrations are not statistically significant. However, RVI and REP values of plants grown in Hg-spiked and in field-contaminated soils are lower relative to those from the control plants during the early and middle portions of the growth cycle and decrease more rapidly than those from control plants at the end of the growth cycle. These lower RVI and REP values

  20. Magnetic hysteresis properties, Mössbauer spectra and structural data of spherical 250 nm particles of solid solutions Fe3O4- γ- Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidbauer, E.; Keller, M.

    2006-02-01

    Magnetic hysteresis, 57Fe Mössbauer and X-ray data are presented for spherical 250 nm particles of solid solutions in the spinel system Fe3O4- γ- Fe2O3 ( Fe3-u□uO4, 0⩽u⩽1/3 ( □=cation vacancy)). For dispersed particles, the composition of u˜0.24 exhibits maxima of coercive force Hc˜25 kA/m, relative saturation remanence σrs/σs˜0.3, switching field distribution HSFD˜100 kA/m and of anhysteretic remanence susceptibility at room temperature. The experimental results point to single domain particles with non-homogeneous magnetization mode or to a magnetization mode intermediate between single domain and two domain particles. The maxima are probably a consequence of the superposed action of (i) Fe—single ion anisotropy and (ii) microstresses. Mössbauer spectra were used to analyse the cation distribution on A- and B-sites of the spinel lattice. The experimental data were found to disagree with the cation distribution according to a formula used in the literature for Mössbauer analysis. From X-ray diffractograms, lattice parameters a0 and intensity of superstructure reflections, due to ordering of □ in the spinel lattice, were determined as a function of the □ concentration u. The reflections are in agreement with a tetragonal cell with c0/a0=3 which has been frequently observed for γ- Fe2O3 ( u={1}/{3}) in the literature.

  1. NIR absorbance characteristics of deoxynivalenol and of sound and Fusarium-damaged wheat kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The near infrared (NIR) absorption spectra of deoxynivalenol (DON) and single wheat kernels with or without DON were examined. The NIR absorption spectra of 0.5-2000 ppm of DON in acetonitrile were recorded in the 350-2500 nm range. Second derivative processing of the NIR spectra and spectral subtra...

  2. A table of semiempirical gf values. Part 1: Wavelengths: 5.2682 nm to 272.3380 nm. [to calculate line-blanketed model atmospheres for solar and stellar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurucz, R. L.; Peytremann, E.

    1975-01-01

    The gf values for 265,587 atomic lines selected from the line data used to calculate line-blanketed model atmospheres are tabulated. These data are especially useful for line identification and spectral synthesis in solar and stellar spectra. The gf values are calculated semiempirically by using scaled Thomas-Fermi-Dirac radial wavefunctions and eigenvectors found through least-squares fits to observed energy levels. Included in the calculation are the first five or six stages of ionization for sequences up through nickel. Published gf values are included for elements heavier than nickel. The tabulation is restricted to lines with wavelengths less than 10 micrometers.

  3. HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON-IMPACT EMISSION SPECTRA AND VIBRATIONAL EMISSION CROSS SECTIONS FROM 330-1100 nm FOR N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mangina, Rao S.; Ajello, Joseph M.; West, Robert A.; Dziczek, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Electron-impact emission cross sections for N{sub 2} were measured in the wavelength range of 330-1100 nm at 25 eV and 100 eV impact energies. Cross sections of several molecular emission bands of the first positive band system B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} A {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and the second positive band system C {sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} ({nu}'') of N{sub 2}, the first negative band (1NB) system B {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u} {sup +}({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') and Meinel band system A {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu}') {yields} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup +}({nu}'') of N{sub 2} {sup +} ions as well as line emissions of N (N I) and N{sup +} (N II) in the visible-optical-near-IR wavelength range reported in this work were measured for the first time in a single experimental setup at high spectral resolving power ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 10000) under single-collision-scattering geometry and optically thin conditions. Rotational emission lines of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2} {sup +} were observed for strong emission bands at a gas temperature of about 300 K. The absolute cross section of the strongest (0,0) vibrational band at 391.43 nm of 1NB was determined using the standard H{sub {alpha}} emission cross sections of H{sub 2} by electron impact at both 25 eV and 100 eV electron-impact energies, and the cross sections for the remainder of the emissions were determined using (0,0) 1NB value. A comparison of the present emission cross sections with the earlier published data from both electron energy loss and electron-impact-induced fluorescence emission is discussed.

  4. Fluorescence excitation spectra of the b (1)Pi(u), b(') (1)Sigma(u) (+), c(n) (1)Pi(u), and c(n) (') (1)Sigma(u) (+) states of N(2) in the 80-100 nm region.

    PubMed

    Wu, C Y Robert; Fung, Hok-Sum; Chang, Kuang-Yu; Singh, Thounaojam S; Mu, Xiao-Lan; Nee, Jan B; Chiang, Su-Yu; Judge, D L

    2007-08-28

    Fluorescence excitation spectra produced through photoexcitation of N(2) using synchrotron radiation in the spectral region between 80 and 100 nm have been studied. Two broadband detectors were employed to simultaneously monitor fluorescence in the 115-320 nm and 300-700 nm regions, respectively. The peaks in the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence excitation spectra are found to correspond to excitation of absorption transitions from the ground electronic state to the b (1)Pi(u), b(') (1)Sigma(u) (+), c(n) (1)Pi(u) (with n=4-8), c(n) (') (1)Sigma(u) (+) (with n=5-9), and c(4) (')(v('))(1)Sigma(u) (+) (with v(')=0-8) states of N(2). The relative fluorescence production cross sections for the observed peaks are determined. No fluorescence has been produced through excitation of the most dominating absorption features of the b-X transition except for the (1,0), (5,0), (6,0), and (7,0) bands, in excellent agreement with recent lifetime measurements and theoretical calculations. Fluorescence peaks, which correlate with the long vibrational progressions of the c(4) (') (1)Sigma(u) (+) (with v(')=0-8) and the b(') (1)Sigma(u) (+) (with v(') up to 19), have been observed. The present results provide important information for further unraveling of complicated and intriguing interactions among the excited electronic states of N(2). Furthermore, solar photon excitation of N(2) leading to the production of c(4) (')(0) may provide useful data required for evaluating and analyzing dayglow models relevant to the interpretation of c(4) (')(0) in the atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, and Triton.

  5. Inequality spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  6. Spectra ID of recent SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, Peter

    2013-12-01

    P. Challis, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group, report spectra (range 320-860 nm) of various SN obtained during Dec. 24-27 UT by P. Challis, S. Gottilla (MMTO.org), and E. Marin (MMTO.org) with the MMT 6.5-m telescope (+ Blue Channel). Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  7. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Siyuan; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Economou, Demetre J.

    2015-11-01

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  8. Albuquerque, NM, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Albuquerque, NM (35.0N, 106.5W) is situated on the edge of the Rio Grande River and flood plain which cuts across the image. The reddish brown surface of the Albuquerque Basin is a fault depression filled with ancient alluvial fan and lake bed sediments. On the slopes of the Manzano Mountains to the east of Albuquerque, juniper and other timber of the Cibola National Forest can be seen as contrasting dark tones of vegetation.

  9. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    portion is defined by the day/night boundary (known as the terminator).

    These two images illustrate only a small fraction of the information contained in a single LEISA scan, highlighting just one aspect of the power of infrared spectra for atmospheric studies.

  10. TUNABLE DIODE LASER MEASUREMENTS OF NO2 NEAR 670 NM AND 395 NM. (R823933)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two single-mode diode lasers were used to record high-resolution absorption spectra of NO2 (dilute in Ar) near 670.2 and 394.5 nm over a range of temperatures (296 to 774 K) and total pressures (2.4 x 10(-2) to 1 atm). A commercial InGaAsP laser was tuned 1.3 cm(-1) at a repetiti...

  11. Fluorescence Spectra Of Corneal Tissue Under Excimer Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loree, Thomas R.; Johnson, Tamara M.; Birmingham, Brian S.; McCord, Roy C.

    1988-06-01

    The corneas of pigs' eyes were irradiated with ablative levels of 193, 248, and 308 nm and the spectra of the produced light recorded. In all cases there was an appreciable amount of uv light produced in the 300-400 nm band. The 193 nm irradiation exhibited a threshold at 0.5 J/cm2; markedly different spectra were produced below and above that threshold.

  12. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  13. Diffuse optical spectroscopy of breast tissue extended to 1100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Paola; Bassi, Andrea; Comelli, Daniela; Farina, Andrea; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    The feasibility of in vivo measurements in the range of 1000 to 1100 nm and the potential benefits of operation in that wavelength range for diagnostic applications are investigated. To this purpose, an existing system for time-resolved diffuse spectroscopy is modified to enable in vivo studies to be carried out continuously from 600 to 1100 nm. The optical characterization of collagen powder is extended to 1100 nm and an accurate measurement of the absorption properties of lipid is carried out over the entire spectral range. Finally, the first in vivo absorption and scattering spectra of breast tissue are measured from 10 healthy volunteers between 600 and 1100 nm and tissue composition is evaluated in terms of blood parameters and water, lipid, and collagen content using a spectrally constrained global fitting procedure.

  14. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  15. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  16. Orthogonally polarized dual-wavelength Nd:LuVO4 laser at 1086 nm and 1089 nm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y P; Cho, C Y; Huang, Y J; Chen, Y F

    2012-02-27

    A comparison between the fluorescence spectra of the Nd-doped vanadate crystals (Nd:YVO4, Nd:GdVO4, Nd:LuVO4) for the 4F3/2 → 4I11/2 transition is studied. We numerically analyze the condition of gain-to-loss balance via an uncoated intracavity etalon to achieve the dual-wavelength operation. We further experimentally demonstrate the orthogonally polarized dual-wavelength laser with a single Nd:LuVO4 crystal. The simultaneous dual-wavelength Nd:LuVO4 laser at 1085.7 nm in σ polarization and 1088.5 nm in π polarization is realized. At an incident pump power of 12 W, the average output power obtained at 1085.7 nm and 1088.5 nm is 0.4 W and 1.7 W, respectively.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Luhman 16AB X-shooter spectra (Lodieu+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodieu, N.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Rebolo, R.; Bejar, V. J. S.; Pavlenko, Y.; Perez-Garrido, A.

    2015-07-01

    VLT X-shooter optical and near-infrared spectra of each component of the nearest brown dwarf binary system Luhman 16AB are made public. The spectra cover the ~670nm to ~2480nm with a resolution of 11000 in the optical (670-1000nm) and 6200 in the near-infrared (1000-2480nm). Note: We observe a peak and a dip around 2080-2090nm in the spectra of the components of the system not seen in other T dwarfs, as a potential artefact in our X-shooter data. No other strong artefact is present in our data. (2 data files).

  18. Fast Discrimination of Bamboo Species Using VIS/NIR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Z.; Dong, W. Y.; Kouba, A. J.

    2016-11-01

    The potential of visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy to discriminate different bamboo species was investigated. Vis/NIR spectra were collected on three bamboo species, Bashania fargesii, Fargesia qinlingensis, and Phyllostachys glauca, in the wavelength range of 350-2500 nm. The range of 425-2400 nm was chosen for the spectra modeling. Multiplicative signal correction, standard normal variate with detrending, and 1st and 2nd derivatives were used to preprocess the raw spectral data, and the results were compared. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) methods were applied for building discriminant models. The recognition ratio of 30 samples in the validation set was 100% by both SIMCA and PLSDA models. These results indicate that Vis/NIR spectroscopy may provide a fast and nondestructive technique to discriminate different bamboo species in the field.

  19. Quasi-cw 808-nm 300-W laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Kozyrev, A. A.; Kondakova, N. S.; Kondakov, S. A.; Krokhin, O. N.; Mikaelyan, G. T.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Popov, Yu. M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    Samples of 808-nm quasi-cw laser diode arrays (LDAs) with an output power exceeding 300 W, a pulse duration of 200 μs, and a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz are developed and fabricated. The main output parameters of a set of five LDAs, including light – current characteristics, current – voltage characteristics, and emission spectra are measured. Preliminary life tests show that the LDA power remains stable for 108 pulses.

  20. Transmission spectra of sausage-like microresonators.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming-Yong; Shen, Mei-Xia; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2015-10-05

    We experimentally develop a sausage-like microresonator (SLM) by making two microtapers on a single-mode fiber, and study whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) in SLMs with different lengths. The transmission spectra from 1530 nm to 1550 nm of several SLMs are presented and SLMs with different lengths are shown to have different transmission features. The maximal Q factor observed in the SLMs is 3.8 * 10(7). For comparison, the transmission spectrum of a fiber cylinder microresonator is given and the maximal Q factor achieved in the fiber microcylinder resonator is 1.7 * 10(7). The strain tuning of the SLM is also demonstrated.

  1. Tunable four-pass narrow spectral bandwidth amplifier for use at approximately 508 nm.

    PubMed

    Schwettmann, Arne; McGuffey, Chris; Chauhan, Savith; Overstreet, K Richard; Shaffer, James P

    2007-03-10

    We report the implementation of a tunable, narrow-spectral-bandwidth, pulsed, four-pass dye-laser amplifier with strongly reduced amplified spontaneous emission. We present temporal pulse profiles, pulse spectra, and gain measurements of the amplifier output for the case of Coumarin 307 dye as the gain medium, seeded at wavelengths of approximately 508 nm and pumped at 355 nm.

  2. Lily Pad Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the 'Lily Pad' bounce-mark area at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was acquired on the 3rd sol, or martian day, of Opportunity's mission (Jan.26, 2004). The upper left image is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera, showing regions from which spectra were extracted from the 'Lily Pad' area. As noted by the line graph on the right, the green spectra is from the undisturbed surface and the red spectra is from the airbag bounce mark.

  3. Interaction between Nm23 and the tumor suppressor VHL.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hung; Dammai, Vincent; Adryan, Boris; Hsu, Tien

    2015-02-01

    Among the anti-tumor genes (tumor suppressors and metastasis suppressors), the von-Hippel Lindau gene and the Nm23 family of genes are among the more intriguing ones. Both are small (long and short forms of VHL are 30 and 19 kD, respectively, and Nm23 is ~17 kD), and both possess diverse molecular and cellular functions. Despite extensive studies, the entire spectra of functions and the molecular function-phenotype correlation of these two proteins have not been completely elucidated. In this report, we present data showing these two proteins interact physically. We also summarize and confirm the previous studies that demonstrated the endocytic function of these two genes and further show that the endocytic function of VHL is mediated through the activity of Nm23. These functional and molecular interactions are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to human.

  4. Absorption spectrum of DNA for wavelengths greater than 300 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.; Griffin, K.P.

    1981-06-01

    Although DNA absorption at wavelengths greater than 300 nm is much weaker than that at shorter wavelengths, this absorption seems to be responsible for much of the biological damage caused by solar radiation of wavelengths less than 320 nm. Accurate measurement of the absorption spectrum of DNA above 300 nm is complicated by turbidity characteristic of concentrated solutions of DNA. We have measured the absorption spectra of DNA from calf thymus, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, salmon testis, and human placenta using procedures which separate optical density due to true absorption from that due to turbidity. Above 300 nm, the relative absorption of DNA increases as a function of guanine-cytosine content, presumably because the absorption of guanine is much greater than the absorption of adenine at these wavelengths. This result suggests that the photophysical processes which follow absorption of a long-wavelength photon may, on the average, differ from those induced by shorter-wavelength photons. It may also explain the lower quantum yield for the killing of cells by wavelengths above 300 nm compared to that by shorter wavelengths.

  5. Sediment mineralogy based on visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrard, R.D.; Vanden Berg, M.D.; ,

    2006-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIS) can be used to measure reflectance spectra (wavelength 350-2500 nm) for sediment cores and samples. A local ground-truth calibration of spectral features to mineral percentages is calculated by measuring reflectance spectra for a suite of samples of known mineralogy. This approach has been tested on powders, core plugs and split cores, and we conclude that it works well on all three, unless pore water is present. Initial VNIS studies have concentrated on determination of relative proportions of carbonate, opal, smectite and illite in equatorial Pacific sediments. Shipboard VNIS-based determination of these four components was demonstrated on Ocean Drilling Program Leg 199. ?? The Geological Society of London 2006.

  6. Unknown Bands Observed in the 266 NM Photolysis of Iodomethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jia-Jen; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Bor-Chen

    2012-06-01

    Unknown bands that were not seen in the nascent emission spectra following the near-UV photolysis of bromomathanes (CHBr3-nCl_n, n= 0, 1, 2 and CH_2Br_2) were observed in the 520-820 nm region of the nascent emission spectra following the 266 nm photolysis of iodomethanes (CHI_3, CH_2I_2, and CH_3I) in a slow flow system at ambient temperature. We have dramatically improved the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of these unknown bands for further data analyses. Pressure dependence and temporal waveforms of the unknown bands were also recorded. The analyses show that these bands have the vibrational intervals of roughly 400 cm-1 and possibly originate from the same upper level with emission to different lower levels. Moreover, the nascent emission spectra of photolyzing the deuterated or 13C-substituted isotopomers (CD_2I_2, CD_3I, and 13CH_2I_2) were also acquired, and the results indicate that the carrier molecule probably does not contain any hydrogen or carbon atoms. Our current progress will be presented. S.-X. Yang, G.-Y. Hou, J.-H. Dai, C-.H. Chang, and B.-C. Chang, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4785 (2010) C.-N. Liu, H.-F. Liao, G.-Y. Hou, S-.X. Yang, and B.-C. Chang, 65 OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, MI10 (2010).

  7. Spectra of Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-22

    with a wave follower during Marsen. J. Gophysical Res. 88, 9844-9849. 11. Hughes, B.A., 1978. The effects on internal waves on surface waves : 2...Spectra of Surface Waves K. Watson March 1989 JSR-88-130 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DTIC SELECTE JUN0 11989 0 JASONE The...Arlington, VA 22209 8503Z 11. TITLE (hlde Secvfty Cof.kaftn) SPECTRA OF SURFACE WAVES (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOfRS) K. Watson 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME

  8. Analysis of Cervical Supernatant Samples Luminescence Using 355 nm Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Stanikunas, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2010-05-01

    The biomarker discovery for accurate detection and diagnosis of cervical carcinoma and its malignant precursors represents one of the current challenges in clinical medicine. Laser induced autofluorescence spectra in cervical smear content were fitted to predict the cervical epithelium diagnosis as a lab off "optical biopsy" method. Liquid PAP supernatant sediment dried on Quartz plate spectroscopy was performed by 355 nm Nd YAG microlaser STA-1 (Standa, Ltd). For comparison a liquid supernatant spectroscopy was formed by laboratory "Perkin Elmer LS 50B spetrometer at 290, 300, 310 nm excitations. Analysis of spectrum was performed by approximation using the multi-peaks program with Lorentz functions for the liquid samples and with Gaussian functions for the dry samples. Ratio of spectral components area to the area under whole experimental curve (SPP) was calculated. The spectral components were compared by averages of SPP using Mann-Whitney U-test in histology groups. Results. Differentiation of Normal and HSIL/CIN2+ cases in whole supernatant could be performed by stationary laboratory lamp spectroscopy at excitation 290 nm and emission >379 nm with accuracy AUC 0,69, Sens 0,72, Spec 0,65. Differentiation Normal versus HSIL/CIN2+ groups in dried enriched supernatant could be performed by 355 nm microlaser excitation at emission 405-424 nm with accuracy (AUC 0,96, Sens 0,91, Spec 1.00). Diagnostic algorithm could be created for all histology groups differentiation under 355 nm excitation. Microlaser induced "optical biopsy "looks promising method for cervical screening at the point of care.

  9. Quantum spectra and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (1) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems. This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential-energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (2) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes -- Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  10. Quantum Spectra and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    1992-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (i) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems--This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential -energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (ii) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes --Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  11. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  12. Sub-180 nm generation with borate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chen; Yoshimura, Masashi; Tsunoda, Jun; Kaneda, Yushi; Imade, Mamoru; Sasaki, Takatomo; Mori, Yusuke

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrated a new scheme for the generation of 179 nm vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) light with an all-solid-state laser system. It was achieved by mixing the deep-ultraviolet (DUV) of 198.8 nm and the infrared (IR) of 1799.9 nm. While CsB3O5 (CBO) did not satisfy the phase-matching at around 180 nm, 179 nm output was generated with LiB3O5 (LBO) for the first time. The phase-matching property of LBO at around 180 nm was also investigated. There was small deviation from theoretical curve in the measurement, which is still considered reasonable.

  13. Experimental research of fluorescence spectra of watercress stressed by lack or excess of watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullo, O. A.; Fedotov, Yu. V.; Belov, M. L.; Gorodnichev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental laboratory investigations of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of watercress were conducted. The fluorescence spectra were excited by a YAG:Nd laser emitting at 532 nm. The laboratory setup was described and fluorescence spectra of watercress in stressed states caused by lack and excess of water were presented. It was established that the influence of stress caused by lack and excess of watering is manifested in changes of fluorescence spectra.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Classification of stellar spectra 644-681nm (Damiani+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, F.; Prisinzano, L.; Micela, G.; Randich, S.; Gilmore, G.; Drew, J. E.; Jeffries, R. D.; Fremat, Y.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Sacco, G. G.; Smiljanic, R.; Jackson, R. J.; de Laverny, P.; Morbidelli, L.; Worley, C. C.; Hourihane, A.; Costado, M. T.; Jofre, P.; Lind, K.; Maiorca, E.

    2014-05-01

    A set of newly-defined spectral indices is presented for all stars in the field of the γ Vel cluster, observed within the Gaia-ESO Survey. All indices are based exclusively on the spectral range 6440-6810 Angstroms, corresponding to the VLT/FLAMES Giraffe setup HR15N. Fundamental stellar parameters can be derived from these indices as explained in the paper. Stars with either high cluster membership probability, or/and SB2 binaries, are flagged. (2 data files).

  15. Spectroscopy of Pluto at six longitudes, 380-930 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lorenzi, Vania; Grundy, Will M.; Licandro, Javier; Binzel, Richard P.

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained spectra of the Pluto-Charon pair (unresolved) in the wavelength range 380-930 nm with resolution ~450 at six roughly equally spaced longitudes. The data were taken in May and June, 2014, with the 4.2-m Isaac Newton Telescope at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands, using the ACAM (auxiliary-port camera) in spectrometer mode, and using two solar analog stars. The new spectra clearly show absorption bands of solid CH4 at 620, 728, and 850-910 nm, which were known from earlier work. The 620-nm CH4 band is intrinsically very weak, and its appearance indicates a long optical pathlength through the ice. This is especially true if it arises from CH4 dissolved in N2 ice. Earlier work (Owen et al. Science 261, 745, 1993) on the near-infrared spectrum of Pluto (1-2.5 µm) has shown that the CH4 bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths because the CH4 occurs as a solute in beta-phase crystalline N2. The optical pathlength through the N2 crystals must be on the order of several cm to produce the N2 band observed at 2.15 µm. The new spectra exhibit a pronounced red slope across the entire wavelength range; the slope is variable with longitude, and differs in a small but significant way from that measured at comparable longitudes by Grundy & Fink (Icarus 124, 329, 1996) in their 15-year study of Pluto’s spectrum (500-1000 nm). The new spectra will provide an independent means for calibrating the color filter bands on the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) (Reuter et al. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129, 2008) on the New Horizons spacecraft, which will encounter the Pluto-Charon system in mid-2015. They will also form the basis of modeling the spectrum of Pluto at different longitudes to help establish the nature of the non-ice component(s) of Pluto’s surface. It is presumed that the non-ice component is the source of the yellow-red coloration of Pluto, which is known to be variable across the surface.

  16. Spectroscopy of Pluto, 380-930 Nm at Six Longitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Lorenzi, V.; Grundy, William; Licandro, J.; Binzel, R. P.

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of the Pluto-Charon pair (unresolved) in the wavelength range 380-930 nm with resolution approx..450 at six roughly equally spaced longitudes. The data were taken in May and June, 2014, with the 4.2-m Isaac Newton Telescope at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands, using the ACAM (auxiliary-port camera) in spectrometer mode, and using two solar analog stars. The new spectra clearly show absorption bands of solid CH4 at 620, 728, and 850-910 nm, which were known from earlier work. The 620-nm CH4 band is intrinsically very weak, and its appearance indicates a long optical path-length through the ice. This is especially true if it arises from CH4 dissolved in N2 ice. Earlier work (Owen et al. Science 261, 745, 1993) on the near-infrared spectrum of Pluto (1-2.5 microns) has shown that the CH4 bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths because the CH4 occurs as a solute in beta-phase crystalline N2. The optical path-length through the N2 crystals must be on the order of several cm to produce the N2 band observed at 2.15 microns. The new spectra exhibit a pronounced red slope across the entire wavelength range; the slope is variable with longitude, and differs in a small but significant way from that measured at comparable longitudes by Grundy & Fink (Icarus 124, 329, 1996) in their 15-year study of Pluto's spectrum (500-1000 nm). The new spectra will provide an independent means for calibrating the color filter bands on the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) (Reuter et al. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129, 2008) on the New Horizons spacecraft, which will encounter the Pluto-Charon system in mid-2015. They will also form the basis of modeling the spectrum of Pluto at different longitudes to help establish the nature of the non-ice component(s) of Pluto's surface. It is presumed that the non-ice component is the source of the yellow-red coloration of Pluto, which is known to be variable across the surface.

  17. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  18. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  19. High power room temperature 1014.8 nm Yb fiber amplifier and frequency quadrupling to 253.7 nm for laser cooling of mercury atoms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinmeng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Hongli; Liu, Kangkang; Xu, Zhen; Feng, Yan

    2013-12-16

    An 8 W continuous wave linearly-polarized single-frequency 1014.8 nm fiber amplifier working at room temperature is developed with commercial double-clad single-mode Yb-doped silica fiber. Re-absorption at the laser wavelength and amplified spontaneous emission at longer wavelength are managed by optimizing the amplifier design. The laser has a linewidth of ~24 kHz without noticeable broadening after amplification. Using two resonant cavity frequency doublers, 1.03 W laser at 507.4 nm and 75 mW laser at 253.7 nm are generated with 4 W 1014.8 nm laser. Both absorption and saturated absorption spectra of the (1)S(0) - (3)P(1) transition of atomic mercury are measured with the 253.7 nm laser.

  20. Observation of Quiet Limb in He I 1083.0 nm, H Paschen alpha1281.8 nm and H Brackett gamma 2166.1 nm lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Choudhary, Debi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we shall present the results of an observational study of the quiet solar limb in the near infrared lines using the New IR Array Camera (NAC) and the vertical spectrograph at the focal plane of McMath-Pierce telescope. The NAC, at the exit port of the spectrograph, was used to record the limb spectrum in HeI 1083.0 nm, Hydrogen Paschen 1281.8 nm and Brackett 2165.5 nm wavelength regions. The NAC is a 1024x1024 InSb Alladin III Detector operating over 1-5 micron range with high density sampling at 0.018 arc second/pixel. The all-reflective optical train minimizes number of surfaces and eliminates ghosts leading to low scatter, ghost-free optics. The close-cycle cryogenic provides a stable cooling environment over six hour period with an accuracy of 0.01K leading to low dark current. The low read out noise combined with low scattered light and dark current makes NAC an ideal detector for making high quality infrared spectral observations of solar limb. The limb spectrums were obtained by placing the spectrograph slit perpendicular to the limb at an interval of 10 degrees around the solar disk. We shall report the intensity profile, line-of-sight velocity and line width distribution around the sun derived from the spectra along the slit.

  1. Aqueous glucose measurement using differential absorption-based frequency domain optical coherence tomography at wavelengths of 1310 nm and 1625 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Pauline; Manoj, Murali; Sujatha, N.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Rao, Suresh R.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a combination of differential absorption technique and frequency domain optical coherence tomography for detection of glucose, which is an important analyte in medical diagnosis of diabetes. Differential absorption technique is used to detect glucose selectively in the presence of interfering species especially water and frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) helps to obtain faster acquisition of depth information. Two broadband super-luminescent diode (SLED) sources with centre wavelengths 1586 nm (wavelength range of 1540 to 1640 nm) and 1312 nm (wavelength range of 1240 to 1380 nm) and a spectral width of ≍ 60 nm (FWHM) are used. Preliminary studies on absorption spectroscopy using various concentrations of aqueous glucose solution gave promising results to distinguish the absorption characteristics of glucose at two wavelengths 1310 nm (outside the absorption band of glucose) and 1625 nm (within the absorption band of glucose). In order to mimic the optical properties of biological skin tissue, 2% and 10% of 20% intralipid with various concentrations of glucose (0 to 4000 mg/dL) was prepared and used as sample. Using OCT technique, interference spectra were obtained using an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution of 0.5 nm. Further processing of the interference spectra provided information on reflections from the surfaces of the cuvette containing the aqueous glucose sample. Due to the absorption of glucose in the wavelength range of 1540 nm to 1640 nm, a trend of reduction in the intensity of the back reflected light was observed with increase in the concentration of glucose.

  2. Vibrational Spectra of Hydrolysed Triethoxysilane on Germania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabtawi, Sami; Mallik, Robert

    1996-04-01

    Hydrolysed triethoxysilane (TES) monolayers are introduced onto ultra-thin (of order 1.5 nm) and relatively hydrogern-free sputtered germania films. Two methods are used to dope the germania surface: (i) from TES vapor under a water vapor/nitrogen atmosphere, and (ii) from aqueous acidic hydrolysed TES solution. Vibrational Spectra obtained using these two methods are similar; in both cases Si-H stretching and bending modes are present at approximately 2000 - 2200, and 900 wavenumbers respectively, together with broad Si-O-Si symmetric and asymmetric stretching peaks centered at 700 and 1100 wavenumbers respectively. Only very weak features due to residual CH species are present indicating a large degree of hydrolysis in both cases. All spectra obtained closely resemble those of hydrogenated amorphous silicon monoxide films, confirming that a polysiloxane matrix is present.

  3. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  4. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  5. [Near infrared Raman spectra analysis of rhizoma dioscoreae].

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Shuo; Chen, Rong; Li, Yong-Zeng; Feng, Shang-Yuan; Huang, Zu-Fang; Xie, Bing-Xian

    2008-05-01

    A novel and compact near-infrared (NIR) Raman system was developed using 785 nm diode laser, volume-phase technology holographic system, and NIR intensified charge-coupled device (CCD). The Raman spectra and first derivative spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae were obtained. The Raman spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae showed three strong characteristic peaks at 477, 863 and 936 cm(-1), respectively. The major ingredients are protein, amino acid, starch, polysaccharides and so on, matching the known basic biochemical composition of rhizoma dioscoreae. In the first derivative spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae, the distinguishing characteristic peaks appeared at 467, 484, 870 and 943 cm(-1). Contrasted with rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra in the ranges of 600 to 800 cm(-1) and 1 000 to 1 400 cm(-1), the changes in rhizoma dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra are represented more clearly than the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra. So the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra can be an accurate supplementary analysis method to the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra.

  6. Flat Supercontinuum Generation at 1550 nm in a Dispersion-Flattened Microstructure Fibre Using Picosecond Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-Zhao; Ren, Xiao-Min; Wang, Zi-Nan; Zhang, Xia; Huang, Yong-Qing

    2007-03-01

    The generation of a flat supercontinuum of over 80 nm in the 1550 nm region by injecting 1.6 ps 10 GHz repetition rate optical pulses into an 80-m-long dispersion-flattened microstructure fibre is demonstrated. The fibre has small normal dispersion with a variation smaller than 1.5 (ps.nm-1.km-1) between 1500 and 1650 nm. The generated supercontinuum ranging from 1513 to 1591 nm has the flatness of +/-1.5 dB and it is not so flat in the range of several nanometres around the pump wavelength 1552 nm. Numerical simulation is also used to study the effect of optical loss, fibre parameters and pumping conditions on supercontinuum generation in the dispersion-flattened microstructure fibre, and can be used for further optimization to generate flat broad spectra.

  7. Generation of Thermospheric OI 845 nm Emission by Bowen Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Sharpee, B. D.; Cosby, P. C.; Slanger, T. G.

    2006-12-01

    777 and 845 nm emissions from the 3p-3s multiplets of atomic oxygen are commonly observed at non-auroral latitudes in the terrestrial nightglow. By studying the relative strengths of these emissions we can learn something about the mechanisms that produce them and what they can teach us about the atmosphere. Recently [1] we have used intensity-calibrated sky spectra from the Keck telescopes to investigate the relative strengths of a wide range of O-atom Rydberg lines and have confirmed that electron-ion radiative recombination is a primary source of excitation for both the triplet and quintet systems. Following the intensity of the 777 and 845 nm lines during the night, we find that for most of the night the quintet 777 nm line is consistently stronger than the triplet 845 nm line, with a nearly constant intensity ratio I(777)/I(845) near 2.3, although both intensities fall rapidly as the night progresses. However, late in the night the 845 nm intensity levels off, while the 777 nm intensity continues to fall, and the I(777)/I(845) ratio plunges by a factor of 5-10. We interpret these observations as indicating that the O-atom quintet states are still being excited by the same mechanism as earlier in the night, i.e. radiative recombination, but some triplet states are also being excited by an additional mechanism. Such a mechanism has been proposed before [2-6] but not previously observed directly in the terrestrial nightglow. The oxygen triplet 3d-2p transition at 102.576 nm is in close coincidence with the solar hydrogen Lyman-β line at 102.572 nm. Radiative transport in the hydrogen geocorona will deliver Lyman-β intensity into the Earth's shadow and will produce triplet O(3d 3D) high in the atmosphere, even prior to direct solar illumination. The result is observable in a radiative cascade sequence 3d-3p(1129 nm) → 3p- 3s(845 nm) → 3s-2p(130 nm). A similar effect is observed in the H-α emission, which is also excited by Lyman-β absorption. This process

  8. On the origins of 718 nm fluorescence from Porphyridium cruentum at 77 K.

    PubMed

    Wang, R T; Graham, J R; Myers, J

    1980-09-05

    Emission spectra and transient behavior of fluorescence in Porphyridium cruentum have been studied in search of the pathway of excitation energy from the phycobilisome to Photosystem I (PS I) of photosynthesis. For activating light at 436 nm, absorbed almost entirely by chlorophyll, fluorescence is dominated by the 718 nm band generally attributed to chlorophyll of PS I. Activating light at 550 nm, absorbed mostly by the phycobilisome, gives rise to the distinctive fluorescence band of PS II chlorophyll at 696 nm but also gives a large component at 718 nm. Analysis depends critically upon the source of emission at 718 nm under 550 nm activation: does it arise from PS I or PS IIC0 Ley and Butler (Ley, A.C. and Butler, W.L. (1976) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 73, 3956-3960) have proposed that the 718 nm arises mostly from PS I, to which it is transferred by spillover from PS II. We suggest a different proposition: that under 550 nm activation most of the 718 emission arises from PS II. Analysis shows that this proposition provides an alternative explanation. Using the small change in fluorescence yield observed under 436 nm activation as a monitor of excitation in PS I, we provide evidence that under 550 activation most of the 718 nm fluorescence arises from PS II.

  9. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  10. Simultaneous three-wavelength continuous wave laser at 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm in Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Zhao, Lianshui; Zhai, Pei; Xia, Jing; Fu, Xihong; Li, Shutao

    2013-01-01

    A continuous-wave (cw) diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG laser that generates simultaneous laser at the wavelengths 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm is demonstrated. The optimum oscillation condition for the simultaneous three-wavelength operation has been derived. Using the separation of the three output couplers, we obtained the maximum output powers of 0.24 W at 946 nm, 1.07 W at 1319 nm and 1.88 W at 1064 nm at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W. A total output power of 3.19 W for the three-wavelength was achieved at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W with optical conversion efficiency of 28.5%.

  11. Absolute fluorescence measurements > 1000 nm: setup design, calibration and standards (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resch-Genger, Ute; Würth, Christian; Pauli, Jutta; Hatami, Soheil; Kaiser, Martin

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in optical reporters like semiconductor quantum dots and upconversion nanophosphors with emission < 1000 nm for bioanalysis, medical diagnostics, and safety barcodes and hence, in reliable fluorescence measurements in this wavelength region, e.g., for the comparison of material performance and the rational design of new nanomaterials with improved properties [1-4]. The performance of fluorescence measurements < 800 nm and especially < 1000 nm is currently hampered by the lack of suitable methods and standards for the simple determination of the wavelength-dependent spectral responsivity of fluorescence measuring systems and the control of measured emission spectra and intensities [3-5]. This is of special relevance for nanocrystalline emitters like quantum dots and rods as well as for upconversion nanocrystals, where surface states and the accessibility of emissive states by quenchers largely control accomplishable quantum yields and hence, signal sizes and detection sensitivities from the reporter side. Here, we present the design of an integrating sphere setup for the absolute measurement of emission spectra and quantum yields in the wavelength region of 650 to 1600 nm and its calibration as well as examples for potential fluorescence standards from different reporter classes for the control of the reliability of such measurements [5]. This includes new spectral fluorescence standards for the wavelength region of 650 nm to 1000 nm as well as a set of quantum yield standards covering the wavelength region from 400 nm to 1000 nm.

  12. SPECTRA. September 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Transportation Services program with the Dragon capsule. (Credit: SpaceX /Chris Thompson) S p a c e c r a f t e n g in e e r in g spectra NRL...secondary payloads on board a Space Exploration Technologies ( SpaceX ), Inc., Falcon 9 launch vehicle. NRL’s nanosatellites are part of the CubeSat...Maryland. The primary payload launched aboard the SpaceX Falcon 9 was the Dragon capsule. Developed by SpaceX and sponsored by NASA’s Commercial Orbital

  13. Determinations of Photon Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    COVERED O14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 115. PAGE COUNT THESIS/ftFROW*W FROM TO 1989 1 54 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION A ?RQVk;U kOR 3UB LIC RELEASE...IAW AFR 190- 1 ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, 1st Lt, USAF Executive Officer, Civilian Institution ProQrams 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on...spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with

  14. Detection of homemade explosives using Raman excitation at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Eric G.; Dentinger, Claire; Robotham, Claude

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for obtaining molecular structure information of a sample. While Raman spectroscopy is a common laboratory based analytical tool, miniaturization of opto-electronic components has allowed handheld Raman analyzers to become commercially available. These handheld systems are utilized by Military and Bomb squad operators tasked with rapidly identifying explosives in the field, sometimes in clandestine laboratories. However, one limitation of many handheld Raman detection systems is strong interference caused by fluorescence of the sample or underlying surface which obscures the characteristic Raman signature of the target analyte. Homemade explosives (HMEs) are produced in clandestine laboratories, and the products under these conditions are typically contaminated with degradation products, contaminants, and unreacted precursors. These contaminations often will have strong fluorescence. In this work, Raman spectra of both commercial explosives and HMEs were collected using a handheld Raman spectrometer with a 1064 nm excitation laser. While Raman scattering generated by a 1064 nm laser is inherently less efficient than excitation at shorter wavelengths, high quality spectra were easily obtained due to significantly reduced fluorescence of HMEs.

  15. Comprehensive Analyses of the Spectra of Iron-group Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J; Pickering, Juliet C; Liggins, Florence

    2014-06-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Group at NIST has measured atomic data of vital use to astronomy and other fields using high resolution spectrometers that are found in few other places in the world. These now include the 2-m Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer covering the region 285 nm to 5500 nm, the FT700 vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) FT spectrometer covering the region 143 nm to 900 nm, and a 10.7-m normal incidence spectrograph (NIVS) covering 30 nm to 500 nm. Recent work focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths and energy levels of iron-group elements to provide extensive data for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. Our comprehensive linelist for Fe II from 90 nm to 5500 nm contains over 13 600 lines with order of magnitude improvements in the wavelengths compared to previous work [Nave & Johansson, ApJSS 204, 1(2013)]. The spectra were observed in high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) discharges using FT spectrometers and our NIVS spectrograph. A similar analysis of Cr II contains over 5300 lines and extends the knowledge of this spectrum to the previously unobserved region between 731 nm at 5500 nm [Sansonetti, Nave, Reader & Kerber, ApJSS 202, 15 (2012); Sansonetti & Nave, ApJSS (in prep.)]. Our analysis of the Co III spectrum contains 750 lines observed in Penning discharge lamps and an additional 900 lines compiled from previous work, including Ritz wavelengths, optimized energy levels, and calculated log(gf) values [Smillie, Pickering, Nave & Smith, ApJSS (in prep.)]. NIST and ICL are currently collaborating to complete the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters for all singly-ionized iron-group elements of astrophysical interest, covering the wavelength range 80 nm to 5500 nm. This project uses archival data from FT spectrometers at NIST, ICL and Kitt Peak National Observatory, with additional spectra of HCL and Penning discharge sources taken using our FT and

  16. Spectral characteristics of caries-related autofluorescence spectra and their use for diagnosis of caries stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sung-Ae; Jung, Kyeong-Hoon; Ko, Ching-Chang; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify factors useful for diagnosis of the caries stage from laser-induced autofluorescence (AF) spectra. Affected teeth were accurately staged and allocated to four groups: sound, stage II, stage III, or stage IV. A 405-nm laser was used to produce AF spectra. The spectrum factors analyzed were spectrum slope at 550 to 600 nm, spectral area from 500 and 590 nm, and intensity ratio of peaks 625 and 667 nm (625/667 nm). DIAGNOdent was used as control measurement. AF spectra of sound teeth had a peak near 500 nm followed by a smooth decline to 800 nm. As caries progressed, some specimens in stages II to IV showed one or two peak(s) near 625 and 667 nm. Slopes at 550 to 600 nm and areas under the curve at 500 to 590 nm were significantly different (p<0.001) for each stage. Two-peak ratios were also significantly different (p<0.001) except for stage III and stage IV. DIAGNOdent readings for sound and stage II and stage III and IV were not significantly different. Among the studied factors, the spectrum slope at 550 to 600 nm and area under curve at 500 to 590 nm could be useful treatment decision-making tools for carious lesions.

  17. Application of normalized spectra in resolving a challenging Orphenadrine and Paracetamol binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia, Ali M.; Abd El-Rahman, Mohamed K.

    2015-03-01

    Normalized spectra have a great power in resolving spectral overlap of challenging Orphenadrine (ORP) and Paracetamol (PAR) binary mixture, four smart techniques utilizing the normalized spectra were used in this work, namely, amplitude modulation (AM), simultaneous area ratio subtraction (SARS), simultaneous derivative spectrophotometry (S1DD) and ratio H-point standard addition method (RHPSAM). In AM, peak amplitude at 221.6 nm of the division spectra was measured for both ORP and PAR determination, while in SARS, concentration of ORP was determined using the area under the curve from 215 nm to 222 nm of the regenerated ORP zero order absorption spectra, in S1DD, concentration of ORP was determined using the peak amplitude at 224 nm of the first derivative ratio spectra. PAR concentration was determined directly at 288 nm in the division spectra obtained during the manipulation steps in the previous three methods. The last RHPSAM is a dual wavelength method in which two calibrations were plotted at 216 nm and 226 nm. RH point is the intersection of the two calibration lines, where ORP and PAR concentrations were directly determined from coordinates of RH point. The proposed methods were applied successfully for the determination of ORP and PAR in their dosage form.

  18. Control spectra for Quito

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Roberto; Rivas-Medina, Alicia; Caiza, Pablo; Quizanga, Diego

    2017-03-01

    The Metropolitan District of Quito is located on or very close to segments of reverse blind faults, Puengasí, Ilumbisí-La Bota, Carcelen-El Inca, Bellavista-Catequilla and Tangahuilla, making it one of the most seismically dangerous cities in the world. The city is divided into five areas: south, south-central, central, north-central and north. For each of the urban areas, elastic response spectra are presented in this paper, which are determined by utilizing some of the new models of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) NGA-West2 program. These spectra are calculated considering the maximum magnitude that could be generated by the rupture of each fault segment, and taking into account the soil type that exists at different points of the city according to the Norma Ecuatoriana de la Construcción (2015). Subsequently, the recurrence period of earthquakes of high magnitude in each fault segment is determined from the physical parameters of the fault segments (size of the fault plane and slip rate) and the pattern of recurrence of type Gutenberg-Richter earthquakes with double truncation magnitude (Mmin and Mmax) is used.

  19. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  20. New antireflective coatings for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gu; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Dobson, Norman

    1998-06-01

    New bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) for 193 nm lithography have been recently developed by Brewer Science Inc. Copolymers of benzyl methacrylate (or benzyl acrylate) and hydroxypropyl methacrylate have been synthesized and used as a main component in 193 nm BARCs. The acrylic copolymers have strong absorbance at 193 nm UV light wavelength. The 193 nm BARCs were formulated in safe solvents such as ethyl lactate and formed by spin-on coating process. Thermosetting of the 193 nm BARCs limited their intermixing with photoresists. These 193 nm BARCs had optical density of about 10 micrometers -1, k equals 0.35, and n equals 1.81. Preliminary oxygen plasma etch rates were > 1.5 times DUV resists. Good profiles at small feature sizes (< 0.20 micrometers ) were achieved with tested photoresists.

  1. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  2. Assessment of Transition Element Speciation in Glasses Using a Portable Transmission Ultraviolet-Visible-Near-Infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hunault, Myrtille; Lelong, Gérald; Gauthier, Michel; Gélébart, Frédéric; Ismael, Saindou; Galoisy, Laurence; Bauchau, Fanny; Loisel, Claudine; Calas, Georges

    2016-05-01

    A new low-cost experimental setup based on two compact dispersive optical spectrometers has been developed to measure optical absorption transmission spectra over the 350-2500nm energy range. We demonstrate how near-infrared (NIR) data are essential to identify the coloring species in addition to ultraviolet visible data. After calibration with reference glasses, the use of an original sample stage that maintains the window panel in the vertical position enables the comparison of ancient and modern glasses embedded in a panel from the Sainte-Chapelle of Paris, without any sampling. The spectral resolution enables to observe fine resonances arising in the absorption bands of Cr(3+), and the complementary information obtained in the NIR enables to determine the contribution of Fe(2+), a key indicator of glassmaking conditions.

  3. Pattern transfer processes for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Seiro; Furukawa, Takamitsu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Irie, Shigeo; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    We describe and evaluate three kinds of pattern transfer processes that are suitable for 157-nm lithography. These transfer processes are 1) a hard mask (HM) process using SiO as a HM material, 2) a HM process using an organic bottom anti-reflecting coating (BARC)/SiN structure, and 3) a bi- layer process using a silicon-containing resist and an organic film as the bottom layer. In all of these processes, the underlayer fo the resist acts as an anti-reflecting layer. For the HM processes, we patterned a newly developed fluorine-containing resist using a 157-nm microstepper, and transferred the resist patterns to the hard mask by reactive ion etching (RIE) with minimal critical dimension shift. Using the HM pattern, we then fabricated a 65nm Wsi/poly-Si gate pattern using a high-NA microstepper (NA=0.85). With the bi-layer process, we transferred a 60nm 1:1 lines and spaces pattern of a newly developed silicon-containing resist to a 300nm-thick organic film by RIE. The fabrication of a 65nm 1:1 gate pattern and 60nm 1:1 organic film patten clearly demonstrated that 157-nm lithography is the best candidate for fabricating sub-70nm node devices.

  4. Can DUV take us below 100 nm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finders, Jo; Jorritsma, Louis; Eurlings, Mark; Moerman, Richard; van Greevenbroek, Henk; van Schoot, Jan B.; Flagello, Donis G.; Socha, Robert J.; Stammler, Thomas

    2001-09-01

    Currently, the 130 nm SIA node is being implemented at leading edge semiconductor manufacturing facilities. Previously, this node appeared to be the insertion point for 193 nm lithography. However, it is evident that for the majority of applications 248 nm will be the wavelength of choice. This once again raises the question how far DUV lithography (248 nm) will take us. To investigate this, overlay, imaging and productivity related issues have to be considered. Although these items become more and more linked at low k1-factors (e.g. overlay and imaging), this paper will focus on some of the imaging related topics.

  5. Lithography strategy for 65-nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodovsky, Yan A.; Schenker, Richard E.; Allen, Gary A.; Tejnil, Edita; Hwang, David H.; Lo, Fu-Chang; Singh, Vivek K.; Gleason, Robert E.; Brandenburg, Joseph E.; Bigwood, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    Intel will start high volume manufacturing (HVM) of the 65nm node in 2005. Microprocessor density and performance trends will continue to follow Moore's law and cost-effective patterning solutions capable of supporting it have to be found, demonstrated and developed during 2002-2004. Given the uncertainty regarding the readiness and respective capabilities of 157nm and 193nm lithography to support 65nm technology requirements, Intel is developing both lithographic options and corresponding infrastructure with the intent to use both options in manufacturing. Development and use of dual lithographic options for a given technology node in manufacturing is not a new paradigm for Intel: whenever introduction of a new exposure wavelength presented excessive risk to the manufacturing schedule, Intel developed parallel patterning approaches in time for the manufacturing ramp. Both I-line and 248nm patterning solutions were developed and successfully used in manufacturing of the 350nm node at Intel. Similarly, 248nm and 193nm patterning solutions were fully developed for 130nm node high volume manufacturing.

  6. Articular Cartilage Optical Properties in the Spectral Range 300-850 nm.

    PubMed

    Ebert, D W; Roberts, C; Farrar, S K; Johnston, W M; Litsky, A S; Bertone, A L

    1998-07-01

    Measurements of absolute total reflectance were recorded from weight-bearing (n=9) and nonweight-bearing (n=9) equine articular cartilage specimens from 300 to 850 nm using a spectrophotometer with integrating sphere attachment. Following correction of measured spectra for interfacial reflections and edge losses, Kubelka-Munk theory was applied to estimate absorption and scattering coefficient, one-dimensional light intensity distribution, and light penetration depth. Kubelka-Munk absorption coefficients ranged from ∼7 cm-1 at 330 nm to ∼1 cm-1 at 850 nm. A localized absorption peak was noted at ∼340 nm. Above 510 nm, weight-bearing cartilage demonstrated significantly higher absorption coefficients than nonweight-bearing tissue (paired t-test, p<0.05). Kubelka-Munk scattering coefficients ranged from ∼40 cm-1 at 360 nm to ∼6 cm-1 at 850 nm. No statistical differences in scattering coefficient were noted between weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing tissue. Penetration depths predicted by Kubelka-Munk theory ranged from 0.6 mm at 350 nm to over 3 mm at 850 nm. Stronger absorption in weight-bearing cartilage compared to nonweight-bearing tissue resulted in lower light penetration depths in weight-bearing cartilage at all wavelengths longer than 510 nm. © 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  7. Articular cartilage optical properties in the spectral range 300--850 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Daniel W.; Roberts, Cynthia J.; Farrar, Stuart K.; Johnston, William M.; Litsky, Alan S.; Bertone, Alicia L.

    1998-07-01

    Measurements of absolute total reflectance were recorded from weight-bearing (n equals 9) and nonweight-bearing (n equals 9) equine articular cartilage specimens from 300 to 850 nm using a spectrophotometer with integrating sphere attachment. Following correction of measured spectra for interfacial reflections and edge losses, Kubelka-Munk theory was applied to estimate absorption and scattering coefficient, 1D light intensity distribution, and light penetration depth. Kubelka-Munk absorption coefficients ranged from approximately 7 cm-1 at 330 nm to approximately 1 cm-1 at 850 nm. A localized absorption peak was noted at approximately 340 nm. Above 510 nm, weight-bearing cartilage demonstrated significantly higher absorption coefficients than nonweight-bearing tissue (paired t-test, p < 0.05). Kubelka-Munk scattering coefficients ranged from approximately 40 cm-1 at 360 nm to approximately 6 cm-1 at 850 nm. No statistical differences in scattering coefficient were noted between weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing tissue. Penetration depths predicted by Kubelka-Munk theory ranged from 0.6 mm at 350 nm to over 3 mm at 850 nm. Stronger absorption in weight-bearing cartilage compared to nonweight-bearing tissue resulted in lower light penetration depths in weight-bearing cartilage at all wavelengths longer than 510 nm.

  8. Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Jiang, Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2010-09-13

    We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

  9. Principal-components analysis of fluorescence cross-section spectra from pathogenic and simulant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Harold I.

    2005-10-01

    Principal-components analysis of a new set of highly resolved (<1 nm) fluorescence cross-section spectra excited at 354.7 nm over the 370 646 nm band has been used to demonstrate the potential ability of UV standoff lidars to discriminate among particular biological warfare agents and simulants over short ranges. The remapped spectra produced by this technique from Bacillus globigii (Bg) and Bacillus anthracis (Ba) spores were sufficiently different to allow them to be cleanly separated, and the Ba spectra obtained from Sterne and Ames strain spores were distinguishable. These patterns persisted as the spectral resolution was subsequently degraded in processing from ˜1 to 34 nm. This is to the author's knowledge the first time that resolved fluorescence spectra from biological warfare agents have been speciated or shown to be distinguishably different from those normally used surrogates by optical spectroscopy.

  10. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  11. Photoluminescence spectra of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in solution.

    PubMed

    Ibnaouf, K H; Prasad, Saradh; Hamdan, A; Alsalhi, M; Aldwayyan, A S; Zaman, M B; Masilamani, V

    2014-01-01

    The spectral properties of CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) of 3 nm size have been studied under different organic solvents, concentrations and temperatures. Our results showed that the absorption spectra of CdSe/ZnS in benzene have two humps; one around 420 nm and another at 525 nm, with a steady increase in absorption along UV region, and the absorption spectral profile under a wide range of concentrations did not change. On the other hand, the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdSe/ZnS in benzene showed two bands one around 375 nm and the other around 550 nm. It could be seen that the band at 375 nm is due to the interaction between the shell (ZnS) with the solvent species in high excited state, and the band at 550 nm is due to core alone (CdSe).

  12. Photoelectron Emission Studies in CsBr at 257 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, Juan R.; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Yun; Pianetta, Piero A.; Pease, Fabian W.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    CsBr/Cr photocathodes were found [1,2] to meet the requirements of a multi-electron beam lithography system operating with a light energy of 4.8 eV (257nm). The fact that photoemission was observed with a light energy below the reported 7.3 eV band gap for CsBr was not understood. This paper presents experimental results on the presence of intra-band gap absorption sites (IBAS) in CsBr thin film photo electron emitters, and presents a model based on IBAS to explain the observed photoelectron emission behavior at energies below band gap. A fluorescence band centered at 330 nm with a FWHM of about 0.34 eV was observed in CsBr/Cr samples under 257 nm laser illumination which can be attributed to IBAS and agrees well with previously obtained synchrotron photoelectron spectra[1] from the valence band of CsBr films.

  13. Ruby Emission in the Range 400-800 nm with Excitation by Continuous-Wave CO2 Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, V. M.; Kiselev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal emission spectra of ruby single crystals in the range 400-800 nm were studied experimentally as functions of the intensity at 10.6 μm of exciting pulses ( 0.5 s) from a continuous-wave electrical-discharge CO2 laser. Spectra at excitation intensity 1-20 kW/cm2 were superpositions of the thermal emission continuum of the sapphire crystal lattice in the range 600-800 nm and selective emission spectra of Cr3+ that were observed for the first time for ruby and consisted of R-lines at 695 nm; N-lines at 715 nm; 2 T 1, 4 T 2 → 4 A 2 transition bands at 672 and 643 nm; and 4 T 1, 2 T 2 → 4 A 2 transition bands at 530 and 490 nm that were not observed in the luminescence spectrum. Time dependences of the shapes of selective emission spectra, quenching and shifts of the R 1 line, and the temperature dependence of ruby luminescence spectra were investigated.

  14. Detection of munitions grade g-series nerve agents using Raman excitation at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Eric; Wilcox, Phillip G.; Hoffland, Soren; Pardoe, Ian

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for obtaining molecular structure information of a sample. While Raman spectroscopy is a common laboratory based analytical tool, miniaturization of opto-electronic components has allowed handheld Raman analyzers to become commercially available. These handheld systems are utilized by Military and First Responder operators tasked with rapidly identifying potentially hazardous chemicals in the field. However, one limitation of many handheld Raman detection systems is strong interference caused by fluorescence of the sample or underlying surface which obscures the characteristic Raman signature of the target analyte. Munitions grade chemical warfare agents (CWAs) are produced and stored in large batches and typically have more impurities from the storage container, degradation, or unreacted precursors. In this work, Raman spectra of munitions grade CWAs were collected using a handheld Raman spectrometer with a 1064 nm excitation laser. While Raman scattering generated by a 1064 nm laser is inherently less efficient than excitation at shorter wavelengths, high quality spectra were easily obtained due to significantly reduced fluorescence of the munitions grade CWAs. The spectra of these less pure, but more operationally relevant, munitions grade CWAs were then compared to spectra of CASARM grade CWAs, as well as Raman spectra collected using the more common 785 nm excitation laser.

  15. Surface-Enhanced Hyper-Raman Spectra of Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, Thymine, and Uracil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using picosecond excitation at 1064 nm, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) spectra of the nucleobases adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil with two different types of silver nanoparticles were obtained. Comparing the SEHRS spectra with SERS data from the identical samples excited at 532 nm and with known infrared spectra, the major bands in the spectra are assigned. Due to the different selection rules for the one- and two-photon excited Raman scattering, we observe strong variation in relative signal strengths of many molecular vibrations obtained in SEHRS and SERS spectra. The two-photon excited spectra of the nucleobases are found to be very sensitive with respect to molecule–nanoparticle interactions. Using both the SEHRS and SERS data, a comprehensive vibrational characterization of the interaction of nucleobases with silver nanostructures can be achieved. PMID:28077982

  16. Simultaneous triple 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm operation of a diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Liu, Huilong; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2014-10-01

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave (cw) triple-wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 914, 1084, and 1086 nm. A theoretical analysis has been introduced to determine the threshold conditions for simultaneous triple-wavelength laser. Using a T-shaped cavity, we realized an efficient triple-wavelength operation at 4F3/2→4I9/2 and 4F3/2→4I11/2 transitions for Nd:YVO4 crystal, simultaneously. At an absorbed pump power of 16 W (or 25 W of incident pump power), the maximum output power was 2.3 W, which included 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm three wavelengths, and the optical conversion efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power was 14.4%.

  17. Final report on the torque comparison EURAMET.M.T-S2, measurand torque: 10 N.m, 20 N.m, 40 N.m, 60 N.m, 80 N.m, and 100 N.m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röske, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the EURAMET comparison EURAMET.M.T-S2 was to compare the measuring capabilities up to 100 N.m of a reference-type torque calibration machine of ZAG, Slovenia, with the torque standard machine of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) acting as pilot laboratory. A very stable TT1 torque transducer with well-known properties and two torque measuring bridges was used as travelling standard. According to the technical protocol, torque steps of at least 10 N.m, 20 N.m, 40 N.m, 60 N.m, 80 N.m, and 100 N.m had to be measured both in clockwise and anticlockwise directions. For each of the torque steps and both senses of direction of the torque vector, En values were calculated. The results are in general in good agreement with the claimed measurement uncertainties except for the very first measurement at ZAG with additional support and four plate couplings. It seems to be sufficient in a vertical set-up (vertical torque axis) to use only two flexible couplings and there is no need for a further support between the transducers. The measurements with two couplings fulfill the requirement to the En value and support ZAG's claimed uncertainties of measurement. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Electronic spectra of Fe3+ oxides and oxide hydroxides in the near IR to near UV.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.; Waite, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Optical absorption and diffuse reflectance spectra of several Fe2O3 and FeOOH polymorphs (hematite, maghemite, goethite, lepidocrocite) in the near-IR to near-UV spectral regions (2000-200 nm) are presented. The spectra consist primarily of Fe3+ ligand field and ligand-to-metal charge-transfer transitions.-J.A.Z.

  19. Sub-70-nm pattern fabrication using an alternating phase-shifting mask in 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Shigeo; Kanda, Noriyoshi; Watanabe, Kunio; Suganaga, Toshifumi; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    In Selete, we have developed various resolution-enhancement technologies (RETs) such as the alternating phase shifting mask (alt-PSM), attenuated-PSM (att-PSM), and off-axis illumination (OAI). The alt-PSM, for example, reduces the k1 factor and extends the lithographic performance. A problem concerning the alt-PSM is the difference in the transmitted light intensities of the non-phase-shifting region and the phase-shifting region which can cause critical-dimension (CD) placement error. The transmitted light intensities of the two regions can be made equal by side-etching, in which the quartz (Qz) is undercut by wet-etching at the side of the transmitting region. We sought to optimize the mask structure in terms of a high numerical aperture (NA) through a simulation using two kinds of structures with a 157 nm exposure wavelength. The structures were a single-trench structure and a dual-trench structure, with each trench dug in the transmitting region. To attain a high NA (NA equals 0.85), we tried to optimize the parameters of the Cr film thickness, the amount of the undercut (side-etching), and the phase shift. The evaluated line pattern sizes were 70 nm (line/space size equals 70/70 nm, 70/140 nm, 70/210 nm, and 70/350 nm) and 50 nm (line/space size equals 50/50 nm, 50/100 nm, 50/150 nm, and 50/250 nm) at the wafer. Further, using the optimized mask, we calculated the lithographic margin of a sub 70 nm pattern through a simulation. For the 70 nm line patterns, we found that it will be difficult to fabricate precisely a 70 nm line patten using a mask with a single- trench structure. And we also found that the most suitable conditions for the dual-trench structure mask were a 90 nm undercut, a 100 nm Cr film thickness, and a 180 degree(s) phase shift. The exposure latitude at a depth of focus (DOF) of 0.3 micrometers , simulated using the optimized mask, was 5.3% for the 70/70 nm pattern, 3.6% for 70/140 nm 16.0% for 70/210 nm, and 29.3% for 70/350 nm. As the pitch

  20. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  1. Sequencing BPS spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  2. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; ...

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  3. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of tomato epidermis on gold/ silver sol active substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhenyi; Chen, Na; Hu, Ling; Zhu, Hongfei; Liu, Shupeng; Guo, Qiang

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, tomato epidermis' surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra were measured on gold and silver active substrates and analyzed. Preparing and using gold sol and silver sol in similar particle diameters (about 50-60nm), three comparable Raman spectra were obtained. Silver sol and gold sol can both increase Raman scattering signal of tomato epidermis. Through the Raman spectra, silver sol has greater enhancement ability than gold sol to tomato epidermis.

  5. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Siyuan Donnelly, Vincent M. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Economou, Demetre J. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Ruchhoeft, Paul

    2015-11-09

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  6. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  7. Laboratory simulation of dust spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies of the IR spectra of interstellar dust are reviewed. Studies of the absorption spectra of dense molecular clouds are discussed, including methods to produce interstellar ice analogues, simulations of astronomical spectra, and IR absorption features caused by ices. Comparisons are made between observational and experimental results of interstellar dust studies. Also, the interstellar emission features associated with dusty regions exposed to UV radiation are examined, including bands related to PAHs and PAH-related materials. It is shown that interstellar spectra are more consistant with emission from free PAHs than with emission from particles.

  8. Photosynthetic action spectra and adaptation to spectral light distribution in a benthic cyanobacterial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, B. B.; Cohen, Y.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    We studied adaptation to spectral light distribution in undisturbed benthic communities of cyanobacterial mats growing in hypersaline ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico. Microscale measurements of oxygen photosynthesis and action spectra were performed with microelectrodes; spectral radiance was measured with fiber-optic microprobes. The spatial resolution of all measurements was 0.1 mm, and the spectral resolution was 10 to 15 nm. Light attenuation spectra showed absorption predominantly by chlorophyll a (Chl a) (430 and 670 nm), phycocyanin (620 nm), and carotenoids (440 to 500 nm). Blue light (450 nm) was attenuated 10-fold more strongly than red light (600 nm). The action spectra of the surface film of diatoms accordingly showed activity over the whole spectrum, with maxima for Chl a and carotenoids. The underlying dense Microcoleus population showed almost exclusively activity dependent upon light harvesting by phycobilins at 550 to 660 nm. Maximum activity was at 580 and 650 nm, indicating absorption by phycoerythrin and phycocyanin as well as by allophycocyanin. Very little Chl a-dependent activity could be detected in the cyanobacterial action spectrum, even with additional 600-nm light to excite photosystem II. The depth distribution of photosynthesis showed detectable activity down to a depth of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, where the downwelling radiant flux at 600 nm was reduced to 0.2 to 0.6% of the surface flux.

  9. Gallup, NM, CARE Grant Success Story

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A CARE Grant, Level II award, was made to Gallup, NM to focus on cleaning up the waste stream, reuse and recycling of materials, and reclaiming land for these purposes through outreach, education and organization.

  10. Recent progress in 193-nm antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meador, James D.; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Xu, Gu; Shao, Xie; Dobson, Norman; Claypool, James B.; Nowak, Kelly A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents the chemistries and properties of organic, spin-on, bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) that are designed for 193 nm lithography. All of the BARCs are thermosetting and use dye-attached/incorporated polymers. A first generation product, NEXT, will soon be commercialized. NEXT is built form i-line and deep-UV chemistries with the polymeric constituent being a substitute novolac. This product provide outstanding resolution of 0.16 micrometers L/S with several 193 nm photoresists. Second generation chemical platforms under study include acrylics, polyesters, and polyethers with the 193 nm absorbing chromophore being an aromatic function. The performance of selected BARCs from the four platforms is described, including: optical properties, 193 nm litho, plasma etch rates, Prolith modeling data, spin-bowl and waste line compatibility, and ambient stability.

  11. Isothermal annealing of a 620 nm optical absorption band in Brazilian topaz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isotani, Sadao; Matsuoka, Masao; Albuquerque, Antonio Roberto Pereira Leite

    2013-04-01

    Isothermal decay behaviors, observed at 515, 523, 562, and 693 K, for an optical absorption band at 620 nm in gamma-irradiated Brazilian blue topaz were analyzed using a kinetic model consisting of O- bound small polarons adjacent to recombination centers (electron traps). The kinetic equations obtained on the basis of this model were solved using the method of Runge-Kutta and the fit parameters describing these defects were determined with a grid optimization method. Two activation energies of 0.52±0.08 and 0.88±0.13 eV, corresponding to two different structural configurations of the O- polarons, explained well the isothermal decay curves using first-order kinetics expected from the kinetic model. On the other hand, thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectra measured at various temperatures showed a single band at 400 nm in the temperature range of 373-553 K in which the 620 nm optical absorption band decreased in intensity. Monochromatic TL glow curve data at 400 nm extracted from the TL emission spectra observed were found to be explained reasonably by using the knowledge obtained from the isothermal decay analysis. This suggests that two different structural configurations of O- polarons are responsible for the 620 nm optical absorption band and that the thermal annealing of the polarons causes the 400 nm TL emission band.

  12. Fabrication of sub-10 nm metal nanowire arrays with sub-1 nm critical dimension control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shuang; Lin, Peng; Xia, Qiangfei

    2016-11-01

    Sub-10 nm metal nanowire arrays are important electrodes for building high density emerging ‘beyond CMOS’ devices. We made Pt nanowire arrays with sub-10 nm feature size using nanoimprint lithography on silicon substrates with 100 nm thick thermal oxide. We further studied the critical dimension (CD) evolution in the fabrication procedure and achieved 0.4 nm CD control, providing a viable solution to the imprint lithography CD challenge as specified by the international technology roadmap for semiconductors. Finally, we fabricated Pt/TiO2/Pt memristor crossbar arrays with the 8 nm electrodes, demonstrating great potential in dimension scaling of this emerging device.

  13. Study of two-photon excitation spectra of organic compounds absorbing in the UV region

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V A; Sychev, Andrei A

    2004-12-31

    A method is proposed for recording two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of organic compounds with the help of picosecond pulses from a dye laser tunable in the range from 550 to 640 nm. The TPE spectra are obtained for organic scintillators and drugs: paraterphenyl in liquid and solid phases, stilbene single crystal and Streptocid powder, having a one-photon absorption band in the region from 270 to 350 nm. It is shown that the vibronic structure in the TPE spectra of these compounds is independent of their aggregate state and is an individual characteristic of each of the compounds. (active media)

  14. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  15. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  16. Atomic transition probabilities of Ce I from Fourier transform spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitz, D. E.; Lawler, J. E.; Chisholm, J.; Wood, M. P.; Sobeck, J.; den Hartog, E. A.

    2010-03-01

    We report transition probabilities for 2874 lines of CeI in the wavelength range 360 -- 1500 nm. These are derived from new branching fraction measurements on Fourier transform spectra normalized with recently-reported radiative lifetimes (Den Hartog et al., J. Phys. B 42, 085006 (2009)). We have analyzed the decay branches for 153 upper levels in 14 different spectra recorded under a variety of discharge lamp conditions. Comparison of results with previous less extensive investigations shows good agreement for lines studied in common. Accurate Ce I transition probabilities are needed for applications in astrophysics and in lighting research, particularly for the development of improved metal halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  17. High-speed stimulated Brillouin scattering spectroscopy at 780 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, Itay; Bilenca, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a high-speed stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) spectroscopy system that is able to acquire stimulated Brillouin gain point-spectra in water samples and Intralipid tissue phantoms over 2 GHz within 10 ms and 100 ms, respectively, showing a 10-100 fold increase in acquisition rates over current frequency-domain SBS spectrometers. This improvement was accomplished by integrating an ultra-narrowband hot rubidium-85 vapor notch filter in a simplified frequency-domain SBS spectrometer comprising nearly counter-propagating continuous-wave pump-probe light at 780 nm and conventional single-modulation lock-in detection. The optical notch filter significantly suppressed stray pump light, enabling detection of stimulated Brillouin gain spectra with substantially improved acquisition times at adequate signal-to-noise ratios (˜25 dB in water samples and ˜15 dB in tissue phantoms). These results represent an important step towards the use of SBS spectroscopy for high-speed measurements of Brillouin gain resonances in scattering and non-scattering samples.

  18. Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy of Propargyl Radicals at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Goncher, S.J.; Moore, D.T.; Sveum, N.E.; Neumark, D.M.

    2007-12-21

    The photodissociation of propargyl radical, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}, and its perdeuterated isotopolog was investigated using photofragment translational spectroscopy. Propargyl radicals were produced by 193 nm photolysis of allene entrained in a molecular beam expansion, and then photodissociated at 248 nm. photofragment time-of-flight spectra were measured at a series of laboratory angles using electron impact ionization coupled to a mass spectrometer. Data for ion masses corresponding to C{sub 3}H{sub 2}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sup +}, C{sub 3}{sup +}, and the analogous deuterated species show that both H and H{sub 2} loss occur. The translational energy distributions for these processes have average values = 5.7 and 15.9 kcal/mol, respectively, and are consistent with dissociation on the ground state following internal conversion, with no exit barrier for H loss but a tight transition state for H{sub 2} loss. The translational energy distribution for H atom loss is similar to that in previous work on propargyl in which the H atom, rather than the heavy fragment, was detected. The branching ratio for H loss/H{sub 2} loss was determined to be 97.6/2.4 {+-} 1.2, in good agreement with RRKM results.

  19. 810nm, 980nm, 1470nm and 1950nm diode laser comparison: a preliminary "ex vivo" study on oral soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Sozzi, Michele; Selleri, Stefano; Vescovi, Paolo; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of diode lasers in dentistry has several advantages, mainly consisting on the reduced size, reduced cost and possibility to beam delivering by optical fibers. At the moment the two diode wavelengths normally utilized in the dental field are 810 and 980 nm for soft tissues treatments. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of four different diode wavelengths: 810, 980, 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser for the ablation of soft tissues. Several samples of veal tongue were exposed to the four different wavelengths, at different fluences. The internal temperature of the soft tissues, in the area close to the beam, was monitored with thermocouple during the experiment. The excision quality of the exposed samples have been characterized by means of an optical microscope. Tissue damages and the cut regularity have been evaluated on the base of established criteria. The lowest thermal increase was recorded for 1950 nm laser. Best quality and speed of incision were obtained by the same wavelength. By evaluating epithelial, stromal and vascular damages for all the used wavelengths, the best result, in terms of "tissue respect", have been obtained for 1470 and 1950 nm exposures. From the obtained results 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser showed to be the best performer wavelengths among these used in this "ex vivo" study, probably due to their greatest affinity to water.

  20. Radiation Failures in Intel 14nm Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossev, Dobrin P.; Duncan, Adam R.; Gadlage, Matthew J.; Roach, Austin H.; Kay, Matthew J.; Szabo, Carl; Berger, Tammy J.; York, Darin A.; Williams, Aaron; LaBel, K.; Ingalls, James D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the 14 nm Intel Broadwell 5th generation core series 5005U-i3 and 5200U-i5 was mounted on Dell Inspiron laptops, MSI Cubi and Gigabyte Brix barebones and tested with Windows 8 and CentOS7 at idle. Heavy-ion-induced hard- and catastrophic failures do not appear to be related to the Intel 14nm Tri-Gate FinFET process. They originate from a small (9 m 140 m) area on the 32nm planar PCH die (not the CPU) as initially speculated. The hard failures seem to be due to a SEE but the exact physical mechanism has yet to be identified. Some possibilities include latch-ups, charge ion trapping or implantation, ion channels, or a combination of those (in biased conditions). The mechanism of the catastrophic failures seems related to the presence of electric power (1.05V core voltage). The 1064 nm laser mimics ionization radiation and induces soft- and hard failures as a direct result of electron-hole pair production, not heat. The 14nm FinFET processes continue to look promising for space radiation environments.

  1. Spectral analysis on origination of the bands at 437 nm and 475.5 nm of chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lizhang; Wang, Yongqiang; Zhou, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence has been often used as an intrinsic optical molecular probe to study photosynthesis. In this study, the origin of bands at 437 and 475.5 nm in the chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum for emission at 685 nm in Arabidopsis chloroplasts was investigated using various optical analysis methods. The results revealed that this fluorescence excitation spectrum was related to the absorption characteristics of pigment molecules in PSII complexes. Moreover, the excitation band centred at 475.5 nm had a blue shift, but the excitation band at 437 nm changed relatively less due to induction of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Furthermore, fluorescence emission spectra showed that this blue shift occurred when excitation energy transfer from both chlorophyll b (Chl b) and carotenoids (Cars) to chlorophyll a (Chl a) was blocked. These results demonstrate that the excitation band at 437 nm was mainly contributed by Chl a, while the excitation band at 475.5 nm was mainly contributed by Chl b and Cars. The chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum, therefore, could serve as a useful tool to describe specific characteristics of light absorption and energy transfer between light-harvesting pigments.

  2. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  3. 14nm M1 triple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiao; Ghosh, Pradiptya; Abercrombie, David; LaCour, Pat; Kanodia, Suniti

    2012-03-01

    With 20nm production becoming a reality, research has started to focus on the technology needs for 14nm. The LELE double patterning used in 20nm production will not be able to resolve M1 for 14nm. Main competing enabling technologies for the 14nm M1 are SADP, EUV, and LELELE (referred as LE3 thereafter) triple patterning. SADP has a number of concerns of 1. density, as a layout geometry needs to stay complete as a whole, and can not be broken; 2. the complexity in SADP mask generation and debug feedback to designers; 3. the subtraction nature of the trim mask further complicates OPC and yield. While EUV does not share those concerns, it faces significant challenges on the manufacturing equipment side. Of the SADP concerns, LE3 only shares that of complexity involved in mask generation and intuitive debug feedback mechanism. It does not require a layout geometry to stay as a whole, and it benefits from the affinity to LELE which is being deployed for 20nm production. From a process point of view, this benefit from affinity to LELE is tremendous due to the data and knowledge that have been collected and will be coming from the LELE deployment. In this paper, we first recount the computational complexity of the 3-colorability problem which is an integral part of a LE3 solution. We then describe graph characteristics that can be exploited such that 3-colorability is equivalent under divide-and-conquer. Also outlined are heuristics, which are generally applied in solving computationally intractable problems, for the 3-colorability problem, and the importance in choosing appropriate worst-case exponential runtime algorithms. This paper concludes with a discussion on the new hierarchical problem that faces 3-colorability but not 2-colorability and proposals for non-3-colorability feedback mechanism.

  4. Phonon spectra of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, S.; Vukajlović, F.; Veljković, V.

    1982-10-01

    In this work we used a simple local model pseudopotential which includes screening for the phonon spectra calculations of alkali metals. The results obtained are in very good agreement with experimental data. In some branches of phonon spectra the differences between theoretical and experimental results are within 1-2%, while the maximum error is about 6%. The suggested form of the pseudopotential allows us to describe the phonon spectra of Na, K and Rb with only one, and, at the same time, a unique, parameter. In this case, the maximum disagreements from experiment are 9% for Na, 8% for K and 7% for Rb.

  5. Quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra with principal components analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. E.; Smith, M. O.; Adams, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is presented for quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra as mixtures of particles on microscopic and macroscopic scales using principal components analysis. This technique allows for determination of the endmembers being mixed, their abundance, and the scale of mixing, as well as other physical parameters. Eighteen lunar telescopic reflectance spectra of the Copernicus crater region, from 600 nm to 1800 nm in wavelength, are modeled in terms of five likely endmembers: mare basalt, mature mare soil, anorthosite, mature highland soil, and clinopyroxene. These endmembers were chosen from a similar analysis of 92 lunar soil and rock samples. The models fit the data to within 2 percent rms. It is found that the goodness of fit is marginally better for intimate mixing over macroscopic mixing.

  6. Raman spectra and optical coherent tomography images of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.; Vazquez-Villa, A.

    2011-03-01

    The optical coherence tomography images are useful to see the internal profile and the structure of material samples. In this work, OCT images were recorded in 10 volunteers with different skin tone which were related to Raman spectra. The areas where we obtained OCT images and Raman spectra were a) index finger nail, b) between index finger and middle finger, c) middle finger tip, d) half of middle finger, e) the thumb finger tip and f) between index finger and thumb, areas measured were for the purpose of finding extracellular fluids with contain triglycerides, cholesterol and glucose that are reported in the literature. The excitation wavelength used for this work was 785 nm, a spectrometer of 6 cm-1 resolution. The spectral region used ranges from 300 to 1800 cm-1. We use an OCT with 930 nm of Central Wavelength, 1.6 mm of Image Depth, 6 mm of image width and 6.2 μm of axial resolution.

  7. Comparative study of Nd:KGW lasers pumped at 808 nm and 877 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Ge, Wen-Qi; Zhao, Tian-Zhuo; He, Jian-Guo; Feng, Chen-Yong; Fan, Zhong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The laser performance and thermal analysis of Nd:KGW laser continuously pumped by 808 nm and 877 nm are comparatively investigated. Output power of 670 mW and 1587 mW, with nearly TEM00 mode, are achieved respectively at 808 nm pump and 877 nm pump. Meanwhile, a high-power passively Q-switched Nd:KGW/Cr4+:YAG laser pumped at 877 nm is demonstrated. An average output power of 1495 mW is obtained at pump power of 5.22 W while the laser is operating at repetition of 53.17 kHz. We demonstrate that 877 nm diode laser is a more potential pump source for Nd:KGW lasers.

  8. Reflectance Spectra of Space Debris in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Vannanti, A.; Krag, H.; Erd, C.

    The space debris environment in the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) region is mostly investigated by means of optical surveys. Such surveys revealed a considerable amount of debris in the size range of 10 centimeter to one meter. Some of these debris exhibit particularly high area-to-mass ratios as derived from the evolution of their orbits. In order to understand the nature and eventually the origin of these objects, observations allowing to derive physical characteristics like size, shape and material are required. Information on the shape and the attitude motion of a debris piece may be obtained by photometric light curves. The most promising technique to investigate the surface material properties is reflectance spectroscopy. This paper discusses preliminary results obtained from spectrometric observations of space debris in GEO. The observations were acquired at the 1-meter ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) on Tenerife with a low-resolution spectrograph in the wavelength range of 450-960 nm. The target objects were space debris of different types with brightness as small as magnitude 15. Some simple-shaped, intact "calibration objects" with known surface materials like the MSG-2 satellites were also observed. The spectra show shape variations expected to be caused by the different physical properties of the objects. The determination of the possible materials is still in a preliminary phase. Limitations of the acquisition process of the spectra and the subsequent analysis are discussed. Future steps planned for a better characterization of the debris from the observed data are briefly outlined.

  9. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  10. Synthesis of fluorinated materials for 193-nm immersion lithography and 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Yoshida, T.; Hayamai, T.; Araki, Takayuki; Aoyama, H.; Hagiwara, T.; Itani, Toshiro; Fujii, Kiyoshi

    2005-05-01

    Various fluorinated polymers were synthesized for application in 193-nm immersion lithography with the goal of improving 157-nm photoresist performance. Their fundamental properties were characterized, such as transparency at 193-nm and 157-nm (wavelength) and solubility in water and a standard alkaline developer. High transparency, i.e., absorbance better than 0.3 μm-1 at 193-nm wavelength, was achieved. The dissolution behaviors of them were studied by using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) method. We find that the dissolution rate of Poly(norbornene-2-fluoro-2-hexafluoroalchol) (PNB1FVIP) in 0.065N tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was >200 times (nm/s) faster than that of the copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and norbornene-2-fluoro-2-hexafluoroalchol (TFE/NB1FVIP). A resist based on TFE/NB1FVIP was able to delineate 75 nm dense lines by exposure at 193-nm (wavelength) with an alternating phase shift mask using a 0.75 NA ArF scanner. The dissolution rates of the fluoropolymers in water and a 0.262N and 0.065 TMAH can be controlled by optimizing counter monomers containing hexafluoroisopropanol (HFA) unit, carboxylic acid unit and so on. In addition, we have collect water contact angle data. This data shows that fluoropolymers can be used as resist cover materials for 193-nm immersion lithography.

  11. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of metalorganic molecules diluted in hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideo; Watanabe, Masanobu; Mukai, Seiji; Yajima, Hiroyoshi

    1988-12-01

    Ultraviolet absorption spectra of trimethyl gallium, triethyl gallium, and trimethyl aluminum diluted in hydrogen gas were measured as a function of the wavelength (185-350 nm) and the concentration of the molecules (4.8×10 -6 -1.6×10 -4 mol/liter). Their absorbances changed linearly with the concentration of the molecules, which allowed us to calculate the molar absorption coefficients of the molecules on the basis of the Beer-Lambert law.

  12. New Measurements of Doubly Ionized Iron Group Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Smith, Peter L.; Nave, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report new measurements of doubly ionized iron group element spectra, important in the analysis of B-type (hot) stars whose spectra they dominate. These measurements include Co III and Cr III taken with the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer and measurements of Co III taken with the normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at NIST, below 135 nm. We report new Fe III grating spectra measurements to complement our FT spectra. Work towards transition wavelengths, energy levels and branching ratios (which, combined with lifetimes, produce oscillator strengths) for these ions is underway.

  13. Predicting accurate fluorescent spectra for high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jacob; Heider, Emily C.; Campiglia, Andres; Harper, James K.

    2016-10-01

    The ability of density functional theory (DFT) methods to predict accurate fluorescence spectra for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is explored. Two methods, PBE0 and CAM-B3LYP, are evaluated both in the gas phase and in solution. Spectra for several of the most toxic PAHs are predicted and compared to experiment, including three isomers of C24H14 and a PAH containing heteroatoms. Unusually high-resolution experimental spectra are obtained for comparison by analyzing each PAH at 4.2 K in an n-alkane matrix. All theoretical spectra visually conform to the profiles of the experimental data but are systematically offset by a small amount. Specifically, when solvent is included the PBE0 functional overestimates peaks by 16.1 ± 6.6 nm while CAM-B3LYP underestimates the same transitions by 14.5 ± 7.6 nm. These calculated spectra can be empirically corrected to decrease the uncertainties to 6.5 ± 5.1 and 5.7 ± 5.1 nm for the PBE0 and CAM-B3LYP methods, respectively. A comparison of computed spectra in the gas phase indicates that the inclusion of n-octane shifts peaks by +11 nm on average and this change is roughly equivalent for PBE0 and CAM-B3LYP. An automated approach for comparing spectra is also described that minimizes residuals between a given theoretical spectrum and all available experimental spectra. This approach identifies the correct spectrum in all cases and excludes approximately 80% of the incorrect spectra, demonstrating that an automated search of theoretical libraries of spectra may eventually become feasible.

  14. RESEARCH PAPER: Automated estimation of stellar fundamental parameters from low resolution spectra: the PLS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Luo, A.-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2009-06-01

    PLS (Partial Least Squares regression) is introduced into an automatic estimation of fundamental stellar spectral parameters. It extracts the most correlative spectral component to the parameters (Teff, log g and [Fe/H]), and sets up a linear regression function from spectra to the corresponding parameters. Considering the properties of stellar spectra and the PLS algorithm, we present a piecewise PLS regression method for estimation of stellar parameters, which is composed of one PLS model for Teff, and seven PLS models for log g and [Fe/H] estimation. Its performance is investigated by large experiments on flux calibrated spectra and continuum normalized spectra at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolutions. The results show that the piecewise PLS method is robust for spectra at the medium resolution of 0.23 nm. For low resolution 0.5 nm and 1 nm spectra, it achieves competitive results at higher SNR. Experiments using ELODIE spectra of 0.23 nm resolution illustrate that our piecewise PLS models trained with MILES spectra are efficient for O ~ G stars: for flux calibrated spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.14 dex, and -0.09 dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.44 dex and 0.38 dex, respectively; for continuum normalized spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.12dex, and -0.13dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.49 dex and 0.41 dex, respectively. The PLS method is rapid, easy to use and does not rely as strongly on the tightness of a parameter grid of templates to reach high precision as Artificial Neural Networks or minimum distance methods do.

  15. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  16. Radiation Tolerance of 65nm CMOS Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Krohn, M.; Bentele, B.; Christian, D. C.; ...

    2015-12-11

    We report on the effects of ionizing radiation on 65 nm CMOS transistors held at approximately -20°C during irradiation. The pattern of damage observed after a total dose of 1 Grad is similar to damage reported in room temperature exposures, but we observe less damage than was observed at room temperature.

  17. The 503nm pigment of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kamitakahara, Joyce R.; Polglase, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    The yield of cell protein was one-third less for streptomycin-dependent Escherichia coli B than for the wild-type parent strain when both were grown aerobically on a medium with limiting glucose, but anaerobically the yield of protein was similar for both strains. The transient pigment absorbing at 503nm that is known to be present in E. coli and other organisms was not detectable in streptomycin-dependent mutants nor in a non-dependent (energy-deficient) revertant. When wild-type E. coli B was grown on limiting glucose–salts medium containing 2,4 dinitrophenol, the yield of cell protein was decreased and formation of the 503nm pigment was inhibited. Fumarase, aconitase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were de-repressed in E. coli B cells grown with excess of glucose in a medium containing 2,4-dinitrophenol. In air-oxidized, wild-type E. coli B cells, the 503nm pigment appeared before reduced cytochromes when gluconate was the substrate but failed to appear when succinate was the substrate. The results provide evidence for a role of the 503nm pigment in aerobic energy metabolism, possibly as an electron acceptor from NADPH. PMID:4395501

  18. Interpretation of cathodoluminescence spectra obtained from carbonate gangue minerals and breccias, Right Fork area, central Tennessee zinc district

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, O.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Owen, M.R. . Dept. of Geology); Fuller, E.L. Jr. . Metals and Ceramics Div.)

    1993-03-01

    Spectral patterns (from approximately 350 nm to 750 nm) were obtained for zoned dolomite and unzoned calcite gangue, and dolostone breccia fragments from the Right Fork area in Jackson and Overton Counties, 40 km northeast of the elmwood Mine in the Central Tennessee zinc district. The materials had been analyzed for Fe, Mn, REE, and other trace elements using the synchrotron XRF probe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three distinct zones in dolomite gangue (arbitrarily named zones 4, 5, and 6) could be traced throughout the entire area. The largest number of spectra were obtained for zone 4, which luminesces medium bright red to the eye. The spectra reveal broad peaks in the vicinity of 460 nm and 660 nm; however, spectral deconvolution suggests that the spectra comprise several peaks. The broad peak at 460 nm may consist of overlapping peaks at about 430 nm and 530 nm. Of special interest is the broad peak at 660 nm, which is normally assigned solely to Mn. Shoulders in the range from 700 nm to 725 nm might be due to Fe, which is generally assumed to quench Mn-activated cathodoluminescence. Note that Fe[sup 3+] produces peaks in the vicinity of 550 nm and 710 nm in plagioclase. Intensities determined for zone 4 vary by a factor of 3X and are related to both the Mn concentrations and the Fe/Mn ratios of the individual spots analyzed, even though little, if any, differences in intensity are observed by eye.

  19. Kerr-gated picosecond Raman spectroscopy and Raman photon migration of equine bone tissue with 400-nm excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Michael D.; Goodship, Allen E.; Draper, Edward R. C.; Matousek, Pavel; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W.

    2004-07-01

    We show that Raman spectroscopy with visible lasers, even in the deep blue is possible with time-gated Raman spectroscopy. A 4 picosec time gate allows efficient fluorescence rejection, up to 1000X, and provides almost background-free Raman spectra with low incident laser power. The technology enables spectroscopy with better than 10X higher scattering efficiency than is possible with the NIR (785 nm and 830 nm) lasers that are conventionally used. Raman photon migration is shown to allow depth penetration. We show for the first time that Kerr-gated Raman spectra of bone tissue with blue laser excitation enables both fluorescence rejection and depth penetration.

  20. Ocean color spectra measured off the Oregon coast - Characteristic vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    The ocean color spectrum is defined as the ratio of the spectrum of light upwelled from the sea to the spectrum of light incident on the sea surface. Ocean color spectra, observed from an airplane flown over waters off Oregon, are analyzed. The original spectra are resolved into fifty-five wavelength bands, each 5 nm wide. The shapes of these spectra are parameterized by, and shown to be accurately recoverable from, their first four principal components. These components are the scalar projections of each spectrum on the first four characteristic vectors of the sample covariance matrix. Regression equations are found with which phytoplankton pigment concentration and water transparency may be estimated as linear functions of the principal components. Pigment concentration estimates thus obtained are imprecise. The poor fit is at least partly due to the inappropriateness of the linear regression model and the neglect of other optically important substances typically present in sea water.

  1. Mechanically tunable sub-10 nm metal gap by stretching PDMS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Shen, Yang; Xiao, Guohui; She, Xiaoyi; Wang, Jianfang; Jin, Chongjun

    2017-02-01

    Manipulating light in sub-10 nm or subnanometer metal nanogaps is crucial to study the strong interaction between electromagnetic waves and matters. However, the fabrication of metallic nanogaps with precisely controlled size and high-throughput still remains a challenge. Here, we developed an approach to actively control the gap distance between adjacent metal nanoparticles from 140 nm to sub-10 nm or even 0 nm via mechanical stretching process. To demonstrate this method, we manufactured the gold disk arrays in a square lattice on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate through interference lithography and gold deposition, and sub-10 nm interparticle gap was achieved as exerting a strain of 100% to the PDMS substrate. Transmission spectra show a remarkable red shift of the dipole resonance with narrowing gap from 140 nm to sub-10 nm. Importantly, a universal scaling law between the gap distance in nanoscale and the stretching amount of PDMS substrate in macroscopic scale were demonstrated experimentally and theoretically. Our method can tune the gap distance continuously and reversibly, suggesting potential applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering, single photon emitter and quantum tunneling of electric charge.

  2. Analyzing LED-induced haemal fluorescent spectra on laboratory small albino rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shumei; Luo, Xiaosen; Lan, Xiufeng; Jiao, Fangxiang; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu; Xu, Jiaying; Lu, Shiyue; Shen, Jian; Liu, Jiangang

    2002-04-01

    Native fluorescence spectral characteristics of red blood cells were studied in the visible region in this paper. Blood samples were collected from normal small albino rats. Native fluorescence spectra of the erythrocyte were induced using Light Emitting Diode (LED) at yellow wavelength about 570+/- 16 nm ((Delta) (lambda) 0.5approximately equals 32nm). As the rat's erythrocyte content of in physiological water is increasing, the fluorescent primary emission peak is red shifted from 588 nm to above 615 nm. Furthermore, the fluorescence intensity at about 600 nm was found to be maximal while the rat's erythrocyte consistence is 1%. Moreover, it is shown in large numbers of experiments that LED-induced fluorescence spectra of the erythrocyte are similar with the whole blood. It may make sense for low- intensity light therapy.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Thorium spectrum from 250nm to 5500nm (Redman+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, S. L.; Nave, G.; Sansonetti, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    We observed the spectrum of a commercial sealed Th/Ar HCL running at 25mA for almost 15hr starting on 2011 November 2. The region of observation was limited to between 8500/cm and 28000/cm (360nm and 1200nm) by the sensitivity of the silicon photodiode detector. (5 data files).

  4. Generation of picosecond laser pulses at 1030 nm with gigahertz range continuously tunable repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Aubourg, Adrien; Lhermite, Jérôme; Hocquet, Steve; Cormier, Eric; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2015-12-01

    We report on a watt range laser system generating picosecond pulses using electro-optical modulation of a 1030 nm single frequency low noise laser diode. Its repetition rate is continuously tunable between 11 and 18 GHz. Over this range, output spectra and pulse characteristics are measured and compared with a numerical simulation. Finally, amplitude and residual phase noise measurements of the source are also presented.

  5. Optical properties of human colon tissues in the 350 – 2500 nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Genina, E A; Kochubey, V I; Kolesnikova, E A; Tuchin, V V; Rubtsov, V S

    2014-08-31

    We present the optical characteristics of the mucosa and submucosa of human colon tissue. The experiments are performed in vitro using a LAMBDA 950 spectrophotometer in the 350 – 2500 nm spectral range. The absorption and scattering coefficients and the scattering anisotropy factor are calculated based on the measured diffuse reflectance and total and collimated transmittance spectra using the inverse Monte Carlo method. (laser biophotonics)

  6. Efficient 1645-nm Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, York E.; Setzler, Scott D.; Snell, Kevin J.; Budni, Peter A.; Pollak, Thomas M.; Chicklis, E. P.

    2004-05-01

    We report a resonantly fiber-laser-pumped Er:YAG laser operating at the eye-safe wavelength of 1645 nm, exhibiting 43% optical efficiency and 54% incident slope efficiency and emitting 7-W average power when repetitively Q switched at 10 kHz. To our knowledge, this is the best performance (conversion efficiency and average power) obtained from a bulk solid-state Q-switched erbium laser. At a 1.1-kHz pulse repetition frequency the laser produces 3.4-mJ pulses with a corresponding peak power of 162 kW. Frequency doubling to produce 822.5-nm, 4.7-kW pulses at 10 kHz was performed to demonstrate the laser's utility.

  7. DNA Charge Transport over 34 nm

    PubMed Central

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. DNA of precise length, by contrast, is easily synthesized, but its conductivity has not been explored over the distances required for nanoscale devices. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation that is accessible to protein binding. Similar electron transfer rates are measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers, consistent with rate-limiting electron tunneling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses most reports of molecular wires. PMID:21336329

  8. Radiation Status of Sub-65 nm Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-scaled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) includes commercial foundry capabilities at and below the 65 nm technology node Radiation evaluations take place using standard products and test characterization vehicles (memories, logic/latch chains, etc.) NEPP focus is two-fold: (1) Conduct early radiation evaluations to ascertain viability for future NASA missions (i.e. leverage commercial technology development). (2) Uncover gaps in current testing methodologies and mechanism comprehension -- early risk mitigation.

  9. Binary 193nm photomasks aging phenomenon study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaye, Félix; Sartelli, Luca; Pogliani, Carlo; Gough, Stuart; Sundermann, Frank; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Hidenori, Yoshioka; Charras, Nathalie; Brochard, Christophe; Thivolle, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    193nm binary photomasks are still used in the semiconductor industry for the lithography of some critical layers for the nodes 90nm and 65nm, with high volumes and over long period. These 193nm binary masks seem to be well-known but recent studies have shown surprising degrading effects, like Electric Field induced chromium Migration (EFM) [1] or chromium migration [2] [3] . Phase shift Masks (PSM) or Opaque MoSi On Glass (OMOG) might not be concerned by these effects [4] [6] under certain conditions. In this paper, we will focus our study on two layers gate and metal lines. We will detail the effects of mask aging, with SEM top view pictures revealing a degraded chromium edge profile and TEM chemical analyses demonstrating the growth of a chromium oxide on the sidewall. SEMCD measurements after volume production indicated a modified CD with respect to initial CD data after manufacture. A regression analysis of these CD measurements shows a radial effect, a die effect and an isolated-dense effect. Mask cleaning effectiveness has also been investigated, with sulphate or ozone cleans, to recover the mask quality in terms of CD. In complement, wafer intrafield CD measurements have been performed on the most sensitive structure to monitor the evolution of the aging effect on mask CD uniformity. Mask CD drift have been correlated with exposure dose drift and isolated-dense bias CD drift on wafers. In the end, we will try to propose a physical explanation of this aging phenomenon and a solution to prevent from it occurring.

  10. Laser damage database at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, F.; Gonzales, R.P.; Morgan, A.J.

    1990-03-01

    In conjunction with our diversification of laser damage testing capabilities, we have expanded upon a database of threshold measurements and parameter variations at 1064 nm. This includes all tests at low pulse-repetition frequencies (PRF) ranging from single shots to 120 Hz. These tests were conducted on the Reptile laser facility since 1987 and the Variable Pulse Laser (VPL) facility since 1988. Pulse durations ranged from 1 to 16 ns. 10 refs., 14 figs.

  11. Quick analysis of optical spectra to quantify epidermal melanin and papillary dermal blood content of skin.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Steven L

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a practical approach for assessing the melanin and blood content of the skin from total diffuse reflectance spectra, R(λ), where λ is wavelength. A quick spectral analysis using just three wavelengths (585 nm, 700 nm and 800 nm) is presented, based on the 1985 work of Kollias and Baquer who documented epidermal melanin of skin using the slope of optical density (OD) between 620 nm and 720 nm. The paper describes the non-rectilinear character of such a quick analysis, and shows that almost any choice of two wavelengths in the 600-900 range can achieve the characterization of melanin. The extrapolation of the melanin slope to 585 nm serves as a baseline for subtraction from the OD (585 nm) to yield a blood perfusion score. Monte Carlo simulations created spectral data for a skin model with epidermis, papillary dermis and reticular dermis to illustrate the analysis.

  12. Selection of Portable Spectrometers for Planetary Exploration: A Comparison of 532 nm and 785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of Reduced Carbon in Archean Cherts.

    PubMed

    Harris, Liam V; Hutchinson, Ian B; Ingley, Richard; Marshall, Craig P; Marshall, Alison Olcott; Edwards, Howell G M

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge and understanding of the martian environment has advanced greatly over the past two decades, beginning with NASA's return to the surface of Mars with the Pathfinder mission and its rover Sojourner in 1997 and continuing today with data being returned by the Curiosity rover. Reduced carbon, however, is yet to be detected on the martian surface, despite its abundance in meteorites originating from the planet. If carbon is detected on Mars, it could be a remnant of extinct life, although an abiotic source is much more likely. If the latter is the case, environmental carbonaceous material would still provide a source of carbon that could be utilized by microbial life for biochemical synthesis and could therefore act as a marker for potential habitats, indicating regions that should be investigated further. For this reason, the detection and characterization of reduced or organic carbon is a top priority for both the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars rover, currently due for launch in 2018, and for NASA's Mars 2020 mission. Here, we present a Raman spectroscopic study of Archean chert Mars analog samples from the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. Raman spectra were acquired with a flight-representative 532 nm instrument and a 785 nm instrument with similar operating parameters. Reduced carbon was successfully detected with both instruments; however, its Raman bands were detected more readily with 785 nm excitation, and the corresponding spectra exhibited superior signal-to-noise ratios and reduced background levels.

  13. 3 Watt CW OPO tunable 604nm to 616nm for quantum optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Angus; Halfmann, Thomas; Mieth, Simon

    2012-06-01

    A continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (CW OPO) pumped by a fiber laser has been developed which emits up to 3 Watts of single longitudinal mode radiation tunable in the wavelength range 604nm to 616nm. The device is a modified version of the ``Argos'' Model 2400 commercial product by Lockheed Martin Aculight. A 15 Watt 1064nm fiber laser pumps a CW OPO based upon periodically-poled Lithium Niobate (PPLN). A short section of the nonlinear crystal is poled to allow efficient intracavity sum frequency generation (SFG) between the OPO pump and signal wavelengths to generate orange radiation. The device can be coarsely tuned by matching the poling periods and temperature within the nonlinear crystal to phase-match both OPO and SFG processes simultaneously. Fine mode-hop-free tuning of the orange wavelength of up to 100GHz range can be achieved by applying a voltage to a PZT which tunes the pump laser. By similar intracavity conversion schemes, the system offers the potential of providing high power at wavelengths from 600nm to 1400nm in addition to the direct signal and idler wavelength ranges from 1400nm to 4630nm. Such capability comes without the complexity and reliability issues which are inherent in dye and Ti:Sapphire systems. Details of the OPO system performance and its use in quantum optics applications will be provided.

  14. Vesicle membrane fluctuations at nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Min, Chang-Ki; Granick, Steve; Granick Group Team

    2011-03-01

    We measure membrane thermal fluctuations with nanometer spatial resolution and microsecond time resolution, extending a scattering technique used at the Curie Institute to study red blood cell dynamics (Timo Betz et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 106, 15320, 2009). A laser beam is focused at the leading edge of a phospholipid vesicle membrane and the forward scattered light is detected by a quadrant photodiode. The measurements over 4 orders of magnitude of frequency allow quantification of more complete fluctuation spectra than competing methods, and therefore fuller understanding of the vesicle membrane mechanics. As a proof of concept, we quantify how adsorbed nanoparticles stiffen giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs).

  15. Vibrational Spectra of Selected Monohalogenated Monocarboxylic Acids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS, INFRARED SPECTRA), (*CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, *INFRARED SPECTRA), IODINE COMPOUNDS, CHLORINE COMPOUNDS, BROMINE COMPOUNDS, ACETIC ACID , ACETATES, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, MOLECULAR ASSOCIATION

  16. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  17. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  18. The structure of BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro

    In this thesis we develop and apply novel techniques for analyzing BPS spectra of supersymmetric quantum field theories of class S. By a combination of wall-crossing, spectral networks and quiver methods we explore the BPS spectra of higher rank four-dimensional N = 2 super Yang-Mills, uncovering surprising new phenomena. Focusing on the SU(3) case, we prove the existence of wild BPS spectra in field theory, featuring BPS states of higher spin whose degeneracies grow exponentially with the energy. The occurrence of wild BPS states is surprising because it appears to be in tension with physical expectations on the behavior of the entropy as a function of the energy scale. The solution to this puzzle comes from realizing that the size of wild BPS states grows rapidly with their mass, and carefully analyzing the volume-dependence of the entropy of BPS states. We also find some interesting structures underlying wild BPS spectra, such as a Regge-like relation between the maximal spin of a BPS multiplet and the square of its mass, and the existence of a universal asymptotic distribution of spin-j irreps within a multiplet of given charge. We also extend the spectral networks construction by introducing a refinement in the topological classification of 2d-4d BPS states, and identifying their spin with a topological invariant known as the "writhe of soliton paths". A careful analysis of the 2d-4d wall-crossing behavior of this refined data reveals that it is described by motivic Kontsevich-Soibelman transformations, controlled by the Protected Spin Character, a protected deformation of the BPS index encoding the spin of BPS states. Our construction opens the way for the systematic study of refined BPS spectra in class S theories. We apply it to several examples, including ones featuring wild BPS spectra, where we find an interesting relation between spectral networks and certain functional equations. For class S theories of A 1 type, we derive an alternative technique for

  19. Visible/near-infrared spectra of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.

    2003-01-01

    High shock pressures cause structural changes in plagioclase feldspars such as mechanical fracturing and disaggregation of the crystal lattice at submicron scales, the formation of diaplectic glass (maskelynite), and genuine melting. Past studies of visible/ near-infrared spectra of shocked feldspars demonstrated few spectral variations with pressure except for a decrease in the depth of the absorption feature near 1250-1300 nm and an overall decrease in reflectance. New visible/near-infrared spectra (400-2500 nm) of experimentally shocked (17-56 GPa) albite- and anorthite-rich rock powders demonstrate similar trends, including the loss of minor hydrated mineral bands near 1410, 1930, 2250, and 2350 nm. However, the most interesting new observations are increases in reflectance at intermediate pressures, followed by subsequent decreases in reflectance at higher pressures. The amount of internal scattering and overall sample reflectance is controlled by the relative proportions of micro-fractures, submicron grains, diaplectic glass, and melts formed during shock metamorphism. We interpret the observed reflectance increases at intermediate pressures to result from progressively larger proportions of submicron feldspar grains and diaplectic glass. The ensuing decreases in reflectance occur after diaplectic glass formation is complete and the proportion of genuine melt inclusions increases. The pressure regimes over which these reflectance variations occur differ between albite and anorthite, consistent with thermal infrared spectra of these samples and previous studies of shocked feldspars. These types of spectral variations associated with different peak shock pressures should be considered during interpretation and modeling of visible/near-infrared remotely sensed spectra of planetary and asteroidal surfaces.

  20. Time-resolved hydrino continuum transitions with cutoffs at 22.8 nm and 10.1 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. L.; Lu, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Spectra of low energy, high current pinch discharges in pure hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and helium were recorded in the EUV region, and continuum radiation was only observed from hydrogen [www.blacklightpower.com/pdf/GEN3_Harvard.pdf; Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 35, 8446 (2010); Cent. Eur. J. Phys. 8, 318 (2010)]. The continuum radiation bands at 10.1 and 22.8 nm and going to longer wavelengths for theoretically predicted transitions of hydrogen to lower-energy, so called "hydrino" states, was observed first at blacklight power, Inc. (BLP) and reproduced at the Harvard center for astrophysics (CfA). Considering the low energy of 5.2 J per pulse, the observed radiation in the energy range of about 120 eV to 40 eV and reference experiments, no conventional explanation was found to be plausible, including electrode metal emission, Bremsstrahlung radiation, ion recombination, molecular or molecular ion band radiation, and instrument artifacts involving radicals and energetic ions reacting at the CCD and H2 re-radiation at the detector chamber. To further study these continuum bands assigned to hydrinos, time resolved spectra were performed that showed a unique delay of the continuum radiation of about 0.1 μs and a duration of < 2 μs following the high-voltage pulse consistent with the mechanism of recombination to form the optimal high-density atomic hydrogen in the pinch that permits the H-H interactions to cause the hydrino transitions and corresponding emission.

  1. White light upconversion emissions from Tm3++Ho3++Yb3+ codoped tellurite and germanate glasses on excitation with 798 nm radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Neeraj Kumar; Rai, D. K.; Rai, S. B.

    2008-12-01

    White light has been produced using 798 nm laser excitation in Tm3++Ho3++Yb3+ codoped tellurite and germanate glasses. These glasses simultaneously generate the three primary colors, red, green, and blue, on 798 nm excitation. Thus, multicolor emission obtained was tuned to white luminescence by adjusting the Ho3+ ion concentration and excitation power. UV excitation and fluorescence spectra of these triply doped glasses give additional emissions, which do not appear on 798 nm excitation.

  2. One-step fabrication of sub-10-nm plasmonic nanogaps for reliable SERS sensing of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Qin, Gaowu; Wang, Jiansheng; Yu, Jiangyu; Shen, Bo; Li, Song; Ren, Yuping; Zuo, Liang; Shen, Wen; Das, Biswajit

    2013-06-15

    Nanoscale gaps in noble metal films can produce intense electromagnetic enhancement. When Raman-active molecules are positioned in these regions, their surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals can be dramatically enhanced. However, the lack of convenient and reliable fabrication methods with ultrasmall nanogaps (<10 nm) severely block the application of SERS. Here, we propose a cost-effective and reproducible technique to fabricate the large-area Ag SERS-active substrates which are full of the high-density, sub-10-nm nanogaps by high pressure sputtering, and the enhancement factor (EF) is testified to improve by 10(3) times compared to the continuous Ag film with a smooth surface (the roughness is 0.5 nm) and without nanogaps. Since there are no chemicals used during fabrication, this substrate has a clean surface, which is crucial for acquiring reliable SERS spectra. This SERS-active substrate has then been applied to identify a series of microorganisms, and excellent, reproducible SERS spectra were obtained. Finally, a set of piecewise-linear equations is provided according to the correlation between SERS intensity and rhodamine 6G (R6G) concentration, and the detection limit is calculated to be 0.2×10(-8)M. These results suggest that the high pressure sputtering is an excellent, reliable technique for fabricating sub-10-nm plasmonic nanogaps, and the SERS-based methodology is very promising for being used in biological sensing field.

  3. 75 FR 81437 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Taos, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... Taos, NM. Decommissioning of the Ski non-directional beacon (NDB) at Taos Regional Airport, Taos, NM... Taos, NM area. Decommissioning of the Ski NDB and cancellation of the NDB approach at Taos...

  4. Size and Purity Control of HPHT Nanodiamonds down to 1 nm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) nanodiamonds originate from grinding of diamond microcrystals obtained by HPHT synthesis. Here we report on a simple two-step approach to obtain as small as 1.1 nm HPHT nanodiamonds of excellent purity and crystallinity, which are among the smallest artificially prepared nanodiamonds ever shown and characterized. Moreover we provide experimental evidence of diamond stability down to 1 nm. Controlled annealing at 450 °C in air leads to efficient purification from the nondiamond carbon (shells and dots), as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Annealing at 500 °C promotes, besides of purification, also size reduction of nanodiamonds down to ∼1 nm. Comparably short (1 h) centrifugation of the nanodiamonds aqueous colloidal solution ensures separation of the sub-10 nm fraction. Calculations show that an asymmetry of Raman diamond peak of sub-10 nm HPHT nanodiamonds can be well explained by modified phonon confinement model when the actual particle size distribution is taken into account. In contrast, larger Raman peak asymmetry commonly observed in Raman spectra of detonation nanodiamonds is mainly attributed to defects rather than to the phonon confinement. Thus, the obtained characteristics reflect high material quality including nanoscale effects in sub-10 nm HPHT nanodiamonds prepared by the presented method. PMID:26691647

  5. Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2011-10-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A/cm2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated.

  6. Sunlight induced chlorophyll fluorescence in the near-infrared spectral region in natural waters: Interpretation of the narrow reflectance peak around 761 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yingcheng; Li, Linhai; Hu, Chuanmin; Li, Lin; Zhang, Minwei; Sun, Shaojie; Lv, Chunguang

    2016-07-01

    Sunlight induced chlorophyll a fluorescence (SICF) can be used as a probe to estimate chlorophyll a concentrations (Chl) and infer phytoplankton physiology. SICF at ˜685 nm has been widely applied to studies of natural waters. SICF around 740 nm has been demonstrated to cause a narrow reflectance peak at ˜761 nm in the reflectance spectra of terrestrial vegetation. This narrow peak has also been observed in the reflectance spectra of natural waters, but its mechanism and applications have not yet been investigated and it has often been treated as measurement artifacts. In this study, we aimed to interpret this reflectance peak at ˜761 nm and discuss its potential applications for remote monitoring of natural waters. A derivative analysis of the spectral reflectance suggests that the 761 nm peak is due to SICF. It was also found that the fluorescence line height (FLH) at 761 nm significantly and linearly correlates with Chl. FLH(761 nm) showed a tighter relationship with Chl than the relationship between FLH(˜685 nm) and Chl mainly due to weaker perturbations by nonalgal materials around 761 nm. While it is not conclusive, a combination of FLH(761 nm) and FLH(˜685 nm) might have some potentials to discriminate cyanobacteria from other phytoplankton due to their different fluorescence responses at the two wavelengths. It was further found that reflectance spectra with a 5 nm spectral resolution are adequate to capture the spectral SICF feature at ˜761 nm. These preliminary results suggest that FLH(761 nm) need to be explored more for future applications in optically complex coastal and inland waters.

  7. Laser-induced bulk damage of silica glass at 355nm and 266nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, R.; Aramomi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Laser processing machines using Nd:YAG 3rd harmonic wave (355 nm) and 4th harmonic wave (266 nm) have been developed and put into practical use lately. Due to this, optical elements with high laser durability to 355 nm and 266 nm are required. Silica glass is the optical element which has high UV transmission and high laser durability. Laser-induced surface damage of the silica glass has been studied in detail, but we hardly have the significant knowledge of laserinduced bulk damage. This knowledge is required in order to evaluate the silica glass itself. That is because cracks and scratches on the surface give rise to a higher possibility of damage. Therefore, we studied the laser durability of a variety of the silica glass samples by 1-on-1 and S-on-1 laser-induced bulk damage threshold (LIDT) at 355 nm and 266 nm. In this study, we gained knowledge in three areas about bulk damage to the silica glass. First, the LIDT became lower as shot counts increased. Second, the LIDT decreased as the hydroxyl content in the silica glass increased. Last, the LIDT became higher as the hydrogen concentration in the silica glass increased. Under the UV irradiation, impurities are generated and the silica glass absorbs more light. Therefore, the LIDT decreased as shot counts increased. Also, the hydroxyl in particular generates more impurities, so damage easily occurs. On the other hand, the hydrogen reacts with impurities and absorption is suppressed. Based on these results, we can improve laser durability at 355 nm and 266 nm by reducing the hydroxyl content and increasing the hydrogen concentration in the silica glass.

  8. Yb fiber amplifier at 972.5 nm with frequency quadrupling to 243.1 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkley, Z.; Rasor, C.; Cooper, S. F.; Brandt, A. D.; Yost, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a continuous-wave ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier which produces 6.3 W at a wavelength of 972.5 nm. We frequency-quadruple this source in two resonant doubling stages to generate 530 mW at 243.1 nm. Radiation at this wavelength is required to excite the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and could therefore find application in experimental studies of hydrogen and anti-hydrogen.

  9. Gd plasma source modeling at 6.7 nm for future lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Jiang, Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2011-12-05

    Plasmas containing gadolinium have been proposed as sources for next generation lithography at 6.x nm. To determine the optimum plasma conditions, atomic structure calculations have been performed for Gd{sup 11+} to Gd{sup 27+} ions which showed that n = 4 - n = 4 resonance transitions overlap in the 6.5-7.0 nm region. Plasma modeling calculations, assuming collisional-radiative equilibrium, predict that the optimum temperature for an optically thin plasma is close to 110 eV and that maximum intensity occurs at 6.76 nm under these conditions. The close agreement between simulated and experimental spectra from laser and discharge produced plasmas indicates the validity of our approach.

  10. CdTe surface roughness by Raman spectroscopy using the 830 nm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, C; Molina-Contreras, J Rafael; Medina-Gutiérrez, C; Calixto, Sergio

    2006-09-01

    A Raman spectroscopic study was performed to detect the surface roughness of a cadmium telluride (CdTe) wafer sample, using the 514.5, 632.8 and 830.0 nm excitations wavelengths. To verify the relation between the roughness and the structure of Raman spectra, in certain zones of the sample, we measured their roughness with an atomic force microscopy. It was found that, using the 830 nm wavelength there is a direct correspondence between the spectrum structure and the surface roughness. For the others wavelengths it was found, however, that there is not a clearly correspondence between them. Our results suggest that, using the excitation wavelength of 830 nm the Raman spectroscopy can be used as an on-line roughness monitor on the CdTe growth.

  11. Diffuse optical characterization of collagen absorption from 500 to 1700 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekar, Sanathana Konugolu Venkata; Bargigia, Ilaria; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Taroni, Paola; Ruggeri, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Farina, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Reduction in scattering, high absorption, and spectral features of tissue constituents above 1000 nm could help in gaining higher spatial resolution, penetration depth, and specificity for in vivo studies, opening possibilities of near-infrared diffuse optics in tissue diagnosis. We present the characterization of collagen absorption over a broadband range (500 to 1700 nm) and compare it with spectra presented in the literature. Measurements were performed using a time-domain diffuse optical technique. The spectrum was extracted by carefully accounting for various spectral distortion effects, due to sample and system properties. The contribution of several tissue constituents (water, lipid, collagen, oxy, and deoxy-hemoglobin) to the absorption properties of a collagen-rich in vivo bone location, such as radius distal in the 500- to 1700-nm wavelength region, is also discussed, suggesting bone diagnostics as a potential area of interest.

  12. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-01

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  13. Photolysis of formic acid at 355 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Denhi; Bautista, Teonanacatl; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2015-05-01

    Formic acid is well known as a food additive and recently an application on fuel cell technology has emerged. In this work we have studied the dissociative ionization process by multiphoton absorption of formic acid molecules at 355nm wavelength photons, using TOF spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the most abundant ionic fragments produced are studied at different settings of the laser harmonic generator. The dependence of the products on these conditions is reported. This work was supported by CONACYT Project 165410 and PAPIIT IN102613 and IN101215.

  14. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    SciTech Connect

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-15

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  15. [Experimental study on the size spectra and emission factor of ultrafine particle from coal combustion].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zai; Yang, Wen-jun; Xie, Xiao-fang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Cai, Zhi-liang

    2014-12-01

    The emission characteristics of ultrafine particles released from pulverized coal combustion were studied, the size spectra of ultrafine particles (5.6-560 nm) were measured with FMPS (fast mobility particle sizer) on a self-built aerosol experiment platform. Meanwhile, a particle dynamic evolution model was established to obtain the particle deposition rate and the emission rate through the optimized algorithm. Finally, the emission factor was calculated. The results showed that at the beginning of particle generation, the size spectra were polydisperse and complex, the initial size spectra was mainly composed of three modes including 10 nm, 30-40 nm and 100-200 nm. Among them, the number concentration of mode around 10 nm was higher than those of other modes, the size spectrum of around 100-200 nm was lognormal distributed, with a CMD (count median diameter) of around 16 nm. Then, as time went on, the total number concentration was decayed by exponential law, the CMD first increased and then tended to be stable gradually. The calculation results showed that the emission factor of particles from coal combustion under laboratory condition was (5.54 x 10(12) ± 2.18 x 10(12)) unit x g(-1).

  16. Nonlinear absorption properties of DKDP crystal at 263 nm and 351 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiangxu; Zhu, Qihua; Feng, Bin; Li, Fuquan; Feng, Xi; Wang, Fang; Han, Wei; Wang, Liquan

    2017-02-01

    At the wavelength of 263 nm and 351 nm, the nonlinear absorption curves of 66% deuterated DKDP crystal were measured in the geometries of beam polarizing along the optics axis (E∥Z) and perpendicular to it (E⊥Z). The results indicate that the nonlinear absorption in the E⊥Z geometry is stronger than that in the E∥Z geometry. The nonlinear absorptions at 263 nm and 351 nm are identified to two- and three-photon absorption, respectively. The theoretical fits to the experimental data yields the two-photon absorption coefficients of 0.32 ± 0.03 cm/GW (E⊥Z geometry) and 0.17 ± 0.02 cm/GW (E∥Z geometry) at 263 nm, and the three-photon absorption coefficients of (8.1 ± 1.1) × 10-4 cm3/GW2 (E⊥Z geometry) and (2.2 ± 0.5) × 10-4 cm3/GW2 (E∥Z geometry) at 351 nm.

  17. Correlation between near-infrared tissue spectra and pH, temperature, and blood flow using partial least squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Tania; Soller, Babs R.; Zhang, Songbiao

    1999-07-01

    It has been shown that near-infrared spectroscopy is a feasible technique to non-invasively measure tissue pH in vivo. Since this technique relies on pH-induced changes in heme protein spectra, other factors that affect those spectra were investigated. In this study, the correlation between spectra collected from the bowel (575 - 1100 nm) with local tissue temperature and blood flow were investigated simultaneously with pH changes during eight independent swine hemorrhagic shock experiments.

  18. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-16nm, ASASSN-16nn, ASASSN-16no and Gaia16bub/AT2016ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, J. L.; Madore, B. F.; Shappee, B. J.; Seidel, M. K.; Dong, S.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Optical spectra of the supernova candidates ASASSN-16nm/AT2016ijc (ATel #9785), ASASSN-16nn/AT2016ijf (ATel #9785), ASASSN-16no (ATel #9796, #9797), and Gaia16bub/AT2016ice were obtained on UT 2016 November 23-29 with WFCCD mounted on the du Pont 2.5-m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory.

  19. Computer Simulation of NMR Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a PASCAL computer program which provides interactive analysis and display of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra from spin one-half nuclei using a hard-copy or monitor. Includes general and theoretical program descriptions, program capability, and examples of its use. (Source for program/documentation is included.)…

  20. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  1. Discrimination of petroleum fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Stelmaszewski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents studies of the total spectra (fluorescence-excitation matrix) of petroleum with regard to the utilization of fluorescence for determining petroleum pollutants. Thorough testing of one group, comprising almost forty lubricating oils in the form of their hexane solutions, points out their discrimination.

  2. Polarization effects in cutaneous autofluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Genova, Ts.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    Used polarized light for fluorescence excitation one could obtain response related to the anisotropy features of extracellular matrix. The fluorophore anisotropy is attenuated during lesions' growth and level of such decrease could be correlated with the stage of tumor development. Our preliminary investigations are based on in vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from healthy volunteers skin on different ages and from different anatomical places using linear polarizer and analyzer for excitation and emission light detected. Measurements were made using spectrofluorimeter FluoroLog 3 (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) with fiber-optic probe in steady-state regime using excitation in the region of 280-440 nm. Three different situations were evaluated and corresponding excitation-emission matrices were developed - with parallel and perpendicular positions for linear polarizer and analyzer, and without polarization of excitation and fluorescence light detected from a forearm skin surface. The fluorescence spectra obtained reveal differences in spectral intensity, related to general attenuation, due to filtering effects of used polarizer/analyzer couple. Significant spectral shape changes were observed for the complex autofluorescence signal detected, which correlated with collagen and protein cross-links fluorescence, that could be addressed to the tissue extracellular matrix and general condition of the skin investigated, due to morphological destruction during lesions' growth. A correlation between volunteers' age and the fluorescence spectra detected was observed during our measurements. Our next step is to increase developed initial database and to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescent polarization effects and found if they are significantly altered from normal skin to cancerous state of the tissue, this way to develop a non-invasive diagnostic tool for dermatological practice.

  3. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  4. DNA charge transport over 34 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics, but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of precise length, by contrast, is synthesized easily, but its conductivity over the distances required for nanoscale devices has not been explored. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base-pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation accessible to protein binding. Similar electron-transfer rates measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers are consistent with rate-limiting electron tunnelling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses that of most reports of molecular wires.

  5. Charge recombination reactions in photosystem II. 2. Transient absorbance difference spectra and their temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, B; Brettel, K; van Mieghem, F; Kamlowski, A; Rutherford, A W; Schlodder, E

    1995-04-11

    Absorbance difference spectra of the transient states in photosystem II (PS II) have been examined in the Qv absorption region between 660 and 700 nm. The P680+Pheo-/P680Pheo, 3P680/P680, and P680+QA-/P680QA spectra were measured in O2-evolving PS II core complexes from Synechococcus and PS II-enriched membrane fragments from spinach. The low-temperature absorbance difference spectra vary only slightly between both PS II preparations. The 3P680/P680 spectrum is characterized by a bleaching at 685 nm at 25 K and indicates weak exciton coupling with neighboring pigment(s). We conclude that P680 absorbs at 685 nm in more intact PS II preparations at cryogenic temperature. The difference spectra of the radical pairs are strongly temperature dependent. At low temperature the P680+QA-/P680QA- spectrum exhibits the strongest bleaching at 675 nm whereas the P680+Phe-/P680Pheo spectra show two distinct bleaching bands at 674 and 684 nm. It is suggested that an electrochronic red shift resulting in a bleaching at 675 nm and an absorbance increase at about 682 nm dominates the spectral features of the charge-separated states. On the basis of the present results and those in the literature, we conclude that the interactions between the pigments and especially the organization of the primary donor must be quite different in PS II compared to bacterial reaction centers, although the basic structural arrangement of the pigments might be similar. Spectral data obtained with samples in the presence of singly and doubly reduced QA indicate that the primary photochemistry in PS II is not strongly influenced by the redox state of QA at low temperature and confirm the results of the accompanying paper [Van Mieghem, F. J. E., Brettel, K., Hillmann, B., Kamlowski, A., Rutherford, A. W., & Schlodder, E. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 4798-4813]. The spectra of the primary radical pair and the reaction center triplet obtained with more intact PS II preparations differ widely from those of D1/D2

  6. Resolution of overlapped spectra for the determination of ternary mixture using different and modified spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Bahia Abbas; El-Zaher, Asmaa Ahmed; Mahrouse, Marianne Alphonse; Ahmed, Maha Said

    2016-08-05

    Four new spectrophotometric methods were developed, applied to resolve the overlapped spectra of a ternary mixture of [aliskiren hemifumarate (ALS)-amlodipine besylate (AM)-hydrochlorothiazide (HCT)] and to determine the three drugs in pure form and in combined dosage form. Method A depends on simultaneous determination of ALS, AM and HCT using principal component regression and partial least squares chemometric methods. In Method B, a modified isosbestic spectrophotometric method was applied for the determination of the total concentration of ALS and HCT by measuring the absorbance at 274.5nm (isosbestic point, Aiso). On the other hand, the concentration of HCT in ternary mixture with ALS and AM could be calculated without interference using first derivative spectrophotometric method by measuring the amplitude at 279nm (zero crossing of ALS and zero value of AM). Thus, the content of ALS was calculated by subtraction. Method C, double divisor first derivative ratio spectrophotometry (double divisor (1)DD method), was based on that for the determination of one drug, the ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectra of its different concentrations by the sum of the absorption spectra of the other two drugs as a double divisor. The first derivative of the obtained ratio spectra were then recorded using the appropriate smoothing factor. The amplitudes at 291nm, 380nm and 274.5nm were selected for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT in their ternary mixture, respectively. Method D was based on mean centering of ratio spectra. The mean centered values at 287, 295.5 and 269nm were recorded and used for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT, respectively. The developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines and proved to be accurate, precise and selective. Satisfactory results were obtained by applying the proposed methods to the analysis of pharmaceutical dosage form.

  7. Resolution of overlapped spectra for the determination of ternary mixture using different and modified spectrophotometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Bahia Abbas; El-Zaher, Asmaa Ahmed; Mahrouse, Marianne Alphonse; Ahmed, Maha Said

    2016-08-01

    Four new spectrophotometric methods were developed, applied to resolve the overlapped spectra of a ternary mixture of [aliskiren hemifumarate (ALS)-amlodipine besylate (AM)-hydrochlorothiazide (HCT)] and to determine the three drugs in pure form and in combined dosage form. Method A depends on simultaneous determination of ALS, AM and HCT using principal component regression and partial least squares chemometric methods. In Method B, a modified isosbestic spectrophotometric method was applied for the determination of the total concentration of ALS and HCT by measuring the absorbance at 274.5 nm (isosbestic point, Aiso). On the other hand, the concentration of HCT in ternary mixture with ALS and AM could be calculated without interference using first derivative spectrophotometric method by measuring the amplitude at 279 nm (zero crossing of ALS and zero value of AM). Thus, the content of ALS was calculated by subtraction. Method C, double divisor first derivative ratio spectrophotometry (double divisor 1DD method), was based on that for the determination of one drug, the ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectra of its different concentrations by the sum of the absorption spectra of the other two drugs as a double divisor. The first derivative of the obtained ratio spectra were then recorded using the appropriate smoothing factor. The amplitudes at 291 nm, 380 nm and 274.5 nm were selected for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT in their ternary mixture, respectively. Method D was based on mean centering of ratio spectra. The mean centered values at 287, 295.5 and 269 nm were recorded and used for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT, respectively. The developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines and proved to be accurate, precise and selective. Satisfactory results were obtained by applying the proposed methods to the analysis of pharmaceutical dosage form.

  8. Low-intensity LED (625 and 405 nm) and laser (805 nm) killing of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2009-02-01

    In the present work we have investigated in vitro sensitivity of microorganisms P. acnes and S. epidermidis to action of red (625 nm and 405 nm) and infrared (805 nm) radiations in combination with photosensitizes Methylene Blue and Indocyanine Green.

  9. Changes in in-vivo autofluorescence spectra at different periods in rat colorectal tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.; Chia, Chee T.; Tang, C. L.; Diong, Cheong Hoong; Seow, Francis C.

    2001-10-01

    The study focuses on the Laser-Induced Autofluorescence (LIAF) diagnosis technique to identify early tumor tissue. 442nm light from a Helium-Cadmium Laser is excited to investigate the spectra of the in vivo normal and tumor rat colorectal tissues. The experiment results show that the LIAF spectra of the normal and tumor colorectal tissues exhibit the significant differences. The results are potentially useful for the development of a clinical study for early colorectal cancer diagnosis.

  10. Instrumentation and action spectra in light-associated diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cripps, D.J.

    1981-07-01

    Instrumentation for studying action spectra in controls and various light-associated diseases is described. This study summarizes tests performed with a prism grating monochromator during the last 10 yr. There were 68 photodermatoses studied: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) (1), lupus erythematosus (LE) (12), polymorphous light eruption (PLE) (23), solar urticaria (4), actinic reticuloid (2), halogenated salicylanilide photosensitivity and persistent light reactors (11), psoralen photosensitivity (6), and porphyria (9). A normal minimal erythema dose in the UVB (below 320 nm) was generally observed in polymorphous light eruption and lupus erythematosus. The most exquisite photosensitivity for delayed erythema was observed in actinic reticuloid, which in one case was 25-35 times more sensitive in the UVB range which was also observed but to a lesser extent in XP and in persistent light reactors. Persistence of erythema and edema at test sites was observed in XP, PLE, LE, and actinic reticuloid. A delay in development of erythema reaching a maximum at 72 hr was observed in XP and psoralen phototoxicity. Maximum photosensitivity occurred in solar urticaria. Three patients had peak sensitivity in the range of 310-313 nm and the 4th at 460 nm. Photosensitivity in the visible range was detected in 2 patients with solar urticaria, one with actinic reticuloid, and confirmed in 9 patients with porphyria (405 nm). Photosensitivity in the UVA (above 320 nm) occurred to some degree in all groups.

  11. Time resolved EUV spectra from Zpinching capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancarek, Alexandr; Nevrkla, Michal; Nawaz, Fahad

    2015-09-01

    We developed symmetrically charged driver to obtain high voltage, high current Z-pinching capillary discharge. Plasma is created by up to 70 kA, 29 ns risetime current pulse passing through a 5 mm inner diameter, 224 mm long capillary filled with gas to initial pressure in the range of 1 kPa. Due to the low inductance design of the driver, the pinch is observable directly from the measured current curve. Time-integrated and time-resolved spectra of discharge plasma radiation are recorded together with the capillary current and analyzed. The most encouraging spectra were captured in the wavelength range 8.3 ÷ 14 nm. This spectral region contains nitrogen Balmer series lines including potentially lasing NVII 2 - 3 transition. Spectral lines are identified in the NIST database using the FLY kinetic code. The line of 13.38 nm wavelength, transition NVII 2 - 3, was observed in gated, and also in time-integrated spectra for currents >60 kA. This work has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic grants LG13029.

  12. [Feasibility of monitoring karst standing conditions with vegetation spectra].

    PubMed

    Yue, Yue-Min; Wang, Ke-Lin; Xiong, Ying

    2012-07-01

    Karst regions are typically ecological fragile zones constrained by geological setting, which resulted in high heterogeneity of vegetation standing conditions. The karst vegetation was featured with stone, dry and high calcium carbonate content growth conditions. Based on vegetation spectral analysis and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA), the present study aimed to examine the feasibility of using vegetation spectra to monitor the heterogeneous karst standing conditions. The results showed that there were significant differences between karst vegetation and non-karst vegetation within the spectral range of 1 300-2 500 nm reflectance and 400 - 680 nm first-derivative spectra. It was found that soil moisture and calcium carbonate contents had the most significant effects on vegetation spectral features in karst regions. Ordination diagrams of CCA could distinguish the differences of karst vegetation and non-karst vegetation. Our study demonstrates that vegetation spectra are highly related to karst standing conditions and it is feasible to monitor karst standing conditions with vegetation spectral features.

  13. Study of the absorption spectra of Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Gambarini, Grazia; Artuso, Emanuele; Liosi, Giulia Maria; Giacobbo, Francesca; Mariani, Mari; Brambilla, Luigi; Castiglioni, Chiara; Carrara, Mauro; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2015-07-01

    A systematic study of the absorption spectra of Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeters has been performed, in the wavelength range from 300 nm to 700 nm. The spectrum of Xylenol Orange (without ferrous sulphate solution) has been achieved, in order to subtract its contribution from the absorption spectra of the irradiated Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeters. The absorbance due to ferric ions chelated by Xylenol Orange has been studied for various irradiation doses. Two absorbance peaks are visible, mainly at low doses: the first peak increases with the dose more slowly than the second one. This effect can explain the apparent threshold dose that was frequently evidenced. (authors)

  14. Novel spectrophotometric method for selective determination of compounds in ternary mixtures (dual wavelength in ratio spectra).

    PubMed

    Saad, Ahmed S

    2015-08-05

    A simple selective spectrophotometric method for determination of compounds in ternary mixture was developed by combining the resolution power of two well-known methods that are commonly used for binary mixtures; namely ratio difference method and dual wavelength. The new method (dual wavelength in ratio spectra) was successfully applied for the determination of a ternary mixture of betamethasone dipropionate (BM), clotrimazole (CT) and benzyl alcohol (BA) in pure powder form and in their pharmaceutical preparation. The difference in amplitudes (ΔP) in the ratio spectra at 252.0 and 258.0 nm (ΔP(252.0-258.0 nm)) corresponds to BM, while ΔP(266.8-255.4 nm) and ΔP(254.2-243.5 nm) corresponds to CT and BA, respectively. The method was validated as per the USP 2005 guidelines. The developed method can be used in quality control laboratories for routine analysis of compounds in ternary mixtures.

  15. TCSPC FLIM in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1700 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavsky, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    Excitation and detection in the wavelength range above 800nm is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to increase the penetration depth in optical microscopy. Moreover, detection at long wavelength avoids the problem that tissue autofluorescence contaminates the signals from endogenous fluorescence probes. FLIM at NIR wavelength may therefore be complementary to multiphoton microscopy, especially if the lifetimes of NIR fluorophores report biological parameters of the tissue structures they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the excitation sources nor the detectors of standard confocal and multiphoton laser scanning systems are directly suitable for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. Most of these problems can be solved, however, by using ps diode lasers or Ti:Sapphire lasers at their fundamental wavelength, and NIR-sensitive detectors. With NIR-sensitive PMTs the detection wavelength range can be extended up to 900 nm, with InGaAs SPAD detectors up to 1700 nm. Here, we demonstrate the use of a combination of laser scanning, multi-dimensional TCSPC, and advanced excitation sources and detectors for FLIM at up to 1700 nm. The performance was tested at tissue samples incubated with NIR dyes. The fluorescence lifetimes generally get shorter with increasing absorption and emission wavelengths of the dyes. For the cyanine dye IR1061, absorbing around 1060 nm, the lifetime was found to be as short as 70 ps. Nevertheless the fluorescence decay could still be clearly detected. Almost all dyes showed clear lifetime changes depending on the binding to different tissue constituents.

  16. Comparison of 980-nm and 1070-nm in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaloglu, Nermin; Tabakoglu, Ozgur; Ergenoglu, Mehmet U.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2009-07-01

    The use of endovenous laser treatment for varicose veins has been increasing in recent years. It is a safer technique than surgical vein stripping. Its complications (e.g. bruising, pain) are less than the complications of surgical vein stripping. But best parameters such as optimum wavelength, power, and application duration are still under investigation to clarify uncertainties about this technique. To prevent its complications and improve its clinical outcomes, the exact mechanism of it has to be known. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different laser wavelengths on endovenous laser therapy. In this study 980-nm diode laser and 1070-nm fiber laser were used. Human veins were irradiated with 980-nm and 1070-nm lasers at 8 W and 10 W to find the optimal power and wavelength. After laser application, remarkable shrinkage was observed. Inner and outer diameters of the veins also narrowed for both of the laser types. 10 W of 980-nm laser application led to better shrinkage results.

  17. Dual illumination OCT at 1050nm and 840nm for whole eye segment imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui; Qin, Lin; Dai, Cuixia; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-11-01

    We presented an improved dual channel dual focus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with two illuminations at 840 nm and 1050 nm for whole eye segment imaging and biometry in vivo. The two light beams were coupled and optically optimized to scan the anterior and posterior segment of the eye simultaneously. This configuration with dichroic mirrors integrated in the sample arm enables us to acquire images from the anterior segment and retina effectively with minimum loss of sample signal. In addition, the full resolved complex (FRC) method was applied to double the imaging depth for the whole anterior segment imaging by eliminating the mirror image. The axial resolution for 1050 nm and 840 nm OCT was 14 μm and 8 μm in air, respectively. Finally, the system was successfully tested in imaging the unaccommodated and accommodated eyes. The preliminary results demonstrated the significant improvements comparing with our previous dual channel SD-OCT configuration in which the two probing beams had the same central wavelength of 840 nm.

  18. Laser Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Spectra of Cajanus Cajan L Plant Growing Under Cadmium Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ram; Pandey, J. K.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-induced Chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) spectra of Cajanus cajan L leaves treated with different concentrations of Cd (0.05, 0.5 and 1 mM) are recorded at 10 and 20 days after first treatment of cadmium. LICF spectra are recorded in the region of 650-780 nm using violet diode laser (405 nm). LICF spectra of plant leaves show two maxima near 685 and 730nm. Fluorescence induction kinetics (FIK) curve are recorded at 685 and 730 nm with red diode laser (635 nm) for excitation. The fluorescence intensity ratios (FIR) F685/F730 are calculated from LICF spectra and vitality index (Rfd) are determined from FIK curve. FIR and Rfd value are good stress indicator of plant health. These parameters along with chlorophyll content are used to analyze the effect of Cd on wheat plants. The result indicates that higher concentrations of Cd hazardous for photosynthetic activity and health of Arhar plants. The lower concentration of 0.05 mM shows stimulatory response up to 10 days while after 20 days this concentration also shows inhibitory response. R. Gopal, K. B. Mishra, M. Zeeshan, S. M. Prasad, and M. M. Joshi Curr. Sci., 83, 880, 2002 K. B. Mishra and R. Gopal Int. J. Rem. Sen., 29, 157, 2008 R. Maurya, S. M. Prasad, and R. Gopal J. Photochem. Photobio. C: Photochem. Rev., 9, 29, 2008

  19. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  20. 308-nm excimer laser in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesenhoff, Tim

    1992-06-01

    Root canal preparation was performed on 20 extracted human teeth. After opening the coronal pulp, the root canals were prepared by 308 nm excimer laser only. All root canals were investigated under SEM after separation in the axial direction. By sagittal separation of the mandibles of freshly slaughtered cows, it was possible to get access to the tissues and irradiate under optical control. Under irradiation of excimer laser light, tissue starts to fluoresce. It was possible to demonstrate that each tissue (dentin, enamel, bone, pulpal, and connective tissue) has a characteristic spectral pattern. The SEM analyses showed that it is well possible to prepare root canals safely. All organic soft tissue has been removed by excimer laser irradiation. There was no case of via falsa. The simultaneous spectroscopic identification of the irradiated tissue provides a safe protection from overinstrumentation. First clinical trials on 20 patients suffering of chronical apical parodontitis have been carried out successfully.

  1. Microscope illumination systems for 157 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, Alexander; Uhlendorf, Kristina; Deparnay, Arnaud; Erdmann, Lars; Kuschnerus, Peter; Engel, Thomas; Brunner, Robert

    2003-05-01

    The image quality of an inspection microscope depends strongly on the performance of the illumination system. Especially in the case of laser-based illumination it is necessary to transform the original beam profile into a homogeneous light spot with a flat top field distribution. Simultaneously, speckles caused by the coherence of the laser have to be reduced. Here we discuss different ways to homogenize the multi mode beam profile of a pulsed compact 157 nm excimer laser. A variety of setups, combining dynamic acting diffusers, microlens arrays and primary lenses were realized and characterized in several geometrical arrangements. The homogenizers were evaluated and characterized especially with respect to the statistical behavior on the integrated pulse number.

  2. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  3. Eigenvectors of optimal color spectra.

    PubMed

    Flinkman, Mika; Laamanen, Hannu; Tuomela, Jukka; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2013-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and weighted PCA were applied to spectra of optimal colors belonging to the outer surface of the object-color solid or to so-called MacAdam limits. The correlation matrix formed from this data is a circulant matrix whose biggest eigenvalue is simple and the corresponding eigenvector is constant. All other eigenvalues are double, and the eigenvectors can be expressed with trigonometric functions. Found trigonometric functions can be used as a general basis to reconstruct all possible smooth reflectance spectra. When the spectral data are weighted with an appropriate weight function, the essential part of the color information is compressed to the first three components and the shapes of the first three eigenvectors correspond to one achromatic response function and to two chromatic response functions, the latter corresponding approximately to Munsell opponent-hue directions 9YR-9B and 2BG-2R.

  4. Optical and fluorescence properties of corn leaves from different nitrogen regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Entcheva Campbell, Petya K.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Butcher, L. M.; Chappelle, Emmett W.

    2003-03-01

    The important role of nitrogen (N) in limiting or enhancing vegetation productivity is relatively well understood, although the interaction of N with other environmental variables in natural and agricultural ecosystems needs more study. In 2001, a suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves of corn (Zea Mays L.) from field plots provided four N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of optimal N levels. Two complementary sets of high-resolution (< 2 nm) optical spectra were acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces. The first was comprised of leaf optical properties (350-2500 nm) for reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance. The second was comprised of reflectance spectra (500-1000 nm) acquired with and without a long pass 665 nm filter to determine the fluorescence contribution to "apparent reflectance" in the 670-750 nm spectrum that includes the 685 and 740 nm chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) peaks. Two types of fluorescence measurements were also made on adaxial and abaxial surfaces: 1) fluorescence images in four 10 nm bands (blue, green, red, far-red) resulting from broadband irradiance excitation; and 2) emission spectra at 5 nm resolution produced by three excitation wavelengths (280, 380, and 532 nm). The strongest relationships between optical properties and foliar chemistry were obtained for a "red-edge" optical parameter versus C/N and chlorophyll b. Select optical indices and ChlF parameters were correlated. A significant contribution of steady-state ChlF to apparent reflectance was observed, averaging 10-25% at 685 nm and 2-6% at 740 nm over the range of N treatments. From all measurements assessing fluorescence, higher ChlF was measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces.

  5. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15-30 labels simultaneously.

  6. Measurement of 100 nm and 60 nm Particle Standards by Differential Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, George W.; Donnelly, Michelle K.; Hagwood, Charles R.; Kukuck, Scott R.; Hackley, Vincent A.; Pui, David Y. H.

    2006-01-01

    The peak particle size and expanded uncertainties (95 % confidence interval) for two new particle calibration standards are measured as 101.8 nm ± 1.1 nm and 60.39 nm ± 0.63 nm. The particle samples are polystyrene spheres suspended in filtered, deionized water at a mass fraction of about 0.5 %. The size distribution measurements of aerosolized particles are made using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) system calibrated using SRM® 1963 (100.7 nm polystyrene spheres). An electrospray aerosol generator was used for generating the 60 nm aerosol to almost eliminate the generation of multiply charged dimers and trimers and to minimize the effect of non-volatile contaminants increasing the particle size. The testing for the homogeneity of the samples and for the presence of multimers using dynamic light scattering is described. The use of the transfer function integral in the calibration of the DMA is shown to reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of the peak particle size compared to the approach based on the peak in the concentration vs. voltage distribution. A modified aerosol/sheath inlet, recirculating sheath flow, a high ratio of sheath flow to the aerosol flow, and accurate pressure, temperature, and voltage measurements have increased the resolution and accuracy of the measurements. A significant consideration in the uncertainty analysis was the correlation between the slip correction of the calibration particle and the measured particle. Including the correlation reduced the expanded uncertainty from approximately 1.8 % of the particle size to about 1.0 %. The effect of non-volatile contaminants in the polystyrene suspensions on the peak particle size and the uncertainty in the size is determined. The full size distributions for both the 60 nm and 100 nm spheres are tabulated and selected mean sizes including the number mean diameter and the dynamic light scattering mean diameter are computed. The use of these particles for calibrating DMAs and for

  7. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  8. Ultraviolet Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, Ted

    1996-07-01

    The ultraviolet reflectance spectra of the icy satellites ofUranus are largely unknown. We propose to use the HubbleSpace Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph in order to obtainthe first high S/N UV spectra of Ariel, Titania, and Oberon.Because of our innovative targeting approach, we have alsobeen able to include Umbriel in our observational plans.These satellites sample almost the full range of UV albedosand UV/VIS colors exhibited by the large Uranian satellites.The spectral resolution and range will overlap with earth-based telescopic and spacecraft observations of these objectsallowing for comparisons of the UV data with existing visualand near-infrared spectra of these objects. These comparisonswill ultimately provide greater constraints on the relativelylow albedo spectrally neutral non-ice component on the Uraniansatellites. The existance of UV spectral features due tospecies such as O_3, H_2O_2 or carbon-rich macromolecules(e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) can provide evidencefor modification of the surfaces via plasma or meteoriticbombardment, alteration by high-energy ultraviolet radiation,or accretion of particles from nearby sources such asplanetary rings or dust bands.

  9. Electronic and Vibrational Spectra of InP Quantum Dots Formed by Sequential Ion Implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    We have performed sequential ion implantation of indium and phosphorus into silica combined with controlled thermal annealing to fabricate InP quantum dots in a dielectric host. Electronic and vibrational spectra were measured for the as-implanted and annealed samples. The annealed samples show a peak in the infrared spectra near 320/cm which is attributed to a surface phonon mode and is in good agreement with the value calculated from Frolich's theory of surface phonon polaritons. The electronic spectra show the development of a band near 390 nm that is attributed to quantum confined InP.

  10. Influence of substitution on the T-T absorption spectra in furocoumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryantseva, N. G.

    2006-11-01

    The present paper deals with compounds called photosensitizers, namely, psoralen, 3,4-phenyl-4',5'- cyclohexylpsoralen, 4'-methyl-3,4-cycloheptyl psoralen, 4',5'-dimethyl-3,4-cyclohexyl psoralen (fig. 1). The absorption spectra from excited triplets states were investigated. The computed triplet-triplet absorption spectra of research compounds have been determined using INDO method. The experimental triplet-triplet absorption spectra have been obtained using the technique of laser flash photolysis in ethanol. The compare of computed and experimental data is shows that the computed second band wavelenght throughout agree very well (0,5-6 nm) with experimental data.

  11. Analysis of the spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectra of N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Xia, Ruxiao; He, Xingdao; Zhang, Xinyi; Yu, Huan

    2016-10-01

    The influence of different pressures, temperatures, scattering angles and incident wavelengths to the relative intensity of the Brillouin peaks to the Rayleigh peak and the Brillouin shift in the spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (SRBS) spectra of N2 is analyzed by using the Tenti S6 model. A system for detecting the SRBS spectra of gas is also introduced in this paper. The SRBS spectra of N2 at different pressures with the incident wavelength of 532nm, the temperature of 300K and the scattering angle of 90° have been measured, the experiment results are well agreed to the simulations.

  12. Analysis of soft x-ray emission spectra of laser-produced dysprosium, erbium and thulium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheil, John; Dunne, Padraig; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Kos, Domagoj; Long, Elaine; Miyazaki, Takanori; O’Reilly, Fergal; O’Sullivan, Gerard; Sheridan, Paul; Suzuki, Chihiro; Sokell, Emma; White, Elgiva; Kilbane, Deirdre

    2017-03-01

    Soft x-ray emission spectra of dysprosium, erbium and thulium ions created in laser-produced plasmas were recorded with a flat-field grazing-incidence spectrometer in the 2.5–8 nm spectral range. The ions were produced using an Nd:YAG laser of 7 ns pulse duration and the spectra were recorded at various power densities. The experimental spectra were interpreted with the aid of the Cowan suite of atomic structure codes and the flexible atomic code. At wavelengths above 5.5 nm the spectra are dominated by overlapping n = 4 ‑ n = 4 unresolved transition arrays from adjacent ion stages. Below 6 nm, n = 4 ‑ n = 5 transitions also give rise to a series of interesting overlapping spectral features.

  13. Portable Raman spectroscopy using retina-safe (1550 nm) laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouillette, Carl; Smith, Wayne; Donahue, Michael; Huang, Hermes; Shende, Chetan; Sengupta, Atanu; Inscore, Frank; Patient, Michael; Farquharson, Stuart

    2012-06-01

    The use of portable Raman analyzers to identify unknown substances in the field has grown dramatically during the past decade. Measurements often require the laser beam to exit the confines of the sample compartment, which increases the potential of eye or skin damage. This is especially true for most commercial analyzers, which use 785 nm laser excitation. To overcome this safety concern, we have built a portable FT-Raman analyzer using a 1550 nm retina-safe excitation laser. Excitation at 1550 nm falls within the 1400 to 2000 nm retina-safe range, so called because the least amount of damage to the eye occurs in this spectral region. In contrast to wavelengths below 1400 nm, the retina-safe wavelengths are not focused by the eye, but are absorbed by the cornea, aqueous and vitreous humor. Here we compare the performance of this system to measurements of explosives at shorter wavelengths, as well as its ability to measure surface-enhanced Raman spectra of several chemicals, including the food contaminant melamine.

  14. Principal Component Analysis of Arctic Solar Irradiance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the FIRE (First ISCPP Regional Experiment) Arctic Cloud Experiment and coincident SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) campaign, detailed moderate resolution solar spectral measurements were made to study the radiative energy budget of the coupled Arctic Ocean - Atmosphere system. The NASA Ames Solar Spectral Flux Radiometers (SSFRs) were deployed on the NASA ER-2 and at the SHEBA ice camp. Using the SSFRs we acquired continuous solar spectral irradiance (380-2200 nm) throughout the atmospheric column. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to characterize the several tens of thousands of retrieved SSFR spectra and to determine the number of independent pieces of information that exist in the visible to near-infrared solar irradiance spectra. It was found in both the upwelling and downwelling cases that almost 100% of the spectral information (irradiance retrieved from 1820 wavelength channels) was contained in the first six extracted principal components. The majority of the variability in the Arctic downwelling solar irradiance spectra was explained by a few fundamental components including infrared absorption, scattering, water vapor and ozone. PCA analysis of the SSFR upwelling Arctic irradiance spectra successfully separated surface ice and snow reflection from overlying cloud into distinct components.

  15. Optical Spectra of Some Pathological Conditions of Stomach Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Kobsev, O. V.

    Diffuse reflection spectra, diffuse and collimated transmittance spectra of the mucous tissue of stomach anthrus in norm and at a low-differential form of stomach cancer are measured in 300-800 nm spectrum range. The optical coefficients of absorption (μa), scattering (μs) and anisotropy factor (g) for tissues with pathological changes have been calculated by the three-flux model and diffusion approximation methods. It has been determined that the magnitude of optical parameters grows with the development of malignant processes in stomach tissues which indicates the prevalence of forward light scattering and the increase in Mi scatter contribution to the total scattering coefficient of malignant tissues. It has also been shown that the application of two independent theories as methods of tissues' optical parameters determination (μa,μs,g) gives satisfactorily similar results.

  16. An atlas of ground UV spectra of selected stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkova, Valentina G.; Chentsov, Eugene L.; Kipper, Tonu; Panchuk, Vladimir E.; Tavolganskaya, Nonna S.; Yushkin, Maxim V.

    2011-09-01

    We present a spectral atlas of 4 B and A stars containing spectra in a poorly studied spectral range of 305-452 nm. The atlas is based on high resolution (R=60 000) spectra obtained with the 6 meter telescope (SAO, Russia) combined with the NES-spectrograph. The procedure of spectral lines identification and compilation of the atlas is discussed in detail. Using the spectral data we thoroughly investigated the velocity field in expanding atmospheres and envelopes of hot evolved stars β Ori, α Cyg and supergiant KS Per with the extreme hydrogen deficiency. The complete atlas and list of the identified spectral lines will be available via the astronomical database SIMBAD.

  17. Evaluation of Raman spectra of human brain tumor tissue using the learning vector quantization neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tuo; Chen, Changshui; Shi, Xingzhe; Liu, Chengyong

    2016-05-01

    The Raman spectra of tissue of 20 brain tumor patients was recorded using a confocal microlaser Raman spectroscope with 785 nm excitation in vitro. A total of 133 spectra were investigated. Spectra peaks from normal white matter tissue and tumor tissue were analyzed. Algorithms, such as principal component analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and the support vector machine, are commonly used to analyze spectral data. However, in this study, we employed the learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which is typically used for pattern recognition. By applying the proposed method, a normal diagnosis accuracy of 85.7% and a glioma diagnosis accuracy of 89.5% were achieved. The LVQ neural network is a recent approach to excavating Raman spectra information. Moreover, it is fast and convenient, does not require the spectra peak counterpart, and achieves a relatively high accuracy. It can be used in brain tumor prognostics and in helping to optimize the cutting margins of gliomas.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Comparative modelling of cool giants spectra (Lebzelter+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebzelter, T.; Heiter, U.; Abia, C.; Eriksson, K.; Ireland, M.; Neilson, H.; Nowotny, W.; Maldonado, J.; Merle, T.; Peterson, R.; Plez, B.; Short, C. I.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Worley, C.; Aringer, B.; Bladh, S.; de Laverny, P.; Goswami, A.; Mora, A.; Norris, R. P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Scholz, M.; Thevenin, F.; Tsuji, T.; Kordopatis, G.; Montesinos, B.; Wing, R. F.

    2012-09-01

    Spectra representing four cool giant stars were made available to various groups and individuals working in the area of spectral synthesis, asking them to derive stellar parameters from the data provided. The results were discussed at a workshop in Vienna in 2010. Most of the major codes currently used in the astronomical community for analyses of stellar spectra were included in this experiment. The files contain the spectra in the same form as they were made available to the experiment participants. The spectra for Star 1 and Star 2 are on the heliocentric wavelength scale (i.e. corrected for Earth motion, but not for stellar radial velocity). The spectra are normalized to the continuum by an automatic pipeline, which first divides the spectrum by a flat field response function and then removes the overall slope of the whole spectrum. These optical spectra also contain a number of telluric lines. The spectra for Star 3 and Star 4 are on the laboratory wavelength scale and the flux is normalized to the continuum. They do not contain telluric lines. Additional information which was provided to the experiment participants: ---------------------------------------------------------------- FileName Spectral resolution Signal-to-noise ratio ---------------------------------------------------------------- star1.dat 80000 463 at 871 nm star2.dat 80000 517 at 871 nm star3.dat 70000 125 star4.dat 70000 125 ---------------------------------------------------------------- (10 data files).

  19. Determination Of The Elements In The Olive Oil Responsible For The Luminescence Spectra Using A Green Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawaz, Saiof; Mahmod, Al-gafary; Lamia, Al-mamouly

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we were able to record luminescence spectra of olive, sunflower, corn, gourd and laurel oils, chlorophyll and carotene by using an argon laser (488-514 nm) and second harmonic Nd-YAG laser (532 nm) along with a monochromator whose spectral range is 400-900 nm. Only when the luminescence light is vertical to laser light, two new peaks 540 nm and 673 nm have been detected with the latter one is more intense. In discussing our results, we succeeded in determining which materials in olive oil are responsible for producing the luminescence spectral peak; 673 nm. The experimental data has shown that the chlorophyll is the main part of the olive components which gives the olive oil luminescence spectral peak; 673 nm. The other luminescence spectral peak; 540 nm was common to all different kinds of oil in general.

  20. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  1. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  2. THE SPECTRUM OF THORIUM FROM 250 nm TO 5500 nm: RITZ WAVELENGTHS AND OPTIMIZED ENERGY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm{sup –1} to 1800 cm{sup –1}). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer and Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis and Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  3. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm-1 to 1800 cm-1). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis & Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  4. Optical constants determination of neodymium and gadolinium in the 3-nm to 100-nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Windt, D. L.; Uspenskii, Y. A.; Seely, J. F.

    2006-08-01

    The optical constants (n, k) of the wavelength-dependent index of refraction N = n+ik = 1-δ+ik of Nd (Neodymium) and Gd (Gadolinium) are determined in the wavelength range of 3 nm to 100 nm by the transmittance method using synchrotron radiation. Nd and Gd films with thicknesses ranging from 5 nm to 180 nm were fabricated on Si photodiodes (which served as the coating substrates as well as the detectors) and capped with Si layers to protect these reactive rare earth elements from oxidation. The imaginary part (k) obtained directly from the transmittance measurement is used in the derivation of the real part (δ) of the complex index of refraction N through the Kramers- Kronig integral. The measured optical constants are used in the design of currently developed Nd- and Gd-based multilayers for solar imaging applications. Our results on Nd and Gd optical constants and the reflectance of some Nd- and Gd-based multilayers are presented.

  5. NXT:1980Di immersion scanner for 7nm and 5nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Roelof; Weichselbaum, Stefan; Droste, Richard; McLaren, Matthew; Koek, Bert; de Boeij, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Immersion scanners remain the critical lithography workhorses in semiconductor device manufacturing. When progressing towards the 7nm device node for logic and D18 device node for DRAM production, pattern-placement and layer-to-layer overlay requirements keep progressively scaling down and consequently require system improvements in immersion scanners. The on-product-overlay requirements are approaching levels of only a few nanometers, imposing stringent requirements on the scanner tool design in terms of reproducibility, accuracy and stability. In this paper we report on the performance of the NXT:1980Di immersion scanner. The NXT:1980Di builds upon the NXT:1970Ci, that is widely used for 16nm, 14nm and 10nm high-volume manufacturing. We will discuss the NXT:1980Di system- and sub-system/module enhancements that drive the scanner overlay, focus and productivity performance. Overlay, imaging, focus, productivity and defectivity data will be presented for multiple tools. To further reduce the on-product overlay system performance, alignment sensor contrast improvements as well as active reticle temperature conditioning are implemented on the NXT:1980Di. Reticle temperature conditioning will reduce reticle heating overlay and the higher contrast alignment sensor will improve alignment robustness for processed alignment targets. Due to an increased usage of multiple patterning techniques, an increased number of immersion exposures is required. NXT:1980Di scanner design modifications raised productivity levels from 250wph to 275wph. This productivity enhancement provides lower cost of ownership (CoO) for customers using immersion technology.

  6. Characterization of LANDSAT Panels Using the NIST BRDF Scale from 1100 nm to 2500 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Tsai, Benjamin K.; Allen, David W.; Cooksey, Catherine; Yoon, Howard; Hanssen, Leonard; Zeng, Jinan; Fulton, Linda; Biggar, Stuart; Markham, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Many earth observing sensors depend on white diffuse reflectance standards to derive scales of radiance traceable to the St Despite the large number of Earth observing sensors that operate in the reflective solar region of the spectrum, there has been no direct method to provide NIST traceable BRDF measurements out to 2500 rim. Recent developments in detector technology have allowed the NIST reflectance measurement facility to expand the operating range to cover the 250 nm to 2500 nm range. The facility has been modified with and additional detector using a cooled extended range indium gallium arsenide (Extended InGaAs) detector. Measurements were made for two PTFE white diffuse reflectance standards over the 1100 nm to 2500 nm region at a 0' incident and 45' observation angle. These two panels will be used to support the OLI calibration activities. An independent means of verification was established using a NIST radiance transfer facility based on spectral irradiance, radiance standards and a diffuse reflectance plaque. An analysis on the results and associated uncertainties will be discussed.

  7. Detection of methyl mercaptan with a 3393-nm distributed feedback interband cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenhui; Zhen, Weimeng; Zhang, Zheyuan; Li, Jinyi; Gao, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Attention has been focused recently on the harmful effects and malodor of methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), so it is desired to detect CH3SH in situ, sensitively, and selectively. We detected methyl mercaptan via tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) with a room-temperature distributed feedback interband cascade laser emitting around 3393 nm and a hollow waveguide gas cell with 5 m length. The fundamental characteristic fingerprint absorptions of CH3SH from 3260 to 3400 nm were examined, and the spectral line 3393.584 nm (corresponding to the ν 2 C-H symmetric stretch) was determined to be the optimum for CH3SH detection. The response characteristics of the TLAS system were established by implementing a set of CH3SH concentration gradient experiments with wavelength-scanned direct absorption spectroscopy. The results show that CH3SH TLAS spectra are in excellent agreement with spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory database; the TLAS response linearity is 0.987, and the detection limit is as low as 25 ppbv (parts per billion by volume, 10-9) with integrated time 1.84 s, corresponding to an absorbance of 1.34 × 10-4 (near the theoretical detection limit). Overall, the TLAS system is a robust method for CH3SH monitoring of industrial waste gas emissions.

  8. Shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy using a microsystem light source at 488 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiwald, M.; Sowoidnich, K.; Schmidt, H.; Sumpf, B.; Erbert, G.; Kronfeldt, H.-D.

    2010-04-01

    Experimental results in shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy (SERRDS) at 488 nm will be presented. A novel compact diode laser system was used as excitation light source. The device is based on a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser as a pump light source and a nonlinear frequency doubling using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide crystal. All elements including micro-optics are fixed on a micro-optical bench with a footprint of 25 mm × 5 mm. An easy temperature management of the DFB laser and the crystal was used for wavelength tuning. The second harmonic generation (SHG) provides an additional suppression of the spontaneous emission. Raman spectra of polystyrene demonstrate that no laser bandpass filter is needed for the Raman experiments. Resonance-Raman spectra of the restricted food colorant Tartrazine (FD&C Yellow 5, E 102) in distilled water excited at 488 nm demonstrate the suitability of this light source for SERRDS. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.4 μmol.l-1 of E102 enables SERRDS at 488 nm for trace detection in e.g. food safety control as an appropriate contactless spectroscopic technique.

  9. Comparison of reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Mostafa; Ando, Masatoshi; Stookey, George K.

    2000-03-01

    Development of dental caries is associated with the loss of minerals and change in the enamel structure. In this study, we have measured and compared reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel, to investigate its utility in detection and analysis of dental caries. One hundred twenty, 3-mm diameter human enamel cores, with no sign of fluorosis, tetracycline stain, hypoplasia, fracture and restorations, were prepared. The enamel surfaces then were ground and polished. Specimens were placed on a fitted holder with either black or white color for background, with no fluorescence. The baseline spectra were measured using a spectrophotometer with enclosed diffused illumination. Spectra measured from 380 to 780 nm at 5 nm intervals. All measurements were corrected to compensate for the spectrum of illumination. The specimens were divided into two groups and exposed to a demineralizing solution, for 48 and 96 hours, respectively. Reflectance spectra of specimens were measured following lesion induction. All specimens were sectioned and analyzed by transverse microradiography (TMR), where lesion depth and mineral loss ((Delta) Z) were measured. Dimensionality of multi-spectral data was reduced through its conversion to L*a*b* color coordinates and principal component analysis (PCA). Multiple linear regression analysis showed low correlation between L*a*b* and lesion depth and mineral loss. PCA analysis showed higher correlation coefficient, compared to L*a*b*. Preliminary results of this study suggest that multi-spectral measurement and analysis of the tooth surface could be useful in predicting the depth and severity of an early carious lesion.

  10. Maskless plasmonic lithography at 22 nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang; Park, Yongshik; Xiong, Yi; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wang, Yuan; Zeng, Li; Xiong, Shaomin; Rho, Junsuk; Sun, Cheng; Bogy, David B; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging and photolithography promise broad applications in nano-electronics, metrologies, and single-molecule biology. Light diffraction however sets a fundamental limit on optical resolution, and it poses a critical challenge to the down-scaling of nano-scale manufacturing. Surface plasmons have been used to circumvent the diffraction limit as they have shorter wavelengths. However, this approach has a trade-off between resolution and energy efficiency that arises from the substantial momentum mismatch. Here we report a novel multi-stage scheme that is capable of efficiently compressing the optical energy at deep sub-wavelength scales through the progressive coupling of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) and localized surface plasmons (LSPs). Combining this with airbearing surface technology, we demonstrate a plasmonic lithography with 22 nm half-pitch resolution at scanning speeds up to 10 m/s. This low-cost scheme has the potential of higher throughput than current photolithography, and it opens a new approach towards the next generation semiconductor manufacturing.

  11. Faster qualification of 193-nm resists for 100-nm development using photo cell monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris M.; Kallingal, Chidam; Zawadzki, Mary T.; Jeewakhan, Nazneen N.; Kaviani, Nazila N.; Krishnan, Prakash; Klaum, Arthur D.; Van Ess, Joel

    2003-05-01

    The development of 100-nm design rule technologies is currently taking place in many R&D facilities across the world. For some critical alyers, the transition to 193-nm resist technology has been required to meet this leading edge design rule. As with previous technology node transitions, the materials and processes available are undergoing changes and improvements as vendors encounter and solve problems. The initial implementation of the 193-nm resits process did not meet the photolithography requirements of some IC manufacturers due to very high Post Exposure Bake temperature sensitivity and consequently high wafer to wafer CD variation. The photoresist vendors have been working to improve the performance of the 193-nm resists to meet their customer's requirements. Characterization of these new resists needs to be carried out prior to implementation in the R&D line. Initial results on the second-generation resists evaluated at Cypress Semicondcutor showed better CD control compared to the aelrier resist with comparable Depth of Focus (DOF), Exposure Latitute, Etch Resistance, etc. In addition to the standard lithography parameters, resist characterization needs to include defect density studies. It was found that the new resists process with the best CD control, resulted in the introduction of orders of magnitude higher yield limiting defects at Gate, Contact adn Local Interconnect. The defect data were shared with the resists vendor and within days of the discovery the resist vendor was able to pinpoint the source of the problem. The fix was confirmed and the new resists were successfully released to production. By including defect monitoring into the resist qualification process, Cypress Semiconductor was able to 1) drive correction actions earlier resulting in faster ramp and 2) eliminate potential yield loss. We will discuss in this paper how to apply the Micro Photo Cell Monitoring methodology for defect monitoring in the photolithogprhay module and the

  12. Atomic transition probabilities of Ce I from Fourier transform spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; Chisholm, J.; Nitz, D. E.; Wood, M. P.; Sobeck, J.; Den Hartog, E. A.

    2010-04-01

    Atomic transition probabilities for 2874 lines of the first spectrum of cerium (Ce I) are reported. These data are from new branching fraction measurements on Fourier transform spectra normalized with previously reported radiative lifetimes from time-resolved laser-induced-fluorescence measurements (Den Hartog et al 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 085006). The wavelength range of the data set is from 360 to 1500 nm. Comparisons are made to previous investigations which are less extensive. Accurate Ce i transition probabilities are needed for lighting research and development on metal halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  13. Optical absorption and scattering spectra of pathological stomach tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Lakhina, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Diffuse reflection spectra of biotissues in vivo and transmission and reflection coefficients for biotissues in vitro are measured over 300-800 nm. These data are used to determine the spectral absorption and scattering indices and the scattering anisotropy factor for stomach mucous membranes under normal and various pathological conditions (chronic atrophic and ulcerous defects, malignant neoplasms). The most importan tphysiological (hemodynamic and oxygenation levels) and structural-morphological (scatterer size and density) parameters are also determined. The results of a morphofunctional study correlate well with the optical properties and are consistent with data from a histomorphological analysis of the corresponding tissues.

  14. THE 217.5 nm BAND, INFRARED ABSORPTION, AND INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Duley, W. W.; Hu, Anming E-mail: a2hu@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-12-20

    We report on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ''slow'' deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility. The initial chemistry leads to the formation of carbon chains, together with a limited range of small aromatic ring molecules, and eventually results in carbon nanoparticles having an sp {sup 2}/sp {sup 3} ratio Almost-Equal-To 0.4. Spectroscopic analysis of particle composition indicates that naphthalene and naphthalene derivatives are important constituents of this material. We suggest that carbon nanoparticles with similar composition are responsible for the appearance of the interstellar 217.5 nm band and outline how these particles can form in situ under diffuse cloud conditions by deposition of carbon on the surface of silicate grains. Spectral data from carbon nanoparticles formed under these conditions accurately reproduce IR emission spectra from a number of Galactic sources. We provide the first detailed fits to observational spectra of Type A and B emission sources based entirely on measured spectra of a carbonaceous material that can be produced in the laboratory.

  15. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  16. Two slow meteors with spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubs, Martin; Sposetti, Stefano; Spinner, Roger; Booz, Beat

    2017-01-01

    On January 2, 2017 two peculiar meteors (M20170102_001216 and M20170102_015202) were observed by several stations in Switzerland. Both had a long duration, slow velocity, similar brightness and a very similar radiant. As they appeared in a time interval of 100 minutes, a satellite was suspected as a possible origin of these two observations. A closer inspection however showed that this interpretation was incorrect. The two objects were slow meteors. Spectra were taken from both objects, which were nearly identical. Together this points to a common origin of the two meteors.

  17. The Optical Spectra of Aerosols.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    espressione dell’ampiezza di diffusione in * avanti vengono fattorizzati. In questo modo la somma delle am- piezze di diftusione di "cluster" con...F1D-Ali35 687 THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF REROSOLSOU) MESSINA UNIV (ITALY) i/i 1ST DI STRIJTTURA DELLA IIATERIA F BORIIHESE OCT 83 UNCLASSIFIED DRR78--85F...ELEMENT PROJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS * Istituto di Struttura della Materia 61102A-1T161102-BH57-01 Un iversita di Messina V~nina. Ttalv St

  18. Medium resolution spectra of the shuttle glow in the visible region of the spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viereck, R. A.; Murad, E.; Pike, C. P.; Mende, S. B.; Swenson, G. R.; Culbertson, F. L.; Springer, B. C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent spectral measurements of the visible shuttle glow (lambda = 400 - 800 nm) at medium resolution (1 nm) reveal the same featureless continuum with a maximum near 680 nm that was reported previously. This is also in good agreement with recent laboratory experiments that attribute the glow to the emissions of NO2 formed by the recombination of O + NO. The data that are presented were taken from the aft flight deck with a hand-held spectrograph and from the shuttle bay with a low-light-level television camera. Shuttle glow images and spectra are presented and compared with laboratory data and theory.

  19. Method of processing positron lifetime spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Valuev, N.P.; Klimov, A.B.; Zhikharev, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes a method for the processing of spectra of positron annihilation which permits a much more relaible determination of the lifetime during numerical processing of spectra by computer.

  20. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  1. Selection of Portable Spectrometers for Planetary Exploration: A Comparison of 532 nm and 785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of Reduced Carbon in Archean Cherts

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Ian B.; Ingley, Richard; Marshall, Craig P.; Olcott Marshall, Alison; Edwards, Howell G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge and understanding of the martian environment has advanced greatly over the past two decades, beginning with NASA's return to the surface of Mars with the Pathfinder mission and its rover Sojourner in 1997 and continuing today with data being returned by the Curiosity rover. Reduced carbon, however, is yet to be detected on the martian surface, despite its abundance in meteorites originating from the planet. If carbon is detected on Mars, it could be a remnant of extinct life, although an abiotic source is much more likely. If the latter is the case, environmental carbonaceous material would still provide a source of carbon that could be utilized by microbial life for biochemical synthesis and could therefore act as a marker for potential habitats, indicating regions that should be investigated further. For this reason, the detection and characterization of reduced or organic carbon is a top priority for both the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars rover, currently due for launch in 2018, and for NASA's Mars 2020 mission. Here, we present a Raman spectroscopic study of Archean chert Mars analog samples from the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. Raman spectra were acquired with a flight-representative 532 nm instrument and a 785 nm instrument with similar operating parameters. Reduced carbon was successfully detected with both instruments; however, its Raman bands were detected more readily with 785 nm excitation, and the corresponding spectra exhibited superior signal-to-noise ratios and reduced background levels. Key Words: Raman spectroscopy—Archean—Organic matter—Planetary science—Mars. Astrobiology 15, 420–429. PMID:26060980

  2. Classification and radiative-transfer modeling of meteorite spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentikäinen, H.; Penttilä, A.; Peltoniemi, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    The interpretation of asteroid spectra is closely tied to surface structure and composition. Asteroid surfaces are usually assumed to be covered with a regolith, which is a mixture of mineral grains ranging from micrometers to centimeters in size. The inverse problem of deducing the characteristics of the grains from the scattering of light (e.g., using photometric and polarimetric observations) is difficult. Meteorite spectroscopy can be a valuable alternative source of information considering that unweathered meteoritic ''falls'' are almost pristine samples of their parent bodies. Reflectance spectra of 18 different meteorite samples were measured with the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO) covering a wavelength range of 450--2250 nm [1,2]. The measurements expand the database of reflectance spectra obtained by Paton et al. [3] and Gaffey [4]. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) performed on the spectra indicates a separation of the undifferentiated ordinary chondrites and the differentiated achondrites. The principal components also suggest a discrimination between the spectra of ordinary chondrites with petrologic grades 5 and 6. The distinction is not present when the data are supplemented with the spectra from the two other data sets obtained with differing measuring techniques. To further investigate the different classifications, the PCA is implemented with selected spectral features contrary to the previous analyses, which encompassed the complete spectra. Single-scattering albedos for meteoritic fundamental scatterers were derived with a Monte Carlo radiative-transfer model [1]. In the derivation, realistic scattering phase functions were utilized. The functions were obtained by fitting triple Henyey-Greenstein functions to the measured scattering phase functions of olivine powder for two different size distributions [5,6]. The simulated reflectances for different scattering phase functions were matched to the measured meteorite

  3. [Ultraviolet absorption spectra of iodine, iodide ion and triiodide ion].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yong-Ju; Liu, Cui-Ge; Mo, Li-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet absorption spectra of iodine I2, iodide ion I(-) and triiodide ion I3(-) were studied, and molar absorptivities of these species were determined. Absorption spectrum of I2 aqueous solution appears as an absorption peak at 203 nm with a molar absorptivity of 1.96 x 10(4) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1). Absorption spectrum of I(-) appears as two absorption peaks at 193 and 226 nm with molar absorptivities of 1.42 x 10(4) and 1.34 x 10(4) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1), respectively. When I2 aqueous solution is mixed with KI solution, two absorption peaks appear at 288 and 350 nm, respectively, indicating the formation of I3(-). Using saturation method, molar absorptivities of I3(-) at 288 and 350 nm were determined to be 3.52 x 10(4) and 2.32 x 10(4) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1), respectively.

  4. An Inverse Modeling Approach to Estimating Phytoplankton Pigment Concentrations from Phytoplankton Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moisan, John R.; Moisan, Tiffany A. H.; Linkswiler, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton absorption spectra and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigment observations from the Eastern U.S. and global observations from NASA's SeaBASS archive are used in a linear inverse calculation to extract pigment-specific absorption spectra. Using these pigment-specific absorption spectra to reconstruct the phytoplankton absorption spectra results in high correlations at all visible wavelengths (r(sup 2) from 0.83 to 0.98), and linear regressions (slopes ranging from 0.8 to 1.1). Higher correlations (r(sup 2) from 0.75 to 1.00) are obtained in the visible portion of the spectra when the total phytoplankton absorption spectra are unpackaged by multiplying the entire spectra by a factor that sets the total absorption at 675 nm to that expected from absorption spectra reconstruction using measured pigment concentrations and laboratory-derived pigment-specific absorption spectra. The derived pigment-specific absorption spectra were further used with the total phytoplankton absorption spectra in a second linear inverse calculation to estimate the various phytoplankton HPLC pigments. A comparison between the estimated and measured pigment concentrations for the 18 pigment fields showed good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.5) for 7 pigments and very good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.7) for chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin. Higher correlations result when the analysis is carried out at more local geographic scales. The ability to estimate phytoplankton pigments using pigment-specific absorption spectra is critical for using hyperspectral inverse models to retrieve phytoplankton pigment concentrations and other Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) from passive remote sensing observations.

  5. Photodissociation of ozone at 276nm by photofragment imaging and high resolution photofragment translational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, D.A.; Suits, A.G.

    1996-11-01

    The photodissociation of ozone at 276 nm is investigated using both state resolved ion imaging and high-resolution photofragment translational spectroscopy. Ion images from both [3+1] and [2+1] resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of the O({sup 1}D) photofragment are reported. All images show strong evidence of O({sup 1}D) orbital alignment. Photofragment translation spectroscopy time-of-flight spectra are reported for the O{sub 2} ({sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}) photofragment. Total kinetic energy release distributions determined form these spectra are generally consistent with those distributions determined from imaging data. Observed angular distributions are reported for both detection methods, pointing to some unresolved questions for ozone dissociation in this wavelength region.

  6. Europa's ultraviolet absorption band (260 to 320 nm) - Temporal and spatial evidence from IUE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockert, Maureen E.; Nelson, Robert M.; Lane, Arthur L.; Matson, Dennis L.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of 33 IUE UV spectra of Europa, obtained from 1978 to 1982 for orbital phase angles of 21 to 343 deg, confirms that the Lane et al. (1981) absorption feature, centered at 280 nm, is most clearly revealed when 223-333 deg orbital phase angle spectra are ratioed to those nearest 90 deg. The feature's strength is noted to have persisted over the 5-year period studied, suggesting that no large endogenically or exogenically generated changes in surface sulfur dioxide concentration have occurred. These results further substantiate the Lane et al. hypothesis that the feature is due to the implantation of Io plasma torus-derived sulfur ions on the Europa trailing side's water-ice surface.

  7. Optical properties of apple skin and flesh in the wavelength range from 350 to 2200 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeys, Wouter; Velazco-Roa, Maria A.; Thennadil, Suresh N.; Ramon, Herman; Nicolaï, Bart M.

    2008-03-01

    Optical measurement of fruit quality is challenging due to the presence of a skin around the fruit flesh and the multiple scattering by the structured tissues. To gain insight in the light-tissue interaction, the optical properties of apple skin and flesh tissue are estimated in the 350-2200 nm range for three cultivars. For this purpose, single integrating sphere measurements are combined with inverse adding-doubling. The observed absorption coefficient spectra are dominated by water in the near infrared and by pigments and chlorophyll in the visible region, whose concentrations are much higher in skin tissue. The scattering coefficient spectra show the monotonic decrease with increasing wavelength typical for biological tissues with skin tissue being approximately three times more scattering than flesh tissue. Comparison to the values from time-resolved spectroscopy reported in literature showed comparable profiles for the optical properties, but overestimation of the absorption coefficient values, due to light losses.

  8. Optical properties of apple skin and flesh in the wavelength range from 350 to 2200 nm.

    PubMed

    Saeys, Wouter; Velazco-Roa, Maria A; Thennadil, Suresh N; Ramon, Herman; Nicolaï, Bart M

    2008-03-01

    Optical measurement of fruit quality is challenging due to the presence of a skin around the fruit flesh and the multiple scattering by the structured tissues. To gain insight in the light-tissue interaction, the optical properties of apple skin and flesh tissue are estimated in the 350-2200 nm range for three cultivars. For this purpose, single integrating sphere measurements are combined with inverse adding-doubling. The observed absorption coefficient spectra are dominated by water in the near infrared and by pigments and chlorophyll in the visible region, whose concentrations are much higher in skin tissue. The scattering coefficient spectra show the monotonic decrease with increasing wavelength typical for biological tissues with skin tissue being approximately three times more scattering than flesh tissue. Comparison to the values from time-resolved spectroscopy reported in literature showed comparable profiles for the optical properties, but overestimation of the absorption coefficient values, due to light losses.

  9. Distributed Humidity Sensing in PMMA Optical Fibers at 500 nm and 650 nm Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Liehr, Sascha; Breithaupt, Mathias; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-03-31

    Distributed measurement of humidity is a sought-after capability for various fields of application, especially in the civil engineering and structural health monitoring sectors. This article presents a method for distributed humidity sensing along polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) by analyzing wavelength-dependent Rayleigh backscattering and attenuation characteristics at 500 nm and 650 nm wavelengths. Spatially resolved humidity sensing is obtained from backscatter traces of a dual-wavelength optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). Backscatter dependence, attenuation dependence as well as the fiber length change are characterized as functions of relative humidity. Cross-sensitivity effects are discussed and quantified. The evaluation of the humidity-dependent backscatter effects at the two wavelength measurements allows for distributed and unambiguous measurement of relative humidity. The technique can be readily employed with low-cost standard polymer optical fibers and commercial OTDR devices.

  10. Polarization properties of lidar scattering from clouds at 347 nm and 694 nm.

    PubMed

    Pal, S R; Carswell, A I

    1978-08-01

    The polarization characteristics of lidar scattering from cumulus and low-lying shower clouds have been measured with a system operating at 694 nm (red) and 347 nm (blue). The backscatter profiles of the polarization components as well as of the total intensity of the return are presented and discussed for the two wavelengths. The linear depolarization ratio delta, which can be used as a measure of the unpolarized multiple scattering, has been obtained at both wavelengths. This quantity has a very low value at cloud base for both wavelengths and increases with pulse penetration. The blue registers generally higher values of a within the cloud. The measured total intensity backscatter functions for both wavelengths are presented and discussed in relation to theoretical calculations of cloud models.

  11. Novel 980-nm and 490-nm light sources using vertical cavity lasers with extended coupled cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, John G.; Mooradian, Aram; Lewis, Alan; Shchegrov, Andrei V.; Strzelecka, Eva M.; Lee, Dicky; Watson, Jason P.; Liebman, Michael K.; Carey, Glen P.; Umbrasas, Arvydas; Amsden, Charles A.; Cantos, Brad D.; Hitchens, William R.; Heald, David L.; Doan, Vincent V.; Cannon, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    We have developed novel electrically pumped, surface-emitting lasers emitting at 980 nm with an extended coupled cavity. The concept is scalable from monolithic low power devices all the way to high power extended cavity lasers. The latter have demonstrated 1W cw multi-mode and 0.5 W cw in a TEM00 mode and a single frequency, with 90% coupling efficiency into a single-mode fiber. By inserting a nonlinear optical medium in the external cavity, efficient and compact frequency doubling has been achieved with CW output powers 5-40 mW demonstrated at 490 nm. The latter devices are especially noteworthy due to their very low noise, sub 10 μrad beam pointing stability combined with small size, low power consumption and high efficiency.

  12. A 15 W 1152 nm Raman fiber laser with 6 nm spectral width for Ho3+-doped crystal's pumping source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiuyan; Jiang, Huawei

    2016-12-01

    A 11.5 W 1152 nm Raman fiber laser with 6 nm spectral width was demonstrated based on the resonator constructed with one fiber loop mirror and one fiber Bragg grating. By mans of experimental measurement and theoretical calculation, the reflectivity of the fiber loop mirror was confirmed as 0.93. The Yb3+-doped 1090 nm fiber length was about 5 m. When the maximum pumping power of 976 nm laser was 54.8 W, 32.2 W 1090 nm laser was obtained and the optical to optical conversion efficiency from 1090 nm to 1152 nm light was 48%. Finally, the 1152 nm Raman fiber laser was used for pumping Ho3+:LLF crystal, and the 1194 nm fluorescence emission peak was detected for the first time.

  13. Investigations of a dual seeded 1178nm Raman laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Matthew; Henry, Leanne J.; Klopfer, Michael; Jain, Ravinder

    2016-03-01

    The leakage of 1121 nm power from a resonator cavity because of spectral broadening seriously degrades the performance of a Raman resonator by reducing the 1121 nm circulating power and the 1178 nm output power. Therefore, it is important to understand the conditions which minimize 1121 nm power leakage, maximize 1121 intracavity and 1178 nm output power while enabling a manageable Stimulated Brillouin Scattering gain for narrow linewidth systems. It was found that cavity lengths longer than approximately 40 m didn't result in significantly more 1121 nm linewidth broadening. Relative to the high reflectivity bandwidth of the fiber Bragg gratings, it was found that 4 nm FBGs seemed to optimize 1178 nm amplification while minimizing the amount of 1121 nm power leakage. A two stage high power 1178 nm Raman system was built and 20 W of 1178 nm output power was achieved with a polarization extinction ratio of 21 and nearly diffraction limited beam quality. Linewidth broadening was found to increase as the 1178 nm output increased and was approximately 8 GHz when the 1178 nm output power was 20 W. Because of the linewidth broadening, a co-pumped second Stokes Raman laser system is not useful for the sodium guidestar laser application which requires narrow linewidth.

  14. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON, J W; DROBSHOFF, A D; BEACH, R J; MESSERLY, M J; PAYNE, S A; BROWN, A; PENNINGTON, D M; BAMFORD, D J; SHARPE, S J; COOK, D J

    2006-01-19

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the competing 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  15. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jay W.; Drobshoff, Alex D.; Beach, Raymond J.; Messerly, Michael J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Brown, Aaron; Pennington, Deanna M.; Bamford, Douglas J.; Sharpe, Scott J.; Cook, David J.

    2006-02-01

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichio-metric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd 3+ fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M2 of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  16. Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes: fluorescent and absorption spectroscopy under two-photon (1200-1500 nm) and one-photon (600-750 nm) excitation by laser femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, Il'ya A.; Kompanets, Viktor O.; Chekalin, Sergey V.; Makhneva, Zoya K.; Moskalenko, Andrey A.; Razjivin, Andrei P.

    2010-09-01

    The pathways of excitation energy transfer (EET) via pigments of the light-harvesting antenna are still in discussion. The bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence of peripheral light-harvesting complexes (LH2) from purple bacteria can be observed upon two-photon excitation (TPE) within 1200-1500 nm spectral range (a broad band near 1300 nm). Earlier the occurrence of this band was taken as an evidence for the participation of "dark" carotenoid S1 state in EET processes (see [Walla et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 10808-10813 (2000)] and references in it). However we showed that TPE spectrum of LH2 fluorescence within 1200-1500 nm is not associated with carotenoids [Stepanenko et al., J. Phys. Chem. B. 113(34), 11720-11723 (2009)]. Here we present TPE spectra of fluorescence for chromatophores and lightharvesting complexes LH2 and LH1 from wild-type cells and from carotenoid-depleted or carotenoidless mutant cells of several purple bacteria. The broad band within 1300-1400 nm was found for all preparations. Absorption pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy applied to LH2 complex from Rb. sphaeroides revealed the similar spectral and kinetic patterns for TPE at 1350 nm and one-photon excitation at 675 nm. Analysis of pigment composition of this complex by high-pressure liquid chromatography showed that even under mild isolation conditions some bacteriochlorophyll molecules were oxidized to 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules having the long-wavelength absorption peak in the 650-700 nm range. It is proposed that these 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules are responsible for the broad band in TPE spectra within the 1200-1500 nm region.

  17. Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes: fluorescent and absorption spectroscopy under two-photon (1200-1500 nm) and one-photon (600-750 nm) excitation by laser femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, Il'ya A.; Kompanets, Viktor O.; Chekalin, Sergey V.; Makhneva, Zoya K.; Moskalenko, Andrey A.; Razjivin, Andrei P.

    2011-02-01

    The pathways of excitation energy transfer (EET) via pigments of the light-harvesting antenna are still in discussion. The bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence of peripheral light-harvesting complexes (LH2) from purple bacteria can be observed upon two-photon excitation (TPE) within 1200-1500 nm spectral range (a broad band near 1300 nm). Earlier the occurrence of this band was taken as an evidence for the participation of "dark" carotenoid S1 state in EET processes (see [Walla et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 10808-10813 (2000)] and references in it). However we showed that TPE spectrum of LH2 fluorescence within 1200-1500 nm is not associated with carotenoids [Stepanenko et al., J. Phys. Chem. B. 113(34), 11720-11723 (2009)]. Here we present TPE spectra of fluorescence for chromatophores and lightharvesting complexes LH2 and LH1 from wild-type cells and from carotenoid-depleted or carotenoidless mutant cells of several purple bacteria. The broad band within 1300-1400 nm was found for all preparations. Absorption pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy applied to LH2 complex from Rb. sphaeroides revealed the similar spectral and kinetic patterns for TPE at 1350 nm and one-photon excitation at 675 nm. Analysis of pigment composition of this complex by high-pressure liquid chromatography showed that even under mild isolation conditions some bacteriochlorophyll molecules were oxidized to 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules having the long-wavelength absorption peak in the 650-700 nm range. It is proposed that these 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules are responsible for the broad band in TPE spectra within the 1200-1500 nm region.

  18. Visible Spectra of Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Nagarajan, R.; Maier, J. P.; Zhuang, X.; Le, A.; Steimle, T. C.

    2011-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO) has been extensively studied spectroscopically due to its astrophysical relevance. TiO is the main opacity source in the atmospheres of cool M-type stars in the visible and near infrared. In view of the high cosmic abundance of Ti and O, titanium dioxide (TiO2) is believed to play an important role in dust formation processes from the gas-phase in circumstellar shells of oxygen-rich stars. The electronic spectra of a cold molecular beam of TiO2 have been investigated using mass-resolved resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. TiO2 was produced by laser ablation of a pure titanium rod in the presence of a supersonic expanding mixture of approximately 5% O2 in either helium or argon. The spectra were recorded in the region 17500 cm-1 to 22500 cm-1 and the bands assigned to the A1B2 ← X1A1 transition. The origin and harmonic vibrational constants for the A1B2 state were determined to be: T000 = 17593(5) cm-1, ω1 = 876(3) cm-1, ω2 = 184(1) cm-1, and ω3 = 316(2) cm-1. Further, the dispersed fluorescence of a few bands were recorded to obtain vibrational parameters for the X1A1 state.

  19. Spectral emission properties of a LPP light source in the sub-200nm range for wafer inspection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Hudgins, Duane; Abhari, Reza; Abreau, F.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the spectral emission proprieties of a droplet-based laser-produced plasma are investigated in the VUV range. These studies are performed with a spectrograph operating from 30 nm to 180 nm at a spectral resolution of 0.1 nm. The emission spectra are recorded for different droplet-based metal fuels such as tin, indium and gallium in the presence of different background gas pressure levels. The experimental results are relevant for alternative light sources that would be needed for future wafer inspection tools. In addition, the experimental results help to determine the Out- Of-Band (OOB) radiation emission of the EUV source. By tuning the type of fuel, the laser energies and the background gas, the LPP light source shows good capabilities to be operated as a tunable light source that covers a spectral emission range from the EUV to the sub-200 nm range.

  20. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    DOE PAGES

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; ...

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environmentsmore » for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.« less

  1. A robust 45 nm gate-length CMOSFET for 90 nm Hi-speed technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, K. Y.; Chan, V.; Rengarajan, R.; Lee, H. K.; Rovedo, N.; Lim, E. H.; Yang, S.; Jamin, F.; Nguyen, P.; Lin, W.; Lai, C. W.; Teh, Y. W.; Lee, J.; Kim, L.; Luo, Z.; Ng, H.; Sudijono, J.; Wann, C.; Yang, I.

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a robust 45 nm gate-length CMOSFET for 90 nm node high performance application. Aggressive gate length and gate dielectric scaling along with optimized strain engineering enable high performance device similar to 65 nm node CMOSFET [Nakahara Y, et al. IEDM Tech Dig 2003;281] We have utilized oxy-nitride gate with post-nitridation anneal, high ramp rate spike anneal, low temperature spacer scheme and stress controlled SiN contact etch stop liner process in order to improve drive current as well as transistor short-channel roll-off. In particular, we will focus on the study of middle-of-line (MOL) process parameters, (i.e. MOL thermal expense and mechanical stress from contact etch stop liner) on transistor performance and reliability. Based on the study, we have obtained device exhibit drive-current of 900/485 μA/μm for NMOSFET and PMOSFET, respectively, at standard supply voltage of 1 V.

  2. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Funkhouser, E. D.; King, M. P.; Narasimham, B.; Bartz, B.; Baumann, R.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Labello, R.; Nichols, J.; Weeden-Wright, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environments for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.

  3. Application of 266-nm and 355-nm Nd:YAG laser radiation for the investigation of fuel-rich sooting hydrocarbon flames by raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Egermann, Jan; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2004-10-10

    We describe the use of linear Raman scattering for the investigation of fuel-rich sooting flames. In comparison, the frequency-tripled and -quadrupled fundamental wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser have been used as an excitation source for study of the applicability of these laser wavelengths for analysis of sooting flames. The results obtained show that, for the investigation of strongly sooting flames, 266-nm excitation is better than 355-nm excitation. Although the entire fluorescence intensity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) decreases with rising excitation wavelength, there is increased interference with the Raman signals by displacement of the spectral region of the Raman signals toward the fluorescence maximum of the laser-induced fluorescence emissions. Besides the broadband signals of PAHs, narrowband emissions of laser-produced C2 occur in the spectra of sooting flames and affect the Raman signals. These C2 emission bands are completely depolarized and can be separated by polarization-resolved detection. A comparison of the laser-induced fluorescence emissions of an ethylene flame with those of a methane flame shows the same spectral features, but the intensity of the emissions is larger by a factor of 5 for the ethylene fuel. Using 266-nm radiation for Raman signal excitation makes possible measurements in the ethylene flame also.

  4. Transit Spectra of a Hazy World Revealed by Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Hazes dramatically influence exoplanet observations by obscuring deeper atmospheric layers. This effect is especially pronounced in transit spectroscopy, which probes large pathlengths through an exoplanet atmosphere as it crosses the disk of its host star. While hazes are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra, it is difficult to make inferences from the observations because of the need to disentangle effects of noise, gas absorption, and haze extinction. Here, we turn to Titan, an extremely well studied world with a hazy atmosphere, to better understand how high altitude hazes can impact exoplanet transit observations. We use solar occultation observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. The data, which span 0.88-5 microns at a resolution of 12-18 nm, show strong methane absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases, including acetylene and carbon monoxide. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous absorption features. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum, and demonstrate how high altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding our observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Overall, these new data challenge our understanding of how hazes influence exoplanet transit observations, and provide a means of testing proposed approaches for exoplanet characterization. Additionally, our findings will

  5. Titan Reveals Transit Spectra of a Definitively Hazy World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-11-01

    Hazes dramatically influence exoplanet observations by obscuring deeper atmospheric layers. This effect is especially pronounced in transit spectroscopy, which probes large pathlengths through an exoplanet atmosphere as it crosses the disk of its host star. While hazes are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra, it is difficult to make inferences from the observations because of the need to disentangle effects of noise, gas absorption, and haze extinction. Here, we turn to Titan, an extremely well studied world with a hazy atmosphere, to better understand how high altitude hazes can impact exoplanet transit observations. We use solar occultation observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. The data, which span 0.88-5 microns at a resolution of 12-18 nm, show strong methane absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases, including acetylene and carbon monoxide. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is neither flat nor has a pure Rayleigh slope, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous absorption features. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum, and demonstrate how high altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding our observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Overall, these new data challenge our understanding of how hazes influence exoplanet transit observations, and provide a means of testing proposed approaches for exoplanet characterization

  6. 322 W single-mode Yb-doped all-fiber laser operated at 1120 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanwei; Xiao, Hu; Zhou, Pu; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2014-05-01

    An all-fiber, high-power, spectrally clean, single-mode Yb-doped fiber oscillator at 1120 nm wavelength is demonstrated. By optimizing the reflectivity of the output coupler and the length of the gain fiber, an output power of 322 W and an optical efficiency of 71% have been achieved. The output power, spectra, and bandwidth broadening are presented and briefly discussed. The power scaling capability of the cavity is analyzed on the basis of the thermal effect, and a maximal thermal-damage-free output power of 450 W could be expected.

  7. Retinal Oximetry with 510-600 nm Light Based on Partial Least-Squares Regression Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Hidenobu; Furukawa, Hiromitsu

    2010-11-01

    The oxygen saturation distribution in the retinal blood stream is estimated by measuring spectral images and adopting the partial-least squares regression. The wavelengths range used for the calculation is from 510 to 600 nm. The regression model for estimating the retinal oxygen saturation is built on the basis of the arterial and venous blood spectra. The experiment is performed using an originally designed spectral ophthalmoscope. The obtained two-dimensional (2D) oxygen saturation indicates the reasonable oxygen level across the retina. The measurement quality is compared with those obtained using other wavelengths sets and data processing methods.

  8. Creation and testing of an artificial neural network based carbonate detector for Mars rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, Benjamin; Castano, Rebecca; Gilmore, Martha S.; Merrill, Matthew; Greenwood, James P.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an artificial neural network (ANN) based carbonate detector capable of running on current and future rover hardware. The detector can identify calcite in visible/NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra of both laboratory specimens covered by ferric dust and rocks in Mars analogue field environments. The ANN was trained using the Backpropagation algorithm with sigmoid activation neurons. For the training dataset, we chose nine carbonate and eight non-carbonate representative mineral spectra from the USGS spectral library. Using these spectra as seeds, we generated 10,000 variants with up to 2% Gaussian noise in each reflectance measurement. We cross-validated several ANN architectures, training on 9,900 spectra and testing on the remaining 100. The best performing ANN correctly detected, with perfect accuracy, the presence (or absence) of carbonate in spectral data taken on field samples from the Mojave desert and clean, pure marbles from CT. Sensitivity experiments with JSC Mars-1 simulant dust suggest the carbonate detector would perform well in aeolian Martian environments.

  9. The effect of viewing angle on the spectral behavior of a Gd plasma source near 6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect

    O'Gorman, Colm; Li Bowen; Cummins, Thomas; Dunne, Padraig; Sokell, Emma; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Yugami, Noboru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Jiang Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2012-04-02

    We have demonstrated the effect of viewing angle on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission spectra of gadolinium (Gd) near 6.7 nm. The spectra are shown to have a strong dependence on viewing angle when produced with a laser pulse duration of 10 ns, which may be attributed to absorption by low ion stages of Gd and an angular variation in the ion distribution. Absorption effects are less pronounced at a 150-ps pulse duration due to reduced opacity resulting from plasma expansion. Thus for evaluating source intensity, it is necessary to allow for variation with both viewing angle and target orientation.

  10. Modification of luminescence spectra of CaF2:Eu2+.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vartika S; Joshi, C P; Moharil, S V; Muthal, P L; Dhopte, S M

    2015-11-01

    CaF2:Eu(2+) is a well known phosphor having efficient excitation in the near ultraviolet (NUV) range. Phosphors with NUV excitation are required in newly emerging applications such as photoluminescence liquid crystal displays (PLLCD), solid-state lighting (SSL), and down-conversion for solar cells. However, emission of CaF2:Eu(2+) is around 424 nm. Eye sensitivity drops considerably at these wavelengths. It is thus not useful for display applications for which emission in one of the primary colours (blue - 450 nm, green - 540 nm or red - 610 nm) is required. Efforts were made to modify the Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CaF2:Eu(2+) to meet these requirements using co-dopants. A Ca0.49 Sr0.50 Eu0.01 F2 phosphor showing better colour coordinates and having an emission maximum around 440 nm was discovered during these studies.

  11. Threshold and efficiency for perforation of 1 nm thick carbon nanomembranes with slow highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Gruber, Elisabeth; Ritter, Robert; Heller, René; Beyer, André; Turchanin, Andrey; Klingner, Nico; Hübner, René; Stöger-Pollach, Michael; Vieker, Henning; Hlawacek, Gregor; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2015-09-01

    Cross-linking of a self-assembled monolayer of 1,1‧-biphenyl-4-thiol by low energy electron irradiation leads to the formation of a carbon nanomembrane, that is only 1 nm thick. Here we study the perforation of these freestanding membranes by slow highly charged ion irradiation with respect to the pore formation yield. It is found that a threshold in potential energy of the highly charged ions of about 10 keV must be exceeded in order to form round pores with tunable diameters in the range of 5-15 nm. Above this energy threshold, the efficiency for a single ion to form a pore increases from 70% to nearly 100% with increasing charge. These findings are verified by two independent methods, namely the analysis of individual membranes stacked together during irradiation and the detailed analysis of exit charge state spectra utilizing an electrostatic analyzer.

  12. Analysis of excited-state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter at 1529 nm.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Junyu; Yin, Longfei; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-27

    In this work, a detailed theoretical analysis of 1529 nm ES-FADOF (excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter) based on rubidium atoms pumped by 780 nm laser is introduced, where Zeeman splitting, Doppler broadening, and relaxation processes are considered. Experimental results are carefully compared with the derivation. The results prove that the optimal pumping frequency is affected by the working magnetic field. The population distribution among all hyperfine Zeeman sublevels under the optimal pumping frequency has also been obtained, which shows that 85Rb atoms are the main contribution to the population. The peak transmittance above 90% is obtained, which is in accordance with the experiment. The calculation also shows that the asymmetric spectra observed in the experiment are caused by the unbalanced population distribution among Zeeman sublevels. This theoretical model can be used for all kinds of calculations for FADOF.

  13. Critical assessment of the emission spectra of various photosystem II core complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhai; Kell, Adam; Acharya, Khem; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate low-temperature (low-T) emission spectra of photosystem II core complexes (PSII-cc) previously reported in the literature, which are compared with emission spectra of PSII-cc obtained in this work from spinach and for dissolved PSII crystals from Thermosynechococcus (T.) elongatus. This new spectral dataset is used to interpret data published on membrane PSII (PSII-m) fragments from spinach and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, as well as PSII-cc from T. vulcanus and intentionally damaged PSII-cc from spinach. This study offers new insight into the assignment of emission spectra reported on PSII-cc from different organisms. Previously reported spectra are also compared with data obtained at different saturation levels of the lowest energy state(s) of spinach and T. elongatus PSII-cc via hole burning in order to provide more insight into emission from bleached and/or photodamaged complexes. We show that typical low-T emission spectra of PSII-cc (with closed RCs), in addition to the 695 nm fluorescence band assigned to the intact CP47 complex (Reppert et al. J Phys Chem B 114:11884-11898, 2010), can be contributed to by several emission bands, depending on sample quality. Possible contributions include (i) a band near 690-691 nm that is largely reversible upon temperature annealing, proving that the band originates from CP47 with a bleached low-energy state near 693 nm (Neupane et al. J Am Chem Soc 132:4214-4229, 2010; Reppert et al. J Phys Chem B 114:11884-11898, 2010); (ii) CP43 emission at 683.3 nm (not at 685 nm, i.e., the F685 band, as reported in the literature) (Dang et al. J Phys Chem B 112:9921-9933, 2008; Reppert et al. J Phys Chem B 112:9934-9947, 2008); (iii) trap emission from destabilized CP47 complexes near 691 nm (FT1) and 685 nm (FT2) (Neupane et al. J Am Chem Soc 132:4214-4229, 2010); and (iv) emission from the RC pigments near 686-687 nm. We suggest that recently reported emission of single PSII-cc complexes from T. elongatus may not represent

  14. Uncertainties of the Intensity of the 1130 nm Band of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, L. P.; Pilewskie, P.; Gore, W. J.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Freedman, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    Belmiloud, et al have recently suggested that the HITRAN line intensities in the 1130 nm water vapor band are much too weak. Giver, et at corrected unit conversion errors to make the HITRAN intensities compatible with the original measurements of Mandin, et al, but Belmiloud, et al believe that many of those line intensity measurements were too weak, and they propose the total intensity of the 1130 nm water vapor band is 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. We have made independent assessments of this proposal using 2 spectra obtained with the Ames 25 meter base path White cell. The first was made using the moderate resolution (8 nm) solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with a White cell absorbing path of 506 meters and 10 torr water vapor pressure. Modeling this spectrum using the HITRAN linelist gives a reasonable match, and the model is not compatible when the HITRAN line intensities are increased by 38%. The second spectrum was obtained with a White cell path of 1106 meters and 12 torr water vapor pressure, using a Bomem FTIR with near Doppler width resolution. This spectrum is useful for measuring intensities of isolated weak lines to compare with the measurements of Mandin, et al. Unfortunately, as Belmiloud et al point out, at these conditions the strong lines are much too saturated for good intensity measurements. Our measurements of the weak lines are in reasonable agreement with those of Mandin, et al. Neither of our spectra supports the proposal of Belmiloud et al for a general 38% increase of the absorption intensity in the 1130 nm water vapor band.

  15. Quantum confinement in metal nanofilms: Optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir I.

    2016-05-01

    We report optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of Au, Fe, Co and Ni polycrystalline nanofilms in the UV-vis-NIR range, featuring discrete bands resulting from transverse quantum confinement. The film thickness ranged from 1.1 to 15.6 nm, depending on the material. The films were deposited on fused silica substrates by sputtering/thermo-evaporation, with Fe, Co and Ni protected by a SiO2 film deposited on top. The results are interpreted within the particle-in-a-box model, with the box width equal to the mass thickness of the nanofilm. The transverse-quantized energy levels and transition energies scale as the inverse square of the film thickness. The calculated values of the effective electron mass are 0.93 (Au), 0.027 (Fe), 0.21 (Co) and 0.16 (Ni), in units of mo - the mass of the free electron, being independent on the film thickness. The uncertainties in the effective mass values are ca. 2.5%, determined by the film thickness calibration. The second calculated model parameter, the quantum number n of the HOMO, was thickness-independent in Au (5.00) and Fe (6.00), and increased with the film thickness in Co (from 7 to 9) and Ni (from 7 to 11). The transitions observed in the absorbance all start at the level n and correspond to Δn=+1, +2, +3, etc. The photoluminescence bands exhibit large Stokes shifts, shifting to higher energies with the increased excitation energy. The photoluminescence quantum yields grow linearly with the excitation energy, showing evidence of multiple exciton generation. A prototype Fe-SnO2 nanofilm photovoltaic cell demonstrated at least 90% quantum yield of photoelectrons at 77 K.

  16. [Observation and Analysis of Ground Daylight Spectra of China's Different Light Climate Partitions].

    PubMed

    Liang, Shu-ying; Yang, Chun-yu

    2015-12-01

    The territory of China is vast, so the daylight climates of different regions are not the same. In order to expand theutilization scope and improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy and daylight resources, this article observed and analyzed the ground daylight spectra of China's different light climate partitions. Using a portable spectrum scanner, this article did a tracking observation of ground direct daylight spectra in the period of 380-780 nm visible spectrum of different solar elevation angles during one day in seven representative cities of china's different light climate partitions. The seven representative cities included Kunming, Xining, Beijing, Shenzhen, Nanjing, Nanchang and Chongqing. According to the observation results, this article analyzed the daylight spectrum changing law, compared the daylight spectrum curves of different light climate partitions cities, and summarized the influence factors of daylight spectral radiation intensity. The Analysis of the ground direct daylight spectra showed that the daylight spectral radiation intensity of different solar elevation angles during one day of china's different light climate partitions cities was different, but the distribution and trend of daylight power spectra were basically the same which generally was first increased and then decreased. The maximum peak of spectral power distribution curve appeared at about 475 nm, and there were a steep rise between 380-475 nm and a smooth decline between 475-700 nm while repeatedly big ups and downs appearing after 700 nm. The distribution and trend of daylight power spectra of china's different light climate partitions cities were basically the same, and there was no obvious difference between the daylight spectral power distribution curves and the different light climate partitions. The daylight spectral radiation intensity was closely related to the solar elevation angle and solar surface condition.

  17. Mapping Agricultural Crops with AVIRIS Spectra in Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert; Pavri, Betina; Roberts, Dar; Ustin, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Spectroscopy is used in the laboratory to measure the molecular components and concentrations of plant constituents to answer questions about the plant type, status, and health. Imaging spectrometers measure the upwelling spectral radiance above the Earth's surface as images. Ideally, imaging spectrometer data sets should be used to understand plant type, plant status, and health of plants in an agricultural setting. An Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data set was acquired over agricultural fields near Wallula, Washington on July 23rd, 1997. AVIRIS measures upwelling radiance spectra through 224 spectral channels with contiguous 10-nm sampling from 400 to 2500 nm in the solar-reflected spectrum. The spectra are measured as images of 11 by up to 800 km with 20-m spatial resolution. The spectral images measured by AVIRIS represent the integrated signal resulting from: the solar irradiance; two way transmittance and scattering of the atmosphere; the absorptions and scattering of surface materials; as well as the spectral, radiometric and spatial response functions of AVIRIS. This paper presents initial research to derive properties of the agricultural fields near Wallula from the calibrated spectral images measured by AVIRIS near the top of the atmosphere.

  18. Neutron and photon spectra in LINACs.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Martínez-Ovalle, S A; Lallena, A M; Mercado, G A; Benites-Rengifo, J L

    2012-12-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10(-6) and 1 MeV. Neutron and the Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage.

  19. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  20. [Vibrational spectra of Corallium elatius].

    PubMed

    Fan, Lu-wei; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yang

    2013-09-01

    Corallium elatius, which has unique color distribution characteristic, is the most important species of Taiwan precious corals. EPMA, XRD, FTIR and Laser Raman detective methods were used to study the chemical, mineral composition and spectra characteristics of Corallium elatius. The result of EPMA, XRD and FTIR shows the high-Mg calcite mineral componentand the stable minor chemical constituents of the samples. Meanwhile, the cell parameter indicates the lattice distortion and the preferred orientation of calcite grain caused by organic matter. The red part of the samples shows a different Raman spectrum from that of the white part, located at 1517/1128 cm(-1) and 1296/1016 cm(-1). Raman scattering measurement reveals the relationship between the organic matter and color.

  1. Power spectra of solar convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Labonte, B. J.; Braun, D. C.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of convective motions on the sun are studied using Kitt Peak Doppler images and power spectra of convection. The power peaks at a scale of about 29,000 km and drops off smoothly with wavenumber. There is no evidence of apparent energy excess at the scale of the mesogranulation proposed by other authors. The vertical and horizontal power for each wavenumber are obtained and used to calculate the vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation. The amplitude of vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation are 0.034 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.38 (+ or - 0.01) km/s, respectively. The corresponding rms values are 0.024 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.27 (+ or - 0.01) km/s.

  2. Reflectance spectra of primitive chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.

    2013-05-01

    We are studying a wide sample of pristine carbonaceous chondrites from the NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the physico-chemical processes occurred in the parent bodies of these meteorites. We are obtaining laboratory reflectance spectra of different groups of carbonaceous chondrites, but here we focus in CM and CI chondrites. We discuss the main spectral features that can be used to identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids by remote sensing techniques. Two different spectrometers were used covering the entire 0.3 to 30 μm electromagnetic window. Only a handful of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) exhibit bands or features clearly associated with aqueous alteration. Among them are the target asteroids of Osiris Rex and Marco Polo-R missions.

  3. Effects of ozone and relative humidity on fluorescence spectra of octapeptide bioaerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Coleman, Mark; Bare, Christopher; Kinahan, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ozone and relative humidity (RH) at common atmospheric levels on the properties of single octapeptide bioaerosol particles were studied using an improved rotating reaction chamber, an aerosol generator, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS), an improved single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS), and equipments to generate, monitor and control the ozone and RH. Aerosol particles (mean diameter 2 μm) were generated from a slurry of octapeptide in phosphate buffered saline, injected into the rotating chamber, and kept airborne for hours. Bioaerosols were sampled from the chamber hourly for the measurements of particle-size distribution, concentration, total fluorescence excited at 355-nm, and single particle fluorescence spectra excited at 266-nm and 351-nm under different controlled RH (20%, 50%, or 80%) and ozone concentration (0 or 150 ppb). The results show that: (1) Particle size, concentration, and the 263-nm-excited fluorescence intensity decrease at different rates under different combinations of the RH and ozone concentrations used. (2) The 263-nm-excited UV fluorescence (280-400 nm) decreased more rapidly than the 263-nm-excited visible fluorescence (400-560 nm), and decreased most rapidly when ozone is present and RH is high. (3) The UV fluorescence peak near 340 nm slightly shifts to the shorter wavelength (blue-shift), consistent with a more rapid oxidation of tryptophan than tyrosine. (4) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence (430-580 nm/380-700 nm) increases when ozone is present, especially when the RH is high. (5) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence increase that occurs as the tryptophan emission in the UV decreases, and the observation that these changes occur more rapidly at higher RH with the present of ozone, are consistent with the oxidation of tryptophan by ozone and the conversion of the resulting ozonides to N-formyl kynurenine and kynurenine.

  4. Pressure spectra and cross spectra at an area contraction in a ducted combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Raftopoulos, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure spectra and cross-spectra at an area contraction in a liquid fuel, ducted, combustion noise test facility are analyzed. Measurements made over a range of air and fuel flows are discussed. Measured spectra are compared with spectra calculated using a simple analytical model.

  5. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  6. Cell projection use in maskless lithography for 45nm and 32nm logic nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakli, S.; Komami, H.; Takizawa, M.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Pain, L.

    2009-03-01

    Due to the ever-increasing cost of equipment and mask complexity, the use of optical lithography for integrated circuit manufacturing is increasingly more complex and expensive. Recent workshops and conferences in semiconductor lithography underlined that one alternative to support sub-32nm technologies is mask-less lithography option using electron beam technology. However, this direct write approach based on variable shaped beam principle (VSB) is not sufficient in terms of throughput, i.e. of productivity. New direct write techniques like multibeam systems are under development, but these solutions will not be mature before 2012. The use of character/cell projection (CP) on industrial VSB tools is the first step to deal with the throughput concerns. This paper presents the status of the CP technology and evaluates its possible use for the 45nm and 32nm logic nodes. It will present standard cell and SRAM structures that are printed as single characters using the CP technique. All experiments are done using the Advantest tool (F3000) which can project up to 100 different cells per layer. Cell extractions and design have been performed with the design and software solution developed by D2S. In this paper, we first evaluate the performance gain that can be obtained with the CP approach compared to the standard VSB approach. This paper also details the patterning capability obtained by using the CP concept. An evaluation of the CD uniformity and process stability is also presented. Finally this paper discusses about the improvements of this technique to address high resolution and to improve the throughput concerns.

  7. Manufacturability of 2x-nm devices with EUV tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawarayama, Kazuo; Nakajima, Yumi; Kyoh, Suigen; Aoyama, Hajime; Matsunaga, Kentaro; Magoshi, Shunko; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yumi; Mori, Ichiro

    2011-04-01

    Due to the promising development status of EUVL as a practical lithography technology for the 2x-nm node, we are continuing to evaluate its process liability using the EUV1 at Selete, which has an Off-Axis illumination capability. The resolution limit of the EUV1 for L&S patterns is currently 18 nm for dipole illumination, and 16 nm for aggressive dipole illumination. This study examined the critical points of EUVL for device manufacturing through wafer processes. The yield obtained from electrical measurements indicates the maturity of the technology, including the resist process, the tool, and the mask. Optimization of the resist and RIE processes significantly improved the yield. The final yields obtained from electrical measurements were 100% for hp 30 nm, 70% for hp 28 nm, and 40% for hp 26 nm. These results demonstrate EUV lithography to be a practical technology that is now suitable for 2x nm semiconductor manufacture.

  8. Fluorescence polarization and dichroic spectra of stilbene derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Nekadamov, S.; Senyuk, M.A.; Bobrovich, V.P.

    1987-09-01

    Fluorescence polarization spectra were measured by means of the single photon counting technique with the use of a setup comprising two quartz monochromators. The relative experiment error did not exceed 3% for polarizations close to the limiting value of 6% for p approx. 0.1. Dichroic spectra of stilbene derivatives were measured with a Specord UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The polarization of the fluorescence emission band for the oxazole derivatives of stilbene is practically constant exhibiting slight increases in the vibration maxima. This polarization behavior indicates that the emission is due to a single electronic transition. The absorption spectra of the oxazole derivatives of stilbene contain three broad bands in the near-UV region. The long-wavelength absorption band (A band) is due to the excitation of the entire ..pi..-electron system of the molecule. Phenyl and oxazole rings lead to the appearance of a new absorption band (R band) with the maximum near 290 nm. The short-wavelength B band is due to the ..pi..-excitation of the benzene rings.

  9. Effect of solvents on the fluorescence spectra of bacterial luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukovataya, Irina E.; Tyulkova, Natalya A.; Kaykova, Elisaveta V.

    2006-08-01

    Bacteria luciferases catalyze the oxidation reaction of the long-chain aliphatic aldehyde and reduced flavinmononucleotide involving molecular oxygen to a respective fatty acid emitting light quanta in the visible spectrum. Fluorescence emission of luciferases from Photobacterium leiognathi dissolved in organic solvent-water mixtures was investigated. Methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide were used as organic solvents. As the methanol and acetone concentration is increased the emission maximum peak is decrease. In contrast, with dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide addition induced a increasing of the emission maximum intensity. The values of wavelength maximum (λ max) at the addition of this solvent can shows the spectra shifted to the red by about 12 nm. These increasing in the fluorescence intensity and in the λ max may be due to luciferase denaturation, resulting from the more intensive contact of chromospheres of luciferase with the solvent. At all used concentrations of methanol, acetone and formamide the shape of the fluorescence spectra was not changed. These studies demonstrate that the luciferase tryptophan fluorescence is sensitive to changes of physical-chemical property of enzyme environment. A comparison of activation/inactivation and fluorescence spectra of luciferase in methanol or acetone solutions shows that the extent of inactivation is larger than the extent of fluorescence changes at the same methanol or acetone concentration.

  10. Ultraviolet 320 nm laser excitation for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William; Stickland, Lynn; Koschorreck, Marco

    2017-02-27

    Although multiple lasers and high-dimensional analysis capability are now standard on advanced flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (usually 325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. This is primarily due to their cost, and the small number of applications that require this wavelength. The development of the Brilliant Ultraviolet (BUV fluorochromes, however, has increased the importance of this formerly niche excitation wavelength. Historically, UV excitation was usually provided by water-cooled argon- and krypton-ion lasers. Modern flow cytometers primary rely on diode pumped solid state lasers emitting at 355 nm. While useful for all UV-excited applications, DPSS UV lasers are still large by modern solid state laser standards, and remain very expensive. Smaller and cheaper near UV laser diodes (NUVLDs) emitting at 375 nm make adequate substitutes for 355 nm sources in many situations, but do not work as well with very short wavelength probes like the fluorescent calcium chelator indo-1. In this study, we evaluate a newly available UV 320 nm laser for flow cytometry. While shorter in wavelength that conventional UV lasers, 320 is close to the 325 nm helium-cadmium wavelength used in the past on early benchtop cytometers. A UV 320 nm laser was found to excite almost all Brilliant Ultraviolet dyes to nearly the same level as 355 nm sources. Both 320 nm and 355 nm sources worked equally well for Hoechst and DyeCycle Violet side population analysis of stem cells in mouse hematopoetic tissue. The shorter wavelength UV source also showed excellent excitation of indo-1, a probe that is not compatible with NUVLD 375 nm sources. In summary, a 320 nm laser module made a suitable substitute for conventional 355 nm sources. This laser technology is available in a smaller form factor than current 355 nm units, making it useful for small cytometers with space constraints. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  11. Sidewall spacer quadruple patterning for 15nm half-pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ping; Chen, Yongmei; Chen, Yijian; Miao, Liyan; Sun, Shiyu; Kim, Sung-Woo; Berger, Ami; Mao, Daxin; Bencher, Christ; Hung, Raymond; Ngai, Chris

    2011-04-01

    193nm immersion lithography, with the single-exposure resolution limitation of half-pitch 38nm, has extended its patterning capability to about 20nm using the double-patterning technique[1]. Despite the non-trivial sub-20nm patterning challenges, several NAND Flash manufacturers are already pursuing for sub-16nm patterning technology. 25nm NAND flash memory has already begun production in 2010, and given the typical 2-year scaling cycle, sub-16nm NAND devices should see pilot or mass production as early as 2014. Using novel patterning techniques such as sidewall spacer quadruple patterning (upon 120nm to 128nm pitch using dry ArF lithography) or triple patterning (upon 90nm pitch using immersion ArF lithography), we are able to extend optical lithography to sub-16nm half-pitch and demonstrate the lithographic performance that can nearly meet the ITRS roadmap requirements. In this paper, we conduct an in-depth review and demonstration of sidewall spacer quadruple patterning; including 300mm wafer level data of the mean values and CDU along with a mathematical assessment of the various data pools for sub-16nm lines and spaces. By understanding which processes (lithography, deposition, and etch) define the critical dimension of each data pool, we can make predictions of CDU capability for the sidewall spacer quad patterning. Our VeritySEM4i CD SEM tool demonstrated high measurement yield during fully automated measurements, which enables accurate lines, spaces and CDU measurements of the sub-16nm. The patterns generated from the sidewall spacer quadruple patterning techniques are used as a hardmask to transfer sub-16nm lines and spaces patterns to underneath amorphous silicon and silicon oxide layers, or poly silicon layer for 1X STI or poly gate applications.

  12. OVI absorbers in SDSS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan

    We conducted a systematic search for signatures of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) in Quasar spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3 (DR3), focusing on finding intervening absorbers via detection of their O VI doublet. We present a search algorithm, and criteria for distinguishing candidates from spurious Lyman a forest lines. In addition, we compare our findings with simulations of the Lyman a forest in order to estimate the detectability of O VI doublets over various redshift intervals. We obtain a sample of 1866 O VI doublet candidates with rest-frame equivalent width >= 0.05 λ in 855 AGN spectra (out of 3702 objects with redshifts in the range accessible for O VI detection). This sample is subdivided into 3 groups according to the likelihood of being real and the potential for follow-up observation of the candidate. The group with the cleanest and most secure candidates is comprised of 145 candidates. 69 of these reside at a velocity separation >= 5000 km/s from the QSO, and can therefore be classified tentatively as intervening absorbers. Most of these absorbers have not been picked up by earlier, automated QSO absorption line detection algorithms. This sample increases the number of known O VI absorbers at redshifts beyond z abs >= 2.7 substantially. We propose to obtain observations of some of the candidates with the best signatures for O VI doublets with high signal-to-noise and high resolution in order to better constrain the physical state of the absorbers. We then focused on a subsample of 387 AGN sightlines with an average S/N >= 5: 0, allowing for the detection of absorbers above a rest-frame equivalent width limit of W r >= 0:19 ? A for the O VI 1032 λ component. Accounting for random interlopers mimicking an O VI doublet, we derive for the first time a secure lower limit for the redshift number density DN/Dz for redshifts z abs >= 2:8. With extensive Monte Carlo simulations we quantify the losses of absorbers due to blending

  13. Measurements of Stokes parameters of materials at 1064-nm and 532-nm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Songxin; Narayanan, Ram M.; Kalshoven, James E., Jr.

    2001-09-01

    Laser radar systems have found wide applications in the field of remote sensing. Reflectance as well as polarization features are used together for applications ranging from environmental monitoring to target classification. The Stokes parameters are ideal quantities for characterizing the above features because they provide useful information on both light intensity and polarization state. The University of Nebraska is currently refurbishing an airborne multi-wavelength laser radar system based on the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed Airborne Laser Polarimetric Sensor (ALPS). The system uses a Nd:YAG laser operating at wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, and contains four channels at each wavelength to measure the polarization states. This system was used to measure the Stokes parameters of backscattered laser light from different materials. These included canvas tarp, white paper, plywood, concrete, aluminum plate and anodized aluminum plate. The data provide an understanding of the polarized scattering properties of various materials, and are expected to be useful in developing target discrimination algorithms.

  14. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  15. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  16. [Polarization-sensitive characteristics of the transmission spectra in photonic crystal with nematic liquid crystal defects].

    PubMed

    Dai, Qin; Wu, Ri-na; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Rui-liang; Wang, Peng-chong; Quan, Wei; Xu, Song-ning

    2012-05-01

    The polarization-sensitive characteristics in the transmission spectra of TiO2/SiO2 optical multilayer films of one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) with nematic liquid crystal defects were investigated in the present paper. The transmission spectra measurements and simulated results show that the polarization-sensitive feature was obvious when natural light was normal incident onto the parallelly aligned nematic liquid crystal. There were peaks of the extraordinary light (TE mode) with center wavelengths 1831 and 1800 nm and the ordinary light (TM mode) with center wavelengths 1452 and 1418 nm in the photonic forbidden band, respectively. With applied voltage increasing, the peaks of the extraordinary light was blue-shifted, and coincided with the peaks of O light gradually. Their tunable ranges were about 31 and 34 nm, respectively. For the random nematic liquid crystal, polarization sensitivity was not observed. Meanwhile, an individual extraordinary light peak with center wavelength 1801 nm and an individual ordinary light peak with center wavelength 1391 nm were obtained in the photonic forbidden band, respectively. The peaks were also found blue-shifted with applied voltage increasing, and their tunable ranges were about 64 and 15 nm, respectively. The polarization insensitive photonic crystal with nematic liquid crystal defects can be achieved by random liquid crystal molecules, which make the effective refractive index of the extraordinary light equal to that of the ordinary light.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Rearrangement of a phosphosilicate glass network induced by the 193-nm radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, Yu V.; Sokolov, V. O.; Plotnichenko, V. G.

    2008-10-01

    The IR absorption and Raman spectra of phosphosilicate glass (PSG) are measured during its exposure to radiation at a wavelength of 193 nm. The obtained data demonstrate the complicated rearrangement dynamics of the glass network around phosphor atoms and of the glass network as a whole. The experimental dependences are explained by the model of the PSG network based on the concepts of the theory of rigidity percolation.

  18. Synthesis of gold nanorods with a longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peak of around 1250 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi Nhat Hang; Le Trinh Nguyen, Thi; Thanh Tuyen Luong, Thi; Thang Nguyen, Canh Minh; Nguyen, Thi Phuong Phong

    2016-03-01

    We prepared gold nanorods and joined them to chemicals such as tetrachloauric (III) acid trihydrate, silver nitrate, hydroquinone, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, sodium hydroxide and sodium borohydride using the seed-mediated method. The combination of hydroquinone, with or without salicylic acid, influences the size of the gold nanorods, and this is demonstrated by the results of TEM images, UV-vis spectra and the value of the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peak with respect to the UV-vis spectra. By changing the Ag+ ion and hydroquinone concentration and the combination of hydroquinone and salicylic acid, the size of the gold nanorods can be controlled and this is manifested by longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peaks forming between 875 and 1278 nm. In particular, sample E2 achieved a longitudinal surface plasmon peak at 1273 nm and an aspect ratio of more than 10 by modifying the hydroquinone to 2.5 mM and salicylic acid to 0.5 mM concentration in the growth solution.

  19. Estimation of damped oscillation associated spectra from ultrafast transient absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Jumper, Chanelle C; Snellenburg, Joris J; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk; Malý, Pavel

    2016-11-07

    When exciting a complex molecular system with a short optical pulse, all chromophores present in the system can be excited. The resulting superposition of electronically and vibrationally excited states evolves in time, which is monitored with transient absorption spectroscopy. We present a methodology to resolve simultaneously the contributions of the different electronically and vibrationally excited states from the complete data. The evolution of the excited states is described with a superposition of damped oscillations. The amplitude of a damped oscillation cos(ωnt)exp(-γnt) as a function of the detection wavelength constitutes a damped oscillation associated spectrum DOASn(λ) with an accompanying phase characteristic φn(λ). In a case study, the cryptophyte photosynthetic antenna complex PC612 which contains eight bilin chromophores was excited by a broadband optical pulse. Difference absorption spectra from 525 to 715 nm were measured until 1 ns. The population dynamics is described by four lifetimes, with interchromophore equilibration in 0.8 and 7.5 ps. We have resolved 24 DOAS with frequencies between 130 and 1649 cm(-1) and with damping rates between 0.9 and 12 ps(-1). In addition, 11 more DOAS with faster damping rates were necessary to describe the "coherent artefact." The DOAS contains both ground and excited state features. Their interpretation is aided by DOAS analysis of simulated transient absorption signals resulting from stimulated emission and ground state bleach.

  20. Estimation of damped oscillation associated spectra from ultrafast transient absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Snellenburg, Joris J.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Malý, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    When exciting a complex molecular system with a short optical pulse, all chromophores present in the system can be excited. The resulting superposition of electronically and vibrationally excited states evolves in time, which is monitored with transient absorption spectroscopy. We present a methodology to resolve simultaneously the contributions of the different electronically and vibrationally excited states from the complete data. The evolution of the excited states is described with a superposition of damped oscillations. The amplitude of a damped oscillation cos(ωnt)exp(-γnt) as a function of the detection wavelength constitutes a damped oscillation associated spectrum DOASn(λ) with an accompanying phase characteristic φn(λ). In a case study, the cryptophyte photosynthetic antenna complex PC612 which contains eight bilin chromophores was excited by a broadband optical pulse. Difference absorption spectra from 525 to 715 nm were measured until 1 ns. The population dynamics is described by four lifetimes, with interchromophore equilibration in 0.8 and 7.5 ps. We have resolved 24 DOAS with frequencies between 130 and 1649 cm-1 and with damping rates between 0.9 and 12 ps-1. In addition, 11 more DOAS with faster damping rates were necessary to describe the "coherent artefact." The DOAS contains both ground and excited state features. Their interpretation is aided by DOAS analysis of simulated transient absorption signals resulting from stimulated emission and ground state bleach.

  1. Expression of NM23 in human melanoma progression and metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Easty, D. J.; Maung, K.; Lascu, I.; Véron, M.; Fallowfield, M. E.; Hart, I. R.; Bennett, D. C.

    1996-01-01

    NM23 is a putative metastasis-suppressor gene for some human cancers. Here we have studied NM23 expression during melanoma progression using Northern blotting and immunocytochemistry. There was no significant difference in the average amounts of NM23 mRNA between cell lines derived from metastatic and primary melanomas. The level of NM23 mRNA was also determined for three pairs of poorly metastatic parental (P) and their highly metastatic variant (M) cell lines; the ratios for M/P were 1.2, 0.98 and 0.80. Next we used immunocytochemistry to study NM23 protein in normal skin, benign naevi and primary and metastatic melanomas. Melanocytes in all normal skin and benign samples were positive for NM23; however most primary melanomas (7/11) were not stained by the antibody. All metastatic melanoma samples (5/5) were positively stained. Findings were similar with an antiserum reactive with both forms of NM23 (H1 and H2), and with an antibody specific for NM23-H1. No relationship was apparent between NM23 immunoreactivity in primary tumours and their aggressiveness or prognosis. Hence, in contrast to the situation described for murine melanoma, the amount of NM23 mRNA or protein in human melanoma did not correlate inversely with metastasis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8679442

  2. Infrared reflection spectra of the films of topological insulator Pb1-xSnxSe on the substrates ZnTe/GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, N. N.; Yakovlev, V. A.; Kucherenko, I. V.; Karczewski, G.; Chusnutdinow, S.

    2016-12-01

    Infrared reflectivity spectra of the 700 nm thick topological insulator Pb1-xSnxSe films grown by the molecular beam epitaxy technique on ZnTe/GaAs substrates were studied. Using dispersion analysis of reflectivity spectra plasmon and phonon parameters for the samples under study were obtained.

  3. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  4. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  5. Spectroscopic Measurements of Impurity Spectra on the EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jia; Li, Yingying; Shi, Yuejiang; Wang, Fudi; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Bo; Huang, Juan; Wan, Baonian; Zhou, Qian

    2012-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) and visible impurity spectra (200~750 nm) are commonly used to study plasma and wall interactions in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two optical multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems have been installed for the UV-visible spectrum measurement on EAST. These two OMA systems are both equipped with the Czerny-Turner (C-T) type spectrometer. The upper vacuum vessel and inner divertor baffle can be viewed simultaneously through two optical lenses. The OMA1 system is mainly used for multi-impurity lines radiation measurement. A 280 nm wavelength range can be covered by a 300 mm focal length spectrometer equipped with a 300 grooves/mm grating. The Dα/Hα line shapes can be resolved by the OMA2 system. The focal length is 750 mm. The spectral resolution can be up to 0.01 nm using a 1800 grooves/mm grating. The impurity behaviour and hydrogen ratio evolution after boroniztion, lithium coating, and siliconization are compared. Lithium coating has shown beneficial effects on the reduction of edge recycling and low Z impurity (C, O) influx. The impurity expelling effect of the divertor configuration is also briefly discussed through multi-channels observation of OMA1 system.

  6. Study of absorption spectra of gasolines and other hydrocarbon mixtures in the second overtone region of the CH3, CH2, CH groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradov, V. G.; Sannikov, D. G.

    2007-03-01

    We have obtained experimental and model absorption spectra for individual hydrocarbons (toluene, benzene, n-heptane, and iso-octane) and their mixtures in the near IR range (λ = 1080 1220 nm). We model the spectra of nonsynthetic gasolines obtained under the same conditions by combining the spectra of three pure hydrocarbons. We show that the octane number of the studied gasoline is linearly related to the toluene (or benzene) concentrations in the model mixture.

  7. Specific features of Tm 3+ doped BiB 3O 6 glasses fluorescence spectra and their kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrowski, A.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Kuznik, W.; Brik, M. G.; Klosowicz, S.; Kityk, I. V.

    2012-02-01

    Synthesis and spectral fluorescent features of the thulium-doped BiB 3O 6 glasses are presented. All spectra were recorded using a pulsed (pulse energy ca. 1 μJ, pulse duration 10 ns) 355 nm third harmonic of 10 kHz Nd:YAG laser as an excitation source. A laser beam was focused in a backscattering geometry onto about 1 mm 2 spot on the surface of a sample. The Andor SR-303 i spectrograph equipped with an Andor DH-501 intensified charge coupled device with spectral resolution up to 1 nm was used as a spectra recorder. The time-resolution of this system can be as low as 5 ns. The decay kinetics was derived from integrated time-resolved spectra. Additionally the absorption and excitation spectra were measured. The main parameters of the Judd-Ofelt analysis were calculated and comparison of the obtained results with corresponding data for other materials was carried out.

  8. Specific features of Tm3+ doped BiB3O6 glasses fluorescence spectra and their kinetics.

    PubMed

    Majchrowski, A; Jaroszewicz, L; Kuznik, W; Brik, M G; Klosowicz, S; Kityk, I V

    2012-02-15

    Synthesis and spectral fluorescent features of the thulium-doped BiB(3)O(6) glasses are presented. All spectra were recorded using a pulsed (pulse energy ca. 1μJ, pulse duration 10ns) 355nm third harmonic of 10kHz Nd:YAG laser as an excitation source. A laser beam was focused in a backscattering geometry onto about 1mm(2) spot on the surface of a sample. The Andor SR-303i spectrograph equipped with an Andor DH-501 intensified charge coupled device with spectral resolution up to 1nm was used as a spectra recorder. The time-resolution of this system can be as low as 5ns. The decay kinetics was derived from integrated time-resolved spectra. Additionally the absorption and excitation spectra were measured. The main parameters of the Judd-Ofelt analysis were calculated and comparison of the obtained results with corresponding data for other materials was carried out.

  9. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  10. Segmentation of the macular choroid in OCT images acquired at 830nm and 1060nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sieun; Beg, Mirza F.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-06-01

    Retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT) has rapidly advanced in ophthalmic applications with the broad availability of Fourier domain (FD) technology in commercial systems. The high sensitivity afforded by FD-OCT has enabled imaging of the choroid, a layer of blood vessels serving the outer retina. Improved visualization of the choroid and the choroid-sclera boundary has been investigated using techniques such as enhanced depth imaging (EDI), and also with OCT systems operating in the 1060-nm wavelength range. We report on a comparison of imaging the macular choroid with commercial and prototype OCT systems, and present automated 3D segmentation of the choroid-scleral layer using a graph cut algorithm. The thickness of the choroid is an important measurement to investigate for possible correlation with severity, or possibly early diagnosis, of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  11. A precise measurement of lunar spectral irradiance from 450 nm to 1000 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, C. E.; Lykke, K.; Woodward, J. T.; Smith, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    Although the Moon is our nearest celestial neighbor, our knowledge of its absolute spectral irradiance is an order of magnitude less precise than our knowledge of the best-calibrated stars, including the Sun. A precise determination of the Moon's absolute spectral irradiance has the potential to improve on-orbit calibrations of Earth-observing instruments and extend atmospheric monitoring techniques based on Sun photometry to nighttime measurements based on lunar spectrophotometry. Observations of the Moon have already been used to track changes in satellite sensor response at the sub-percent level, relying on a model of lunar irradiance developed by the United States Geological Survey to predict time-dependent changes in lunar irradiance. The absolute scale of this model, however, is not known accurately enough to allow the Moon to specify an absolute scale for instrument response on orbit or to bridge gaps in various climate data records. We report initial measurements of lunar spectral irradiance with an uncertainty below 1 % from 420 nm to 1000 nm and compare them with the USGS model. Our measurement uncertainty meets the radiometric calibration requirement for many climate data records derived from satellite images, including those for vegetation, aerosols, and snow and ice albedo. It therefore opens the possibility of using the Moon as a calibration standard to bridge gaps in satellite coverage and validate atmospheric retrieval algorithms. Our measurement technique also yields detailed information about the atmosphere at the measurement site, suggesting that lunar observations are a possible solution for aerosol monitoring during the polar winter and can provide nighttime measurements to complement aerosol data collected with Sun photometers. Our measurement, made with a novel apparatus, is an order of magnitude more accurate than the previous state-of-the-art and has continuous spectral coverage, removing the need to interpolate between filter passbands.

  12. A Bayesian method for analysing relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, L.; Pellizza, L. J.; Matteo, C. L.; Sorichetti, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of electrical and mechanical properties of material, relies on a precise analysis of the relaxation spectra. We explore the ability of a Bayesian method to achieve an accurate estimation of spectral parameters. We implemented a parallel-tempering Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm and used it to fit simulated and measured spectra. An exhaustive testing of the code shows that it presents an extremely good performance, accurately fitting complex spectra under strong noise and overlapping components. We conclude that this technique is quite suitable for relaxation spectra analysis, complementing classical methods.

  13. ALIEN: A nebular spectra analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, R.; Vazquez, R.

    2000-11-01

    A new C-coded software, designed to analyze nebular spectra, is presented. T his software is able to read the fluxes of the most important ions directly from IRAF's output file (splot.log). Spectra can be dereddened using the Balmer lines ratio and the Seaton's extinction law. Electron temperature and density, as well as ionic abundances by number are estimated by means of numeric calculations based on the five-level atom model. The dereddened spectra and the table containing the ionic abundances can be saved in a LaTex formatted file. This software has been initially designed to work with a low dispersion spectra.

  14. Near-Infrared Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, C. C.; Lynch, D. K.; Rudy, R. J.; Mazuk, S.; Puetter, R. C.

    2001-05-01

    We present 0.8 to 2.5 micron spectra taken on June 21 & 22, 1998 UT of the Uranian satellites Miranda, Titania, Ariel, Oberon, and Umbriel. The spectra were taken using The Aerospace Corporation's Near-Infrared Imaging Spectragraph (NIRIS) on the University of California's Lick Observatory 3 meter Shane telescope. These spectra will be compared with previous work including Brown, R.H. and Cruikshank, D.P. (1983) as well as more recent spectra and analysis by Grundy, W. et al. (1999). Support for this research was provided by The Aerospace Corporation's Independent Research and Development Program.

  15. [Describing language of spectra and rough set].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bo; Hu, Zhan-yi; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2002-06-01

    It is the traditional way to analyze spectra by experiences in astronomical field. And until now there has never been a suitable theoretical frame to describe spectra, which is may be owing to small spectra datasets that astronomers can get by low-level instruments. With the high-speed development of telescopes, especially on behalf of LAMOST, a large telescope which can collect more than 20,000 spectra in an observing night, spectra datasets are becoming larger and larger very fast. Facing these voluminous datasets, the traditional spectra-processing way simply depending on experiences becomes unfit. In this paper, we develop a brand-new language--describing language of spectra (DLS) to describe spectra of celestial bodies by defining BE (Basic element). And based on DLS, we introduce the method of RSDA (Rough set and data analysis), which is a technique of data mining. By RSDA we extract some rules of stellar spectra, and this experiment can be regarded as an application of DLS.

  16. Light pulse and spectra of conical bubbles sonoluminescence in glycol and 1,2-propanediol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shou Jie; Chen, Qi Dai; Wang, Long

    2005-01-01

    A sonoluminescence apparatus based on the original design of T.Gleighton's conical bubble U-tube is built, in which the gas volume in the tube is increased in order to get intense light. Glycol and 1,2-propanediol are used as the liquid media and argon as the gas media. Moreover using photomultiplier and optical spectrometer, the light pulses and the emitted spectra of the conical bubbles have been measured. The results show that the width of the light pulses is of the order of microseconds, which is wider than that of acoustical sonoluminescence's. The spectra for glycol and 1,2-propanediol are similar. Each one is a continuum accompanied three peak bands: one of the peaks is the resonance line of Na, occurs at 590nm;the other two bands lie on two sides of the resonance line. They are at 555nm, blue satellite for sodium, and at 620nm, red satellite. The spectra for glycol using xenon and nitrogen as gas media have also been measured, which are similar to that using argon. When we change the ratio of argon/air in the bubbles in glycol, we find that the light intensity of spectra increase with the increasing of the ratio. So we conclude that the argon could enhance the luminescence of conical bubbles, which is identical to the previous experiments about single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) and mutibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

  17. Sub-10 nm patterning using EUV interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Päivänranta, Birgit; Langner, Andreas; Kirk, Eugenie; David, Christian; Ekinci, Yasin

    2011-09-16

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is currently considered as the leading technology for high-volume manufacturing below sub-20 nm feature sizes. In parallel, EUV interference lithography based on interference transmission gratings has emerged as a powerful tool for industrial and academic research. In this paper, we demonstrate nanopatterning with sub-10 nm resolution using this technique. Highly efficient and optimized molybdenum gratings result in resolved line/space patterns down to 8 nm half-pitch and show modulation down to 6 nm half-pitch. These results show the performance of optical nanopatterning in the sub-10 nm range and currently mark the record for photon-based lithography. Moreover, an efficient phase mask completely suppressing the zeroth-order diffraction and providing 50 nm line/space patterns over large areas is evaluated. Such efficient phase masks pave the way towards table-top EUV interference lithography systems.

  18. Absorption mechanisms of human melanin in the visible, 400-720 nm.

    PubMed

    Kollias, N; Baqer, A H

    1987-10-01

    In this paper we propose that human melanin absorbs visible radiation through two distinct mechanisms: one that is in effect over the entire visible range and is linear in wavelength, and a second one that is evident at wavelengths in the range 400-500 nm and is exponential in frequency. These mechanisms are apparent in all human diffuse reflectance spectra that we have collected. We show that the absorber is the same in all human volunteer skin samples. By studying the diffuse reflection spectra of DOPA-melanin in solution and DOPA-melanin in powder form, we find that we can correlate the absorption mechanisms, one with melanin in solution (a low molecular weight form) and the other with melanin in powder (a high molecular weight form). Therefore, we propose that melanin exists in two distinct states. This model is of biologic significance, as it provides a reasonable interpretation for the diffuse reflection spectra obtained from delayed pigment (UVB-induced) and immediate pigment (UVA-induced). Delayed pigment appears as an increase of both forms of melanin (neomelanogenesis), whereas immediate pigment appears as an increase in the higher molecular weight form with a commensurate decrease in the lower molecular weight form: the two mechanisms change independently of each other. Finally, we show that we can distinguish spectroscopically between the delayed pigment and the immediate pigment.

  19. LINE PARAMETERS OF THE 782 nm BAND OF CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Liu, A.-W.; Li, X.-F.; Wang, J.; Cheng, C.-F.; Sun, Y. R.; Lambo, R.; Hu, S.-M.

    2013-09-20

    The 782 nm band of CO{sub 2}, in a transparent window of Earth's atmosphere, was the first CO{sub 2} band observed 80 yr ago in the spectra of Venus. The band is very weak and therefore not saturated by the thick atmosphere of Venus, but its spectral parameters are still very limited due to the difficulty of detecting it in the laboratory. It is the highest overtone (ν{sub 1} + 5ν{sub 3}) of CO{sub 2} given in widely used spectroscopy databases such as HITRAN and GEISA. In the present work, the band is studied using a cavity ring-down spectrometer with ultra-high sensitivity as well as high precision. The positions of 55 lines in the band were determined with an absolute accuracy of 3 × 10{sup –5} cm{sup –1}, two orders of magnitude better than previous studies. The line intensities, self-induced pressure broadening coefficients, and the shift coefficients were also derived from the recorded spectra. The obtained spectral parameters can be applied to model the spectra of the CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheres of planets like Venus and Mars.

  20. 32nm node technology development using interference immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Harry; McCafferty, Diane; Markoya, Louis; Hendrickx, Eric; Hermans, Jan; Ronse, Kurt

    2005-05-01

    The 38nm and 32nm lithography nodes are the next major targets for optical lithography on the Semiconductor Industry Roadmap. The recently developed water-based immersion lithography using ArF illumination will be able to provide an optical solution for lithography at the 45nm node, but it will not be able to achieve the 38nm or the 32nm nodes as currently defined. To achieve these next lithographic nodes will require new, very high refractive index fluids to replace the water used in current immersion systems. This paper describes tests and experiments using an interference immersion lithography test jig to develop key technology for the 32nm node. Interference imaging printers have been available for years, and with the advent of Immersion Lithography, they have a new use. Interference immersion image printing offers users a rapid, cost-effective way to develop immersion lithography, particularly at extremely high resolutions. Although it can never replace classical lens-based lithography systems for semiconductor device production, it does offer a way to develop resist and fluid technology at a relatively low cost. Its simple image-forming format offers easy access to the basic physics of advanced imaging. Issues such as: Polarization of the image forming light rays; Fluid/resist interaction during exposure; Topcoat film performance; and the Line Edge Roughness (LER) of resists at extremely high resolutions can all be readily studied. Experiments are described and results are provided for work on: 32nm imaging tests; high refractive index fluid testing using 193nm wavelength at resolutions well beyond current lens-based system capabilities; and polarization configuration testing on 45nm, 38nm, and 32nm L/S features. Results on the performance of resists and topcoats are reported for 32nm L/S features.

  1. Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves photoexcited by sunlight measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Saeka; Yano, Ayako; Ishii, Hiroshi; Satoh, Chikahiro; Akai, Nobuyuki; Nakata, Munetaka

    2013-06-01

    Delayed fluorescence spectra of intact leaves of Green pak choi (Brassica rapa var. chinensis) were measured with a multichannel Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer, which we developed recently. The intact samples, photoexcited by sunlight without artificial light sources, showed delayed fluorescence around 740 nm with a lifetime of ˜6 s. The observed spectra were deconvoluted into two Gaussian bands: the delayed fluorescence from photosystem II and photosystem I complexes. Their relative intensities depended on the chlorophyll concentration, but their wavelengths were unchanged.

  2. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  3. Leaf color is fine-tuned on the solar spectra to avoid strand direct solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Kume, Atsushi; Akitsu, Tomoko; Nasahara, Kenlo Nishida

    2016-07-01

    The spectral distributions of light absorption rates by intact leaves are notably different from the incident solar radiation spectra, for reasons that remain elusive. Incident global radiation comprises two main components; direct radiation from the direction of the sun, and diffuse radiation, which is sunlight scattered by molecules, aerosols and clouds. Both irradiance and photon flux density spectra differ between direct and diffuse radiation in their magnitude and profile. However, most research has assumed that the spectra of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) can be averaged, without considering the radiation classes. We used paired spectroradiometers to sample direct and diffuse solar radiation, and obtained relationships between the PAR spectra and the absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments and organs. As monomers in solvent, the spectral absorbance of Chl a decreased with the increased spectral irradiance (W m(-2) nm(-1)) of global PAR at noon (R(2) = 0.76), and was suitable to avoid strong spectral irradiance (λmax = 480 nm) rather than absorb photon flux density (μmol m(-2) s(-1) nm(-1)) efficiently. The spectral absorption of photosystems and the intact thallus and leaves decreased linearly with the increased spectral irradiance of direct PAR at noon (I dir-max), where the wavelength was within the 450-650 nm range (R(2) = 0.81). The higher-order structure of photosystems systematically avoided the strong spectral irradiance of I dir-max. However, when whole leaves were considered, leaf anatomical structure and light scattering in leaf tissues made the leaves grey bodies for PAR and enabled high PAR use efficiency. Terrestrial green plants are fine-tuned to spectral dynamics of incident solar radiation and PAR absorption is increased in various structural hierarchies.

  4. Raman spectra from Symmetric Hydrogen Bonds in Water by High-intensity Laser-induced Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Men, Zhiwei; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Dongfei; Li, Zhanlong; Sun, Chenglin

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectra of ice VII and X were investigated using strong plasma shockwave generated by laser-induced breakdown (LIB) in liquid water. Simultaneously, the occurrence of the hydrogen emission lines of 656 nm (Hα), 486 nm (Hβ), 434 nm (Hγ) and 410 nm (Hδ) was observed. At 5 × 1012 W/cm2 optical power density, the O-H symmetric stretching, translational and librational modes of ice VII and a single peak at 785 cm−1 appeared in the spectra. The band was assigned to the Raman-active O-O mode of the monomolecular phase, which was the symmetric hydrogen bond of cuprite ice X. The spectra indicated that ice VII and X structure were formed, as the trajectory of the strong plasma shockwave passes through the stable Pressure-Temperature range of ice VII and X. The shockwave temperature and pressure were calculated by the Grüneisen model. PMID:24709652

  5. UV spectra of the icy Saturnian satellites: Understanding exogenic processes and NH3 in the system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Amanda

    2014-10-01

    Existing data from Cassini and HST inform us that the icy satellites of Saturn exhibit unidentified UV absorptions - an overall reddish slope in the ~200-400 nm range, with additional spectral features superimposed. We are unable to solve these mysteries surrounding the source(s) of these absorptions using Cassini datasets due to a gap in spectral coverage in the 190-350 nm range (broadband coverage is available to wavelengths as short as 260 nm). HST/STIS data are critical to understanding the spectra of these moons, and to resolving the sources and processes that cause the absorptions. We suspect that ammonia, with its distinctive and strong absorption near 200 nm, plays a role in the spectra of these moons, which has implications for geologic activity. These observations will provide the first-ever NUV observations of Mimas, improved coverage on Enceladus, and the first-ever STIS observations on Dione and Rhea. We base our observation strategy and estimated SNRs on existing high-quality STIS spectra of Tethys (from program 7316).

  6. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  7. 1064 nm dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of plant lignin.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Matthew W; Lupoi, Jason S; Smith, Emily A

    2011-11-07

    The mixed phenylpropanoid polymer lignin is one of the most abundant biopolymers on the planet and is used in the paper, pulp and biorenewable industries. For many downstream applications, the lignin monomeric composition is required, but traditional methods for performing this analysis do not necessarily represent the lignin composition as it existed in the plant. Herein, it is shown that Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the lignin monomer composition. The use of 1064 nm excitation is needed for lignin analyses since high fluorescence backgrounds are measured at wavelengths as long as 785 nm. The instrument used for these measurements is a 1064 nm dispersive multichannel Raman spectrometer that is suitable for applications outside of the laboratory, for example in-field or in-line analyses and using remote sensing fiber optics. This spectrometer has the capability of acquiring toluene/acetonitrile spectra with 800 cm(-1) spectral coverage, 6.5 cm(-1) spectral resolution and 54 S/N ratio in 10s using 280 mW incident laser powers. The 1135-1350 cm(-1) and 1560-1650 cm(-1) regions of the lignin spectrum can be used to distinguish among the three primary model lignin monomers: coumaric, ferulic and sinapic acids. Mixtures of the three model monomers and first derivative spectra or partial least squares analysis of the phenyl ring breathing modes around 1600 cm(-1) are used to determine sugarcane lignin monomer composition. Lignin extracted from sugarcane is shown to have a predominant dimethoxylated and monomethoxylated phenylpropanoid content with a lesser amount of non-methoxylated phenol, which is consistent with sugarcane's classification as a non-woody angiosperm. The location of the phenyl ring breathing mode peaks do not shift in ethanol, methanol, isopropanol, 1,4 dioxane or acetone.

  8. Fluorescence spectra of blood plasma treated with ultraviolet irradiation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Maslova, T. O.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the fluorescence spectra of blood plasma from patients with acute coronary syndrome, and also the effect of therapeutic doses of in vivo ultraviolet blood irradiation (UBI) on the spectra. We have established that the maxima in the fluorescence spectra of the original plasma samples, obtained from unirradiated blood, are located in the wavelength interval 330-340 nm, characteristic for the fluorescence of tryptophan residues. In extracorporeal UBI ( λ = 254 nm), we observed changes in the shape and also both a blue and a red shift in the maxima of the fluorescence spectra, differing in magnitude for blood plasma samples from different patients in the test group. We show that UBI-initiated changes in the fluorescence spectra of the plasma depend on the original pathological disturbances of metabolite levels, and also on the change in the oxygen-transport function of the blood and the acid-base balance, affecting the oxidative stability of the plasma. We have concluded that UV irradiation, activating buffer systems in the blood, has an effect on the universal and specific interactions of the tryptophan residue with the amino acid residues and water surrounding it.

  9. [Application of fluorescence spectra and parallel factor analysis in the classification of edible vegetable oils].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi-jun; Pan, Zhao; Zhao, Yan-peng; Liu, Hai-long; Zheng, Long-jiang

    2014-08-01

    The fluorescence spectra of 22 samples of 8 kinds of edible vegetable oils (soybean oil, maize oil, olive oil, rice oil, peanut oil, walnut oil, sunflower oil and sesame oil) were measured with FS920 fluorescence spectrometer and the fluorescence matrixs (EEMs) were analyzed with parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis model. To synthesize the capabilities of material characterization and component identification, fluorescence spectra combined with PARAFAC fulfill the classification of vegetable oils. The map feature (peak position, peak value and peak number) was obtained by analyzing three dimensional spectra and con tour maps in the range of emission wavelength from 260 to 750 nm, and excitation wavelengths from 250 to 550 nm. The fluorescent substances (unsaturated fatty acids, vitamin E and its derivatives, chlorophyll and carotenoid) corresponding to spectrum peaks were determined. The factor-number was selected and the components (vitamin E and its derivatives, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, fatty acid oxidation products, vegetable oil oxidation products) corresponding to each factor were ascertained. The four-factor excitation and emission profiles and projection score plots of PARAFAC model were plotted. Different vegetable oils can be characterized and distinguished with the map features of fluorescence spectra and sample projection plots of PARAFAC model. The results demonstrate the capability of the combination of fluorescence spectra technology and four-factor PARAFAC model for differentiating and characterizing vegetable oils.

  10. Two-Component Fitting of Coronal-Hole and Quiet-Sun He I 1083 Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.; Malanushenko, Elena V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present reduction techniques and first results for detailed fitting of solar spectra obtained with the NASA/National Solar Observatory Spectromagnetograph (NASA/NSO SPM over a 2 nm bandpass centered on the He 1 1083 nm line. The observation for this analysis was a spectra-spectroheliogram obtained at the NSO/Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope (KPVT) on 00 Apr 17 at 21:46 UT spanning an area of 512 x 900 arc-seconds; the field of view included a coronal hole near disk center as well as surrounding quiet sun. Since the He I line is very weak and blended with nearby solar and telluric lines, accurate determination of the continuum intensity as a function of wavelength is crucial. We have modified the technique of Malanushenko {\\it et al.) (1992; {\\it AA) (\\bf 259), 567) to tie regions of continuua and the wings of spectral lines which show little variation over the image to standard reference spectra such as the NSO Fourier Transform Spectrometer atlas (Wallace {\\it et al). 1993; NSO Tech Report \\#93-001). We performed detailed least-squares fits of spectra from selected areas, accounting for all the known telluric and solar absorbers in the spectral bandpass. The best physically consistent fits to the Helium lines were obtained with Gaussian profiles from two components (one ''cool'', characteristic of the upper chromosphere; one ''hot'', representing the cool transition region at 2-3 x 10$^{4)$ K). In the coronal hole, the transition-region component, shifted by 6-7 km/s to the blue, is mildly dominant, consistent with mass outflow as suggested by Dupree {\\it et all. (1996; {\\it Ap. J.}-{\\bf 467), 121). In quiet-sun spectra there is less evidence of outward flow, and the chromospheric component is more important. All our fitted spectra show a very weak unidentified absorption feature at 1082.880 nm in the red wing of the nearby Si I line.

  11. Quantitative photoabsorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of H2S and D2S at 49-240 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako

    1987-01-01

    Photoabsorption and fluorescence cross sections of H2S and D2S were measured in the 49-240 nm region using synchrotron radiation as a light source. Fluorescence from photoexcitation of H2S appears at 49-97 nm, but not in the long wavelength region. Fluorescence spectra were dispersed, and used to identify the emitters to be H2S(+) (A), SH(+)(A), and H(n greater than 2). The fluorescence quantum yield is about 6 percent. Photoexcitation of D2S at 49-96 nm produces fluorescence with a quantum yield of about 5 percent. The emitters are identified from the fluorescence spectra to be D2S(+)(A), SD(+)(A), and D(n greater than 2). The Franck-Condon factors for the SH(+) and SD(+) (A-X) transitions were determined. The SD(A-X) fluorescence was observed from photoexcitation of D2S at 100-151 nm, for which the fluorescence cross section and quantum yield were measured.

  12. [High-order derivative spectroscopy of infrared absorption spectra of the reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides].

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of reduced and chemically oxidized reaction center preparations from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides were investigated by means of high-order derivative spectroscopy. The model Gaussian band with a maximum at 810 nm and a half-band of 15 nm found in the absorption spectrum of the reduced reaction center preparation is eliminated after the oxidation of photoactive bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P). This band was related to the absorption of the P(+)y excitonic band of P. On the basis of experimental results, it was concluded that the bleaching of the P(+)y absorption band at 810 nm in the oxidized reaction center preparations gives the main contribution to the blue shift of the 800 nm absorption band of Rb. sphaeroides reaction centers.

  13. Non-Destructive Observation of the Laser Treatment Effect on Historical Paper via the Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, K.; Sliwinski, G.

    The fluorescence spectra of historical and model paper samples, previously irradiated with the laser beam at wavelengths of 1,064, 532, 355, and 266 nm, are recorded under excitation at 266 nm, and the nonirradiated samples are used for reference. The spectral profiles obtained for the laser-treated model papers made of cotton and/or linen only reveal differences compared to the reference ones. After irradiation at 532 and 1,064 nm, a decrease of the band intensities of the entire spectral profile is observed. In contrary, the UV irradiation at 355nm of the same samples results in the increase of bands centered at 341 and 370nm compared to the visible region only. Prolonged treatment at 266nm results in the marked increase of band intensities in the visible region and corresponds to the independently observed yellowing.

  14. Resolution enhancement in second-derivative spectra.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Mirosław A

    2015-01-01

    Derivative spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the resolution enhancement in infrared, near-infrared, Raman, ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Despite its great significance in analytical chemistry, not all aspects of the applications of this method have been explored as yet. This is the first systematic study of the parameters that influence the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra. The derivative spectra were calculated with the Savitzky-Golay method with different window size (5, 15, 25) and polynomial order (2, 4). The results obtained in this work show that the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra strongly depends on the data spacing in the original spectra, window size, polynomial order, and peak profile. As shown, the resolution enhancement is related to variations in the width of the peaks upon the differentiation. The present study reveals that in order to maximize the separation of the peaks in the second derivative spectra, the original spectra should be recorded at high resolution and differentiated using a small window size and high polynomial order. However, working with the real spectra one has to compromise between the noise reduction and optimization of the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra.

  15. Spectra of the Jovian ring and Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Jewitt, D. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Terrile, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements made between 0.887 and 2.4 microns demonstrate that the Jovian ring and Amalthea have similar reflection spectra. The spectra, in particular the ratio of the 0.9- to 2.2-micron reflectivities, are inconsistent with those expected from water, ammonia, or methane frosts, but are consistent with reflection from large rock bodies.

  16. Optical Absorption Spectra of Ternary Complex of Praseodymium in Different Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anup Kumar; Ujjwal, Shri Kishan

    The optical absorption spectra of complex of Praseodymium in different solvents i.e water, Methanol, Ethanol & Acetic Acid have been recorded in visible region (360-620 nm for Pr3+) using amino acid as primary ligand and diol as secondary ligand. The value of energies & intensities of various transitions have been calculated using Judd-Ofelt relation is in good agreement with experimental result. The study of complex found it to be covalent in nature. The spectra in visible region have been recorded on model uv-2601 Rayleigh analytical instrument corp.

  17. Evaluation of dental pulp repair using low level laser therapy (688 nm and 785 nm) morphologic study in capuchin monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretel, H.; Oliveira, J. A.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Ramalho, L. T. O.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) 688 nm and 785 nm accelerate dentin barrier formation and repair process after traumatic pulp exposure. The sample consisted of 45 premolars of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) with pulp exposure Class V cavities. All premolars were treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), divided in groups of 15 teeth each, and analyzed on 7th, 25th, and 60th day. Group GI - only Ca(OH)2, GII - laser 688 nm, and GIII - laser 785 nm. Laser beam was used in single and punctual dose with the parameters: continuous, 688 nm and 785 nm wavelength, tip's area of 0.00785 cm2, power 50 mW, application time 20 s, dose 255 J/cm2, energy 2 J. Teeth were capped with Ca(OH)2, Ca(OH)2 cement and restored with amalgam. All groups presented pulp repair. On 25th day the thickness of the formed dentin barrier was different between the groups GI and GII (p < 0.05) and between groups GI and GIII (p < 0.01). On 60th day there was difference between GI and GIII (p < 0.01). It may be concluded that, LLLT 688 nm and 785 nm accelerated dentin barrier formation and consequently pulp repair process, with best results using infrared laser 785 nm.

  18. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo; Damiano, Mario; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of chemical species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a powerful blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, thence it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/WFC3, Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS and Hubble/WFC3 in spectroscopy (Damiano, Morello et al., in prep., Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013) with excellent

  19. The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Drozdov, L. A. Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V.; Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A.

    2011-12-15

    The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

  20. Diagnosis of Breast Cancer Tissues Using 785 nm Miniature Raman Spectrometer and Pattern Regression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingbo; Hao, Can; Xu, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    For achieving the development of a portable, low-cost and in vivo cancer diagnosis instrument, a laser 785 nm miniature Raman spectrometer was used to acquire the Raman spectra for breast cancer detection in this paper. However, because of the low spectral signal-to-noise ratio, it is difficult to achieve high discrimination accuracy by using the miniature Raman spectrometer. Therefore, a pattern recognition method of the adaptive net analyte signal (NAS) weight k-local hyperplane (ANWKH) is proposed to increase the classification accuracy. ANWKH is an extension and improvement of K-local hyperplane distance nearest-neighbor (HKNN), and combines the advantages of the adaptive weight k-local hyperplane (AWKH) and the net analyte signal (NAS). In this algorithm, NAS was first used to eliminate the influence caused by other non-target factors. Then, the distance between the test set samples and hyperplane was calculated with consideration of the feature weights. The HKNN only works well for small values of the nearest-neighbor. However, the accuracy decreases with increasing values of the nearest-neighbor. The method presented in this paper can resolve the basic shortcoming by using the feature weights. The original spectra are projected into the vertical subspace without the objective factors. NAS was employed to obtain the spectra without irrelevant information. NAS can improve the classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of breast cancer early diagnosis. Experimental results of Raman spectra detection in vitro of breast tissues showed that the proposed algorithm can obtain high classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. This paper demonstrates that the ANWKH algorithm is feasible for early clinical diagnosis of breast cancer in the future. PMID:28335504

  1. Diagnosis of Breast Cancer Tissues Using 785 nm Miniature Raman Spectrometer and Pattern Regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingbo; Hao, Can; Xu, Zhi

    2017-03-19

    For achieving the development of a portable, low-cost and in vivo cancer diagnosis instrument, a laser 785 nm miniature Raman spectrometer was used to acquire the Raman spectra for breast cancer detection in this paper. However, because of the low spectral signal-to-noise ratio, it is difficult to achieve high discrimination accuracy by using the miniature Raman spectrometer. Therefore, a pattern recognition method of the adaptive net analyte signal (NAS) weight k-local hyperplane (ANWKH) is proposed to increase the classification accuracy. ANWKH is an extension and improvement of K-local hyperplane distance nearest-neighbor (HKNN), and combines the advantages of the adaptive weight k-local hyperplane (AWKH) and the net analyte signal (NAS). In this algorithm, NAS was first used to eliminate the influence caused by other non-target factors. Then, the distance between the test set samples and hyperplane was calculated with consideration of the feature weights. The HKNN only works well for small values of the nearest-neighbor. However, the accuracy decreases with increasing values of the nearest-neighbor. The method presented in this paper can resolve the basic shortcoming by using the feature weights. The original spectra are projected into the vertical subspace without the objective factors. NAS was employed to obtain the spectra without irrelevant information. NAS can improve the classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of breast cancer early diagnosis. Experimental results of Raman spectra detection in vitro of breast tissues showed that the proposed algorithm can obtain high classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. This paper demonstrates that the ANWKH algorithm is feasible for early clinical diagnosis of breast cancer in the future.

  2. Mid-Infrared Spectra of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, B.; Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.; Morgan, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Mid-infrared (8-13 microns) spectra of radiation emitted from the surface of solar system objects can be interpreted in terms of surface composition. However, the spectral features are weak, and require exceptionally high signal-to-noise ratio spectra to detect them. Ground-based observations of spectra in this region are plagued by strong atmospheric absorptions from water and ozone. High-altitude balloon measurements that avoid atmospheric absorptions can be affected by contamination of the optics by dust. We have developed a technique to obtain mid-infrared spectra of Mercury that minimizes these problems. The resulting spectra show evidence of transparency features that can be used to qualitatively characterize the surface composition. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Isotope shifts in spectra of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, E. V.; Kolomiitsova, T. D.; Shurukhina, A. V.; Shchepkin, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    In the IR absorption spectra of low-temperature molecular liquids, we have observed anomalously large isotope shifts of frequencies of vibrational bands that are strong in the dipole absorption. The same effect has also been observed in their Raman spectra. At the same time, in the spectra of cryosolutions, the isotope shifts of the same bands coincide with a high accuracy (±(0.1-0.5) cm-1) with the shifts that are observed in the spectra of the gas phase. The difference between the spectra of examined low-temperature systems is caused by the occurrence of resonant dipole-dipole interactions between spectrally active identical molecules. The calculation of the band contour in the spectrum of liquid freon that we have performed in this work taking into account the resonant interaction between states of simultaneous transitions in isotopically substituted molecules can explain this effect.

  4. PCA: Principal Component Analysis for spectra modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Peter D.; Oliver, Seb; Farrah, Duncan; Wang, Lingyu; Efstathiou, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The mid-infrared spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) contain a variety of spectral features that can be used as diagnostics to characterize the spectra. However, such diagnostics are biased by our prior prejudices on the origin of the features. Moreover, by using only part of the spectrum they do not utilize the full information content of the spectra. Blind statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) consider the whole spectrum, find correlated features and separate them out into distinct components. This code, written in IDL, classifies principal components of IRS spectra to define a new classification scheme using 5D Gaussian mixtures modelling. The five PCs and average spectra for the four classifications to classify objects are made available with the code.

  5. Scattering matrices of martian dust analogs at 488 nm and 647 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska, Dominika D.; Muñoz, Olga; Moreno, Fernando; Ramos, José L.; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Wurm, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    We present measurements of the complete scattering matrix as a function of the scattering angle of five martian dust analogs, namely montmorillonite, two palagonite (JSC-1) samples, basalt, and calcite. The measurements are performed at 488 and 647 nm, covering the scattering angle range from 3° to 177°. The experimental scattering matrices are compared with results of Lorenz-Mie calculations performed for the same size distributions and refractive indices as our analog samples. As expected, we find that scattering matrices of realistic polydispersions of dust particles cannot be replaced by such calculated matrices. In contrast, the measured phase functions for our martian dust analogs may be considered a good approximation for martian dust at the studied wavelengths. Further, because of the sensitivity of polarimetry to particle microphysics, spectro-polarimetric observations from the martian surface appear to be a powerful diagnostic tool to infer the composition of the dust in the martian atmosphere. To facilitate the use of the experimental matrices for multiple-scattering calculations with polarization included, we compute the corresponding synthetic scattering matrices based on the measurements and defined in the full angle range from 0° to 180°.

  6. On high speed transmission with the 850nm VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkiewicz, Jarosław P.; Chorchos, Łukasz; Puerta Ramirez, Rafael; Vegas Olmos, Juan Jose; Ledentsov, Nikolay

    2016-09-01

    One of the key research challenges is development of energy efficient high bit rate data interconnects. The most promising solutions are based on 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) and multi mode fibre (MMF). In this paper options to realize energy efficient 850 nm data interconnects are discussed and evaluated.

  7. Photoluminescence emission spectra of Makrofol® DE 1-1 upon irradiation with ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, M.; Aydarous, Abdulkadir

    Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of Makrofol® DE 1-1 (bisphenol-A based polycarbonate) upon irradiation with ultraviolet radiation of different wavelengths were investigated. The absorption-and attenuation coefficient measurements revealed that the Makrofol® DE 1-1 is characterized by high absorbance in the energy range 6.53-4.43 eV but for a lower energy than 4.43 eV, it is approximately transparent. Makrofol® DE 1-1 samples were irradiated with ultraviolet radiation of wavelength in the range from 250 (4.28 eV) to 400 (3.10 eV) nm in step of 10 nm and the corresponding photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra were measured with a spectrofluorometer. It is found that the integrated counts and the peak height of the photoluminescence emission (PL) bands are strongly correlated with the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. They are increased at the ultraviolet radiation wavelength 280 nm and have maximum at 290 nm, thereafter they decrease and diminish at 360 nm of ultraviolet wavelength. The position of the PL emission band peak was red shifted starting from 300 nm, which increased with the increase the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. The PL bandwidth increases linearly with the increase of the ultraviolet radiation wavelength. When Makrofol® DE 1-1 is irradiated with ultraviolet radiation of short wavelength (UVC), the photoluminescence emission spectra peaks also occur in the UVC but of a relatively longer wavelength. The current new findings should be considered carefully when using Makrofol® DE 1-1 in medical applications related to ultraviolet radiation.

  8. Electron beam inspection of 16nm HP node EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Narukawa, Shogo; Abe, Tsukasa; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Lin, Chia-Wen; Zhao, Yan; Kuan, Chiyan; Jau, Jack

    2012-11-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is the most promising solution for 16nm HP node semiconductor device manufacturing and beyond. The fabrication of defect free EUV mask is one of the most challenging roadblocks to insert EUVL into high volume manufacturing (HVM). To fabricate and assure the defect free EUV masks, electron beam inspection (EBI) tool will be likely the necessary tool since optical mask inspection systems using 193nm and 199nm light are reaching a practical resolution limit around 16nm HP node EUV mask. For production use of EBI, several challenges and potential issues are expected. Firstly, required defect detection sensitivity is quite high. According to ITRS roadmap updated in 2011, the smallest defect size needed to detect is about 18nm for 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Secondly, small pixel size is likely required to obtain the high sensitivity. Thus, it might damage Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer due to accumulated high density electron beam bombardments. It also has potential of elevation of nuisance defects and reduction of throughput. These challenges must be solved before inserting EBI system into EUV mask HVM line. In this paper, we share our initial inspection results for 16nm HP node EUV mask (64nm HP absorber pattern on the EUV mask) using an EBI system eXplore® 5400 developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). In particularly, defect detection sensitivity, inspectability and damage to EUV mask were assessed. As conclusions, we found that the EBI system has capability to capture 16nm defects on 64nm absorber pattern EUV mask, satisfying the sensitivity requirement of 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Furthermore, we confirmed there is no significant damage to susceptible Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer. We also identified that low throughput and high nuisance defect rate are critical challenges needed to address for the 16nm HP node EUV mask inspection. The high nuisance defect rate could be generated by poor LWR and stitching errors during EB writing

  9. Thin bilayer resists for 193-nm and future photolithography II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishiro, Yoshi; Hyatt, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Bilayer, Si-containing resists are a technique of interest and a strong candidate to replace chemical vapor deposition (CVD) hardmask processes for small critical dimensions (CDs). Previously, we proposed a very thin film approach using bilayer resists for future lithography, defined the requirements for the resists, and demonstrated 55nm transferred patterns with high aspect ratios using 2-beam interferometer exposure. In this paper, we have demonstrated smaller-than- 60nm transferred patterns with a high numerical aperture (NA) scanner, as well as 45nm and 40nm transferred patterns with a 2-beam system using a 20% Si-containing thin bilayer resist. Immersion scanner exposure and a 35nm CD with 2- beam system were also studied.

  10. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  11. UV Spectra of the Uranian Satellites, Ariel, Titania, and Oberon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, T. L.; Noll, K.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Pendleton, Y. J.

    1997-07-01

    Using the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ultraviolet spectra were obtained for the Uranian satellites Ariel, Titania, and Oberon. The FOS data provide clear evidence for the presence of an ultraviolet absorber on these three bodies. FOS grating positions of G270 and G400 provided wavelength coverage of ~220-480 nanometers (nm) with a resolving power of ~4300-6400. The data were reduced to flux using the standard STScI data pipeline procedures. Prior to ratioing the fluxes to the solar spectrum(1) , narrow solar lines were used to fine-tune the wavelength positions; the largest shift of the observational data required was 0.16 nm. Spectral geometric albedos were calculated at the solar phase angle of the observations (alpha =0.8deg ) and are consistent with recently reported broad-band albedos(2) within the estimated uncertainties of the two data sets. The geometric albedos of Ariel, Titania, and Oberon all have a broad minimum located at 280+/-10 nm. The features are similar in position to those identified with SO_2 (280 nm) on the Jovian moons Europa(3,4) and Callisto(5,6) , although there is no apparent source of SO_2 molecules in the Uranian system. Another plausible material producing an absorption near 280 nm is OH, which is a photolysis and radiolysis by-product from H_2O(7) . Any OH formed will be more likely to be stable at the lower surface temperatures of the Uranian system than for the icy Jovian satellites(8) . None of these minima correspond to features near 260+/-5 nm, attributed to O_3 on the surfaces of Ganymede(9) , Rhea, and Dione(10) . (1) Colina, L. et al. (1996) AJ 112, 307. (2) Karkoschka, E. (1997) Icarus 125, 348. (3) Lane, A. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 38. (4) Noll, K. et al. (1995) JGR 100, 19,057. (5) Noll, K. et al. (1997) GRL 24, 1139. (6) Lane, A. & D. Domingue (1997) GRL 24, 1143. (7) Taub, I. & K. Eiben (1968) J. Chem. Phys. 49, 2,499. (8) Ghormley, J. & C. Hochanadel (1971) J. Chem. Phys. 75, 40

  12. Investigation of absorption spectra of Gafchromic EBT2 film's components and their impact on UVR dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydarous, Abdulkadir

    2016-05-01

    The absorption spectra of the EBT2 film's components were investigated in conjunction with its use for UVA dosimetry. The polyester (topside) and adhesive layers of the EBT2 film have been gently removed. Gafchromic™ EBT2 films with and without the protected layers (polyester and adhesive) were exposed to UVR of 365 nm for different durations. Thereafter, the UV-visible spectra were measured using a UV-visible spectrophotometer (Model Spectro Dual Split Beam, UVS-2700). Films were digitized using a Nikon CanoScan 9000F Mark II flatbed scanner. The dosimetric characteristics including film's uniformity, reproducibility and post-irradiation development were investigated. The color development of EBT2 and new modified EBT2 (EBT2-M) films irradiated with UVA was relatively stable (less than 1%) immediately after exposure. Based on this study, the sensitivity of EBT2 to UVR with wavelength between ~350 nm and ~390 nm can significantly be enhanced if the adhesive layer (~25 μm) is removed. The polyester layer plays almost no part on absorbing UVR with wavelength between ~320 nm and ~390 nm. Furthermore, various sensitivities for the EBT2-M film has been established depending on the wavelength of analysis.

  13. Polarized absorption spectra of single crystals of lunar pyroxenes and olivines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.; Huggins, F. E.; Abu-Eid, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the polarized absorption spectra (360-2200 nm) of compositionally zoned pyroxene minerals in rocks 10045, 10047 and 10058 and olivines in rocks 10020 and 10022. The Apollo 11 pyroxenes with relatively high Ti/Fe ratios were chosen initially to investigate the presence of crystal field spectra of Fe(2+) and Ti(3+) ions in the minerals. Broad intense bands at about 1000 and 2100 nm arise from spin-allowed, polarization-dependent transitions in Fe(2+) ions in pyroxenes. Several weak sharp peaks occur in the visible region. Peaks at 402, 425, 505, 550, and 585 nm represent spin-forbidden transitions in Fe(2+) ions, while broader bands at 460-470 nm and 650-660 nm are attributed to Ti(3+) ions. Charge transfer bands, which in terrestrial pyroxenes often extend into the visible region, are displaced to shorter wavelengths in lunar pyroxenes. This feature correlates with the absence of Ti(3+) ions in these minerals.

  14. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2013-06-04

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines, and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of water-soluble SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and α-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ∼100 ppb ammonia in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (∼0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for λexcitation = 420 ± 50 nm and λemission = 475 ± 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to λexcitation = 320 ± 25 nm and λemission = 425 ± 38 nm for the α-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the EEM spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles may have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  15. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  16. Spatially and momentum resolved energy electron loss spectra from an ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinyanjui, M. K. Kaiser, U.; Benner, G.; Pavia, G.; Boucher, F.; Habermeier, H.-U.; Keimer, B.

    2015-05-18

    We present an experimental approach which allows for the acquisition of spectra from ultra-thin films at high spatial, momentum, and energy resolutions. Spatially and momentum (q) resolved electron energy loss spectra have been obtained from a 12 nm ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer using a nano-beam electron diffraction based approach which enabled the acquisition of momentum resolved spectra from individual, differently oriented nano-domains and at different positions of the PrNiO{sub 3} thin layer. The spatial and wavelength dependence of the spectral excitations are obtained and characterized after the analysis of the experimental spectra using calculated dielectric and energy loss functions. The presented approach makes a contribution towards obtaining momentum-resolved spectra from nanostructures, thin film, heterostructures, surfaces, and interfaces.

  17. Optimum conditions of the distributed bragg reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Su-Chang; Lee, Byung-Teak; An, Won-Chan; Kim, Dae-Kwang; Jang, In-Kyu; So, Jin-Su; Lee, Hyung-Joo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) for a bottom reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes (Ir-LEDs) was developed and optimized. At an 850-nm wavelength, markedly improved reflection spectra were observed from DBRs consisting of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs materials. In addition, the reflection spectra of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs-based DBRs was found to increase with increasing difference between the high and the low refractive indices. At multiple layers of 10 pairs, maximal reflection spectra having about a 92% reflectivity were obtained from DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. At 20 pairs, however, outstanding reflection spectra having a higher reflectivity and broader width were clearly observed from DBRs consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As. Some incident light appears to have been absorbed and confined by the narrow bandgap of the GaAs material used in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. This fact could be supported by the decrease in the reflectivity of the shorter wavelength region in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. For this reason, a remarkable output power could be obtained from the 850-nm GaAs Ir-LED chip having a DBR consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As.

  18. Control of the Rat Pineal Gland by Light Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, Daniel P.; Larin, Frances; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1972-01-01

    Control of pineal hydroxyindole-O-methyl transferase (S-adenosylmethionine:N-acetylserotonin-O-methyl transferase; EC 2.1.1.4) by light spectra was determined by placing groups of rats previously housed in continuous darkness under one of seven light sources for 96 hr; rats were exposed to the same intensity of irradiation. Activity of the enzyme was lowest in rats maintained under green light (λ peak = 530 nm); blue and yellow light were somewhat less effective; red and ultraviolet light did not significantly lower the enzyme activity. The suppression of pineal hydroxyindole-O-methyl transferase by full-spectrum light sources could be correlated with the proportions of their spectral outputs in the blue-green-yellow range. These observations suggest that the retinal photopigment that mediates pineal responses to light in rats is rhodopsin or another compound with similar absorption properties. PMID:4506068

  19. Near infrared Raman spectra of human brain lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Christoph; Neudert, Lars; Simat, Thomas; Salzer, Reiner

    2005-05-01

    Human brain tissue, in particular white matter, contains high lipid content. These brain lipids can be divided into three principal classes: neutral lipids including the steroid cholesterol, phospholipids and sphingolipids. Major lipids in normal human brain tissue are phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid, sphingomyelin, galactocerebrosides, gangliosides, sulfatides and cholesterol. Minor lipids are cholesterolester and triacylglycerides. During transformation from normal brain tissue to tumors, composition and concentration of lipids change in a specific way. Therefore, analysis of lipids might be used as a diagnostic parameter to distinguish normal tissue from tumors and to determine the tumor type and tumor grade. Raman spectroscopy has been suggested as an analytical tool to detect these changes even under intra-operative conditions. We recorded Raman spectra of the 12 major and minor brain lipids with 785 nm excitation in order to identify their spectral fingerprints for qualitative and quantitative analyses.

  20. Absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashko, Pavlo; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Alonova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  1. Single particle size and fluorescence spectra from emissions of burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate burn pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Houck, Joshua D. T.; Clark, Pamela A.; Pinnick, Ronald G.

    2013-08-01

    A single-particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer were used to measure the fluorescence spectra and particle size distribution from the particulate emissions of 12 different burning materials in a tube furnace to simulate open-air burning of garbage. Although the particulate emissions are likely dominated by particles <1 μm diameter, only the spectra of supermicron particles were measured here. The overall fluorescence spectral profiles exhibit either one or two broad bands peaked around 300-450 nm within the 280-650 nm spectral range, when the particles are illuminated with a 263-nm laser. Different burning materials have different profiles, some of them (cigarette, hair, uniform, paper, and plastics) show small changes during the burning process, and while others (beef, bread, carrot, Styrofoam, and wood) show big variations, which initially exhibit a single UV peak (around 310-340 nm) and a long shoulder in visible, and then gradually evolve into a bimodal spectrum with another visible peak (around 430-450 nm) having increasing intensity during the burning process. These spectral profiles could mainly derive from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with the combinations of tyrosine-like, tryptophan-like, and other humic-like substances. About 68 % of these single-particle fluorescence spectra can be grouped into 10 clustered spectral templates that are derived from the spectra of millions of atmospheric aerosol particles observed in three locations; while the others, particularly these bimodal spectra, do not fall into any of the 10 templates. Therefore, the spectra from particulate emissions of burning materials can be easily discriminated from that of common atmospheric aerosol particles. The SFFS technology could be a good tool for monitoring burning pit emissions and possibly for distinguishing them from atmospheric aerosol particles.

  2. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  3. Variation of cell spreading on TiO2 film modified by 775 nm and 388 nm femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, M.; Shinonaga, T.; Sato, Y.; Chen, P.; Nagai, A.; Hanawa, T.

    2014-03-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most used biomaterials in metals. However, Ti is typically artificial materials. Thus, it is necessary for improving the biocompatibility of Ti. Recently, coating of the titanium dioxides (TiO2) film on Ti plate has been proposed to improve biocompatibility of Ti. We have developed coating method of the film on Ti plate with an aerosol beam. Periodic structures formation on biomaterials was also a useful method for improving the biocompatibility. Direction of cell spreading might be controlled along the grooves of periodic microstructures. In our previous study, periodic nanostructures were formed on the film by femtosecond laser irradiation at fundamental wave (775 nm). Period of the periodic nanostructures was about 230 nm. In cell test, cell spreading along the grooves of the periodic nanostructures was observed although it was not done for the film without the periodic nanostructures. Then, influence of the period of the periodic nanostructures on cell spreading has not been investigated yet. The period might be changed by changing the laser wavelength. In this study, the periodic nanostructures were created on the film with femtosecond laser at 775nm and 388 nm, respectively. After cell test, cell spreading along the grooves of the periodic nanostructures was observed on 775 nm and 388nm laser irradiated areas. Distribution of direction of cell spreading on laser irradiated area was also examined. These results suggested that controlling the cell spreading on periodic nanostructures with period of 230 nm was better than that with period of 130 nm.

  4. A continuous wave 10 W cryogenic fiber amplifier at 1015 nm and frequency quadrupling to 254 nm.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Koglbauer, A; Bachor, P; Diehl, T; Kolbe, D; Stappel, M; Walz, J

    2013-09-23

    A stable, continuous wave, single frequency fiber amplifier system at 1015 nm with 10 W output power is presented. It is based on a large mode double clad fiber cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. The amplified light is frequency quadrupled to 254 nm and used for spectroscopy of the 6¹S → 6³P transition in mercury.

  5. Ultraviolet spectra of quenched carbonaceous composite derivatives: Comparison to the '217 nanometer' interstellar absorption feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, Akira; Wada, Setsuko; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Narisawa, Takatoshi; Nakagawa, Hidehiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    QCCs (quenched carbonaceous composite) are amorphus carbonaceous material formed from a hydrocarbon plasma. We present the UV-visible spectra of 'filmy QCC; (obtained outside of the beam ejected from the hydrocarbon plasma) and 'dark QCC' (obtained very near to the beam) for comparison to the stellar extinction curve. When filmy QCC is heated to 500-700 C (thermally altered), the wavelength of the absorption maximum increases form 204 nm to 220-222 nm. The dark QCC has an absorption maximum at 217-222 nm. In addition, the thermally altered filmy QCC has a slope change at about 500 nm which resmbles that in the interstellar extinction curve. The resemblance of the extinction curve of the QCCs to that of the interstellar medium suggests that QCC derivatives may be representative of the type of interstellar material that produces the 217 nm interstellar medium feature. The peak extinction of the dark QCC is higher than the average interstellar extinction curve while that of the thermally altered filmy QCC is lower, so that a mixture of dark and thermally altered filmy QCC can match the peak extinction observed in the interstellar medium. It is shown from electron micrographs that most of the thermally altered flimy QCC is in the form of small grainy structure less than 4 nm in diameter. This shows that the structure unit causing the 217-222 nm feature in QCC is very small.

  6. Handbook of Monochromatic XPS Spectra, Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, B. Vincent

    2000-10-01

    This handbook is one of three containing an invaluable collection of research grade XPS Spectra. Each handbook concentrates on a specific family of materials (the elements and their native oxides, semiconductors and polymers) and is entirely self-contained. The introductory section to each handbook includes comprehensive information about the XPS instrument used, the materials and the advanced methods used to collect the spectra. Energy resolution settings, instrument characteristics, energy referencing methods, traceability, energy scale calibration details and transmission function are all reported. Among the many valuable features included in each of these handbooks are: ? All spectra were measured by using AlK monochromatic X-rays ? All spectra were collected in a self-consistent manner to maximise data reliability and quality ? All peaks in the wide spectra are fully annotated and accompanied by detailed atom % tables that report BEs for each of the labelled peaks ? Each high-energy resolution spectrum is peak-fitted and accompanied by detailed tables containing binding energies, FWHMs and relative percentages. In this volume 'Semiconductors' are contained XPS Spectra from a wide range of semiconductive materials and related materials, a rare tool for scientists and analysts in this area. Exclusive features of this volume include: ? Binding energies are accurate to +/- 0.08eV ? Charge compensation was done with a flood-gun mesh-screen system ? Valence band spectra document the occupied density of states (DOS) and the fundamental electronic nature of the semi-conductive materials analysed ? Analyses were done: "as received", "freshly fractured in air", "ion etched" and "chemically treated" ? Alphabetically organised by chemical abbreviations for ease of locating each material This handbook is an invaluable reference for materials scientists and electrical engineers in industry, academia and government laboratories interested in the analysis of semiconductors

  7. Highly transparent superhydrophobic surfaces from the coassembly of nanoparticles (≤100 nm).

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Raghuraman G; Lu, Cheng-Hsin; Zhang, Zanhe; Yang, Shu

    2011-04-19

    We report a simple and versatile approach to creating a highly transparent superhydrophobic surface with dual-scale roughness on the nanoscale. 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTS)-functionalized silica nanoparticles of two different sizes (100 and 20 nm) were sequentially dip coated onto different substrates, followed by thermal annealing. After hydrophobilization of the nanoparticle film with (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)trichlorosilane for 30 min or longer, the surface became superhydrophobic with an advancing water contact angle of greater than 160° and a water droplet (10 μL) roll-off angle of less than 5°. The order of nanoparticles dip coated onto the silicon wafer (i.e., 100 nm first and 20 nm second or vice versa) did not seem to have a significant effect on the resulting apparent water contact angle. In contrast, when the substrate was dip coated with monoscale nanoparticles (20, 50, and 100 nm), a highly hydrophobic surface (with an advancing water contact angle of up to 143°) was obtained, and the degree of hydrophobicity was found to be dependent on the particle size and concentration of the dip-coating solution. UV-vis spectra showed nearly 100% transmission in the visible region from the glass coated with dual-scale nanoparticles, similar to the bare one. The coating strategy was versatile, and superhydrophobicity was obtained on various substrates, including Si, glass, epoxy resin, and fabrics. Thermal annealing enhanced the stability of the nanoparticle coating, and superhydrophobicity was maintained against prolonged exposure to UV light under ambient conditions.

  8. Emission properties and CW laser operation of Pr:YLF in the 910 nm spectral range.

    PubMed

    Cai, Z P; Qu, B; Cheng, Y J; Luo, S Y; Xu, B; Xu, H Y; Luo, Z Q; Camy, P; Doualan, J L; Moncorgé, R

    2014-12-29

    The polarized emission spectra for the 3P01G4 emission transition of the Pr3+ ion around 910 nm in the Pr3+:LiYF4 (Pr:YLF) laser crystal were registered and calibrated in unit of cross sections for the first time. Continuous-wave (CW) laser operation is demonstrated at 915 nm in π polarization by pumping the crystal with an optically pumped semiconductor laser (OPSL) at 479.2 nm. An output power of 218 mW is thus obtained with a laser slope efficiency of about 24% for an output coupler (OC) transmission of 1.9%. CW laser operation is also demonstrated at 907 nm in σ polarization by using a thin plate oriented at Brewster angle. An output power of about 89 mW with a slope efficiency of about 10% is then obtained for an OC transmission of 0.8%.The round-trip cavity losses are estimated for different experimental cavity configurations to be about 1% and the typical beam quality M2 factors measured in the transverse x and y directions are found equal to about 1.07 and 1.04, respectively. Finally, we also report on a double laser wavelength operation by using an OC with a transmission of about 0.05%, such effect resulting from joint-etalon effects inside the cavity.

  9. EUV reticle inspection with a 193nm reticle inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, William; Inderhees, Gregg; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lee, Isaac; Lim, Phillip

    2013-06-01

    The prevailing industry opinion is that EUV Lithography (EUVL) will enter High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) in the 2015 - 2017 timeframe at the 16nm HP node. Every year the industry assesses the key risk factors for introducing EUVL into HVM - blank and reticle defects are among the top items. To reduce EUV blank and reticle defect levels, high sensitivity inspection is needed. To address this EUV inspection need, KLA-Tencor first developed EUV blank inspection and EUV reticle inspection capability for their 193nm wavelength reticle inspection system - the Teron 610 Series (2010). This system has become the industry standard for 22nm / 3xhp optical reticle HVM along with 14nm / 2xhp optical pilot production; it is further widely used for EUV blank and reticle inspection in R and D. To prepare for the upcoming 10nm / 1xhp generation, KLA-Tencor has developed the Teron 630 Series reticle inspection system which includes many technical advances; these advances can be applied to both EUV and optical reticles. The advanced capabilities are described in this paper with application to EUV die-to-database and die-to-die inspection for currently available 14nm / 2xhp generation EUV reticles. As 10nm / 1xhp generation optical and EUV reticles become available later in 2013, the system will be tested to identify areas for further improvement with the goal to be ready for pilot lines in early 2015.

  10. Sub-30-nm defect removal on EUV substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Abbas; Eichenlaub, Sean; Kadaksham, Arun John; House, Matt; Cha, Brian; Yun, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring sub 30 nm defects on quartz and Low Thermal Expansion Material (LTEM) substrates were characterized by using Atomic Force Microscope(AFM). Our data indicates that a majority of defects on the incoming substrate are hard defects including large, flat particles with a height less than 5 nm, tiny particles with a size of 10 nm to 30 nm SEVD and pits with a depth of about 9 nm. All the soft particles added by handling with sizes of >50 nm can be removed with a single cleaning process. At least four cleaning cycles are required to remove all of the remaining embedded particles. However, after particle removal in their initial location a shallow pit remains. Based on detailed characterization of defect and surface by AFM, we propose that these hard particles are added during the glass polishing step and therefore it is important to revisit the glass Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) processes and optimize them for defect reduction. A qualitative value for particle removal efficiency (PRE) of >99% was obtained for 20 nm Poly Styrene Latex Sphere (PSL) deposited particles on surface of glass.

  11. Photomask technology for 32nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikichi, Ryugo; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Migita, Hidekazu; Kakehi, Noriko; Shimizu, Mochihiro; Takamizawa, Hideyoshi; Nagano, Tsugumi; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Iwashita, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Hosoya, Morio; Ohkubo, Yasushi; Ushida, Masao; Mitsui, Hideaki

    2008-05-01

    193nm-immersion lithography is the most promising technology for 32nm-node device fabrication. At the 32nm technology-node, the performance of photomasks, not only phase-shift masks but also binary masks, needs to be improved, especially in "resolution" and "CD accuracy". To meet sub-100nm resolution with high precision, further thinning of resist thickness will be needed. To improve CD performance, we have designed a new Cr-on-glass (COG) blank for binary applications, having OD-3 at 193nm. This simple Cr structure can obtain superior performance with the conventional mask-making process. Since the hardmask concept is one of the alternative solutions, we have also designed a multilayered binary blank. The new COG blank (NTARC) was fully dry-etched with over 25% shorter etching time than NTAR7, which is a conventional COG blank. Thinner resist (up to 200nm) was possible for NTARC. NTARC with 200nm-thick resist showed superior resolution and CD linearity in all pattern categories. On the other hand, the multilayered binary stack gives us a wide etching margin for several etching steps. Super thin resist (up to 100nm) was suitable by using a Cr-hardmask on a MoSi-absorber structure (COMS). The COMS blanks showed superior performance, especially in tiny clear patterns, such as the isolated hole pattern. We confirmed that these new photomask blanks, NTARC and COMS, will meet the requirements for 32nm-node and beyond, for all aspects of mask-making.

  12. Computer processing of tunable diode laser spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1989-01-01

    A computer-controlled tunable diode laser spectrometer and spectral analysis software are described. The three-channel system records simultaneously the transmission of a subject gas, a temperature-stabilized etalon, and a calibration gas. The software routines are applied to diode laser spectra of HNO3 and NO2 to illustrate the procedures adopted for conversion of raw spectral data to useful transmission and harmonic spectra. Extraction of line positions, absorption intensities, collisional broadening coefficients, and gas concentrations from recorded spectra is also described.

  13. Analysis of atmospheric spectra for trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Seals, Robert K., Jr.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, David G.; Murcray, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the comprehensive analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra recorded in the middle-infrared region to obtain simultaneous measurements of coupled parameters (gas concentrations of key trace constituents, total column amounts, pressure, and temperature) in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.002 and 0.02 cm exp -1 resolutions with the University of Denver group's balloon-borne, aircraft borne, and ground-based interferometers and 0.005 to 0.01 cm exp -1 resolution solar spectra from Kitt Peak are used in the analyses.

  14. Vibrational spectra and structure of isopropylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, A. I.; Noskov, A. I.; Remizov, A. B.; Chachkov, D. V.

    2008-12-01

    Infrared spectra (4000-400 cm -1) and Raman spectra (1700-40 cm -1) of the liquid and two crystalline solids of isopropylbenzene (cumene) and isopropylbenzene-d 12 have been recorded. The spectra indicate that in the liquid and crystalline solids isopropylbenzene exists in planar conformation only (C sbnd H bond is in the plane of the benzene ring). An assignment of the observed band wave numbers both isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene-d 12 is discussed by comparison with normal mode wave numbers and IR intensities calculated from ab initio 6-31G (d) force fields.

  15. Visible photodissociation spectra of gaseous rhodamine ions: Effects of temperature and tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrátil, Rafael; Jašík, Juraj; Roithová, Jana

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports on the effect of He, Ar, and N2 tagging on visible photodissociation (VisPD) spectra of Rhodamine 123 ions. We show that the effect of tagging on the determination of the 0-0 transition in the electronic spectra is negligible. In contrast to the photodissociation spectra of the bare ions, the tagging method provides resolved Franck-Condon envelopes. Ar and N2 tagging spectra revealed minor blue-shifts (∼ 0.5 nm) for some maxima in the Franck-Condon envelope with respect to the He tagging spectrum. The N2 tagging VisPD spectrum was less resolved compared to He and Ar tagging spectra. Further, we have investigated the effect of temperature on photodissociation spectra of bare rhodamine ions. At room temperature, the absorption spectrum is dominated by the absorption of vibrationally excited ions. Vibrationally relaxed ions start to be dominantly sampled at about 150 K. In average, three to four photons are required to induce photodissociation of the rhodamine ions and it is slightly wavelength dependent. We ascribe it to the fluorescence process.

  16. EUV mask inspection study for sub-20nm device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Inkyun; Yoon, Gisung; Na, Ji Hoon; Chung, Paul D. H.; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2012-11-01

    Reflected light inspection has been used to inspect EUVL mask which consists of multi layers and metal absorber. However, sub-wavelength half pitch patterns and reflected inspection make unprecedented phenomenon like tone inversion. These lead EUV inspection more difficult in detectability and inspectability for separating out defects and false. In this study, we report the evaluation result of inspection dependency of illumination conditions like OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), sigma and polarization for sub-20nm EUVL PDM(programmed defect mask). With inspection of sub- 20nm device mask, we finally address the inspection feasibility for sub-20nm device and the future direction of inspection technology.

  17. 80 nm tunable DBR-free semiconductor disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Albrecht, A. R.; Cederberg, J. G.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report a widely tunable optically pumped distributed Bragg reflector (DBR)-free semiconductor disk laser with 6 W continuous wave output power near 1055 nm when using a 2% output coupler. Using only high reflecting mirrors, the lasing wavelength is centered at 1034 nm and can be tuned up to a record 80 nm by using a birefringent filter. We attribute such wide tunability to the unique broad effective gain bandwidth of DBR-free semiconductor disk lasers achieved by eliminating the active mirror geometry.

  18. High-Performance 1645-nm Er: YAG Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-25

    laser set-up is shown in Figure 1. An IPG Photonics TEM00 erbium fiber laser , which provided 20 W cw power at 1532.4 nm, was used in these experi...output of the resonantly fiber - laser -pumped Er:AYG laser at 1645 nm using 0.25% doped crystal out- performed the 0.5% doped crystal. In addition to the...the advantages of small quantum defect and small thermal load for the laser materials. High-brightness erbium fiber pump lasers at 1532 nm not only

  19. The Infrared Spectra and Absorption Intensities of Amorphous Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Our research group is carrying out new IR measurements of icy solids relevant to the outer solar system and to the interstellar medium, with an emphasis on amorphous and crystalline ices below ~ 120 K. Our goal is to update and add to the relatively meager literature on this subject and to provide electronic versions of state-of-the-art data, since the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate reference spectra and IR band strengths. In the past year, we have focused on three of the simplest and most abundant components of interstellar and solar-system ices: methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methanol (CH3OH). Infrared spectra from ˜ 4500 to 500 cm-1 have been measured for each of these molecules in μm-thick films at temperatures from 10 to 120 K. All known amorphous and crystalline phases have been reproduced and, for some, presented for the first time. We also report measurements of the index of refraction at 670 nm and the mass densities for each ice phase. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible. Electronic versions of our new results are available at http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/691/cosmicice/ constants.html.

  20. Mapping Agricultural Crops with AVIRIS Spectra in Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Pavri, Betina; Roberts, Dar; Ustin, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Spectroscopy is used in the laboratory to measure the molecular components and concentrations of plant constituents to answer questions about the plant type, status, and health. Imaging spectrometers measure the upwelling spectral radiance above the Earth's surface as images. Ideally, imaging spectrometer data sets should be used to understand plant type, plant status, and health of plants in an agricultural setting. An Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data set was acquired over agricultural fields near Wallula, Washington on July 23rd, 1997. AVIRIS measures upwelling radiance spectra through 224 spectral channels with contiguous 10-nm sampling from 400 to 2500 run in the solar-reflected spectrum. The spectra are measured as images of 11 by up to 800 km with 20-m spatial resolution. The spectral images measured by AVIRIS represent the integrated signal resulting from: the solar irradiance; two way transmittance and scattering of the atmosphere; the absorptions and scattering of surface materials; as well as the spectral, radiometric and spatial response functions of AVIRIS. This paper presents initial research to derive properties of the agricultural fields near Wallula from the calibrated spectral images measured by AVIRIS near the top of the atmosphere.

  1. Adaptive spectral window sizes for feature extraction from optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Chih-Wen; Lee, Andy Y.; Pham, Nhi; Nieman, Linda T.; Sokolov, Konstantin; Markey, Mia K.

    2008-02-01

    We propose an approach to adaptively adjust the spectral window size used to extract features from optical spectra. Previous studies have employed spectral features extracted by dividing the spectra into several spectral windows of a fixed width. However, the choice of spectral window size was arbitrary. We hypothesize that by adaptively adjusting the spectral window sizes, the trends in the data will be captured more accurately. Our method was tested on a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy dataset obtained in a study of oblique polarization reflectance spectroscopy of oral mucosa lesions. The diagnostic task is to classify lesions into one of four histopathology groups: normal, benign, mild dysplasia, or severe dysplasia (including carcinoma). Nine features were extracted from each of the spectral windows. We computed the area (AUC) under Receiver Operating Characteristic curve to select the most discriminatory wavelength intervals. We performed pairwise classifications using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) with leave-one-out cross validation. The results showed that for discriminating benign lesions from mild or severe dysplasia, the adaptive spectral window size features achieved AUC of 0.84, while a fixed spectral window size of 20 nm had AUC of 0.71, and an AUC of 0.64 is achieved with a large window size containing all wavelengths. The AUCs of all feature combinations were also calculated. These results suggest that the new adaptive spectral window size method effectively extracts features that enable accurate classification of oral mucosa lesions.

  2. Fluorescence Emission and Excitation Spectra of Photo-Fragmented Nitrobenzene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Christopher J.; Tanjaroon, Chakree; Johnson, J. Bruce; Allen, Susan D.; Reeve, Scott W.

    2012-06-01

    Upon absorption of a UV photon, nitrobenzene readily dissociates into C_6H_5, NO_2, C_6H_5NO, O, C_6H_5O, and NO through three different channels. We have recorded high resolution emission and excitation spectra of the NO resulting from photo-fragmented nitrobenzene using a pulsed picosecond tunable laser and a nanosecond dye laser. Specifically, the lasers probed the A^2Σ^+→ X^2π(1/2,3/2) NO band system between 225-260 nm using an one or two color process. In a one color process, the same energy (wavelength) photon is used to dissociate nitrobenzene and excite NO. In a two color process, photons of a particular energy are used to dissociate the nitrobenzene while photons of a different energy are used to probe the resultant NO. We have determined the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the nascent NO. And, we have examined the effect of the relative timing of the two photons on the fluorescence spectra to extract information about the photodissociation dynamics. Lin, M.-F.; Lee, Y. T.; Ni, C.-K.; Xu, S. and Lin, M. C. J. Chem. Phys., AIP, 2007, 126.

  3. GOME wavelength calibration using solar and atmospheric spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspar, C.; Chance, K.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral information in the global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) solar irradiance spectra and GOME earth radiance spectra are used in conjunction with the GOME solar reference spectrum to provide absolute vacuum internal wavelength calibration for GOME. Two methods for wavelength calibration of GOME data are investigated. The first employs chi-square minimization of a merit function involving wavelength and the GOME slit function. It is quite robust and requires little GOME data in the processing (calibration window regions from 15 to 40 pixels). The second employs cross correlation of GOME data and the solar reference spectrum in the Fourier transform domain, using a procedure in the image reduction and analysis facility (IRAF) software system developed for the determination of galaxy redshifts. It also requires small amounts of GOME data (calibration window regions with from 10 to 15 pixels). Both methods provide absolute wavelength calibration accurate to a small fraction of a GOME pixel across the entire GOME spectrum, and to 0.001 nm over much of the range.

  4. Temperature dependence of resonance Raman spectra of carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, A.; Apostolova, I.; Velitchkova, M.

    2011-04-01

    To understand the mechanism of the photoprotective and antioxidative functions of carotenoids, it is essential to have a profound knowledge of their excited electronic and vibronic states. In the present study we investigate the most powerful antioxidants: β-carotene and lutein by means of resonance Raman spectroscopy. The aim was to study in detail their Raman spectra in solution at room temperature and their changes as a function of temperature. To measure the spectra in their natural environment pyridine has been used as a solvent. It has been chosen because of its polarizability ( n = 1.5092) which is close to that of membrane lipids and proteins. The temperature dependence of the most intensive ν1 band in the range from 77 K to 295 K at 514.5 nm excitation has been obtained. It was found that in pyridine the C dbnd C stretching frequency, its intensity, line shape, and line width are very sensitive to the temperature (the sensitivity being different for the two studied carotenoids). The observed linear temperature dependence of the C dbnd C stretching frequency is explained by a mechanism involving changes of the vibronic coupling and the extent of π-electron delocalization. The different behavior of the temperature-induced broadening of the ν1 band and its intensity for the two studied carotenoids can be associated with the different nature of their solid matrices: glassy for β-carotene and crystalline-like for lutein, owing to their different chemical structures.

  5. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  6. Analyzing reflectance spectra of human skin in legal medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenki, Liudmila; Sterzik, Vera; Schulz, Katharina; Bohnert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Our current research in the framework of an interdisciplinary project focuses on modelling the dynamics of the hemoglobin reoxygenation process in post-mortem human skin by reflectance spectrometry. The observations of reoxygenation of hemoglobin in livores after postmortem exposure to a cold environment relate the reoxygenation to the commonly known phenomenon that the color impression of livores changes from livid to pink under low ambient temperatures. We analyze the spectra with respect to a physical model describing the optical properties of human skin, discuss the dynamics of the reoxygenation, and propose a phenomenological model for reoxygenation. For additional characterization of the reflectance spectra, the curvature of the local minimum and maximum in the investigated spectral range is considered. There is a strong correlation between the curvature of specra at a wavelength of 560 nm and the concentration of O2-Hb. The analysis is carried out via C programs, as well as MySQL database queries in Java EE, JDBC, Matlab, and Python.

  7. FLOW VIROMETRY TO ANALYZE ANTIGENIC SPECTRA OF VIRIONS AND EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Zicari, Sonia; Grivel, Murad Vagida Jean-Charles; Margolis, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    To characterize antigenic spectra of individual viruses or extracellular vesicles we immunocapture them with 15nm magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coupled to antibodies that recognize a surface antigen of interest. The captured virions or vesicles are labeled with fluorescent antibodies against other surface antigens and the resultant complexes are separated from unbound antibodies in a high magnetic field followed by analysis on conventional flow cytometer triggered on fluorescence. PMID:28190041

  8. [Decomposition of hemoglobin UV absorption spectrum into absorption spectra of prosthetic group and apoprotein by means of an additive model].

    PubMed

    Lavrinenko, I A; Vashanov, G A; Artyukhov, V G

    2015-01-01

    The decomposition pathways of hemoglobin UV absorption spectrum into the absorption spectra of the protein and non-protein components are proposed and substantiated by means of an additive model. We have established that the heme component has an absorption band with a maximum at λ(max) = 269.2 nm (ε = 97163) and the apoprotein component has an absorption band with a maximum at λ(max) = 278.4 nm (ε = 48669) for the wavelength range from 240.0 to 320.0 nm. An integral relative proportion of absorption for the heme fraction (78.8%) and apoprotein (21.2%) in the investigating wavelength range is defined.

  9. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  10. Spectra: Time series power spectrum calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Tabaré

    2017-01-01

    Spectra calculates the power spectrum of a time series equally spaced or not based on the Spectral Correlation Coefficient (Ferraz-Mello 1981, Astron. Journal 86 (4), 619). It is very efficient for detection of low frequencies.

  11. Spatial evolution of ocean wave spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spatially evolving deep water synthetic aperture radar (SAR) directional spectra of a mixed ocean wave system are compared with a comprehensive set of surface and aircraft measurements. The evolution of the SAR spectra, at least for ocean wavelengths greater than 80 m, is seen as generally consistent with the auxiliary data set in both time and space. From the spatial evolution of the angular component of the spectra, it is possible to project back to an apparent remote storm source that is also consistent with the storm location via GOES satellite imagery. The data provide compelling evidence that the spatial evolution of SAR ocean wave spectra can be a useful tool in global ocean wave monitoring and forecasting.

  12. Synthesis and Spectra of Vanadium Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.; Stupgia, Sean

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates simple synthetic techniques, redox principles in synthesis reactions, interpretation of visible spectra using Orgel diagrams, and the spectrochemical series. The experiment is suitable for the advanced undergraduate inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  13. An analysis of middle ultraviolet dayglow spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, Billie S.

    1991-12-01

    Middle ultraviolet spectra from 1800 to 3400A are analyzed. These spectra were obtained from the March 1990 rocket flight of the NPS MUSTANG instrument over the altitudes 105km to 315km. The data were compared with computer generated synthetic spectra. A least squares fitting procedure was developed for this purpose. Each data point was weighted using the standard deviation of the means. Synthetic spectra were generated for the following emissions: N2 Vegard-Kaphan; N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield; NO gamma, delta, and epsilon; OI 2972A, OII 2470A; and NII 2143A. Altitude profiles for the emissions were obtained. Tentative identification was made of the OIII 2853A emission. A comparison of VK and LBH profiles demonstrates the process of N2 A-state quenching by atomic oxygen.

  14. [Spectra of dark green jade from Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chai, Lin-Tao; Guo, Shou-Guo; Fan, Jian-Liang; Bao, Feng

    2013-05-01

    Chemical compositions and spectral characteristics of one type of dark green jades assumed from omphacite jadeite from Myanmar jadeite mining area were studied by X-ray powder diffraction(XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectra(XRF), Raman spectra(RM) and UV-Vis Spectroscopy, etc. Based on testing by XRD and XRF, it was shown that it belongs to iron-enriched plagioclase, including albite and anorthite. The compositions range is between Ab0.731 An0.264 Or0.004 and Ab0.693 An0.303 Or0.004. Raman spectra of samples, albite jade and anorthite were collected and analyzed. Additionally, the distributions of Si, Al in the crystal structure were also discussed. UV-Vis spectra showed that dark green hue of this mineral is associated with d--d electronic transition of Fe3+ and Cr3+.

  15. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  16. Frequency Spectra of Magnetoacoustic Emission in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, S. V.; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Kolchanov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the magnetoacoustic emission spectra of iron meteorites and their industrial analogs. The revealed differences in signal amplitude, position and width of the peaks are associated with the features of structure and the magnetic texture.

  17. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  18. Comparing Ultraviolet Spectra Against Calculations: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2003-01-01

    The five-year goal of this effort is to calculate high fidelity mid-UV spectra for individual stars and stellar systems for a wide range of ages, abundances, and abundance ratios. In this first year, the emphasis was placed on revising the list of atomic line parameters used to calculate mid-UV spectra. First, new identifications of atomic lines and measurements of their transition probabilities were obtained for lines of the first and second ionization stages of iron-peak elements. Second, observed mid-UV and optical spectra for standard stars were re-analyzed and compared to new calculations, to refine the determination of transition probabilities and to estimate the identity of lines still missing from the laboratory lists. As evidenced by the figures, a dramatic improvement has resulted in the reproduction of the spectra of standard stars by the calculations.

  19. Efficient laser operation of Nd3+:Lu2O3 at various wavelengths between 917 nm and 1463 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brunn, P.; Heuer, A. M.; Fornasiero, L.; Huber, G.; Kränkel, C.

    2016-08-01

    Even though the first Nd3+-doped sesquioxide lasers have been realized more than 50 years ago, up to now no reports on efficient laser operation of Nd3+:doped sesquioxides can be found. In this work, we review the favorable spectroscopic properties of the sesquioxide Nd3+:Lu2O3 in terms of ground state absorption, stimulated emission, and excited state absorption cross sections as well as the upper level lifetime. Making use of these properties, we achieved efficient laser performance on eight different laser transitions in the wavelength range between 917 nm and 1463 nm under Ti:sapphire laser pumping using state-of-the-art HEM-grown Nd3+:Lu2O3 crystals with good optical quality. At the strongest transition around 1076 nm we determined a slope efficiency of 69%, which represents the highest efficiency ever obtained for a Nd3+-doped sesquioxide. Furthermore, we could generate watt level output powers and high slope efficiencies for seven other transitions. Lasers at 917 nm, 1053 nm, 1108 nm and 1463 nm were realized for the first time and the latter represents one of the longest laser wavelengths obtained on the 4F3/2  →  4I13/2 transition in Nd3+-doped materials.

  20. POLLUX: a database of synthetic stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Gebran, M.; Josselin, E.; Martins, F.; Plez, B.; Belmas, M.; Lèbre, A.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: Synthetic spectra are needed to determine fundamental stellar and wind parameters of all types of stars. They are also used for the construction of theoretical spectral libraries helpful for stellar population synthesis. Therefore, a database of theoretical spectra is required to allow rapid and quantitative comparisons to spectroscopic data. We provide such a database offering an unprecedented coverage of the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Methods: We present the POLLUX database of synthetic stellar spectra. For objects with Teff ≤ 6000 K, MARCS atmosphere models are computed and the program TURBOSPECTRUM provides the synthetic spectra. ATLAS12 models are computed for stars with 7000 K ≤ Teff ≤ 15 000 K. SYNSPEC gives the corresponding spectra. Finally, the code CMFGEN provides atmosphere models for the hottest stars (Teff > 25 000 K). Their spectra are computed with CMF_FLUX. Both high resolution (R > 150 000) optical spectra in the range 3000 to 12 000 Å and spectral energy distributions extending from the UV to near-IR ranges are presented. These spectra cover the HR diagram at solar metallicity. Results: We propose a wide variety of synthetic spectra for various types of stars in a format that is compliant with the Virtual Observatory standards. A user-friendly web interface allows an easy selection of spectra and data retrieval. Upcoming developments will include an extension to a large range of metallicities and to the near-IR high resolution spectra, as well as a better coverage of the HR diagram, with the inclusion of models for Wolf-Rayet stars and large datasets for cool stars. The POLLUX database is accessible at http://pollux.graal.univ-montp2.fr/ and through the Virtual Observatory. Copy of database is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb

  1. 76 FR 76801 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... Mexico Disaster NM-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a... New Mexico (FEMA- 4047-DR), dated 11/23/2011. Incident: Flooding. Incident Period: 08/19/2011...

  2. Compact frequency-quadrupled pulsed 1030nm fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chris; Goldberg, Lew; Cole, Brian; DiLazaro, Tom; Hays, Alan D.

    2016-03-01

    A compact 1030nm fiber laser for ultraviolet generation at 257.5nm is presented. The laser employs a short length of highly-doped, large core (20μm), coiled polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber pumped by a wavelength-stabilized 975nm diode. It is passively Q-switched via a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber and generates 2.4W at 1030nm in a 110μJ pulse train. Lithium triborate (LBO) and beta-barium borate (BBO) are used to achieve 325mW average power at the fourth harmonic. The laser's small form factor, narrow linewidth and modest power consumption are suitable for use in a man-portable ultraviolet Raman explosives detection system.

  3. RadNet Air Data From Navajo Lake, NM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Navajo Lake, NM from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  4. RadNet Air Data From Albuquerque, NM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Albuquerque, NM from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  5. RadNet Air Data From Carlsbad, NM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Carlsbad, NM from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  6. Absorption and electroabsorption spectra of carotenoid cation radical and dication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Stanisław

    1998-05-01

    Radical cations and dications of two carotenoids astaxanthin and canthaxanthin were prepared by oxidation with FeCl 3 in fluorinated alcohols at room temperature. Absorption and electroabsorption (Stark effect) spectra were recorded for astaxanthin cations in mixed frozen matrices at temperatures about 160 K. The D 0→D 2 transition in cation radical is at 835 nm. The electroabsorption spectrum for the D 0→D 2 transition exhibits a negative change of molecular polarizability, Δ α=-1.2·10 -38 C·m 2/V (-105 A 3), which seems to originate from the change in bond order alternation in the ground state rather than from the electric field-induced interaction of D 1 and D 2 excited states. Absorption spectrum of astaxanthin dication is located at 715-717 nm, between those of D 0→D 2 in cation radical and S 0→S 2 in neutral carotenoid. Its shape reflects a short vibronic progression and strong inhomogeneous broadening. The polarizability change on electronic excitation, Δ α=2.89·10 -38 C·m 2/V (260 A 3), is five times smaller than in neutral astaxanthin. This value reflects the larger energetic distance from the lowest excited state to the higher excited states than in the neutral molecule.

  7. The Missing Solar Irradiance Spectrum: 1 to 7 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Lewis, M.; David, M.; Schunk, R. W.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    During large X-class flares the Earth's upper atmospheric E-region responds immediately to solar photons in the 1 to 7 nm range. The response can change the E-region density by factors approaching 10, create large changes in conductivity, and plague HF communications. GOES-XRS provide 0.1 to 0.8 nm and a 0.05 to 0.4 nm integral channels; SOHO-SEM provided a 0 to 50 nm irradiance; TIMED and SORCE-XPS diode measurements also integrated down to 0.1 nm; and most recently SDO-EVE provided a 0.1 to 7 nm irradiance. For atmospheric response to solar flares the cadence is also crucial. Both GOES and SDO provided integral measurements at 10 seconds or better. Unfortunately these measurements have failed to capture the 1 to 7 nm spectral changes that occur during flares. It is these spectral changes that create the major impact since the ionization cross-section of the dominant atmospheric species, N2 and O2, both contain step function changes in the cross-sections. Models of the solar irradiance over this critical wavelength regime have suffered from the need to model the spectral variability based on incomplete measurements. The most sophisticated empirical model FISM [Chamberlin et al., 2008] used 1 nm spectral binning and various implementations of the above integral measurements to describe the 1 to 7 nm irradiance. Since excellent solar observations exist at other wavelengths it is possible to construct an empirical model of the solar atmosphere and then use this model to infer the spectral distribution at wavelengths below 5 nm. This differential emission measure approach has been used successfully in other contexts [e.g., Warren, 2005, Chamberlin et al., 2009]. This paper contrasts the broadband versus spectrally resolved descriptions of the incoming irradiance that affects the upper atmospheric E-layer. The results provide a prescription of what wavelength resolution would be needed to adequately measure the incoming solar irradiance in the 1 to 7 nm range.

  8. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  9. On the Photoelectron Spectra of Li4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The most stable structure for Li4(-) is found to be the rhombus. Electron detachment from this structure does not seem able to fully explain the photoelectron spectra. The computed results are consistent with those Rao, Jena, and Ray who have proposed that the experimental spectra consists of a superposition of detachment from the Li4(-) rhombus and tetrahedron, forming the singlet and triplet states of Li4, respectively.

  10. New atlas of IR solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Vanallen, J. W.; Bradford, C. M.; Cook, G. R.; Murcray, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Over 4500 absorption lines have been marked on the spectra and the corresponding line positions tabulated. The associated absorbing telluric or solar species for more than 90% of these lines have been identified and only a fraction of the unidentified lines have peak absorptions greater than a few percent. The high resolution and the low Sun spectra greatly enhance the sensitivity limits for identification of trace constituents.

  11. Trigonometric Polynomials For Estimation Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Orthogonal sets of trigonometric polynomials used as suboptimal substitutes for discrete prolate-spheroidal "windows" of Thomson method of estimation of spectra. As used here, "windows" denotes weighting functions used in sampling time series to obtain their power spectra within specified frequency bands. Simplified windows designed to require less computation than do discrete prolate-spheroidal windows, albeit at price of some loss of accuracy.

  12. Analytical calculation of two-dimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joshua D; Conrad, Rebecca; Siemens, Mark E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate an analytical calculation of two-dimensional (2D) coherent spectra of electronic or vibrational resonances. Starting with the solution to the optical Bloch equations for a two-level system in the 2D time domain, we show that a fully analytical 2D Fourier transform can be performed if the projection-slice and Fourier-shift theorems of Fourier transforms are applied. Results can be fit to experimental 2D coherent spectra of resonances with arbitrary inhomogeneity.

  13. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Song, Inseok

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  14. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba-Son; Lin, Jen-Fin

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750 °C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750 °C. At 800 °C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  15. Electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over 40 nm bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, Vicente; Andrekson, Peter A.; Torres-Company, Víctor

    2016-09-01

    Dual-comb interferometry is a measurement technique that uses two laser frequency combs to retrieve complex spectra in a line-by-line basis. This technique can be implemented with electro-optic frequency combs, offering intrinsic mutual coherence, high acquisition speed and flexible repetition-rate operation. A challenge with the operation of this kind of frequency comb in dual-comb interferometry is its limited optical bandwidth. Here, we use coherent spectral broadening and demonstrate electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over the entire telecommunications C band (200 lines covering ~ 40 nm, measured within 10 microseconds at 100 signal-to-noise ratio per spectral line). These results offer new prospects for electro-optic dual-comb interferometry as a suitable technology for high-speed broadband metrology, for example in optical coherence tomography or coherent Raman microscopy.

  16. Dual-comb spectroscopy using frequency-doubled combs around 775 nm.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Simon; Genest, Jérôme

    2013-12-16

    Two frequency-doubled combs are generated by nonlinear frequency conversion to realize spectroscopic measurements around 775 nm. Frequency-doubled interferograms are corrected in real-time by monitoring the relative instabilities between the combs at their fundamental frequency. Rubidium absorption lines are used to demonstrate the technique's accuracy and serve as absolute references to calibrate the frequency grid of computed spectra. The method allows frequency-doubled interferograms to be averaged without distortion during long periods of time. The calibrated frequency grid is validated by the measurement of the oxygen A-band. Moreover, the measurement analysis of the acetylene ν(1) + 3ν(3) overtone band has revealed some discrepancies with previous publications.

  17. Surface modification during Nd:YAG (1064 nm) pulsed laser cleaning of organic fibrous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strlič, Matija; Kolar, Jana; Šelih, Vid-Simon; Marinček, Marko

    2003-02-01

    Formation of yellow chromophores on artificially soiled surfaces of cellulose sheets, rag paper, linen, cotton, wool and silk during Nd:YAG (1064 nm) pulsed laser cleaning was followed using Vis and FTIR diffuse reflectance spectrometry. Content of reducing carbonyl groups and changes in FTIR reflectance spectra of cellulose are indicative of surface chemical modifications typical of thermal degradation at elevated temperatures. Two types of soiling were used: well-characterised natural dust and carbon powder and no difference in laser-induced formation of chromophores on material surface was observed at low deposit densities. The influence of laser fluence and number of repetitions was studied and a single pulse of a higher fluence (1 J cm -1) is in general more advisable. No bleaching of the chromophores formed was noticed after repeated treatments.

  18. Parallel-type C+L band hybrid amplifier pumped by 1480 nm laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, S.-K.; Huang, C.-K.; Hsiao, Y.-L.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel-type, dispersion compensating C+L band erbium-doped fiber amplifier/Raman fiber amplifier is constructed by sharing a common 1480-nm pump source. The gain spectra of C+L band are flattened by optimally dividing the pump power ratio to 1:29 for EDFA and RFA, respectively. In a signal input power of -20 dBm, the average gain is 14 dB for the C-band EDFA and 13.6 dB for the L-band RFA when a pump reflector is used to recycle the residual pump power in L-band. The noise figure value ranges from 4.6 to 6.5 dB and the polarization dependent gain is less than 0.14 dB.

  19. Picosecond holmium fibre laser pumped at 1125 \\ {\\text{nm}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamynin, V. A.; Filatova, S. A.; Zhluktova, I. V.; Tsvetkov, V. B.

    2016-12-01

    We report a passively mode-locked, all-fibre holmium laser based on nonlinear polarisation rotation. As a pump source use is made of an 1125-{\\text{nm}} ytterbium-doped fibre laser. The pulse repetition rate of the holmium laser is 7.5 {\\text{MHz}}, and the pulse duration does not exceed 52 {\\text{ps}} at wavelengths of 2065 and 2080 {\\text{nm}}. The average laser output power reaches 5 {\\text{mW}}.

  20. Investigation of a Pulsed 1550 nm Fiber Laser System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    Jain 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...14. ABSTRACT There is a strong need for a pulsed laser system at eye safe wavelengths for illuminator applications . High power pulsed 1550 nm fiber...system at eye safe wavelengths for illuminator applications . High power pulsed 1550 nm fiber lasers systems are able to generate, shaped, pulses at

  1. 670-nm light treatment reduces complement propagation following retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Complement activation is associated with the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We aimed to investigate whether 670-nm light treatment reduces the propagation of complement in a light-induced model of atrophic AMD. Methods Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with 9 J/cm2 670-nm light for 3 minutes daily over 5 days; other animals were sham treated. Animals were exposed to white light (1,000 lux) for 24 h, after which animals were kept in dim light (5 lux) for 7 days. Expression of complement genes was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry. Counts were made of C3-expressing monocytes/microglia using in situ hybridization. Photoreceptor death was also assessed using outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness measurements, and oxidative stress using immunohistochemistry for 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Results Following light damage, retinas pretreated with 670-nm light had reduced immunoreactivity for the oxidative damage maker 4-HNE in the ONL and outer segments, compared to controls. In conjunction, there was significant reduction in retinal expression of complement genes C1s, C2, C3, C4b, C3aR1, and C5r1 following 670 nm treatment. In situ hybridization, coupled with immunoreactivity for the marker ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (IBA1), revealed that C3 is expressed by infiltrating microglia/monocytes in subretinal space following light damage, which were significantly reduced in number after 670 nm treatment. Additionally, immunohistochemistry for C3 revealed a decrease in C3 deposition in the ONL following 670 nm treatment. Conclusions Our data indicate that 670-nm light pretreatment reduces lipid peroxidation and complement propagation in the degenerating retina. These findings have relevance to the cellular events of complement activation underling the pathogenesis of AMD, and highlight the potential of 670-nm light as a non-invasive anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:23181358

  2. Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectra of Diborane(6): B2H6 and B2D6.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu-Chain; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Lo, Jen-Iu; Lin, Meng-Yeh; Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Ogilvie, J F

    2016-07-21

    We recorded absorption spectra of diborane(6), B2H6 and B2D6, dispersed in solid neon near 4 K in both mid-infrared and ultraviolet regions. For gaseous B2H6 from 105 to 300 nm, we report quantitative absolute cross sections; for solid B2H6 and for B2H6 dispersed in solid neon, we measured ultraviolet absorbance with relative intensities over a wide range. To assign the mid-infrared spectra to specific isotopic variants, we applied the abundance of (11)B and (10)B in natural proportions; we undertook quantum-chemical calculations of wavenumbers associated with anharmonic vibrational modes and the intensities of the harmonic vibrational modes. To aid an interpretation of the ultraviolet spectra, we calculated the energies of electronically excited singlet and triplet states and oscillator strengths for electronic transitions from the electronic ground state.

  3. How to build a low cost spectrometer with Tracker for teaching light spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Marques, M. B.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2016-01-01

    Optics is probably one on the most exciting topics in physics. However, it also contains some of the less understood phenomena by students—the light spectra obtained from the diffraction of light. The experimental study of light spectra for studying radiating bodies, usually requests sophisticated and expensive equipment that is not normaly affordable for schools, and only a few teachers know how to measure the wavelength of light in a spectrum. In this work we present a simple and inexpensive setup, with enough accuracy for measuring light spectra to be used both in physics and chemistry classes. We show how freeware software Tracker, commonly used for teaching mechanics, can serve to measure wavelengths with about 2 nm of resolution. Several approaches to the calibration of different setups are also provided, depending on the degree of accuracy demanded.

  4. Plastocyanin conformation: an analysis of its near ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Draheim, J.E.; Anderson, G.P.; Duane, J.W.; Gross, E.L.

    1986-04-01

    The near-ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroic spectra of plastocyanin are dependent upon the redox state, solution pH, and ammonium sulfate concentration. This dependency was observed in plastocyanin isolated from spinach, poplar, and lettuce. Removal of the copper atom also perturbed the near-ultraviolet spectra. Upon reduction there are increases in both extinction and ellipticity at 252 nm. Further increases at 252 nm were observed upon formation of apo plastocyanin eliminating charge transfer transitions as the cause. The spectral changes in the near-ultraviolet imply a flexible tertiary conformation for plastocyanin. There are at least two charge transfer transitions at approx.295-340 nm. One of these transitions is sensitive to low pH's and is attributed to the His 87 copper ligand. The redox state dependent changes observed in the near-ultraviolet spectra of plastocyanin are attenuated either by decreasing the pH to 5 or by increasing the ammonium sulfate concentration to 2.7 M. This attenuation cannot be easily explained by simple charge screening. Hydrophobic interactions probably play an important role in this phenomenon. The pH and redox state dependent conformational changes may play an important role in regulating electron transport.

  5. An automated research facility for measuring thermoluminescence emission spectra using an optical multichannel analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piters, T. M.; Meulemans, W. H.; Bos, A. J. J.

    1993-01-01

    A facility for research into the mechanism of thermoluminescence (TL) is described. The facility comprises three units: an annealing oven, an irradiator, and a TL-emission spectrometer. Crystals or hot-pressed chips can be moved from and to the mentioned units by an automated sample changer. All units operate automatically and are controlled by a personal computer program. The spectrometer is based on a dispersive grating and an intensified diode array (512 active elements) and covers the 200-800-nm wavelength range. The wavelength resolution of the spectrometer is 6 nm when a 25-μm-wide entrance slit is used and 29 nm when a 1-mm-wide entrance slit is used. The sensitive spectrometer could measure emission spectra of CaSO4:Dy (TLD-200) irradiated at an absorbed dose as low as 3 mGy at a signal-to-noise ratio of 10:1 for LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) this ratio was obtained at 75 mGy. A detailed description is given how measured data can be related to spectra predicted by a model, taking into account all system aberrations. Spectra of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) irradiated to an absorbed dose of 5 Gy are analyzed according to the Franck-Condon model for light emission. Two emission bands with peak energies of 3.01 and 2.60 eV at 463 K have been found.

  6. Identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) using handheld Raman spectroscopy employing both 785 and 1064nm laser sources.

    PubMed

    Guirguis, Amira; Girotto, Sarah; Berti, Benedetta; Stair, Jacqueline L

    2017-02-04

    The chemical identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) in the field is challenging due not only to the plethora of substances available, but also as a result of the chemical complexity of products and the chemical similarity of NPS analogues. In this study, handheld Raman spectroscopy and the use of two excitation wavelengths, 785 and 1064nm, were evaluated for the identification of 60 NPS products. The products contained a range of NPS from classes including the aminoindanes, arylalkylamines, benzodiazepines, and piperidines & pyrrolidines. Identification was initially assessed using the instruments' in built algorithm (i.e., % HQI) and then further by visual inspection of the Raman spectra. Confirmatory analysis was preformed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. For the 60 diverse products, an NPS was successfully identified via the algorithm in 11 products (18%) using the 785nm source and 29 products (48%) using the 1064nm source. Evaluation of the Raman spectra showed that increasing the excitation wavelength from 785 to 1064nm improved this 'first pass' identification primarily due to a significant reduction in fluorescence, which increased S/N of the characteristic peaks of the substance identified. True positive correlations between internet products and NPS signatures ranged from 57.0 to 91.3% HQI with typical RSDs<10%. Tablet formulations and branded products were particularly challenging as a result of low NPS concentration and high chemical complexity, respectively. This study demonstrates the advantage of using a 1064nm source with handheld Raman spectroscopy for improved 'first pass' NPS identification when minimal spectral processing is required, such as when working in field. Future investigations will focus on the use of mixture algorithms, effect of NPS concentration, and further improvement of spectral libraries.

  7. On optimization of absorption-dispersion spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawranek, J. P.; Grabska, J.; Beć, K. B.

    2016-12-01

    A modified approach to the analysis of spectra of the complex electric permittivity of liquids in the Infrared region is presented. These spectra are derived from experimental spectra of the complex refractive index. Subsequently they are used to determine important secondary quantities, e.g. spectra of complex molecular polarizabilities and an integral property - the molar vibrational polarization. The accuracy of these quantities depends essentially on the accuracy of both components of the complex electric permittivity spectrum. In the proposed procedure, the spectra of the complex electric permittivity are approximated using the Classical Damped Harmonic Oscillator (CDHO) model for the description of individual bandshapes. The CDHO model defines both the real and imaginary part of the complex permittivity. The fitting procedure includes a simultaneous optimization of both the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity spectrum. A comparison of absorption-only curve fitting and the novel absorption-dispersion double curve fitting is presented; advantages of the new approach in accuracy, reliability and convergence time are pointed out. Due to the complexity of the problem, the choice was restricted to non-gradient methods of optimization. The performance of several gradientless algorithms was tested. Among numerous procedures the Powell General Least Squares Method Without Derivatives was found to be the most efficient. The reliability of obtained results of the band separatiovn process was tested on several simulated spectra of increasing complexity. The applicability of the developed approach to the analysis of exemplary experimental data was evaluated and discussed.

  8. Cs 728 nm Laser Spectroscopy and Faraday Atomic Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Zheng; Tao, Zhi-Ming; Jiang, Zhao-Jie; Chen, Jing-Biao

    2014-12-01

    We mainly present the 728 nm laser spectroscopy and Faraday atomic filter of Cs atoms with 650 MHz linewidth and 2.6% transmission based on an electrodeless discharge vapor lamp, compared with Rb 728 nm laser spectroscopy. Accidentally, this remarkably strong Cs 728 nm transition from the 6F7/2 state to the 5D5/2 state is only about 2.5 GHz away from the Rb 728 nm transition of the future potential four-level active optical clock, once laser cooled and trapped from the 7S1/2 state to the 5P1/2 state, as we proposed previously. A Faraday atomic filter stabilized 728 nm laser using a Cs electrodeless discharge vapor lamp with a power of 10mW will provide a frequency reference to evaluate the performance of the potential Rb four-level active optical clock at 728 nm with power less than 1 nW by 2.5 GHz heterodyne measurements.

  9. Electron beam inspection methods for imprint lithography at 32 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  10. Defect inspection of imprinted 32 nm half pitch patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; McMackin, Ian; Perez, Joseph; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2008-10-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  11. Power scaling of laser diode pumped Pr3+:LiYF4 cw lasers: efficient laser operation at 522.6 nm, 545.9 nm, 607.2 nm, and 639.5 nm.

    PubMed

    Gün, Teoman; Metz, Philip; Huber, Günter

    2011-03-15

    We report efficient cw laser operation of laser diode pumped Pr(3+)-doped LiYF4 crystals in the visible spectral region. Using two InGaN laser diodes emitting at λ(P)=443.9 nm with maximum output power of 1 W each and a 2.9-mm-long crystal with a doping concentration of 0.5%, output powers of 938 mW, 418 mW, 384 mW, and 773 mW were achieved for the laser wavelengths 639.5 nm, 607.2 nm, 545.9 nm, and 522.6 nm, respectively. The maximum absorbed pump powers were approximately 1.5 W, resulting in slope efficiencies of 63.6%, 32.0%, 52.1%, and 61.5%, as well as electro-optical efficiencies of 9.4%, 4.2%, 3.8%, and 7.7%, respectively. Within these experiments, laser diode-pumped laser action at 545.9 nm was demonstrated for what is believed to be the first time.

  12. Trends in nanosecond melanosome microcavitation up to 1540 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Vincelette, Rebecca L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2015-09-01

    Thresholds for microcavitation of bovine and porcine melanosomes were previously reported, using single nanosecond (ns) laser pulses in the visible (532 nm) and the near-infrared (NIR) from 1000 to 1319 nm. Here, we report average radiant exposure thresholds for bovine melanosome microcavitation at additional NIR wavelengths up to 1540 nm, which range from ˜0.159 J/cm2 at 800 nm to 4.5 J/cm2 at 1540 nm. Melanosome absorption coefficients were also estimated, and decreased with increasing wavelength. These values were compared to retinal pigment epithelium coefficients, and to water absorption, over the same wavelength range. Corneal total intraocular energy retinal damage threshold values were estimated and compared to the previous (2007) and recently changed (2014) maximum permissible exposure (MPE) safe levels. Results provide additional data that support the recent changes to the MPE levels, as well as the first microcavitation data at 1540 nm, a wavelength for which melanosome microcavitation may be an ns-pulse skin damage mechanism.

  13. Magneto-optical trap for metastable helium at 389 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Koelemeij, J.C.J.; Stas, R.J.W.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2003-05-01

    We have constructed a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for metastable triplet helium atoms utilizing the 2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}{yields}3 {sup 3}P{sub 2} line at 389 nm as the trapping and cooling transition. The far-red-detuned MOT (detuning {delta}=-41 MHz) typically contains few times 10{sup 7} atoms at a relatively high ({approx}10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) density, which is a consequence of the large momentum transfer per photon at 389 nm and a small two-body loss rate coefficient (2x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}/s<{beta}<1.0x10{sup -9} cm{sup 3}/s). The two-body loss rate is more than five times smaller than in a MOT on the commonly used 2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}{yields}2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} line at 1083 nm. Furthermore, laser cooling at 389 nm results in temperatures somewhat lower than those achieved using 1083 nm. The 389-nm MOT exhibits small losses due to two-photon ionization, which have been investigated as well.

  14. Influences of the Mie resonance on reflectance spectra of Si nanopillar arrays with different wetting states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sujung; Gwon, Minji; Li, Jiaqi; Xu, Xiumei; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Lee, Eunsongyi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Chen, Chang

    The reflectance spectra of crystalline Si nanopillar (SiNP) arrays with various diameters were investigated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The spectra exhibited distinct features depending on the wetting states. The FDTD-simulated reflectance dips of the 40-nm-diameter SiNP array were in good agreement with those estimated from destructive interference conditions at the top and bottom of the SiNPs: the SiNP arrays and the surrounding medium were treated as one optically homogeneous medium with an effective permittivity estimated from the effective medium approximation (EMA) model. However, the dip positions of the simulated spectra for 70-, 100-, and 130-nm-diameter SiNP arrays deviated from the results of interference calculations, particularly for short wavelengths. The optical reflectance spectra were significantly affected by the strong diameter-dependent Mie resonances in SiNPs, which were sensitive to the refractive index of the surrounding medium (i.e., the wetting state). Optical reflectance measurements provide an easy and efficient means of inspecting the wetting behavior of nano-patterned surfaces.

  15. A model considering light reabsorption processes to correct in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence spectra in apples.

    PubMed

    Ramos, María E; Lagorio, María G

    2006-05-01

    Chlorophyll-a contained in the peel of Granny Smith apples emits fluorescence upon excitation with blue light. The observed emission, collected by an external detector and corrected by its spectral response, is still distorted by light reabsorption processes taking place in the fruit skin and differs appreciably from the true spectral distribution of fluorescence emerging from chlorophyll molecules in the biological tissue. Reabsorption processes particularly affect the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 680 nm and at 730 nm. A model to obtain the correct spectral distribution of the emission, from the experimental fluorescence recorded at a fluorometer detector and corrected for the detector spectral sensitivity, is developed in the present work. Measurements of the whole fruit reflectance, the peel transmittance and the flesh reflectance allow the calculation of the reabsorption-corrected spectra. The model is validated by comparing the corrected emission spectra with that obtained for a thin layer of apple-peel-chloroplasts, where no reabsorption takes place. It is recommended to correct distortions in emission spectra of intact fruits due to light reabsorption effects whenever a correlation between the physiological state of the fruit and its fluorescence spectra is investigated.

  16. Spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging of lipid-rich plaques in the human aorta in the 740 to 1400 nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Thomas J.; Hall, Andrew; Dhillon, Amar P.; Owen, James S.; Beard, Paul C.

    2012-06-01

    Spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging has the potential to discriminate between normal and lipid-rich atheromatous areas of arterial tissue by exploiting the differences in the absorption spectra of lipids and normal arterial tissue in the 740 to 1400 nm wavelength range. Identification of regions of high lipid concentration would be useful to identify plaques that are likely to rupture (vulnerable plaques). To demonstrate the feasibility of visualizing lipid-rich plaques, samples of human aortas were imaged in forward mode, at wavelengths of 970 and 1210 nm. It was shown that the structure of the arterial wall and the boundaries of lipid-rich plaques obtained from the photoacoustic images were in good agreement with histology. The presence of lipids was also confirmed by comparing the photoacoustic spectra (740 to 1400 nm) obtained in a region within the plaque to the spectral signature of lipids. Furthermore, a lipid-rich plaque was successfully imaged while illuminating the sample through 2.8 mm of blood demonstrating the possibility of implementing the photoacoustic technique in vivo.

  17. The Soil Spectroscopy Group and the development of a global soil spectral library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossel, R. Viscarra Rossel; Soil Spectroscopy Group

    2009-04-01

    This collaboration aims to develop a global soil spectral library and to establish a community of practice for soil spectroscopy. This will help progress soil spectroscopy from an almost purely research tool to a more widely adopted and useful technique for soil analysis, proximal soil sensing, soil monitoring and digital soil mapping. The initiative started in April 2008 with a proposal for the project to be conducted in a number of stages to investigate the following topics: Global soil diversity and variation can be characterised using diffuse reflectance spectra. Soil spectral calibrations can be used to predict soil properties globally. Soil spectroscopy can be a useful tool for digital soil mapping. Currently, the soil spectral library is being developed using legacy soil organic carbon (OC) and clay content data and vis-NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra, but in future we aim to include other soil properties and mid-IR (2500-25000 nm) spectra. The group already has more than 40 collaborators from six continents and 20 countries and the library consists of 5223 spectra from 43 countries. The library accounts for spectra from approximately only 22% of the world's countries, some of which are poorly represented with only very few spectra. We would like to encourage participation from as many countries as possible, particularly, we would like contributions from counties in Central and South America, Mexico, Canada, Russia and countries in Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. We are missing a lot of countries and for some, e.g. China we have only very few data! Do you want to join the group and contribute spectra to the global library? The requirements for contributing spectra to the global library are as follows: Spectra collected in the 350-2500 nm range every 1 nm. At least soil OC and clay content data but also any other soil chemical, physical, biological and mineralogical data, noting which analytical techniques were used. Coordinates (in WGS84 format) for each sample

  18. Advances in physical study of high enthalpy plasma jets of technological interest: emission spectra and plasma characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belevtsev, A. A.; Chinnov, V. F.; Isakaev, E. Kh.; Markin, A. V.; Tazikova, T. F.; Tereshkin, S. A.

    1998-10-01

    Offers a comprehensive study of the emission spectra and plasma characteristics of high enthalpy atmospheric pressure argon and nitrogen jets produced by a high- current industrially important arc plasmatron with a vortex stabilized channel-anode (I<=3D500A, G=3D1-4g/s, jet diameter at a minimum-6mm). The spectra are taken at different distances from the cathode in the 200-950nm region with a spectral resolution=3D0.01nm allowing a fine structure of vibronic bands to be essentially resolved except that due to the dublet (spin) splitting and Λ-doubling. Also derived (through the Abel inversion) are radial distributions of plasma components. The spectra obtained have been used for determining plasma composition, the electron component parameters (by atomic/ionic Stark half-widths and intensities) and the assessment of rotational and vibrational temperatures by simulating molecular bands.

  19. Exciplex electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra of the new organic materials based on zinc complexes of sulphanylamino-substituted ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the electroluminescence spectra of the electroluminescent devices based on the new zinc complexes of amino-substituted benzothiazoles and quinolines containing the C-N-M-N chains in their chelate cycles. The spectra exhibit strong exciplex bands in the green to yellow region 540 to 590 nm due to interaction of the excited states of zinc complexes and triaryl molecules of the hole-transporting layer. For some devices, the intrinsic luminescence band of 460 nm in the blue region is also observed along with the exciplex band giving rise to an almost white color of the device emission. The exciplex band can be eliminated if the material of the hole-transporting layer is not a triarylamine derivative. We have also found the exciplex emission in the photoluminescence spectra of the films containing blends of zinc complex and triphenylamine material. PMID:22471942

  20. The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 161 The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database (Web, free access)   This atlas presents observations of the infra-red (IR) spectrum of a low current Th-Ar hollow cathode lamp with the 2-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at NIST. These observations establish more than 2400 lines that are suitable for use as wavelength standards in the range 691 nm to 5804 nm. The observations were made in collaboration with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), in order to provide calibration reference data for new high-resolution Echelle spectrographs, such as the Cryogenic High-Resolution IR Echelle Spectrograph ([CRIRES]), ESO's new IR spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope in Chile.

  1. 750 nm 1.5 W frequency-doubled semiconductor disk laser with a 44 nm tuning range.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Esa J; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 750 nm by intracavity frequency doubling a wafer-fused semiconductor disk laser diode-pumped at 980 nm. An optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% was achieved using a bismuth borate crystal. The wavelength of the doubled emission could be tuned from 720 to 764 nm with an intracavity birefringent plate. The beam quality parameter M2 of the laser output was measured to be below 1.5 at all pump powers. The laser is a promising tool for biomedical applications that can take advantage of the large penetration depth of light in tissue in the 700-800 nm spectral range.

  2. Gold/silver core-shell 20 nm nanoparticles extracted from citrate solution examined by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Smith, Jordan N.; Baer, Donald R.

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles of many types are widely used in consumer and medical products. The surface chemistry of particles and the coatings that form during synthesis or use in many types of media can significantly impact the behaviors of particles including dissolution, transformation and biological or environmental impact. Consequently it is useful to be able to extract information about the thickness of surface coatings and other attributes of nanoparticles produced in a variety of ways. It has been demonstrated that X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) can be reliably used to determine the thickness of organic and other nanoparticles coatings and shells. However, care is required to produce reliable and consistent information. Here we report the XPS spectra from gold/silver core-shell nanoparticles of nominal size 20 nm removed from a citrate saturated solution after one and two washing cycles. The Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) program had been used to model peak amplitudes to obtain information on citrate coatings that remain after washing and demonstrate the presence of the gold core. This data is provided so that others can compare use of SESSA or other modeling approaches to quantify the nature of coatings to those already published and to explore the impacts particle non-uniformities on XPS signals from core-shell nanoparticles.

  3. Sulphur abundances in halo giants from the [S I] line at 1082 nm and the [S I] triplet around 1045 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, H.; Ryde, N.; Nissen, P. E.; Collet, R.; Eriksson, K.; Asplund, M.; Gustafsson, B.

    2011-06-01

    Context. It is still debated whether or not the Galactic chemical evolution of sulphur in the halo follows the flat trend with [Fe/H] that is ascribed to the result of explosive nucleosynthesis in type II SNe. It has been suggested that the disagreement between different investigations of sulphur abundances in halo stars might be owing to problems with the diagnostics used, that a new production source of sulphur might be needed in the early Universe, like hypernovae, or that the deposition of supernova ejecta into the interstellar medium is time-delayed. Aims: The aim of this study is to try to clarify this situation by measuring the sulphur abundance in a sample of halo giants using two diagnostics: the S i triplet around 1045 nm and the [S i] line at 1082 nm. The latter of the two is not believed to be sensitive to non-LTE effects. We can thereby minimize the uncertainties in the diagnostic used and estimate the usefulness of the triplet for the sulphur determination in halo K giants. We will also be able to compare our sulphur abundance differences from the two diagnostics with the expected non-LTE effects in the 1045 nm triplet previously calculated by others. Methods: High-resolution near-infrared spectra of ten K giants were recorded using the spectrometer CRIRES mounted at VLT. Two standard settings were used, one covering the S i triplet and one covering the [S i] line. The sulphur abundances were individually determined with equivalent widths and synthetic spectra for the two diagnostics using tailored 1D model atmospheres and relying on non-LTE corrections from the litterature. Effects of convective inhomogeneities in the stellar atmospheres are investigated. Results: The sulphur abundances derived from both the [S i] line and the non-LTE corrected 1045 nm triplet favor a flat trend for the evolution of sulphur. In contrast to some previous studies, we saw no "high" values of [S/Fe] in our sample. Conclusions: We corroborate the flat trend in the [S

  4. Compact Fiber Laser for 589nm Laser Guide Star Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D.; Drobshoff, D.; Mitchell, S.; Brown, A.

    Laser guide stars are crucial to the broad use of astronomical adaptive optics, because they facilitate access to a large fraction of possible locations on the sky. Lasers tuned to the 589 nm atomic sodium resonance can create an artificial beacon at altitudes of 95-105 km, thus coming close to reproducing the light path of starlight. The deployment of multiconjugate adaptive optics on large aperture telescopes world-wide will require the use of three to nine sodium laser guide stars in order to achieve uniform correction over the aperture with a high Strehl value. Current estimates place the minimum required laser power at > 10 W per laser for a continuous wave source, though a pulsed format, nominally 6?s in length at ~ 16.7 kHz, is currently preferred as it would enable tracking the laser through the Na layer to mitigate spot elongation. The lasers also need to be compact, efficient, robust and turnkey. We are developing an all-fiber laser system for generating a 589 nm source for laser-guided adaptive optics. Fiber lasers are more compact and insensitive to alignment than their bulk laser counterparts, and the heat-dissipation characteristics of fibers, coupled with the high efficiencies demonstrated and excellent spatial mode characteristics, make them a preferred candidate for many high power applications. Our design is based on sum-frequency mixing an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser operating at 1583 nm with a 938 nm Nd:silica fiber laser in a periodically poled crystal to generate 589 nm. We have demonstrated 14 W at 1583 nm with an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser, based on a Koheras single frequency fiber oscillator amplified in an IPG Photonics fiber amplifier. The Nd:silica fiber laser is a somewhat more novel device, since the Nd3+ ions must operate on the resonance transition (i.e. 4F3/2-4I9/2), while suppressing ASE losses at the more conventional 1088 nm transition. Optimization of the ratio of the fiber core and cladding permits operation of the laser at room

  5. A self-Q-switched all-fiber erbium laser at 1530 nm using an auxiliary 1570-nm erbium laser.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzong-Yow; Fang, Yen-Cheng

    2009-11-23

    We demonstrate a self-Q-switched, all-fiber, tunable, erbium laser at 1530 nm with high pulse repetition rates of 0.9-10 kHz. Through the use of an auxiliary 10-mW, 1570 nm laser that shortened the relaxation time of erbium, sequentially Q-switched pulses with pulse energies between 4 and 6 microJ and pulse widths of 40 ns were steadily achieved. A peak pulse power of 165 W was obtained.

  6. Imaging performance and challenges of 10nm and 7nm logic nodes with 0.33 NA EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Setten, Eelco; Schiffelers, Guido; Psara, Eleni; Oorschot, Dorothe; Davydova, Natalia; Finders, Jo; Depre, Laurent; Farys, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    The NXE:3300B is ASML's third generation EUV system and has an NA of 0.33 and is positioned at a resolution of 22nm, which can be extended down to 18nm and below with off-axis illumination at full transmission. Multiple systems have been qualified and installed at customers. The NXE:3300B succeeds the NXE:3100 system (NA of 0.25), which has allowed customers to gain valuable EUV experience. It is expected that EUV will be adopted first for critical Logic layers at 10nm and 7nm nodes, such as Metal-1, to avoid the complexity of triple patterning schemes using ArF immersion. In this paper we will evaluate the imaging performance of (sub-)10nm node Logic M1 on the NXE:3300B EUV scanner. We will show the line-end performance of tip-to-tip and tip-to-space test features for various pitches and illumination settings and the performance enhancement obtained by means of a 1st round of OPC. We will also show the magnitude of local variations. The Logic M1 cell is evaluated at various critical features to identify hot spots. A 2nd round OPC model was calibrated of which we will show the model accuracy and ability to predict hot spots in the Logic M1 cell. The calibrated OPC model is used to predict the expected performance at 7nm node Logic using off-axis illumination at 16nm minimum half pitch. Initial results of L/S exposed on the NXE:3300B at 7nm node resolutions will be shown. An outlook is given to future 0.33 NA systems on the ASML roadmap with enhanced illuminator capabilities to further improve performance and process window.

  7. Research of the Additional Losses Occurring in Optical Fiber at its Multiple Bends in the Range Waves 1310nm, 1550nm and 1625nm Long

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A. V.; Gorlov, N. I.; Alkina, A. D.; Mekhtiev, A. D.; Kovtun, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Article is devoted to research of the additional losses occurring in the optical fiber at its multiple bends in the range waves of 1310 nanometers, 1550 nanometers and 1625 nanometers long. Article is directed on creation of the external factors methods which allow to estimate and eliminate negative influence. The automated way of calculation of losses at a bend is developed. Results of scientific researches are used by engineers of “Kazaktelekom” AS for practical definition of losses service conditions. For modeling the Wolfram|Alpha environment — the knowledge base and a set of computing algorithms was chosen. The greatest losses are noted on wavelength 1310nm and 1625nm. All dependences are nonlinear. Losses with each following excess are multiplicative.

  8. High-brightness 800nm fiber-coupled laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Yuri; Levy, Moshe; Rappaport, Noam; Tessler, Renana; Peleg, Ophir; Shamay, Moshe; Yanson, Dan; Klumel, Genadi; Dahan, Nir; Baskin, Ilya; Shkedi, Lior

    2014-03-01

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. Single emitters offer reliable multi-watt output power from a 100 m lateral emission aperture. By their combination and fiber coupling, pump powers up to 100 W can be achieved from a low-NA fiber pigtail. Whilst in the 9xx nm spectral range the single emitter technology is very mature with <10W output per chip, at 800nm the reliable output power from a single emitter is limited to 4 W - 5 W. Consequently, commercially available fiber coupled modules only deliver 5W - 15W at around 800nm, almost an order of magnitude down from the 9xx range pumps. To bridge this gap, we report our advancement in the brightness and reliability of 800nm single emitters. By optimizing the wafer structure, laser cavity and facet passivation process we have demonstrated QCW device operation up to 19W limited by catastrophic optical damage to the 100 μm aperture. In CW operation, the devices reach 14 W output followed by a reversible thermal rollover and a complete device shutdown at high currents, with the performance fully rebounded after cooling. We also report the beam properties of our 800nm single emitters and provide a comparative analysis with the 9xx nm single emitter family. Pump modules integrating several of these emitters with a 105 μm / 0.15 NA delivery fiber reach 35W in CW at 808 nm. We discuss the key opto-mechanical parameters that will enable further brightness scaling of multi-emitter pump modules.

  9. Magnetoelastically induced magnetic anisotropy transition in [CoO5nm/CoPt7nm]5 multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Harumoto, Takashi; Sannomiya, Takumi; Muraishi, Shinji; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic anisotropy transition of [CoO5nm/CoPt7nm]5 multilayer film with respect to post-annealing has been studied systematically. It undergoes a smooth transition from longitudinal magnetic anisotropy (LMA) to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) upon annealing and returns backward to LMA at high temperature of 550 °C. The strongest PMA of [CoO5nm/CoPt7nm]5 is achieved after post-annealing at 300 °C and the tolerable post-annealing temperature with strong PMA is up to 400 °C, which indicates this multilayer film could be a potential candidate for the PMA application at middle-high-temperature-region between 300 °C and 400 °C. The mechanism responsible for the transition of magnetic anisotropy has been investigated by analyzing CoO/CoPt interface and CoPt layer internal stress. It is found the effective PMA energy is proportional to the in-plane tensile stress of CoPt layer but is inversely proportional to the roughness of CoO/CoPt interface. Finally, by means of low temperature experiment we demonstrate the magnetic anisotropy transition observed in [CoO5nm/CoPt7nm]5 multilayer film is mainly attributed to the change of CoPt layer in-plane tensile stress.

  10. Optical coherence tomography based imaging of dental demineralisation and cavity restoration in 840 nm and 1310 nm wavelength regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodaran, Vani; Rao, Suresh Ranga; Vasa, Nilesh J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a study of in-house built optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a wavelength of 840 nm for imaging of dental caries, progress in demineralisation and cavity restoration is presented. The caries when imaged with the 840 nm OCT system showed minute demineralisation in the order of 5 μm. The OCT system was also proposed to study the growth of lesion and this was demonstrated by artificially inducing caries with a demineralisation solution of pH 4.8. The progress of carious lesion to a depth of about 50-60 μm after 60 hours of demineralisation was clearly observed with the 840 nm OCT system. The tooth samples were subjected to accelerated demineralisation condition at pH of approximately 2.3 to study the adverse effects and the onset of cavity formation was clearly observed. The restoration of cavity was also studied by employing different restorative materials (filled and unfilled). In the case of restoration without filler material (unfilled), the restoration boundaries were clearly observed. Overall, results were comparable with that of the widely used 1310 nm OCT system. In the case of restoration with filler material, the 1310 nm OCT imaging displayed better imaging capacity due to lower scattering than 840 nm imaging.

  11. Fabricating nanopores with diameters of sub-1 nm to 3 nm using multilevel pulse-voltage injection.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Itaru; Akahori, Rena; Hatano, Toshiyuki; Takeda, Ken-ichi

    2014-05-21

    To date, solid-state nanopores have been fabricated primarily through a focused-electronic beam via TEM. For mass production, however, a TEM beam is not suitable and an alternative fabrication method is required. Recently, a simple method for fabricating solid-state nanopores was reported by Kwok, H. et al. and used to fabricate a nanopore (down to 2 nm in size) in a membrane via dielectric breakdown. In the present study, to fabricate smaller nanopores stably--specifically with a diameter of 1 to 2 nm (which is an essential size for identifying each nucleotide)--via dielectric breakdown, a technique called "multilevel pulse-voltage injection" (MPVI) is proposed and evaluated. MPVI can generate nanopores with diameters of sub-1 nm in a 10-nm-thick Si3N4 membrane with a probability of 90%. The generated nanopores can be widened to the desired size (as high as 3 nm in diameter) with sub-nanometre precision, and the mean effective thickness of the fabricated nanopores was 3.7 nm.

  12. Parameterizing Stellar Spectra Using Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Pan, Ru-Yang; Duan, Fu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale sky surveys are observing massive amounts of stellar spectra. The large number of stellar spectra makes it necessary to automatically parameterize spectral data, which in turn helps in statistically exploring properties related to the atmospheric parameters. This work focuses on designing an automatic scheme to estimate effective temperature ({T}{eff}), surface gravity ({log}g) and metallicity [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. A scheme based on three deep neural networks (DNNs) is proposed. This scheme consists of the following three procedures: first, the configuration of a DNN is initialized using a series of autoencoder neural networks; second, the DNN is fine-tuned using a gradient descent scheme; third, three atmospheric parameters {T}{eff}, {log}g and [Fe/H] are estimated using the computed DNNs. The constructed DNN is a neural network with six layers (one input layer, one output layer and four hidden layers), for which the number of nodes in the six layers are 3821, 1000, 500, 100, 30 and 1, respectively. This proposed scheme was tested on both real spectra and theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models. Test errors are measured with mean absolute errors (MAEs). The errors on real spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are 0.1477, 0.0048 and 0.1129 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (64.85 K for {T}{eff}), respectively. Regarding theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models, the MAE of the test errors are 0.0182, 0.0011 and 0.0112 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (14.90 K for {T}{eff}), respectively.

  13. Discriminating model for diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma and melanoma in vitro based on the Raman spectra of selected biochemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Landulfo; Silveira, Fabrício Luiz; Bodanese, Benito; Zângaro, Renato Amaro; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T.

    2012-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to identify differences in the biochemical constitution of malignant [basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and melanoma (MEL)] cells compared to normal skin tissues, with the goal of skin cancer diagnosis. We collected Raman spectra from compounds such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which are expected to be represented in human skin spectra, and developed a linear least-squares fitting model to estimate the contributions of these compounds to the tissue spectra. We used a set of 145 spectra from biopsy fragments of normal (30 spectra), BCC (96 spectra), and MEL (19 spectra) skin tissues, collected using a near-infrared Raman spectrometer (830 nm, 50 to 200 mW, and 20 s exposure time) coupled to a Raman probe. We applied the best-fitting model to the spectra of biochemicals and tissues, hypothesizing that the relative spectral contribution of each compound to the tissue Raman spectrum changes according to the disease. We verified that actin, collagen, elastin, and triolein were the most important biochemicals representing the spectral features of skin tissues. A classification model applied to the relative contribution of collagen III, elastin, and melanin using Euclidean distance as a discriminator could differentiate normal from BCC and MEL.

  14. Discriminating model for diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma and melanoma in vitro based on the Raman spectra of selected biochemicals.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Landulfo; Silveira, Fabrício Luiz; Bodanese, Benito; Zângaro, Renato Amaro; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T

    2012-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to identify differences in the biochemical constitution of malignant [basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and melanoma (MEL)] cells compared to normal skin tissues, with the goal of skin cancer diagnosis. We collected Raman spectra from compounds such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which are expected to be represented in human skin spectra, and developed a linear least-squares fitting model to estimate the contributions of these compounds to the tissue spectra. We used a set of 145 spectra from biopsy fragments of normal (30 spectra), BCC (96 spectra), and MEL (19 spectra) skin tissues, collected using a near-infrared Raman spectrometer (830 nm, 50 to 200 mW, and 20 s exposure time) coupled to a Raman probe. We applied the best-fitting model to the spectra of biochemicals and tissues, hypothesizing that the relative spectral contribution of each compound to the tissue Raman spectrum changes according to the disease. We verified that actin, collagen, elastin, and triolein were the most important biochemicals representing the spectral features of skin tissues. A classification model applied to the relative contribution of collagen III, elastin, and melanin using Euclidean distance as a discriminator could differentiate normal from BCC and MEL.

  15. NIR Raman spectra of whole human blood: effects of laser-induced and in vitro hemoglobin denaturation.

    PubMed

    Lemler, P; Premasiri, W R; DelMonaco, A; Ziegler, L D

    2014-01-01

    Care must be exercised in the use of Raman spectroscopy for the identification of blood in forensic applications. The Raman spectra of dried whole human blood excited at 785 nm are shown to be exclusively due to oxyhemoglobin or related hemoglobin denaturation products. Raman spectra of whole blood are reported as a function of the incident 785-nm-laser power, and features attributable to heme aggregates are observed for fluences on the order of 10(4) W/cm(2) and signal collection times of 20 s. In particular, the formation of this local-heating-induced heme aggregate product is indicated by a redshifting of several heme porphyrin ring vibrational bands, the appearance of a large broad band at 1,248 cm(-1), the disappearance of the Fe-O2 stretching and bending bands, and the observation of a large overlapping fluorescence band. This denaturation product is also observed in the low-power-excitation Raman spectrum of older ambient-air-exposed bloodstains (2 weeks or more). The Raman spectrum of methemoglobin whole blood excited at 785 nm is reported, and increasing amounts of this natural denaturation product can also be identified in Raman spectra of dried whole blood particularly when the blood has been stored prior to drying. These results indicate that to use 785-nm-excitation Raman spectra as an identification method for forensic applications to maximum effect, incident laser powers need to be kept low to eliminate variable amounts of heme aggregate spectral components contributing to the signal and the natural aging process of hemoglobin denaturation needs to be accounted for. This also suggests that there is a potential opportunity for 785-nm-excitation Raman spectra to be a sensitive indicator of the age of dried bloodstains at crime scenes.

  16. 1er cru: A spectropolarimeter to measure the polarisation of auroral thermospheric emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, Mathieu; Lamy, Herve; Lilensten, Jean; Vialatte, Anne

    2015-04-01

    The polarisation of auroral thermospheric red line have been detected few years ago with degree of polarisation around 2% (Lilensten et al. 2008). Since then several measurements campaign and simulation have been performed (Barthelemy et al. 2011, Lilensten et al. 2013). However, the polarisation of other lines have never been explored. We built a spectropolarimeter able to cover the auroral spectrum from 400 nm to 700 nm with spectral resolution down to 0.5 nm. The first light of the instrument have been performed in December 2014 in Skibotn (Norway). Despite some misalignments problem, we have been able to get some spectra on both ordinary and extraordinary channels. The data are underprocessing but we are confident to be able to extract the polarisation of some other lines. We will especially check that the green line is unpolarized as explained in Bommier et al. (2011).

  17. Bacterial inactivation by solar ultraviolet radiation compared with sensitivity to 254 nm radiation.

    PubMed

    Coohill, Thomas P; Sagripanti, Jose-Luis

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to derive a quantitative factor that would allow us to predict the solar sensitivity of vegetative bacterial cells to natural solar radiation from the wealth of data collected for cells exposed to UVC (254 nm) radiation. We constructed a solar effectiveness spectrum for inactivation of vegetative bacterial cells by combining the available action spectra for vegetative cell killing in the solar range with the natural sunlight spectrum that reaches the ground. We then analyzed previous studies reporting the effects of solar radiation on vegetative bacterial cells and on bacterial spores. Although UVC-sensitive cells were also more sensitive to solar radiation, we found no absolute numerical correlation between the relative solar sensitivity of vegetative cells and their sensitivity to 254 nm radiation. The sensitivity of bacterial spores to solar exposure during both summer and winter correlated closely to their UVC sensitivity. The estimates presented here should make it possible to reasonably predict the time it would take for natural solar UV to kill bacterial spores or with a lesser degree of accuracy, vegetative bacterial cells after dispersion from an infected host or after an accidental or intentional release.

  18. Sensitivity study and parameter optimization of OCD tool for 14nm finFET process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhensheng; Chen, Huiping; Cheng, Shiqiu; Zhan, Yunkun; Huang, Kun; Shi, Yaoming; Xu, Yiping

    2016-03-01

    Optical critical dimension (OCD) measurement has been widely demonstrated as an essential metrology method for monitoring advanced IC process in the technology node of 90 nm and beyond. However, the rapidly shrunk critical dimensions of the semiconductor devices and the increasing complexity of the manufacturing process bring more challenges to OCD. The measurement precision of OCD technology highly relies on the optical hardware configuration, spectral types, and inherently interactions between the incidence of light and various materials with various topological structures, therefore sensitivity analysis and parameter optimization are very critical in the OCD applications. This paper presents a method for seeking the optimum sensitive measurement configuration to enhance the metrology precision and reduce the noise impact to the greatest extent. In this work, the sensitivity of different types of spectra with a series of hardware configurations of incidence angles and azimuth angles were investigated. The optimum hardware measurement configuration and spectrum parameter can be identified. The FinFET structures in the technology node of 14 nm were constructed to validate the algorithm. This method provides guidance to estimate the measurement precision before measuring actual device features and will be beneficial for OCD hardware configuration.

  19. Taking the X Architecture to the 65-nm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Robin C.; Smayling, Michael C.; Arora, Narain; Nagata, Toshiyuki; Duane, Michael P.; Shah, Santosh; Keston, Harris J.; Oemardani, Shiany

    2004-05-01

    The X Architecture is a new way of orienting the interconnect on an integrated circuit using diagonal pathways, as well as the traditional right-angle, or Manhattan, configuration. By enabling designs with significantly less wire and fewer vias, the X Architecture can provide substantial improvements in chip performance, power consumption and cost. Members of the X Initiative semiconductor supply chain consortium have demonstrated the production worthiness of the X Architecture at the 130-nm and 90-nm process technology nodes. This paper presents an assessment of the manufacturing readiness of the X Architecture for the 65-nm technology node. The extent to which current production capabilities in mask writing, lithography, wafer processing, inspection and metrology can be used is discussed using the results from a 65-nm test chip. The project was a collaborative effort amongst a number of companies in the IC fabrication supply chain. Applied Materials fabricated the 65-nm X Architecture test chip at its Maydan Technology Center and leveraged the technology of other X Initiative members. Cadence Design Systems provided the test structure design and chip validation tools, Dai Nippon Printing produced the masks and Canon"s imaging system was employed for the photolithography.

  20. Imaging CIN(3) photodissociation from 234 to 280 nm.

    PubMed

    Samartzis, Peter C; Hansen, Nils; Wodtke, Alec M

    2006-07-07

    We report Cl((2)P(3/2)) and Cl*((2)P(1/2)) fragment images following ClN(3) photolysis in the 234-280 nm region measured by velocity map imaging. Kinetic energy distributions change shape with photolysis wavelength from bimodal at 234 and 240 nm to single peak at 266 and 280 nm. Where two peaks exist, their ratio is significantly different for Cl and Cl* fragments. The single peak of 266 and 280 nm and the faster peak at 234 and 240 nm are assigned to a Cl + linear-N(3) dissociation channel, in agreement with previous work. The slow peak in the bimodal distributions is assigned to the formation of a high energy form (HEF) of N(3). Candidates for the identity of HEF-N(3) are discussed. Combining our data with photofragmentation translational spectroscopy results, we determined the threshold for the appearance of HEF-N(3) at 4.83 +/- 0.17 eV photolysis energy. This threshold behavior is similar to recently reported results on the wavelength dependence of HN(3) photolysis, where the threshold was associated with a ring closed isomer of HN(3) on the S(1) potential energy surface. We also note that the HEF-N(3) formation threshold observed for ClN(3) occurs where the energy available to the products equals the isomerization barrier from linear to cyclic-N(3).

  1. Process liability evaluation for beyond 22nm node using EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawarayama, Kazuo; Aoyama, Hajime; Matsunaga, Kentaro; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Uno, Taiga; Magoshi, Shunko; Kyoh, Suigen; Nakajima, Yumi; Inanami, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kobiki, Ayumi; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kawamura, Daisuke; Takai, Kosuke; Murano, Koji; Hayashi, Yumi; Mori, Ichiro

    2010-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the most promising candidate for the manufacture of devices with a half pitch of 32 nm and beyond. We are now evaluating the process liability of EUVL in view of the current status of lithography technology development. In a previous study, we demonstrated the feasibility of manufacturing 32-nm-node devices by means of a wafer process that employed the EUV1, a full-field step-and-scan exposure tool. To evaluate yield, a test pattern was drawn on a multilayer resist and exposed. After development, the pattern was replicated in SiO2 film by etching, and metal wires were formed by a damascene process. Resolution enhancement is needed to advance to the 22- nm node and beyond, and a practical solution is off-axis illumination (OAI). This paper presents the results of a study on yield improvement that used a 32-nm-node test chip, and also clarifies a critical issue in the use of EUVL in a wafer process for device manufacture at the 22-nm node and beyond.

  2. A cesium bromide photocathode excited by 405 nm radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J. R.; Cheng, Y. T.; Pianetta, P.; Pease, Fabian W.; Hesselink, L.

    2014-07-01

    In several applications, such as electron beam lithography and X-ray differential phase contrast imaging, there is a need for a free electron source with a current density at least 10 A/cm2 yet can be shaped with a resolution down to 20 nm and pulsed. Additional requirements are that the source must operate in a practical demountable vacuum (>1e-9 Torr) and be reasonably compact. In prior work, a photocathode comprising a film of CsBr on metal film on a sapphire substrate met the requirements except it was bulky because it required a beam (>10 W/cm2) of 257 nm radiation. Here, we describe an approach using a 405 nm laser which is far less bulky. The 405 nm laser, however, is not energetic enough to create color centers in CsBr films. The key to our approach is to bombard the CsBr film with a flood beam of about 1 keV electrons prior to operation. Photoelectron efficiencies in the range of 100-1000 nA/mW were demonstrated with lifetimes exceeding 50 h between electron bombardments. We suspect that the electron bombardment creates intraband color centers whence electrons can be excited by the 405 nm photons into the conduction band and thence into the vacuum.

  3. Broadband 308 nm vibrational Raman spectroscopy of gaseous species using a potassium hydrogen phthalate liquid filter and polarization fluorescence suppression.

    PubMed

    Saunders, J E A; Davy, M H

    2010-01-01

    Broadband XeCl excimer lasers operating at 308 nm are not currently used in the field of gas phase vibrational Raman spectroscopy (VRS). An explanation as to why alternative wavelengths, and in particular tuneable, narrowband lasers are currently preferred for gas phase VRS is presented in addition to demonstrating a setup which makes the XeCl laser a viable alternative when considering excitation sources for VRS. A solution of potassium hydrogen phthalate is shown to be a practical low-pass liquid filter and to reduce substantially the effects of Rayleigh scattering on collected Raman spectra. The use of a commercial beam polarizer is also shown to be effective in suppressing background fluorescence that otherwise necessitates the use of expensive tuneable, narrowband lasers when performing VRS with sources of background fluorescence. Finally, an unconventional excitation beam arrangement is shown to produce viable Raman spectra from which species concentrations and distributions can be determined.

  4. High-power 1300-nm Fabry-Perot and DFB ridge-waveguide lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuzov, Dmitri Z.; Maiorov, Mikhail A.; Menna, Raymond J.; Komissarov, Anatoly V.; Khalfin, V.; Kudryashov, Igor V.; Lunev, Alexander V.; DiMarco, Louis A.; Connolly, John C.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper we summarize the results on the development of high power 1300 nm ridge waveguide Fabry-Perot and distributed-feedback (DFB) lasers. Improved performance of MOCVD grown InGaAsP/InP laser structures and optimization of the ridge waveguide design allowed us to achieve more than 800 mW output power from 1300 nm single mode Fabry-Perot lasers. Despite the fact that the beam aspect ratio for ridge lasers (30 degree(s) x 12 degree(s)) is higher than that for buried devices, our modeling and experiments demonstrated that the fiber coupling efficiency of about 75-80% could be routinely achieved using a lensed fiber or a simple lens pair. Fiber power of higher than 600 mW was displayed. Utilizing similar epitaxial structures and device geometry, the 1300 nm DFB lasers with output power of 500 mW have been fabricated. Analysis of the laser spectral characteristics shows that the high power DFB lasers can be separated into several groups. The single frequency spectral behavior was exhibited by about 20% of all studied DFB lasers. For these lasers, side-mode suppression increases from 45 dB at low current up to 60 dB at maximum current. About 30% of DFB lasers, at all driving currents, demonstrate multi-frequency spectra consisting of 4-8 longitudinal modes with mode spacing larger than that for Fabry-Perot lasers of the same cavity length. Both single frequency and multi frequency DFB lasers exhibit weak wavelength-temperature dependence and very low relative intensity noise (RIN) values. Fabry-Perot and both types of DFB lasers can be used as pump sources for Raman amplifiers operating in the 1300 nm wavelength range where the use of EDFA is not feasible. In addition, the single-mode 1300 nm DFB lasers operating in the 500 mW power range are very attractive for new generation of the cable television transmission and local communication systems.

  5. Disk-Averaged Synthetic Spectra of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong ,William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  6. H. N. Russell and Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, David

    2001-04-01

    “I would rather analyze spectra than do cross-word puzzles or do almost anything else” Henry Norris Russell wrote to William F. Meggers in 1927. Meggers, chief of the spectroscopy division at the NBS, had been surprised that an astrophysicist could be so keen about the analysis of complex spectra. But Russell was a new type of astrophysicist, one who made physics the core of his research. Spectra, for Russell, held the "master key" to knowledge about the universe, and of the atom. He was first attracted by the challenge of detecting and explaining anomalies, which he hoped would lead to new knowledge about the structure of matter. Then, influenced by physicists such as Meggers, he devoted himself to filling in the picture of the structure of atoms from their characteristic spectra as completely as possible. In this talk I will review how Russell worked with Meggers and became the nucleus of an ever-widening circle of spectroscopists devoted to the analysis of complex spectra.

  7. Improving Algorithm for Automatic Spectra Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackovic, K.; Nikolic, S.; Kotrc, P.

    2009-09-01

    Testing and improving of the computer program for automatic processing (flat-fielding) of a great number of solar spectra obtained with the horizontal heliospectrograph HSFA2 has been done. This program was developed in the Astronomical Institute of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Ondřejov. An irregularity in its work has been discovered, i.e. the program didn't work for some of the spectra. To discover a cause of this error an algorithm has been developed, and a program for examination of the parallelism of reference hairs crossing the spectral slit on records of solar spectra has been made. The standard methods for data processing have been applied-calculating and analyzing higher-order moments of distribution of radiation intensity. The spectra with the disturbed parallelism of the reference hairs have been eliminated from further processing. In order to improve this algorithm of smoothing of spectra, isolation and removal of the harmonic made by a sunspot with multiple elementary transformations of ordinates (Labrouste's transformations) are planned. This project was accomplished at the first summer astronomy practice of students of the Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Serbia in 2007 in Ondřejov.

  8. Cloud supersaturations from CCN spectra Hoppel minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; Noble, Stephen; Tabor, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectral measurements in two aircraft field projects, Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T), often showed bimodality that had previously been observed in submicrometer aerosol size distributions obtained by differential mobility analyzers. However, a great deal of spectral shape variability from very bimodal to very monomodal was observed in close proximity. Cloud supersaturation (S) estimates based on critical S, Sc, at minimal CCN concentrations between two modes (Hoppel minima) were ascertained for 63% of 325 measured spectra. These cloud S were lower than effective S (Seff) determined by comparing ambient CCN spectra with nearby cloud droplet concentrations (Nc). Averages for the polluted MASE stratus were 0.15 and 0.23% and for the cumulus clouds of ICE-T 0.44 and 1.03%. This cloud S disagreement between the two methods might in part be due to the fact that Hoppel minima include the effects of cloud processing, which push CCN spectra toward lower S. Furthermore, there is less cloud processing by the smaller cloud droplets, which might be related to smaller droplets evaporating more readily. Significantly lower concentrations within the more bimodal spectra compared with the monomodal spectra indicated active physical processes: Brownian capture of interstitial CCN and droplet coalescence. Chemical cloud processing also contributed to bimodality, especially in MASE.

  9. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  10. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  11. EXPLORING THE MORPHOLOGY OF RAVE STELLAR SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienayme, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M.; Watson, F. G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a medium-resolution (R {approx} 7500) spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way that has already obtained over half a million stellar spectra. They present a randomly selected magnitude-limited sample, so it is important to use a reliable and automated classification scheme that identifies normal single stars and discovers different types of peculiar stars. To this end, we present a morphological classification of {approx}350, 000 RAVE survey stellar spectra using locally linear embedding, a dimensionality reduction method that enables representing the complex spectral morphology in a low-dimensional projected space while still preserving the properties of the local neighborhoods of spectra. We find that the majority of all spectra in the database ({approx} 90%-95%) belong to normal single stars, but there is also a significant population of several types of peculiars. Among them, the most populated groups are those of various types of spectroscopic binary and chromospherically active stars. Both of them include several thousands of spectra. Particularly the latter group offers significant further investigation opportunities since activity of stars is a known proxy of stellar ages. Applying the same classification procedure to the sample of normal single stars alone shows that the shape of the projected manifold in two-dimensional space correlates with stellar temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity.

  12. Cleaning HI Spectra Contaminated by GPS RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Kamin; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NUDET systems aboard GPS satellites utilize radio waves to communicate information regarding surface nuclear events. The system tests appear in spectra as RFI (radio frequency interference) at 1381MHz, which contaminates observations of extragalactic HI (atomic hydrogen) signals at 50-150 Mpc. Test durations last roughly 20-120 seconds and can occur upwards of 30 times during a single night of observing. The disruption essentially renders the corresponding HI spectra useless.We present a method that automatically removes RFI in HI spectra caused by these tests. By capitalizing on the GPS system's short test durations and predictable frequency appearance we are able to devise a method of identifying times containing compromised data records. By reevaluating the remaining data, we are able to recover clean spectra while sacrificing little in terms of sensitivity to extragalactic signals. This method has been tested on 500+ spectra taken by the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), in which it successfully identified and removed all sources of GPS RFI. It will also be used to eliminate RFI in the upcoming Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS).This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  13. Background noise spectra of global seismic stations

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.M.; Claassen, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Over an extended period of time station noise spectra were collected from various sources for use in estimating the detection and location performance of global networks of seismic stations. As the database of noise spectra enlarged and duplicate entries became available, an effort was mounted to more carefully select station noise spectra while discarding others. This report discusses the methodology and criteria by which the noise spectra were selected. It also identifies and illustrates the station noise spectra which survived the selection process and which currently contribute to the modeling efforts. The resulting catalog of noise statistics not only benefits those who model network performance but also those who wish to select stations on the basis of their noise level as may occur in designing networks or in selecting seismological data for analysis on the basis of station noise level. In view of the various ways by which station noise were estimated by the different contributors, it is advisable that future efforts which predict network performance have available station noise data and spectral estimation methods which are compatible with the statistics underlying seismic noise. This appropriately requires (1) averaging noise over seasonal and/or diurnal cycles, (2) averaging noise over time intervals comparable to those employed by actual detectors, and (3) using logarithmic measures of the noise.

  14. Development and validation of different methods manipulating zero order and first order spectra for determination of the partially overlapped mixture benazepril and amlodipine: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemdan, A.

    2016-07-01

    Three simple, selective, and accurate spectrophotometric methods have been developed and then validated for the analysis of Benazepril (BENZ) and Amlodipine (AML) in bulk powder and pharmaceutical dosage form. The first method is the absorption factor (AF) for zero order and amplitude factor (P-F) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 238 nm or from their first order spectra at 253 nm. The second method is the constant multiplication coupled with constant subtraction (CM-CS) for zero order and successive derivative subtraction-constant multiplication (SDS-CM) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 240 nm and 238 nm, respectively, or from their first order spectra at 214 nm and 253 nm for Benazepril and Amlodipine respectively. The third method is the novel constant multiplication coupled with derivative zero crossing (CM-DZC) which is a stability indicating assay method for determination of Benazepril and Amlodipine in presence of the main degradation product of Benazepril which is Benazeprilate (BENZT). The three methods were validated as per the ICH guidelines and the standard curves were found to be linear in the range of 5-60 μg/mL for Benazepril and 5-30 for Amlodipine, with well accepted mean correlation coefficient for each analyte. The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy results were well within the acceptable limits.

  15. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Corn and Soybean Plants Under Nitrogen Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    We are investigating the use of spectral indices derived from actively induced fluorescence spectra and passive optical spectra. We examined the influence of photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content on the spectral fluorescence and passive optical property characteristics of mature, upper leaves from plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of recommended N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight. Steady state laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra (5 nm resolution) were obtained from adaxial and abaxial surfaces resulting from excitation at single wavelengths (280, 380 or 360, and 532 nm). For emission spectra produced by each of these excitation wavelengths, ratios of emission peaks were calculated, including the red far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) ratio (F685/F740) and the far-red/green (F740/F525) ratio. High resolution (< 3 nm) optical spectra (350-2500 nm) of reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance were also acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces. Species differences were demonstrated for several optical parameters. A 'red edge' derivative ratio determined from transmittance spectra [as the maximum first deivative, between 650-750 nm, normalized to the value at 744 nm, or Dmax/D744], was strongly associated with the C/N ratio (r(exp 2) = 0.90, P +/- 0.001). This ratio, calculated from reflectance spectra, was inversely related to chlorophyll b content (r(exp 2) = 0.91, P +/- 0.001) as was the ChlF (F685/F740) ratio obtained with 532 nm excitation (r(exp 2) = 0.76, P +/- 0.01). Discrimination of N treatment groups was possible with specific fluorescence band ratios (e.g., F740/F525 obtained with 380 nm excitation). Higher ChlF and blue-green emissions were measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces

  16. Assessing the maturity of crude petroleum oils using total synchronous fluorescence scan spectra.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Alan G

    2004-01-01

    There have been many applications of fluorescence methods for the analysis of crude petroleum oils down through the years. However, none of these studies has yielded a robust qualitative or quantitative method for quantifying the chemical composition, or assessing the maturity of crude oils. Simple fluorescence parameters such as lifetime, intensity, and intensity ratios do not correlate well with chemical composition particularly for medium weight crude oils [A. G. Ryder, T. J. Glynn, and M. Feely (2003). Proc. SPIE-Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 4876, 1188-1195.]. A better approach may be to use the Total Synchronous Fluorescence Scan (TSFS) method to fully interrogate the complex chemical composition of the oils [D. Patra and A. K. Mishra (2002). Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 373, 304-309.]. We present TSFS spectra from 18 crude petroleum oils of varying composition, sourced from around the world. The TSFS plots of these oils are very complex, with the contours being spread over the full 250-700 nm wavelength range (lambda(ex)) and 40-200 nm wavelength interval (delta lambda) sampled. The 3-D contour maps tend to two contour concentrations one at lambda(em) < 300 nm, delta lambda = 120-200 nm, and a second near lambda(ex) approximately 380-400 nm, delta lambda = 40-60 nm. The first feature represents fluorescence emission originating mainly from energy transfer processes with the second, longer wavelength feature originating from fluorescence emission generated by a higher proportion of direct excitation as opposed to emission resulting from energy transfer. The topography of the 3D contour plots is therefore influenced by the balance between energy transfer and direct fluorescence emission, which is governed by the chemical composition of the crude oils. We discuss how the gross chemical composition affects TSFS spectra and how TSFS can be used to assess oil maturity with a view to developing quantitative methods.

  17. Electronic spectra of PS I mutants: the peripheral subunits do not bind red chlorophylls in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Soukoulis, V; Savikhin, S; Xu, W; Chitnis, P R; Struve, W S

    1999-05-01

    Steady-state fluorescence and absorption spectra have been obtained in the Qy spectral region (690-780 nm and 600-750 nm, respectively) for several subunit-deficient photosystem I mutants from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The 77 K fluorescence spectra of the wild-type and subunit-deficient mutant photosystem I particles are all very similar, peaking at approximately 720 nm with essentially the same excitation spectrum. Because emission from far-red chlorophylls absorbing near 708 nm dominates low-temperature fluorescence in Synechocystis sp., these pigments are not coordinated to any the subunits PsaF, Psa I, PsaJ, PsaK, PsaL, or psaM. The room temperature (wild-type-mutant) absorption difference spectra for trimeric mutants lacking the PsaF/J, PsaK, and PsaM subunits suggest that these mutants are deficient in core antenna chlorophylls (Chls) absorbing near 685, 670, 675, and 700 nm, respectively. The absorption difference spectrum for the PsaF/J/I/L-deficient photosystem I complexes at 5 K reveals considerably more structure than the room-temperature spectrum. The integrated absorbance difference spectra (when normalized to the total PS I Qy spectral area) are comparable to the fractions of Chls bound by the respective (groups of) subunits, according to the 4-A density map of PS I from Synechococcus elongatus. The spectrum of the monomeric PsaL-deficient mutant suggests that this subunit may bind pigments absorbing near 700 nm.

  18. High Power 938nm Cladding Pumped Fiber Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Beach, R; Brobshoff, A; Liao, Z; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Taylor, L; Hackenberg, W; Bonaccini, D

    2002-12-26

    We have developed a Nd:doped cladding pumped fiber amplifier, which operates at 938nm with greater than 2W of output power. The core co-dopants were specifically chosen to enhance emission at 938nm. The fiber was liquid nitrogen cooled in order to achieve four-level laser operation on a laser transition that is normally three level at room temperature, thus permitting efficient cladding pumping of the amplifier. Wavelength selective attenuation was induced by bending the fiber around a mandrel, which permitted near complete suppression of amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm. We are presently seeking to scale the output of this laser to 10W. We will discuss the fiber and laser design issues involved in scaling the laser to the 10W power level and present our most recent results.

  19. Incoherent magnetization reversal in 30-nm Ni particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C. A.; Chantrell, R.; Hwang, M.; Farhoud, M.; Savas, T. A.; Hao, Y.; Smith, Henry I.; Ross, F. M.; Redjdal, M.; Humphrey, F. B.

    2000-12-01

    The magnetic properties of a 100-nm-period large-area array of regular, 30-nm polycrystalline nickel particles have been studied. The particles are found to reverse incoherently, and their hysteresis behavior has been compared with a computational model over a range of temperatures. Excellent agreement with the model is obtained, indicating that switching of the particles is dominated by the reversal of approximately 10-nm-diameter volumes within each particle. These switching volumes are identified with the columnar grains in the polycrystalline nickel, showing that the microstructure determines the magnetic behavior of the particles. This explains the anisotropy distribution and the onset of superparamagnetism in the sample. Incoherent reversal occurs even though the particles are only 1.5 times the exchange length in nickel, a size at which nearly uniform rotation is expected to occur if the particles were homogeneous.

  20. High power narrowband 589 nm frequency doubled fibre laser source.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Luke; Feng, Yan; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate high-power high-efficiency cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation of an in-house built ultra-high spectral density (SBS-suppressed) 1178 nm narrowband Raman fibre amplifier. Up to 14.5 W 589 nm CW emission is achieved with linewidth Delta nu(589) < 7 MHz in a diffraction-limited beam, with peak external conversion efficiency of 86%. The inherently high spectral and spatial qualities of the 589 nm source are particularly suited to both spectroscopic and Laser Guide Star applications, given the seed laser can be easily frequency-locked to the Na D(2a) emission line. Further, we expect the technology to be extendable, at similar or higher powers, to wavelengths limited only by the seed-pump-pair availability.