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Sample records for 35cl nqr frequency

  1. Asymmetry parameter studies for systems containing the 35Cl nucleus from Zeeman NQR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, K. V.

    1995-02-01

    A review of Zeeman nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) work on systems containing the 35Cl nucleus is presented. In the case of the 35cl nucleus with spin I = {3}/{2}, owing to the existence of ± m degeneracy in the absence of a magnetic field (Kramer's degeneracy), there exists only one pure NQR frequency which is related to the two electric field gradient (EFG) parameters, η and e2qQ, by the formula, v = ( {e 2qQ }/{2h})(1 + ( {η 2}/{3})) {1}/{2}. Hence it is necessary to study the Zeeman effect to obtain both these parameters. Zeeman NQR studies have been carried out by many workers using single crystals and powder specimens, and these are discussed here. The computer simulation method for powder η values is also presented in this paper. The numerical computation program for an IBM 370-158 computer used to simulate the powder Zeeman spectrum is also discussed briefly. The paper also presents two-dimensional Zeeman NQR and Zeeman perturbed spin-echo envelope modulation (ZSEEM) studies on 35Cl systems. Very recently, two-dimensional NQR experiments based on the principle of nutation spectroscopy have been carried out with zero applied magnetic field on {3}/{2} spin nuclei. This method is also discussed in this review. The relationship between the asymmetry parameter (η) and bond properties is also discussed.

  2. Electronic structure and biological activity of chosen DDT-type insecticides studied by 35Cl-NQR.

    PubMed

    Jadzyn, Maciej; Nogaj, Bolesław

    2009-02-01

    A correlation between the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)-type insecticides: 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane, 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene, 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethanoic acid and 4,4'-dichlorobenzophenone (used in agriculture) has been analysed on the basis of the (35)Cl-nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy. The (35)Cl-NQR resonance frequencies measured at 77 K have been correlated with the lethal dose (LD(50)) parameter that characterises the biological activity of these insecticides.

  3. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by 35Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronisz, K.; Ostafin, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Mielcarek, J.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-11-01

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by 35Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The 35Cl NQR resonance frequencies ( νQ) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period ( t0.5), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC 50) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of 35Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  4. Stability and molecular dynamics of chloroxylenol (API of antiseptics and drugs) in solid state studied by 35Cl-NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latosińska, J. N.; Tomczak, M. A.; Kasprzak, J.

    2009-02-01

    Thermal stability of 4-chloro-3,5-dimethyl-phenol (chloroxylenol) in solid state has been studied by 35Cl-NQR spectroscopy. Two NQR resonance lines at the frequencies 34.348 and 34.415 MHz at 77 K have been assigned to chlorine atoms from two crystallographically inequivalent molecules on the basis of the B3LYP/6-311++G∗∗ results. The temperature dependence of the resonance frequency and full width at half maximum suggest the occurrence of small-angle torsional oscillations of the mean activation energy of 3.83 kJ/mol and rotation of both methyl groups around their symmetry axis C3 with the activation energies 12.49 and 11.27 kJ/mol for CH3 in molecule A and B, respectively. B3LYP/6-311++G∗∗ method reproduced very well the activation energies of both motions.

  5. Detection of {sup 14}N and {sup 35}Cl in cocaine base and hydrochloride using NQR, NMR, and SQUID techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yesinowski, J.P.; Buess, M.L.; Garroway, A.N.; Ziegeweid, M.; Pines, A. |

    1995-07-01

    Results from {sup 14}N pure NQR of cocaine in the free base form (cocaine base) yield a nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (NQCC) e{sup 2}Qq/h of 5.0229 ({+-}0.0001) MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.0395 ({+-}0.0001) at 295 K, with corresponding values of 5.0460 ({+-}0.0013) MHz and 0.0353 ({+-}0.0008) at 77 K. Both pure NQR (at 295-77 K) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector (at 4.2 K) were used to measure the very low (<1 MHz) {sup 14}N transition frequencies in cocaine hydrochloride; at 295 K the NQCC is 1.1780 ({+-}0.0014) MHz and the asymmetry parameter is 0.2632 ({+-}0.0034). Stepping the carrier frequency enables one to obtain a powder pattern without the severe intensity distortions that otherwise arise from finite pulse power. A powder pattern simulation using an NQCC value of 5.027 MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.2 agrees reasonably well with the experimental stepped-frequency spectrum. The use of pure NQR for providing nondestructive, quantitative, and highly specific detection of crystalline compounds is discussed, as are experimental strategies. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. 35Cl NQR study of lattice dynamic and magnetic property of a crystalline coordination polymer {CuCA(phz)(H 2O) 2} n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Kazuma; Terao, Takeshi; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    Copper(II) compounds {CuCA(phz)(H 2O) 2} n (H 2CA = chloranilic acid, phz = phenazine) having a layer structure of -CuCA(H 2O) 2- polymer chains and phenazine were studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The single NQR line observed at 35.635 MHz at 261.5 K increased to 35.918 MHz at 4.2 K. The degree of reduction of electric field gradient due to lattice vibrations was similar to that of chloranilic acid crystal. Temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, of the 35Cl NQR signal below 20 K, between 20 and 210 K, and above 210 K, was explained by (1) a decrease of effective electron-spin density caused by antiferromagnetic interaction, (2) a magnetic interaction between Cl nuclear-spin and electron-spins on paramagnetic Cu(II) ions, and (3) an increasing contribution from reorientation of ligand molecules, respectively. The electron spin-exchange parameter ∣ J∣ between the neighboring Cu(II) electrons was estimated to be 0.33 cm -1 from the T1 value of the range 20-210 K. Comparing this value with that of J = -1.84 cm -1 estimated from the magnetic susceptibility, it is suggested that the magnetic dipolar coupling with the electron spins on Cu(II) ions must be the principal mechanism for the 35Cl NQR spin-lattice relaxation of {CuCA(phz)(H 2O) 2} n but a delocalization of electron spin over the chloranilate ligand has to be taken into account.

  7. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  8. Electron density distribution in cladribine (2-chloro-2‧-deoxyadenosine) - A drug against leukemia and multiple sclerosis - Studied by multinuclear NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latosińska, J. N.; Latosińska, M.; Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.; Kazimierczuk, Z.

    2009-07-01

    2-Chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (Cladribine) chemotherapeutic drug has been studied experimentally in solid state by 35Cl NQR and NMR-NQR double resonance and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory. Fifteen resonance frequencies on 14N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in the 2-CdA molecule. The effects of tautomerism, regioisomerism, conformations and molecular aggregations, related to intermolecular hydrogen bond formation, on the NQR parameters have been analysed within the DFT and AIM ( Atoms in Molecules) formalism. The properties of the whole molecule, the so-called global reactivity descriptors, have been calculated for a comparison of both syn and anti conformations of 2-CdA molecule to check the effect of crystal packing on molecular conformation.

  9. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  10. Weakly coordinating anions: crystallographic and NQR studies of halogen-metal bonding in silver, thallium, sodium, and potassium halomethanesulfonates.

    PubMed

    Wulfsberg, Gary; Parks, Katherine D; Rutherford, Richard; Jackson, Debra Jones; Jones, Frank E; Derrick, Dana; Ilsley, William; Strauss, Steven H; Miller, Susie M; Anderson, Oren P; Babushkina, T A; Gushchin, S I; Kravchenko, E A; Morgunov, V G

    2002-04-22

    35Cl, (79,81)Br, and (127)I NQR (nuclear quadrupole resonance) spectroscopy in conjunction with X-ray crystallography is potentially one of the best ways of characterizing secondary bonding of metal cations such as Ag(+) to halogen donor atoms on the surfaces of very weakly coordinating anions. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of Ag(O(3)SCH(2)Cl) (a = 13.241(3) A; b = 7.544(2) A; c = 4.925(2) A; orthorhombic; space group Pnma; Z = 4) and compared it with the known structure of Ag(O(3)SCH(2)Br) (Charbonnier, F.; Faure, R.; Loiseleur, H. Acta Crystallogr., Sect. B 1978, 34, 3598-3601). The halogen atom in each is apical (three-coordinate), being weakly coordinated to two silver ions. (127)I NQR studies on Ag(O(3)SCH(2)I) show the expected NQR consequences of three-coordination of iodine: substantially reduced NQR frequencies nu(1) and nu(2) and a fairly small NQR asymmetry parameter eta. The reduction of the halogen NQR frequency of the coordinating halogen atom in Ag(O(3)SCH(2)X) becomes more substantial in the series X = Cl < Br < I, indicating that the coordination to Ag(+) strengthens in this series, as expected from hard-soft acid-base principles. The numbers of electrons donated by the organic iodine atom to Ag(+) have been estimated; these indicate that the bonding to the cation is weak but not insignificant. We have not found any evidence for the bonding of these organohalogen atoms to another soft-acid metal ion, thallium. A scheme for recycling of thallium halide wastes is included.

  11. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device.

    PubMed

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting (14)N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring (14)N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel (14)N NQR based detection device. PMID:25233110

  12. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device.

    PubMed

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting (14)N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring (14)N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel (14)N NQR based detection device.

  13. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting 14N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring 14N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel 14N NQR based detection device.

  14. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C

  15. Signal processing for NQR discrimination of buried land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantum, Stacy L.; Collins, Leslie M.; Carin, Lawrence; Gorodnitsky, Irina; Hibbs, Andrew D.; Walsh, David O.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Gregory, David M.; Matthews, Robert; Vierkotter, Stephie A.

    1999-08-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique that discriminates mines from clutter by exploiting unique properties of explosives, rather than the attributes of the mine that exist in many forms of anthropic clutter. After exciting the explosive with a properly designed electromagnetic-induction (EMI) system, one attempts to sense late-time spin echoes, which are characterized by radiation at particular frequencies. It is this narrow-band radiation that indicates the presence of explosives, since this effect is not seen in most clutter, both natural and anthropic. However, this problem is complicated by several issues. First, the late-time radiation if often very weak, particularly for TNT, and therefore the signal-to-noise ratio must be high for extracting the NQR response. Further, the frequency at which the explosive radiates is often a strong function of the background environment, and therefore in practice the NQR radiation frequency is not known a priori. Finally, at the frequencies of interest, there is a significant amount of background radiation, which induces radio frequency interference (RFI). In this paper we discuss several signal processing tools we have developed to enhance the utility of NQR explosives detection. In particular, with regard to the RFI, we exposure least-mean-squares algorithms which have proven well suited to extracting background interference. Algorithm performance is assessed through consideration of actual measured data. With regard to the detection of the NQR electromagnetic echo, we consider a Bayesian discrimination algorithm. The performance of the Bayesian algorithm is presented, again using measured NQR data.

  16. NQR application to the study of hydrogen dynamics in hydrogen-bonded molecular dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, Tetsuo

    2016-12-01

    The temperature dependences of 1H NMR as well as 35Cl NQR spin-lattice relaxation times T 1 were investigated in order to study the hydrogen transfer dynamics in carboxylic acid dimers in 3,5-dichloro- and 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acids. The asymmetry energy A/ k B and the activation energy V/ k B for the hydrogen transfer were estimated to be 240 K and 900 K, and 840 K and 2500 K, respectively, for these compounds. In spite of a large asymmetric potential the quantum nature of hydrogen transfer is recognized in the slope of the temperature dependence of T 1 on the low-temperature side of the T 1 minimum. The NQR T 1 measurements was revealed to be a good probe for the hydrogen transfer dynamics.

  17. Enhancing nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signature detection leveraging interference suppression algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBardelaben, James A.; Miller, Jeremy K.; Myrick, Wilbur L.; Miller, Joel B.; Gilbreath, G. Charmaine; Bajramaj, Blerta

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) magnetic spectroscopic technique that has been shown to detect and identify a wide range of explosive materials containing quadrupolar nuclei. The NQR response signal provides a unique signature of the material of interest. The signal is, however, very weak and can be masked by non-stationary RF interference (RFI) and thermal noise, limiting detection distance. In this paper, we investigate the bounds on the NQR detection range for ammonium nitrate. We leverage a low-cost RFI data acquisition system composed of inexpensive B-field sensing and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software-defined radios (SDR). Using collected data as RFI reference signals, we apply adaptive filtering algorithms to mitigate RFI and enable NQR detection techniques to approach theoretical range bounds in tactical environments.

  18. Peak Determination of ^35 Cl(n,γ) Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Patrick

    2004-10-01

    To achieve our goal of performing a stringent test of the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation (IMME) for the lowest T = 2 quintuplet, an accurate measurement of the mass of ^32 S in its lowest T = 2 state is needed, as the other masses of the members of the quintuplet are well known [1]. To achieve the desired precision, several calibration reactions are required including ^35 Cl(n,γ). A proton beam of 1.912 MeV is incident upon a Li 2 O target to create neutrons via ^7Li(p,n). The neutrons are then moderated and absorbed by a volume of NaCl. The resulting radiation is measured with a Ge(Li) detector. Due to differences in the position of the source during calibration versus data runs, a source of mis-calibration may result from detector orientation to and distance from the source [2]. We are currently measuring the centroid shifts with respect to detector angle to see its influence upon our data collection. [1] K. Blaum, G. Audi et. al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 91, 260801, (2003) [2] R. G. Helmer, R. J. Gehrke, R. C. Greenwood, Nucl. Instr. and Meth., 123 (1975) p. 51-59.

  19. (35)Cl profiling using centric scan SPRITE with variable flip angle excitation.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin V; Cano-Barrita, P F de J; Balcom, Bruce J

    2009-05-01

    An efficient MRI technique for quantitative density profiling of samples with fast spin-lattice relaxation (T(1)<5ms) is introduced. The pulse scheme is based on the 1D centric scan SPRITE technique. Strong excitation of the sample at the k-space origin improves the sensitivity with respect to the original centric scan SPRITE technique. Radio frequency pulse durations are defined so as to provide uniform excitation of the sample at every k-space point. For a particular k-space point the pulse duration is required to be less than the inverse sample bandwidth. Simulations permit one to examine distortions from ideal profile geometry due to flip angle and spin-lattice relaxation effects. The proposed technique is especially suitable for the observation of low sensitivity samples, in particular, low-gamma nuclei like (35)Cl. In some cases, this strategy permits one to reduce the number of scans, i.e. the experiment time, by a factor of 100, depending on hardware, sample length and tolerable resolution loss. The designed pulse scheme is tested on cylindrical agar gel and type 1 Portland cement paste phantoms prepared to provide (1)H and (35)Cl signals, respectively. PMID:19201634

  20. Mutual effect of ligands in nitrido and nitroso complexes of osmium and ruthenium from NQR data

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko. E.A.; Burtsev, M.Yu.; Sinitsyn, M.N.; Svetlov, A.A.; Kokunov, Ya.V.; Buslaev, A.

    1987-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study by NQR the spectral results of the mutual ligand effect in complex compounds having various types of short bonds. The authors obtained the /sup 35/Cl, /sup 81/Br, and /sup 127/I NQR spectra of a large number of halogen complexes of osmium and ruthenium having short Os=N and M in equilibrium NO bonds of the following types: R(OsNHal/sub 4/) (R = (Ph/sub 4/P)/sup +/, (Bu/sub 4/N)/sup +/; Hal = Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/), K/sub 2/(OsNCl/sub 5/), Rb/sub 2/(OsNBr/sub 5/), (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/(OsNBr/sub 5/), K(OsNHal/sub 4/L) (Hal = Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/; L = H/sub 2/O, CH/sub 3/CN), K/sub 2/(MNOHal/sub 5/) (M = Os, Ru; Hal = Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/). The experimental NQR values measured are connected by the Townes and Dailey theory with the chemical bond characteristics i, sigma, ..pi.., the degree of the ionic, the sigma-covalent, and the ..pi..-covalent natures respectively ( i + sigma + ..pi.. = 1).

  1. First far-infrared high resolution analysis of the ν3 band of phosgene 35Cl2CO and 35Cl37ClCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndao, M.; Perrin, A.; Kwabia Tchana, F.; Manceron, L.; Flaud, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    The high-resolution absorption spectra of phosgene (Cl2CO) has been recorded at 0.001 cm-1 resolution in the 250-350 cm-1 region by Fourier transform spectroscopy at synchrotron SOLEIL. To reduce the spectral congestion, the spectra have been recorded at low temperature (197 K) using a 93.14 m optical path length cryogenic cell. This enables the first detailed infrared analysis of the ν3 bands of the 35Cl2CO and 35Cl37ClCO isotopologues of phosgene. Using a Watson-type Hamiltonian, it was possible to reproduce the upper state rovibrational infrared energy levels, together with, for 35Cl2CO, the available microwave data in the 31 excited state (Yamamoto et al. 1984) to within their experimental accuracy. In this way, accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants together with the following band centers: ν0(ν3, 35Cl2CO) = 301.545622(17) cm-1 and ν0(ν3, 35Cl37ClCO) = 298.199194(81) cm-1, were derived for the ν3 bands of 35Cl2CO and 35Cl37ClCO.

  2. Measuring 36Ar without H35Cl interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, John

    2015-04-01

    Noble gas measurements are usually made in static mode, when the mass spectrometer sensitivity is inversely proportional to volume: this makes the building of very large instruments to obtain high mass resolution impracticable. A particularly challenging interference has hitherto been H35Cl, which differs in mass from 36Ar by 1 part in 3937. We have developed a method which makes improved use of the available MRP to remove interferences, and used it to obtain HCl-free 36Ar measurements on a multicollector instrument with MRP of only ~6000 (MRP= mass resolving power = m/dm 5-95% on side of peak). By arranging that the target mass position on a minor isotope (e.g. 36Ar), from which the interference must be removed, coincides with the ~50% point on the side of a major isotope (e.g. 40Ar), it is possible both to set the mass accurately and to verify the mass position and stability during measurements. The peak top of 40Ar is measured in a separate mass step. Two small corrections are necessary. One compensates for the residual HCl tail at the 36Ar position. The other arises because the peak is not totally flat in the region of interest: 40Ar and 36Ar+HCl are measured on the peak top, whilst 36Ar is measured at the extreme edge, with slightly lower efficiency. The required correction parameters can be obtained from a series of air calibrations with different target/interference ratios. With samples containing 4x10-15to 3x10-14moles of 40Ar, 36Ar/40Ar was measured, without HCl interference, to a 1σ precision of 0.5%, only slightly worse than counting statistics. This is potentially useful for 40Ar/39Ar dating, where 36Ar is used to correct for trapped air, and may be particularly significant for smaller or younger samples.

  3. First far-infrared high resolution analysis of the ν6 band of phosgene 35Cl2CO and 35Cl37ClCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaud, J.-M.; Tchana, F. Kwabia; Lafferty, W. J.; Manceron, L.; Ndao, M.

    2016-08-01

    A Fourier transform spectrum of phosgene (Cl2CO) has been recorded in the 22.5 μm spectral region at a resolution of 0.00102 cm-1 using a Bruker IFS125HR spectrometer coupled to synchrotron radiation leading to the observation of the ν6 vibrational bands of the two isotopologues 35Cl2CO and 35Cl37ClCO. The corresponding upper state ro-vibrational levels were fit using Watson-type Hamiltonians. In this way it was possible to reproduce the upper state ro-vibrational levels to within the experimental uncertainty i.e. ∼0.30 × 10-3 cm-1. Very accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were derived from the fit together with the following band centers: ν0(ν6,35Cl2CO) = 443.172062(15) cm-1, ν0(ν6,35Cl37ClCO) = 440.534956(17) cm-1.

  4. NQR investigation and characterization of cocrystals and crystal polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2013-05-01

    The application of 14N NQR to the study of cocrystals and crystal polymorphs is reviewed. In ferroelectric and antiferroelectric organic cocrystals 14N NQR is used to determine proton position in an N-H...O hydrogen bond and proton displacement below TC. In cocrystal isonicitinamide - oxalic acid (2:1) 14N NQR is used to distinguish between two polymorphs and to determine the type of the hydrogen bond (N-...H-O). The difference in the 14N NQR spectra of cocrystal formers and cocrystal is investigated in case of carbamazepine, saccharin and carbamazepine - saccharin (1:1). The experimental resolution allows an unambiguous distinction between the 14N NQR spectrum of the cocrystal and the 14N NQR spectra of the cocrystal formers. The possibility of application of NQR and double resonance for the determination of the inhomogeneity of the sample and for the study of the life time of an unstable polymorph is discussed.

  5. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  6. Solid-state NMR/NQR and first-principles study of two niobium halide cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Perić, Berislav; Gautier, Régis; Pickard, Chris J; Bosiočić, Marko; Grbić, Mihael S; Požek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds with a [Nb6X12](2+) (X=Cl, Br) diamagnetic cluster core, have been studied by a combination of experimental solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were determined by using variable Bo field static broadband NMR measurements and additional NQR measurements. It was found that they possess large positive chemical shifts, contrary to majority of niobium compounds studied so far by solid-state NMR, but in accordance with chemical shifts of (95)Mo nuclei in structurally related compounds containing [Mo6Br8](4+) cluster cores. Experimentally determined δiso((93)Nb) values are in the range from 2,400 to 3,000 ppm. A detailed analysis of geometrical relations between computed electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors with respect to structural features of cluster units was carried out. These tensors on niobium sites are almost axially symmetric with parallel orientation of the largest EFG and the smallest CS principal axes (Vzz and δ33) coinciding with the molecular four-fold axis of the [Nb6X12](2+) unit. Bridging halogen sites are characterized by large asymmetry of EFG and CS tensors, the largest EFG principal axis (Vzz) is perpendicular to the X-Nb bonds, while intermediate EFG principal axis (Vyy) and the largest CS principal axis (δ11) are oriented in the radial direction with respect to the center of the cluster unit. For more symmetrical bromide compound the PAW predictions for EFG parameters are in better correspondence with the NMR/NQR measurements than in the less symmetrical chlorine compound. Theoretically predicted NMR parameters of bridging halogen sites were checked by (79/81)Br NQR and (35)Cl solid-state NMR measurements.

  7. 14 N NQR spectrum of sildenafil citrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David; Singh, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    The 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of sildenafil citrate tablets has been recorded allowing the quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters of all six unique nitrogen atoms in its structure to be determined. A density function calculation gives results that are largely in agreement with the experimental values.

  8. Spin 3/2 Zeeman perturbed NQR in the presence of slow sample rotation.

    PubMed

    Panguluri, R P; Suits, B H

    2006-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are presented for the case of Zeeman perturbed nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) using spin-3/2 nuclei with a small Zeeman interaction, gammaB0, while the sample is very slowly rotated. It is found that the decay envelope for a simple two-pulse echo measurement can be strongly affected even though the sample may rotate only a few degrees or less during the course of the measurement. To lowest order the decay envelope can be described using a one dimensional function of the product of gammaB0, the rotation rate, and the square of the pulse spacing. Aside from an indirect and weak dependence on the quadrupole asymmetry parameter, eta, the result is independent of the NQR frequency. Identical results are expected for a stationary sample in a small rotating magnetic field. The effect seen here may be used to advantage to measure rotational motion, for example of particles in fluids, or may be an additional complication for some Zeeman perturbed NQR measurements, including some NQR detection and imaging methods.

  9. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  10. First High-Resolution Analysis of Phosgene 35CL2CO and 35CL37CLCO Fundamentals in the 250 - 480 wn Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwabia Tchana, F.; Ndao, M.; Manceron, Laurent; Perrin, Agnes; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Lafferty, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Phosgene (COCl_2) is relatively more abundant in the stratosphere, but is also present in the troposphere in spite of a shorter lifetime (seventy days). Monitoring its concentration by remote sounding of the upper atmosphere is of importance, since some of its strong infrared absorptions, occurring in the important 8-12 μm atmospheric window, hinder the correct retrieval of Freon-11 concentration profiles. Indeed, the infrared absorptions used to retrieve this ozone depleting compound occur in the same spectral region. Phosgene, presents two fundamental bands in the 250 - 480 wn spectral region, with the lowest (ν_3) near 285 wn. These are responsible for hot bands, not yet analysed but of great importance for accurate modeling of the 5.47 μm (ν_1) and 11.75 μm (ν_5) spectral regions and consequently the correct retrieval of Freon-11 atmospheric absorption profiles. High-resolution absorption spectra of phosgene have been recorded at 0.00102 wn resolution in the 250-480 wn region by Fourier transform spectroscopy at synchrotron SOLEIL. Due to the spectral congestion, the spectra have been recorded at low temperature (197 K) using a 93.15 m optical path length cryogenic cell. This enables the first detailed far-infrared analyzes of the ν_3 and ν_6 bands of the 35Cl2CO and 35Cl37ClCO isotopologues of phosgene. Using a Watson-type Hamiltonian, it was possible to reproduce the upper state rovibrational infrared energy levels to within the experimental accuracy. The results will be presented in this talk. G. Toon, J.F. Blavier, B. Sen and B.J. Drouin, Geophys. Res. Lett., 28/14 (2001) 2835. F. Kwabia Tchana, F. Willaert, X. Landsheere, J.-M. Flaud, L. Lago, M. Chapuis, P. Roy and L. Manceron, Rev. Sci. Inst., 84 (2013) 093101.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary analysis of the NqrA and NqrC subunits of the Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Vohl, Georg; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Claussen, Björn; Casutt, Marco S.; Vorburger, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Möller, Heiko M.; Steuber, Julia; Fritz, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae is a membrane protein complex consisting of six different subunits NqrA–NqrF. The major domains of the NqrA and NqrC subunits were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized. The structure of NqrA1–377 was solved in space groups C2221 and P21 by SAD phasing and molecular replacement at 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. NqrC devoid of the transmembrane helix was co-expressed with ApbE to insert the flavin mononucleotide group covalently attached to Thr225. The structure was determined by molecular replacement using apo-NqrC of Parabacteroides distasonis as search model at 1.8 Å resolution. PMID:25005105

  12. Crystallization and preliminary analysis of the NqrA and NqrC subunits of the Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Vohl, Georg; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Claussen, Björn; Casutt, Marco S; Vorburger, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Möller, Heiko M; Steuber, Julia; Fritz, Günter

    2014-07-01

    The Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae is a membrane protein complex consisting of six different subunits NqrA-NqrF. The major domains of the NqrA and NqrC subunits were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized. The structure of NqrA1-377 was solved in space groups C222₁ and P2₁ by SAD phasing and molecular replacement at 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. NqrC devoid of the transmembrane helix was co-expressed with ApbE to insert the flavin mononucleotide group covalently attached to Thr225. The structure was determined by molecular replacement using apo-NqrC of Parabacteroides distasonis as search model at 1.8 Å resolution.

  13. NQR Characteristics of an RDX Plastic Explosives Simulant.

    PubMed

    Turecek, J; Schwitter, B; Miljak, D; Stancl, M

    2012-12-01

    For reliable detection of explosives, a combination of methods integrated within a single measurement platform may increase detection performance. However, the efficient field testing of such measurement platforms requires the use of inexplosive simulants that are detectable by a wide range of methods. Physical parameters such as simulant density, elemental composition and crystalline structure must closely match those of the target explosive. The highly discriminating bulk detection characteristics of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) especially constrain simulant design. This paper describes the development of an inexplosive RDX simulant suited to a wide range of measurement methods, including NQR. Measurements are presented that confirm an RDX NQR response from the simulant. The potential use of the simulant for field testing a prototype handheld NQR-based RDX detector is analyzed. Only modest changes in prototype operation during field testing would be required to account for the use of simulant rather than real explosive. PMID:23204647

  14. 63Cu NQR spectra of dicoordinated Cu(I) cations with imidazole and pyrazole ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajenhouri, Fereidoun; Motallebi, Shahrock; Lucken, Edwin A. C.

    1995-02-01

    The 63Cu NQR spectra of five dicoordinated complex cations of Cu(I) with substituted imidazoles as ligands and six analogous complexes with substituted pyrazoles as ligands are reported. The structures of four of these complexes have been previously determined and the relationship of their 63Cu resonance frequency to the average CuN bond length is compared to that of the analogous lutidine or collidine complexes. It is concluded that there are probably significant differences between the electronic structures of the pyridine complexes and those of the pyrazole or imidazole series.

  15. Numerical simulation of NQR/NMR: Applications in quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Possa, Denimar; Gaudio, Anderson C; Freitas, Jair C C

    2011-04-01

    A numerical simulation program able to simulate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is presented, written using the Mathematica package, aiming especially applications in quantum computing. The program makes use of the interaction picture to compute the effect of the relevant nuclear spin interactions, without any assumption about the relative size of each interaction. This makes the program flexible and versatile, being useful in a wide range of experimental situations, going from NQR (at zero or under small applied magnetic field) to high-field NMR experiments. Some conditions specifically required for quantum computing applications are implemented in the program, such as the possibility of use of elliptically polarized radiofrequency and the inclusion of first- and second-order terms in the average Hamiltonian expansion. A number of examples dealing with simple NQR and quadrupole-perturbed NMR experiments are presented, along with the proposal of experiments to create quantum pseudopure states and logic gates using NQR. The program and the various application examples are freely available through the link http://www.profanderson.net/files/nmr_nqr.php.

  16. Three-dimensional high-inductance birdcage coil for NQR applications.

    PubMed

    Peshkovsky, A S; Cerioni, L; Osan, T M; Avdievich, N I; Pusiol, D J

    2006-09-01

    A birdcage coil capable of operating simultaneously and independently in three orthogonal dimensions has been developed. A co-rotational end-ring mode producing an RF field in the longitudinal direction was utilized in addition to the two common transverse orthogonal modes. Two conductor turns were used for each of the coil's windows, increasing its inductance by a factor of four, thereby, making the coil suitable for low-frequency applications. Two or three-frequency detection can be easily carried out with this device. Orthogonality of the coil's channels allows arbitrarily close frequency positioning of each resonant mode, potentially useful in wide-line NQR studies, in which simultaneous excitation/detection of signals from three adjacent regions of a single wide line can be performed. The coil's performance was evaluated using a three-dimensional scheme, in which a circularly polarized experiment was combined with a linearly polarized measurement at another frequency, resulting in SNR improvement by 55%.

  17. An electronically tuned wideband probehead for NQR spectroscopy in the VHF range.

    PubMed

    Scharfetter, Hermann

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy is an analytical method which allows to characterize materials which contain quadrupolar nuclei, i.e. nuclei with spin ⩾1. The measurement technology is similar to that of NMR except that no static magnetic field is necessary. In contrast to NMR, however, it is frequently necessary to scan spectra with a very large bandwidth with a span of several tens of % of the central frequency so as to localize unknown peaks. Standard NMR probeheads which are typically constructed as resonators must be tuned and matched to comparatively narrow bands and must thus be re-tuned and re-matched very frequently when scanning over a whole NQR spectrum. At low frequencies up to few MHz dedicated circuits without the need for tuning and matching have been developed, but many quadrupole nuclei have transitions in the VHF range between several tens of MHz up to several hundreds of MHz. Currently available commercial NQR probeheads employ stepper motors for setting mechanically tuneable capacitors in standard NMR resonators. These yield high quality factors (Q) and thus high SNR but are relatively large and clumsy and do not allow for fast frequency sweeps. This article presents a new concept for a NQR probehead which combines a previously published no-tune no-match wideband concept for the transmit (TX) pulse with an electronically tuneable receive (RX) part employing varactor diodes. The prototype coil provides a TX frequency range of 57MHz with a center frequency of 97.5MHz with a return loss of ⩽-15dB. During RX the resonator is tuned and matched automatically to the right frequency via control voltages which are read out from a previously generated lookup table, thus providing high SNR. The control voltages which bias the varactors settle very fast and allow for hopping to the next frequency point in the spectrum within less than 100μs. Experiments with a test sample of ZnBr2 proved the feasibility of the method.

  18. An electronically tuned wideband probehead for NQR spectroscopy in the VHF range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfetter, Hermann

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy is an analytical method which allows to characterize materials which contain quadrupolar nuclei, i.e. nuclei with spin ⩾1. The measurement technology is similar to that of NMR except that no static magnetic field is necessary. In contrast to NMR, however, it is frequently necessary to scan spectra with a very large bandwidth with a span of several tens of % of the central frequency so as to localize unknown peaks. Standard NMR probeheads which are typically constructed as resonators must be tuned and matched to comparatively narrow bands and must thus be re-tuned and re-matched very frequently when scanning over a whole NQR spectrum. At low frequencies up to few MHz dedicated circuits without the need for tuning and matching have been developed, but many quadrupole nuclei have transitions in the VHF range between several tens of MHz up to several hundreds of MHz. Currently available commercial NQR probeheads employ stepper motors for setting mechanically tuneable capacitors in standard NMR resonators. These yield high quality factors (Q) and thus high SNR but are relatively large and clumsy and do not allow for fast frequency sweeps. This article presents a new concept for a NQR probehead which combines a previously published no-tune no-match wideband concept for the transmit (TX) pulse with an electronically tuneable receive (RX) part employing varactor diodes. The prototype coil provides a TX frequency range of 57 MHz with a center frequency of 97.5 MHz with a return loss of ⩽-15 dB. During RX the resonator is tuned and matched automatically to the right frequency via control voltages which are read out from a previously generated lookup table, thus providing high SNR. The control voltages which bias the varactors settle very fast and allow for hopping to the next frequency point in the spectrum within less than 100 μs. Experiments with a test sample of ZnBr2 proved the feasibility of the method.

  19. An electronically tuned wideband probehead for NQR spectroscopy in the VHF range.

    PubMed

    Scharfetter, Hermann

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy is an analytical method which allows to characterize materials which contain quadrupolar nuclei, i.e. nuclei with spin ⩾1. The measurement technology is similar to that of NMR except that no static magnetic field is necessary. In contrast to NMR, however, it is frequently necessary to scan spectra with a very large bandwidth with a span of several tens of % of the central frequency so as to localize unknown peaks. Standard NMR probeheads which are typically constructed as resonators must be tuned and matched to comparatively narrow bands and must thus be re-tuned and re-matched very frequently when scanning over a whole NQR spectrum. At low frequencies up to few MHz dedicated circuits without the need for tuning and matching have been developed, but many quadrupole nuclei have transitions in the VHF range between several tens of MHz up to several hundreds of MHz. Currently available commercial NQR probeheads employ stepper motors for setting mechanically tuneable capacitors in standard NMR resonators. These yield high quality factors (Q) and thus high SNR but are relatively large and clumsy and do not allow for fast frequency sweeps. This article presents a new concept for a NQR probehead which combines a previously published no-tune no-match wideband concept for the transmit (TX) pulse with an electronically tuneable receive (RX) part employing varactor diodes. The prototype coil provides a TX frequency range of 57MHz with a center frequency of 97.5MHz with a return loss of ⩽-15dB. During RX the resonator is tuned and matched automatically to the right frequency via control voltages which are read out from a previously generated lookup table, thus providing high SNR. The control voltages which bias the varactors settle very fast and allow for hopping to the next frequency point in the spectrum within less than 100μs. Experiments with a test sample of ZnBr2 proved the feasibility of the method. PMID:27591955

  20. NqrM (DUF539) Protein Is Required for Maturation of Bacterial Na+-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Vitaly A.; Bertsova, Yulia V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Baykov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in the bacterial respiratory chain, coupled with Na+ translocation across the membrane. Na+-NQR maturation involves covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues, catalyzed by flavin transferase encoded by the nqr-associated apbE gene. Analysis of complete bacterial genomes has revealed another putative gene (duf539, here renamed nqrM) that usually follows the apbE gene and is present only in Na+-NQR-containing bacteria. Expression of the Vibrio harveyi nqr operon alone or with the associated apbE gene in Escherichia coli, which lacks its own Na+-NQR, resulted in an enzyme incapable of Na+-dependent NADH or reduced nicotinamide hypoxanthine dinucleotide (dNADH) oxidation. However, fully functional Na+-NQR was restored when these genes were coexpressed with the V. harveyi nqrM gene. Furthermore, nqrM lesions in Klebsiella pneumoniae and V. harveyi prevented production of functional Na+-NQR, which could be recovered by an nqrM-containing plasmid. The Na+-NQR complex isolated from the nqrM-deficient strain of V. harveyi lacks several subunits, indicating that nqrM is necessary for Na+-NQR assembly. The protein product of the nqrM gene, NqrM, contains a single putative transmembrane α-helix and four conserved Cys residues. Mutating one of these residues (Cys33 in V. harveyi NqrM) to Ser completely prevented Na+-NQR maturation, whereas mutating any other Cys residue only decreased the yield of the mature protein. These findings identify NqrM as the second specific maturation factor of Na+-NQR in proteobacteria, which is presumably involved in the delivery of Fe to form the (Cys)4[Fe] center between subunits NqrD and NqrE. IMPORTANCE Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (Na+-NQR) is a unique primary Na+ pump believed to enhance the vitality of many bacteria, including important pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio

  1. Detection of Cl- binding to band 3 by double-quantum-filtered 35Cl nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D; Knauf, P A; Kennedy, S D

    1996-01-01

    We have applied double-quantum-filtered (DQF) NMR of 35Cl to study binding of Cl- to external sites on intact red blood cells, including the outward-facing anion transport sites of band 3, an integral membrane protein. A DQF 35Cl NMR signal was observed in cell suspensions containing 150 mM KCl, but the DQF signal can be totally eliminated by adding 500 microM 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DNDS), an inhibitor that interferes with Cl- binding to the band 3 transport site. Therefore, it seems that only the binding of Cl- to transport sites of band 3 can give rise to a 35Cl DQF signal from red blood cell suspensions. In accordance with this concept, analysis of the single quantum free induction decay (FID) revealed that signals from buffer and DNDS-treated cells were fitted with a single exponential function, whereas the FID signals of untreated control cells were biexponential. The DQF signal remained after the cells were treated with eosin-5-maleimide (EM), a noncompetitive inhibitor of chloride exchange. This result supports previous reports that EM does not block the external chloride binding site. The band 3-dependent DQF signal is shown to be caused at least in part by nonisotropic motions of Cl- in the transport site, resulting in incompletely averaged quadrupolar couplings. PMID:8789088

  2. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  3. Polymorphism and disorder in natural active ingredients. Low and high-temperature phases of anhydrous caffeine: Spectroscopic ((1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR/(14)N NQR) and solid-state computational modelling (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) study.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Apih, Tomaž; Gregorovič, Alan; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz Andrzej; Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia

    2016-03-31

    The polymorphism of anhydrous caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) has been studied by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) double resonance and pure (14)N NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) followed by computational modelling (Density Functional Theory, supplemented Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules with Reduced Density Gradient) in solid state. For two stable (phase II, form β) and metastable (phase I, form α) polymorphs the complete NQR spectra consisting of 12 lines were recorded. The assignment of signals detected in experiment to particular nitrogen sites was verified with the help of DFT. The shifts of the NQR frequencies, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters at each nitrogen site due to polymorphic transition were evaluated. The strongest shifts were observed at N(3) site, while the smallest at N(9) site. The commercial pharmaceutical sample was found to contain approximately 20-25% of phase I and 75-80% of phase II. The orientational disorder in phase II with a local molecular arrangement mimics that in phase I. Substantial differences in the intermolecular interaction phases I and II of caffeine were analysed using computational (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) approach. The analysis of local environment of each nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the topology of interactions in both polymorphs. For the most stable orientations in phase I and phase II the maps of the principal component qz of EFG tensor and its asymmetry parameter at each point of the molecular system were calculated and visualized. The relevant maps calculated for both phases I and II indicates small variation in electrostatic potential upon phase change. Small differences between packings in phases slightly disturb the neighbourhood of the N(1) and N(7) nitrogens, thus are meaningless from the biological point of view. The composition of two phases in pharmaceutical material

  4. Chemical structure and intra-molecular effects on NMR-NQR tensors of harmine and harmaline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadinejad, Neda; Tahan, Arezoo; Talebi Tari, Mostafa

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to analyze the effects of molecular structure and ring currents on the NMR chemical shielding tensors and NQR frequencies of harmine and harmaline alkaloids in the gas phase. The results demonstrated that NMR tensors and NQR frequencies of 15N nuclei in these compounds depend on chemical environment and resonance interactions. Hence, their values are obviously different in the mentioned structures. The interpretation of natural bond orbital (NBO) data suggests that in harmine structure, the lone pair participation of N9 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyrrole ring. However, the chemical shielding around N9 atom in harmine structure is higher than in harmaline, while in harmaline structure, lone pair participation of N2 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyridine ring. Hence, chemical shielding around N2 atom in harmaline structure is higher than in harmine. It can be deduced that by increasing lone pair electrons contribution of nitrogen atoms in ring resonance interactions and aromaticity development, the values of NMR chemical shielding around them increase, while χ and q zz values of these nuclei decrease.

  5. Part I. Analyzing the distribution of gas law questions in chemistry textbooks. Part II. Chlorine-35 NQR spectra of group 1 and silver dichloromethanesulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Gabriel

    Part I. Two studies involving the gas law questions in eight high school and Advanced Placement/college chemistry textbooks were performed using loglinear analysis to look for associations among six variables. These variables included Bloom's Taxonomy (higher-order, lower-order), Book Type (high school, college), Question Format (multiple-choice, problem, short answer), Question Placement (in-chapter, end-of-chapter, test bank), Representation (macroscopic, microscopic, symbolic), and Arkansas Science Standard (conceptual, mathematical; gas laws, pressure conversion, stoichiometry). The first study, involving the conceptual gas law questions, found the Book Type and Question Placement variables had the biggest impact, each appearing in 5 of the 11 significant associations. The second study, involving the mathematical gas law questions, found the Question Placement had the biggest impact, appearing in 7 of the 11 significant associations, followed by Book Type and the Arkansas Science Standard variables, which appeared in 5 of the 11 significant associations. These studies showed that compared to the high school books, college books have fewer multiple-choice questions (compared to short-answer and problem questions), fewer in-chapter questions (compared to end-of-chapter and test bank questions), fewer questions in the chapters and more questions at the end of the chapters and fewer multiple-choice questions in and at the end of the books and more multiple-choice questions in the test banks. Part II. The dichloromethanesulfonate salts of several +1 charged cations, M+Cl2CHSO3 - (M = Li, Na, K, Rb Ag, Cs Tl) were synthesized and studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Dichloromethanesulfonic acid was prepared by the methanolysis of dichloromethanesulfonyl chloride, which was neutralized with the metal carbonates to produce the corresponding metal dichloromethanesulfonate salts. This study completed the NQR investigation of the family of chloroacetates

  6. New Accurate Wavenumbers of H35Cl^+ and H37Cl^+ Rovibrational Transitions in the v=0-1 Band of the ^2Π State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domenech, Jose Luis; Cueto, Maite; Herrero, Victor Jose; Tanarro, Isabel; Cernicharo, Jose; Drouin, Brian

    2015-06-01

    HCl^+ is a key intermediate in the interstellar chemistry of chlorine. It has been recently identified in space from Herschel's spectra and it has also been detected in the laboratory through its optical emission, infrared and mm-wave spectra. Now that Hershchel is decomissioned, further astrophysical studies on this radical ion will likely rely on ground-based observations in the mid-infrared. We have used a difference frequency laser spectrometer coupled to a hollow cathode discharge to measure the absorption spectrum of H35Cl^+ and H37Cl^+ in the v=0-1 band of the ^2Π state with Dopppler limited resolution. The accuracy of the individual measurements (˜ 10 MHz (3σ)) relies on a solid state wavemeter referenced to an iodine-stabilized Ar^+ laser. The new data are being fit using the CALPGM software from JPL, and the current status will be presented. M. De Luca et al., Astrophys. J. Lett. 751, L37 (2012) W. D. Sheasley and C. W. Mathews, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 47, 420 (1973) P. B. Davies, P. A. Hamilton, B. A. Johnson, Mol. Phys. 57, 217 (1986) H. Gupta, B. J. Drouin, and J. C. Pearson, Astrophys. J. Lett. 751, L37 (2012)

  7. Prediction of P-branch emission spectral lines of NaF and 63Cu35Cl molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yonghong; Sun, Weiguo; Zhang, Yi; Fu, Jia; Fan, Qunchao; Li, Huidong; Feng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The analytical formula derived by Sun et al. in 2011 and used to predict the rotational lines for rovibrational diatomic systems is improved in this study. The new formula is obtained by adding a higher order spectral term Hυ that is neglected in our previous expression. A physical requirement is also added to the converging process to minimize the possible error of the predicted rotational line. All these are applied to study some rovibrational transition systems of 63Cu35Cl and NaF molecules. The results indicate that the accuracy of the P-branch rotational lines predicted by this new formula is about one order of magnitude better than the results obtained using the previous formula, and that both the small Hυ contribution and the improved converging requirement may play a vital role in predicting the high-lying rovibrational energies and the rotational lines. Comparisons between physical predictions and mathematical extrapolations on the rotational lines are also given.

  8. 79Br Nuclear Quadrupole Relaxation in the High Temperature Modification of Niobium Pentabromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Noriaki; Sekiya, Harutaka; Ishikawa, Chiaki; Abe, Yoshihito

    1992-06-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time of 79Br NQR has been measured between 4.2 K and room temperature. The result is compared with that of 35Cl NQR in NbCl5. The origin of the relaxation is attributed to the quadrupolar interaction and the temperature dependence is explained by the Raman process. The Debye temperature is determined to be 94 K and the relaxation time is related with the NQR frequency through the covalency.

  9. High temperature (35)Cl nuclear magnetic resonance study of the LiCl-KCl system and the effect of CeCl3 dissolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Farnan, I

    2016-08-15

    This paper examines the dynamics of the LiCl-KCl system over a range of temperatures in order to understand the local structure surrounding chlorine, which is the common ion in these systems, during molten salt pyro-processing. Chlorine-35 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is sensitive to the local environments of the resonant nuclei and their motion on a diffusive timescale. Thus, it is a good probe of the atomic scale processes controlling the viscosities, diffusivities and conductivities of these molten salts. The average isotropic chemical shifts (((35)Cl)δ) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of (35)Cl in (Li,K)Cl salt mixtures have been obtained over a compositional range of 0-100 mol% KCl with an interval of 10 mol% using high temperature nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy from room temperature up to 890 °C. The ((35)Cl)δ in the two end member salts are consistent with the cation-anion radius ratio as previously measured on the solid halides and the average radius ratio of cation to anion, can be used to explain the variation of ((35)Cl)δ with composition. The quadrupolar interaction is found to be responsible for the spin-lattice relaxation of the (35)Cl, and the activation energies for T1 relaxation have been obtained for all compositions. The measured T1 ((35)Cl) activation energies do not vary linearly with composition and peak at 50% KCl, which also coincides with the Chemla point for this system. They also are in good agreement with the values from equivalent conductivity measurements. To investigate the response of the system to solutes, 8 wt% of CeCl3 was added to the pure LiCl as a surrogate actinide. The shift induced was 120 ppm and the activation energy for the T1 ((35)Cl) increased by a factor of four. This is a promising preliminary result for probing the effect of actinide dissolution on the dynamics of these pyro-processing salts. PMID:27212395

  10. High temperature (35)Cl nuclear magnetic resonance study of the LiCl-KCl system and the effect of CeCl3 dissolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Farnan, I

    2016-08-15

    This paper examines the dynamics of the LiCl-KCl system over a range of temperatures in order to understand the local structure surrounding chlorine, which is the common ion in these systems, during molten salt pyro-processing. Chlorine-35 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is sensitive to the local environments of the resonant nuclei and their motion on a diffusive timescale. Thus, it is a good probe of the atomic scale processes controlling the viscosities, diffusivities and conductivities of these molten salts. The average isotropic chemical shifts (((35)Cl)δ) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of (35)Cl in (Li,K)Cl salt mixtures have been obtained over a compositional range of 0-100 mol% KCl with an interval of 10 mol% using high temperature nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy from room temperature up to 890 °C. The ((35)Cl)δ in the two end member salts are consistent with the cation-anion radius ratio as previously measured on the solid halides and the average radius ratio of cation to anion, can be used to explain the variation of ((35)Cl)δ with composition. The quadrupolar interaction is found to be responsible for the spin-lattice relaxation of the (35)Cl, and the activation energies for T1 relaxation have been obtained for all compositions. The measured T1 ((35)Cl) activation energies do not vary linearly with composition and peak at 50% KCl, which also coincides with the Chemla point for this system. They also are in good agreement with the values from equivalent conductivity measurements. To investigate the response of the system to solutes, 8 wt% of CeCl3 was added to the pure LiCl as a surrogate actinide. The shift induced was 120 ppm and the activation energy for the T1 ((35)Cl) increased by a factor of four. This is a promising preliminary result for probing the effect of actinide dissolution on the dynamics of these pyro-processing salts.

  11. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  12. The Conformational Changes Induced by Ubiquinone Binding in the Na+-pumping NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) Are Kinetically Controlled by Conserved Glycines 140 and 141 of the NqrB Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Juárez, Oscar; Neehaul, Yashvin; Cook, Darcie A.; Barquera, Blanca; Hellwig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Na+-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is responsible for maintaining a sodium gradient across the inner bacterial membrane. This respiratory enzyme, which couples sodium pumping to the electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone, is not present in eukaryotes and as such could be a target for antibiotics. In this paper it is shown that the site of ubiquinone reduction is conformationally coupled to the NqrB subunit, which also hosts the final cofactor in the electron transport chain, riboflavin. Previous work showed that mutations in conserved NqrB glycine residues 140 and 141 affect ubiquinone reduction and the proper functioning of the sodium pump. Surprisingly, these mutants did not affect the dissociation constant of ubiquinone or its analog HQNO (2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide) from Na+-NQR, which indicates that these residues do not participate directly in the ubiquinone binding site but probably control its accessibility. Indeed, redox-induced difference spectroscopy showed that these mutations prevented the conformational change involved in ubiquinone binding but did not modify the signals corresponding to bound ubiquinone. Moreover, data are presented that demonstrate the NqrA subunit is able to bind ubiquinone but with a low non-catalytically relevant affinity. It is also suggested that Na+-NQR contains a single catalytic ubiquinone binding site and a second site that can bind ubiquinone but is not active. PMID:25006248

  13. 75As-NQR study of the hybridization gap semiconductor CeOs4As12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogi, M.; Higa, N.; Niki, H.; Kawata, T.; Sekine, C.

    2016-02-01

    We performed an 75As nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement on CeOs4As12. The 75As-NQR spectrum shape demonstrates that the Ce-site filling fraction of our high-pressure synthesized sample is close to unity. A presence of the c — f hybridization gap is confirmed from the temperature dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1. An increase of 1/T1 below ∼3 K indicates a development of the spin fluctuations. The 1/T1 for CeOs4As12 shows similar behavior as that for CeOs4Sb12 with different magnitude of the c — f hybridization gap. An absence of phase transition in CeOs4As12 may be caused by the increase of the c — f hybridization, which increases the gap magnitude and reduces the residual density of state inside the gap.

  14. NQR Line Broadening Due to Crystal Lattice Imperfections and Its Relationship to Shock Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulder, S. M.; Buess, M. L.; Garroway, A. N.; Miller, P. J.

    2004-07-01

    The hydrodynamic hot spot model is used to explain the difference between shock sensitive and shock insensitive explosives. Among the major factors that influence the shock sensitivity of energetic compounds are the quality and particle size of the energetic crystals used to formulate the cast plastic bonded explosive. As do all energetic compounds, RDX and HMX exhibit internal crystal defects the magnitude and type of which depend on the manufacturing process used to synthesize and re-crystallize the energetic compound. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) spectroscopy was used to determine the crystal quality of RDX, HMX and CL-20 obtained from various manufacturers. The NQR experimental results are discussed. Cast plastic bonded explosives were made using the RDX and HMX obtained from the various manufacturers and subsequently subjected to the NOL large-scale gap test (LSGT). The results of the LSGT are discussed and correlated with the NQR results. A relationship between the crystal defect density and shock initiation pressure of the plastic bonded explosive is developed and discussed.

  15. Detection of chloronium and measurement of the 35Cl/37Cl isotopic ratio at z = 0.89 toward PKS 1830-211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, S.; Black, J. H.; Guélin, M.; Henkel, C.; Combes, F.; Gérin, M.; Aalto, S.; Beelen, A.; Darling, J.; Horellou, C.; Martín, S.; Menten, K. M.; V-Trung, Dinh; Zwaan, M. A.

    2014-06-01

    We report the first extragalactic detection of chloronium (H2Cl+) in the z = 0.89 absorber in front of the lensed blazar PKS 1830-211. The ion is detected through its 111-000 line along two independent lines of sight toward the North-East and South-West images of the blazar. The relative abundance of H2Cl+ is significantly higher (by a factor ~7) in the NE line of sight, which has a lower H2/H fraction, indicating that H2Cl+ preferably traces the diffuse gas component. From the ratio of the H235Cl+ and H237Cl+ absorptions toward the SW image, we measure a 35Cl/37Cl isotopic ratio of 3.1-0.2+0.3 at z = 0.89, similar to that observed in the Galaxy and the solar system.

  16. The far infrared pure rotational spectrum and the Coriolis coupling between v3 and v8 in CH35ClF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckhaus, David; Quack, Martin

    The FIR rotational spectrum of gaseous CH35ClF2 (chlorodifluoromethane, CFC22) is analysed improving vibrational ground state parameters for J up to 80. A new set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants is given for the C-Cl stretching fundamental v4. The Coriolis coupling between the two C-F stretching fundamentals v3 and v8 is investigated. An effective coupling constant ξa = 0·38 ± 0·03 cm-1(ξa3,8 = 0·56 ± 0·04) was obtained from a rotational analysis of the high resolution FTIR room temperature spectrum (apodized experimental bandwidth: 0·005 cm-1). A ratio of 2 : 1 was estimated for the squares of the vibrational transition moments for the fundamentals v3 and v8. A fortran program for simulations and least squares refinements of asymmetric top spectra is described, which allows for the inclusion of any kind of rovibrational coupling between several vibrational states.

  17. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Roles of the sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on vibrio cholerae metabolism, motility and osmotic stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Minato, Yusuke; Fassio, Sara R; Kirkwood, Jay S; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J; Faulkner, Wyatt J; Aagesen, Alisha M; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F; Häse, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology.

  19. Roles of the Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on Vibrio cholerae Metabolism, Motility and Osmotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Yusuke; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J.; Faulkner, Wyatt J.; Aagesen, Alisha M.; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F.; Häse, Claudia C.

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology. PMID:24811312

  20. Measurement of in-situ stress in salt and rock using NQR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Schempp, E.; Hirschfeld, T.; Klainer, S.

    1980-12-01

    A discussion of how stress and strain affect the quantities which can be measured in an NQR experiment shows that, for stresses of the magnitude to be expected at depths up to about 10,000 feet, quadrupole coupling constants will fall in the range of 1 to 10 kHz for both the sodium and chloride ions in NaCl. The most promising system involves pulsed nuclear double resonance detection; and alterative is to observe the quadrupolar splitting of the NMR signal. Choices to be made in the measurement and mapping techniques are discussed. The well-known perturbation of the homogenous stress field in the neighborhood of a borehole is shown to be advantageous from the point of view of obtaining directional information on the stress. Construction and operation of a borehole stress sensor are considered. The NQR technique seems feasible for measuring the magnitude and direction of underground stress with a resolution of about 25 psi, or 2.5% at 1000 psi. Downhole instrumentation suitable for in-situ determinations of stress appears within the state of the art. Additional tasks required on the project are identified.

  1. NQR investigation of pressure-induced charge transfer in oxygen-deficient YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} ({delta} = 0.38)

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, A.P.; Ahrens, E.T.; Hammel, P.C.; Heffner, R.H.; Takigawa, M.

    1992-03-01

    Measurements of the pressure dependence of {sup 63}Cu nuclear quadrupole frequency in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.62} from ambient pressure up to 1.5 GPa at 4k have been performed. {Tc} was found to increase with pressure: d{Tc}/dp {approximately} 5 K/GPa. All observed NQR lines are linear in pressure: dln{nu}{sub Q}/dp=z. We found positive z for the empty chain sites, consistent with ionic (Cu{sup 1+}) configuration in which the atom simply feels a squeezing lattice. Planar coppers close to the empty chains have positive z, while those that are close to full chains have z {approximately} 0. We present an analysis of the NQR result on the basis of the charge transfer model in which the mobile charges migrate from the chain to the plane sites. We deduced that a transfer of 0.021 holes to the O(2,3) sites would explain the result in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.62}, whereas only 0.007 holes transfer in fully oxygenated YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  2. Pt(CN)2-4 and Au(CN)-2: potential general probes for anion-binding sites of proteins. 35Cl and 81Br nuclear-magnetic-resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Norne, J E; Lilja, H; Lindman, B; Einarsson, R; Zeppezauer, M

    1975-11-15

    Nuclear magnetic quadrupole relaxation appears to be a general method for studying the binding of anions to proteins. This is shown by the increase in transverse quadrupole relaxation rate of 35Cl- and 81Br- in the presence of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, lysozyme, trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, human carbonic anhydrase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase and human serum albumin. Of the many possible binding sites at the surface of a protein (e.g. positively charged amino acid side-chains) only a few account for the main part of the relaxation enhancement. This is shown by the decrease in 35Cl- and 81Br- relaxation rate on addition of functional ligands. Large, kinetically inert, complex anions like Pt(CN)2-4 and Au(CN)-2 are found to act as strong competitors towards halogen ions for the high-affinity anion binding sites of a number of proteins. Titrations with complex anions following the 35Cl- or 81Br- relaxation rates are found to be helpful in attempts to elucidate binding mechanisms. Especially, the complex anions may be useful probes for the discrimination between general and metallic anion binding sites in proteins and they also permit correlation of information from X-ray investigations of crystals with that from physical measurements in solution. From the change in halide ion quadrupole relaxation rate on addition of strongly binding ligands the quadrupole coupling constants of the high affinity Cl- and Br- binding sites are estimated using certain assumptions. It is found that for several proteins, comprising the metal-free proteins but also alcohol dehydrogenase and Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase, the 35Cl quadrupole coupling constants have approximately the same values. For some other metallo-proteins like carbonic anhydrase and a zinc - serum-albumin complex considerably greater quadrupole coupling constants were obtained. The estimated quadrupole coupling constants are used as a basis for a discussion of the interactions involved in anion

  3. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  4. A Cu NQR study in a d-electron heavy-fermion system, CaCu3Ru4O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Harukazu; Tsuruta, Takuya; Nishioka, Takashi; Matsumura, Masahiro; Sakai, Hironori; Kambe, Shinsaku

    2007-11-01

    Cu nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies have been carried out for CaCu3Ru4O12, which has been suggested to show a heavy-fermion-like behavior although it possess no f electron. A Lorentzian shape of the Cu NQR line with a narrow width implies that no magnetic ordering appears, at least, down to 5 K. The spin lattice relaxation rate of the Cu nuclei probes a change of the Cu 3d electron nature, resulting in the Fermi liquid state at a low temperature. These facts strongly support that the heavy fermion picture is available in the concerned compound.

  5. N.Q.R measurements of low energy Chiral structures in powdered glassy As2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on the As-chalcogen glasses have shown that in the glassy state the local cylindrical symmetry associated with the elemental pyramidal unit is preserved. Here we introduce a local paracrystalline model of glassy As2Se3. This model is based on a tight binding calculation of the electric field gradient (EFG) at the core of an As atom located at the apex of the pyramidal structure. This EFG is shown to be hyper sensitive to the bond angles and bond lengths the As atom forms with the chalcogen nearest neighbors, as well as the hybrid angle formed with second neighbor As atoms. A continuous variation of the bonding parameters produces a unique set of these pyramidal units which are shown to fit the NQR data for powdered glassy samples. The best fit to the NQR data indicates that the pyramidal units organize themselves into Chiral structures in the glass. A plot of the electronic energy per molecular site shows that the chiral structures have on average a lower electronic energy than a random configuration.

  6. Central role of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) in sodium bioenergetics of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Steuber, Julia; Halang, Petra; Vorburger, Thomas; Steffen, Wojtek; Vohl, Georg; Fritz, Günter

    2014-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that lives in brackish or sea water environments. Strains of V. cholerae carrying the pathogenicity islands infect the human gut and cause the fatal disease cholera. Vibrio cholerae maintains a Na(+) gradient at its cytoplasmic membrane that drives substrate uptake, motility, and efflux of antibiotics. Here, we summarize the major Na(+)-dependent transport processes and describe the central role of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR), a primary Na(+) pump, in maintaining a Na(+)-motive force. The Na(+)-NQR is a membrane protein complex with a mass of about 220 kDa that couples the exergonic oxidation of NADH to the transport of Na(+) across the cytoplasmic membrane. We describe the molecular architecture of this respiratory complex and summarize the findings how electron transport might be coupled to Na(+)-translocation. Moreover, recent advances in the determination of the three-dimensional structure of this complex are reported.

  7. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1991-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for x ranging from 0 up to 0.3, with particular emphasis on the effect of doping on the Cu(2+) magnetic correlations and dynamics, are reviewed. In the low doping limit, x less than or equal to 0.05, the results can be interpreted consistently in terms of a simple phenomenological 'two-fluids' model whereby the effect of thermally-activated mobile O(2p) holes is the one of disrupting locally the Cu(2+) spin correlations. For x greater than or equal to 0.1, the results indicate the onset, as T approaches T(sub c)(+), of a strong coupling between Cu(2+) spins and the Fermi liquid of O(2p) holes leading to the apparent disappearance of localized Cu(2+) moment in connection with the opening of a superconducting gap.

  8. Development of ΔE-E telescope ERDA with 40 MeV 35Cl7+ beam at MALT in the University of Tokyo optimized for analysis of metal oxynitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harayama, I.; Nagashima, K.; Hirose, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Sekiba, D.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a compact ΔE-E telescope elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) system, for the first time at Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem Accelerator (MALT) in the University of Tokyo, which consists of a gas ionization chamber and solid state detector (SSD) for the quantitative analysis of light elements. The gas ionization chamber is designed to identify the recoils of O and N from metal oxynitrides thin films irradiated with 40 MeV 35Cl7+. The length of the electrodes along the beam direction is 50 mm optimized to sufficiently separate energy loss of O and N recoils in P10 gas at 6.0 × 103 Pa. The performance of the gas ionization chamber was examined by comparing the ERDA results on the SrTaO2N thin films with semi-empirical simulation and the chemical compositions previously determined by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). We also confirmed availability of the gas ionization chamber for identifying not only the recoils of O and N but also those of lithium, carbon and fluorine.

  9. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin–rotation constants in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br and {sup 127}I)

    SciTech Connect

    Demissie, Taye B. Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Jaszuński, Michał

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin–rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin–rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin–rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin–rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin–rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  10. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br and 127I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  11. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s-wave superconductor CaPd2As2: As75 NMR-NQR measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Q. -P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-07

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1/T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T, confirming a conventional s-wave SC. Additionally, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, hasmore » been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.« less

  12. A systematic study on hydrogen bond interactions in sulfabenzamide: DFT calculations of the N-14, O-17, and H-2 NQR parameters.

    PubMed

    Nozad, Ahmad G; Najafi, Hamidreza; Meftah, Sakineh; Aghazadeh, Mustafa

    2009-02-01

    A systematic computational study was carried out to characterize the hydrogen bond, HB, interactions of sulfabenzamide crystal structure by DFT calculations of electric field gradient, EFG, tensors at the sites of 14N, 17O, and 2H nuclei. The computations were performed with the B3LYP and B3PW91 DFT methods and 6-311+G and 6-311++G* standard basis sets using the Gaussian 98 package. To perform the calculations, a hydrogen-bonded heptameric cluster of sulfabenzamide was created by X-ray coordinates where the hydrogen atom positions were optimized and the EFG tensors were calculated for the target molecule. Additional optimization and EFG calculations were also performed for crystalline monomer and an isolated gas-phase sulfabenzamide. The calculated EFG tensors were converted to the experimentally measurable nuclear quadrupole resonance, NQR, parameters: quadrupole coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry parameter, eta(Q). The results reveal that the geometrical and NQR parameters of the optimized isolated gas-phase and crystalline phase are different. In addition, the difference between the calculated NQR parameters of the monomer and the target molecule shows how much H-bonding interactions affect the EFG tensors of each nucleus. The evaluated NQR parameters reveal that due to the contribution of the target molecule to N-H...O and C-H...O hydrogen bond interactions, the EFG tensors at the sites of N1, O3 and H1 undergo significant changes from monomer to the target molecule in cluster. These features reveal the major role of N-H...O type intermolecular HBs in cluster model of sulfabenzamide which the presence of these interactions can lead to polymorphism directly related to the drug activity and related properties.

  13. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions. [[sup 35]Cl at E/A = 15 MeV, [sup 37]Cl at E/A = 7. 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions [sup 37]Cl on [sup 40]Ca and [sup 209]Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and [sup 35]Cl, on [sup 209]Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the [sup 31]Cl on [sup 209]Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system [sup 37]Cl on [sup 40]Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction [sup 37]Cl on [sup 40]Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids.

  14. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1990-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for O = to or less than 0.3 and in the temperature range 1.6 + 450 K are analyzed in terms of Cu(++) magnetic correlations and dynamics. It is described how the magnetic correlations that would result from Cu-Cu exchange are reduced by mobile charge defects related to x-doping. A comprehensive picture is given which explains satisfactorily the x and T dependence of the correlation time, of the correlation length and of the Neel temperature T(sub n)(x) as well as being consistent with known electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is discussed how, in the superconducting samples, the mobile defects also cause the decrease, for T yields T(sub c)(+) of the hyperfine Cu electron-nucleus effective interaction, leading to the coexistence of quasi-localized, reduced magnetic moments from 3d Cu electrons and mobile oxygen p-hole carriers. The temperature dependence of the effective hyperfine field around the superconducting transition yields an activation energy which could be related to the pairing energy. New specific heat measurements are also presented and discussed in terms of the above picture.

  15. Electronic properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors as seen by Cu and O NMR/NQR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkmann, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) allow the investigation of electronic properties at the atomic level. We will report on such studies of typical members of the the Y-Ba-Cu-O family such as YBa2Cu30(6 + x) (1-2-3-(6 + x)), YBa2Cu4O8 (1-2-4) and Y2Ba4Cu7015 (2-4-7) with many examples of recent work performed in our laboratory. In particular, we will deal with Knight shift and relaxation studies of copper and oxygen. We will discuss important issues of current studies such as: (1) Existence of a common electronic spin-susceptibility in the planes (and perhaps in the chains) of 1-2-4; (2) Strong evidence for the existence of a pseudo spin-gap of the antiferromagnetic fluctuations in 1-2-4 and 2-4-7; (3) Evidence for d-wave pairing in 1-2-4; (4) Strong coupling of inequivalent Cu-O planes in 2-4-7 and possible origin for the high Tc value of this compound; and (5) The possibility to describe NMR data in the framework of a charge-excitation picture.

  16. Noise-resilient multi-frequency surface sensor for nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Peshkovsky, A S; Cattena, C J; Cerioni, L M; Osán, T M; Forguez, J G; Peresson, W J; Pusiol, D J

    2008-10-01

    A planar nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) sensor has been developed. The sensor is resilient to environmental noise and is capable of simultaneous independent multi-frequency operation. The device was constructed as an open multimodal birdcage structure, in which the higher modes, generally not used in magnetic resonance, are utilized for NQR detection. These modes have smooth distributions of the amplitudes of the corresponding radiofrequency magnetic fields everywhere along the sensor's surface. The phases of the fields, on the other hand, are cyclically shifted across the sensor's surface. Noise signals coming from distant sources, therefore, induce equal-magnitude cyclically phase-shifted currents in different parts of the sensor. When such cyclically phase-shifted currents arrive at the mode connection point, they destructively interfere with each other and are cancelled out. NQR signals of polycrystalline or disordered substances, however, are efficiently detected by these modes because they are insensitive to the phases of the excitation/detection. No blind spots exist along the sensor's surface. The sensor can be used for simultaneous detection of one or more substances in locations with environmental noise.

  17. NMR and NQR study of Si-doped (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube as n or P-semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Baei, Mohammad T; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Tavakoli, Khadijeh; Babaheydari, Ali Kazemi; Moghimi, Masoumeh

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the electronic structure properties of pristine and Si-doped aluminum nitride nanotubes as n or P-semiconductors at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory in order to evaluate the influence of Si-doped in the (6,0) zigzag AlNNTs. We extended the DFT calculation to predict the electronic structure properties of Si-doped aluminum nitride nanotubes, which are very important for production of solid-state devices and other applications. To this aim, pristine and Si-doped AlNNT structures in two models (Si(N) and Si(Al)) were optimized, and then the electronic properties, the isotropic (CS(I)) and anisotropic (CS(A)) chemical shielding parameters for the sites of various (27)Al and (14)N atoms, NQR parameters for the sites of various of (27)Al and (14)N atoms, and quantum molecular descriptors were calculated in the optimized structures. The optimized structures, the electronic properties, NMR and NQR parameters, and quantum molecular descriptors for the Si(N) and Si(Al) models show that the Si(N) model is a more reactive material than the pristine or Si(Al) model.

  18. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  19. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  20. Cu NQR Study of Impurity-doped YBa_2(Cu_1-xM_x)_4O8 (M=Ni, Zn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Machi, Takato; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Koshizuka, Naoki

    2001-03-01

    We report Cu NQR measurements of ^63Cu(2) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation curves for the impurity-doped powdered YBa_2(Cu_1-xM_x)_4O8 (M=Ni, x=0 ~0.042 M=Zn, x=0 ~0.022) from 4.2 K to 300 K. We estimated the host and the impurity-induced Cu nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times from the nonexponential recovery curves. Near the superconductor-to-semiconductor transition at the critical impurity concentration, we observed that the wipeout effect works at low temperature and that the pseudo spin-gap behavior of the host Cu nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T_1T)_HOST is suppressed. We associate these results with the localization effect in conduction. This work was supported by New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) as Collaborative Research and Development of Fundamental Technologies for Superconductivity Applications.

  1. Towards ferromagnetic quantum criticality in FeGa3 -xGex :71Ga NQR as a zero-field microscopic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M.; Wagner-Reetz, M.; Cardoso-Gil, R.; Gille, P.; Steglich, F.; Grin, Y.; Baenitz, M.

    2016-02-01

    71Ga NQR, magnetization, and specific-heat measurements have been performed on polycrystalline Ge-doped FeGa3 samples. A crossover from an insulator to a correlated local moment metal in the low-doping regime and the evolution of itinerant ferromagnet upon further doping is found. For the nearly critical concentration at the threshold of ferromagnetic order, xC=0.15, 71(1 /T1T ) exhibits a pronounced T-4 /3 power law over two orders of magnitude in temperature, which indicates three-dimensional quantum critical ferromagnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, for the ordered x =0.2 sample (TC≈6 K), 71(1 /T1T ) could be fitted well in the frame of Moriya's self-consistent renormalization theory for weakly ferromagnetic systems with 1 /T1T ˜χ . In contrast to this, the low-doping regime nicely displays local moment behavior where 1 /T1T ˜χ2 is valid. For T →0 , the Sommerfeld ratio γ =(C /T ) is enhanced (70 mJ /mole K2 for x =0.1 ) , which indicates the formation of heavy 3 d electrons.

  2. The study of polymorphic states of paradichlorobenzene by means of nuclear quadrupole resonance relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Sinyavsky, N Ya; Mershiev, I G; Kupriyanova, G S

    2016-09-01

    The article describes the results of the experimental study of the molecular crystal of paradichlorobenzene in α- and β-phases by means of NQR-relaxometry with the inversion of Laplace transformation. The anisotropy effect of the pore space of wood on the distribution of times of the spin-lattice relaxation of p-C6H4Cl2 in the pores of pre-impregnated with the molten sample is shown. It was established that the increase in the T1 spin-lattice relaxation time of (35)Cl nucleus in the wood pores (channels) is observed in the case when the radio frequency field B1 is parallel to the tracheid's of wood. The NQR T1ρ dispersion analysis of paradichlorobenzene in α-phase was carried out for the first time. PMID:27494233

  3. Peculiarities of geminal atom interaction in chloro-containing imidazoles using ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feshin, V. P.; Feshina, E. V.

    2000-07-01

    The results of ab initio calculations at the RHF/6-31G ∗ level of 1-methyl-4-chloro- and -5-chloroimidazoles as well as of 1-methyl-4,5-dichloroimidazoles with total optimization of their geometry were presented. They were used for the interpretation of peculiarities of an influence of the "pyridine" and "pyrrole" N atoms on the electron distribution of the Cl atoms in these molecules and of their 35Cl NQR frequencies. These peculiarities are caused by the different space electron distribution of these N atoms that causes the different polarization of the geminal Cl atom p-electron shell.

  4. Isolated versus Condensed Anion Structure II; the Influence of the Cations (1,3-propanediammonium, 1,4-phenylendiammonium, and n-propylammonium) on Structures and Phase Transitions of CdBr2-4Salts A 79,81Br NQR and X-ray Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Hideta; Dou, Shi-qi; Horiuchi, Keizo; Krishnan, V. G.; Paulus, Helmut; Fuess, Hartmut; Weiss, Alarich

    1996-12-01

    The influence of the cations on the condensation of anions CdBr42- in salts (A')CdBr4 (II) and (A)2CdBr4 (II) is studied by 79,81Br NQR and X-ray crystal structure determinations. (A')CdBr4 : A' = [H3N(CH2)3NH3]2+ (1) crystallizes with a layer-type anion structure at 298 K and A' = [1,4-(H3N)2C6H4]2+ (2) crystallizes with a chain-type anion structure at 298 K. (A)2 CdBr4 : A = [n-H3C(CH2)2NH3]+ (3) crystallizes with a layer-type anion structure at 293 K. (1) shows successive phase transitions at 328, 363, and 495 K according to the NQR and DSC measurements. Phase IV of (1): at 298 K orthorhombic, Pnma, Z = 4,a = 772.1 (4), b = 1905.4(9), c = 789.8(4) pm. 81Br NQR spectrum showed a doublet at 77 K (phase IV) with ν1= 61.177 and ν2 = 45.934 MHz and also a doublet at 350 K (phase III) with ν1= 57.581 and ν2 = 48.747 MHz. (2): at 295 K orthorhombic, Pnma, Z = 4, a = 802.5(3), b = 1775.1(6), c = 881.9(3) pm; the five-coordinated Cd atom and one-dimensional [CdBr4]2- anion chain structure was observed. This coordination and chain structure are very rare for (A')CdX4 (II) or (A)2CdX4 (II). Two 81Br NQR lines were observed at 77 K: ν1= 70.159 and ν3 = 40.056 MHz. One more line appeared at 85 K: ν2 = 53.622 MHz. A 81Br NQR triplet was observed at 273 K: ν1 = 67.919, ν2 = 56.317, and ν3 = 40.907 MHz. (3) shows successive phase transitions at 121, 135, 165, and 208 K according to the NQR, DSC, and DTA measurements. Phase I of (3): at 293 K orthorhombic, Cmca, Z = 4, a = 783.4(4), b = 2480.2(10), c = 806.5(4) pm. 81Br NQR doublet was observed at 77 K (phase V) and at 300 K (Phase I) with ν1 = 61.060 and ν2 = 54.098 MHz (77 K); v1 = 55.835 and ν2 = 55.964 MHz (373 K). No NQR line could be observed in phases II, III, and IV.

  5. An innovative method for the non-destructive identification of photodegradation products in solid state: 1H-14N NMR-NQR and DFT/QTAIM study of photodegradation of nifedipine (anti-hypertensive) to nitrosonifedipine (potential anti-oxidative).

    PubMed

    Latosińska, J N; Latosińska, M; Seliger, J; Zagar, V

    2012-08-30

    Stability of the antihypertensive drug nifedipine (NIF) has been studied experimentally in solid state by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR double resonance (NQDR) and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory (DFT). Photodegradation of NIF to its metabolite in vivo nitrosonifedipine, NO-NIF (antioxidative agent) upon long term daylight exposure was detected and the changes in the molecular structure of NIF were analysed. The photoconversion of NIF to NO-NIF in solid was found to be accompanied with the electron density redistribution at nitrogen sites (NH to N and NO(2) to NO) and proved to be successfully detected with identification of photoproducts by (1)H-(14)N NQDR and DFT methods. The increase in the e(2)qQ/h and η describing EFG tendency towards non-spherical symmetry was significantly greater upon the reduction of NO(2) site than upon hydrogen abstraction from NH site. The level of sensitivity of detection of the photodegradation product was about 1% of the original sample. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) analysis has been found useful in predicting photoreactive sites in the molecules and finding the explanation of differences in reactivity between parent NIF and its photoproduct NO-NIF. Using NIF as a model, this study demonstrates the suitability of NQDR supported by DFT for non-destructive determination of the photodegradation products in solid state.

  6. Frequency spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call "frequency spirals." These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  7. Frequency-Rank Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Bertram C.; Griffiths, Jose M.

    1978-01-01

    Frequency, rank, and frequency rank distributions are defined. Extensive discussion on several aspects of frequency rank distributions includes the Poisson process as a means of exploring the stability of ranks; the correlation of frequency rank distributions; and the transfer coefficient, a new measure in frequency rank distribution. (MBR)

  8. The registration of signals from the nuclei other than protons at 0.5 T MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, N.; Volkov, D.; Gulyaev, M.; Pavlova, O.; Pirogov, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The practical aspects of the adaptation of the medical MRI scanner for multinuclear applications are considered. Examples of high resolution NMR spectra for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B, 13C, 2H, and also NQR spectrum for 35Cl are given. Possibilities of MRI for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B are shown. Experiments on registration of signals 19F from the fluorocarbons injected in laboratory animals are described.

  9. AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, C.F.; Salisbury, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    A control is described for automatically matching the frequency of a resonant cavity to that of a driving oscillator. The driving oscillator is disconnected from the cavity and a secondary oscillator is actuated in which the cavity is the frequency determining element. A low frequency is mixed with the output of the driving oscillator and the resultant lower and upper sidebands are separately derived. The frequencies of the sidebands are compared with the secondary oscillator frequency. deriving a servo control signal to adjust a tuning element in the cavity and matching the cavity frequency to that of the driving oscillator. The driving oscillator may then be connected to the cavity.

  10. Narcotics and explosives detection by 14N pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.

    1994-03-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a proof-of-concept NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). With minimal modification to the existing explosives detector, we can detect operationally relevant quantities of (free base) cocaine within the 300-liter inspection volume in 6 seconds. We are presently extending this approach to the detection of heroin base and also examining 14N and 35,37Cl pure NQR for detection of the hydrochloride forms of both materials. An adaptation of this NQR approach may be suitable for scanning personnel for externally carried contraband and explosives. We first outline the basics of the NQR approach, highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and then present representative results for RDX and cocaine detection. We also present a partial compendium of relevant NQR parameters measured for some materials of interest.

  11. Polarization enhanced Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Espy, Michelle A.; Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) has been demonstrated for the detection of 14-N in explosive compounds. Application of a material specific radio-frequency (RF) pulse excites a response typically detected with a wire- wound antenna. NQR is non-contact and material specific, however fields produced by NQR are typically very weak, making demonstration of practical utility challenging. For certain materials, the NQR signal can be increased by transferring polarization from hydrogen nuclei to nitrogen nuclei using external magnetic fields. This polarization enhancement (PE) can enhance the NQR signal by an order of magnitude or more. Atomic magnetometers (AM) have been shown to improve detection sensitivity beyond a conventional antenna by a similar amount. AM sensors are immune to piezo-electric effects that hamper conventional NQR, and can be combined to form a gradiometer for effective RF noise cancellation. In principle, combining polarization enhancement with atomic magnetometer detection should yield improvement in signal-to-noise ratio that is the product of the two methods, 100-fold or more over conventional NQR. However both methods are even more exotic than traditional NQR, and have never been combined due to challenges in operating a large magnetic field and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor in proximity. Here we present NQR with and without PE with an atomic magnetometer, demonstrating signal enhancement greater than 20-fold for ammonium nitrate. We also demonstrate PE for PETN using a traditional coil for detection with an enhancement factor of 10. Experimental methods and future applications are discussed.

  12. Frequency stability review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Certain aspects of the description and measurement of oscillator stability are treated. Topics covered are time and frequency deviations, Allan variance, the zero-crossing counter measurement technique, frequency drift removal, and the three-cornered hat.

  13. Modeling Frequency Comb Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Yuan, Jinhui; Kang, Zhe; Li, Qian; Wai, P. K. A.

    2016-06-01

    Frequency comb sources have revolutionized metrology and spectroscopy and found applications in many fields. Stable, low-cost, high-quality frequency comb sources are important to these applications. Modeling of the frequency comb sources will help the understanding of the operation mechanism and optimization of the design of such sources. In this paper,we review the theoretical models used and recent progress of the modeling of frequency comb sources.

  14. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  15. Frequency Response Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel; Chassin, PNNL David; Zhang, PNNL Yu; PNNL,

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could lead to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.

  16. Frequency Response Tool

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could leadmore » to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.« less

  17. Characterization of solid phases and study of transformation kinetics in m-chlorofluorobenzene by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Silvina; Wolfenson, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Polymorphism is of widespread occurrence in the world of molecular crystals. In this work we present experimental results showing the existence of four solid phases in m-chlorofluorobenzene. A glass structure is achieved by quenching the liquid phase at 77 K. This glassy state crystallizes in a disordered phase at T~143 K, which in turn transforms to the high-temperature stable phase (phase I) at T~153 K. Depending on the thermal history of the sample, a different ordered phase (phase III) can be obtained. The disorder is attributed to a molecular orientational disorder. There is no evidence of molecular reorientation in any phase. A study of the disorder-order phase transformation kinetics, using nuclear quadrupole resonance, is presented. The results are analyzed following Cahn's theory. Nucleation seems to take place at grain boundaries. Growth rates for different temperatures have been determined.

  18. Chlorine transfer out of a very low permeability clay sequence (Paris Basin, France): 35Cl and 37Cl evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavastre, Véronique; Jendrzejewski, Nathalie; Agrinier, Pierre; Javoy, Marc; Evrard, Marc

    2005-11-01

    The marine Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation is found at a depth around 410m in the eastern part of the Paris Basin (France). It is a very low permeability formation investigated by the French agency for nuclear waste management (ANDRA) to study the feasibility of a radioactive waste disposal. Examining hydrogeological and geochemical characteristics of the clay sequence may test confinement properties of this formation. This study uses chlorine isotopes to investigate long-term transport processes which may carry chemical elements out of the clay layer to the surrounding rocks. Detailed chlorine concentration and δ 37Cl depth profiles are examined using pore waters and aquifer waters sampled in the clay formation and its surrounding aquifers (the Dogger at the bottom and the Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian/Tithonian unit at the top). They are discussed in terms of chlorine budget and hydrogeological processes. Clay pore waters and aquifer waters show strong chlorine concentration depletion (<3000 mg/L) relative to the original marine interstitial water (˜19000 mg/L). This probably results from an early dilution by meteoric water in limestones (as also indicated by oxygen and hydrogen isotopes). A steep Cl-concentration gradient from the Dogger at ˜500m in depth (˜2500 mg/L) to the Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian/Tithonian aquifer near the surface (≈ 10 mg/L) is associated to a 'v-shaped' profile of the δ 37Cl values. Modelling Cl transport shows that a hydrodynamic dispersion process explains Cl concentration and δ 37Cl profiles in Oxfordian Limestone. This process implies a mean upward flux of chloride in the 2.6 10 -8-8.2 10 -8 mole/m 2/yr range from the clay formation towards upper limestones where a westward advective flow disperses the chloride. The modelling and knowledge of underground water transfer suggest a maximum effective Cl-hydrodynamic vertical dispersion coefficient (= vertical Cl-transport coefficient) of ˜7.6 10 -10 m 2/s. Chlorine transfer through the Callovo-Oxfordian clay, since deposition 160My ago, can be mainly described by the interplay of an early dilution and a later hydrodynamic dispersion event which has apparently erased most of the isotopic effects of diagenetic events (such as early diffusion, ion filtration etc.).

  19. Vibrational relaxation dynamics of I35Cl(B, v') induced by low-temperature collisions with He atoms.

    PubMed

    Darr, Joshua P; Loomis, Richard A

    2005-09-21

    Using laser-induced fluorescence and two-laser, pump-probe spectroscopy, collision-induced vibrational relaxation is observed to compete with the dissociation of electronically excited ICl in a helium carrier gas expansion. By thoroughly characterizing the expansion properties, we observe that collisions of ICl(B, v'= 3) molecules with He atoms in the expansion induce vibrational relaxation of the initially prepared dihalogen down to rotor states in the next lower ICl(B,v'= 2) level on timescales that compete with the rate for non-adiabatic transfer from the B state to the Z1 state. The resulting ICl(B,v'= 2,j') product rotational distribution, along with the analogous ICl(B,v'= 1,j') distribution formed by collisional relaxation of molecules in the long-lived ICl(B,v'= 2) level are compared to ICl(B,v'= 2,j') products formed by vibrational predissociation of He...ICl complexes prepared in different intermolecular vibrational levels within the He + ICl(B,v'= 3) potential. No evidence is observed for resonance-enhanced collisional cross sections, even at the low temperatures achieved, T < 1.0 K.

  20. Light and variable 37Cl/35Cl ratios in rocks from Gale Crater, Mars: Possible signature of perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Martin, P.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairén, A. G.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2016-03-01

    Cl isotope ratios measured on HCl thermally evolved from as-yet-unknown phases in sedimentary rocks and sand in Gale Crater provide unexpected insights to the Martian surficial Cl cycle. The seven samples yield δ37Cl values ranging from - 1 ± 25 ‰ to - 51 ± 5 ‰. Five analyses from two samples of the Sheepbed mudstone (Yellowknife Bay study area) are analytically indistinguishable with a mean δ37Cl of - 11 ± 7 ‰ (1 σ). In contrast, four mudstones/sandstones from the Kimberley and Pahrump study areas also yielded indistinguishable ratios, but with a mean δ37Cl of - 43 ± 6 ‰. The Rocknest sand deposit gave a highly uncertain δ37Cl value of - 7 ± 44 ‰. These light and highly variable δ37Cl values are unique among known solar system materials. Two endmember models are offered to account for these observations, and in both, perchlorate, with its extreme ability to fractionate Cl isotopes, is critical. In the first model, SAM is detecting HCl from an oxychlorine compound (e.g., perchlorate) produced from volcanic gas emissions by atmospheric chemical reactions. Similar reactions in Earth's atmosphere may be responsible for the isotopically lightest known Cl outside of this study, in perchlorate from the Atacama Desert. Some of the Gale Crater δ37Cl values are more negative than those in Atacama perchlorate, but because reaction mechanisms and associated fractionation factors are unknown, it is impossible to assess whether this difference is prohibitive. If the negative δ37Cl signal is produced in this fashion, the isotopic variability among samples could arise either from variations in the relative size of the reactant chloride and product perchlorate reservoirs, or from variations in the fraction of perchlorate reduced back to chloride after deposition. Such reduction strongly enriches 37Cl in the residual perchlorate. Perchlorate reduction alone offers an alternative endmember model that can explain the observed data if SAM measured HCl derived from chloride. In this model isotopically normal perchlorate produced by an unspecified mechanism is reduced to chloride. Depending on the relative size of the reduced reservoir, the integrated product chloride can vary in isotopic composition from - 70 ‰ in the first increment all the way to the starting composition if the perchlorate is fully reduced. Thus, variable degrees of perchlorate reduction can produce chloride with the appropriate δ37Cl range. Combination of the two endmember models, in which the perchlorate subject to post-deposition reduction is isotopically negative from atmospheric reactions, is also possible. Determination of the phase hosting the Cl measured by SAM, an oxychlorine compound or chloride, is critical for selecting between these models, and for developing implications of the results for the Mars surficial Cl cycle. At present it is not possible to conclusively establish which phase is responsible (possibly both), but limited evidence favors the conclusion that the measured Cl derives mostly from an oxychlorine compound.

  1. Harmonic Frequency Lowering

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm for frequency lowering in music was developed and experimentally tested in hearing-impaired listeners. Harmonic frequency lowering (HFL) combines frequency transposition and frequency compression to preserve the harmonic content of music stimuli. Listeners were asked to make judgments regarding detail and sound quality in music stimuli. Stimuli were presented under different signal processing conditions: original, low-pass filtered, HFL, and nonlinear frequency compressed. Results showed that participants reported perceiving the most detail in the HFL condition. In addition, there was no difference in sound quality across conditions. PMID:26834122

  2. Regional flood frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book, the fourth of a four volume set, contains five sections encompassing major aspects of regional flood frequency analysis. Each section starts usually with an invited state-of-the-art paper followed by contributed papers. The first section provides an assessment of regional flood frequency analysis. Methods for performing regional frequency analysis for ungaged watersheds are presented in Section 2. More discussion on regional frequency analysis is provided in Section 3. Selection and comparison of regional frequency methods are dealt with in Section 4; these are of great interest to the user. Increasing attention is being focused these days on paleohydrologic flood analysis. This topic is covered in Section 5.

  3. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2014-11-25

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  4. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2013-05-28

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  5. Frequency set on systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, W. A.; Brett, A. R. H.

    Frequency set on techniques used in ECM applications include repeater jammers, frequency memory loops (RF and optical), coherent digital RF memories, and closed loop VCO set on systems. Closed loop frequency set on systems using analog phase and frequency locking are considered to have a number of cost and performance advantages. Their performance is discussed in terms of frequency accuracy, bandwidth, locking time, stability, and simultaneous signals. Some experimental results are presented which show typical locking performance. Future ECM systems might require a response to very short pulses. Acoustooptic and fiber-optic pulse stretching techniques can be used to meet such requirements.

  6. Frequency discriminator/phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Circuit provides dual function of frequency discriminator/phase detector which reduces frequency acquisition time without adding to circuit complexity. Both frequency discriminators, in evaluated frequency discriminator/phase detector circuits, are effective two decades above and below center frequency.

  7. Frequency dependent squeezed light at audio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John

    2015-04-01

    Following successful implementation in the previous generation of instruments, squeezed states of light represent a proven technology for the reduction of quantum noise in ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. As a result of lower noise and increased circulating power, the current generation of detectors places one further demand on this technique - that the orientation of the squeezed ellipse be rotated as function of frequency. This extension allows previously negligible quantum radiation pressure noise to be mitigated in addition to quantum shot noise. I will present the results of an experiment which performs the appropriate rotation by reflecting the squeezed state from a detuned high-finesse optical cavity, demonstrating frequency dependent squeezing at audio frequencies for the first time and paving the way for broadband quantum noise reduction in Advanced LIGO. Further, I will indicate how a realistic implementation of this approach will impact Advanced LIGO both alone and in combination with other potential upgrades.

  8. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    DOEpatents

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  9. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system comprises first and second gain sources providing first and second frequency radiation outputs where the second gain source receives as input the output of the first gain source and, further, the second gain source comprises a Raman or Brillouin gain fiber for wave shifting a portion of the radiation of the first frequency output into second frequency radiation output to provided a combined output of first and second frequencies. Powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  10. Laser frequency offset synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, D. A.; Evans, R. M.; Finn, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is reported for locking the frequency difference of two lasers with an accuracy of 0.5 kHz or less over a one-second interval which is simple, stable, and relatively free from systematic errors. Two 633 nm He-Ne lasers are used, one with a fixed frequency and the other tunable. The beat frequency between the lasers is controlled by a voltage applied to a piezoelectric device which varies the cavity length of the tunable laser. This variable beat frequency, scaled by a computer-controlled modulus, is equivalent to a synthesizer. This approach eliminates the need for a separate external frequency synthesizer; furthermore, the phase detection process occurs at a relatively low frequency, making the required electronics simple and straightforward.

  11. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    PubMed Central

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  12. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  13. Frequency modulated oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A frequency modulated push-pull oscillator in which the non-linear characteristic of varactors producing frequency modulation is compensated for by an opposite non-linear characteristic of a field effect transistor providing modulating bias to the varactors is described.

  14. Frequencies for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Smith, F G

    1970-10-31

    At present the scope of research in radio astronomy is limited by the allocation of frequencies, some of which have to be shared with other radio services. When the International Telecommunications Union reconsiders all frequency allocations next year, astronomers are hoping for an improvement.

  15. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  16. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  17. Digital frequency discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    Frequency discriminator has five integrated circuit chips interconnected to provide a divide function, exclusive OR function, phase shifting, and holding so that a single binary output signal results. The state of the binary signal indicates which one of the two input signals has a lower frequency than the other.

  18. Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donelan, Darsa; Mueller, Guido; Thorpe, James; Livas, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Laser ranging and interferometry are essential technologies allowing for many astounding new spacebased missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) to measure gravitational radiation emitted from distant super massive black hole mergers or distributed aperture telescopes with unprecedented angular resolution in the NIR or visible regime. The requirements on laser frequency noise depend on the residual motion and the distances between the spacecraft forming the interferometer. The intrinsic frequency stability of commercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above these requirements. Therefore, it is necessary for lasers to be stabilized to an ultrastable frequency reference so that they can be used to sense and control distances between spacecraft. Various optical frequency references and frequency stabilization schemes are considered and investigated for the applicability and usefulness for space-based interferometry missions.

  19. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  20. External laser frequency stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.L.; Hansch, T.W.

    1987-10-13

    A frequency transducer for controlling or modulating the frequency of a light radiation system is described comprising: a source of radiation having a predetermined frequency; an electro-optic phase modulator for receiving the radiation and for changing the phase of the radiation in proportion to an applied error voltage; an acousto-optic modulator coupled to the electro-optic modulator for shifting the frequency of the output signal of the electro-optic modulator; a signal source for providing an error voltage representing undesirable fluctuations in the frequency of the light radiation; a first channel including a fast integrator coupled between the signal source and the input circuit of the electro-optic modulator; a second channel including a voltage controlled oscillator coupled between the signal source and the acousto-optic modulator; and a network including an electronic delay circuit coupled between the first and second channels for matching the delay of the acousto-optic modulator.

  1. Precision frequency synthesizing sources with excellent time/frequency performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Liren; Lin, Hai

    1994-01-01

    Precision frequency synthesizing sources are needed in the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards, telemetry, communication, and radar systems. This kind of frequency synthesizing source possesses high frequency accuracy and excellent long term and short term frequency stability. Several precision frequency synthesizing sources developed by Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement (BIRMM) which have been successfully applied to the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards system, and radar system are described. In addition, the working principle, implementation approach, and the main technical specifications of the frequency synthesizing sources are also given.

  2. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  3. Simple sweep frequency generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorov, I.

    1985-01-01

    A sweep frequency generator is described whose center frequency can be varied from 10 kHz to 50 MHz, with seven 1 to 3 and 3 to 10 scales covering the 10 kHz to 30 MHz range and one 3 to 5 scale for the 30 to 50 MHz range. It consists of a tunable pulse generator with output voltage attenuator, a diode mixer for calibration, and a sawtooth voltage generator as a source of frequency deviation. The pulse generator is a multivibrator with two emitter coupled transistors and two diodes in the collector circuit of one. The first diode extends the tuning range and increases the frequency deviation, the second diode provides the necessary base bias to the other transistor. The pulse repetition rate is modulated either directly by the sweep voltage of the calibrating oscilloscope, this voltage being applied to the base of the transistor with the two diodes in its collector circuit through an additional attenuator or a special emitter follower, or by the separate sawtooth voltage generator. The latter is a conventional two transistor multivibrator and produces signals at any constant frequency within the 40 to 60 Hz range. The mixer receives unmodulated signals from a reference frequency source and produces different frequency signals which are sent through an RCR-filter to a calibrating oscilloscope.

  4. Frequency discriminating laser

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.D.

    1987-10-20

    A laser is described for discriminating between a higher gain transition and a lower gain transition to permit the laser to lase at the lower gain transition. It consists of: a laser cavity, including more than two mirrors each of which is highly transmissive at the frequency of the higher gain transition, one of which is partially reflective at the frequency of the lower gain transition, and all but the one of which are highly reflective at the frequency of the lower gain transition; an active laser medium disposed within the cavity; and means for pumping the active laser medium.

  5. Digital Radio Frequency Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey-Shipton, Gregory L.

    The Digital RF Memory (DRFM) is gradually replacing the recirculating Frequency Memory Loop (FML). The shortcomings of the FML in the area of limited storage time, single signal processing, and limited ECM capabilities are overcome by the use of the DRFM. There are several architectures for the DRFM but all of them accomplish the same basic function: to convert an incoming RF signal to a low enough frequency to allow storage in a digital memory and subsequent upconversion to the original signal frequency. Multiple signal handling capabilities on a pulse by pulse basis and software controlled ECM generation make the DRFM a powerful addition to any ECM suite.

  6. Supernova frequency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the frequency of type I and II supernovae occurring in galaxies of different types are derived from observational material acquired by the supernova patrol of the Shternberg Astronomical Institute.

  7. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  8. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  9. Monolithic THz Frequency Multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, N. R.; Narayanan, G.; Grosslein, R. M.; Martin, S.; Mehdi, I.; Smith, P.; Coulomb, M.; DeMartinez, G.

    2001-01-01

    Frequency multipliers are required as local oscillator sources for frequencies up to 2.7 THz for FIRST and airborne applications. Multipliers at these frequencies have not previously been demonstrated, and the object of this work was to show whether such circuits are really practical. A practical circuit is one which not only performs as well as is required, but also can be replicated in a time that is feasible. As the frequency of circuits is increased, the difficulties in fabrication and assembly increase rapidly. Building all of the circuit on GaAs as a monolithic circuit is highly desirable to minimize the complexity of assembly, but at the highest frequencies, even a complete monolithic circuit is extremely small, and presents serious handling difficulty. This is compounded by the requirement for a very thin substrate. Assembly can become very difficult because of handling problems and critical placement. It is very desirable to make the chip big enough to that it can be seen without magnification, and strong enough that it may be picked up with tweezers. Machined blocks to house the chips present an additional challenge. Blocks with complex features are very expensive, and these also imply very critical assembly of the parts. It would be much better if the features in the block were as simple as possible and non-critical to the function of the chip. In particular, grounding and other electrical interfaces should be done in a manner that is highly reproducible.

  10. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  11. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  12. Radio frequency distribution assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culley, K. M.

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Radio Frequency Distribution Assembly (RFDA) is an interface between the Sperry four-channel, fast-switching synthesizer and the EF-111 jamming system antenna ports. The RFDS is a sophisticated, high-speed RF interface designed to convert the banded outputs of the four-channel synthesizer (16 ports) to 36 ports which represent six ordinal directions of arrival (DOA) for the EF-111 jamming system. The RFDS will distribute the RF signals while providing controlled RF amplitudes to simulate the antenna patterns of the EF-111 Electronic Warfare (EW) system. The simulation of the arrival angles which appear between the ordinal directions is performed by controlling the amplitude of the RF signal from the DOA channels. The RFDA is capable of operating over the frequency range of 500MHz to 18GHz, and can rapidly switch between varying frequencies and attenuation levels.

  13. Hg(+) Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we review the development of Hg(+) microwave frequency standards for use in high reliability and continuous operation applications. In recent work we have demonstrated short-term frequency stability of 3 x 10(exp -14)/nu(sub tau) when a cryogenic oscillator of stability 2-3 x 10(exp 15) was used a the local oscillator. The trapped ion frequency standard employs a Hg-202 discharge lamp to optically pump the trapped Hg(+)-199 clock ions and a helium buffer gas to cool the ions to near room temperature. We describe a small Hg(+) ion trap based frequency standard with an extended linear ion trap (LITE) architecture which separates the optical state selection region from the clock resonance region. This separation allows the use of novel trap configurations in the resonance region since no optical pumping is carried out there. A method for measuring the size of an ion cloud inside a linear trap with a 12-rod trap is currently being investigated. At approx. 10(exp -12), the 2nd order Doppler shift for trapped mercury ion frequency standards is one of the largest frequency offsets and its measurement to the 1% level would represent an advance in insuring the very long-term stability of these standards to the 10(exp -14) or better level. Finally, we describe atomic clock comparison experiments that can probe for a time variation of the fine structure constant, alpha = e(exp 2)/2(pi)hc, at the level of 10(exp -20)/year as predicted in some Grand Unified String Theories.

  14. Frequency Tunable Wire Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides frequency tunable solid-state radiation-generating devices, such as lasers and amplifiers, whose active medium has a size in at least one transverse dimension (e.g., its width) that is much smaller than the wavelength of radiation generated and/or amplified within the active medium. In such devices, a fraction of radiation travels as an evanescent propagating mode outside the active medium. It has been discovered that in such devices the radiation frequency can be tuned by the interaction of a tuning mechanism with the propagating evanescent mode.

  15. Frequency division multiplex technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brey, H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for monitoring a plurality of condition responsive devices is described. It consists of a master control station and a remote station. The master control station is capable of transmitting command signals which includes a parity signal to a remote station which transmits the signals back to the command station so that such can be compared with the original signals in order to determine if there are any transmission errors. The system utilizes frequency sources which are 1.21 multiples of each other so that no linear combination of any harmonics will interfere with another frequency.

  16. Effective Frequency Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, C. Laurence; Weng, Chi Y.

    2002-01-01

    An effective monochromatic frequency technique is described to represent the effects of finite spectral bandwidth for active and passive measurements centered on an absorption line, a trough region, or a slowly varying spectral feature. For Gaussian and rectangular laser line shapes, the effective frequency is shown to have a simple form which depends only on the instrumental line shape and bandwidth and not on the absorption line profile. The technique yields accuracies better than 0.1% for bandwidths less than 0.2 times the atmospheric line width.

  17. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  18. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  19. All-frequency reflectionlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbin, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    We derive planar permittivity profiles that do not reflect perpendicularly exiting radiation of any frequency. The materials obey the Kramers-Kronig relations and have no regions of gain. Reduction of the Casimir force by means of such materials is also discussed.

  20. Frequency of orthodontic extraction

    PubMed Central

    Dardengo, Camila de S.; Fernandes, Luciana Q. P.; Capelli, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The option of dental extraction for orthodontic purposes has been debated for more than 100 years, including periods when it was widely used in treatment, including the present, during which other methods are used to avoid dental extractions. The objective was to analyze the frequency of tooth extraction treatment performed between 1980 and 2011 at the Orthodontic Clinic of Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ). Material and Methods: The clinical records of 1484 patients undergoing orthodontic treatment were evaluated. The frequency of extractions was evaluated with regard to sex, Angle's classification, the different combinations of extractions and the period when orthodontic treatment began. Chi-square test was used to determine correlations between variables, while the chi-square test for trends was used to assess the frequency of extractions over the years. Results: There was a reduction of approximately 20% in the frequency of cases treated with tooth extraction over the last 32 years. The most frequently extracted teeth were first premolars. Patients with Class I malocclusion showed fewer extractions, while Class II patients underwent a higher number of extraction treatment. There were no statistically significant differences with regard to sex. Conclusion: New features introduced into the orthodontic clinic and new esthetic concepts contributed to reducing the number of cases treated with dental extractions. However, dental extractions for orthodontic purposes are still well indicated in certain cases. PMID:27007762

  1. Food frequency questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen; Aranceta, Javier; Salvador, Gemma; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-26

    Food Frequency Questionnaires are dietary assessment tools widely used in epidemiological studies investigating the relationship between dietary intake and disease or risk factors since the early '90s. The three main components of these questionnaires are the list of foods, frequency of consumption and the portion size consumed. The food list should reflect the food habits of the study population at the time the data is collected. The frequency of consumption may be asked by open ended questions or by presenting frequency categories. Qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaires do not ask about the consumed portions; semi-quantitative include standard portions and quantitative questionnaires ask respondents to estimate the portion size consumed either in household measures or grams. The latter implies a greater participant burden. Some versions include only close-ended questions in a standardized format, while others add an open section with questions about some specific food habits and practices and admit additions to the food list for foods and beverages consumed which are not included. The method can be self-administered, on paper or web-based, or interview administered either face-to-face or by telephone. Due to the standard format, especially closed-ended versions, and method of administration, FFQs are highly cost-effective thus encouraging its widespread use in large scale epidemiological cohort studies and also in other study designs. Coding and processing data collected is also less costly and requires less nutrition expertise compared to other dietary intake assessment methods. However, the main limitations are systematic errors and biases in estimates. Important efforts are being developed to improve the quality of the information. It has been recommended the use of FFQs with other methods thus enabling the adjustments required.

  2. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  3. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  4. Extended frequency turbofan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Park, J. W.; Jaekel, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The fan model was developed using two dimensional modeling techniques to add dynamic radial coupling between the core stream and the bypass stream of the fan. When incorporated into a complete TF-30 engine simulation, the fan model greatly improved compression system frequency response to planar inlet pressure disturbances up to 100 Hz. The improved simulation also matched engine stability limits at 15 Hz, whereas the one dimensional fan model required twice the inlet pressure amplitude to stall the simulation. With verification of the two dimensional fan model, this program formulated a high frequency F-100(3) engine simulation using row by row compression system characteristics. In addition to the F-100(3) remote splitter fan, the program modified the model fan characteristics to simulate a proximate splitter version of the F-100(3) engine.

  5. Low frequency radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This article consists of a summarized report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) and critical commentaries on the report by two leading researchers in electric and magnetic field frequency exposure. The report was requested by the U.S. Department of Labor, which was particularly concerned about published information suggesting that cancer results from electrical transmission lines, household appliances, and video display terminals. The commentaries were by David Savitz, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Thomas Tenforde, a biophysicist with Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories. In response to the Department of Labor request, CIRRPC asked Oak Ridge Associated Universities to establish a panel to conduct an independent scientific review on the reported health hazards attributed to low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF).

  6. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  7. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  8. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  9. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  10. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  11. Active frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng

    2013-05-01

    Split ring resonator arrays are investigated for use as active elements for the realization of voltage controllable frequency selective surfaces. Finite difference time domain simulations suggest the absorptive and reflective properties of such surfaces can be externally controlled through modifications of the split ring resonator gap impedance. In this work, such voltage-controlled resonance tuning is obtained through the addition of an appropriately designed high electron mobility transistor positioned across the split ring resonator gap. It is shown that a 0.5μm gate length high electron mobility transistor allows voltage controllable switching between the two resonant conditions associated with a split ring resonator and that of a closed loop geometry when the surface is illuminated with THz radiation. Partial switching between these two resonant conditions is observed at larger gate lengths. Such active frequency selective surfaces are proposed, for example, for use as modulators in THz detection schemes and as RF filters in radar applications when scaled to operate at GHz frequencies.

  12. Fiber optic frequency transfer link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, Lori E. (Inventor); Sydnor, Richard L. (Inventor); Lutes, George F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A reference frequency distribution system is disclosed for transmitting a reference frequency from a reference unit to a remote unit while keeping the reference frequency at the reference unit and the remote unit in phase. A fiber optic cable connects the reference unit to the remote unit. A frequency source at the reference unit produces a reference frequency having an adjustable phase. A fiber optic transmitter at the reference unit modulates a light beam with the reference frequency and transmits the light beam into the fiber optic cable. A 50/50 reflector at the remote unit reflects a first portion of the light beam from the reference unit back into the fiber optic cable to the reference unit. A first fiber optic receiver disposed at the remote unit receives a second portion of the light beam and demodulates the reference frequency to be used at the remote unit. A second fiber optic receiver disposed at the reference unit receives the first portion of the light beam and demodulates a reference frequency component. A phase conjugator is connected to the frequency source for comparing the phase of the reference frequency component to the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam being transmitted from the reference unit to maintain a conjugate (anti-symmetric) relationship between the reference frequency component and the reference frequency modulating the light beam where virtually no phase difference exists between the phase of the reference frequency component and the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam.

  13. Broadband frequency demodulator for detecting small frequency shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyand, K.; Simon, E.

    1980-03-01

    A technique is presented that enables the indication of the smallest frequency-modulation shifts over a wide carrier-frequency range. Through coil-less modulation following conversion of the carrier-frequency, and subsequent phase-sensitive rectification of the low-frequency signal, it is possible to achieve high linearity and resolution over a frequency range of 20 kHz through 4 MHz. It is noted that the smallest frequency shift that can still be detected is 10 to the -4th Hz.

  14. Frequency domain nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legare, Francois

    2016-05-01

    The universal dilemma of gain narrowing occurring in fs amplifiers prevents ultra-high power lasers from delivering few-cycle pulses. This problem is overcome by a new amplification concept: Frequency domain Optical Parametric Amplification - FOPA. It enables simultaneous up-scaling of peak power and amplified spectral bandwidth and can be performed at any wavelength range of conventional amplification schemes, however, with the capability to amplify single cycles of light. The key idea for amplification of octave-spanning spectra without loss of spectral bandwidth is to amplify the broad spectrum ``slice by slice'' in the frequency domain, i.e. in the Fourier plane of a 4f-setup. The striking advantages of this scheme, are its capability to amplify (more than) one octave of bandwidth without shorting the corresponding pulse duration. This is because ultrabroadband phase matching is not defined by the properties of the nonlinear crystal employed but the number of crystals employed. In the same manner, to increase the output energy one simply has to increase the spectral extension in the Fourier plane and to add one more crystal. Thus, increasing pulse energy and shortening its duration accompany each other. A proof of principle experiment was carried out at ALLS on the sub-two cycle IR beam line and yielded record breaking performance in the field of few-cycle IR lasers. 100 μJ two-cycle pulses from a hollow core fibre compression setup were amplified to 1.43mJ without distorting spatial or temporal properties. Pulse duration at the input of FOPA and after FOPA remains the same. Recently, we have started upgrading this system to be pumped by 250 mJ to reach 40 mJ two-cycle IR few-cycle pulses and latest results will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, the extension of the concept of FOPA to other nonlinear optical processes will be discussed. Frequency domain nonlinear optics.

  15. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  16. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  17. Multiple frequency atmospheric radar techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stitt, Gary Richard

    The use of multiple frequency coding to improve the vertical resolution of pulsed-Doppler very high frequency atmospheric radars, especially with regards to the two-frequency techniques known as frequency domain interferometry (FDI), is presented. This technique consists of transmitting alternate pulses on two distinct carrier frequencies. The two resulting time series are used to evaluate the normalized cross-correlation function, whose magnitude and phase are related to the thickness and position of a scattering layer. These same time series are also used to evaluate cross-spectra, which yield magnitude and phase values for each Doppler frequency component of the return signal.

  18. Pronunciation and the Frequency Meaningfulness Effect in Children's Frequency Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghatala, Elizabeth S.; And Others

    In an absolute frequency judgment task, 130 sixth graders received either high-frequency (Hi-F), low-frequency, high-meaningfulness (Lo-F/Hi-M), or low-frequency, low-meaningfulness (Lo-F/Lo-M) words selected from the 1944 Thorndike-Lorge list. Subjects were asked to either pronounce the words aloud, listen to the examiner prounounce the written…

  19. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  20. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Eide, S.A.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  1. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A. ); Eide, S.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  2. Time, Frequency and Physical Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Helmut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes several developments in atomic clocks and frequency standards pointing out the feasibility and practicality in adopting a unified standard of time and frequency to replace other base standards of length, mass, and temperature. (GA)

  3. Frequency mixer having ferromagnetic film

    DOEpatents

    Khitun, Alexander; Roshchin, Igor V.; Galatsis, Kosmas; Bao, Mingqiang; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-03-29

    A frequency conversion device, which may include a radiofrequency (RF) mixer device, includes a substrate and a ferromagnetic film disposed over a surface of the substrate. An insulator is disposed over the ferromagnetic film and at least one microstrip antenna is disposed over the insulator. The ferromagnetic film provides a non-linear response to the frequency conversion device. The frequency conversion device may be used for signal mixing and amplification. The frequency conversion device may also be used in data encryption applications.

  4. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  5. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  6. Flying radio frequency undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Vikharev, A. A.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-07-21

    A concept for the room-temperature rf undulator, designed to produce coherent X-ray radiation by means of a relatively low-energy electron beam and pulsed mm-wavelength radiation, is proposed. The “flying” undulator is a high-power short rf pulse co-propagating together with a relativistic electron bunch in a helically corrugated waveguide. The electrons wiggle in the rf field of the −1st spatial harmonic with the phase velocity directed in the opposite direction in respect to the bunch velocity, so that particles can irradiate high-frequency Compton's photons. A high group velocity (close to the speed of light) ensures long cooperative motion of the particles and the co-propagating rf pulse.

  7. Frequency mixing crystal

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, Christopher A.; Davis, Laura E.; Webb, Mark

    1992-01-01

    In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmoic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X.sub.2 Y(NO.sub.3).sub.5 .multidot.2 nZ.sub.2 o wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

  8. FREQUENCY STABILIZING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.; Anderson, O.A.

    1960-05-01

    An electronic control circuit is described in which a first signal frequency is held in synchronization with a second varying reference signal. The circuit receives the first and second signals as inputs and produces an output signal having an amplitude dependent upon rate of phase change between the two signals and a polarity dependent on direction of the phase change. The output may thus serve as a correction signal for maintaining the desired synchronization. The response of the system is not dependent on relative phase angle between the two compared signals. By having practically no capacitance in the circuit, there is minimum delay between occurrence of a phase shift and a response in the output signal and therefore very fast synchronization is effected.

  9. Frequency doubling crystals

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Francis; Velsko, Stephan P.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  10. Bounce frequency fishbone analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Roscoe; Fredrickson, Eric; Chen, Liu

    2002-11-01

    Large amplitude bursting modes are observed on NSTX, which are identified as bounce frequency fishbone modes(PDX Group, Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, Phys Rev. Lett) 50, 891 (1983)^,(L. Chen, R. B. White, and M. N. Rosenbluth Phys Rev. Lett) 52, 1122 (1984). The identification is carried out using numerical equilibria obtained from TRANSP( R. V. Budny, M. G. Bell A. C. Janos et al), Nucl Fusion 35, 1497 (1995) and the numerical guiding center code ORBIT( R.B. White, Phys. Fluids B 2)(4), 845 (1990). These modes are important for high energy particle distributions which have large average bounce angle, such as the nearly tangentially injected beam ions in NSTX and isotropic alpha particle distributions. They are particularly important in high q low shear advanced plasma scenarios. Different ignited plasma scenarios are investigated with these modes in view.

  11. Instantaneous Frequency Attribute Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Margrave, G. F.; Ben Horin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The instantaneous seismic data attribute provides a different means of seismic interpretation, for all types of seismic data. It first came to the fore in exploration seismology in the classic paper of Taner et al (1979), entitled " Complex seismic trace analysis". Subsequently a vast literature has been accumulated on the subject, which has been given an excellent review by Barnes (1992). In this research we will compare two different methods of computation of the instantaneous frequency. The first method is based on the original idea of Taner et al (1979) and utilizes the derivative of the instantaneous phase of the analytic signal. The second method is based on the computation of the power centroid of the time-frequency spectrum, obtained using either the Gabor Transform as computed by Margrave et al (2011) or the Stockwell Transform as described by Stockwell et al (1996). We will apply both methods to exploration seismic data and the DPRK events recorded in 2006 and 2013. In applying the classical analytic signal technique, which is known to be unstable, due to the division of the square of the envelope, we will incorporate the stabilization and smoothing method proposed in the two paper of Fomel (2007). This method employs linear inverse theory regularization coupled with the application of an appropriate data smoother. The centroid method application is straightforward and is based on the very complete theoretical analysis provided in elegant fashion by Cohen (1995). While the results of the two methods are very similar, noticeable differences are seen at the data edges. This is most likely due to the edge effects of the smoothing operator in the Fomel method, which is more computationally intensive, when an optimal search of the regularization parameter is done. An advantage of the centroid method is the intrinsic smoothing of the data, which is inherent in the sliding window application used in all Short-Time Fourier Transform methods. The Fomel technique

  12. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  13. Frequency-bin entangled photons

    SciTech Connect

    Olislager, L.; Emplit, P.; Nguyen, A. T.; Massar, S.; Merolla, J.-M.; Huy, K. Phan

    2010-07-15

    A monochromatic laser pumping a parametric down-conversion crystal generates frequency-entangled photon pairs. We study this experimentally by addressing such frequency-entangled photons at telecommunication wavelengths (around 1550 nm) with fiber-optics components such as electro-optic phase modulators and narrow-band frequency filters. The theory underlying our approach uses the notion of frequency-bin entanglement. Our results show that the phase modulators address coherently up to eleven frequency bins, leading to an interference pattern which can violate by more than five standard deviations a Bell inequality adapted to our setup.

  14. The harmonic frequencies of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, Nicholas C.; Maslen, Paul E.; Amos, Roger D.; Andrews, Jamie S.; Murray, Christopher W.; Laming, Gregory J.

    1992-09-01

    We report calculations for the harmonic frequencies of C 6H 6 and C 6D 6. Our most sophisticated quantum chemistry values are obtained with the MP2 method and a TZ2P+f basis set (288 basis functions), which are the largest such calculations reported on benzene to date. Using the SCF density, we also calculate the frequencies using the exchange and correlation expressions of density functional theory. We compare our calculated harmonic frequencies with those deduced from experiment by Goodman, Ozkabak and Thakur. The density functional frequencies appear to be more reliable predictions than the MP2 frequencies and they are obtained at significantly less cost.

  15. Nuclear Quadrupole Coupling Constants in Niobium Pentachloride and Related Compounds (I) Halogen Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Noriaki

    1982-02-01

    35Cl NQR spectrum in NbCl5 has been investigated from 4.2 K to 480 K. The lines of about 7 MHz have larger multiplicity and show positive temperature dependence in contrast to the usual negative one for the line of about 13 MHz. The former lines are further separated into two groups having different temperature dependences. The expressions for the chlorine coupling constant are derived according to Townes-Dailey’s method on the basis of the pπ-dπ bond. The NQR data are analysed and the lines are assigned to the axial, equatorial and bridging chlorine atoms in the Nb2Cl10 dimer. The theory is applied to other related compounds.

  16. Influence of modulation frequency in rubidium cell frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.; Viennet, J.; Cyr, N.; Vanier, J.

    1983-01-01

    The error signal which is used to control the frequency of the quartz crystal oscillator of a passive rubidium cell frequency standard is considered. The value of the slope of this signal, for an interrogation frequency close to the atomic transition frequency is calculated and measured for various phase (or frequency) modulation waveforms, and for several values of the modulation frequency. A theoretical analysis is made using a model which applies to a system in which the optical pumping rate, the relaxation rates and the RF field are homogeneous. Results are given for sine-wave phase modulation, square-wave frequency modulation and square-wave phase modulation. The influence of the modulation frequency on the slope of the error signal is specified. It is shown that the modulation frequency can be chosen as large as twice the non-saturated full-width at half-maximum without a drastic loss of the sensitivity to an offset of the interrogation frequency from center line, provided that the power saturation factor and the amplitude of modulation are properly adjusted.

  17. Flood frequency in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childers, J.M.

    1970-01-01

    Records of peak discharge at 183 sites were used to study flood frequency in Alaska. The vast size of Alaska, its great ranges of physiography, and the lack of data for much of the State precluded a comprehensive analysis of all flood determinants. Peak stream discharges, where gaging-station records were available, were analyzed for 2-year, 5-year, 10-year, 25-year, and 50-year average-recurrence intervals. A regional analysis of the flood characteristics by multiple-regression methods gave a set of equations that can be used to estimate floods of selected recurrence intervals up to 50 years for any site on any stream in Alaska. The equations relate floods to drainage-basin characteristics. The study indicates that in Alaska the 50-year flood can be estimated from 10-year gaging- station records with a standard error of 22 percent whereas the 50-year flood can be estimated from the regression equation with a standard error of 53 percent. Also, maximum known floods at more than 500 gaging stations and miscellaneous sites in Alaska were related to drainage-area size. An envelope curve of 500 cubic feet per second per square mile covered all but 2 floods in the State.

  18. A Biochemical Magic Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1993-01-01

    Life is composed principally of four classes of biomolecules - protein, nucleic acid, polysaccharide and lipid. Using 1) estimates of the reducing equivalents (electron pairs) needed to synthesize these biomolecules from carbon dioxide, and 2) measurements of the molecular composition of different organisms, we calculated the average number of electron pairs required for the reduction of carbon dioxide to biological carbon (electron pairs/carbon atom). These calculations showed that the carbon of the Earths biosphere is at the reduction level of formaldehyde that requires 2 electron pairs/carbon atom to be synthesized from carbon dioxide. This was also the reduction level of carbon of individual organisms, except for those that stored large amounts of fuel as lipid. Since this chemical property of life is easily discovered and probably universal, it's most likely known by other intelligent life in the universe. It could be the one thing we know about other carbon-based life in the universe, and the one thing that other intelligent life knows about us. We believe this common knowledge that formaldehyde represents the reduction level of life's carbon could lead to the selection of the 72.83814 GHz line of the 0,0,0,1,0,1 ground-state rotational transition of formaldehyde as a frequency for interstellar communication.

  19. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  20. Operational frequency stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The frequency stabilities under operational conditions of several commercially available rubidium and cesium frequency standards were determined from experimental data for frequency averaging times from 10 to the 7th power s and are presented in table and graph form. For frequency averaging times between 10 to the 5th power and 10 to the 7th power s, the rubidium standards tested have a stability of between 10 to the minus 12th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 12th power, while the cesium standards have a stability of between 2 x 10 to the minus 13th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 13th power.

  1. Frequency synchronization of a frequency-hopped MFSK communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.; Polydoros, A.; Simon, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the performance of fine-frequency synchronization. The performance degradation due to imperfect frequency synchronization is found in terms of the effect on bit error probability as a function of full-band or partial-band noise jamming levels and of the number of frequency hops used in the estimator. The effect of imperfect fine-time synchronization is also included in the calculation of fine-frequency synchronization performance to obtain the overall performance degradation due to synchronization errors.

  2. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, G.J.; Kaskey, J.A.

    1992-11-24

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics. 2 figs.

  3. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

  4. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia; Peng, Fang Z.

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  5. Frequency-Shift Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hearing aid maps spectrum of speech into band of lower frequencies at which ear remains sensitive. By redirecting normal speech frequencies into frequency band from 100 to 1,500 Hz, hearing aid allows people to understand normal conversation, including telephone calls. Principle operation of hearing aid adapted to other uses such as, clearing up noisy telephone or radio communication. In addition, loud-speakers more easily understood in presence of high background noise.

  6. [Proton generator of superhigh frequency].

    PubMed

    Liberman, E A; Eĭdus, V L

    1981-01-01

    Possible mechanism of superhigh frequency (10(10)-10(12) Hz) electromagnetic oscillation generation by an external proton in a system of hydrogen bonds of biomacromolecules is briefly discussed. The external proton in a proton channel deforms the potential profile of the proton of hydrogen bond in such a way, that there appears a possibility of the low frequency proton tunneling along the hydrogen bond. The interaction with the neighbouring bonds leads to further lowering of the generated frequency.

  7. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  8. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  9. Linear Frequency Estimation Technique for Reducing Frequency Based Signals

    PubMed Central

    Woodbridge, Jonathan; Bui, Alex; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a linear frequency estimation (LFE) technique for data reduction of frequency-based signals. LFE converts a signal to the frequency domain by utilizing the Fourier transform and estimates both the real and imaginary parts with a series of vectors much smaller than the original signal size. The estimation is accomplished by selecting optimal points from the frequency domain and interpolating data between these points with a first order approximation. The difficulty of such a problem lies in determining which points are most significant. LFE is unique in the fact that it is generic to a wide variety of frequency-based signals such as electromyography (EMG), voice, and electrocardiography (ECG). The only requirement is that spectral coefficients are spatially correlated. This paper presents the algorithm and results from both EMG and voice data. We complete the paper with a description of how this method can be applied to pattern types of recognition, signal indexing, and compression.

  10. Lexical Frequency in Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Measures of lexical frequency presuppose the existence of corpora, but true machine-readable corpora of sign languages (SLs) are only now being created. Lexical frequency ratings for SLs are needed because there has been a heavy reliance on the interpretation of results of psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic experiments in the SL research…

  11. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  12. Contour Integration across Spatial Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persike, Malte; Olzak, Lynn A.; Meinhardt, Gunter

    2009-01-01

    Association field models of contour integration suggest that local band-pass elements are spatially grouped to global contours within limited bands of spatial frequency (Field, Hayes, & Hess, 1993). While results for local orientation and spacing variation render support for AF models, effects of spatial frequency (SF) have rarely been addressed.…

  13. Gaming Frequency and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Barry; Jacobs, Gabriel; Watkins, Alan

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous claims that playing computer and video games may be educationally beneficial, but there has been little formal investigation into whether or not the frequency of exposure to such games actually affects academic performance. This paper explores the issue by analysing the relationships between gaming frequency--measured as the…

  14. Frequency conversion of structured light

    PubMed Central

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Pruneri, Valerio; Torres, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Coherent frequency conversion of structured light, i.e. the ability to manipulate the carrier frequency of a wave front without distorting its spatial phase and intensity profile, provides the opportunity for numerous novel applications in photonic technology and fundamental science. In particular, frequency conversion of spatial modes carrying orbital angular momentum can be exploited in sub-wavelength resolution nano-optics and coherent imaging at a wavelength different from that used to illuminate an object. Moreover, coherent frequency conversion will be crucial for interfacing information stored in the high-dimensional spatial structure of single and entangled photons with various constituents of quantum networks. In this work, we demonstrate frequency conversion of structured light from the near infrared (803 nm) to the visible (527 nm). The conversion scheme is based on sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped with a 1540-nm Gaussian beam. We observe frequency-converted fields that exhibit a high degree of similarity with the input field and verify the coherence of the frequency-conversion process via mode projection measurements with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. Our results demonstrate the suitability of exploiting the technique for applications in quantum information processing and coherent imaging. PMID:26875448

  15. Laser Spectroscopy and Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2013-12-01

    The spectrum of a frequency comb, commonly generated by a mode-locked femtosecond laser consists of several hundred thousand precisely evenly spaced spectral lines. Such laser frequency combs have revolutionized the art measuring the frequency of light, and they provide the long-missing clockwork for optical atomic clocks. The invention of the frequency comb technique has been motivated by precision laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom. The availability of commercial instruments is facilitating the evolution of new applications far beyond the original purpose. Laser combs are becoming powerful instruments for broadband molecular spectroscopy by dramatically improving the resolution and recording speed of Fourier spectrometers and by creating new opportunities for highly multiplexed nonlinear spectroscopy, such as two-photon spectroscopy or coherent Raman spectroscopy. Other emerging applications of frequency combs range from fundamental research in astronomy, chemistry, or attosecond science to telecommunications and satellite navigation.

  16. Frequency fluctuations in silicon nanoresonators

    PubMed Central

    Sansa, Marc; Sage, Eric; Bullard, Elizabeth C.; Gély, Marc; Alava, Thomas; Colinet, Eric; Naik, Akshay K.; Villanueva, Luis Guillermo; Duraffourg, Laurent; Roukes, Michael L.; Jourdan, Guillaume; Hentz, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Frequency stability is key to performance of nanoresonators. This stability is thought to reach a limit with the resonator’s ability to resolve thermally-induced vibrations. Although measurements and predictions of resonator stability usually disregard fluctuations in the mechanical frequency response, these fluctuations have recently attracted considerable theoretical interest. However, their existence is very difficult to demonstrate experimentally. Here, through a literature review, we show that all studies of frequency stability report values several orders of magnitude larger than the limit imposed by thermomechanical noise. We studied a monocrystalline silicon nanoresonator at room temperature, and found a similar discrepancy. We propose a new method to show this was due to the presence of frequency fluctuations, of unexpected level. The fluctuations were not due to the instrumentation system, or to any other of the known sources investigated. These results challenge our current understanding of frequency fluctuations and call for a change in practices. PMID:26925826

  17. Frequency fluctuations in silicon nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansa, Marc; Sage, Eric; Bullard, Elizabeth C.; Gély, Marc; Alava, Thomas; Colinet, Eric; Naik, Akshay K.; Villanueva, Luis Guillermo; Duraffourg, Laurent; Roukes, Michael L.; Jourdan, Guillaume; Hentz, Sébastien

    2016-06-01

    Frequency stability is key to the performance of nanoresonators. This stability is thought to reach a limit with the resonator's ability to resolve thermally induced vibrations. Although measurements and predictions of resonator stability usually disregard fluctuations in the mechanical frequency response, these fluctuations have recently attracted considerable theoretical interest. However, their existence is very difficult to demonstrate experimentally. Here, through a literature review, we show that all studies of frequency stability report values several orders of magnitude larger than the limit imposed by thermomechanical noise. We studied a monocrystalline silicon nanoresonator at room temperature and found a similar discrepancy. We propose a new method to show that this was due to the presence of frequency fluctuations, of unexpected level. The fluctuations were not due to the instrumentation system, or to any other of the known sources investigated. These results challenge our current understanding of frequency fluctuations and call for a change in practices.

  18. Single-frequency tunable laser for pumping cesium frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, O V; Ivanov, Andrei V; Leonovich, A I; Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V; Chernov, Roman V; Shishkov, V V; Pleshanov, S A

    2006-08-31

    A single-frequency tunable laser for pumping the cesium frequency standard is studied. It is shown experimentally that the laser emits at a single frequency despite the fact that a few longitudinal modes of the external cavity fall within the reflection band of a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) written in the optical fibre. The laser wavelength can be tuned by varying the pump current of the laser, its temperature, and the FBG temperature. The laser linewidth does not exceed 2 MHz for 10 mW of output power. (lasers)

  19. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  20. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  1. Laser frequency stabilization for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Guido; McNamara, Paul; Thorpe, Ira; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    The requirement on laser frequency noise in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) depends on the velocity and our knowledge of the position of each spacecraft of the interferometer. Currently it is assumed that the lasers must have a pre-stabilized frequency stability of 30Hz/square root of Hz over LISA'S most sensitive frequency band (3 mHz - 30 mHz). The intrinsic frequency stability of even the most stable com- mercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above this level. Therefore it is necessary to stabilize the laser frequency to an ultra-stable frequency reference which meets the LISA requirements. The baseline frequency reference for the LISA lasers are high finesse optical cavities based on ULE spacers. We measured the stability of two ULE spacer cavities with respect to each other. Our current best results show a noise floor at, or below, 30 Hz/square root of Hz above 3 mHz. In this report we describe the experimental layout of the entire experiment and discuss the limiting noise sources.

  2. Ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces, infrared spectra, and vibrational predissociation dynamics of the 35Cl-⋯H2/D2 complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. A.; Grinev, T. A.; Kłos, J.; Bieske, E. J.; Szczȩśniak, M. M.; Chałasiński, G.

    2003-12-01

    Three-dimensional potential energy and dipole moment surfaces of the Cl--H2 system are calculated ab initio by means of a coupled cluster method with single and double excitations and noniterative correction to triple excitations with augmented correlation consistent quadruple-zeta basis set supplemented with bond functions, and represented in analytical forms. Variational calculations of the energy levels up to the total angular momentum J=25 provide accurate estimations of the measured rotational spectroscopic constants of the ground van der Waals levels n=0 of the Cl-⋯H2/D2 complexes although they underestimate the red shifts of the mid-infrared spectra with v=0→v=1 vibrational excitation of the monomer. They also attest to the accuracy of effective radial interaction potentials extracted previously from experimental data using the rotational RKR procedure. Vibrational predissociation of the Cl-⋯H2/D2(v=1) complexes is shown to follow near-resonant vibrational-to-rotational energy transfer mechanism so that more than 97% of the product monomers are formed in the highest accessible rotational level. This mechanism explains the strong variation of the predissociation rate with isotopic content and nuclear spin form of the complex. Strong deviation of the observed relative abundances of ortho and para forms of the complexes from those of the monomers is qualitatively explained by the secondary ligand exchange reactions in the ionic beam, within the simple thermal equilibrium model. Positions and intensities of the hot v=0, n=1→v=1, n=1 and combination v=0, n=0→v=1, n=1 bands are predicted, and implications to the photoelectron spectroscopy of the complex are briefly discussed.

  3. Pulsed optically pumped frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo

    2004-08-01

    We reconsider the idea of a pulsed optically pumped frequency standard conceived in the early 1960s to eliminate the light-shift effect. The development of semiconductor lasers and of pulsed electronic techniques for atomic fountains and new theoretical findings allow an implementation of this idea which may lead to a frequency standard whose frequency stability is limited only by the thermal noise in the short term and by the temperature drift in the long term. We shall also show both theoretically and experimentally the possibility of doubling the atomic quality factor with respect to the classical Ramsey technique approach.

  4. Estimations of uncertainties of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, Laurent; Nicoletti, Jean-Marc; Morgenthaler, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    Diverse variable phenomena in the Universe are periodic. Astonishingly many of the periodic signals present in stars have timescales coinciding with human ones (from minutes to years). The periods of signals often have to be deduced from time series which are irregularly sampled and sparse, furthermore correlations between the brightness measurements and their estimated uncertainties are common.The uncertainty on the frequency estimation is reviewed. We explore the astronomical and statistical literature, in both cases of regular and irregular samplings. The frequency uncertainty is depending on signal to noise ratio, the frequency, the observational timespan. The shape of the light curve should also intervene, since sharp features such as exoplanet transits, stellar eclipses, raising branches of pulsation stars give stringent constraints.We propose several procedures (parametric and nonparametric) to estimate the uncertainty on the frequency which are subsequently tested against simulated data to assess their performances.

  5. Coherent frequency combs and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun

    2010-03-01

    Optical frequency combs maintain precise phase coherence across the entire visible spectrum and they have profoundly changed optical frequency metrology and ultrafast science, with breakthrough developments in optical atomic clocks, optical frequency synthesis, direct frequency comb spectroscopy (DFCS), high-resolution quantum control, coherent pulse synthesis and amplification, and control of sub-femtosecond electron dynamics in atoms and molecules. DFCS [1] is a new spectroscopic approach that realizes simultaneously broad spectral coverage, high spectral resolution, many parallel detection channels, ultrahigh sensitivity, and real-time analysis [2]. These powerful capabilities have been demonstrated in a series of experiments where identification and quantification of many different molecular states or species are achieved in a massively parallel fashion [3].[4pt] [1] A. Marian et al., Science 306, 2063 (2004). [0pt] [2] M. J. Thorpe et al., Science 311, 1595 (2006). [0pt] [3] M. J. Thorpe & J. Ye, Appl. Phys. B 91, 397 (2008).

  6. Coherent frequency combs and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun

    2010-03-01

    Optical frequency combs possessing precise phase coherence across the entire visible spectrum have profoundly changed optical frequency metrology and ultrafast science, with breakthrough developments in optical atomic clocks, optical frequency synthesis, direct frequency comb spectroscopy (DFCS), high-resolution quantum control, coherent pulse synthesis and amplification, and control of sub-femtosecond electron dynamics in atoms and molecules. DFCS [1] is a new spectroscopic approach that embraces simultaneously broad spectral coverage, fine spectral resolution, numerous detection channels, ultrahigh sensitivity, and real-time analysis [2]. These powerful capabilities have been demonstrated in a series of experiments where identification and quantification of many different molecular states or species are achieved in a massively parallel fashion [3]. A range of interesting scientific applications will be discussed. [4pt] [1] A. Marian et al., Science 306, 2063 (2004). [0pt] [2] M. J. Thorpe et al., Science 311, 1595 (2006). [0pt] [3] M. J. Thorpe & J. Ye, Appl. Phys. B 91, 397 (2008).

  7. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  8. Dual-frequency microwave antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, D. A.; Brunstein, S. A.; Ludwig, A. C.; Potter, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Single antenna using two feed horns (one for receiving and radiation X-band signals, and one for S-band signals), in conjunction with ellipsoid reflector and dichronic plate, can accommodate two different frequencies simultaneously.

  9. Frequency coded sensors incorporating tapers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor); Solie, Leland P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave device includes a piezoelectric substrate on which is formed a transducer that generates acoustic waves on the surface of the substrate from electrical waves received by the transducer. The waves are carried along an acoustic track to either a second transducer or a reflector. The transducers or transducer and reflector are formed of subsections that are constructed to operate at mutually different frequencies. The subsections of at least one of the transducers or transducer and reflector are out of alignment with respect to one another relative to the transverse of the propagation direction. The out of aligned subsections provide not only a frequency component but also a time to the signal output signal. Frequency response characteristics are improved. An alternative embodiment provides that the transducers and/or reflectors are continuously tapered instead of having discrete frequency subsections.

  10. The classical microwave frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busca, Giovanni; Thomann, Pierre; Laurent-Guy, Bernier; Willemin, Philippe; Schweda, Hartmut S.

    1990-01-01

    Some key problems are presented encountered in the classical microwave frequency standards which are still not solved today. The point of view expressed benefits from the experience gained both in the industry and in the research lab, on the following classical microwave frequency standards: active and passive H, conventional and laser pumped Cs beam tube, small conventional and laser pumped Rubidium. The accent is put on the Rubidium standard.

  11. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, R.F.

    1982-08-10

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices. 11 figs.

  12. Prospects for atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.

    1984-01-01

    The potentialities of different atomic frequency standards which are not yet into field operation, for most of them, but for which preliminary data, obtained in laboratory experiments, give confidence that they may improve greatly the present state of the art are described. The review will mainly cover the following devices: (1) cesium beam frequency standards with optical pumping and detection; (2) optically pumped rubidium cells; (3) magnesium beam; (4) cold hydrogen masers; and (5) traps with stored and cooled ions.

  13. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices.

  14. Stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOEpatents

    Vadnais, Kenneth G.; Bashforth, Michael B.; Lewallen, Tricia S.; Nammath, Sharyn R.

    1994-01-01

    A stepped frequency ground penetrating radar system is described comprising an RF signal generating section capable of producing stepped frequency signals in spaced and equal increments of time and frequency over a preselected bandwidth which serves as a common RF signal source for both a transmit portion and a receive portion of the system. In the transmit portion of the system the signal is processed into in-phase and quadrature signals which are then amplified and then transmitted toward a target. The reflected signals from the target are then received by a receive antenna and mixed with a reference signal from the common RF signal source in a mixer whose output is then fed through a low pass filter. The DC output, after amplification and demodulation, is digitized and converted into a frequency domain signal by a Fast Fourier Transform. A plot of the frequency domain signals from all of the stepped frequencies broadcast toward and received from the target yields information concerning the range (distance) and cross section (size) of the target.

  15. Parametric Effects of Word Frequency in Memory for Mixed Frequency Lists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohnas, Lynn J.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The "word frequency paradox" refers to the finding that low frequency words are better recognized than high frequency words yet high frequency words are better recalled than low frequency words. Rather than comparing separate groups of low and high frequency words, we sought to quantify the functional relation between word frequency and…

  16. The measurement of frequency and frequency stability of precision oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    The specification and performance of precision oscillators is discussed as a very important topic to the owners and users of these oscillators. This paper presents at the tutorial level some convenient methods of measuring the frequencies of precision oscillators -- giving advantages and disadvantages of these methods. Further it is shown that by processing the data from the frequency measurements in certain ways, one may be able to state more general characteristics of the oscillators being measured. The goal in this regard is to allow the comparisons of different manufacturers' specifications and more importantly to help assess whether these oscillators will meet the standard of performance the user may have in a particular application.

  17. Variable frequency drive applications guide

    SciTech Connect

    Laloudakis, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Traditionally, fans and pumps have been designed to be capable of handling the maximum demand of the system in which they are installed. However, quite often the actual demand can vary and it can be much lower than the original design capacity. These situations have been corrected in the past through additions of outlet dampers to fans or throttling valves to pumps. While these can be effective and simple controls they severely affect the efficiency of the system. Variable frequency (speed) is the most efficient means of capacity control. The most cost effective method of achieving variable speed capacity control is using AC adjustable frequency drives. AC adjustable frequency controls convert any fixed speed AC motor into an adjustable speed device. Adjusting the speed of a motor, by controlling the frequency of the AC power to that motor, reduces its horsepower requirements. According to pump and fan laws, capacity is proportional to speed while horsepower is proportional to the cube of the speed. Therefore, by reducing the speed of an AC motor by 20 percent the horsepower requirement is reduced by nearly 50 percent. Reduced speed through variable frequency control allows for flexibility of meeting changing weather and comfort requirements without operating costly equipment at full capacity.

  18. Frequency response of ice streams.

    PubMed

    Williams, C Rosie; Hindmarsh, Richard C A; Arthern, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    Changes at the grounding line of ice streams have consequences for inland ice dynamics and hence sea level. Despite substantial evidence documenting upstream propagation of frontal change, the mechanisms by which these changes are transmitted inland are not well understood. In this vein, the frequency response of an idealized ice stream to periodic forcing in the downstream strain rate is examined for basally and laterally resisted ice streams using a one-dimensional, linearized membrane stress approximation. This reveals two distinct behavioural branches, which we find to correspond to different mechanisms of upstream velocity and thickness propagation, depending on the forcing frequency. At low frequencies (centennial to millennial periods), slope and thickness covary hundreds of kilometres inland, and the shallow-ice approximation is sufficient to explain upstream propagation, which occurs through changes in grounding-line flow and geometry. At high frequencies (decadal to sub-decadal periods), penetration distances are tens of kilometres; while velocity adjusts rapidly to such forcing, thickness varies little and upstream propagation occurs through the direct transmission of membrane stresses. Propagation properties vary significantly between 29 Antarctic ice streams considered. A square-wave function in frontal stress is explored by summing frequency solutions, simulating some aspects of the dynamical response to sudden ice-shelf change.

  19. Quantum Cascade Laser Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faist, Jérôme; Villares, Gustavo; Scalari, Giacomo; Rösch, Markus; Bonzon, Christopher; Hugi, Andreas; Beck, Mattias

    2016-06-01

    It was recently demonstrated that broadband quantum cascade lasers can operate as frequency combs. As such, they operate under direct electrical pumping at both mid-infrared and THz frequencies, making them very attractive for dual-comb spectroscopy. Performance levels are continuously improving, with average powers over 100mW and frequency coverage of 100 cm-1 in the mid-infrared region. In the THz range, 10mW of average power and 600 GHz of frequency coverage are reported. As a result of the very short upper state lifetime of the gain medium, the mode proliferation in these sources arises from four-wave mixing rather than saturable absorption. As a result, their optical output is characterized by the tendency of small intensity modulation of the output power, and the relative phases of the modes to be similar to the ones of a frequency modulated laser. Recent results include the proof of comb operation down to a metrological level, the observation of a Schawlow-Townes broadened linewidth, as well as the first dual-comb spectroscopy measurements. The capability of the structure to integrate monothically nonlinear optical elements as well as to operate as a detector shows great promise for future chip integration of dual-comb systems.

  20. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks. PMID:25361349

  1. Frequency response of ice streams.

    PubMed

    Williams, C Rosie; Hindmarsh, Richard C A; Arthern, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    Changes at the grounding line of ice streams have consequences for inland ice dynamics and hence sea level. Despite substantial evidence documenting upstream propagation of frontal change, the mechanisms by which these changes are transmitted inland are not well understood. In this vein, the frequency response of an idealized ice stream to periodic forcing in the downstream strain rate is examined for basally and laterally resisted ice streams using a one-dimensional, linearized membrane stress approximation. This reveals two distinct behavioural branches, which we find to correspond to different mechanisms of upstream velocity and thickness propagation, depending on the forcing frequency. At low frequencies (centennial to millennial periods), slope and thickness covary hundreds of kilometres inland, and the shallow-ice approximation is sufficient to explain upstream propagation, which occurs through changes in grounding-line flow and geometry. At high frequencies (decadal to sub-decadal periods), penetration distances are tens of kilometres; while velocity adjusts rapidly to such forcing, thickness varies little and upstream propagation occurs through the direct transmission of membrane stresses. Propagation properties vary significantly between 29 Antarctic ice streams considered. A square-wave function in frontal stress is explored by summing frequency solutions, simulating some aspects of the dynamical response to sudden ice-shelf change. PMID:23197934

  2. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks.

  3. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of...

  4. 47 CFR 5.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.303 Section 5.303... Licenses § 5.303 Frequencies. Licensees may operate in any frequency band, except for frequency bands... licensees are permitted to operate in frequency bands above 38.6 GHz, unless these bands are listed...

  5. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of...

  6. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of...

  7. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of...

  8. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of § 90.213 of...

  9. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Thigpen, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  10. Variable frequency microprocessor clock generator

    SciTech Connect

    Branson, C.N.

    1989-04-04

    A microprocessor-based system is described comprising: a digital central microprocessor provided with a clock input and having a rate of operation determined by the frequency of a clock signal input thereto; memory means operably coupled to the central microprocessor for storing programs respectively including a plurality of instructions and addressable by the central microprocessor; peripheral device operably connected to the central microprocessor, the first peripheral device being addressable by the central microprocessor for control thereby; a system clock generator for generating a digital reference clock signal having a reference frequency rate; and frequency rate reduction circuit means connected between the clock generator and the clock input of the central microprocessor for selectively dividing the reference clock signal to generate a microprocessor clock signal as an input to the central microprocessor for clocking the central microprocessor.

  11. Low-frequency electrical properties.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olhoeft, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the interpretation of induced polarization data, it is commonly assumed that metallic mineral polarization dominantly or solely causes the observed response. However, at low frequencies, there is a variety of active chemical processes which involve the movement or transfer of electrical charge. Measurements of electrical properties at low frequencies (such as induced polarization) observe such movement of charge and thus monitor many geochemical processes at a distance. Examples in which this has been done include oxidation-reduction of metallic minerals such as sulfides, cation exchange on clays, and a variety of clay-organic reactions relevant to problems in toxic waste disposal and petroleum exploration. By using both the frequency dependence and nonlinear character of the complex resistivity spectrum, these reactions may be distinguished from each other and from barren or reactionless materials.-Author

  12. The instantaneous frequency rate spectrogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    An accelerogram of the instantaneous phase of signal components referred to as an instantaneous frequency rate spectrogram (IFRS) is presented as a joint time-frequency distribution. The distribution is directly obtained by processing the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) locally. A novel approach to amplitude demodulation based upon the reassignment method is introduced as a useful by-product. Additionally, an estimator of energy density versus the instantaneous frequency rate (IFR) is proposed and referred to as the IFR profile. The energy density is estimated based upon both the classical energy spectrogram and the IFRS smoothened by the median filter. Moreover, the impact of an analyzing window width, additive white Gaussian noise and observation time is tested. Finally, the introduced method is used for the analysis of the acoustic emission of an automotive engine. The recording of the engine of a Lamborghini Gallardo is analyzed as an example.

  13. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.; Johnson, A.C.; Thigpen, L.T.

    1999-10-05

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  14. Gabor: frequency, time, and memory.

    PubMed

    Korpel, A

    1982-10-15

    Dennis Gabor is well-known as the inventor of holography. Less well-known, perhaps, are his contributions to other areas. Yet they are important and, like holography, characteristic of his foresight. In the field of communications, Gabor investigated the classic dichotomy of time and frequency. Guided by analogies to quantum mechanics, he postulated a set of elementary signals and made brilliant use of time-frequency diagrams to analyze communication systems. Applying his theories to acoustics, he researched the mechanism of hearing, defining acoustical quanta in the process and inventing early prototype frequency compressors and expanders. In a completely different field, Gabor, inspired by some early work of Longuet-Higgins on models for holographic temporal recall in the brain, suggested novel approaches which contributed significantly to the understanding of associative memories. In this paper we describe Gabor's pioneering work in these areas and trace the subsequent development by himself and others. PMID:20396288

  15. Partnership concurrency and coital frequency.

    PubMed

    Gaydosh, Lauren; Reniers, Georges; Helleringer, Stéphane

    2013-09-01

    National HIV prevalence estimates across sub-Saharan Africa range from less than 1 percent to over 25 percent. Recent research proposes several explanations for the observed variation, including prevalence of male circumcision, levels of condom use, presence of other sexually transmitted infections, and practice of multiple concurrent partnerships. However, the importance of partnership concurrency for HIV transmission may depend on how it affects coital frequency with each partner. The coital dilution hypothesis suggests that coital frequency within a partnership declines with the addition of concurrent partners. Using sexual behavior data from rural Malawi and urban Kenya, we investigate the relationship between partnership concurrency and coital frequency, and find partial support for the coital dilution hypothesis. We conclude the paper with a discussion of our findings in light of the current literature on concurrency.

  16. Swept Frequency Laser Metrology System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A swept frequency laser ranging system having sub-micron accuracy that employs multiple common-path heterodyne interferometers, one coupled to a calibrated delay-line for use as an absolute reference for the ranging system. An exemplary embodiment uses two laser heterodyne interferometers to create two laser beams at two different frequencies to measure distance and motions of target(s). Heterodyne fringes generated from reflections off a reference fiducial X(sub R) and measurement (or target) fiducial X(sub M) are reflected back and are then detected by photodiodes. The measured phase changes Delta phi(sub R) and Delta phi (sub m) resulting from the laser frequency swept gives target position. The reference delay-line is the only absolute reference needed in the metrology system and this provides an ultra-stable reference and simple/economical system.

  17. Power enhanced frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system includes at least one source providing a first near-IR wavelength output including a gain medium for providing high power amplification, such as double clad fiber amplifier, a double clad fiber laser or a semiconductor tapered amplifier to enhance the power output level of the near-IR wavelength output. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Ra-man/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device.

  18. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  19. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  20. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, S.P.

    1998-11-24

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy. 14 figs.

  1. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, Stephan P.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy.

  2. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun; Joshi, B. C.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.; Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii, i.e., at frequencies below 30 MHz. The LORE can be complimentary to the planned Indian solar mission, “Aditya-L1” and its other payloads as well as synergistic to ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, which are routinely carried out by the Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and its particular suitability for providing measurements on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting type-III and slow drifting type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolutions. We also brief the gonio-polarimetry, which is possible with better-designed antennas and state-of-the-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. These would enable us to make a wide range of studies, such as nonlinear plasma processes in the Sun-Earth distance, in-situ radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary CME driven shocks, nature of ICMEs driving decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of solar wind interaction regions.

  3. Connecting colors to flexible frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Mike

    2010-11-01

    Here is a simple way to reinforce the relationships among wavelength, frequency, and color in the visible light spectrum. All that is required is a 3-ft section of plastic or metal electric dryer venting hose, cans of red and violet spray paint, a couple of 5-in elastic bands, and a metric ruler.

  4. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach

  5. Generation of multiple optical frequencies referenced to a frequency comb for precision free-space frequency transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Byung Jae; Kang, Hyun Jay; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2016-03-01

    Generating multiple optical frequencies referenced to the frequency standard is an important task in optical clock dissemination and optical communication. An apparatus for frequency-comb-referenced generation of multiple optical frequencies is demonstrated for high-precision free-space transfer of multiple optical frequencies. The relative linewidth and frequency instability at each channel corresponds to sub-1 Hz and 1.06×10-15 at 10 s averaging time, respectively. During the free-space transfer, the refractive index change of transmission media caused by atmospheric turbulences induces phase and frequency noise on optical frequencies. These phase and frequency noise causes induced linewidth broadening and frequency shift in optical frequencies which can disturb the accurate frequency transfer. The proposed feedback loop with acousto-optic modulator can monitor and compensate phase/frequency noise on optical frequencies. As a result, a frequency-comb-referenced single optical mode is compensated with a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 80 dB. By sharing the same optical paths, this feedback loop is confirmed to be successfully transferred to the neighboring wavelength channels (a 100 GHz spaced channel). This result confirms our proposed system can transfer optical frequencies to the remote site in free-space without performance degradation.

  6. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  7. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  8. Natural frequency of regular basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjandra, Sugih S.; Pudjaprasetya, S. R.

    2014-03-01

    Similar to the vibration of a guitar string or an elastic membrane, water waves in an enclosed basin undergo standing oscillatory waves, also known as seiches. The resonant (eigen) periods of seiches are determined by water depth and geometry of the basin. For regular basins, explicit formulas are available. Resonance occurs when the dominant frequency of external force matches the eigen frequency of the basin. In this paper, we implement the conservative finite volume scheme to 2D shallow water equation to simulate resonance in closed basins. Further, we would like to use this scheme and utilizing energy spectra of the recorded signal to extract resonant periods of arbitrary basins. But here we first test the procedure for getting resonant periods of a square closed basin. The numerical resonant periods that we obtain are comparable with those from analytical formulas.

  9. Frequency response of electrochemical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    Impedance concepts can be applied to the analysis of battery electrodes, yielding information about the structure of the electrode and the processes occurring in the electrode. Structural parameters such as the specific area (surface area per gram of electrode) can be estimated. Electrode variables such as surface overpotential, ohmic losses, and diffusion limitations may be studied. Nickel and cadmium electrodes were studied by measuring the ac impedance as a function of frequency, and the specific areas that were determined were well within the range of specific areas determined from BET measurements. Impedance spectra were measured for the nickel and cadmium electrodes, and for a 20 A-hr NiCd battery as functions of the state of charge. More work is needed to determine the feasibility of using frequency response as a nondestructive testing technique for batteries.

  10. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  11. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) § 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal Locator Beacons that transmit on the frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz must use G1D emission. Use of...

  12. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB). § 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal Locator Beacons that transmit on the frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz must use G1D emission. Use of...

  13. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB). § 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal Locator Beacons that transmit on the frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz must use G1D emission. Use of...

  14. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) § 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal Locator Beacons that transmit on the frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz must use G1D emission. Use of...

  15. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) § 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal Locator Beacons that transmit on the frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz must use G1D emission. Use of...

  16. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency is... control of unicom frequency) the licensee must submit an application for modification to specify the...

  17. 47 CFR 73.754 - Frequency monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency monitors. 73.754 Section 73.754... International Broadcast Stations § 73.754 Frequency monitors. (a) The licensee of each international broadcast station shall operate a frequency monitor at the transmitter independent of the frequency control of...

  18. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.421 Section 87.421... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs....

  19. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  20. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters § 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  1. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations § 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  2. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.349 Section 87.349... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.349 Frequencies. (a) The frequency assigned to an aeronautical... frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station...

  3. 47 CFR 73.754 - Frequency monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency monitors. 73.754 Section 73.754... International Broadcast Stations § 73.754 Frequency monitors. (a) The licensee of each international broadcast station shall operate a frequency monitor at the transmitter independent of the frequency control of...

  4. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  5. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations § 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the assigned frequency....

  6. 47 CFR 24.229 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.229 Section 24.229... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.229 Frequencies. The frequencies available in the Broadband PCS service are listed in this section in accordance with the frequency allocations table of § 2.106 of this chapter....

  7. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  8. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  9. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  10. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  11. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  12. 47 CFR 73.754 - Frequency monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency monitors. 73.754 Section 73.754... International Broadcast Stations § 73.754 Frequency monitors. (a) The licensee of each international broadcast station shall operate a frequency monitor at the transmitter independent of the frequency control of...

  13. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.303 Section 87.303... Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight....375 3 123.450 3 (b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight...

  14. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  15. 47 CFR 74.103 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.103 Section 74.103....103 Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies allocated to broadcasting and the various categories of auxiliary stations, in the FCC's Table of Frequency Allocations (Part 2 of this chapter), may be...

  16. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  17. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  18. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  19. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations § 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the assigned frequency....

  20. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations § 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the assigned frequency....

  1. 47 CFR 5.403 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.403 Section 5.403... Radio Licenses § 5.403 Frequencies. (a) Licensees may operate in any frequency band, including those above 38.6 GHz, except for frequency bands exclusively allocated to the passive services (including...

  2. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters § 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  3. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  4. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  5. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  6. 47 CFR 73.754 - Frequency monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency monitors. 73.754 Section 73.754... International Broadcast Stations § 73.754 Frequency monitors. (a) The licensee of each international broadcast station shall operate a frequency monitor at the transmitter independent of the frequency control of...

  7. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  8. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.217 Section 87.217... Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken...

  9. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  10. 47 CFR 5.403 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.403 Section 5.403... Radio Licenses § 5.403 Frequencies. (a) Licensees may operate in any frequency band, including those above 38.6 GHz, except for frequency bands exclusively allocated to the passive services (including...

  11. 47 CFR 5.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.303 Section 5.303... Licenses § 5.303 Frequencies. Licensees may operate in any frequency band, except for the following: (a) Frequency bands at or below 38.6 GHz that are designated as restricted in § 15.205(a) of this chapter;...

  12. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency is... control of unicom frequency) the licensee must submit an application for modification to specify the...

  13. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  14. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.349 Section 87.349... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.349 Frequencies. (a) The frequency assigned to an aeronautical... frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station...

  15. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  16. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations § 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  17. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency coordinator. 95.1113 Section 95.1113... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency...

  18. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  19. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.349 Section 87.349... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.349 Frequencies. (a) The frequency assigned to an aeronautical... frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station...

  20. 47 CFR 74.161 - Frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerances. 74.161 Section 74.161... Technical Operation and Operators § 74.161 Frequency tolerances. The departure of the carrier frequency or frequencies of an experimental broadcast station must not exceed the tolerance specified in the instrument...

  1. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07 MHz, 26.11 MHz, and 26.45 MHz, and frequencies listed in paragraphs (a)(4) and (c)(1) of this...

  2. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  3. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.217 Section 87.217... Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken...

  4. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency is... control of unicom frequency) the licensee must submit an application for modification to specify the...

  5. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.303 Section 87.303... Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight....375 3 123.450 3 (b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight...

  6. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  7. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  8. 47 CFR 74.103 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.103 Section 74.103....103 Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies allocated to broadcasting and the various categories of auxiliary stations, in the FCC's Table of Frequency Allocations (Part 2 of this chapter), may be...

  9. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters § 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  10. 47 CFR 24.229 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.229 Section 24.229... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.229 Frequencies. The frequencies available in the Broadband PCS service are listed in this section in accordance with the frequency allocations table of § 2.106 of this chapter....

  11. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  12. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.421 Section 87.421... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs....

  13. 47 CFR 80.375 - Radiodetermination frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiodetermination frequencies. 80.375 Section... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Radiodetermination § 80.375 Radiodetermination frequencies. This section describes the carrier frequencies assignable to radiodetermination stations....

  14. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.217 Section 87.217... Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken...

  15. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  16. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  17. 47 CFR 87.287 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.287 Section 87.287... Data Link Land Test Stations § 87.287 Frequencies. (a) The frequencies assignable to aircraft data link..., 136.925 MHz, 136.950 MHz, and 136.975 MHz. Interstitial frequencies separated by 8.33 kilohertz...

  18. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  19. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters § 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  20. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.303 Section 87.303... Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight....375 3 123.450 3 (b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight...

  1. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations § 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  2. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  3. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  4. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters § 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  5. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  6. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07 MHz, 26.11 MHz, and 26.45 MHz, and frequencies listed in paragraphs (a)(4) and (c)(1) of this...

  7. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  8. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency coordinator. 95.1113 Section 95.1113... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency...

  9. 47 CFR 74.161 - Frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerances. 74.161 Section 74.161... Technical Operation and Operators § 74.161 Frequency tolerances. The departure of the carrier frequency or frequencies of an experimental broadcast station must not exceed the tolerance specified in the instrument...

  10. 47 CFR 24.229 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.229 Section 24.229... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.229 Frequencies. The frequencies available in the Broadband PCS service are listed in this section in accordance with the frequency allocations table of § 2.106 of this chapter....

  11. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.421 Section 87.421... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs....

  12. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations § 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the assigned frequency....

  13. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  14. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.303 Section 87.303... Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight....375 3 123.450 3 (b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight...

  15. 47 CFR 24.229 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.229 Section 24.229... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.229 Frequencies. The frequencies available in the Broadband PCS service are listed in this section in accordance with the frequency allocations table of § 2.106 of this chapter....

  16. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  17. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  18. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  19. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations § 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  20. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.349 Section 87.349... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.349 Frequencies. (a) The frequency assigned to an aeronautical... frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station...

  1. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  2. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  3. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  4. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations § 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  5. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  6. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  7. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.349 Section 87.349... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.349 Frequencies. (a) The frequency assigned to an aeronautical... frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station...

  8. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  9. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations § 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the assigned frequency....

  10. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.421 Section 87.421... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs....

  11. 47 CFR 80.375 - Radiodetermination frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiodetermination frequencies. 80.375 Section... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Radiodetermination § 80.375 Radiodetermination frequencies. This section describes the carrier frequencies assignable to radiodetermination stations....

  12. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency coordinator. 95.1113 Section 95.1113... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency...

  13. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  14. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07 MHz, 26.11 MHz, and 26.45 MHz, and frequencies listed in paragraphs (a)(4) and (c)(1) of this...

  15. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  16. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.303 Section 87.303... Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight....375 3 123.450 3 (b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight...

  17. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  18. 47 CFR 24.229 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.229 Section 24.229... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.229 Frequencies. The frequencies available in the Broadband PCS service are listed in this section in accordance with the frequency allocations table of § 2.106 of this chapter....

  19. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  20. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  1. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency coordinator. 95.1113 Section 95.1113... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the usage of the frequency...

  2. 47 CFR 73.754 - Frequency monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency monitors. 73.754 Section 73.754... International Broadcast Stations § 73.754 Frequency monitors. (a) The licensee of each international broadcast station shall operate a frequency monitor at the transmitter independent of the frequency control of...

  3. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.217 Section 87.217... Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken...

  4. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07 MHz, 26.11 MHz, and 26.45 MHz, and frequencies listed in paragraphs (a)(4) and (c)(1) of this...

  5. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  6. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  7. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  8. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... § 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  9. 47 CFR 74.103 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.103 Section 74.103....103 Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies allocated to broadcasting and the various categories of auxiliary stations, in the FCC's Table of Frequency Allocations (Part 2 of this chapter), may be...

  10. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... § 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  11. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.217 Section 87.217... Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken...

  12. 47 CFR 74.161 - Frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerances. 74.161 Section 74.161... Technical Operation and Operators § 74.161 Frequency tolerances. The departure of the carrier frequency or frequencies of an experimental broadcast station must not exceed the tolerance specified in the instrument...

  13. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  14. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07 MHz, 26.11 MHz, and 26.45 MHz, and frequencies listed in paragraphs (a)(4) and (c)(1) of this...

  15. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.421 Section 87.421... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs....

  16. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  17. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough device

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.; Baity, Frederick W.; Hoffman, Daniel J.; Whealton, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A radio frequency coaxial vacuum feedthrough is provided which utilizes a cylindrical ceramic vacuum break formed of an alumina ceramic. The cylinder is coaxially disposed and brazed between tapered coaxial conductors to form a vacuum sealed connection between a pressurized upstream coaxial transmission line and a utilization device located within a vacuum container. The feedthrough provides 50 ohm matched impedance RF feedthrough up to about 500 MHz at power levels in the multimegawatt range.

  18. HELIOS dual swept frequency radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The HELIOS dual swept frequency radiometer, used in conjunction with a dipole antenna, was designed to measure electromagnetic radiation in space. An engineering prototype was fabricated and tested on the HELIOS spacecraft. Two prototypes and two flight units were fabricated and three of the four units were integrated into the HELIOS spacecraft. Two sets of ground support equipment were provided for checkout of the radiometer.

  19. Necessary relations for nucleotide frequencies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Genome composition analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies is known to be evolutionarily informative, and useful in metagenomic studies, where binning of raw sequence data is often an important first step. Patterns appearing in genome composition analysis may be due to evolutionary processes or purely mathematical relations. For example, the total number of dinucleotides in a sequence is equal to the sum of the individual totals of the sixteen types of dinucleotide, and this is entirely independent of any assumptions made regarding mutation or selection, or indeed any physical or chemical process. Before any statistical analysis can be attempted, a knowledge of all necessary mathematical relations is required. I show that 25% of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies can be written as simple sums and differences of the remainder. The vast majority of organisms have circular genomes, for which these relations are exact and necessary. In the case of linear molecules, the absolute error is very nearly zero, and does not grow with contiguous sequence length. As a result of the new, necessary relations presented here, the foundations of the statistical analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies, and k-mer analysis in general, need to be revisited.

  20. Necessary relations for nucleotide frequencies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Genome composition analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies is known to be evolutionarily informative, and useful in metagenomic studies, where binning of raw sequence data is often an important first step. Patterns appearing in genome composition analysis may be due to evolutionary processes or purely mathematical relations. For example, the total number of dinucleotides in a sequence is equal to the sum of the individual totals of the sixteen types of dinucleotide, and this is entirely independent of any assumptions made regarding mutation or selection, or indeed any physical or chemical process. Before any statistical analysis can be attempted, a knowledge of all necessary mathematical relations is required. I show that 25% of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies can be written as simple sums and differences of the remainder. The vast majority of organisms have circular genomes, for which these relations are exact and necessary. In the case of linear molecules, the absolute error is very nearly zero, and does not grow with contiguous sequence length. As a result of the new, necessary relations presented here, the foundations of the statistical analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies, and k-mer analysis in general, need to be revisited. PMID:25843217

  1. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

    1994-06-14

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

  2. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  3. Automatic frequency control for FM transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic frequency control circuit for an FM television transmitter is described. The frequency of the transmitter is sampled during what is termed the back porch portion of the horizontal synchronizing pulse which occurs during the retrace interval, the frequency sample compared with the frequency of a reference oscillator, and a correction applied to the frequency of the transmitter during this portion of the retrace interval.

  4. Perceptual frames in frequency estimation.

    PubMed

    Zyłowska, Aleksandra; Kossek, Marcin; Wawrzyniak, Małgorzata

    2014-02-01

    This study is an introductory investigation of cognitive frames, focused on perceptual frames divided into information and formal perceptual frames, which were studied based on sub-additivity of frequency estimations. It was postulated that different presentations of a response scale would result in different percentage estimates of time spent watching TV or using the Internet. The results supported the existence of perceptual frames that influence the perception process and indicated that information perceptual frames had a stronger effect than formal frames. The measures made possible the exploration of the operation of perceptual frames and also outlined the relations between heuristics and cognitive frames. PMID:24765715

  5. Multi-frequency communication system and method

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-06-01

    A multi-frequency RFID remote communication system is provided that includes a plurality of RFID tags configured to receive a first signal and to return a second signal, the second signal having a first frequency component and a second frequency component, the second frequency component including data unique to each remote RFID tag. The system further includes a reader configured to transmit an interrogation signal and to receive remote signals from the tags. A first signal processor, preferably a mixer, removes an intermediate frequency component from the received signal, and a second processor, preferably a second mixer, analyzes the IF frequency component to output data that is unique to each remote tag.

  6. Low frequency ac waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, O.W.

    1983-11-22

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stablization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  7. Low frequency AC waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, Oscar W.

    1986-01-01

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stabilization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform itself. The cosine is synthesized by squaring the triangular waveform, raising the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  8. Radio frequency sustained ion energy

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Hooke, William M.

    1977-01-01

    Electromagnetic (E.M.) energy injection method and apparatus for producing and sustaining suprathermal ordered ions in a neutral, two-ion-species, toroidal, bulk equilibrium plasma. More particularly, the ions are produced and sustained in an ordered suprathermal state of existence above the average energy and velocity of the bulk equilibrium plasma by resonant rf energy injection in resonance with the natural frequency of one of the ion species. In one embodiment, the electromagnetic energy is injected to clamp the energy and velocity of one of the ion species so that the ion energy is increased, sustained, prolonged and continued in a suprathermal ordered state of existence containing appreciable stored energy that counteracts the slowing down effects of the bulk equilibrium plasma drag. Thus, selective deuteron absorption may be used for ion-tail creation by radio-frequency excitation alone. Also, the rf can be used to increase the fusion output of a two-component neutral injected plasma by selective heating of the injected deuterons.

  9. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  10. Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Coffey, Tyler; Cornell, Eric; Ye, Jun

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel technique for rapid ion-sensitive spectroscopy over a broad spectral bandwidth by combining the high sensitivity of velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) with the parallel nature and high frequency accuracy of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy. Prior to this research, no techniques have been capable of high sensitivity velocity modulation spectroscopy on every parallel detection channel over such a broad spectral range. We have demonstrated the power of this technique by measuring the A^2Π_u - X^2Σ_g^+ (4,2) band of N_2^+ at 830 nm with an absorption sensitivity of 1×10-6 for each of 1500 simultaneous measurement channels spanning 150 Cm-1. A densely sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements to achieve 75 MHz spacing is acquired in under an hour. This technique is ideally suited for high resolution survey spectroscopy of molecular ions with applications including chemical physics, astrochemistry, and precision measurement. Currently, this system is being used to map the electronic transitions of HfF^+ for the JILA electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment. The JILA eEDM experiment uses trapped molecular ions to significantly increase the coherence time of the measurement in addition to utilizing the strong electric field enhancement available from molecules. Previous theoretical work has shown that the metastable ^3Δ_1 state in HfF^+ and ThF^+ provides high sensitivity to the eEDM and good cancellation of systematic effects; however, the electronic level structure of these species have not previously been measured, and the theoretical uncertainties are hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers. This necessitates broad-bandwidth, high-resolution survey spectroscopy provided by frequency comb VMS in the 700-900 nm spectral window. F. Adler, M. J. Thorpe, K. C. Cossel, and J. Ye. Annu. Rev. Anal. Chem. 3, 175-205 (2010) A. E. Leanhardt, et. al. arXiv:1008.2997v2 E. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, and M. P. Deskevich

  11. Frequency Conversion Activation on the Mercury Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Beach, R J; Bibeau, C; Campbell, R; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L; Kent, R; Van Lue, D; Liao, Z; Landron, T; Payne, S A; Schaffers, K I; Sutton, S; Fei, Y; Chai, B

    2004-09-24

    High efficiency frequency conversion while operating at average power is critical for the Mercury laser. We will demonstrate average power frequency conversion of face-cooled DKDP and YCOB crystals using a sapphire heat spreader approach.

  12. 47 CFR 87.475 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Management Office prior to each activation of the transmitter. (e) Frequencies available for differential GPS... stations for differential GPS data links. (1) The frequencies available are on 25 kHz centers with...

  13. 47 CFR 87.475 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Management Office prior to each activation of the transmitter. (e) Frequencies available for differential GPS... stations for differential GPS data links. (1) The frequencies available are on 25 kHz centers with...

  14. 47 CFR 87.475 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Management Office prior to each activation of the transmitter. (e) Frequencies available for differential GPS... stations for differential GPS data links. (1) The frequencies available are on 25 kHz centers with...

  15. Environmental Tests Of Cesium Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L.; Tucker, Thomas K.; Greenhall, Charles A.; Diener, William A.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1992-01-01

    Report describes environmental tests of cesium-beam frequency standards of United States Naval Observatory. Purpose of tests to determine effects of atmospheric temperature, relative humidity, and pressure on frequencies.

  16. Substructure coupling in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Frequency domain analysis was found to be a suitable method for determining the transient response of systems subjected to a wide variety of loads. However, since a large number of calculations are performed within the discrete frequency loop, the method loses it computational efficiency if the loads must be represented by a large number of discrete frequencies. It was also discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain work particularly well for analyzing structural system with a small number of interface and loaded degrees of freedom. It was discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain can lead to an efficient method of obtaining natural frequencies of undamped structures. It was also found that the damped natural frequencies of a system may be determined using frequency domain techniques.

  17. Special Aspects in Designing High - Frequency Betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, A. A.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to designing the high - frequency betatron. In high - frequency betatron most important problem is overheating of the elements of the body radiator unit. In an article some directions of solving this problem are shown.

  18. ELM frequency feedback control on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennholm, M.; Beaumont, P. S.; Carvalho, I. S.; Chapman, I. T.; Felton, R.; Frigione, D.; Garzotti, L.; Goodyear, A.; Graves, J.; Grist, D.; Jachmich, S.; Lang, P.; Lerche, E.; de la Luna, E.; Mooney, R.; Morris, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Rimini, F.; Sips, G.; Solano, E.; Tsalas, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the first development and implementation of a closed loop edge localized mode (ELM) frequency controller using gas injection as the actuator. The controller has been extensively used in recent experiments on JET and it has proved to work well at ELM frequencies in the 15-40 Hz range. The controller responds effectively to a variety of disturbances, generally recovering the requested ELM frequency within approximately 500 ms. Controlling the ELM frequency has become of prime importance in the new JET configuration with all metal walls, where insufficient ELM frequency is associated with excessive tungsten influx. The controller has allowed successful operation near the minimum acceptable ELM frequency where the best plasma confinement can be achieved. Use of the ELM frequency controller in conjunction with pellet injection has enabled investigations of ELM triggering by pellets while maintaining the desired ELM frequency even when pellets fail to trigger ELMs.

  19. 47 CFR 87.475 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Management Office prior to each activation of the transmitter. (e) Frequencies available for differential GPS... stations for differential GPS data links. (1) The frequencies available are on 25 kHz centers with...

  20. 47 CFR 87.475 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Management Office prior to each activation of the transmitter. (e) Frequencies available for differential GPS... stations for differential GPS data links. (1) The frequencies available are on 25 kHz centers with...

  1. Reduction of frequency noise and frequency shift by phase shifting elements in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2011-03-15

    We recently reported the analysis of the frequency noise in the frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) both in high-Q and low-Q environments [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043708 (2009)]. We showed in the paper that the oscillator noise, the frequency fluctuation of the oscillator, becomes prominent in the modulation frequency lower than f{sub 0}/2Q, where f{sub 0} and Q are the resonance frequency and Q-factor. The magnitude of the oscillator noise is determined by the slope of the phase versus frequency curve of the cantilever at f{sub 0}. However, in actual FM-AFM in liquids, the phase versus frequency curve may not be always ideal because of the existence of various phase shifting elements (PSEs). For example, the spurious resonance peaks caused by the acoustic excitation and a band-pass filter in the self-oscillation loop increase the slope of the phase versus frequency curve. Due to those PSEs, the effective Q-factor is often increased from the intrinsic Q-factor of the cantilever. In this article, the frequency noise in the FM-AFM system with the PSEs in the self-oscillation loop is analyzed to show that the oscillator noise is reduced by the increase of the effective Q-factor. It is also shown that the oscillation frequency deviates from the resonance frequency due to the increase of the effective Q-factor, thereby causing the reduction in the frequency shift signal with the same factor. Therefore the increase of the effective Q-factor does not affect the signal-to-noise ratio in the frequency shift measurement, but it does affect the quantitativeness of the measured force in the FM-AFM. Furthermore, the reduction of the frequency noise and frequency shift by the increase of the effective Q-factor were confirmed by the experiments.

  2. A radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, T.L.

    1987-12-07

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feedthrough is provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflection from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits the voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  3. Frequency stabilization of algaas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, M.; Tsuchida, H.; Tako, T.

    1982-01-01

    Performances of semiconductor lasers have been remarkably improved by the demand of the optical communications industry. Recently, a single longitudinal mode, CW oscillation at room temperature has been realized. The price of each laser has been reduced as low as $250. These lasers are mostly oscillated in the near-infrared, and the coherent lights of 0.83 micrometers and 1.3-1.6 micrometers in wavelengths are obtained by AlGaAs lasers and InGaAsP lasers, respectively. Since few number of other kind of lasers oscillates in these wavelength regions, these semiconductor lasers could be conveniently used not only in optical communications but in many fields of application, e.g., laser spectroscopy, optical pumping, frequency and length standards, laser radar, air-borne gyroscope, etc.

  4. Estimating diversity via frequency ratios.

    PubMed

    Willis, Amy; Bunge, John

    2015-12-01

    We wish to estimate the total number of classes in a population based on sample counts, especially in the presence of high latent diversity. Drawing on probability theory that characterizes distributions on the integers by ratios of consecutive probabilities, we construct a nonlinear regression model for the ratios of consecutive frequency counts. This allows us to predict the unobserved count and hence estimate the total diversity. We believe that this is the first approach to depart from the classical mixed Poisson model in this problem. Our method is geometrically intuitive and yields good fits to data with reasonable standard errors. It is especially well-suited to analyzing high diversity datasets derived from next-generation sequencing in microbial ecology. We demonstrate the method's performance in this context and via simulation, and we present a dataset for which our method outperforms all competitors. PMID:26038228

  5. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-05-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength.

  6. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The Community College Division is pleased to report progress of NASA funded research at West Virginia State College. During this reporting period, the project research group has continued with activities to develop instrumentation capability designed to monitor resonant cavity frequencies in the atmospheric region between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. In addition, the project's principal investigator, Dr. Craig Spaniol, and NASA technical officer, Dr. John Sutton, have written and published technical papers intended to expand the scientific and technical framework needed for project research. This research continues to provide an excellent example of government and education working together to provide significant research in the college environment. This cooperative effort has provided many students with technical project work which compliments their education.

  7. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  8. Laser-frequency stabilization using forward scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, T.; Lindberg, Å.; Ståhlberg, B.

    1994-12-01

    Frequency stabilization of a single-mode dye laser is demonstrated using a simple magneto-optical forward scattering method. The dye laser was locked to the 2p4-3ss2, λ = 633 nm neon transition. Heterodyne beat-frequency measurements against a127I2-He-Ne meter standard laser showed a frequency stability of a few MHz.

  9. 47 CFR 101.505 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 101.505 Section 101.505 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.505 Frequencies. Frequencies, and...

  10. 47 CFR 101.505 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 101.505 Section 101.505 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.505 Frequencies. Frequencies, and...

  11. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  12. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  13. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  14. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  15. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  16. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  17. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  18. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  19. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  20. 47 CFR 101.803 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... service. (7) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space to earth) in the earth exploration... GHz band. (4) This frequency band is shared with stations in the earth-exploration satellite service... other parts of the Commission's rules. (3) This frequency band is shared with space stations (space...

  1. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  2. Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1991-01-01

    Report describes principle of operation, design, and results of initial measurements on trapped-mercury-ion frequency-standard apparatus at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. New frequency standard being developed. Based on linear ion trap described in (NPO-17758). Expected to show much better short-term frequency stability because of increased ion-storage capacity.

  3. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  4. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency is required to be changed because of an action by the FAA or the Commission (such as a change in the...

  5. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency is required to be changed because of an action by the FAA or the Commission (such as a change in the...

  6. 47 CFR 78.36 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in 47 CFR 101.105(a), (b), and (c) and the following frequency usage coordination procedures will... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 78.36 Section 78.36... SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.36 Frequency coordination. (a) Coordination of all...

  7. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times:...

  8. 33 CFR 401.61 - Assigned frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Assigned frequencies. 401.61 Section 401.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... frequencies. The Seaway stations operate on the following assigned VHF frequencies: 156.8 MHz—(channel...

  9. 47 CFR 87.41 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.41 Section 87.41... Applications and Licenses § 87.41 Frequencies. (a) Applicant responsibilities. The applicant must propose frequencies to be used by the station consistent with the applicant's eligibility, the proposed operation...

  10. 47 CFR 101.107 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 101.107 Section 101.107... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.107 Frequency tolerance. (a) The carrier frequency of each transmitter authorized in these services must be maintained within the following percentage of the reference...

  11. 47 CFR 80.513 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 80.513 Section 80.513... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.513 Frequency coordination. (a... frequency coordinating committee must be accompanied by: (1) A report based on a field study, indicating...

  12. 47 CFR 74.761 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.761 Section 74.761... Booster Stations § 74.761 Frequency tolerance. The licensee of a low power TV, TV translator, or TV booster station shall maintain the transmitter output frequencies as set forth below. The...

  13. 47 CFR 87.279 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.279 Section 87.279... Aeronautical Enroute and Aeronautical Fixed Stations Aeronautical Fixed Stations § 87.279 Frequencies. (a) United States (except Alaska). The applicant must request specific frequencies in accordance with §...

  14. 33 CFR 401.61 - Assigned frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assigned frequencies. 401.61 Section 401.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... frequencies. The Seaway stations operate on the following assigned VHF frequencies: 156.8 MHz—(channel...

  15. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and...

  16. 47 CFR 80.1077 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... assigned from the fixed satellite service, see 47 CFR § 2.106. 11 12 Service to INMARSAT-E EPIRB stations... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.1077 Section 80.1077... Frequencies. The following table describes the frequencies used in the Global Maritime Distress and...

  17. 47 CFR 87.187 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 87.187, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.187 Section 87.187... Aircraft Stations § 87.187 Frequencies. (a) Frequencies used for air-ground Communications are listed...

  18. 47 CFR 101.101 - Frequency availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency availability. 101.101 Section 101.101... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.101 Frequency availability. Frequencyband (MHz) Radio service... Satellite Service—(Part 25) Notes: F—Fixed M—Mobile TF—Temporary Fixed (1)—Applications for frequencies...

  19. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 74.762 Section 74.762... Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  20. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  1. 47 CFR 87.41 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.41 Section 87.41... Applications and Licenses § 87.41 Frequencies. (a) Applicant responsibilities. The applicant must propose frequencies to be used by the station consistent with the applicant's eligibility, the proposed operation...

  2. 47 CFR 78.111 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 78.111 Section 78.111... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.111 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the...

  3. 47 CFR 80.513 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 80.513 Section 80.513... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.513 Frequency coordination. (a... frequency coordinating committee must be accompanied by: (1) A report based on a field study, indicating...

  4. 47 CFR 87.41 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.41 Section 87.41... Applications and Licenses § 87.41 Frequencies. (a) Applicant responsibilities. The applicant must propose frequencies to be used by the station consistent with the applicant's eligibility, the proposed operation...

  5. 47 CFR 22.355 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 22.355 Section 22.355... Operational and Technical Requirements Technical Requirements § 22.355 Frequency tolerance. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the carrier frequency of each transmitter in the Public Mobile...

  6. 47 CFR 22.355 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 22.355 Section 22.355... Operational and Technical Requirements Technical Requirements § 22.355 Frequency tolerance. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the carrier frequency of each transmitter in the Public Mobile...

  7. 47 CFR 90.715 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies available. 90.715 Section 90.715... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 220-222 MHz Band § 90.715 Frequencies available. (a) The following table indicates the channel designations of...

  8. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 74.762 Section 74.762... Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  9. 47 CFR 87.305 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 87.305 Section 87.305... Flight Test Stations § 87.305 Frequency coordination. (a)(1) Each application for a new station license, renewal or modification of an existing license concerning flight test frequencies, except as provided...

  10. 47 CFR 80.509 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 80.509 Section 80.509... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.509 Frequency assignment. Frequencies assignable to private coast stations and marine utility stations are listed in subpart H....

  11. 33 CFR 401.61 - Assigned frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Assigned frequencies. 401.61 Section 401.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... frequencies. The Seaway stations operate on the following assigned VHF frequencies: 156.8 MHz—(channel...

  12. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and...

  13. 47 CFR 101.101 - Frequency availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency availability. 101.101 Section 101.101... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.101 Frequency availability. Frequencyband (MHz) Radio service... Satellite Service—(Part 25) Notes: F—Fixed M—Mobile TF—Temporary Fixed (1)—Applications for frequencies...

  14. 47 CFR 87.187 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... § 87.187, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.187 Section 87.187... Aircraft Stations § 87.187 Frequencies. (a) Frequencies used for air-ground Communications are listed...

  15. 47 CFR 74.761 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.761 Section 74.761... Booster Stations § 74.761 Frequency tolerance. The licensee of a low power TV, TV translator, or TV booster station shall maintain the transmitter output frequencies as set forth below. The...

  16. 47 CFR 95.1511 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies available. 95.1511 Section 95.1511... SERVICES Dedicated Short-Range Communications Service On-Board Units (DSRCS-OBUs) § 95.1511 Frequencies available. (a) The following table indicates the channel designations of frequencies available...

  17. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  18. 47 CFR 74.1202 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.1202 Section 74.1202... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1202 Frequency assignment. (a) An applicant for a new FM broadcast... stations. The application must be specific with regard to the frequency requested. Only one output...

  19. 47 CFR 74.638 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... frequency coordinated under this paragraph, the interference protection criteria in 47 CFR 101.105(a), (b), and (c) and the frequency usage coordination procedures in 47 CFR 101.103(d) will apply. (c) For each... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 74.638 Section...

  20. 23 CFR 650.311 - Inspection frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inspection frequency. 650.311 Section 650.311 Highways..., STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS National Bridge Inspection Standards § 650.311 Inspection frequency. (a) Routine... level and frequency to which these bridges are inspected considering such factors as age,...

  1. 47 CFR 95.1111 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 95.1111 Section 95.1111... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1111 Frequency coordination. (a... devices must register all devices with a designated frequency coordinator. Except as specified in §...

  2. 47 CFR 80.709 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies available. 80.709 Section 80.709 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Alaska Fixed Stations § 80.709 Frequencies available. Frequencies assignable to...

  3. 47 CFR 74.761 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.761 Section 74.761... Booster Stations § 74.761 Frequency tolerance. The licensee of a low power TV, TV translator, or TV booster station shall maintain the transmitter output frequencies as set forth below. The...

  4. 47 CFR 74.502 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.502 Section 74.502... § 74.502 Frequency assignment. (a) Except as provided in NG30, broadcast auxiliary stations licensed as... Frequency Allocations. These stations will be protected from possible interference caused by new users...

  5. 47 CFR 74.638 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... frequency coordinated under this paragraph, the interference protection criteria in 47 CFR 101.105(a), (b), and (c) and the frequency usage coordination procedures in 47 CFR 101.103(d) will apply. (c) For each... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 74.638 Section...

  6. 47 CFR 95.1111 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 95.1111 Section 95.1111... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1111 Frequency coordination. (a... devices must register all devices with a designated frequency coordinator. Except as specified in §...

  7. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  8. 47 CFR 80.1077 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Feeder links for satellite communications are assigned from the fixed satellite service, see 47 CFR § 2... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.1077 Section 80.1077... Frequencies. The following table describes the frequencies used in the Global Maritime Distress and...

  9. 47 CFR 22.355 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 22.355 Section 22.355... Operational and Technical Requirements Technical Requirements § 22.355 Frequency tolerance. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the carrier frequency of each transmitter in the Public Mobile...

  10. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency...

  11. 47 CFR 101.1005 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies available. 101.1005 Section 101... FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1005 Frequencies available. (a) The following frequencies are available for assignment to LMDS in two license blocks: Block A of 1,150 MHz...

  12. 47 CFR 78.111 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 78.111 Section 78.111... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.111 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the...

  13. 47 CFR 22.355 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 22.355 Section 22.355... Operational and Technical Requirements Technical Requirements § 22.355 Frequency tolerance. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the carrier frequency of each transmitter in the Public Mobile...

  14. 47 CFR 95.1511 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies available. 95.1511 Section 95.1511... SERVICES Dedicated Short-Range Communications Service On-Board Units (DSRCS-OBUs) § 95.1511 Frequencies available. (a) The following table indicates the channel designations of frequencies available...

  15. 47 CFR 87.305 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 87.305 Section 87.305... Flight Test Stations § 87.305 Frequency coordination. (a)(1) Each application for a new station license, renewal or modification of an existing license concerning flight test frequencies, except as provided...

  16. 47 CFR 80.1077 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Feeder links for satellite communications are assigned from the fixed satellite service, see 47 CFR § 2... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.1077 Section 80.1077... Frequencies. The following table describes the frequencies used in the Global Maritime Distress and...

  17. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 74.762 Section 74.762... Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  18. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 758-775 and 788-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and...

  19. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  20. 47 CFR 87.323 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.323 Section 87.323... Aviation Support Stations § 87.323 Frequencies. (a) 121.500 MHz: Emergency and distress only. (b) The frequencies 121.950, 123.300 and 123.500 MHz are available for assignment to aviation support stations...

  1. 47 CFR 101.505 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 101.505 Section 101.505 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.505 Frequencies. Frequencies, and...

  2. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times:...

  3. 47 CFR 101.1005 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies available. 101.1005 Section 101... FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1005 Frequencies available. (a) The following frequencies are available for assignment to LMDS in two license blocks: Block A of 1,150 MHz...

  4. 47 CFR 87.187 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 87.187, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.187 Section 87.187... Aircraft Stations § 87.187 Frequencies. (a) Frequencies used for air-ground Communications are listed...

  5. 47 CFR 90.311 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 90.311 Section 90.311... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz (UHF-TV Sharing) § 90.311 Frequencies. (a) Except as provided for in § 90.315 and except for those frequencies allocated to services in part 22...

  6. 47 CFR 80.509 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 80.509 Section 80.509... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.509 Frequency assignment. Frequencies assignable to private coast stations and marine utility stations are listed in subpart H....

  7. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times:...

  8. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times:...

  9. 47 CFR 74.1202 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.1202 Section 74.1202... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1202 Frequency assignment. (a) An applicant for a new FM broadcast... stations. The application must be specific with regard to the frequency requested. Only one output...

  10. 47 CFR 90.311 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 90.311 Section 90.311... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Authorization in the Band 470-512 MHz (UHF-TV Sharing) § 90.311 Frequencies. (a) Except as provided for in § 90.315 and except for those frequencies allocated to services in part 22...

  11. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that,...

  12. 47 CFR 22.355 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 22.355 Section 22.355... Operational and Technical Requirements Technical Requirements § 22.355 Frequency tolerance. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the carrier frequency of each transmitter in the Public Mobile...

  13. 47 CFR 80.513 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 80.513 Section 80.513... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations § 80.513 Frequency coordination. (a... frequency coordinating committee must be accompanied by: (1) A report based on a field study, indicating...

  14. 47 CFR 80.709 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies available. 80.709 Section 80.709 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Alaska Fixed Stations § 80.709 Frequencies available. Frequencies assignable to...

  15. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 74.762 Section 74.762... Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  16. 47 CFR 80.709 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies available. 80.709 Section 80.709 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Alaska Fixed Stations § 80.709 Frequencies available. Frequencies assignable to...

  17. 47 CFR 74.1202 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.1202 Section 74.1202... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1202 Frequency assignment. (a) An applicant for a new FM broadcast... stations. The application must be specific with regard to the frequency requested. Only one output...

  18. 47 CFR 95.1225 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency coordinator. 95.1225 Section 95.1225... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1225 Frequency coordinator. (a) The Commission will designate a frequency coordinator(s) to manage the operation of medical body area networks...

  19. 47 CFR 74.502 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.502 Section 74.502... § 74.502 Frequency assignment. (a) Except as provided in NG30, broadcast auxiliary stations licensed as... Frequency Allocations. These stations will be protected from possible interference caused by new users...

  20. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101...) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. An applicant must propose to use a frequency tolerance that would confine emissions within the band of operation, unless...