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Sample records for 3a neuron response

  1. Area 3a Neuron Response to Skin Nociceptor Afferent Drive

    PubMed Central

    Favorov, Oleg V.; Li, Yongbiao; Quibrera, Miguel; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Area 3a neurons are identified that respond weakly or not at all to skin contact with a 25–38 °C probe, but vigorously to skin contact with the probe at ≥49 °C. Maximal rate of spike firing associated with 1- to 7-s contact at ≥49 °C occurs 1-2 s after probe removal from the skin. The activity evoked by 5-s contact with the probe at 51 °C remains above-background for ∼20 s after probe retraction. After 1-s contact at 55–56 °C activity remains above-background for ∼4 s. Magnitude of spike firing associated with 5-s contact increases linearly as probe temperature is increased from 49–51 °C. Intradermal capsaicin injection elicits a larger (∼2.5×) and longer-lasting (100×) increase in area 3a neuron firing rate than 5-s contact at 51 °C. Area 3a neurons exhibit enhanced or novel responsivity to 25–38 °C contact for a prolonged time after intradermal injection of capsaicin or α, β methylene adenosine triphosphate. Their 1) delayed and persisting increase in spike firing in response to contact at ≥49 °C, 2) vigorous and prolonged response to intradermal capsaicin, and 3) enhanced and frequently novel response to 25–38 °C contact following intradermal algogen injection or noxious skin heating suggest that the area 3a neurons identified in this study contribute to second pain and mechanical hyperalgesia/allodynia. PMID:18534992

  2. FoxO3a is activated and executes neuron death via Bim in response to β-amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Sanphui, P; Biswas, S C

    2013-01-01

    The molecules that mediate death of selective neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are mostly unknown. The Forkhead transcription factor FoxO3a has emerged as an important mediator of cell fate including apoptosis. When phosphorylated by Akt, it is localized in the cytosol as an inactive complex bound with 14-3-3 protein. For activation and localization of FoxO3a in the nucleus, further modifications are required, such as phosphorylation by mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) and arginine methylation by protein arginine methyltransferase1. We report here that Akt-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO3a is diminished in neurons exposed to oligomeric β-amyloid (Aβ), in vitro and in vivo. We also find that oligomeric Aβ activates FoxO3a by MST1 phosphorylation and arginine methylation in primary cultures of hippocampal and cortical neurons. Moreover, FoxO3a translocates from the cytosol to nucleus in cultured neurons in response to Aβ. Most importantly, the nuclear redistribution of FoxO3a is significantly increased in Aβ-overexpressing AβPPswe-PS1dE9 mice and Aβ-infused rat brains. We further find that FoxO3a is essential for loss of neurons and neural networks in response to Aβ. Recent reports implicate Bim, a pro-apoptotic member of Bcl-2 family, in neuron death in AD, as a key target of this transcription factor. We show that Bim is a direct target of FoxO3a in Aβ-treated neurons. Our findings thus indicate that FoxO3a is activated, translocated to the nucleus and mediates neuron death via Bim in response to Aβ toxicity. PMID:23661003

  3. Axon responses of embryonic stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons to Semaphorins 3A and 3C

    PubMed Central

    Tamariz, Elisa; Díaz-Martínez, N. Emmanuel; Díaz, Néstor F.; García-Peña, Claudia M.; Velasco, Iván; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Class 3 Semaphorins are a subfamily of chemotropic molecules implicated in the projection of dopaminergic neurons from the ventral mesencephalon and in the formation of the nigrostriatal pathway (NSP) during embryonic development. In humans, loss of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons leads to Parkinson’s disease (PD). Cell replacement therapy with dopaminergic neurons generated from embryonic stem cells (ES-TH+) is being actively explored in models of PD. Among several requisites for this approach to work are the adequate reconstruction of the NSP and the correct innervation of normal striatal targets by dopaminergic axons. In this work, we characterized the response of ES-TH+ neurons to Semaphorins 3A, 3C, and 3F, and compared it with that of tyrosine hidroxylase-positive neurons (TH+) obtained from embryonic ventral mesencephalon (VM-TH+). We observed that similar proportions of ES-TH+ and VM-TH+ neurons express Semaphorin receptors Neuropilin 1 and 2. Furthermore, the axons of both populations responded very similarly to Semaphorin exposure: Semaphorin 3A increased axon length, and Semaphorin 3C attracted axons and increased their length. These effects were mediated by Neuropilins, since addition of blocking antibodies against these proteins reduced the effects on axonal growth and attraction, and only TH+ axons expressing Neuropilins responded to the Semaphorins analyzed. The observations reported here show phenotypic similarities between VM-TH+ and ES-TH+ neurons, and suggest that Semaphorins 3A and 3C could be employed to guide axons of grafted ES-TH+ in therapeutic protocols for PD. PMID:19859963

  4. Distinct cytoplasmic domains in Plexin-A4 mediate diverse responses to semaphorin 3A in developing mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Mlechkovich, Guy; Peng, Sheng-Shiang; Shacham, Vered; Martinez, Edward; Gokhman, Irena; Minis, Adi; Tran, Tracy S; Yaron, Avraham

    2014-03-11

    Guidance receptor signaling is crucial for neural circuit formation and elicits diverse cellular events in specific neurons. We found that signaling from the guidance cue semaphorin 3A diverged through distinct cytoplasmic domains in its receptor Plexin-A4 to promote disparate cellular behavior in different neuronal cell types. Plexin-A4 has three main cytoplasmic domains--C1, Hinge/RBD, and C2--and interacts with family members of the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor FARP proteins. We show that growth cone collapse occurred in Plexin-A4-deficient dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons reconstituted with Plexin-A4 containing either the Hinge/RBD or C2 domain, whereas both of the Hinge/RBD and C1 domains were required for dendritic arborization in cortical neurons. Although knockdown studies indicated that both the collapse and arborization responses involved FARP2, mutations in the cytoplasmic region of Plexin-A4 that reduced its interaction with FARP2 strongly inhibited semaphorin 3A-induced dendritic branching but not growth cone collapse, suggesting that different degrees of interaction are required for the two responses or that developing axons have an indirect path to FARP2 activation. Thus, our study provided insights into the multifunctionality of guidance receptors, in particular showing that the semaphorin 3A signal diverges through specific functions of the modular domains of Plexin-A4.

  5. Response suppression by extending sine-wave gratings within the receptive fields of neurons in visual cortical area V3A of the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Gaska, J P; Jacobson, L D; Pollen, D A

    1987-01-01

    Even though there are many more cycles of the "optimal" grating extending across the receptive fields of cells in V3A than of cells in V1 and V2, the spatial frequency bandwidths in V3A are no narrower than in V1 or V2. Thus, the inputs to V3A cells are not combined in a phase coherent manner across the entire receptive field. Moreover, the defined receptive fields of cells in V3A are generally surrounded by suppressive regions which are, on average, much stronger than those found for neurons in V1 and V2. Even within the classical receptive field, most neurons in V3A respond far more vigorously to a limited patch of a few cycles of a grating at the preferred spatial frequency than to wider grating stimuli. This intra-receptive field suppression demonstrates a new level of response complexity, and suggests that V3A cells may antagonistically combine nonlinear mechanisms that themselves encode stimulus energy over a restricted region of space and spatial-frequency.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Neuronal Responsivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-10

    O-A187 061 MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF NEURONAL RESPONSIVITY(U) / VERMONT UNIV BURLINGTON COIL OF MEDICINE V EHRLICH 7 UwKL7RS1S1 IS1 JUL 87 RFOSR-TR-87...The grant was awarded to support the organization of a scientific conference entitled: "Molecular Mechanisms of Neuronal Responsivity." This...from the University of New York, on: "Synaptic Transmission and Neuronal Integration." It should be mentioned that this presentation emerged as a most

  7. Subcellular organization of UBE3A in neurons.

    PubMed

    Burette, Alain C; Judson, Matthew C; Burette, Susan; Phend, Kristen D; Philpot, Benjamin D; Weinberg, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    Ubiquitination regulates a broad array of cellular processes, and defective ubiquitination is implicated in several neurological disorders. Loss of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome. Despite its clinical importance, the normal role of UBE3A in neurons is still unclear. As a step toward deciphering its possible functions, we performed high-resolution light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. We report a broad distribution of UBE3A in neurons, highlighted by concentrations in axon terminals and euchromatin-rich nuclear domains. Our findings suggest that UBE3A may act locally to regulate individual synapses while also mediating global, neuronwide influences through the regulation of gene transcription. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:233-251, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Neuronal Responses to Physiological Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, due to an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level. PMID:23112806

  9. Ischemic neurons prevent vascular regeneration of neural tissue by secreting semaphorin 3A

    PubMed Central

    Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Sitaras, Nicholas; Binet, François; Rivera, Jose Carlos; Stahl, Andreas; Zaniolo, Karine; Shao, Zhuo; Polosa, Anna; Zhu, Tang; Hamel, David; Djavari, Mikheil; Kunik, Dario; Honoré, Jean-Claude; Picard, Emilie; Zabeida, Alexandra; Varma, Daya R.; Hickson, Gilles; Mancini, Joseph; Klagsbrun, Michael; Costantino, Santiago; Beauséjour, Christian; Lachapelle, Pierre; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2011-01-01

    The failure of blood vessels to revascularize ischemic neural tissue represents a significant challenge for vascular biology. Examples include proliferative retinopathies (PRs) such as retinopathy of prematurity and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, which are the leading causes of blindness in children and working-age adults. PRs are characterized by initial microvascular degeneration, followed by a compensatory albeit pathologic hypervascularization mounted by the hypoxic retina attempting to reinstate metabolic equilibrium. Paradoxically, this secondary revascularization fails to grow into the most ischemic regions of the retina. Instead, the new vessels are misdirected toward the vitreous, suggesting that vasorepulsive forces operate in the avascular hypoxic retina. In the present study, we demonstrate that the neuronal guidance cue semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is secreted by hypoxic neurons in the avascular retina in response to the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. Sema3A contributes to vascular decay and later forms a chemical barrier that repels neo-vessels toward the vitreous. Conversely, silencing Sema3A expression enhances normal vascular regeneration within the ischemic retina, thereby diminishing aberrant neovascularization and preserving neuroretinal function. Overcoming the chemical barrier (Sema3A) released by ischemic neurons accelerates the vascular regeneration of neural tissues, which restores metabolic supply and improves retinal function. Our findings may be applicable to other neurovascular ischemic conditions such as stroke. PMID:21355092

  10. Response variability of marmoset parvocellular neurons

    PubMed Central

    Victor, J D; Blessing, E M; Forte, J D; Buzás, P; Martin, P R

    2007-01-01

    This study concerns the properties of neurons carrying signals for colour vision in primates. We investigated the variability of responses of individual parvocellular lateral geniculate neurons of dichromatic and trichromatic marmosets to drifting sinusoidal luminance and chromatic gratings. Response variability was quantified by the cycle-to-cycle variation in Fourier components of the response. Averaged across the population, the variability at low contrasts was greater than predicted by a Poisson process, and at high contrasts the responses were approximately 40% more variable than responses at low contrasts. The contrast-dependent increase in variability was nevertheless below that expected from the increase in firing rate. Variability falls below the Poisson prediction at high contrast, and intrinsic variability of the spike train decreases as contrast increases. Thus, while deeply modulated responses in parvocellular cells have a larger absolute variability than weakly modulated ones, they have a more favourable signal: noise ratio than predicted by a Poisson process. Similar results were obtained from a small sample of magnocellular and koniocellular (‘blue-on’) neurons. For parvocellular neurons with pronounced colour opponency, chromatic responses were, on average, less variable (10–15%, p < 0.01) than luminance responses of equal magnitude. Conversely, non-opponent parvocellular neurons showed the opposite tendency. This is consistent with a supra-additive noise source prior to combination of cone signals. In summary, though variability of parvocellular neurons is largely independent of the way in which they combine cone signals, the noise characteristics of retinal circuitry may augment specialization of parvocellular neurons to signal luminance or chromatic contrast. PMID:17124265

  11. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain.

  12. Photolithography-Based Substrate Microfabrication for Patterning Semaphorin 3A to Study Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    Shelly, Maya; Lee, Seong-Il; Suarato, Giulia; Meng, Yizhi; Pautot, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Summary Protein micropatterning techniques, including microfluidic devices and protein micro-contact printing, enable the generation of highly controllable substrates for spatial manipulation of intracellular and extracellular signaling determinants to examine the development of cultured dissociated neurons in vitro. In particular, culture substrates coated with proteins of interest in defined stripes, including cell adhesion molecules and secreted proteins, have been successfully used to study neuronal polarization, a process in which the neuron establishes axon and dendrite identities, a critical architecture for the input/output functions of the neuron. We have recently used this methodology to pattern the extracellular protein Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a secreted factor known to control neuronal development in the mammalian embryonic cortex. We showed that stripe patterned Sema3A regulates axon and dendrite formation during the early phase of neuronal polarization in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Here, we describe microfabrication and substrate stripe micropatterning of Sema3A. We note that same methodologies can be applied to pattern other extracellular proteins that regulate neuronal development in the embryonic brain, as Nerve growth factor (NGF), Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Netrin-1. We describe modifications of these methodologies for stripe micropatterning of membrane-permeable analogs of the second messengers cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), intracellular regulators of neuronal polarization that might act downstream of Sema3A. PMID:27787862

  13. Persistent neuronal Ube3a expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of Angelman syndrome model mice.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kelly A; Han, Ji Eun; DeBruyne, Jason P; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-06-16

    Mutations or deletions of the maternal allele of the UBE3A gene cause Angelman syndrome (AS), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. The paternal UBE3A/Ube3a allele becomes epigenetically silenced in most neurons during postnatal development in humans and mice; hence, loss of the maternal allele largely eliminates neuronal expression of UBE3A protein. However, recent studies suggest that paternal Ube3a may escape silencing in certain neuron populations, allowing for persistent expression of paternal UBE3A protein. Here we extend evidence in AS model mice (Ube3a(m-/p+)) of paternal UBE3A expression within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker. Paternal UBE3A-positive cells in the SCN show partial colocalization with the neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) and clock proteins (PER2 and BMAL1), supporting that paternal UBE3A expression in the SCN is often of neuronal origin. Paternal UBE3A also partially colocalizes with a marker of neural progenitors, SOX2, implying that relaxed or incomplete imprinting of paternal Ube3a reflects an overall immature molecular phenotype. Our findings highlight the complexity of Ube3a imprinting in the brain and illuminate a subpopulation of SCN neurons as a focal point for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms of Ube3a imprinting.

  14. Persistent neuronal Ube3a expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of Angelman syndrome model mice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelly A.; Han, Ji Eun; DeBruyne, Jason P.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations or deletions of the maternal allele of the UBE3A gene cause Angelman syndrome (AS), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. The paternal UBE3A/Ube3a allele becomes epigenetically silenced in most neurons during postnatal development in humans and mice; hence, loss of the maternal allele largely eliminates neuronal expression of UBE3A protein. However, recent studies suggest that paternal Ube3a may escape silencing in certain neuron populations, allowing for persistent expression of paternal UBE3A protein. Here we extend evidence in AS model mice (Ube3am–/p+) of paternal UBE3A expression within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker. Paternal UBE3A-positive cells in the SCN show partial colocalization with the neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) and clock proteins (PER2 and BMAL1), supporting that paternal UBE3A expression in the SCN is often of neuronal origin. Paternal UBE3A also partially colocalizes with a marker of neural progenitors, SOX2, implying that relaxed or incomplete imprinting of paternal Ube3a reflects an overall immature molecular phenotype. Our findings highlight the complexity of Ube3a imprinting in the brain and illuminate a subpopulation of SCN neurons as a focal point for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms of Ube3a imprinting. PMID:27306933

  15. Semaphorin 3A is a retrograde cell death signal in developing sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Amanda B.; Abdesselem, Houari; Dickendesher, Travis L.; Imai, Fumiyasu; Yoshida, Yutaka; Giger, Roman J.; Pierchala, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During development of the peripheral nervous system, excess neurons are generated, most of which will be lost by programmed cell death due to a limited supply of neurotrophic factors from their targets. Other environmental factors, such as ‘competition factors' produced by neurons themselves, and axon guidance molecules have also been implicated in developmental cell death. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), in addition to its function as a chemorepulsive guidance cue, can also induce death of sensory neurons in vitro. The extent to which Sema3A regulates developmental cell death in vivo, however, is debated. We show that in compartmentalized cultures of rat sympathetic neurons, a Sema3A-initiated apoptosis signal is retrogradely transported from axon terminals to cell bodies to induce cell death. Sema3A-mediated apoptosis utilizes the extrinsic pathway and requires both neuropilin 1 and plexin A3. Sema3A is not retrogradely transported in older, survival factor-independent sympathetic neurons, and is much less effective at inducing apoptosis in these neurons. Importantly, deletion of either neuropilin 1 or plexin A3 significantly reduces developmental cell death in the superior cervical ganglia. Taken together, a Sema3A-initiated apoptotic signaling complex regulates the apoptosis of sympathetic neurons during the period of naturally occurring cell death. PMID:27143756

  16. Suppression of Sin3A activity promotes differentiation of pluripotent cells into functional neurons

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Debasish; Lee, Chang-Hee; Hyun, Ji Young; Chang, Gyeong-Eon; Cheong, Eunji; Shin, Injae

    2017-01-01

    Sin3 is a transcriptional corepressor for REST silencing machinery that represses multiple neuronal genes in non-neuronal cells. However, functions of Sin3 (Sin3A and Sin3B) in suppression of neuronal phenotypes are not well characterized. Herein we show that Sin3A knockdown impedes the repressive activity of REST and enhances differentiation of pluripotent P19 cells into electrophysiologically active neurons without inducing astrogenesis. It is also found that silencing Sin3B induces neurogenesis of P19 cells with a lower efficiency than Sin3A knockdown. The results suggest that Sin3A has a more profound effect on REST repressive machinery for silencing neuronal genes in P19 cells than Sin3B. Furthermore, we show that a peptide inhibitor of Sin3A-REST interactions promotes differentiation of P19 cells into functional neurons. Observations made in studies using genetic deletion and a synthetic inhibitor suggests that Sin3A plays an important role in the repression of neuronal genes by the REST regulatory mechanism. PMID:28303954

  17. Prefrontal Neuronal Responses during Audiovisual Mnemonic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jaewon

    2015-01-01

    During communication we combine auditory and visual information. Neurophysiological research in nonhuman primates has shown that single neurons in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) exhibit multisensory responses to faces and vocalizations presented simultaneously. However, whether VLPFC is also involved in maintaining those communication stimuli in working memory or combining stored information across different modalities is unknown, although its human homolog, the inferior frontal gyrus, is known to be important in integrating verbal information from auditory and visual working memory. To address this question, we recorded from VLPFC while rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) performed an audiovisual working memory task. Unlike traditional match-to-sample/nonmatch-to-sample paradigms, which use unimodal memoranda, our nonmatch-to-sample task used dynamic movies consisting of both facial gestures and the accompanying vocalizations. For the nonmatch conditions, a change in the auditory component (vocalization), the visual component (face), or both components was detected. Our results show that VLPFC neurons are activated by stimulus and task factors: while some neurons simply responded to a particular face or a vocalization regardless of the task period, others exhibited activity patterns typically related to working memory such as sustained delay activity and match enhancement/suppression. In addition, we found neurons that detected the component change during the nonmatch period. Interestingly, some of these neurons were sensitive to the change of both components and therefore combined information from auditory and visual working memory. These results suggest that VLPFC is not only involved in the perceptual processing of faces and vocalizations but also in their mnemonic processing. PMID:25609614

  18. The Angelman syndrome protein Ube3a is required for polarized dendrite morphogenesis in pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Miao, Sheng; Chen, Renchao; Ye, Jiahao; Tan, Guo-He; Li, Shuai; Zhang, Jing; Jiang, Yong-hui; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2013-01-02

    Pyramidal neurons have a highly polarized dendritic morphology, characterized by one long apical dendrite and multiple short basal dendrites. They function as the primary excitatory cells of the mammalian prefrontal cortex and the corticospinal tract. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of polarized dendrite morphology in pyramidal neurons remain poorly understood. Here, we report that the Angelman syndrome (AS) protein ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (Ube3a) plays an important role in specifying the polarization of pyramidal neuron dendritic arbors in mice. shRNA-mediated downregulation of Ube3a selectively inhibited apical dendrite outgrowth and resulted in impaired dendrite polarity, which could be rescued by coexpressing mouse Ube3a isoform 2, but not isoform 1 or 3. Ube3a knockdown also disrupted the polarized distribution of the Golgi apparatus, a well established cellular mechanism for asymmetric dendritic growth in pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, downregulation of Ube3a completely blocked Reelin-induced rapid deployment of Golgi into dendrite. Consistently, we also observed selective inhibition of apical dendrite outgrowth in pyramidal neurons in a mouse model of AS. Overall, these results show that Ube3a is required for the specification of the apical dendrites and dendrite polarization in pyramidal neurons, and suggest a novel pathological mechanism for AS.

  19. Trimethyltin retinopathy: relationship of subcellular response to neuronal subspecialization

    SciTech Connect

    Bouldin, T.W.; Goines, N.D.; Krigman, M.R.

    1984-03-01

    Retinal neurons from rats acutely intoxicated with trimethyltin (TMT) were examined by light and electron microscopy to determine if there is a relationship between the subcellular response of a neuron to TMT and its morphologic subspecialization. Subcellular pathologic alterations were present in neurons from all three cellular layers of the sensory retina. However, the type and degree of subcellular response varied among the highly subspecialized neurons of the different retinal layers. Clusters of dense-cored vesicles and tubules were mainly limited to neurons of the ganglion-cell layer, large accumulations of dense bodies were mainly limited to neurons of the inner nuclear layer, and neuronal necrosis was mainly limited to the photoreceptor cells. The inner segment of the photoreceptor cell shared with the perikaryon of more conventional neurons a special vulnerability to TMT cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that the subspecialization of neurons affects the type and the degree of subcellular response to TMT.

  20. Semaphorin3A regulates neuronal polarization by suppressing axon formation and promoting dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Maya; Cancedda, Laura; Lim, Byung Kook; Popescu, Andrei T; Cheng, Pei-lin; Gao, Hongfeng; Poo, Mu-ming

    2011-08-11

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a secreted factor known to guide axon/dendrite growth and neuronal migration. We found that it also acts as a polarizing factor for axon/dendrite development in cultured hippocampal neurons. Exposure of the undifferentiated neurite to localized Sema3A suppressed its differentiation into axon and promoted dendrite formation, resulting in axon formation away from the Sema3A source, and bath application of Sema3A to polarized neurons promoted dendrite growth but suppressed axon growth. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging showed that Sema3A elevated the cGMP but reduced cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and its axon suppression is attributed to the downregulation of PKA-dependent phosphorylation of axon determinants LKB1 and GSK-3β. Downregulating Sema3A signaling in rat embryonic cortical progenitors via in utero electroporation of siRNAs against the Sema3A receptor neuropilin-1 also resulted in polarization defects in vivo. Thus, Sema3A regulates the earliest step of neuronal morphogenesis by polarizing axon/dendrite formation.

  1. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of UBE3A is not imprinted in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hope, Kevin A; LeDoux, Mark S; Reiter, Lawrence T

    2016-09-01

    In mammals, expression of UBE3A is epigenetically regulated in neurons and expression is restricted to the maternal copy of UBE3A. A recent report claimed that Drosophila melanogaster UBE3A homolog (Dube3a) is preferentially expressed from the maternal allele in fly brain, inferring an imprinting mechanism. However, complex epigenetic regulatory features of the mammalian imprinting center are not present in Drosophila, and allele specific expression of Dube3a has not been documented. We used behavioral and electrophysiological analysis of the Dube3a loss-of-function allele (Dube3a(15b)) to investigate Dube3a imprinting in fly neurons. We found that motor impairment (climbing ability) and a newly-characterized defect in synaptic transmission are independent of parental inheritance of the Dube3a(15b) allele. Furthermore, expression analysis of coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Dube3a did not reveal allele specific expression differences among reciprocal crosses. These data indicate that Dube3a is neither imprinted nor preferentially expressed from the maternal allele in fly neurons.

  2. Dopamine neurons share common response function for reward prediction error

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Bukwich, Michael; Uchida, Naoshige

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to signal reward prediction error, or the difference between actual and predicted reward. How dopamine neurons jointly encode this information, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that different neurons specialize in different aspects of prediction error; another is that each neuron calculates prediction error in the same way. We recorded from optogenetically-identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. Our tasks allowed us to determine the full prediction error functions of dopamine neurons and compare them to each other. We found striking homogeneity among individual dopamine neurons: their responses to both unexpected and expected rewards followed the same function, just scaled up or down. As a result, we could describe both individual and population responses using just two parameters. Such uniformity ensures robust information coding, allowing each dopamine neuron to contribute fully to the prediction error signal. PMID:26854803

  3. Image Familiarization Sharpens Response Dynamics of Neurons in Inferotemporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Travis; Walker, Christopher; Cho, Raymond Y.; Olson, Carl R.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated viewing of an image over days and weeks induces a marked reduction in the strength with which neurons in monkey inferotemporal cortex respond to it. The processing advantage that attaches to this reduction is unknown. One possibility is that truncation of the response to a familiar image leaves neurons in a state of readiness to respond to ensuing images and thus enhances their ability to track rapidly changing displays. We have explored this possibility by assessing neuronal responses to familiar and novel images in rapid serial visual displays. Inferotemporal neurons respond more strongly to familiar than to novel images in such displays. The effect is stronger among putative inhibitory neurons than among putative excitatory neurons. A comparable effect occurs at the level of the scalp potential in humans. We conclude that long-term familiarization sharpens the response dynamics of neurons in both monkey and human extrastriate visual cortex. PMID:25151263

  4. Unitary response of mouse olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chaim, Yair; Cheng, Melody M.; Yau, King-Wai

    2011-01-01

    The sense of smell begins with odorant molecules binding to membrane receptors on the cilia of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), thereby activating a G protein, Golf, and the downstream effector enzyme, an adenylyl cyclase (ACIII). Recently, we have found in amphibian ORNs that an odorant-binding event has a low probability of activating sensory transduction at all; even when successful, the resulting unitary response apparently involves a single active Gαolf–ACIII molecular complex. This low amplification is in contrast to rod phototransduction in vision, the best-quantified G-protein signaling pathway, where each photoisomerized rhodopsin molecule is well known to produce substantial amplification by activating many G-protein, and hence effector-enzyme, molecules. We have now carried out similar experiments on mouse ORNs, which offer, additionally, the advantage of genetics. Indeed, we found the same low probability of transduction, based on the unitary olfactory response having a fairly constant amplitude and similar kinetics across different odorants and randomly encountered ORNs. Also, consistent with our picture, the unitary response of Gαolf+/− ORNs was similar to WT in amplitude, although their Gαolf-protein expression was only half of normal. Finally, from the action potential firing, we estimated that ≤19 odorant-binding events successfully triggering transduction in a WT mouse ORN will lead to signaling to the brain. PMID:21187398

  5. [Responses of squirrel visual cortex neurons to patterned visual stimuli].

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ia

    1975-01-01

    The responses of visual cortical neurons to patterned visual stimuli were studied in squirrel Sciurus vulgaris. The direction selective, orientation-selective and non-selective neurons were observed. Most direction-selective and non-selective neurons were sensitive to high speeds of stimulus movement--hundreds deg/s. The direction-selective neurons exhibited their selectivity at such high speeds in spite of the short time of the stimulus movement through the receptive field. Orientation-selective neurons (with simple or complex receptive fields) were sensitive to lower speeds of the stimulus movement (tens deg/s). Some mechanisms of the properties described are discussed.

  6. Response of cat cortical neurons to position and movement of the femur.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, A M; Decchi, B; Fontani, G; Rossi, A; Carli, G

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of joint afferents to the response of cortical neurons in area 3a to mechanical stimulation of the contralateral hindlimb was evaluated in cats anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital and paralyzed with pancuronium bromide. The hindlimb projection to the pericruciate cortex was established by recording the evoked potentials to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve and some of its branches, the bicepssemitendinosus and the quadratus femoris. Out of 169 neurons, 63 responded exclusively to cutaneous stimuli (superficial), whereas the others could be activated by local pressure of hindlimb muscles and/or by joint rotation (deep). Deep neurons were classified as slowly adapting (SA) or rapidly adapting (RA) units. In the neurons responding exclusively to joint rotation, the site of the receptive field could not be identified with certainty. In 13 deep neurons, their firing was affected by rotation of multiple joints of the contralateral hindlimb. In an attempt to identify the source of activation of cortical neurons, partial denervations and muscle disconnections were performed in five animals to isolate and stimulate the hip capsule. In these preparations, in 14 of 15 cortical neurons the source of activation was localized in the periarticular muscles, with no response to mechanical stimulation of the joint capsule. Only one neuron (SA) could be selectively excited by punctate pressure on the hip capsule. Our results suggest that in neurons of area 3a of the cat, the information about the position of the femur relies mainly on muscle afferents.

  7. Angelman syndrome-derived neurons display late onset of paternal UBE3A silencing.

    PubMed

    Stanurova, Jana; Neureiter, Anika; Hiber, Michaela; de Oliveira Kessler, Hannah; Stolp, Kristin; Goetzke, Roman; Klein, Diana; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Klump, Hannes; Steenpass, Laura

    2016-08-03

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon resulting in parent-of-origin-specific gene expression that is regulated by a differentially methylated region. Gene mutations or failures in the imprinting process lead to the development of imprinting disorders, such as Angelman syndrome. The symptoms of Angelman syndrome are caused by the absence of functional UBE3A protein in neurons of the brain. To create a human neuronal model for Angelman syndrome, we reprogrammed dermal fibroblasts of a patient carrying a defined three-base pair deletion in UBE3A into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In these iPSCs, both parental alleles are present, distinguishable by the mutation, and express UBE3A. Detailed characterization of these iPSCs demonstrated their pluripotency and exceptional stability of the differentially methylated region regulating imprinted UBE3A expression. We observed strong induction of SNHG14 and silencing of paternal UBE3A expression only late during neuronal differentiation, in vitro. This new Angelman syndrome iPSC line allows to study imprinted gene regulation on both parental alleles and to dissect molecular pathways affected by the absence of UBE3A protein.

  8. Angelman syndrome-derived neurons display late onset of paternal UBE3A silencing

    PubMed Central

    Stanurova, Jana; Neureiter, Anika; Hiber, Michaela; de Oliveira Kessler, Hannah; Stolp, Kristin; Goetzke, Roman; Klein, Diana; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Klump, Hannes; Steenpass, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon resulting in parent-of-origin-specific gene expression that is regulated by a differentially methylated region. Gene mutations or failures in the imprinting process lead to the development of imprinting disorders, such as Angelman syndrome. The symptoms of Angelman syndrome are caused by the absence of functional UBE3A protein in neurons of the brain. To create a human neuronal model for Angelman syndrome, we reprogrammed dermal fibroblasts of a patient carrying a defined three-base pair deletion in UBE3A into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In these iPSCs, both parental alleles are present, distinguishable by the mutation, and express UBE3A. Detailed characterization of these iPSCs demonstrated their pluripotency and exceptional stability of the differentially methylated region regulating imprinted UBE3A expression. We observed strong induction of SNHG14 and silencing of paternal UBE3A expression only late during neuronal differentiation, in vitro. This new Angelman syndrome iPSC line allows to study imprinted gene regulation on both parental alleles and to dissect molecular pathways affected by the absence of UBE3A protein. PMID:27484051

  9. Diversity and homogeneity in responses of midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Christopher D; Yun, Sora R; Song, Minryung R

    2013-03-13

    Dopamine neurons of the ventral midbrain have been found to signal a reward prediction error that can mediate positive reinforcement. Despite the demonstration of modest diversity at the cellular and molecular levels, there has been little analysis of response diversity in behaving animals. Here we examine response diversity in rhesus macaques to appetitive, aversive, and neutral stimuli having relative motivational values that were measured and controlled through a choice task. First, consistent with previous studies, we observed a continuum of response variability and an apparent absence of distinct clusters in scatter plots, suggesting a lack of statistically discrete subpopulations of neurons. Second, we found that a group of "sensitive" neurons tend to be more strongly suppressed by a variety of stimuli and to be more strongly activated by juice. Third, neurons in the "ventral tier" of substantia nigra were found to have greater suppression, and a subset of these had higher baseline firing rates and late "rebound" activation after suppression. These neurons could belong to a previously identified subgroup of dopamine neurons that express high levels of H-type cation channels but lack calbindin. Fourth, neurons further rostral exhibited greater suppression. Fifth, although we observed weak activation of some neurons by aversive stimuli, this was not associated with their aversiveness. In conclusion, we find a diversity of response properties, distributed along a continuum, within what may be a single functional population of neurons signaling reward prediction error.

  10. Egr2-neurons control the adult respiratory response to hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell S.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Brust, Rachael D.; Soriano, Laura P.; Nattie, Eugene E.; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    ‘The early growth response 2 transcription factor, Egr2, establishes a population of brainstem neurons essential for normal breathing at birth. Egr2-null mice die perinatally of respiratory insufficiency characterized by subnormal respiratory rate and severe apneas. Here we bypass this lethality using a noninvasive pharmacogenetic approach to inducibly perturb neuron activity postnatally, and ask if Egr2-neurons control respiration in adult mice. We found that the normal ventilatory increase in response to elevated tissue CO2 was impaired, blunted by 63.1±8.7% after neuron perturbation due to deficits in both respiratory amplitude and frequency. By contrast, room-air breathing was unaffected, suggesting that the drive for baseline breathing may not require those Egr2-neurons manipulated here. Of the multiple brainstem sites proposed to affect ventilation in response to hypercapnia, only the retrotrapezoid nucleus, a portion of the serotonergic raphé, and a portion of the A5 nucleus have a history of Egr2 expression. We recently showed that acute inhibition of serotonergic neurons en masse blunts the CO2 chemoreflex in adults, causing a difference in hypercapnic response of ~50% after neuron perturbation through effects on respiratory amplitude only. The suppressed respiratory frequency upon perturbation of Egr2-neurons thus may stem from non-serotonergic neurons within the Egr2 domain. Perturbation of Egr2-neurons did not affect body temperature, even on exposure to ambient 4 °C. These findings support a model in which Egr2-neurons are a critical component of the respiratory chemoreflex into adulthood. Methodologically, these results highlight how pharmacogenetic approaches allow neuron function to be queried in unanesthetized adult animals, reaching beyond the roadblocks of developmental lethality and compensation as well as the anatomical disturbances associated with invasive methods. PMID:23261662

  11. Authors’ response: mirror neurons: tests and testability.

    PubMed

    Catmur, Caroline; Press, Clare; Cook, Richard; Bird, Geoffrey; Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-04-01

    Commentators have tended to focus on the conceptual framework of our article, the contrast between genetic and associative accounts of mirror neurons, and to challenge it with additional possibilities rather than empirical data. This makes the empirically focused comments especially valuable. The mirror neuron debate is replete with ideas; what it needs now are system-level theories and careful experiments – tests and testability.

  12. Interhemispheric Synchronization of Oscillatory Neuronal Responses in Cat Visual Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas K.; Konig, Peter; Kreiter, Andreas K.; Singer, Wolf

    1991-05-01

    Neurons in area 17 of cat visual cortex display oscillatory responses that can synchronize across spatially separate columns in a stimulus-specific way. Response synchronization has now been shown to occur also between neurons in area 17 of the right and left cerebral hemispheres. This synchronization was abolished by section of the corpus callosum. Thus, the response synchronization is mediated by corticocortical connections. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that temporal synchrony of neuronal discharges serves to bind features within and between the visual hemifields.

  13. Face-selective neurons maintain consistent visual responses across months.

    PubMed

    McMahon, David B T; Jones, Adam P; Bondar, Igor V; Leopold, David A

    2014-06-03

    Face perception in both humans and monkeys is thought to depend on neurons clustered in discrete, specialized brain regions. Because primates are frequently called upon to recognize and remember new individuals, the neuronal representation of faces in the brain might be expected to change over time. The functional properties of neurons in behaving animals are typically assessed over time periods ranging from minutes to hours, which amounts to a snapshot compared to a lifespan of a neuron. It therefore remains unclear how neuronal properties observed on a given day predict that same neuron's activity months or years later. Here we show that the macaque inferotemporal cortex contains face-selective cells that show virtually no change in their patterns of visual responses over time periods as long as one year. Using chronically implanted microwire electrodes guided by functional MRI targeting, we obtained distinct profiles of selectivity for face and nonface stimuli that served as fingerprints for individual neurons in the anterior fundus (AF) face patch within the superior temporal sulcus. Longitudinal tracking over a series of daily recording sessions revealed that face-selective neurons maintain consistent visual response profiles across months-long time spans despite the influence of ongoing daily experience. We propose that neurons in the AF face patch are specialized for aspects of face perception that demand stability as opposed to plasticity.

  14. Flotillin-mediated endocytic events dictate cell-type specific responses to Semaphorin 3A

    PubMed Central

    Carcea, Ioana; Ma'ayan, Avi; Mesias, Roxana; Sepulveda, Bryan; Salton, Stephen R.; Benson, Deanna L.

    2010-01-01

    Cortical efferents growing in the same environment diverge early in development. The expression of particular transcription factors dictates the trajectories taken presumably by regulating responsiveness to guidance cues via cellular mechanisms that are not yet known. Here we show that cortical neurons that are dissociated and grown in culture maintain their cell-type specific identities defined by the expression of transcription factors. Using this model system we sought to identify and characterize mechanisms that are recruited to produce cell-type specific responses to Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a guidance cue that would be presented similarly to cortical axons in vivo. Axons from presumptive corticofugal neurons lacking the transcription factor Satb2 and expressing Ctip2 or Tbr1 respond far more robustly to Sema3A than those from presumptive callosal neurons expressing Satb2. Both populations of axons express similar levels of Sema3A receptors (Neuropilin-1, L1CAM and PlexinA4), but significantly, axons from neurons lacking Satb2 internalize more Sema3A and they do so via a raft-mediated endocytic pathway. We used an in silico approach to identify the endocytosis effector Flotillin-1 as a Sema3A signaling candidate. We tested the contributions of Flotillin-1 to Sema3A endocytosis and signaling, and show that raft-mediated Sema3A endocytosis is defined by and depends on the recruitment of Flotillin-1, which mediates LIMK activation, and regulates axon responsiveness to Sema3A in presumptive corticofugal axons. PMID:21068336

  15. Semaphorin 3A inhibits growth of adult sympathetic and parasympathetic neurones via distinct cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nangle, MR; Keast, JR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is an important secreted repulsive guidance factor for many developing neurones. Sema3A continues to be expressed in adulthood, and expression of its receptor, neuropilin-1 (Nrp-1), can be altered by nerve injury. Autonomic neurones innervating the pelvic viscera are particularly susceptible to damage during pelvic surgical procedures, and failure to regenerate or aberrant growth of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves lead to organ dysfunction. However, it is not known if adult pelvic neurones are potential targets for Sema3A. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of Sema3A and activation or inhibition of cyclic nucleotide signalling were assessed in adult rat pelvic ganglion neurones in culture using a growth cone collapse assay. KEY RESULTS Sema3A caused growth cone collapse in both parasympathetic and sympathetic neurones expressing Nrp-1. However, the effect of Sema3A was mediated by distinct cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways in each neurone type. In parasympathetic neurones, cAMP and downstream activation of protein kinase A were required for growth cone collapse. In sympathetic neurones, cGMP was required for Sema3A-induced collapse; cAMP can also cause collapse but was not required. Sema3A-mediated, cGMP-dependent collapse in sympathetic neurones may require activation of cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels (CNGCs). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We propose that Sema3A is an important guidance factor for adult pelvic autonomic neurones, and that manipulation of their distinct signalling mechanisms could potentially promote functional selective regeneration or attenuate aberrant growth. To our knowledge, this is also the first study to implicate CNGCs in regulating growth cone dynamics of adult neurones. PMID:21054346

  16. Semaphorin 3A inhibits growth of adult sympathetic and parasympathetic neurones via distinct cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nangle, M R; Keast, J R

    2011-03-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is an important secreted repulsive guidance factor for many developing neurones. Sema3A continues to be expressed in adulthood, and expression of its receptor, neuropilin-1 (Nrp-1), can be altered by nerve injury. Autonomic neurones innervating the pelvic viscera are particularly susceptible to damage during pelvic surgical procedures, and failure to regenerate or aberrant growth of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves lead to organ dysfunction. However, it is not known if adult pelvic neurones are potential targets for Sema3A. The effects of Sema3A and activation or inhibition of cyclic nucleotide signalling were assessed in adult rat pelvic ganglion neurones in culture using a growth cone collapse assay. Sema3A caused growth cone collapse in both parasympathetic and sympathetic neurones expressing Nrp-1. However, the effect of Sema3A was mediated by distinct cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways in each neurone type. In parasympathetic neurones, cAMP and downstream activation of protein kinase A were required for growth cone collapse. In sympathetic neurones, cGMP was required for Sema3A-induced collapse; cAMP can also cause collapse but was not required. Sema3A-mediated, cGMP-dependent collapse in sympathetic neurones may require activation of cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels (CNGCs). We propose that Sema3A is an important guidance factor for adult pelvic autonomic neurones, and that manipulation of their distinct signalling mechanisms could potentially promote functional selective regeneration or attenuate aberrant growth. To our knowledge, this is also the first study to implicate CNGCs in regulating growth cone dynamics of adult neurones. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Neuronal ERK signaling in response to graphene oxide in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Qu, Man; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Qiuli; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Dayong

    2017-05-01

    ERK signaling is one of the important mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). However, the role of ERK signaling in the regulation of response to engineered nanomaterial exposure is still largely unclear. In this study, using in vivo assay system of Caenorhabditis elegans, we investigated the function of ERK signaling in response to graphene oxide (GO) exposure and the underlying molecular mechanism. GO exposure increased the expression of MEK-2/MEK and MPK-1/ERK in the ERK signaling pathway. Mutation of mek-2 or mpk-1 resulted in a susceptibility to GO toxicity. Both the MEK-2 and the MPK-1 acted in neurons to regulate the response to GO exposure, and the neuronal expression of MEK-2 or MPK-1 caused a resistance to GO toxicity. In the neurons, SKN-1b/Nrf acted downstream of the MPK-1, and AEX-3, a guanine exchange factor for GTPase, further acted downstream of the SKN-1b to regulate the response to GO exposure. Therefore, a signaling cascade of MEK-2-MPK-1-SKN-1b/-AEX-3 was identified in the neurons required for the regulation of response to GO exposure. Moreover, genetic interaction assay demonstrated that the neuronal ERK signaling-mediated signaling pathway and the intestinal p38 MAPK-mediated signaling pathway functioned synergistically in the regulation of response to GO exposure. Our results highlight the crucial function of the neuronal ERK signaling in the regulation of response to nanomaterial exposure in organisms.

  18. Asynchronous response of coupled pacemaker neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    We study a network model of two conductance-based pacemaker neurons of differing natural frequency, coupled with either mutual excitation or inhibition, and receiving shared random inhibitory synaptic input. The networks may phase-lock spike-to-spike for strong mutual coupling. But the shared input can desynchronize the locked spike-pairs by selectively eliminating the lagging spike or modulating its timing with respect to the leading spike depending on their separation time window. Such loss of synchrony is also found in a large network of sparsely coupled heterogeneous spiking neurons receiving shared input. PMID:19257636

  19. A simple white noise analysis of neuronal light responses.

    PubMed

    Chichilnisky, E J

    2001-05-01

    A white noise technique is presented for estimating the response properties of spiking visual system neurons. The technique is simple, robust, efficient and well suited to simultaneous recordings from multiple neurons. It provides a complete and easily interpretable model of light responses even for neurons that display a common form of response nonlinearity that precludes classical linear systems analysis. A theoretical justification of the technique is presented that relies only on elementary linear algebra and statistics. Implementation is described with examples. The technique and the underlying model of neural responses are validated using recordings from retinal ganglion cells, and in principle are applicable to other neurons. Advantages and disadvantages of the technique relative to classical approaches are discussed.

  20. Temporal characteristics of gustatory responses in rat parabrachial neurons vary by stimulus and chemosensitive neuron type.

    PubMed

    Geran, Laura; Travers, Susan

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that temporal features of spike trains can increase the amount of information available for gustatory processing. However, the nature of these temporal characteristics and their relationship to different taste qualities and neuron types are not well-defined. The present study analyzed the time course of taste responses from parabrachial (PBN) neurons elicited by multiple applications of "sweet" (sucrose), "salty" (NaCl), "sour" (citric acid), and "bitter" (quinine and cycloheximide) stimuli in an acute preparation. Time course varied significantly by taste stimulus and best-stimulus classification. Across neurons, the ensemble code for the three electrolytes was similar initially but quinine diverged from NaCl and acid during the second 500 ms of stimulation and all four qualities became distinct just after 1s. This temporal evolution was reflected in significantly broader tuning during the initial response. Metric space analyses of quality discrimination by individual neurons showed that increases in information (H) afforded by temporal factors was usually explained by differences in rate envelope, which had a greater impact during the initial 2s (22.5% increase in H) compared to the later response (9.5%). Moreover, timing had a differential impact according to cell type, with between-quality discrimination in neurons activated maximally by NaCl or citric acid most affected. Timing was also found to dramatically improve within-quality discrimination (80% increase in H) in neurons that responded optimally to bitter stimuli (B-best). Spikes from B-best neurons were also more likely to occur in bursts. These findings suggest that among PBN taste neurons, time-dependent increases in mutual information can arise from stimulus- and neuron-specific differences in response envelope during the initial dynamic period. A stable rate code predominates in later epochs.

  1. Sexually dimorphic neuronal responses to social isolation

    PubMed Central

    Senst, Laura; Baimoukhametova, Dinara; Sterley, Toni-Lee; Bains, Jaideep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Many species use social networks to buffer the effects of stress. The mere absence of a social network, however, may also be stressful. We examined neuroendocrine, PVN CRH neurons and report that social isolation alters the intrinsic properties of these cells in sexually dimorphic fashion. Specifically, isolating preadolescent female mice from littermates for <24 hr increased first spike latency (FSL) and decreased excitability of CRH neurons. These changes were not evident in age-matched males. By contrast, subjecting either males (isolated or grouped) or group housed females to acute physical stress (swim), increased FSL. The increase in FSL following either social isolation or acute physical stress was blocked by the glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitor, metyrapone and mimicked by exogenous corticosterone. The increase in FSL results in a decrease in the excitability of CRH neurons. Our observations demonstrate that social isolation, but not acute physical stress has sex-specific effects on PVN CRH neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18726.001 PMID:27725087

  2. Visual Attention Model Based on Statistical Properties of Neuron Responses

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haibin; Wang, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Visual attention is a mechanism of the visual system that can select relevant objects from a specific scene. Interactions among neurons in multiple cortical areas are considered to be involved in attentional allocation. However, the characteristics of the encoded features and neuron responses in those attention related cortices are indefinite. Therefore, further investigations carried out in this study aim at demonstrating that unusual regions arousing more attention generally cause particular neuron responses. We suppose that visual saliency is obtained on the basis of neuron responses to contexts in natural scenes. A bottom-up visual attention model is proposed based on the self-information of neuron responses to test and verify the hypothesis. Four different color spaces are adopted and a novel entropy-based combination scheme is designed to make full use of color information. Valuable regions are highlighted while redundant backgrounds are suppressed in the saliency maps obtained by the proposed model. Comparative results reveal that the proposed model outperforms several state-of-the-art models. This study provides insights into the neuron responses based saliency detection and may underlie the neural mechanism of early visual cortices for bottom-up visual attention. PMID:25747859

  3. Dnmt3a in Sim1 Neurons Is Necessary for Normal Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Syann; Harper, Matthew J.; Kim, Ki Woo; Sone, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Fan, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    Obesity rates continue to rise throughout the world. Recent evidence has suggested that environmental factors contribute to altered energy balance regulation. However, the role of epigenetic modifications to the central control of energy homeostasis remains unknown. To investigate the role of DNA methylation in the regulation of energy balance, we investigated the role of the de novo DNA methyltransferase, Dnmt3a, in Single-minded 1 (Sim1) cells, including neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH). Dnmt3a expression levels were decreased in the PVH of high-fat-fed mice. Mice lacking Dnmt3a specifically in the Sim1 neurons, which are expressed in the forebrain, including PVH, became obese with increased amounts of abdominal and subcutaneous fat. The mice were also found to have hyperphagia, decreased energy expenditure, and glucose intolerance with increased serum insulin and leptin. Furthermore, these mice developed hyper-LDL cholesterolemia when fed a high-fat diet. Gene expression profiling and DNA methylation analysis revealed that the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and galanin were highly upregulated in the PVH of Sim1-specific Dnmt3a deletion mice. DNA methylation levels of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter were decreased in the PVH of the deletion mice. These results suggest that Dnmt3a in the PVH is necessary for the normal control of body weight and energy homeostasis and that tyrosine hydroxylase is a putative target of Dnmt3a in the PVH. These results provide evidence for a role for Dnmt3a in the PVH to link environmental conditions to altered energy homeostasis. PMID:25392496

  4. Finding and Not Finding Rat Perirhinal Neuronal Responses to Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Robert U.; Brown, Malcolm W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is much evidence that the perirhinal cortex of both rats and monkeys is important for judging the relative familiarity of visual stimuli. In monkeys many studies have found that a proportion of perirhinal neurons respond more to novel than familiar stimuli. There are fewer studies of perirhinal neuronal responses in rats, and those studies based on exploration of objects, have raised into question the encoding of stimulus familiarity by rat perirhinal neurons. For this reason, recordings of single neuronal activity were made from the perirhinal cortex of rats so as to compare responsiveness to novel and familiar stimuli in two different behavioral situations. The first situation was based upon that used in “paired viewing” experiments that have established rat perirhinal differences in immediate early gene expression for novel and familiar visual stimuli displayed on computer monitors. The second situation was similar to that used in the spontaneous object recognition test that has been widely used to establish the involvement of rat perirhinal cortex in familiarity discrimination. In the first condition 30 (25%) of 120 perirhinal neurons were visually responsive; of these responsive neurons 19 (63%) responded significantly differently to novel and familiar stimuli. In the second condition eight (53%) of 15 perirhinal neurons changed activity significantly in the vicinity of objects (had “object fields”); however, for none (0%) of these was there a significant activity change related to the familiarity of an object, an incidence significantly lower than for the first condition. Possible reasons for the difference are discussed. It is argued that the failure to find recognition‐related neuronal responses while exploring objects is related to its detectability by the measures used, rather than the absence of all such signals in perirhinal cortex. Indeed, as shown by the results, such signals are found when a different methodology is used.

  5. Response of medullary respiratory neurons to rostral pontine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baker, J P; Remmers, J E

    1982-11-01

    Respiratory neuron activity was recorded with microelectrodes in the vicinity of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and the rostral portion of nucleus retroambigualis (rNRA) in pentobarbital anesthetized cats with bilateral pneumothorax. Inspiratory NTS neurons receiving facilitatory volume inputs (inspiratory beta neurons) had short latency responses to threshold electrical stimulation in the ipsilateral vagus, but rarely to stimulation of the inspiratory inhibitory region of the rostral pons (pneumotaxic areas), suggesting that beta neurons do not appear to be the site of convergence of inspiratory inhibitory inputs. Inspiratory neurons in the rNRA did not have short latency facilitatory responses to vagal stimulation, but 15% responded to pneumotaxic area stimulation. One-third of the rNRA inspiratory neurons appeared to have spinal axons. None of those with spinal axons responded to pneumotaxic stimulation. Pneumotaxic area stimulation did consistently cause short latency evoked potentials in the rNRA. It is concluded that some rNRA-area propriobulbar inspiratory neurons may play a role in inspiratory inhibition by pneumotaxic mechanisms.

  6. Measurement of infinitesimal phase response curves from noisy real neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Keisuke; Omori, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Shigeo; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Masato; Aonishi, Toru

    2011-10-01

    We sought to measure infinitesimal phase response curves (iPRCs) from rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. It is difficult to measure iPRCs from noisy neurons because of the dilemma that either the linearity or the signal-to-noise ratio of responses to external perturbations must be sacrificed. To overcome this difficulty, we used an iPRC measurement model formulated as the Langevin phase equation (LPE) to extract iPRCs in the Bayesian scheme. We then simultaneously verified the effectiveness of the measurement model and the reliability of the estimated iPRCs by demonstrating that LPEs with the estimated iPRCs could predict the stochastic behaviors of the same neurons, whose iPRCs had been measured, when they were perturbed by periodic stimulus currents. Our results suggest that the LPE is an effective model for real oscillating neurons and that many theoretical frameworks based on it may be applicable to real nerve systems.

  7. 18 CFR 3a.13 - Classification responsibility and procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Classification responsibility and procedure. 3a.13 Section 3a.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification § 3a...

  8. 18 CFR 3a.13 - Classification responsibility and procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Classification responsibility and procedure. 3a.13 Section 3a.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification § 3a...

  9. 18 CFR 3a.13 - Classification responsibility and procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Classification responsibility and procedure. 3a.13 Section 3a.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification § 3a...

  10. 18 CFR 3a.13 - Classification responsibility and procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Classification responsibility and procedure. 3a.13 Section 3a.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification § 3a...

  11. 18 CFR 3a.13 - Classification responsibility and procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Classification responsibility and procedure. 3a.13 Section 3a.13 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification § 3a...

  12. Responses of primate frontal cortex neurons during natural vocal communication

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, A. Wren; Nummela, Samuel U.; de la Mothe, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of primate frontal cortex in vocal communication and its significance in language evolution have a controversial history. While evidence indicates that vocalization processing occurs in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex neurons, vocal-motor activity has been conjectured to be primarily subcortical and suggestive of a distinctly different neural architecture from humans. Direct evidence of neural activity during natural vocal communication is limited, as previous studies were performed in chair-restrained animals. Here we recorded the activity of single neurons across multiple regions of prefrontal and premotor cortex while freely moving marmosets engaged in a natural vocal behavior known as antiphonal calling. Our aim was to test whether neurons in marmoset frontal cortex exhibited responses during vocal-signal processing and/or vocal-motor production in the context of active, natural communication. We observed motor-related changes in single neuron activity during vocal production, but relatively weak sensory responses for vocalization processing during this natural behavior. Vocal-motor responses occurred both prior to and during call production and were typically coupled to the timing of each vocalization pulse. Despite the relatively weak sensory responses a population classifier was able to distinguish between neural activity that occurred during presentations of vocalization stimuli that elicited an antiphonal response and those that did not. These findings are suggestive of the role that nonhuman primate frontal cortex neurons play in natural communication and provide an important foundation for more explicit tests of the functional contributions of these neocortical areas during vocal behaviors. PMID:26084912

  13. Neuronal circuitry controlling the near response.

    PubMed

    Mays, L E; Gamlin, P D

    1995-12-01

    Experiments in primates have contributed greatly to our understanding of the neural mechanisms involved in the eye movements required to view objects at different distances. Early work focused on the circuitry for generating horizontal vergence eye movements alone. However, vergence eye movements are associated with lens accommodation and are usually accompanied by saccadic eye movements, so more recent work has been directed at understanding the interactions between vergence and accommodation, and between vergence and saccades. A new model explains the neural basis for interactions between vergence and accommodation by a neural network in which pre-motor elements are shared by these two systems. The effects of saccades on vergence eye movements appear to be the result of shared pre-motor circuits as well. Current evidence suggests that pontine omnipause neurons, known to be crucial for the generation of saccades, play an important role in the vergence pre-motor circuitry.

  14. Attenuated cold defense responses in orexin neuron-ablated rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mazher; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Blessing, William; Ootsuka, Youichirou

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent reports of the use of transgenic mice targeting orexin neurons show that the ablation of orexin neurons in the hypothalamus causes hypothermia during cold exposure. This suggests the importance of orexin neurons for cold-induced autonomic and physiological defense responses, including brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis and vasoconstriction in thermoregulatory cutaneous vascular bed. The present study investigated whether the ablation of orexin neurons attenuated cold-elicited BAT thermogenesis and cutaneous vasoconstriction. The study took advantage of our established conscious rat experimental model of direct measurement of BAT and body temperature and tail cutaneous blood flow. The study used transgenic orexin neurons-ablated (ORX-AB) rats and wild type (WT) rats. BAT temperature and tail artery blood flow with pre-implanted probes were measured, as well as behavioral locomotor activity under conscious free-moving condition. Gradually, the ambient temperature was decreased to below 5°C. ORX-AB rats showed an attenuated cold-induced BAT thermogenesis and behavioral activity, and delayed tail vasoconstriction. An ambient temperature that initiated BAT thermogenesis and established full cutaneous vasoconstriction was 14.1 ± 1.9 °C, which was significantly lower than 20.5 ± 1.9 °C, the corresponding value in WT rats (n = 10, P < 0.01). The results from this study suggest that the integrity of orexin-synthesising neurons in thermoregulatory networks is important for full expression of the cold defense responses. PMID:28349086

  15. Responses of neurons in the auditory pathway of the barn owl to partially correlated binaural signals.

    PubMed

    Albeck, Y; Konishi, M

    1995-10-01

    1. Extracellular single-unit recording in anesthetized barn owls was used to study neuronal response to dichotic stimuli of variable binaural correlation (BC). Recordings were made in the output fibers of nucleus laminaris (NL), the anterior division of the ventral lateral lemniscal nucleus (VLVa), the core of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICcC), the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICcLS), and the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx). 2. The response of all neurons sensitive to interaural time difference (ITD) varied with BC. The relationship between BC and impulse number fits a linear, a parabolic, or a ramp model. A linear or parabolic model fits most neurons in low-level nuclei. Higher order neurons in ICx did not respond to noise bursts with strong negative binaural correlation, creating a ramp-like response to BC. 3. A neuron's ability to detect ITD varied as a function of BC. Conversely, a neuron's response to BC changed with ITD. Neurons in NL, VLVa, and ICcC show almost periodic ITD response curves. In these neurons peaks and troughs of ITD response curves diminished as BC decreased, creating a flat ITD response when BC = 0. When BC was set to -1, the most favorable ITD became the least favorable one and vice versa. The ITD response curve of ICx neurons usually has a single dominant peak. The response of those neurons to a negatively correlated noise pair (BC = -1) showed two ITD peaks, flanking the position of the primary peak. 4. The parabolic BC response of NL neurons fits the prediction of the cross-correlation model, assuming half-wave rectification of the sound by the cochlea. Linear response is not predicted by the model. However, the parabolic and the linear neurons probably do not belong to two distinct groups as the difference between them is not statistically significant. Thus, the cross-correlation model provides a good description of the binaural response not only in NL but also in

  16. Empirical Bayesian significance measure of neuronal spike response.

    PubMed

    Oba, Shigeyuki; Nakae, Ken; Ikegaya, Yuji; Aki, Shunsuke; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Ishii, Shin

    2016-05-21

    Functional connectivity analyses of multiple neurons provide a powerful bottom-up approach to reveal functions of local neuronal circuits by using simultaneous recording of neuronal activity. A statistical methodology, generalized linear modeling (GLM) of the spike response function, is one of the most promising methodologies to reduce false link discoveries arising from pseudo-correlation based on common inputs. Although recent advancement of fluorescent imaging techniques has increased the number of simultaneously recoded neurons up to the hundreds or thousands, the amount of information per pair of neurons has not correspondingly increased, partly because of the instruments' limitations, and partly because the number of neuron pairs increase in a quadratic manner. Consequently, the estimation of GLM suffers from large statistical uncertainty caused by the shortage in effective information. In this study, we propose a new combination of GLM and empirical Bayesian testing for the estimation of spike response functions that enables both conservative false discovery control and powerful functional connectivity detection. We compared our proposed method's performance with those of sparse estimation of GLM and classical Granger causality testing. Our method achieved high detection performance of functional connectivity with conservative estimation of false discovery rate and q values in case of information shortage due to short observation time. We also showed that empirical Bayesian testing on arbitrary statistics in place of likelihood-ratio statistics reduce the computational cost without decreasing the detection performance. When our proposed method was applied to a functional multi-neuron calcium imaging dataset from the rat hippocampal region, we found significant functional connections that are possibly mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. The proposed empirical Bayesian testing framework with GLM is promising especially when the amount of information per a

  17. Loss of Npn1 from motor neurons causes postnatal deficits independent from Sema3A signaling.

    PubMed

    Helmbrecht, Michaela S; Soellner, Heidi; Truckenbrodt, Anna M L; Sundermeier, Julia; Cohrs, Christian; Hans, Wolfgang; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Feuchtinger, Annette; Aichler, Michaela; Fouad, Karim; Huber, Andrea B

    2015-03-01

    The correct wiring of neuronal circuits is of crucial importance for the function of the vertebrate nervous system. Guidance cues like the neuropilin receptors (Npn) and their ligands, the semaphorins (Sema) provide a tight spatiotemporal control of sensory and motor axon growth and guidance. Among this family of guidance partners the Sema3A-Npn1 interaction has been shown to be of great importance, since defective signaling leads to wiring deficits and defasciculation. For the embryonic stage these defects have been well described, however, also after birth the organism can adapt to new challenges by compensational mechanisms. Therefore, we used the mouse lines Olig2-Cre;Npn1(cond) and Npn1(Sema-) to investigate how postnatal organisms cope with the loss of Npn1 selectively from motor neurons or a systemic dysfunctional Sema3A-Npn1 signaling in the entire organism, respectively. While in Olig2-Cre(+);Npn1(cond-/-) mice clear anatomical deficits in paw posturing, bone structure, as well as muscle and nerve composition became evident, Npn1(Sema-) mutants appeared anatomically normal. Furthermore, Olig2-Cre(+);Npn1(cond) mutants revealed a dysfunctional extensor muscle innervation after single-train stimulation of the N.radial. Interestingly, these mice did not show obvious deficits in voluntary locomotion, however, skilled motor function was affected. In contrast, Npn1(Sema-) mutants were less affected in all behavioral tests and able to improve their performance over time. Our data suggest that loss of Sema3A-Npn1 signaling is not the only cause for the observed deficits in Olig2-Cre(+);Npn1(cond-/-) mice and that additional, yet unknown binding partners for Npn1 may be involved that allow Npn1(Sema-) mutants to compensate for their developmental deficits.

  18. Intrinsic response of thoracic propriospinal neurons to axotomy.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Justin R; Middelton, Frank A; Stelzner, Dennis J

    2010-06-04

    Central nervous system axons lack a robust regenerative response following spinal cord injury (SCI) and regeneration is usually abortive. Supraspinal pathways, which are the most commonly studied for their regenerative potential, demonstrate a limited regenerative ability. On the other hand, propriospinal (PS) neurons, with axons intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than their supraspinal counterparts, but remain relatively understudied in regards to spinal cord injury. Utilizing laser microdissection, gene-microarray, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we focused on the intrinsic post-axotomy response of specifically labelled thoracic propriospinal neurons at periods from 3-days to 1-month following T9 spinal cord injury. We found a strong and early (3-days post injury, p.i) upregulation in the expression of genes involved in the immune/inflammatory response that returned towards normal by 1-week p.i. In addition, several regeneration associated and cell survival/neuroprotective genes were significantly up-regulated at the earliest p.i. period studied. Significant upregulation of several growth factor receptor genes (GFRa1, Ret, Lifr) also occurred only during the initial period examined. The expression of a number of pro-apoptotic genes up-regulated at 3-days p.i. suggest that changes in gene expression after this period may have resulted from analyzing surviving TPS neurons after the cell death of the remainder of the axotomized TPS neuronal population. Taken collectively these data demonstrate that thoracic propriospinal (TPS) neurons mount a very dynamic response following low thoracic axotomy that includes a strong regenerative response, but also results in the cell death of many axotomized TPS neurons in the first week after spinal cord injury. These data also suggest that the immune/inflammatory response may have an important role in mediating the early strong regenerative response, as well as the apoptotic response

  19. Linear control of neuronal spike timing using phase response curves.

    PubMed

    Stigen, Tyler; Danzl, Per; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple, robust, linear method to control the spike timing of a periodically firing neuron. The control scheme uses the neuron's phase response curve to identify an area of optimal sensitivity for the chosen stimulation parameters. The spike advance as a function of current pulse amplitude is characterized at the optimal phase and a linear least-squares regression is fit to the data. The inverted regression is used as the control function for this method. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated through numerical simulations of a Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model as well as in real neurons from rat hippocampal slice preparations. The study shows a proof of concept for the application of a linear control scheme to control neuron spike timing in-vitro. This study was done on an individual cell level, but translation to a tissue or network level is possible. Control schemes of this type could be implemented in a closed loop implantable device to treat neuromotor disorders involving pathologically neuronal activity such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease.

  20. Phasic activation of ventral tegmental neurons increases response and pattern similarity in prefrontal cortex neurons

    PubMed Central

    Iwashita, Motoko

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is critical for higher neural processes and modifying the activity of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, the mechanism of dopamine contribution to the modification of neural representation is unclear. Using in vivo two-photon population Ca2+ imaging in awake mice, this study investigated how neural representation of visual input to PFC neurons is regulated by dopamine. Phasic stimulation of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) evoked prolonged Ca2+ transients, lasting ∼30 s in layer 2/3 neurons of the PFC, which are regulated by a dopamine D1 receptor-dependent pathway. Furthermore, only a conditioning protocol with visual sensory input applied 0.5 s before the VTA dopaminergic input could evoke enhanced Ca2+ transients and increased pattern similarity (or establish a neural representation) of PFC neurons to the same sensory input. By increasing both the level of neuronal response and pattern similarity, dopaminergic input may establish robust and reliable cortical representation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02726.001 PMID:25269147

  1. Role of spinal bombesin-responsive neurons in nonhistaminergic itch

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Tasuku; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Takamori, Kenji; Carstens, E.

    2014-01-01

    Intrathecal administration of the neurotoxin bombesin-saporin reduces or abolishes pruritogen-evoked scratching behavior. We investigated whether spinal neurons that respond to intradermal (ID) injection of pruritogens also respond to spinal superfusion of bombesin and vice versa. Single-unit recordings were made from superficial lumbar spinal dorsal horn neurons in anesthetized mice. We identified neurons with three search strategies: 1) ID injection of the nonhistaminergic itch mediator chloroquine, 2) spinal superfusion of bombesin, and 3) noxious pinch. All units were tested with an array of itch mediators (chloroquine, histamine, SLIGRL, BAM8-22), algogens [capsaicin, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)], and physical stimuli (brush, pinch, noxious heat, cooling) applied to the hindlimb receptive field. The vast majority of chloroquine-responsive units also responded to bombesin. Of 26 chloroquine-sensitive units tested, most responded to SLIGRL, half responded to histamine and/or BAM8-22, and most responded to capsaicin and/or AITC as well as noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli. Of 29 bombesin-responsive units, a large majority also responded to other itch mediators as well as AITC, capsaicin, and noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli. Responses to successive applications of bombesin exhibited tachyphylaxis. In contrast, of 36 units responsive to noxious pinch, the majority (67%) did not respond to ID chloroquine or spinal bombesin. It is suggested that chloroquine- and bombesin-sensitive spinal neurons signal itch from the skin. PMID:25122701

  2. Exon Silencing by UAGG Motifs in Response to Neuronal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    An, Ping; Grabowski, Paula J

    2007-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays fundamental roles in neurons by generating functional diversity in proteins associated with the communication and connectivity of the synapse. The CI cassette of the NMDA R1 receptor is one of a variety of exons that show an increase in exon skipping in response to cell excitation, but the molecular nature of this splicing responsiveness is not yet understood. Here we investigate the molecular basis for the induced changes in splicing of the CI cassette exon in primary rat cortical cultures in response to KCl-induced depolarization using an expression assay with a tight neuron-specific readout. In this system, exon silencing in response to neuronal excitation was mediated by multiple UAGG-type silencing motifs, and transfer of the motifs to a constitutive exon conferred a similar responsiveness by gain of function. Biochemical analysis of protein binding to UAGG motifs in extracts prepared from treated and mock-treated cortical cultures showed an increase in nuclear hnRNP A1-RNA binding activity in parallel with excitation. Evidence for the role of the NMDA receptor and calcium signaling in the induced splicing response was shown by the use of specific antagonists, as well as cell-permeable inhibitors of signaling pathways. Finally, a wider role for exon-skipping responsiveness is shown to involve additional exons with UAGG-related silencing motifs, and transcripts involved in synaptic functions. These results suggest that, at the post-transcriptional level, excitable exons such as the CI cassette may be involved in strategies by which neurons mount adaptive responses to hyperstimulation. PMID:17298175

  3. Neuronal modelling of baroreflex response to orthostatic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samin, Azfar

    The accelerations experienced in aerial combat can cause pilot loss of consciousness (GLOC) due to a critical reduction in cerebral blood circulation. The development of smart protective equipment requires understanding of how the brain processes blood pressure (BP) information in response to acceleration. We present a biologically plausible model of the Baroreflex to investigate the neural correlates of short-term BP control under acceleration or orthostatic stress. The neuronal network model, which employs an integrate-and-fire representation of a biological neuron, comprises the sensory, motor, and the central neural processing areas that form the Baroreflex. Our modelling strategy is to test hypotheses relating to the encoding mechanisms of multiple sensory inputs to the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the site of central neural processing. The goal is to run simulations and reproduce model responses that are consistent with the variety of available experimental data. Model construction and connectivity are inspired by the available anatomical and neurophysiological evidence that points to a barotopic organization in the NTS, and the presence of frequency-dependent synaptic depression, which provides a mechanism for generating non-linear local responses in NTS neurons that result in quantifiable dynamic global baroreflex responses. The entire physiological range of BP and rate of change of BP variables is encoded in a palisade of NTS neurons in that the spike responses approximate Gaussian 'tuning' curves. An adapting weighted-average decoding scheme computes the motor responses and a compensatory signal regulates the heart rate (HR). Model simulations suggest that: (1) the NTS neurons can encode the hydrostatic pressure difference between two vertically separated sensory receptor regions at +Gz, and use changes in that difference for the regulation of HR; (2) even though NTS neurons do not fire with a cardiac rhythm seen in the afferents, pulse

  4. Expression by midbrain dopamine neurons of Sema3A and 3F receptors is associated with chemorepulsion in vitro but a mild in vivo phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Enrique R.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Here we explore the role of semaphorin 3A and 3F (Sema3A, Sema3F) in the formation of the mesotelencephalic pathway. We show that Sema3A and 3F are expressed in the ventral mesencephalon (VM) of E13.5 rat embryos; the receptors Neuropilin 1 and Neuropilin 2, and coreceptors L1CAM, NrCAM, and Plexins A1 and A3 but not A4 are expressed by VM dopaminergic neurons; these neurons bind Sema3A and 3F in vitro which induces collapse of their growth cones and elicits, with different potencies, a repulsive response; and this response is absent in axons from Nrp1 and Nrp2 null embryos. Despite these in vitro effects, only very mild anatomical defects were detected in the organization of the mesotelencephalic pathway in embryonic and adult Nrp1 or Nrp2 null mice. However, the dopaminergic meso-habenular pathway and catecholaminergic neurons in the parafascicular and paraventricular nuclei of the thalamus were significantly affected in Nrp2 null mice. These data are consistent with a model whereby Sema3A and 3F, in combination with other guidance molecules, contributes to the navigation of DA axons to their final synaptic targets. PMID:20298787

  5. Expression by midbrain dopamine neurons of Sema3A and 3F receptors is associated with chemorepulsion in vitro but a mild in vivo phenotype.

    PubMed

    Torre, Enrique R; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E

    2010-06-01

    Here we explore the role of semaphorin 3A and 3F (Sema3A, Sema3F) in the formation of the mesotelencephalic pathway. We show that Sema3A and 3F are expressed in the ventral mesencephalon (VM) of E13.5 rat embryos; the receptors Neuropilin 1 and Neuropilin 2, and co-receptors L1CAM, NrCAM, and Plexins A1 and A3 but not A4 are expressed by VM dopaminergic neurons; these neurons bind Sema3A and 3F in vitro which induces collapse of their growth cones and elicits, with different potencies, a repulsive response; and this response is absent in axons from Nrp1 and Nrp2 null embryos. Despite these in vitro effects, only very mild anatomical defects were detected in the organization of the mesotelencephalic pathway in embryonic and adult Nrp1 or Nrp2 null mice. However, the dopaminergic meso-habenular pathway and catecholaminergic neurons in the parafascicular and paraventricular nuclei of the thalamus were significantly affected in Nrp2 null mice. These data are consistent with a model whereby Sema3A and 3F, in combination with other guidance molecules, contributes to the navigation of DA axons to their final synaptic targets.

  6. Liganded Thyroid Hormone Receptors Transactivate the DNA Methyltransferase 3a Gene in Mouse Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kyono, Yasuhiro; Subramani, Arasakumar; Ramadoss, Preeti; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Bonett, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) is essential for proper neurological development. The hormone, bound to its receptors, regulates gene transcription in part by modulating posttranslational modifications of histones. Methylation of DNA, which is established by the de novo DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)3a and DNMT3b, and maintained by DNMT1 is another epigenetic modification influencing gene transcription. The expression of Dnmt3a, but not other Dnmt genes, increases in mouse brain in parallel with the postnatal rise in plasma [T3]. We found that treatment of the mouse neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a[TRβ1] with T3 caused rapid induction of Dnmt3a mRNA, which was resistant to protein synthesis inhibition, supporting that it is a direct T3-response gene. Injection of T3 into postnatal day 6 mice increased Dnmt3a mRNA in the brain by 1 hour. Analysis of two chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing datasets, and targeted analyses using chromatin immunoprecipitation, transfection-reporter assays, and in vitro DNA binding identified 2 functional T3-response elements (TREs) at the mouse Dnmt3a locus located +30.3 and +49.3 kb from the transcription start site. Thyroid hormone receptors associated with both of these regions in mouse brain chromatin, but with only 1 (+30.3 kb) in Neuro2a[TRβ1] cells. Deletion of the +30.3-kb TRE using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing eliminated or strongly reduced the Dnmt3a mRNA response to T3. Bioinformatics analysis showed that both TREs are highly conserved among eutherian mammals. Thyroid regulation of Dnmt3a may be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for modulating global changes in DNA methylation during postnatal neurological development. PMID:27387481

  7. Response Properties of Cochlear Nucleus Neurons in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G. Linn; Recio, A.

    2009-01-01

    Much of what is known about how the cochlear nuclei participate in mammalian hearing comes from studies of non-primate mammalian species. To determine to what extent the cochlear nuclei of primates resemble those of other mammalian orders, we have recorded responses to sound in three primate species: marmosets, Cynomolgus macaques, and squirrel monkeys. These recordings show that the same types of temporal firing patterns are found in primates that have been described in other mammals. Responses to tones of neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus have similar tuning, latencies, post-stimulus time and interspike interval histograms as those recorded in non-primate cochlear nucleus neurons. In the dorsal cochlear nucleus, too, responses were similar. From these results it is evident that insights gained from non-primate studies can be applied to the peripheral auditory system of primates. PMID:19531377

  8. Finite Post Synaptic Potentials Cause a Fast Neuronal Response

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Deger, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan; Diesmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    A generic property of the communication between neurons is the exchange of pulses at discrete time points, the action potentials. However, the prevalent theory of spiking neuronal networks of integrate-and-fire model neurons relies on two assumptions: the superposition of many afferent synaptic impulses is approximated by Gaussian white noise, equivalent to a vanishing magnitude of the synaptic impulses, and the transfer of time varying signals by neurons is assessable by linearization. Going beyond both approximations, we find that in the presence of synaptic impulses the response to transient inputs differs qualitatively from previous predictions. It is instantaneous rather than exhibiting low-pass characteristics, depends non-linearly on the amplitude of the impulse, is asymmetric for excitation and inhibition and is promoted by a characteristic level of synaptic background noise. These findings resolve contradictions between the earlier theory and experimental observations. Here we review the recent theoretical progress that enabled these insights. We explain why the membrane potential near threshold is sensitive to properties of the afferent noise and show how this shapes the neural response. A further extension of the theory to time evolution in discrete steps quantifies simulation artifacts and yields improved methods to cross check results. PMID:21427776

  9. HDAC2 selectively regulates FOXO3a-mediated gene transcription during oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shengyi; Zhao, Siqi; Yan, Feng; Cheng, Jinbo; Huang, Li; Chen, Hong; Liu, Qingsong; Ji, Xunming; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2015-01-21

    All neurodegenerative diseases are associated with oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) is a key transcription factor involved in neuronal apoptosis. However, how FOXO3a forms complexes and functions in oxidative stress processing remains largely unknown. In the present study, we show that histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) forms a physical complex with FOXO3a, which plays an important role in FOXO3a-dependent gene transcription and oxidative stress-induced mouse cerebellar granule neuron (CGN) apoptosis. Interestingly, we also found that HDAC2 became selectively enriched in the promoter region of the p21 gene, but not those of other target genes, and inhibited FOXO3a-mediated p21 transcription. Furthermore, we found that oxidative stress reduced the interaction between FOXO3a and HDAC2, leading to an increased histone H4K16 acetylation level in the p21 promoter region and upregulated p21 expression in a manner independent of p53 or E2F1. Phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 is important for the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction, and we found that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion reduced phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 and mitigated the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction in mouse brain tissue. Our study reveals the novel regulation of FOXO3a-mediated selective gene transcription via epigenetic modification in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death, which could be exploited therapeutically.

  10. Benzodiazepines do not potentiate GABA responses in neonatal hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rovira, C; Ben-Ari, Y

    1991-09-16

    Benzodiazepines (midazolam; flunitrazepam) and pentobarbital increase the response to exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in adult hippocampal cells. We report in this paper that in contrast pentobarbital but not benzodiazepine potentiate the effects of exogenous (GABA) in neurons recorded from slices of less than two weeks old. This finding suggests that the functional association of benzodiazepine and GABAA receptors is changed during early postnatal life.

  11. Response of a neuronal membrane to applied sinusoidal currents.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, P; D'Inzeo, G; Eusebi, F

    1985-09-01

    The membrane model of Connor and Stevens was used to calculate the response of a neuron to an injected sinusoidal current. This stimulating current simulates the effects of cell exposure to incident time-harmonic electromagnetic fields. The theoretical results obtained with this model were compared with intracellular recordings carried out during the injection of a sinusoidal transmembrane current through a single microelectrode. Experimental and theoretical data were substantially in agreement for current amplitudes that can be induced by actual exposure conditions.

  12. Responses of rostral fastigial neurons to linear acceleration in an alert monkey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Tang, B F; King, W M

    2001-07-01

    Vestibular-only neuronal responses to angular acceleration have been systematically characterized in the rostral fastigial nucleus (FN) by several studies. However, responses of these neurons to linear acceleration have not been examined. In this study, we recorded single-unit activity of vestibular-only neurons in an alert monkey during pure sinusoidal linear acceleration along different directions in the horizontal plane. Spatiotemporal response properties were quantified by computing two-dimensional response ellipses in the horizontal plane. Based on this analysis, neurons were classified as narrowly or broadly tuned. About 29% (5/17) of neurons were broadly tuned. The other 71% (12/17) were narrowly tuned. Unlike vestibular nuclei neurons, all recorded FN neurons exhibited irregular resting discharge rates (CV*0.2). Based on studies of linear motion-sensitive neurons in the vestibular nuclei, the data suggest that irregular neurons in the rostral FN and the vestibular nuclei have similar responses to linear acceleration in behaving monkeys.

  13. Channel shutdown: a response of hippocampal neurons to adverse environments.

    PubMed

    Somjen, G G; Faas, G C; Vreugdenhil, M; Wadman, W J

    1993-12-31

    Stretch-activated ion channels have been discovered in the membrane of many types of cells, but their presence in neurons is uncertain. We used freshly dissociated rat hippocampal neurons to study the effect of hypotonic swelling but, surprisingly, the isolated neurons did not swell. Voltage-dependent whole-cell membrane currents mediated by K+, Na+ and Ca2+ were rapidly and reversibly suppressed during sudden exposure to strongly hypo-osmotic, hyper-osmotic or glucose deficient solutions. The amplitudes of the sustained components of K+ and Ca2+ currents were more depressed than transient currents, but the rate of decay of transient K+ current greatly accelerated. The voltage dependence of activation and of steady state inactivation of residual K+ and Ca2+ currents were not shifted. The current holding membrane potential at -70 mV and therefore the conductance at that voltage were unchanged or somewhat decreased. Capacitive (charging) membrane current was not affected. Changes in tail current suggested moderate loss of cytosolic K+ in some but not in all cells. We conclude that channel shutdown is a uniform response of neuron somata and proximal dendrites to various adverse environments. Hypothetically we propose that swelling was prevented in anisosmotic conditions because membrane water permeability decreased.

  14. Aerobic exercise reduces neuronal responses in food reward brain regions.

    PubMed

    Evero, Nero; Hackett, Laura C; Clark, Robert D; Phelan, Suzanne; Hagobian, Todd A

    2012-05-01

    Acute exercise suppresses ad libitum energy intake, but little is known about the effects of exercise on food reward brain regions. After an overnight fast, 30 (17 men, 13 women), healthy, habitually active (age = 22.2 ± 0.7 yr, body mass index = 23.6 ± 0.4 kg/m(2), Vo(2peak) = 44.2 ± 1.5 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) individuals completed 60 min of exercise on a cycle ergometer or 60 min of rest (no-exercise) in a counterbalanced, crossover fashion. After each condition, blood oxygen level-dependent responses to high-energy food, low-energy food, and control visual cues, were measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Exercise, compared with no-exercise, significantly (P < 0.005) reduced the neuronal response to food (high and low food) cues vs. control cues in the insula (-0.37 ± 0.13 vs. +0.07 ± 0.18%), putamen (-0.39 ± 0.10 vs. -0.10 ± 0.09%), and rolandic operculum (-0.37 ± 0.17 vs. 0.17 ± 0.12%). Exercise alone significantly (P < 0.005) reduced the neuronal response to high food vs. control and low food vs. control cues in the inferior orbitofrontal cortex (-0.94 ± 0.33%), insula (-0.37 ± 0.13%), and putamen (-0.41 ± 0.10%). No-exercise alone significantly (P < 0.005) reduced the neuronal response to high vs. control and low vs. control cues in the middle (-0.47 ± 0.15%) and inferior occipital gyrus (-1.00 ± 0.23%). Exercise reduced neuronal responses in brain regions consistent with reduced pleasure of food, reduced incentive motivation to eat, and reduced anticipation and consumption of food. Reduced neuronal response in these food reward brain regions after exercise is in line with the paradigm that acute exercise suppresses subsequent energy intake.

  15. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-06

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS.

  16. GABAergic neuron-specific loss of Ube3a causes Angelman syndrome-like EEG abnormalities and enhances seizure susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Matthew C.; Wallace, Michael L.; Sidorov, Michael S.; Burette, Alain C.; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M.; King, Ian F.; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J.; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) – all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. PMID:27021170

  17. Strychnine-sensitive glycine responses of neonatal rat hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Cherubini, E

    1991-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings employing current and voltage clamp techniques were used to study the effects of glycine on rat CA3 hippocampal neurones during the first 3 weeks of postnatal (P) life. 2. Glycine (0.3-1 mM) depolarized neurones from rats less than 4 days old (P4). Neurones from older neonates (P5-P7) were hyperpolarized by glycine, whereas adult neurones were unaffected. 3. Both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing responses were associated with large conductance increases; they reversed polarity at a potential which changed with the extracellular chloride concentration. The responses persisted in tetrodotoxin (1 microM) or in a solution with a much reduced calcium concentration. 4. Strychnine (1 microM) but not bicuculline (10-50 microM) antagonized the effects of glycine. The action of strychnine was apparently competitive with a dissociation constant of 350 nM. 5. In voltage clamp experiments, glycine elicited a non-desensitizing outward current at -60 mV. When a maximal concentration of glycine was applied at the same time as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the conductance increase induced by the two agonists was additive, suggesting the activation of different populations of channels. 6. Concentrations of glycine lower than 100 microM did not affect membrane potential. However, at 30-50 microM glycine increased the frequency of spontaneous GABA-mediated synaptic responses; this action was not blocked by strychnine. 7. It is concluded that during the first 2 weeks of life glycine acts at strychnine-sensitive receptors to open chloride channels. PMID:1804982

  18. DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a contributes to neuropathic pain by repressing Kcna2 in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Liang, Lingli; Gu, Xiyao; Li, Zhisong; Wu, Shaogen; Sun, Linlin; Atianjoh, Fidelis E.; Feng, Jian; Mo, Kai; Jia, Shushan; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Nestler, Eric J.; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Nerve injury induces changes in gene transcription in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which may contribute to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. DNA methylation represses gene expression. Here, we report that peripheral nerve injury increases expression of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a in the injured DRG neurons via the activation of the transcription factor octamer transcription factor 1. Blocking this increase prevents nerve injury-induced methylation of the voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channel subunit Kcna2 promoter region and rescues Kcna2 expression in the injured DRG and attenuates neuropathic pain. Conversely, in the absence of nerve injury, mimicking this increase reduces the Kcna2 promoter activity, diminishes Kcna2 expression, decreases Kv current, increases excitability in DRG neurons and leads to spinal cord central sensitization and neuropathic pain symptoms. These findings suggest that DNMT3a may contribute to neuropathic pain by repressing Kcna2 expression in the DRG. PMID:28270689

  19. Ccm3, a gene associated with cerebral cavernous malformations, is required for neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Louvi, Angeliki; Nishimura, Sayoko; Günel, Murat

    2014-03-01

    Loss of function of cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3) results in an autosomal dominant cerebrovascular disorder. Here, we uncover a developmental role for CCM3 in regulating neuronal migration in the neocortex. Using cell type-specific gene inactivation in mice, we show that CCM3 has both cell autonomous and cell non-autonomous functions in neural progenitors and is specifically required in radial glia and newly born pyramidal neurons migrating through the subventricular zone, but not in those migrating through the cortical plate. Loss of CCM3 function leads to RhoA activation, alterations in the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton affecting neuronal morphology, and abnormalities in laminar positioning of primarily late-born neurons, indicating CCM3 involvement in radial glia-dependent locomotion and possible interaction with the Cdk5/RhoA pathway. Thus, we identify a novel cytoplasmic regulator of neuronal migration and demonstrate that its inactivation in radial glia progenitors and nascent neurons produces severe malformations of cortical development.

  20. Influence of Reward Delays on Responses of Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Psychological and microeconomic studies have shown that outcome values are discounted by imposed delays. The effect, called temporal discounting, is demonstrated typically by choice preferences for sooner smaller rewards over later larger rewards. However, it is unclear whether temporal discounting occurs during the decision process when differently delayed reward outcomes are compared or during predictions of reward delays by pavlovian conditioned stimuli without choice. To address this issue, we investigated the temporal discounting behavior in a choice situation and studied the effects of reward delay on the value signals of dopamine neurons. The choice behavior confirmed hyperbolic discounting of reward value by delays on the order of seconds. Reward delay reduced the responses of dopamine neurons to pavlovian conditioned stimuli according to a hyperbolic decay function similar to that observed in choice behavior. Moreover, the stimulus responses increased with larger reward magnitudes, suggesting that both delay and magnitude constituted viable components of dopamine value signals. In contrast, dopamine responses to the reward itself increased with longer delays, possibly reflecting temporal uncertainty and partial learning. These dopamine reward value signals might serve as useful inputs for brain mechanisms involved in economic choices between delayed rewards. PMID:18667616

  1. ESTRADIOL RAPIDLY MODULATES ODOR RESPONSES IN MOUSE VOMERONASAL SENSORY NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    CHERIAN, S.; LAM, Y. WAI; MCDANIELS, I.; STRUZIAK, M.; DELAY, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    In rodents, many social behaviors are driven by the sense of smell. The vomeronasal organ (VNO), part of the accessory olfactory system mediates many of these chemically driven behaviors. The VNO is heavily vascularized, and is readily accessible to circulating peptide or steroid hormones. Potentially, this allows circulating hormones to alter behavior through modulating the output of the primary sensory neurons in the VNO, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs). Based on this, we hypothesized that steroid hormones, in particular 17β-estradiol, would modulate activity of VSNs. In this paper, we show that the estrogen receptors, GPR30 and ERα, were present in VSNs and that estradiol may be synthesized locally in the VNO. Our results also showed that 17β-estradiol decreased responses of isolated VSNs to dilute urine, a potent natural stimulus, with respect to current amplitudes and depolarization. Further, 17β-estradiol increased the latency of the first action potential (AP) and the AP amplitude. Additionally, calcium responses to sulfated steroids (present in the low molecular weight fraction of urine) that act as ligands for apical vomeronasal receptors were decreased by 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, we show that estradiol modulates odorant responses mediated by VSNs and hence paves the way for future studies to better understand the mechanisms by which odorant mediated behavior is altered by endocrine status of the animal. PMID:24680884

  2. Responses of inferior colliculus neurons to double harmonic tones.

    PubMed

    Sinex, Donal G; Li, Hongzhe

    2007-12-01

    The auditory system can segregate sounds that overlap in time and frequency, if the sounds differ in acoustic properties such as fundamental frequency (f0). However, the neural mechanisms that underlie this ability are poorly understood. Responses of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the anesthetized chinchilla were measured. The stimuli were harmonic tones, presented alone (single harmonic tones) and in the presence of a second harmonic tone with a different f0 (double harmonic tones). Responses to single harmonic tones exhibited no stimulus-related temporal pattern, or in some cases, a simple envelope modulated at f0. Responses to double harmonic tones exhibited complex slowly modulated discharge patterns. The discharge pattern varied with the difference in f0 and with characteristic frequency. The discharge pattern also varied with the relative levels of the two tones; complex temporal patterns were observed when levels were equal, but as the level difference increased, the discharge pattern reverted to that associated with single harmonic tones. The results indicated that IC neurons convey information about simultaneous sounds in their temporal discharge patterns and that the patterns are produced by interactions between adjacent components in the spectrum. The representation is "low-resolution," in that it does not convey information about single resolved components from either individual sound.

  3. In Vitro Ischemia Triggers a Transcriptional Response to Down-Regulate Synaptic Proteins in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Joana; Vieira, Marta; Carreto, Laura; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Duarte, Carlos B.; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Santos, Armanda E.

    2014-01-01

    Transient global cerebral ischemia induces profound changes in the transcriptome of brain cells, which is partially associated with the induction or repression of genes that influence the ischemic response. However, the mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of hippocampal neurons to global ischemia remain to be clarified. To identify molecular changes elicited by ischemic insults, we subjected hippocampal primary cultures to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model for global ischemia that resulted in delayed neuronal death with an excitotoxic component. To investigate changes in the transcriptome of hippocampal neurons submitted to OGD, total RNA was extracted at early (7 h) and delayed (24 h) time points after OGD and used in a whole-genome RNA microarray. We observed that at 7 h after OGD there was a general repression of genes, whereas at 24 h there was a general induction of gene expression. Genes related with functions such as transcription and RNA biosynthesis were highly regulated at both periods of incubation after OGD, confirming that the response to ischemia is a dynamic and coordinated process. Our analysis showed that genes for synaptic proteins, such as those encoding for PICK1, GRIP1, TARPγ3, calsyntenin-2/3, SAPAP2 and SNAP-25, were down-regulated after OGD. Additionally, OGD decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit as well as the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors, but increased the mRNA expression of the GluN3A subunit, thus altering the composition of ionotropic glutamate receptors in hippocampal neurons. Together, our results present the expression profile elicited by in vitro ischemia in hippocampal neurons, and indicate that OGD activates a transcriptional program leading to down-regulation in the expression of genes coding for synaptic proteins, suggesting that the synaptic proteome may change after ischemia. PMID:24960035

  4. Responses of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons to longitudinal whisker stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, Maik C; Kullmann, Stephanie; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2008-10-01

    Responses of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons to longitudinal whisker stimulation. Rats use their mobile set of whiskers to actively explore their environment. Parameters that play a role to generate movement dynamics of the whisker shaft within the follicle, thus activating primary afferents, are manifold: among them are mechanical properties of the whiskers (curvature, elasticity and taper), active movements (head, body, and whiskers), and finally, object characteristics (surface, geometry, position, and orientation). Hence the whisker system is confronted with forces along all three axes in space. Movements along the two latitudinal axes of the whisker (horizontal and vertical) have been well studied. Here we focus on movement along the whisker's longitudinal axis that has been neglected so far. We employed ramp-and-hold movements that pushed the whisker shaft toward the skin and quantified the resulting activity in trigeminal first-order afferents in anesthetized rats. Virtually all recorded neurons were highly sensitive to longitudinal movement. Neurons could be perfectly segregated into two groups according to their modulation by stimulus amplitude and velocity, respectively. This classification regimen correlated perfectly with the presence or absence of slowly adapting responses in longitudinal stimulation but agreed with classification derived from latitudinal stimulation only if the whisker was engaged in its optimal direction and set point. We conclude that longitudinal stimulation is an extremely effective means to activate the tactile pathway and thus is highly likely to play an important role in tactile coding on the ascending somatosensory pathway. In addition, compared with latitudinal stimulation, it provides a reliable and easy to use method to classify trigeminal first-order afferents.

  5. Tibolone Rapidly Attenuates the GABAB Response in Hypothalamic Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kloosterboer, Helenius J.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Tibolone is primarily used for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone is rapidly converted into three major metabolites: 3α- and 3β-hydroxy-tibolone (3α- and 3βOH-tibolone), which have oestrogenic effects, and the Δ4-isomer (Δ4-tibolone), which has progestogenic and androgenic effects. Since tibolone is effective in treating climacteric symptoms, the effects on the brain may be explained by the oestrogenic activity of tibolone. Previously using whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found that 17β-oestradiol (E2) rapidly altered GABA neurotransmission in hypothalamic neurones through a membrane oestrogen receptor (mER). E2 reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate G-protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying K+ channels in hypothalamic neurones. Therefore, we hypothesized that tibolone may have some rapid effects through the mER and sought to elucidate the signalling pathway of tibolone’s action using selective inhibitors and whole cell recording in ovariectomized female guinea pigs and mice. A sub-population of neurones was identified post hoc as proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones by immunocytochemical staining. Similar to E2, we have found that tibolone and its active metabolite 3βOH-tibolone rapidly reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate GIRK channels in POMC neurones. The effects were blocked by the ER antagonist ICI 182,780. Other metabolites of tibolone (3αOH-tibolone and Δ4-tibolone) had no effect. Furthermore, tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) was fully efficacious in ERαKO and ERβKO mice to attenuate GABAB responses. The effects of tibolone were blocked by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. However, in contrast to E2, the effects of tibolone were not blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors or protein kinase A inhibitors. It appears that tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) activates phospholipase C leading to PIP2 metabolism and direct alteration of GIRK channel function. Therefore, tibolone

  6. Neuronal response impedance mechanism implementing cooperative networks with low firing rates and μs precision

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Marmari, Hagar; Brama, Haya; Stern, Edward A.; Sardi, Shira; Sabo, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Realizations of low firing rates in neural networks usually require globally balanced distributions among excitatory and inhibitory links, while feasibility of temporal coding is limited by neuronal millisecond precision. We show that cooperation, governing global network features, emerges through nodal properties, as opposed to link distributions. Using in vitro and in vivo experiments we demonstrate microsecond precision of neuronal response timings under low stimulation frequencies, whereas moderate frequencies result in a chaotic neuronal phase characterized by degraded precision. Above a critical stimulation frequency, which varies among neurons, response failures were found to emerge stochastically such that the neuron functions as a low pass filter, saturating the average inter-spike-interval. This intrinsic neuronal response impedance mechanism leads to cooperation on a network level, such that firing rates are suppressed toward the lowest neuronal critical frequency simultaneously with neuronal microsecond precision. Our findings open up opportunities of controlling global features of network dynamics through few nodes with extreme properties. PMID:26124707

  7. Predicting the response of olfactory sensory neurons to odor mixtures from single odor response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Addolorata; de Paris, Alessandro; Migliore, Michele

    2016-04-01

    The response of olfactory receptor neurons to odor mixtures is not well understood. Here, using experimental constraints, we investigate the mathematical structure of the odor response space and its consequences. The analysis suggests that the odor response space is 3-dimensional, and predicts that the dose-response curve of an odor receptor can be obtained, in most cases, from three primary components with specific properties. This opens the way to an objective procedure to obtain specific olfactory receptor responses by manipulating mixtures in a mathematically predictable manner. This result is general and applies, independently of the number of odor components, to any olfactory sensory neuron type with a response curve that can be represented as a sigmoidal function of the odor concentration.

  8. Predicting the response of olfactory sensory neurons to odor mixtures from single odor response

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Addolorata; De Paris, Alessandro; Migliore, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The response of olfactory receptor neurons to odor mixtures is not well understood. Here, using experimental constraints, we investigate the mathematical structure of the odor response space and its consequences. The analysis suggests that the odor response space is 3-dimensional, and predicts that the dose-response curve of an odor receptor can be obtained, in most cases, from three primary components with specific properties. This opens the way to an objective procedure to obtain specific olfactory receptor responses by manipulating mixtures in a mathematically predictable manner. This result is general and applies, independently of the number of odor components, to any olfactory sensory neuron type with a response curve that can be represented as a sigmoidal function of the odor concentration. PMID:27053070

  9. Physiological identification and infralimbic responsiveness of rat intercalated amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Amir, Alon; Amano, Taiju; Pare, Denis

    2011-06-01

    Intercalated (ITC) amygdala neurons are thought to play a critical role in the extinction of conditioned fear. However, several factors hinder progress in studying ITC contributions to extinction. First, although extinction is usually studied in rats and mice, most ITC investigations were performed in guinea pigs or cats. Thus it is unclear whether their connectivity is similar across species. Second, we lack criteria to identify ITC cells on the basis of their discharge pattern. As a result, key predictions of ITC extinction models remain untested. Among these, ITC cells were predicted to be strongly excited by infralimbic inputs, explaining why infralimbic inhibition interferes with extinction. To study the connectivity of ITC cells, we labeled them with neurobiotin during patch recordings in slices of the rat amygdala. This revealed that medially located ITC cells project topographically to the central nucleus and to other ITC clusters located more ventrally. To study the infralimbic responsiveness of ITC cells, we performed juxtacellular recording and labeling of amygdala cells with neurobiotin in anesthetized rats. All ITC cells were orthodromically responsive to infralimbic stimuli, and their responses usually consisted of high-frequency (~350 Hz) trains of four to six spikes, a response pattern never seen in neighboring amygdala nuclei. Overall, our results suggest that the connectivity of ITC cells is conserved across species and that ITC cells are strongly responsive to infralimbic stimuli, as predicted by extinction models. The unique response pattern of ITC cells to infralimbic stimuli can now be used to identify them in fear conditioning experiments.

  10. Characterization of the chemosensitive response of individual solitary complex neurons from adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Mulkey, Daniel K.; Wilkinson, Katherine A.; Powell, Frank L.; Dean, Jay B.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the CO2/H+-chemosensitive responses of individual solitary complex (SC) neurons from adult rats by simultaneously measuring the intracellular pH (pHi) and electrical responses to hypercapnic acidosis (HA). SC neurons were recorded using the blind whole cell patch-clamp technique and loading the soma with the pH-sensitive dye pyranine through the patch pipette. We found that SC neurons from adult rats have a lower steady-state pHi than SC neurons from neonatal rats. In the presence of chemical and electrical synaptic blockade, adult SC neurons have firing rate responses to HA (percentage of neurons activated or inhibited and the magnitude of response as determined by the chemosensitivity index) that are similar to SC neurons from neonatal rats. They also have a typical response to isohydric hypercapnia, including decreased ΔpHi, followed by pHi recovery, and increased firing rate. Thus, the chemosensitive response of SC neurons from adults is similar to the chemosensitive response of SC neurons from neonatal rats. Because our findings for adults are similar to previously reported values for neurons from neonatal rats, we conclude that intrinsic chemosensitivity is established early in development for SC neurons and is maintained throughout adulthood. PMID:19144749

  11. [Responses of neurons of the associative parietal cortex during acute extinction restoration of a conditioned reflex].

    PubMed

    Prikhodchenko, N N

    1977-01-01

    The dynamics of spike neuronal activity in the parietal associative cortex was studied in the course of acute extinction and restoration of a conditioned reflex. Certain similarities have been found in neuronal firing during the reorganization of behavioral acts (transient processes in neuronal activity, general types of neuronal responses, etc.) The data obtained suggest the involvement of neurones of the parietal associative cortex in the processes related to the reorganization of behavioral acts, and the existence of common mechanisms of search for an optimal regime of neuronal assemblies functioning in different types of conditioned activity.

  12. Differential Responses of Thalamic Reticular Neurons to Nociception in Freely Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2016-01-01

    Pain serves an important protective role. However, it can also have debilitating adverse effects if dysfunctional, such as in pathological pain conditions. As part of the thalamocortical circuit, the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) has been implicated to have important roles in controlling nociceptive signal transmission. However studies on how TRN neurons, especially how TRN neuronal subtypes categorized by temporal bursting firing patterns—typical bursting, atypical bursting and non-bursting TRN neurons—contribute to nociceptive signal modulation is not known. To reveal the relationship between TRN neuronal subtypes and modulation of nociception, we simultaneously recorded behavioral responses and TRN neuronal activity to formalin induced nociception in freely moving mice. We found that typical bursting TRN neurons had the most robust response to nociception; changes in tonic firing rate of typical TRN neurons exactly matched changes in behavioral nociceptive responses, and burst firing rate of these neurons increased significantly when behavioral nociceptive responses were reduced. This implies that typical TRN neurons could critically modulate ascending nociceptive signals. The role of other TRN neuronal subtypes was less clear; atypical bursting TRN neurons decreased tonic firing rate after the second peak of behavioral nociception and the firing rate of non-bursting TRN neurons mostly remained at baseline level. Overall, our results suggest that different TRN neuronal subtypes contribute differentially to processing formalin induced sustained nociception in freely moving mice. PMID:27917114

  13. Visual potentiation of vestibular responses in lamprey reticulospinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ullén, F; Deliagina, T G; Orlovsky, G N; Grillner, S

    1996-11-01

    The lamprey normally swims with the dorsal side up. Illumination of one eye shifts the set-point of the vestibular roll control system, however, so that the animal swims with a roll tilt towards the source of light (the dorsal light response). A tilted orientation is often maintained for up to 1 min after the stimulation. In present study, the basis for this behaviour was investigated at the neuronal level. The middle rhombencephalic reticular nucleus (MRRN) is considered a main nucleus for the control of roll orientation in lampreys. Practically all MRRN neurons receive vestibular and visual input and project to the spinal cord. Earlier extracellular experiments had shown that optic nerve stimulation potentiates the response to vestibular stimulation in the ipsilateral MRRN. This most likely represents a neural correlate of the dorsal light response. Experiments were carried out in vitro on the isolated brainstem of the silver lamprey (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis). MRRN cells were recorded intracellularly, and the overall activity of descending systems was monitored with bilateral extracellular electrodes. The responses to 10 Hz optic nerve stimulation and 1 Hz vestibular nerve stimulation, and the influence of optic nerve stimulation on the vestibular responses, were investigated. In most preparations, optic nerve stimulation excited practically all ipsilateral MRRN cells. After stimulation, the cell was typically depolarized and showed an increased level of synaptic noise for up to 80 s. In contralateral MRRN neurons, optic nerve stimulation usually evoked hyperpolarization or no response. Vestibular nerve stimulation evoked compound excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) or spikes in approximately 90% of the cells, both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. A smaller subpopulation of MRRN cells (approximately 10%) received vestibular inhibition. In 26 of 48 recorded MRRN cells, the response to vestibular stimulation was potentiated after ipsilateral optic nerve

  14. An analysis of the responses of rat striatal neurones to scrotal skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D C; Steele, J E; Gayton, R J

    1987-09-01

    The responses of neurones in the caudate-putamen complex of anaesthetised rats to different scrotal skin temperatures were examined, together with the electroencephalogram (EEG). Caudate neuronal firing patterns did not change independently of rate, unlike the thermo-responsive cells of the hypothalamus previously reported. The scrotal skin temperature threshold for the caudate neuronal response corresponds precisely with the temperature which provokes desynchronisation of the EEG.

  15. Anesthesia and brain sensory processing: impact on neuronal responses in a female songbird

    PubMed Central

    Karino, G.; George, I.; Loison, L.; Heyraud, C.; De Groof, G.; Hausberger, M.; Cousillas, H.

    2016-01-01

    Whether anesthesia impacts brain sensory processing is a highly debated and important issue. There is a general agreement that anesthesia tends to diminish neuronal activity, but its potential impact on neuronal “tuning” is still an open question. Here we show, based on electrophysiological recordings in the primary auditory area of a female songbird, that anesthesia induces neuronal responses towards biologically irrelevant sounds and prevents the seasonal neuronal tuning towards functionally relevant species-specific song elements. PMID:27966648

  16. Functional response properties of VIP-expressing inhibitory neurons in mouse visual and auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mesik, Lukas; Ma, Wen-pei; Li, Ling-yun; Ibrahim, Leena A.; Huang, Z. J.; Zhang, Li I.; Tao, Huizhong W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite accounting for about 20% of all the layer 2/3 inhibitory interneurons, the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) expressing neurons remain the least thoroughly studied of the major inhibitory subtypes. In recent studies, VIP neurons have been shown to be activated by a variety of cortico-cortical and neuromodulatory inputs, but their basic sensory response properties remain poorly characterized. We set out to explore the functional properties of layer 2/3 VIP neurons in the primary visual (V1) and primary auditory cortex (A1), using two-photon imaging guided patch recordings. We found that in the V1, VIP neurons were generally broadly tuned, with their sensory response properties resembling those of parvalbumin (PV) expressing neurons. With the exception of response latency, they did not exhibit a significant difference from PV neurons across any of the properties tested, including overlap index, response modulation, orientation selectivity, and direction selectivity. In the A1, on the other hand, VIP neurons had a strong tendency to be intensity selective, which is a property associated with a subset of putative pyramidal cells and virtually absent in PV neurons. VIP neurons had a best intensity that was significantly lower than that of PV and putative pyramidal neurons. Finally, sensory evoked spike responses of VIP neurons were delayed relative to pyramidal and PV neurons in both the V1 and A1. Combined, these results demonstrate that the sensory response properties of VIP neurons do not fit a simple model of being either PV-like broadly tuned or pyramidal-like narrowly tuned. Instead, the selectivity pattern varies with sensory area and can even be, as in the case of low sound intensity responsiveness, distinct from both PV and pyramidal neurons. PMID:26106301

  17. Differential susceptibility to chronic social defeat stress relates to the number of Dnmt3a-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hammels, Caroline; Prickaerts, Jos; Kenis, Gunter; Vanmierlo, Tim; Fischer, Maximilian; Steinbusch, Harry W M; van Os, Jim; van den Hove, Daniel L A; Rutten, Bart P F

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) is crucially involved in DNA methylation and recent studies have demonstrated that Dnmt3a is functionally involved in mediating and moderating the impact of environmental exposures on gene expression and behavior. Findings in rodents have suggested that DNA methylation is involved in regulating neuronal proliferation and differentiation. So far, it has been shown that chronic social defeat might influence neurogenesis, while susceptibility to social defeat stress is dependent on gene expression changes in the nucleus accumbens and the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. However, the role of Dnmt3a herein has not been fully characterized. Our earlier immunohistochemical work has revealed the existence of two types of Dnmt3a-immunoreactive cells in the mouse hippocampus, of which one represents a distinct type with intense Dnmt3a-immunoreactivity (Dnmt3a type II cells) co-localizing with a marker of recent proliferation. Based on this, we hypothesize that behavioral susceptibility to chronic social defeat stress is linked to (i) Dnmt3a protein levels in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus, and (ii) to the density of Dnmt3a type II cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. While no differences were found in global levels of Dnmt3a protein expression in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus, our stereological quantifications indicated a significantly increased density of Dnmt3a type II cells in the dentate gyrus of animals resilient to social defeat stress compared to susceptible and control animals. Further characterization of the Dnmt3a type II cells revealed that these cells were mostly doublecortin (25%) or NeuN (60%) immunopositive, thus defining them as immature and mature neurons. Moreover, negative associations between the density of Dnmt3a type II cells and indices of depressive-like behavior in the sucrose intake and forced swim test were found. These correlational data suggest that DNA methylation via Dnmt3a in the

  18. Veratridine produces distinct calcium response profiles in mouse Dorsal Root Ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Zainab A.; Doran, Ciara; Grundy, David; Nassar, Mohammed A.

    2017-01-01

    Nociceptors are a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that detect noxious stimuli and signal pain. Veratridine (VTD) is a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) modifier that is used as an “agonist” in functional screens for VGSC blockers. However, there is very little information on VTD response profiles in DRG neurons and how they relate to neuronal subtypes. Here we characterised VTD-induced calcium responses in cultured mouse DRG neurons. Our data shows that the heterogeneity of VTD responses reflects distinct subpopulations of sensory neurons. About 70% of DRG neurons respond to 30–100 μM VTD. We classified VTD responses into four profiles based upon their response shape. VTD response profiles differed in their frequency of occurrence and correlated with neuronal size. Furthermore, VTD response profiles correlated with responses to the algesic markers capsaicin, AITC and α, β-methylene ATP. Since VTD response profiles integrate the action of several classes of ion channels and exchangers, they could act as functional “reporters” for the constellation of ion channels/exchangers expressed in each sensory neuron. Therefore our findings are relevant to studies and screens using VTD to activate DRG neurons. PMID:28338073

  19. Responses to visual stimuli in thalamic neurons of the turtle Emys orbicularis.

    PubMed

    Boiko, V P

    1980-01-01

    The responses to movement of shaped stimuli and diffuse illumination were studied for 300 neurons in three thalamic regions of the bog turtle Emys orbicularis L.' characteristics of their receptive fields (RF) were also studied. According to their responses to stimuli of various sizes, neurons were divided into two types. Neurons of Type I (85%) were activated by stimuli of any size and has large, small or medium RF. Weak or medium adaptive changes were found more often (63%) than strong changes (37%). Some of the neurons (33%) did not react to diffuse light; the remainder gave responses of various types. 57% of the neurons exhibited spontaneous activity, and 9% of the units were direction sensitive. Neurons of Type II (15%) responded only to presentation of stimuli of large sizes and were characterized by large RF, strong adaptation (89%) and weak reactivity to diffuse light (46%). 35% of the neurons exhibited spontaneous activity, and 20% were direction sensitive.

  20. Encoding of head acceleration in vestibular neurons. I. Spatiotemporal response properties to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, G. A.; Perachio, A. A.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    1. Extracellular recordings were made in and around the medial vestibular nuclei in decerebrated rats. Neurons were functionally identified according to their semicircular canal input on the basis of their responses to angular head rotations around the yaw, pitch, and roll head axes. Those cells responding to angular acceleration were classified as either horizontal semicircular canal-related (HC) or vertical semicircular canal-related (VC) neurons. The HC neurons were further characterized as either type I or type II, depending on the direction of rotation producing excitation. Cells that lacked a response to angular head acceleration, but exhibited sensitivity to a change in head position, were classified as purely otolith organ-related (OTO) neurons. All vestibular neurons were then tested for their response to sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. 2. Convergence of macular and canal inputs onto central vestibular nuclei neurons occurred in 73% of the type I HC, 79% of the type II HC, and 86% of the VC neurons. Out of the 223 neurons identified as receiving macular input, 94 neurons were further studied, and their spatiotemporal response properties to sinusoidal stimulation with pure linear acceleration were quantified. Data were obtained from 33 type I HC, 22 type II HC, 22 VC, and 17 OTO neurons. 3. For each neuron the angle of the translational stimulus vector was varied by 15, 30, or 45 degrees increments in the horizontal head plane. In all tested neurons, a direction of maximum sensitivity was identified. An interesting difference among neurons was their response to translation along the direction perpendicular to that that produced the maximum response ("null" direction). For the majority of neurons tested, it was possible to evoke a nonzero response during stimulation along the null direction always had response phases that varied as a function of stimulus direction. 4. These spatiotemporal response properties were quantified in two

  1. Biological Investigations of Adaptive Networks: Neuronal Control of Conditioned Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    NO Boiling AFB, DC 203-4861102F 2312 Al I TI TLE (include Secunty Clamtfiation) Biological Investigations of Adaptive Networks: Neuronal Control of...based on mathematical models and computer simulation. Recordings were done from single brain stem neurons in awake, behaving animals for the purpose...single-unit recordings from awake behaving animals were developed. The relationship between single neurons ’ dynamic behavior and the CR in terms of

  2. Protein Product of CLN6 Gene Responsible for Variant Late-Onset Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis Interacts with CRMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Jared W.; Getty, Amanda L.; Wishart, Thomas M.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Pearce, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in CLN6 cause variant late-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (vLINCL), a childhood neurodegenerative disorder resulting from aberrant neuronal cell loss and pathological accumulation of lysosomal auto-fluorescent storage material in the central nervous system. The direct function of the endoplasmic reticulum– resident protein CLN6 and how dysfunction of this protein results in vLINCL are unknown. We report that CLN6 interacts with collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP-2). To further understand the significance and possible contribution to vLINCL of the CLN6–CRMP-2 interaction, we utilized the nclf mouse, which harbors mutations in CLN6. Significantly, CRMP-2 protein level was found to be reduced in the nclf mouse brain, particularly in the thalamus. Because CRMP-2 functions in growth cone collapse and is an effector protein downstream of Sema3A signaling, this pathway was examined via a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) repulsion assay. However, there were no defects in the repulsion of DRGs derived from nclf mice, indicating that the loss of CLN6 does not affect Sema3A signaling. CRMP-2 has also been implicated in controlling axon number and outgrowth, as observed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Therefore, we explored the formation and maturation of hippocampal neurons derived from nclf mice in a glial coculture system. The maturation of these neurons was reduced; by day in vitro (DIV) 8, more than 50% of nclf-derived hippocampal neurons had died. Additionally, beginning around DIV4, nclf neurons were less mature than their WT counterparts, presumably because of an inability to form mature synaptic connections. We concluded that alterations in neurite maturation resulting from a loss of CLN6–CRMP-2 interaction may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and pathology in vLINCL. PMID:19235893

  3. Wingless-type family member 3A triggers neuronal polarization via cross-activation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Bernis, María E; Oksdath, Mariana; Dupraz, Sebastián; Nieto Guil, Alvaro; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L; Rosso, Silvana B; Quiroga, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Initial axonal elongation is essential for neuronal polarization and requires polarized activation of IGF-1 receptors (IGF-1r) and the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3k) pathway. Wingless-type family growth factors (Wnts) have also been implied in the regulation of axonal development. It is not known, however, if Wnts have any participation in the regulation of initial axonal outgrowth and the establishment of neuronal polarity. We used cultured hippocampal neurons and growth cone particles (GCPs) isolated from fetal rat brain to show that stimulation with the wingless family factor 3A (Wnt3a) was sufficient to promote neuronal polarization in the absence of IGF-1 or high insulin. We also show that Wnt3a triggered a strong activation of IGF-1r, PI3k, and Akt in developmental Stage 2 neurons and that the presence of activatable IGF-1r and PI3k activation were necessary for Wnt3a polarizing effects. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments show that Wnt3a did not bind specifically to the IGF-1r. Using crosslinking and immuno-precipitation experiments, we show that stimulation with Wnt3a triggered the formation of a complex including IGF-1r-Wnt3a-Frizzled-7. We conclude that Wnt3a triggers polarization of neurons via cross-activation of the IGF-1r/PI3k pathway upon binding to Fz7.

  4. Wingless-type family member 3A triggers neuronal polarization via cross-activation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bernis, María E.; Oksdath, Mariana; Dupraz, Sebastián; Nieto Guil, Alvaro; Fernández, Marisa M.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Rosso, Silvana B.; Quiroga, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Initial axonal elongation is essential for neuronal polarization and requires polarized activation of IGF-1 receptors (IGF-1r) and the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3k) pathway. Wingless-type family growth factors (Wnts) have also been implied in the regulation of axonal development. It is not known, however, if Wnts have any participation in the regulation of initial axonal outgrowth and the establishment of neuronal polarity. We used cultured hippocampal neurons and growth cone particles (GCPs) isolated from fetal rat brain to show that stimulation with the wingless family factor 3A (Wnt3a) was sufficient to promote neuronal polarization in the absence of IGF-1 or high insulin. We also show that Wnt3a triggered a strong activation of IGF-1r, PI3k, and Akt in developmental Stage 2 neurons and that the presence of activatable IGF-1r and PI3k activation were necessary for Wnt3a polarizing effects. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments show that Wnt3a did not bind specifically to the IGF-1r. Using crosslinking and immuno-precipitation experiments, we show that stimulation with Wnt3a triggered the formation of a complex including IGF-1r-Wnt3a-Frizzled-7. We conclude that Wnt3a triggers polarization of neurons via cross-activation of the IGF-1r/PI3k pathway upon binding to Fz7. PMID:24298236

  5. Temporal patterning in the responses of gracile and cuneate neurones in the cat to cutaneous vibration.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrington, D G; Horniblow, S; Rowe, M J

    1987-01-01

    1. Recordings were made in decerebrate cats from gracile and cuneate neurones responding to vibration-induced inputs from Pacinian corpuscle (P.c.) receptors of the hind-limb and forelimb footpads. The two groups of neurones were compared, in particular for their capacities for responding to cutaneous vibration with phase-locked impulse patterns. 2. In both nuclei the P.c. neurones were most sensitive to vibration in the range 80 to greater than 600 Hz. Stimulus-response relations were similar for the two groups, as were measures derived from these relations such as response levels, absolute thresholds and the dynamic range (defined as the vibration amplitude range over which responses were graded). 3. At frequencies up to 300-400 Hz, responses for some neurones in both nuclei remained well phase locked to the vibration; however, quantitative analysis using a factorial analysis of variance indicated that the phase locking was poorer in gracile than cuneate neurones. 4. In both nuclei there was marked variability from neurone to neurone in measures of phase locking which may reflect variations in the extent of convergence of P.c. fibres upon different target neurones. For neurones in either nucleus that had comparatively tight phase locking of responses to vibration it is proposed that their output is functionally dominated by one or a few of their convergent P.c. input fibres. PMID:3681710

  6. Fasting enhances the response of arcuate neuropeptide Y-glucose-inhibited neurons to decreased extracellular glucose

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Beth Ann; Fioramonti, Xavier; Jochnowitz, Nina; Fakira, Kurt; Gagen, Karen; Contie, Sylvain; Lorsignol, Anne; Penicaud, Luc; Martin, William J.; Routh, Vanessa H.

    2009-01-01

    Fasting increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, peptide levels, and the excitability of NPY-expressing neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) nucleus. A subpopulation of ARC-NPY neurons (∼40%) are glucose-inhibited (GI)-type glucose-sensing neurons. Hence, they depolarize in response to decreased glucose. Because fasting enhances NPY neurotransmission, we propose that during fasting, GI neurons depolarize in response to smaller decreases in glucose. This increased excitation in response to glucose decreases would increase NPY-GI neuronal excitability and enhance NPY neurotransmission. Using an in vitro hypothalamic explant system, we show that fasting enhances NPY release in response to decreased glucose concentration. By measuring relative changes in membrane potential using a membrane potential-sensitive dye, we demonstrate that during fasting, a smaller decrease in glucose depolarizes NPY-GI neurons. Furthermore, incubation in low (0.7 mM) glucose enhanced while leptin (10 nM) blocked depolarization of GI neurons in response to decreased glucose. Fasting, leptin, and glucose-induced changes in NPY-GI neuron glucose sensing were mediated by 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We conclude that during energy sufficiency, leptin reduces the ability of NPY-GI neurons to sense decreased glucose. However, after a fast, decreased leptin and glucose activate AMPK in NPY-GI neurons. As a result, NPY-GI neurons become depolarized in response to smaller glucose fluctuations. Increased excitation of NPY-GI neurons enhances NPY release. NPY, in turn, shifts energy homeostasis toward increased food intake and decreased energy expenditure to restore energy balance. PMID:19211911

  7. A Neuron-Benign Microfluidic Gradient Generator for Studying the Response of Mammalian Neurons towards Axon Guidance Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Li, Nianzhen; Keenan, Thomas M.; Folch, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of biochemical cues in isolation or in combinations in cell culture systems is crucial for unraveling the mechanisms that govern neural development and repair. The most widely used experimental paradigms that elicit axon guidance in vitro utilize as the source of the gradient a pulsatile pipette, transfected cells, or a loaded gel, producing time-varying gradients of poor reproducibility which are not well suited for studying slow-growing mammalian cells. Although microfluidic device design have allowed for generating stable, complex gradients of diffusible molecules, the flow-induced shear forces in a microchannel has made it impossible to maintain viable mammalian neuronal cultures for sufficiently long times. In this paper, we describe axonal responses of mouse cortical neurons in a “neuron-benign” gradient-generator device based on an open chamber that can establish highly stable gradients of diffusible molecules for at least 6 hours with negligible shear stress, and also allows the neurons to thrive for at least 2 weeks. Except for the period when the gradient is on, the cells in the gradient are under the same conditions as the cells on the control surfaces, which ensure a consistent set of micro-environmental variables. The gradient stability and uniformity over the cell culture surface achieved by the device, together with our software platform for acquiring, post-processing and quantitatively analyzing the large number of images allowed us to extract valuable information even from small datasets. We report a directed response of primary mammalian neurons (from E14 embryonic mice cortex) to a diffusible gradient of netrin in vitro. We infer from our studies that a large majority (~73%) of the neurons that extend axons during the gradient application grow towards the netrin source, and our data analysis also indicates that netrin acts as a growth factor for this same population of neurons. PMID:20957287

  8. Chronic Hypoxia Suppresses the Co2 Response of Solitary Complex (Sc) Neurons from Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Wilkinson, Katherine A.; Powell, Frank L.; Dean, Jay B.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHx; 10-11% O2) on the response to hypercapnia (15% CO2) of individual solitary complex (SC) neurons from adult rats. We simultaneously measured the intracellular pH and firing rate responses to hypercapnia of SC neurons in superfused medullary slices from control and CHx-adapted adult rats using the blind whole cell patch clamp technique and fluorescence imaging microscopy. We found that CHx caused the percentage of SC neurons inhibited by hypercapnia to significantly increase from about 10% up to about 30%, but did not significantly alter the percentage of SC neurons activated by hypercapnia (50% in control versus 35% in CHx). Further, the magnitudes of the responses of SC neurons from control rats (chemosensitivity index for activated neurons of 166±11% and for inhibited neurons of 45±15%) were the same in SC neurons from CHx-adapted rats. This plasticity induced in chemosensitive SC neurons by CHx appears to involve intrinsic changes in neuronal properties since they were the same in synaptic blockade medium. PMID:19619674

  9. Neuronal responses in area 7a to multiple-stimulus displays: I. neurons encode the location of the salient stimulus.

    PubMed

    Constantinidis, C; Steinmetz, M A

    2001-07-01

    The primate posterior parietal cortex (PPC) plays an important role in representing and recalling spatial relationships and in the ability to orient visual attention. This is evidenced by the parietal activation observed in brain imaging experiments performed during visuo- spatial tasks, and by the contralateral neglect syndrome that often accompanies parietal lesions. Individual neurons in monkey parietal cortex respond vigorously to the appearance of single, behaviorally relevant stimuli, but little is known about how they respond to more complex visual displays. The current experiments addressed this issue by recording activity from single neurons in area 7a of the PPC in monkeys performing a spatial version of a match-to-sample task. The task required them to locate salient stimuli in multiple-stimulus displays and release a lever after a subsequent stimulus appeared at the same location. Neurons responded preferentially to the appearance of salient stimuli inside their receptive fields. The presence of multiple stimuli did not affect appreciably the spatial tuning of responses in the majority of neurons or the population code for the location of the salient stimulus. Responses to salient stimuli could be distinguished from background stimuli approximately 100 ms after the onset of the cue. These results suggest that area 7a neurons represent the location of the stimulus attracting the animal's attention and can provide the spatial information required for directing attention to a salient stimulus in a complex scene.

  10. Astrocyte-to-neuron signaling in response to photostimulation with a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Liu, Xiuli; Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2010-08-01

    Conventional stimulation techniques used in studies of astrocyte-to-neuron signaling are invasive or dependent on additional electrical devices or chemicals. Here, we applied photostimulation with a femtosecond laser to selectively stimulate astrocytes in the hippocampal neural network, and the neuronal responses were examined. The results showed that, after photostimulation, cell-specific astrocyte-to-neuron signaling was triggered; sometimes the neuronal responses were even synchronous. Since photostimulation with a femtosecond laser is noninvasive, agent-free, and highly precise, this method has been proved to be efficient in activating astrocytes for investigations of astrocytic functions in neural networks.

  11. Manipulation of an Innate Escape Response in Drosophila: Photoexcitation of acj6 Neurons Induces the Escape Response

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Devanand S.; Zhang, Feng; Deisseroth, Karl; Baker, Bruce S.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Background The genetic analysis of behavior in Drosophila melanogaster has linked genes controlling neuronal connectivity and physiology to specific neuronal circuits underlying a variety of innate behaviors. We investigated the circuitry underlying the adult startle response, using photoexcitation of neurons that produce the abnormal chemosensory jump 6 (acj6) transcription factor. This transcription factor has previously been shown to play a role in neuronal pathfinding and neurotransmitter modality, but the role of acj6 neurons in the adult startle response was largely unknown. Principal Findings We show that the activity of these neurons is necessary for a wild-type startle response and that excitation is sufficient to generate a synthetic escape response. Further, we show that this synthetic response is still sensitive to the dose of acj6 suggesting that that acj6 mutation alters neuronal activity as well as connectivity and neurotransmitter production. Results/Significance These results extend the understanding of the role of acj6 and of the adult startle response in general. They also demonstrate the usefulness of activity-dependent characterization of neuronal circuits underlying innate behaviors in Drosophila, and the utility of integrating genetic analysis into modern circuit analysis techniques. PMID:19340304

  12. Nerve Growth Factor Inhibits Sympathetic Neurons' Response to an Injury Cytokine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadiack, Annette M.; Vaccariello, Stacey A.; Sun, Yi; Zigmond, Richard E.

    1998-06-01

    Axonal damage to adult peripheral neurons causes changes in neuronal gene expression. For example, axotomized sympathetic, sensory, and motor neurons begin to express galanin mRNA and protein, and recent evidence suggests that galanin plays a role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Previous studies in sympathetic and sensory neurons have established that galanin expression is triggered by two consequences of nerve transection: the induction of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and the reduction in the availability of the target-derived factor, nerve growth factor. It is shown in the present study that no stimulation of galanin expression occurs following direct application of LIF to intact neurons in the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion. Injection of animals with an antiserum to nerve growth factor concomitant with the application of LIF, on the other hand, does stimulate galanin expression. The data suggest that the response of neurons to an injury factor, LIF, is affected by whether the neurons still receive trophic signals from their targets.

  13. Propensity to obesity impacts the neuronal response to energy imbalance.

    PubMed

    Cornier, Marc-Andre; McFadden, Kristina L; Thomas, Elizabeth A; Bechtell, Jamie L; Bessesen, Daniel H; Tregellas, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the propensity to gain weight or remain normal weight are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to study the neuronal response to visual food cues during short-term energy imbalance in healthy adults recruited as obesity-resistant (OR) or obesity-prone (OP) based on self-identification, body mass index, and personal/family weight history. Twenty-five OR and 28 OP subjects were studied in underfed (UF) and overfed (OF) as compared to eucaloric (EU) conditions in a randomized crossover design. Each study phase included a 3-day run-in diet, 1 day of controlled feeding (basal energy needs for EU, 40% above/below basal energy needs for OF/UF), and a test day. On the test day, fMRI was performed in the acute fed stated (30 min after a test meal) while subjects viewed images of foods of high hedonic value and neutral non-food objects. Measures of appetite and hormones were also performed before and every 30 min after the test meal. UF was associated with significantly increased activation of insula, somatosensory cortex, inferior and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), parahippocampus, precuneus, cingulate, and visual cortex in OR. However, UF had no impact in OP. As a result, UF was associated with significantly greater activation, specifically in the insula, inferior PFC, and somatosensory cortex in OR as compared to OP. While OF was overall associated with reduced activation of inferior visual cortex, no group interaction was observed with OF. In summary, these findings suggest that individuals resistant to weight gain and obesity are more sensitive to short-term energy imbalance, particularly with UF, than those prone to weight gain. The inability to sense or adapt to changes in energy balance may represent an important mechanism contributing to excess energy intake and risk for obesity.

  14. Propensity to Obesity Impacts the Neuronal Response to Energy Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Cornier, Marc-Andre; McFadden, Kristina L.; Thomas, Elizabeth A.; Bechtell, Jamie L.; Bessesen, Daniel H.; Tregellas, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the propensity to gain weight or remain normal weight are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to study the neuronal response to visual food cues during short-term energy imbalance in healthy adults recruited as obesity-resistant (OR) or obesity-prone (OP) based on self-identification, body mass index, and personal/family weight history. Twenty-five OR and 28 OP subjects were studied in underfed (UF) and overfed (OF) as compared to eucaloric (EU) conditions in a randomized crossover design. Each study phase included a 3-day run-in diet, 1 day of controlled feeding (basal energy needs for EU, 40% above/below basal energy needs for OF/UF), and a test day. On the test day, fMRI was performed in the acute fed stated (30 min after a test meal) while subjects viewed images of foods of high hedonic value and neutral non-food objects. Measures of appetite and hormones were also performed before and every 30 min after the test meal. UF was associated with significantly increased activation of insula, somatosensory cortex, inferior and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), parahippocampus, precuneus, cingulate, and visual cortex in OR. However, UF had no impact in OP. As a result, UF was associated with significantly greater activation, specifically in the insula, inferior PFC, and somatosensory cortex in OR as compared to OP. While OF was overall associated with reduced activation of inferior visual cortex, no group interaction was observed with OF. In summary, these findings suggest that individuals resistant to weight gain and obesity are more sensitive to short-term energy imbalance, particularly with UF, than those prone to weight gain. The inability to sense or adapt to changes in energy balance may represent an important mechanism contributing to excess energy intake and risk for obesity. PMID:25767441

  15. The Responses of VIP Neurons Are Sufficiently Sensitive to Support Heading Judgments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao

    2010-01-01

    The ventral intraparietal area (VIP) of the macaque monkey is thought to be involved in judging heading direction based on optic flow. We recorded neuronal discharges in VIP while monkeys were performing a two-alternative, forced-choice heading discrimination task to relate quantitatively the activity of VIP neurons to monkeys' perceptual choices. Most VIP neurons were responsive to simulated heading stimuli and were tuned such that their responses changed across a range of forward trajectories. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, we found that most VIP neurons were less sensitive to small heading changes than was the monkey, although a minority of neurons were equally sensitive. Pursuit eye movements modestly yet significantly increased both neuronal and behavioral thresholds by approximately the same amount. Our results support the view that VIP activity is involved in self-motion judgments. PMID:20130044

  16. The role of action potentials in determining neuron-type-specific responses to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Estes, Stephen; Zhong, Lei Ray; Artinian, Liana; Tornieri, Karine; Rehder, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    The electrical activity in developing and mature neurons determines the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which in turn is translated into biochemical activities through various signaling cascades. Electrical activity is under control of neuromodulators, which can alter neuronal responses to incoming signals and increase the fidelity of neuronal communication. Conversely, the effects of neuromodulators can depend on the ongoing electrical activity within target neurons; however, these activity-dependent effects of neuromodulators are less well understood. Here, we present evidence that the neuronal firing frequency and intrinsic properties of the action potential (AP) waveform set the [Ca(2+)]i in growth cones and determine how neurons respond to the neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO). We used two well-characterized neurons from the freshwater snail Helisoma trivolvis that show different growth cone morphological responses to NO: B5 neurons elongate filopodia, while those of B19 neurons do not. Combining whole-cell patch clamp recordings with simultaneous calcium imaging, we show that the duration of an AP contributes to neuron-specific differences in [Ca(2+)]i, with shorter APs in B19 neurons yielding lower growth cone [Ca(2+)]i. Through the partial inhibition of voltage-gated K(+) channels, we increased the B19 AP duration resulting in a significant increase in [Ca(2+)]i that was then sufficient to cause filopodial elongation following NO treatment. Our results demonstrate a neuron-type specific correlation between AP shape, [Ca(2+)]i, and growth cone motility, providing an explanation to how growth cone responses to guidance cues depend on intrinsic electrical properties and helping explain the diverse effects of NO across neuronal populations.

  17. Differential neuronal expression of receptor interacting protein 3 in rat retina: involvement in ischemic stress response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3), a member of RIP family proteins, has been shown to participate in programmed necrosis or necroptosis in cell biology studies. Evidence suggests that necroptosis may be a mode of neuronal death in the retina. Results In the present study we determined the expression of RIP3 in normal rat retina and its changes following acute high intraocular pressure (aHIOP). RIP3 immunoreactivity (IR) was largely present in the inner retinal layers, localized to subsets of cells expressing neuron-specific nuclear antigen (NeuN), parvalbumin and calbindin in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL). No double labeling was detected for RIP3 with PKC-α or rhodopsin. RIP3 immunoreactivity was increased in the GCL at 6 hr and 12 hr, but reduced at 24 hr in the retina, without apparent alteration in laminar or cellular distribution pattern. Western blot analysis confirmed the above time-dependent alteration in RIP3 protein expression. RIP3 expressing cells frequently co-localized with propidium iodide (PI). A few co-localized cells were observed between RIP3 and Bax or cleaved caspase-3 in the GCL in 12 hr following aHIOP. Conclusions The results indicate that RIP3 is expressed differentially in retinal neurons in adult rats, including subsets of ganglion cells, amacrine and horizontal cells. RIP3 protein levels are elevated rapidly following aHIOP. RIP3 labeling co-localized with PI, Bax or cleaved caspase-3 among cells in the ganglion cell layer following aHIOP, which suggest its involvement of RIP3 in neuronal responses to acute ischemic insults. PMID:23374330

  18. Spinal sensory projection neuron responses to spinal cord stimulation are mediated by circuits beyond gate control

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianhe C.; Janik, John J.; Peters, Ryan V.; Chen, Gang; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a therapy used to treat intractable pain with a putative mechanism of action based on the Gate Control Theory. We hypothesized that sensory projection neuron responses to SCS would follow a single stereotyped response curve as a function of SCS frequency, as predicted by the Gate Control circuit. We recorded the responses of antidromically identified sensory projection neurons in the lumbar spinal cord during 1- to 150-Hz SCS in both healthy rats and neuropathic rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). The relationship between SCS frequency and projection neuron activity predicted by the Gate Control circuit accounted for a subset of neuronal responses to SCS but could not account for the full range of observed responses. Heterogeneous responses were classifiable into three additional groups and were reproduced using computational models of spinal microcircuits representing other interactions between nociceptive and nonnociceptive sensory inputs. Intrathecal administration of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, increased spontaneous and evoked activity in projection neurons, enhanced excitatory responses to SCS, and reduced inhibitory responses to SCS, suggesting that GABAA neurotransmission plays a broad role in regulating projection neuron activity. These in vivo and computational results challenge the Gate Control Theory as the only mechanism underlying SCS and refine our understanding of the effects of SCS on spinal sensory neurons within the framework of contemporary understanding of dorsal horn circuitry. PMID:25972582

  19. Transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes and its effect on neural functions: gene expression in response to static magnetism in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Yoneda, Yukio

    2005-07-01

    We have previously shown a marked but transient increase in DNA binding of the nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 after brief exposure to static magnetic fields in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, suggesting that exposure to static magnetism would lead to long-term consolidation as well as amplification of different functional alterations through modulation of de novo protein synthesis at the level of gene transcription in the hippocampus. Hippocampal neurons were cultured under sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT, followed by extraction of total RNA for differential display (DD) analysis using random primers. The first and the second DD polymerase chain reaction similarly showed the downregulation of particular genes in response to sustained magnetism. Nucleotide sequence analysis followed by BLASTN homology searching revealed high homology of these 2 DD-PCR products to the 3' non-coding regions of the mouse basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor ALF1 and that of histone H3.3A, respectively. On Northern blot analysis using the 2 cloned differentially expressed fragments labeled with [alpha-(32)P]dCTP by the random primer method, a marked decrease was seen in expression of mRNA for ALF1 and histone H3.3A in hippocampal neurons cultured under sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT. It thus appears that static magnetism may modulate cellular integrity and functionality through expression of a variety of responsive genes required for gene transcription and translation, proliferation, differentiation, maturation, survival, and so on in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  20. Response to histamine allows the functional identification of neuronal progenitors, neurons, astrocytes, and immature cells in subventricular zone cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Agasse, Fabienne; Bernardino, Liliana; Silva, Bruno; Ferreira, Raquel; Grade, Sofia; Malva, João O

    2008-02-01

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) cell cultures contain mixed populations of immature cells, neurons, astrocytes, and progenitors in different stages of development. In the present work, we examined whether cell types of the SVZ could be functionally discriminated on the basis of intracellular free calcium level ([Ca(2+)](i)) variations following KCl and histamine stimulation. For this purpose, [Ca(2+)](i) were measured in SVZ cell cultures from neonatal P1-3 C57Bl/6 donor mice, in single cells, after stimulation with 100 microM histamine or 50 mM KCl. MAP-2-positive neurons and doublecortin-positive neuroblasts were distinguished on the basis of their selective ratio of response to KCl and/or histamine stimulation. Moreover, we could distinguish immature cells on the basis of the selective response to histamine via the histamine 1 receptor activation. Exposure of SVZ cultures to the pro-neurogenic stem cell factor (SCF) induced an increase in the number of cells responding to KCl and a decrease in the number of cells responding to histamine, consistent with neuronal differentiation. The selective response to KCl/histamine in single cell calcium imaging analysis offers a rapid and efficient way for the functional discrimination of neuronal differentiation in SVZ cell cultures, opening new perspectives for the search of potential pro-neurogenic factors.

  1. Responses of pigeon vestibulocerebellar neurons to optokinetic stimulation. II. The 3-dimensional reference frame of rotation neurons in the flocculus.

    PubMed

    Wylie, D R; Frost, B J

    1993-12-01

    1. The complex spike activity of Purkinje cells in the flocculus in response to rotational flowfields was recorded extracellularly in anesthetized pigeons. 2. The optokinetic stimulus was produced by a rotating "planetarium projector." A light source was placed in the center of a tin cylinder, which was pierced with numerous small holes. A pen motor oscillated the cylinder about its long axis. This apparatus was placed above the bird's head and the resultant rotational flow-field was projected onto screens that surrounded the bird on all four sides. The axis of rotation of the planetarium could be oriented to any position in three-dimensional space. 3. Two types of responses were found: vertical axis (VA; n = 43) neurons responded best to visual rotation about the vertical axis, and H-135i neurons (n = 34) responded best to rotation about a horizontal axis. The preferred orientation of the horizontal axis was at approximately 135 degrees ipsilateral azimuth. VA neurons were excited by rotation about the vertical axis producing forward (temporal to nasal) and backward motion in the ipsilateral and contralateral eyes, respectively, and were inhibited by rotation in the opposite direction. H-135i neurons in the left flocculus were excited by counterclockwise rotation about the 135 degrees ipsilateral horizontal axis and were inhibited by clockwise motion. Thus, the VA and H-135i neurons, respectively, encode visual flowfields resulting from head rotations stimulating the ipsilateral horizontal and ipsilateral anterior semicircular canals. 4. Sixty-seven percent of VA and 80% of H-135i neurons had binocular receptive fields, although for most binocular cells the ipsilateral eye was dominant. Binocular stimulation resulted in a greater depth of modulation than did monocular stimulation of the dominant eye for 69% of the cells. 5. Monocular stimulation of the VA neurons revealed that the best axis for the contralateral eye was tilted back 11 degrees, on average, to the

  2. Auditory response properties of neurons in the putamen and globus pallidus of awake cats.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Renjia; Qin, Ling; Sato, Yu

    2014-05-01

    Several decades of research have provided evidence that the basal ganglia are closely involved in motor processes. Recent clinical, electrophysiological, behavioral data have revealed that the basal ganglia also receive afferent input from the auditory system, but the detailed auditory response characteristics have not yet reported. The present study aimed to reveal the acoustic response properties of neurons in parts of the basal ganglia. We recorded single-unit activities from the putamen (PU) and globus pallidus (GP) of awake cats passively listening to pure tones, click trains, and natural sounds. Our major findings were: 1) responses in both PU and GP neurons were elicited by pure-tone stimuli, whereas PU neurons had lower intensity thresholds, shorter response latencies, shorter excitatory duration, and larger response magnitudes than GP neurons. 2) Some GP neurons showed a suppressive response lasting throughout the stimulus period. 3) Both PU and GP did not follow periodically repeated click stimuli well, and most neurons only showed a phasic response at the stimulus onset and offset. 4) In response to natural sounds, PU also showed a stronger magnitude and shorter duration of excitatory response than GP. The selectivity for natural sounds was low in both nuclei. 5) Nonbiological environmental sounds more efficiently evoked responses in PU and GP than the vocalizations of conspecifics and other species. Our results provide insights into how acoustic signals are processed in the basal ganglia and revealed the distinction of PU and GP in sensory representation.

  3. Brain neuronal chromatin responses in acute soman intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, L J; Doebler, J A; Wall, T J; Shih, T M; Anthony, A

    1986-08-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 g) were injected subcutaneously with soman, a potent neuronal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, at doses of 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0 LD50 (1 LD50 = 135 micrograms/kg) before decapitation at 1 and 24 h post-exposure. Correlative data were obtained on the severity of brain AChE inactivation and physicochemical changes in nuclear chromatin of cerebrocortical (layer V) and striatal neurons using Feulgen-DNA (F-DNA) cytophotometry and ocular filar micrometry. Decreased lability of neurons to F-DNA acid hydrolysis (reduced F-DNA yield), nuclear shrinkage and chromatin aggregation (decreased chromophore area) were used as indices of suppression of genomic template activity; conversely, increases in F-DNA yield and chromophore area signify enhanced neuroexcitation. At 1 hr post-soman there was a dose-dependent inactivation of AChE with a moderate increase in chromatin activation, i.e., nuclear hypertrophy and chromatin dispersion. At 24 hr post-soman there was a partial restoration of AChE activity, notably in striatal neurons, with a suppression in chromatin template activity. These data indicate that actions of soman on neuronal functioning are time-dependent. The absence of any dose-related neuronal chromatin changes may signify existence of non-cholinergic mediated events.

  4. Response Latency to Lingual Taste Stimulation Distinguishes Neuron Types Within the Geniculate Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Breza, Joseph M.; Nikonov, Alexandre A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of response latency in discrimination of chemical stimuli by geniculate ganglion neurons in the rat. Accordingly, we recorded single-cell 5-s responses from geniculate ganglion neurons (n = 47) simultaneously with stimulus-evoked summated potentials (electrogustogram; EGG) from the anterior tongue to signal when the stimulus contacted the lingual epithelium. Artificial saliva served as the rinse solution and solvent for all stimuli [(0.5 M sucrose, 0.03−0.5 M NaCl, 0.01 M citric acid, and 0.02 M quinine hydrochloride (QHCl)], 0.1 M KCl as well as for 0.1 M NaCl +1 μM benzamil. Cluster analysis separated neurons into four groups (sucrose specialists, NaCl specialists, NaCl/QHCl generalists and acid generalists). Artificial saliva elevated spontaneous firing rate and response frequency of all neurons. As a rule, geniculate ganglion neurons responded with the highest frequency and shortest latency to their best stimulus with acid generalist the only exception. For specialist neurons and NaCl/QHCl generalists, the average response latency to the best stimulus was two to four times shorter than the latency to secondary stimuli. For NaCl-specialist neurons, response frequency increased and response latency decreased systematically with increasing NaCl concentration; benzamil significantly decreased NaCl response frequency and increased response latency. Acid-generalist neurons had the highest spontaneous firing rate and were the only group that responded consistently to citric acid and KCl. For many acid generalists, a citric-acid-evoked inhibition preceded robust excitation. We conclude that response latency may be an informative coding signal for peripheral chemosensory neurons. PMID:20107132

  5. [The neuronal responses of the caudate nucleus in the cat to sensory stimulation].

    PubMed

    Rodionova, E I; Pigarev, I N

    1990-01-01

    Responses of caudate neurons to a large variety of visual and other sensory stimuli were studied in alert cats. Sharp drops in the spontaneous activity of the unknown origin and differences in the activity level were revealed in adjacent parts of the caudate nucleus. The following types of neurons were recorded: neurons responding to visual stimulation; neurons responding to somatic stimulation; neurons responding to combined visual-somatic stimulation. The best response was observed to moving visual stimuli that attracted the animal's attention, alimentary objects specifically. The caudate nucleus of each hemisphere contained representation of both contra- and ipsilateral half of the animal body. Cell responses to sensory stimuli from the caudate nucleus have been compared with those from some cortical areas.

  6. Somatosensory response properties of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in rat motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    In sensory cortical networks, peripheral inputs differentially activate excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Inhibitory neurons typically have larger responses and broader receptive field tuning compared with excitatory neurons. These differences are thought to underlie the powerful feedforward inhibition that occurs in response to sensory input. In the motor cortex, as in the somatosensory cortex, cutaneous and proprioceptive somatosensory inputs, generated before and during movement, strongly and dynamically modulate the activity of motor neurons involved in a movement and ultimately shape cortical command. Human studies suggest that somatosensory inputs modulate motor cortical activity in a center excitation, surround inhibition manner such that input from the activated muscle excites motor cortical neurons that project to it, whereas somatosensory input from nearby, nonactivated muscles inhibit these neurons. A key prediction of this hypothesis is that inhibitory and excitatory motor cortical neurons respond differently to somatosensory inputs. We tested this prediction with the use of multisite extracellular recordings in anesthetized rats. We found that fast-spiking (presumably inhibitory) neurons respond to tactile and proprioceptive inputs at shorter latencies and larger response magnitudes compared with regular-spiking (presumably excitatory) neurons. In contrast, we found no differences in the receptive field size of these neuronal populations. Strikingly, all fast-spiking neuron pairs analyzed with cross-correlation analysis displayed common excitation, which was significantly more prevalent than common excitation for regular-spiking neuron pairs. These findings suggest that somatosensory inputs preferentially evoke feedforward inhibition in the motor cortex. We suggest that this provides a mechanism for dynamic selection of motor cortical modules during voluntary movements. PMID:21653707

  7. Somatosensory response properties of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter D; Keller, Asaf

    2011-09-01

    In sensory cortical networks, peripheral inputs differentially activate excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Inhibitory neurons typically have larger responses and broader receptive field tuning compared with excitatory neurons. These differences are thought to underlie the powerful feedforward inhibition that occurs in response to sensory input. In the motor cortex, as in the somatosensory cortex, cutaneous and proprioceptive somatosensory inputs, generated before and during movement, strongly and dynamically modulate the activity of motor neurons involved in a movement and ultimately shape cortical command. Human studies suggest that somatosensory inputs modulate motor cortical activity in a center excitation, surround inhibition manner such that input from the activated muscle excites motor cortical neurons that project to it, whereas somatosensory input from nearby, nonactivated muscles inhibit these neurons. A key prediction of this hypothesis is that inhibitory and excitatory motor cortical neurons respond differently to somatosensory inputs. We tested this prediction with the use of multisite extracellular recordings in anesthetized rats. We found that fast-spiking (presumably inhibitory) neurons respond to tactile and proprioceptive inputs at shorter latencies and larger response magnitudes compared with regular-spiking (presumably excitatory) neurons. In contrast, we found no differences in the receptive field size of these neuronal populations. Strikingly, all fast-spiking neuron pairs analyzed with cross-correlation analysis displayed common excitation, which was significantly more prevalent than common excitation for regular-spiking neuron pairs. These findings suggest that somatosensory inputs preferentially evoke feedforward inhibition in the motor cortex. We suggest that this provides a mechanism for dynamic selection of motor cortical modules during voluntary movements.

  8. Polysensory response characteristics of dorsal root ganglion neurones that may serve sensory functions during myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, M H; Horackova, M; Negoescu, R M; Wolf, S; Armour, J A

    1996-09-01

    To determine the response characteristics of dorsal root ganglion neurones that may serve sensory functions during myocardial ischaemia. Extracellular recordings were made from 54 spontaneously active and 5 normally quiescent dorsal root ganglion neurones (T2-T5) in 22 anaesthetized open-chest dogs under control conditions and during epicardial mechanical or chemical stimulation and myocardial ischaemia. The activity of 78% of spontaneously active and all quiescent neurones with left ventricular sensory fields was modified by left ventricular ischaemia. Forty-six spontaneously active neurones (85%) were polysensory with respect to mechanical and chemical stimuli. The 5 quiescent neurones responded only to chemical stimuli. Spontaneously active neurones associated with left ventricular mechanosensory endings (37 neurones) generated four different activity patterns in response to similar mechanical stimuli (high or low pressure active, high-low pressure active, high-low pressure inactive). A fifth group generated activity which was not related to chamber dynamics. Adenosine, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, substance P and bradykinin modified 72, 61, 65 and 63% of the spontaneously active neurones, respectively. Maximum local mechanical or chemical stimuli enhanced activity to similar degrees, as did ischaemia. Each ischaemia-sensitive neurone displayed unique activity patterns in response to similar mechanical or chemical stimuli. Most myocardial ischemia-sensitive dorsal root ganglion neurones associated with epicardial neurites sense mechanical and multiple chemical stimuli, a small population sensing only mechanical or chemical stimuli. Activity patterns generated by these neurones depend on their primary sensory characteristics or those of other neurones that may converge on them, as well as the type and magnitude of the stimuli that impinge upon their sensory fields, both normally and during ischaemia.

  9. Response linearity of alert monkey non-eye movement vestibular nucleus neurons during sinusoidal yaw rotation.

    PubMed

    Newlands, Shawn D; Lin, Nan; Wei, Min

    2009-09-01

    Vestibular afferents display linear responses over a range of amplitudes and frequencies, but comparable data for central vestibular neurons are lacking. To examine the effect of stimulus frequency and magnitude on the response sensitivity and linearity of non-eye movement central vestibular neurons, we recorded from the vestibular nuclei in awake rhesus macaques during sinusoidal yaw rotation at frequencies between 0.1 and 2 Hz and between 7.5 and 210 degrees/s peak velocity. The dynamics of the neurons' responses across frequencies, while holding peak velocity constant, was consistent with previous studies. However, as the peak velocity was varied, while holding the frequency constant, neurons demonstrated lower sensitivities with increasing peak velocity, even at the lowest peak velocities tested. With increasing peak velocity, the proportion of neurons that silenced during a portion of the response increased. However, the decrease in sensitivity of these neurons with higher peak velocities of rotation was not due to increased silencing during the inhibitory portion of the cycle. Rather the neurons displayed peak firing rates that did not increase in proportion to head velocity as the peak velocity of rotation increased. These data suggest that, unlike vestibular afferents, the central vestibular neurons without eye movement sensitivity examined in this study do not follow linear systems principles even at low velocities.

  10. Response Linearity of Alert Monkey Non-Eye Movement Vestibular Nucleus Neurons During Sinusoidal Yaw Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Newlands, Shawn D.; Lin, Nan; Wei, Min

    2009-01-01

    Vestibular afferents display linear responses over a range of amplitudes and frequencies, but comparable data for central vestibular neurons are lacking. To examine the effect of stimulus frequency and magnitude on the response sensitivity and linearity of non-eye movement central vestibular neurons, we recorded from the vestibular nuclei in awake rhesus macaques during sinusoidal yaw rotation at frequencies between 0.1 and 2 Hz and between 7.5 and 210°/s peak velocity. The dynamics of the neurons' responses across frequencies, while holding peak velocity constant, was consistent with previous studies. However, as the peak velocity was varied, while holding the frequency constant, neurons demonstrated lower sensitivities with increasing peak velocity, even at the lowest peak velocities tested. With increasing peak velocity, the proportion of neurons that silenced during a portion of the response increased. However, the decrease in sensitivity of these neurons with higher peak velocities of rotation was not due to increased silencing during the inhibitory portion of the cycle. Rather the neurons displayed peak firing rates that did not increase in proportion to head velocity as the peak velocity of rotation increased. These data suggest that, unlike vestibular afferents, the central vestibular neurons without eye movement sensitivity examined in this study do not follow linear systems principles even at low velocities. PMID:19553479

  11. What response properties do individual neurons need to underlie position and clutter "invariant" object recognition?

    PubMed

    Li, Nuo; Cox, David D; Zoccolan, Davide; DiCarlo, James J

    2009-07-01

    Primates can easily identify visual objects over large changes in retinal position--a property commonly referred to as position "invariance." This ability is widely assumed to depend on neurons in inferior temporal cortex (IT) that can respond selectively to isolated visual objects over similarly large ranges of retinal position. However, in the real world, objects rarely appear in isolation, and the interplay between position invariance and the representation of multiple objects (i.e., clutter) remains unresolved. At the heart of this issue is the intuition that the representations of nearby objects can interfere with one another and that the large receptive fields needed for position invariance can exacerbate this problem by increasing the range over which interference acts. Indeed, most IT neurons' responses are strongly affected by the presence of clutter. While external mechanisms (such as attention) are often invoked as a way out of the problem, we show (using recorded neuronal data and simulations) that the intrinsic properties of IT population responses, by themselves, can support object recognition in the face of limited clutter. Furthermore, we carried out extensive simulations of hypothetical neuronal populations to identify the essential individual-neuron ingredients of a good population representation. These simulations show that the crucial neuronal property to support recognition in clutter is not preservation of response magnitude, but preservation of each neuron's rank-order object preference under identity-preserving image transformations (e.g., clutter). Because IT neuronal responses often exhibit that response property, while neurons in earlier visual areas (e.g., V1) do not, we suggest that preserving the rank-order object preference regardless of clutter, rather than the response magnitude, more precisely describes the goal of individual neurons at the top of the ventral visual stream.

  12. Multimodal Integration After Unilateral Labyrinthine Lesion: Single Vestibular Nuclei Neuron Responses and Implications for Postural Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Soroush G.; Minor, Lloyd B.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity in neuronal responses is necessary for compensation following brain lesions and adaptation to new conditions and motor learning. In a previous study, we showed that compensatory changes in the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) following unilateral vestibular loss were characterized by dynamic reweighting of inputs from vestibular and extravestibular modalities at the level of single neurons that constitute the first central stage of VOR signal processing. Here, we studied another class of neurons, i.e., the vestibular-only neurons, in the vestibular nuclei that mediate vestibulospinal reflexes and provide information for higher brain areas. We investigated changes in the relative contribution of vestibular, neck proprioceptive, and efference copy signals in the response of these neurons during compensation after contralateral vestibular loss in Macaca mulata monkeys. We show that the time course of recovery of vestibular sensitivity of neurons corresponds with that of lower extremity muscle and tendon reflexes reported in previous studies. More important, we found that information from neck proprioceptors, which did not influence neuronal responses before the lesion, were unmasked after lesion. Such inputs influenced the early stages of the compensation process evidenced by faster and more substantial recovery of the resting discharge in proprioceptive-sensitive neurons. Interestingly, unlike our previous study of VOR interneurons, the improvement in the sensitivity of the two groups of neurons did not show any difference in the early or late stages after lesion. Finally, neuronal responses during active head movements were not different before and after lesion and were attenuated relative to passive movements over the course of recovery, similar to that observed in control conditions. Comparison of compensatory changes observed in the vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal pathways provides evidence for similarities and differences between the two classes of

  13. Prokineticin-2 upregulation during neuronal injury mediates a compensatory protective response against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Richard; Neal, Matthew L.; Luo, Jie; Langley, Monica R.; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Panicker, Nikhil; Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Woodruff, Trent M.; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Prokineticin-2 (PK2), a recently discovered secreted protein, regulates important physiological functions including olfactory biogenesis and circadian rhythms in the CNS. Interestingly, although PK2 expression is low in the nigral system, its receptors are constitutively expressed on nigrostriatal neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that PK2 expression is highly induced in nigral dopaminergic neurons during early stages of degeneration in multiple models of Parkinson's disease (PD), including PK2 reporter mice and MitoPark mice. Functional studies demonstrate that PK2 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and activates ERK and Akt survival signalling pathways, thereby driving neuroprotection. Importantly, PK2 overexpression is protective whereas PK2 receptor antagonism exacerbates dopaminergic degeneration in experimental PD. Furthermore, PK2 expression increased in surviving nigral dopaminergic neurons from PD brains, indicating that PK2 upregulation is clinically relevant to human PD. Collectively, our results identify a paradigm for compensatory neuroprotective PK2 signalling in nigral dopaminergic neurons that could have important therapeutic implications for PD. PMID:27703142

  14. Specific responses of human hippocampal neurons are associated with better memory.

    PubMed

    Suthana, Nanthia A; Parikshak, Neelroop N; Ekstrom, Arne D; Ison, Matias J; Knowlton, Barbara J; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Fried, Itzhak

    2015-08-18

    A population of human hippocampal neurons has shown responses to individual concepts (e.g., Jennifer Aniston) that generalize to different instances of the concept. However, recordings from the rodent hippocampus suggest an important function of these neurons is their ability to discriminate overlapping representations, or pattern separate, a process that may facilitate discrimination of similar events for successful memory. In the current study, we explored whether human hippocampal neurons can also demonstrate the ability to discriminate between overlapping representations and whether this selectivity could be directly related to memory performance. We show that among medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurons, certain populations of neurons are selective for a previously studied (target) image in that they show a significant decrease in firing rate to very similar (lure) images. We found that a greater proportion of these neurons can be found in the hippocampus compared with other MTL regions, and that memory for individual items is correlated to the degree of selectivity of hippocampal neurons responsive to those items. Moreover, a greater proportion of hippocampal neurons showed selective firing for target images in good compared with poor performers, with overall memory performance correlated with hippocampal selectivity. In contrast, selectivity in other MTL regions was not associated with memory performance. These findings show that a substantial proportion of human hippocampal neurons encode specific memories that support the discrimination of overlapping representations. These results also provide previously unidentified evidence consistent with a unique role of the human hippocampus in orthogonalization of representations in declarative memory.

  15. Dynamical responses in a new neuron model subjected to electromagnetic induction and phase noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fuqiang; Wang, Chunni; Jin, Wuyin; Ma, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Complex electrical activities in neuron can induce time-varying electromagnetic field and the effect of various electromagnetic inductions should be considered in dealing with electrical activities of neuron. Based on an improved neuron model, the effect of electromagnetic induction is described by using magnetic flux, and the modulation of magnetic flux on membrane potential is realized by using memristor coupling. Furthermore, additive phase noise is imposed on the neuron to detect the dynamical response of neuron and phase transition in modes. The dynamical properties of electrical activities are detected and discussed, and double coherence resonance behavior is observed, respectively. Furthermore, multiple modes of electrical activities can be observed in the sampled time series for membrane potential of the neuron model.

  16. Synaptic dynamics contribute to long-term single neuron response fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Sebastian; Biro, Istvan; Gal, Asaf; Giugliano, Michele; Marom, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    Firing rate variability at the single neuron level is characterized by long-memory processes and complex statistics over a wide range of time scales (from milliseconds up to several hours). Here, we focus on the contribution of non-stationary efficacy of the ensemble of synapses–activated in response to a given stimulus–on single neuron response variability. We present and validate a method tailored for controlled and specific long-term activation of a single cortical neuron in vitro via synaptic or antidromic stimulation, enabling a clear separation between two determinants of neuronal response variability: membrane excitability dynamics vs. synaptic dynamics. Applying this method we show that, within the range of physiological activation frequencies, the synaptic ensemble of a given neuron is a key contributor to the neuronal response variability, long-memory processes and complex statistics observed over extended time scales. Synaptic transmission dynamics impact on response variability in stimulation rates that are substantially lower compared to stimulation rates that drive excitability resources to fluctuate. Implications to network embedded neurons are discussed. PMID:25071452

  17. Immature Responses to GABA in Fragile X Neurons Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Telias, Michael; Segal, Menahem; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited cognitive disability. However, functional deficiencies in FX neurons have been described so far almost exclusively in animal models. In a recent study we found several functional deficits in FX neurons differentiated in-vitro from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), including their inability to fire repetitive action potentials, and their lack of synaptic activity. Here, we investigated the responses of such neurons to pulse application of the neurotransmitter GABA. We found two distinct types of responses to GABA and sensitivity to the GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline; type 1 (mature) characterized by non-desensitized responses to GABA as well as a high sensitivity to bicuculline, and type 2 (immature) which are desensitized to GABA and insensitive to bicuculline. Type 1 responses were age-dependent and dominant in mature WT neurons. In contrast, FX neurons expressed primarily type 2 phenotype. Expression analysis of GABA-A receptor subunits demonstrated that this bias in human FX neurons was associated with a significant alteration in the expression pattern of the GABA-A receptor subunits α2 and β2. Our results indicate that FMRP may play a role in the development of the GABAergic synapse during neurogenesis. This is the first demonstration of the lack of a mature response to GABA in human FX neurons and may explain the inappropriate synaptic functions in FXS. PMID:27242433

  18. Separate functions for responses to oral temperature in thermo-gustatory and trigeminal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yi; Li, Jinrong

    2016-01-01

    Oral temperature is a component and modifier of taste perception. Both trigeminal (V) and taste-sensitive cells, including those in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), can respond to oral temperature. However, functional associations in thermal sensitivity between V and gustatory neurons are poorly understood. To study this we recorded electrophysiological responses to oral stimulation with cool (9, 15, 25, 32, and 34 °C) and warm (40 and 45 °C) temperatures from medullary V (n = 45) and taste-sensitive NTS (n = 27) neurons in anesthetized mice. Results showed temperatures below 34 °C activated the majority of V neurons but only a minority of NTS units. V neurons displayed larger responses to cooling and responded to temperatures that poorly stimulated NTS cells. Multivariate analyses revealed different temperatures induced larger differences in responses across V compared with NTS neurons, indicating V pathways possess greater capacity to signal temperature. Conversely, responses to temperature in NTS units associated with gustatory tuning. Further analyses identified two types of cooling-sensitive V neurons oriented toward innocuous or noxious cooling. Multivariate analyses indicated the combined response of these cells afforded distinction among a broad range of cool temperatures, suggesting multiple types of V neurons work together to represent oral cooling. PMID:26976122

  19. Separate functions for responses to oral temperature in thermo-gustatory and trigeminal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Christian H; Kang, Yi; Li, Jinrong

    2016-06-01

    Oral temperature is a component and modifier of taste perception. Both trigeminal (V) and taste-sensitive cells, including those in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), can respond to oral temperature. However, functional associations in thermal sensitivity between V and gustatory neurons are poorly understood. To study this we recorded electrophysiological responses to oral stimulation with cool (9, 15, 25, 32, and 34 °C) and warm (40 and 45 °C) temperatures from medullary V (n = 45) and taste-sensitive NTS (n = 27) neurons in anesthetized mice. Results showed temperatures below 34 °C activated the majority of V neurons but only a minority of NTS units. V neurons displayed larger responses to cooling and responded to temperatures that poorly stimulated NTS cells. Multivariate analyses revealed different temperatures induced larger differences in responses across V compared with NTS neurons, indicating V pathways possess greater capacity to signal temperature. Conversely, responses to temperature in NTS units associated with gustatory tuning. Further analyses identified two types of cooling-sensitive V neurons oriented toward innocuous or noxious cooling. Multivariate analyses indicated the combined response of these cells afforded distinction among a broad range of cool temperatures, suggesting multiple types of V neurons work together to represent oral cooling.

  20. Microglial responses around intrinsic CNS neurons are correlated with axonal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microglia/macrophages and lymphocytes (T-cells) accumulate around motor and primary sensory neurons that are regenerating axons but there is little or no microglial activation or T-cell accumulation around axotomised intrinsic CNS neurons, which do not normally regenerate axons. We aimed to establish whether there was an inflammatory response around the perikarya of CNS neurons that were induced to regenerate axons through a peripheral nerve graft. Results When neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and red nucleus were induced to regenerate axons along peripheral nerve grafts, a marked microglial response was found around their cell bodies, including the partial enwrapping of some regenerating neurons. T-cells were found amongst regenerating TRN neurons but not rubrospinal neurons. Axotomy alone or insertion of freeze-killed nerve grafts did not induce a similar perineuronal inflammation. Nerve grafts in the corticospinal tracts did not induce axonal regeneration or a microglial or T-cell response in the motor cortex. Conclusions These results strengthen the evidence that perineuronal microglial accumulation (but not T-cell accumulation) is involved in axonal regeneration by intrinsic CNS and other neurons. PMID:20137064

  1. Microglial responses around intrinsic CNS neurons are correlated with axonal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shokouhi, Bahman N; Wong, Bernadette Z Y; Siddiqui, Samir; Lieberman, A Robert; Campbell, Gregor; Tohyama, Koujiro; Anderson, Patrick N

    2010-02-05

    Microglia/macrophages and lymphocytes (T-cells) accumulate around motor and primary sensory neurons that are regenerating axons but there is little or no microglial activation or T-cell accumulation around axotomised intrinsic CNS neurons, which do not normally regenerate axons. We aimed to establish whether there was an inflammatory response around the perikarya of CNS neurons that were induced to regenerate axons through a peripheral nerve graft. When neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and red nucleus were induced to regenerate axons along peripheral nerve grafts, a marked microglial response was found around their cell bodies, including the partial enwrapping of some regenerating neurons. T-cells were found amongst regenerating TRN neurons but not rubrospinal neurons. Axotomy alone or insertion of freeze-killed nerve grafts did not induce a similar perineuronal inflammation. Nerve grafts in the corticospinal tracts did not induce axonal regeneration or a microglial or T-cell response in the motor cortex. These results strengthen the evidence that perineuronal microglial accumulation (but not T-cell accumulation) is involved in axonal regeneration by intrinsic CNS and other neurons.

  2. Descending brain neurons in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus (de Geer): auditory responses and impact on walking.

    PubMed

    Zorović, Maja; Hedwig, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    The activity of four types of sound-sensitive descending brain neurons in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus was recorded intracellularly while animals were standing or walking on an open-loop trackball system. In a neuron with a contralaterally descending axon, the male calling song elicited responses that copied the pulse pattern of the song during standing and walking. The accuracy of pulse copying increased during walking. Neurons with ipsilaterally descending axons responded weakly to sound only during standing. The responses were mainly to the first pulse of each chirp, whereas the complete pulse pattern of a chirp was not copied. During walking the auditory responses were suppressed in these neurons. The spiking activity of all four neuron types was significantly correlated to forward walking velocity, indicating their relevance for walking. Additionally, injection of depolarizing current elicited walking and/or steering in three of four neuron types described. In none of the neurons was the spiking activity both sufficient and necessary to elicit and maintain walking behaviour. Some neurons showed arborisations in the lateral accessory lobes, pointing to the relevance of this brain region for cricket audition and descending motor control.

  3. Concentration dependent requirement for local protein synthesis in motor neuron subtype specific response to axon guidance cues

    PubMed Central

    Nedelec, Stephane; Peljto, Mirza; Shi, Peng; Amoroso, Mackenzie W.; Kam, Lance C.; Wichterle, Hynek

    2012-01-01

    Formation of functional motor circuits relies on the ability of distinct spinal motor neuron subtypes to project their axons with high precision to appropriate muscle targets. While guidance cues contributing to motor axon pathfinding have been identified, the intracellular pathways underlying subtype specific responses to these cues remain poorly understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether responses to axon guidance cues depend on axonal protein synthesis. Using a growth cone collapse assay, we demonstrate that mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived spinal motor neurons (ES-MNs) respond to ephrin-A5, Sema3f and Sema3a in a concentration dependent manner. At low doses, ES-MNs exhibit segmental or subtype specific responses, while this selectivity is lost at higher concentrations. Response to high doses of semaphorins and to all doses of ephrin-A5 is protein synthesis independent. In contrast, using microfluidic devices and stripe assays, we show that growth cone collapse and guidance at low concentrations of semaphorins relies on local protein synthesis in the axonal compartment. Similar bimodal response to low and high concentrations of guidance cues is observed in human ES-MNs, pointing to a general mechanism by which neurons increase their repertoire of responses to the limited set of guidance cues involved in neural circuit formation. PMID:22279234

  4. Concentration-dependent requirement for local protein synthesis in motor neuron subtype-specific response to axon guidance cues.

    PubMed

    Nédelec, Stéphane; Peljto, Mirza; Shi, Peng; Amoroso, Mackenzie W; Kam, Lance C; Wichterle, Hynek

    2012-01-25

    Formation of functional motor circuits relies on the ability of distinct spinal motor neuron subtypes to project their axons with high precision to appropriate muscle targets. While guidance cues contributing to motor axon pathfinding have been identified, the intracellular pathways underlying subtype-specific responses to these cues remain poorly understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether responses to axon guidance cues depend on axonal protein synthesis. Using a growth cone collapse assay, we demonstrate that mouse embryonic stem cell-derived spinal motor neurons (ES-MNs) respond to ephrin-A5, Sema3f, and Sema3a in a concentration-dependent manner. At low doses, ES-MNs exhibit segmental or subtype-specific responses, while this selectivity is lost at higher concentrations. Response to high doses of semaphorins and to all doses of ephrin-A5 is protein synthesis independent. In contrast, using microfluidic devices and stripe assays, we show that growth cone collapse and guidance at low concentrations of semaphorins rely on local protein synthesis in the axonal compartment. Similar bimodal response to low and high concentrations of guidance cues is observed in human ES-MNs, pointing to a general mechanism by which neurons increase their repertoire of responses to the limited set of guidance cues involved in neural circuit formation.

  5. A basal ganglia pathway drives selective auditory responses in songbird dopaminergic neurons via disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Gale, Samuel D; Perkel, David J

    2010-01-20

    Dopaminergic neurons in mammals respond to rewards and reward-predicting cues, and are thought to play an important role in learning actions or sensory cues that lead to reward. The anatomical sources of input that drive or modulate such responses are not well understood; these ultimately define the range of behavior to which dopaminergic neurons contribute. Primary rewards are not the immediate objective of all goal-directed behavior. For example, a goal of vocal learning is to imitate vocal-communication signals. Here, we demonstrate activation of dopaminergic neurons in songbirds driven by a basal ganglia region required for vocal learning, area X. Dopaminergic neurons in anesthetized zebra finches respond more strongly to the bird's own song (BOS) than to other sounds, and area X is critical for these responses. Direct pharmacological modulation of area X output, in the absence of auditory stimulation, is sufficient to bidirectionally modulate the firing rate of dopaminergic neurons. The only known pathway from song control regions to dopaminergic neurons involves a projection from area X to the ventral pallidum (VP), which in turn projects to dopaminergic regions. We show that VP neurons are spontaneously active and inhibited preferentially by BOS, suggesting that area X disinhibits dopaminergic neurons by inhibiting VP. Supporting this model, auditory-response latencies are shorter in area X than VP, and shorter in VP than dopaminergic neurons. Thus, dopaminergic neurons can be disinhibited selectively by complex sensory stimuli via input from the basal ganglia. The functional pathway we identify may allow dopaminergic neurons to contribute to vocal learning.

  6. Compartmentalized cGMP Responses of Olfactory Sensory Neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Shidara, Hisashi; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2017-04-05

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays a crucial role as a second messenger in the regulation of sensory signal transduction in many organisms. In AWC olfactory sensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, cGMP also has essential and distinctive functions in olfactory sensation and adaptation. According to molecular genetic studies, when nematodes are exposed to odorants, a decrease in cGMP regulates cGMP-gated channels for olfactory sensation. Conversely, for olfactory adaptation, an increase in cGMP activates protein kinase G to modulate cellular physiological functions. Although these opposing cGMP responses in single neurons may occur at the same time, it is unclear how cGMP actually behaves in AWC sensory neurons. A hypothetical explanation for opposing cGMP responses is region-specific behaviors in AWC: for odor sensation, cGMP levels in cilia could decrease, whereas odor adaptation is mediated by increased cGMP levels in soma. Therefore, we visualized intracellular cGMP in AWC with a genetically encoded cGMP indicator, cGi500, and examined spatiotemporal cGMP responses in AWC neurons. The cGMP imaging showed that, after odor exposure, cGMP levels in AWC cilia decreased transiently, whereas levels in dendrites and soma gradually increased. These region-specific responses indicated that the cGMP responses in AWC neurons are explicitly compartmentalized. In addition, we performed Ca(2+) imaging to examine the relationship between cGMP and Ca(2+) These results suggested that AWC sensory neurons are in fact analogous to vertebrate photoreceptor neurons.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays crucial roles in the regulation of sensory signal transduction in many animals. In AWC olfactory sensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, cGMP also has essential and distinctive functions involving olfactory sensation and adaptation. Here, we visualized intracellular cGMP in AWC neurons with a genetically encoded cGMP indicator and examined how

  7. Oxytocin, but not vassopressin, modulates nociceptive responses in dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo; Gerardo, Rojas-Piloni; Mejía-Rodríguez, Rosalinda; Rosalinda, Mejía-Rodríguez; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Guadalupe, Martínez-Lorenzana; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Miguel, Condés-Lara

    2010-05-26

    Oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) are synthesized and secreted by the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), and both peptides have been implicated in the pain modulatory system. In the spinal cord, activation of OT-containing axons modulates nociceptive neuronal responses in dorsal horn neurons; however, it is not known whether the direct VPergic descending projection participates. Here, we show that both PVN electrical stimulation and topical application of OT in the vicinity of identified and recorded dorsal horn WDR selectively inhibit Adelta and C-fiber responses. In contrast, the topical administration of VP on the same neurons did not affect the nociceptive responses. In addition, the reduction in nociceptive responses caused by PVN stimulation or OT administration was blocked with a selective OT antagonist. The results suggest that the VP descending projection does not modulate the antinociceptive effects mediated by the PVN on dorsal horn neurons; instead, it is the hypothalamic-spinal OT projection that regulates nociceptive information.

  8. Enhanced responses of the anterior cingulate cortex neurones to colonic distension in viscerally hypersensitive rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyin; Owyang, Chung; Li, Ying

    2006-01-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is critically involved in processing the affective component of pain sensation. Visceral hypersensitivity is a characteristic of irritable bowel syndrome. Electrophysiological activity of the ACC with regard to visceral sensitization has not been characterized. Single ACC neuronal activities in response to colorectal distension (CRD) were recorded in control, sham-treated rats and viscerally hypersensitive (EA) rats (induced by chicken egg albumin injection, i.p). The ACC neurones of controls failed to respond to 10 or 30 mmHg CRD; only 22% were activated by 50 mmHg CRD. Among the latter, 16.4% exhibited an excitatory response to CRD and were labelled ‘CRD-excited’ neurones. In contrast, CRD (10, 30 and 50 mmHg) markedly increased ACC neuronal responses of EA rats (10%, 28% and 47%, respectively). CRD produced greater pressure-dependent increases in ACC spike firing rates in EA rats compared with controls. Splanchnicectomy combined with pelvic nerve section abolished ACC responses to CRD in EA rats. Spontaneous activity in CRD-excited ACC neurones was significantly higher in EA rats than in controls. CRD-excited ACC neurones in control and EA rats (7 of 16 (42%) and 8 of 20 (40%), respectively) were activated by transcutaneous electrical and thermal stimuli. However, ACC neuronal activity evoked by noxious cutaneous stimuli did not change significantly in EA rats. This study identifies CRD-responsive neurones in the ACC and establishes for the first time that persistence of a heightened visceral afferent nociceptive input to the ACC induces ACC sensitization, characterized by increased spontaneous activity of CRD-excited neurones, decreased CRD pressure threshold, and increased response magnitude. Enhanced ACC nociceptive transmission in viscerally hypersensitive rats is restricted to visceral afferent input. PMID:16239277

  9. Muscarinic responses of rat basolateral amygdaloid neurons recorded in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, M S; Moises, H C

    1992-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were obtained from pyramidal-type neurons in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus (BLA) in slices of rat ventral forebrain and used to compare the actions of exogenously applied cholinomimetics to the effects produced by electrical stimulation of amygdalopetal cholinergic afferents from basal forebrain. 2. Bath application of carbachol depolarized pyramidal cells with an associated increase in input resistance (Ri), reduced the slow after-hyperpolarization (AHP) that followed a series of current-evoked action potentials and blocked spike frequency accommodation. All of these effects were reversed by the muscarinic antagonist atropine but not by the nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium. 3. Electrical stimulation of amygdaloid afferents within the external capsule evoked a series of synaptic potentials consisting of a non-cholinergic fast excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), followed by early and late inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs). Each of these synaptic potentials was reduced by carbachol in an atropine-sensitive manner. 4. Local application of carbachol to pyramidal cells produced a short-latency hyperpolarization followed by a prolonged depolarization. The hyperpolarization and depolarization to carbachol were blocked by atropine but not hexamethonium. 5. The carbachol-induced hyperpolarization was associated with a decrease in Ri and had a reversal potential nearly identical to that of the early IPSP. The inhibitory response was blocked by perfusion of medium containing tetrodotoxin (TTX), bicuculline or picrotoxin, while the subsequent depolarization was unaffected. On the basis of these data, it is concluded that the muscarinic hyperpolarization is mediated through the rapid excitation of presynaptic GABAergic interneurons in the slice. 6. The findings that the carbachol-induced depolarization was associated with an increase in Ri, often had a reversal potential below -80 mV, was sensitive to changes in extracellular

  10. Differential responses of lateral and ventrolateral rat periaqueductal grey neurones to noradrenaline in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, C W; Bandler, R; Christie, M J

    1996-01-15

    1. The action of noradrenaline on the membrane properties of rat periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurones was examined using intracellular recordings in brain slices maintained in vitro. Morphological properties and the anatomical location of neurones were characterized by use of intracellular staining within biocytin. 2. Noradrenaline (0.3-100 microM) depolarized 66% (81/123) and hyperpolarized 30% (37/123) of neurones. The alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists phenylephrine and UK 14304 produced depolarizations and hyperpolarizations in all PAG neurones tested, respectively. Neurones depolarized by noradrenaline were more responsive to phenylephrine, whereas neurones hyperpolarized by noradrenaline were more responsive to UK 14304. 3. The UK 14304-induced hyperpolarizations reversed polarity at -108 +/- 2 mV (n = 11). The reversal potential increased when the extracellular potassium concentration was raised (slope = 57.8 mV/log[K+]o mM) in a manner similar to that predicted for potassium conductance. 4. The phenylephrine-induced depolarizations did not reverse polarity at negative potentials (n = 25), or did so at potentials (-119 +/- 2 mV, n = 13) more negative than the UK 14304-induced hyperpolarizations. Superfusion with low calcium (0.1 mM), high magnesium (10 mM) and either cobalt (2-4 mM), or cadmium (100 microM) usually reduced the response to phenylephrine and produced reversals near that predicted for potassium conductance. 5. The majority of the ventrolateral PAG neurones were depolarized by noradrenaline (85%, 62/73). In contrast, almost equal proportions of the lateral PAG neurones were hyperpolarized (54%, 20/37) and depolarized (46%, n = 17/37) by noradrenaline. PAG neurones depolarized or hyperpolarized by noradrenaline could not be differentiated on morphological grounds. 6. These results suggest that the net effect of noradrenaline on lateral and ventrolateral PAG neurones is to bias activity in favour of a ventrolateral PAG-mediated response

  11. NMDA preconditioning and neuroprotection in vivo: delayed onset of kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and c-Fos attenuation in CA3a neurons.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Shirin; Pavlik, Alfred; Krajci, Dimitrolos; Al-Sarraf, Hameed

    2009-02-23

    Intraventricular (i.c.v.) kainic acid (KA) causes an acute excitotoxic lesion to the CA3 region of rodent hippocampus. Recent evidence implicated c-fos gene in regulating neuron survival and death following an excitotoxic insult. In this study we attempted to prevent KA-induced damage in CA3 neurons with NMDA preconditioning, which produced a marked expression of c-fos in the hippocampus. NMDA (0.6-6 microg, i.c.v.) was injected to anesthetized rats alone or 1 h before KA (0.15 microg, i.c.v.). Following KA injection, vibratome sections were processed for immunohistochemistry/electron microscopy. c-Fos and Nissl staining were used to estimate the extent of neuronal excitation and damage, respectively. Quantitative evaluation of c-Fos-labeled cells showed significantly less c-Fos in CA3a than in neighboring CA3b and CA2 from 1 to 4 h after KA alone. Attenuation of expressed c-Fos in CA3a was accompanied by damage of neurons with more apoptotic than necrotic signs. NMDA preconditioning elevated CA3a c-Fos expression and at 1 and 2 h exceeded markedly that after KA alone. However, at 4 h after KA, NMDA-preconditioned c-Fos induction in CA3a diminished to the same level as that seen after KA alone. The onset of neuronal degeneration was delayed in similar way. While NMDA-induced c-Fos expression in CA3a could be blocked by MK-801 completely, MK-801 and CNQX were both without significant effect on KA-induced c-Fos expression and neuronal damage. In conclusion, inhibition of c-Fos expression and onset of neuronal damage in CA3a following icv KA injection might be transiently delayed by i.c.v. NMDA preconditioning.

  12. Primary motor cortex of the parkinsonian monkey: altered neuronal responses to muscle stretch

    PubMed Central

    Pasquereau, Benjamin; Turner, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Exaggeration of the long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is a characteristic neurophysiologic feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) that contributes to parkinsonian rigidity. To explore one frequently-hypothesized mechanism, we studied the effects of fast muscle stretches on neuronal activity in the macaque primary motor cortex (M1) before and after the induction of parkinsonism by unilateral administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). We compared results from the general population of M1 neurons and two antidromically-identified subpopulations: distant-projecting pyramidal-tract type neurons (PTNs) and intra-telecenphalic-type corticostriatal neurons (CSNs). Rapid rotations of elbow or wrist joints evoked short-latency responses in 62% of arm-related M1 neurons. As in PD, the late electromyographic responses that constitute the LLSR were enhanced following MPTP. This was accompanied by a shortening of M1 neuronal response latencies and a degradation of directional selectivity, but surprisingly, no increase in single unit response magnitudes. The results suggest that parkinsonism alters the timing and specificity of M1 responses to muscle stretch. Observation of an exaggerated LLSR with no change in the magnitude of proprioceptive responses in M1 is consistent with the idea that the increase in LLSR gain that contributes to parkinsonian rigidity is localized to the spinal cord. PMID:24324412

  13. Decreased response to acetylcholine during aging of aplysia neuron R15.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Komolitdin; Rizzo, Valerio; Kadakkuzha, Beena M; Carter, Christopher J; Magoski, Neil S; Capo, Thomas R; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V

    2013-01-01

    How aging affects the communication between neurons is poorly understood. To address this question, we have studied the electrophysiological properties of identified neuron R15 of the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. R15 is a bursting neuron in the abdominal ganglia of the central nervous system and is implicated in reproduction, water balance, and heart function. Exposure to acetylcholine (ACh) causes an increase in R15 burst firing. Whole-cell recordings of R15 in the intact ganglia dissected from mature and old Aplysia showed specific changes in burst firing and properties of action potentials induced by ACh. We found that while there were no significant changes in resting membrane potential and latency in response to ACh, the burst number and burst duration is altered during aging. The action potential waveform analysis showed that unlike mature neurons, the duration of depolarization and the repolarization amplitude and duration did not change in old neurons in response to ACh. Furthermore, single neuron quantitative analysis of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) suggested alteration of expression of specific AChRs in R15 neurons during aging. These results suggest a defect in cholinergic transmission during aging of the R15 neuron.

  14. Information conveyed by onset transients in responses of striate cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Müller, J R; Metha, A B; Krauskopf, J; Lennie, P

    2001-09-01

    Normal eye movements ensure that the visual world is seen episodically, as a series of often stationary images. In this paper we characterize the responses of neurons in striate cortex to stationary grating patterns presented with abrupt onset. These responses are distinctive. In most neurons the onset of a grating gives rise to a transient discharge that decays with a time constant of 100 msec or less. The early stages of response have higher contrast gain and higher response gain than later stages. Moreover, the variability of discharge during the onset transient is disproportionately low. These factors together make the onset transient an information-rich component of response, such that the detectability and discriminability of stationary gratings grows rapidly to an early peak, within 150 msec of the onset of the response in most neurons. The orientation selectivity of neurons estimated from the first 150 msec of discharge to a stationary grating is indistinguishable from the orientation selectivity estimated from longer segments of discharge to moving gratings. Moving gratings are ultimately more detectable than stationary ones, because responses to the former are continuously renewed. The principal characteristics of the response of a neuron to a stationary grating-the initial high discharge rate, which decays rapidly, and the change of contrast gain with time-are well captured by a model in which each excitatory synaptic event leads to an immediate reduction in synaptic gain, from which recovery is slow.

  15. The linearity and selectivity of neuronal responses in awake visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Anand, Sanjiv; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Macknik, Stephen L.; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Swadlow, Harvey A.; Alonso, Jose-Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are frequently classified based on their response linearity: the extent in which their visual responses to drifting gratings resemble a linear replica of the stimulus. This classification is supported by the finding that response linearity is bimodally distributed across neurons in area V1 of anesthetized animals. However, recent studies suggest that such bimodal distribution may not reflect two neuronal types but a nonlinear relationship between the membrane potential and the spike output. A main limitation of these previous studies is that they measured response linearity in anesthetized animals, where the distance between the neuronal membrane potential and spike threshold is artificially increased by anesthesia. Here, we measured V1 response linearity in the awake brain and its correlation with the neuronal spontaneous firing rate, which is related to the distance between membrane potential and threshold. Our results demonstrate that response linearity is bimodally distributed in awake V1 but that it is poorly correlated with spontaneous firing rate. In contrast, the spontaneous firing rate is best correlated to the response selectivity and response latency to stimuli. PMID:19761345

  16. Responses of mirror neurons in area F5 to hand and tool grasping observation

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Magali J.; Caruana, Fausto; Jezzini, Ahmad; Escola, Ludovic; Intskirveli, Irakli; Grammont, Franck; Gallese, Vittorio; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    Mirror neurons are a distinct class of neurons that discharge both during the execution of a motor act and during observation of the same or similar motor act performed by another individual. However, the extent to which mirror neurons coding a motor act with a specific goal (e.g., grasping) might also respond to the observation of a motor act having the same goal, but achieved with artificial effectors, is not yet established. In the present study, we addressed this issue by recording mirror neurons from the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) of two monkeys trained to grasp objects with pliers. Neuron activity was recorded during the observation and execution of grasping performed with the hand, with pliers and during observation of an experimenter spearing food with a stick. The results showed that virtually all neurons responding to the observation of hand grasping also responded to the observation of grasping with pliers and, many of them to the observation of spearing with a stick. However, the intensity and pattern of the response differed among conditions. Hand grasping observation determined the earliest and the strongest discharge, while pliers grasping and spearing observation triggered weaker responses at longer latencies. We conclude that F5 grasping mirror neurons respond to the observation of a family of stimuli leading to the same goal. However, the response pattern depends upon the similarity between the observed motor act and the one executed by the hand, the natural motor template. PMID:20577726

  17. The h channel mediates location dependence and plasticity of intrinsic phase response in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Rishikesh; Johnston, Daniel

    2008-05-28

    The presence of phenomenological inductances in neuronal membrane has been known for more than one-half a century. Despite this, the dramatic contributions of such inductive elements to the amplitude and, especially, phase of neuronal impedance, and their roles in modulating temporal dynamics of neuronal responses have surprisingly remained unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate that the h channel contributes a location-dependent and plastic phenomenological inductive component to the input impedance of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Specifically, we show that the h channels introduce an apparent negative delay in the local voltage response of these neurons with respect to the injected current within the theta frequency range. The frequency range and the extent of this lead expand with increases in h current either through hyperpolarization, or with increasing distance of dendritic location from the soma. We also demonstrate that a spatially widespread increase in this inductive phase component accompanies long-term potentiation. Finally, using impedance analysis, we show that both location and activity dependence of intrinsic phase response are attributable not to changes in a capacitive or a leak component, but to changes in h-channel properties. Our results suggest that certain voltage-gated ion channels can differentially regulate internal time delays within neurons, thus providing them with an independent control mechanism in temporal coding of neuronal information. Our analyses and results also establish impedance as a powerful measure of intrinsic dynamics and excitability, given that it quantifies temporal relationships among signals and excitability as functions of input frequency.

  18. Responses of mirror neurons in area F5 to hand and tool grasping observation.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Magali J; Caruana, Fausto; Jezzini, Ahmad; Escola, Ludovic; Intskirveli, Irakli; Grammont, Franck; Gallese, Vittorio; Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra

    2010-08-01

    Mirror neurons are a distinct class of neurons that discharge both during the execution of a motor act and during observation of the same or similar motor act performed by another individual. However, the extent to which mirror neurons coding a motor act with a specific goal (e.g., grasping) might also respond to the observation of a motor act having the same goal, but achieved with artificial effectors, is not yet established. In the present study, we addressed this issue by recording mirror neurons from the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) of two monkeys trained to grasp objects with pliers. Neuron activity was recorded during the observation and execution of grasping performed with the hand, with pliers and during observation of an experimenter spearing food with a stick. The results showed that virtually all neurons responding to the observation of hand grasping also responded to the observation of grasping with pliers and, many of them to the observation of spearing with a stick. However, the intensity and pattern of the response differed among conditions. Hand grasping observation determined the earliest and the strongest discharge, while pliers grasping and spearing observation triggered weaker responses at longer latencies. We conclude that F5 grasping mirror neurons respond to the observation of a family of stimuli leading to the same goal. However, the response pattern depends upon the similarity between the observed motor act and the one executed by the hand, the natural motor template.

  19. Measuring Physiological Responses of Drosophila Sensory Neurons to Lipid Pheromones Using Live Calcium Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shruti; Calvert, Meredith E K; Yew, Joanne Y

    2016-04-29

    Unlike mammals, insects such as Drosophila have multiple taste organs. The chemosensory neurons on the legs, proboscis, wings and ovipositor of Drosophila express gustatory receptors(1,2), ion channels(3-6), and ionotropic receptors(7) that are involved in the detection of volatile and non-volatile sensory cues. These neurons directly contact tastants such as food, noxious substances and pheromones and therefore influence many complex behaviors such as feeding, egg-laying and mating. Electrode recordings and calcium imaging have been widely used in insects to quantify the neuronal responses evoked by these tastants. However, electrophysiology requires specialized equipment and obtaining measurements from a single taste sensillum can be technically challenging depending on the cell-type, size, and position. In addition, single neuron resolution in Drosophila can be difficult to achieve since taste sensilla house more than one type of chemosensory neuron. The live calcium imaging method described here allows responses of single gustatory neurons in live flies to be measured. This method is especially suitable for imaging neuronal responses to lipid pheromones and other ligand types that have low solubility in water-based solvents.

  20. Responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to foot movements in rats with a sprained ankle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are common problems and often lead to persistent pain. To investigate the underlying mechanism of ankle sprain pain, the response properties of spinal dorsal horn neurons were examined after ankle sprain. Acute ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending the ankle of a rat hindlimb in a direction of plantarflexion and inversion. The weight-bearing ratio (WBR) of the affected foot was used as an indicator of pain. Single unit activities of dorsal horn neurons in response to plantarflexion and inversion of the foot or ankle compression were recorded from the medial part of the deep dorsal horn, laminae IV-VI, in normal and ankle-sprained rats. One day after ankle sprain, rats showed significantly reduced WBRs on the affected foot, and this reduction was partially restored by systemic morphine. The majority of deep dorsal horn neurons responded to a single ankle stimulus modality. After ankle sprain, the mean evoked response rates were significantly increased, and afterdischarges were developed in recorded dorsal horn neurons. The ankle sprain-induced enhanced evoked responses were significantly reduced by morphine, which was reversed by naltrexone. The data indicate that movement-specific dorsal horn neuron responses were enhanced after ankle sprain in a morphine-dependent manner, thus suggesting that hyperactivity of dorsal horn neurons is an underlying mechanism of pain after ankle sprain. PMID:21389306

  1. Nucleus accumbens neuronal activity correlates to the animal's behavioral response to acute and chronic methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Catherine M; Chong, Samuel L; Dafny, Nachum

    2014-04-22

    Acute and chronic methylphenidate (MPD) exposure was recorded simultaneously for the rat's locomotor activity and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) neuronal activity. The evaluation of the neuronal events was based on the animal's behavior response to chronic MPD administration: 1) Animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization, 2) Animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. The experiment lasted for 10days with four groups of animals; saline, 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg MPD. For the main behavioral findings, about half of the animals exhibited behavioral sensitization or behavioral tolerance to 0.6, 2.5, and/or 10mg/kg MPD respectively. Three hundred and forty one NAc neuronal units were evaluated. Approximately 80% of NAc units responded to 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg MPD. When the neuronal activity was analyzed based on the animals' behavioral response to chronic MPD exposure, significant differences were seen between the neuronal population responses recorded from animals that expressed behavioral sensitization when compared to the NAc neuronal responses recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. Three types of neurophysiological sensitization and neurophysiological tolerance can be recognized following chronic MPD administration to the neuronal populations. Collectively, these findings show that the same dose of chronic MPD can elicit either behavioral tolerance or behavioral sensitization. Differential statistical analyses were used to verify our hypothesis that the neuronal activity recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization will respond differently to MPD compared to those animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance, thus, suggesting that it is essential to record the animal's behavior concomitantly with neuronal recordings.

  2. Relation between stimulus and response in frog olfactory receptor neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Lánský, Petr; Duchamp, André; Duchamp-Viret, Patricia

    2003-09-01

    The spiking activity of receptor neurons was recorded extracellularly in the frog olfactory epithelium in response to four odourants applied at precisely controlled concentrations. A set of criteria was formulated to define the spikes in the response. Four variables - latency, duration, number of interspike intervals and frequency - were determined to quantify the responses. They were studied at the single neuron, neuron population and ciliary membrane levels. The dose-response curves were determined using specific functions and their characteristics were evaluated. The characteristic molar concentrations at threshold or at maximum duration and the characteristics of variables, e.g. minimum latency or maximum frequency, have asymmetric histograms with peaks close to the origin and long tails. Dynamic ranges have even more asymmetric histograms, so that a significant fraction of neurons presents a much wider range than their one-decade peak. From these histograms, response properties of the whole neuron population can be inferred. In general, location along the concentration axis (thresholds), width (dynamic ranges) and heights of dose-response curves are independent, which explains the diversity of curves, prevents their global categorization and supports the qualitative coding of odourants. No evidence for odourant-independent types of neurons was found. Finally, receptor activation and ciliary membrane conductance were reconstructed in the framework of a model based on firing data, known mucus biochemical and neuron morpho-electrical characteristics. It is in agreement with independent determinations of Kd of odourant-receptor interaction and of conductance characteristics, and describes their statistical distributions in the neuron population.

  3. The essential role of p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) and its regulation by FoxO3a transcription factor in β-amyloid-induced neuron death.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Rumana; Sanphui, Priyankar; Biswas, Subhas Chandra

    2014-04-11

    Neurodegeneration underlies the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD). The molecules responsible for such neurodegeneration in AD brain are mostly unknown. Recent findings indicate that the BH3-only proteins of the Bcl-2 family play an essential role in various cell death paradigms, including neurodegeneration. Here we report that Puma (p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis), an important member of the BH3-only protein family, is up-regulated in neurons upon toxic β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)) exposure both in vitro and in vivo. Down-regulation of Puma by specific siRNA provides significant protection against neuron death induced by Aβ(1-42). We further demonstrate that the activation of p53 and inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathways induce Puma. The transcription factor FoxO3a, which is activated when PI3K/Akt signaling is inhibited, directly binds with the Puma gene and induces its expression upon exposure of neurons to oligomeric Aβ(1-42). Moreover, Puma cooperates with another BH3-only protein, Bim, which is already implicated in AD. Our results thus suggest that Puma is activated by both p53 and PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a pathways and cooperates with Bim to induce neuron death in response to Aβ(1-42).

  4. Neuronal plasticity and neurotrophic factors in drug responses.

    PubMed

    Castrén, E; Antila, H

    2017-08-01

    Neurotrophic factors, particularly brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other members of the neurotrophin family, are central mediators of the activity-dependent plasticity through which environmental experiences, such as sensory information are translated into the structure and function of neuronal networks. Synthesis, release and action of BDNF is regulated by neuronal activity and BDNF in turn leads to trophic effects such as formation, stabilization and potentiation of synapses through its high-affinity TrkB receptors. Several clinically available drugs activate neurotrophin signaling and neuronal plasticity. In particular, antidepressant drugs rapidly activate TrkB signaling and gradually increase BDNF expression, and the behavioral effects of antidepressants are mediated by and dependent on BDNF signaling through TrkB at least in rodents. These findings indicate that antidepressants, widely used drugs, effectively act as TrkB activators. They further imply that neuronal plasticity is a central mechanism in the action of antidepressant drugs. Indeed, it was recently discovered that antidepressants reactivate a state of plasticity in the adult cerebral cortex that closely resembles the enhanced plasticity normally observed during postnatal critical periods. This state of induced plasticity, known as iPlasticity, allows environmental stimuli to beneficially reorganize networks abnormally wired during early life. iPlasticity has been observed in cortical as well as subcortical networks and is induced by several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments. iPlasticity is a new pharmacological principle where drug treatment and rehabilitation cooperate; the drug acts permissively to enhance plasticity and rehabilitation provides activity to guide the appropriate wiring of the plastic network. Optimization of iPlastic drug treatment with novel means of rehabilitation may help improve the efficacy of available drug treatments and expand the use of

  5. Learning of anticipatory responses in single neurons of the human medial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Leila; Poncet, Marlene; Self, Matthew W.; Peters, Judith C.; Douw, Linda; van Dellen, Edwin; Claus, Steven; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Baayen, Johannes C.; Roelfsema, Pieter R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal processes underlying the formation of new associations in the human brain are not yet well understood. Here human participants, implanted with depth electrodes in the brain, learned arbitrary associations between images presented in an ordered, predictable sequence. During learning we recorded from medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurons that responded to at least one of the pictures in the sequence (the preferred stimulus). We report that as a result of learning, single MTL neurons show asymmetric shifts in activity and start firing earlier in the sequence in anticipation of their preferred stimulus. These effects appear relatively early in learning, after only 11 exposures to the stimulus sequence. The anticipatory neuronal responses emerge while the subjects became faster in reporting the next item in the sequence. These results demonstrate flexible representations that could support learning of new associations between stimuli in a sequence, in single neurons in the human MTL. PMID:26449885

  6. Activating transcription factor 3, a useful marker for regenerative response after nerve root injury.

    PubMed

    Lindå, Hans; Sköld, Mattias K; Ochsmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is induced in various tissues in response to stress. In this experiment, ATF3 expression was studied in adult rats subjected either to a dorsal or ventral root avulsion (VRA; L4-6), or sciatic nerve transection (SNT). Post-operative survival times varied between 1.5 h and 3 weeks. In additional experiments an avulsed ventral root was directly replanted to the spinal cord. Dorsal root ganglias (DRGs) from humans exposed to traumatic dorsal root avulsions were also examined. After SNT ATF3 immunoreactivity (ATF3 IR) was detected in a few DRG neurons already 6 h after the lesion. After 24 h the number had clearly increased and still at 3 weeks DRG neurons remained labeled. In the ventral horn, ATF3 IR in motoneurons (MN) was first detected 24 h after the SNT, and still 3 weeks post-operatively lesioned MN showed ATF3 labeling. After a VRA many spinal MN showed ATF3 IR already after 3 h, and after 6 h all MN were labeled. At 3 weeks a majority of the lesioned MN had died, but all the remaining ones were labeled. When an avulsed ventral root was directly replanted, MN survived and were still labeled at 5 weeks. In DRG, a few neurons were labeled already at 1.5 h after a dorsal root avulsion. At 24 h the number had increased but still only a minority of the neurons were labeled. At 3 days the number of labeled neurons was reduced, and a further reduction was at hand at 7 days and 3 weeks. In parallel, in humans, 3 days after a traumatic dorsal root avulsion, only a few DRG neurons showed ATF3 IR. At 6 weeks no labeled neurons could be detected. These facts imply that ATF3 response to axotomy involves a distance-dependent mechanism. ATF3 also appears to be a useful and reliable neuronal marker of nerve lesions even in humans. In addition, ATF3 up-regulation in both motor and sensory neurons seems to be linked to regenerative competence.

  7. Quantized response times are a signature of a neuronal bottleneck in decision

    PubMed Central

    Perona, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The histograms of response times of optimal YES/NO decisions that are computed from a single sensory Poisson neuron are highly structured. In particular, response times in NO decisions are quantized to a small set of times, while response times in YES decisions have a multimodal structure. Both the times of NO decisions, as well as the modes of the the histogram of YES decisions, are associated to the number of action potentials that were necessary to reach the decision. Their value is a function of the firing rate of the neuron in response to the states of the stimulus. PMID:24782750

  8. [Responses of the reticular nucleus neurons and dorsal thalamic nuclei neurons in the cat during extinction of a conditioned instrumental reflex].

    PubMed

    Moldavan, M G

    1991-01-01

    Activity of 66 neurons of the reticular nucleus (R), 31 neurons of the ventroposterolateral nucleus and 14 neurons of the posterolateral nucleus-pulvinar complex of the thalamus was investigated during extinction of the conditioned instrumental alimentary reflex. The quantity of R neurons that show initial excitation in response to the conditional stimulus in the first 300 ms decreased during extinction. Conditioned placing reactions and late excitatory and inhibitory neuronal responses in the R and dorsal thalamic nuclei with latency above 300 ms disappeared during extinction simultaneously. The background unit activity decreased during extinction in the 2/3 of investigated neurons of R and dorsal thalamic nuclei. It is suggested that the efferent influence from the R decreased during extinction.

  9. Antidromic potential spread modulates the receptor responses in the stretch receptor neurons of the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Purali, Nuhan

    2011-12-01

    The effects of antidromic potential spread were investigated in the stretch receptor neurons of the crayfish. Current and potential responses to conductance changes were recorded in the dynamic clamp condition and compared to those obtained by using some conventional clamp methods and a compartmental neuron model. An analogue circuit was used for dynamic calculation of the injected receptor current as a function of the membrane potential and the given conductance change. Alternatively, receptor current responses to a mechanical stimulus were recorded and compared when the cell was voltage clamped to a previously recorded impulse wave form and the resting potential, respectively. Under dynamic clamp, the receptor current had an oscillating waveform which contrasts with the conventional recordings. Frequency, amplitude and sign of the oscillations were dependent on the applied conductance level, reversal potential and electrotonic attenuation. Mean current amplitude and frequency of the evoked impulse responses were smaller under dynamic clamp, especially for large conductance increases. However, firing frequency was larger if plotted against the mean current response. Recorded responses were similar to those calculated in the model. It was not possible to evoke any adaptation in the slowly adapting neuron by using the dynamic clamp. Evoked potential change served as a self limiting response, preventing the depolarization block. However, impulse duration was significantly shorter in the rapidly adapting neuron when the dynamic clamp was used. It was concluded that, in the stretch receptor neurons during a conductance increase, antidromic potential spread modulates the receptor responses and contributes to adaptation.

  10. Neuronal activity in the primate dorsomedial prefrontal cortex contributes to strategic selection of response tactics

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaka, Yoshiya; Akiyama, Tetsuya; Tanji, Jun; Mushiake, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    The functional roles of the primate posterior medial prefrontal cortex have remained largely unknown. Here, we show that this region participates in the regulation of actions in the presence of multiple response tactics. Monkeys performed a forelimb task in which a visual cue required prompt decision of reaching to a left or a right target. The location of the cue was either ipsilateral (concordant) or contralateral (discordant) to the target. As a result of extensive training, the reaction times for the concordant and discordant trials were indistinguishable, indicating that the monkeys developed tactics to overcome the cue-response conflict. Prefrontal neurons exhibited prominent activity when the concordant and discordant trials were randomly presented, requiring rapid selection of a response tactic (reach toward or away from the cue). The following findings indicate that these neurons are involved in the selection of tactics, rather than the selection of action or monitoring of response conflict: (i) The response period activity of neurons in this region disappeared when the monkeys performed the task under the behavioral condition that required a single tactic alone, whereas the action varied across trials. (ii) The neuronal activity was found in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex but not in the anterior cingulate cortex that has been implicated for the response conflict monitoring. These results suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex participates in the selection of a response tactic that determines an appropriate action. Furthermore, the observation of dynamic, task-dependent neuronal activity necessitates reconsideration of the conventional concept of cortical motor representation. PMID:22371582

  11. Cognition-Enhancing Doses of Methylphenidate Preferentially Increase Prefrontal Cortical Neuronal Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Devilbiss, David M.; Berridge, Craig W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite widespread use of low-dose psychostimulants for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the neural basis for the therapeutic actions of these drugs are not well-understood. We recently demonstrated that low-dose methylphenidate (MPH) increases catecholamine efflux preferentially within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), suggesting the PFC is a principal site of action in the behavioral-calming and cognition-enhancing effects of low-dose psychostimulants. To better understand the neural mechanisms involved in the behavioral actions of low-dose stimulants, the current study examined the effects of low-dose MPH on the discharge properties of individual and ensembles of PFC neurons. Methods Extracellular activity of multiple individual PFC neurons was recorded in freely moving rats using multi-channel recording techniques. Behavioral studies identified optimal, working memory-enhancing doses of intraperitoneal MPH. The effects of these low-doses of MPH on PFC neuronal discharge properties were compared to: 1) the effects of high-dose MPH on PFC neuronal discharge; 2) the effects of low-dose MPH on neuronal discharge within the somatosensory cortex. Results Only working memory-enhancing doses of MPH increased the responsivity of individual PFC neurons and altered neuronal ensemble responses within the PFC. These effects were not observed outside the PFC (i.e. within somatosensory cortex). In contrast, high-dose MPH profoundly suppressed evoked discharge of PFC neurons. Conclusions These observations suggest that preferential enhancement of signal processing within the PFC, including alterations in the discharge properties of individual PFC neurons and PFC neuronal ensembles, underlie the behavioral/cognitive actions of low-dose psychostimulants. PMID:18585681

  12. The effects of Brn-3a on neuronal differentiation and apoptosis are differentially modulated by EWS and its oncogenic derivative EWS/Fli-1.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Duncan M; Thomas, G Ruth; Latchman, David S

    2004-05-06

    The Brn-3 family of POU (Pit-Oct-Unc) homeodomain transcription factors regulate differentiation of neuronal cell types. The transcriptional activator Brn-3a is expressed in Ewing's sarcomas, which also express characteristic chimaeric proteins as a consequence of fusion of the TET family gene EWS to one of several ETS genes. We have previously demonstrated a physical interaction between Brn-3a and EWS proteins, and show here that the C-terminal POU domain but not N-terminal activation domain of Brn-3a can interact in vitro with the RNA-binding domain of EWS. Likely due to POU domain homology, the related factor Brn-3b can also interact with EWS, but to a lesser extent than Brn-3a. Importantly, Brn-3a but not Brn-3b interacts in vitro with chimaeric EWS/Fli-1, EWS/ATF-1 and EWS/ERG proteins. Furthermore, overexpression of EWS/Fli-1 but not EWS or Fli-1 inhibits Brn-3a-associated growth arrest and neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells, and specifically inhibits Brn-3a-dependent activation of p21 and SNAP-25 transcription. In contrast, upregulation of Bcl-2 expression and inhibition of apoptosis by Brn-3a is antagonized more by EWS than by EWS/Fli-1. These data demonstrate that oncogenic rearrangement of EWS to produce EWS/Fli-1 may enhance the antiapoptotic effect of Brn-3a and inhibit its ability to promote neuronal differentiation.

  13. [Non-specific facilitating influences on the responses of rabbit visual cortex neurons].

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ia

    1977-01-01

    A study was made of neuronal responses in the rabbit visual cortex to patterned visual stimuli and their change during non-specific activation reaction. Non-specific activation while only slightly affecting the background neuronal activity, enhances the responses of most units to patterned visual stimuli. A comparison of responses with a different degree of inhibition participation shows that the depression of inhibitory processes may act as a mechanism of facilitation of the responses during non-specific activation. After facilitated responses evoked by the action of the stimulus during non-specific activation, the neurones retain a state of enhanced excitability. Repetition of stimuli not attended with non-specific activation leads to the diminution of excitability. The possible connection of the indicated effects with extinction processes is discussed.

  14. Response properties of neurons in the cat's putamen during auditory discrimination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenling; Sato, Yu; Qin, Ling

    2015-10-01

    The striatum integrates diverse convergent input and plays a critical role in the goal-directed behaviors. To date, the auditory functions of striatum are less studied. Recently, it was demonstrated that auditory cortico-striatal projections influence behavioral performance during a frequency discrimination task. To reveal the functions of striatal neurons in auditory discrimination, we recorded the single-unit spike activities in the putamen (dorsal striatum) of free-moving cats while performing a Go/No-go task to discriminate the sounds with different modulation rates (12.5 Hz vs. 50 Hz) or envelopes (damped vs. ramped). We found that the putamen neurons can be broadly divided into four groups according to their contributions to sound discrimination. First, 40% of neurons showed vigorous responses synchronized to the sound envelope, and could precisely discriminate different sounds. Second, 18% of neurons showed a high preference of ramped to damped sounds, but no preference for modulation rate. They could only discriminate the change of sound envelope. Third, 27% of neurons rapidly adapted to the sound stimuli, had no ability of sound discrimination. Fourth, 15% of neurons discriminated the sounds dependent on the reward-prediction. Comparing to passively listening condition, the activities of putamen neurons were significantly enhanced by the engagement of the auditory tasks, but not modulated by the cat's behavioral choice. The coexistence of multiple types of neurons suggests that the putamen is involved in the transformation from auditory representation to stimulus-reward association.

  15. Responses to moving visual stimuli in pretectal neurons of the small-spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula).

    PubMed

    Masseck, Olivia Andrea; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Single-unit recordings were performed from a retinorecipient pretectal area (corpus geniculatum laterale) in Scyliorhinus canicula. The function and homology of this nucleus has not been clarified so far. During visual stimulation with a random dot pattern, 45 (35%) neurons were found to be direction selective, 10 (8%) were axis selective (best neuronal responses to rotations in both directions around one particular stimulus axis), and 75 (58%) were movement sensitive. Direction-selective responses were found to the following stimulus directions (in retinal coordinates): temporonasal and nasotemporal horizontal movements, up- and downward vertical movements, and oblique movements. All directions of motion were represented equally by our sample of pretectal neurons. Additionally we tested the responses of 58 of the 130 neurons to random dot patterns rotating around the semicircular canal or body axes to investigate whether direction-selective visual information is mapped into vestibular coordinates in pretectal neurons of this chondrichthyan species. Again all rotational directions were represented equally, which argues against a direct transformation from a retinal to a vestibular reference frame. If a complete transformation had occurred, responses to rotational axes corresponding to the axes of the semicircular canals should have been overrepresented. In conclusion, the recorded direction-selective neurons in the Cgl are plausible detectors for retinal slip created by body rotations in all directions.

  16. Responses of central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Newlands, Shawn D; Wei, Min

    2013-10-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral measures of vestibular function partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of macaque vestibular nucleus neurons in the compensated state (>6 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). The responses of neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation at a series of frequencies (0.1-2.0 Hz) and peak velocities (7.5-210°/s) were examined to determine how the behavior of these cells differed from those in animals with intact labyrinths. The sensitivity of neurons responding to ipsilateral rotation (type I) did not differ between the intact and injured sides after UL, although this sensitivity was lower bilaterally after lesion than before lesion. The sensitivity of neurons that increase firing with contralateral rotation (type II) was higher ipsilateral to the UL than before lesion or in the nucleus contralateral to the UL. UL did not increase asymmetry in the responses of individual type I or II neurons to ipsilateral vs. contralateral rotation, nor does it change the power law relationship between neuronal firing and level of stimulation. Increased sensitivities of contralesional type I neurons to the remaining vestibular nerve input and increased efficacy of inhibitory vestibular commissures projecting to the ipsilesional vestibular nucleus appear to be responsible for recovery of dynamic function of central vestibular neurons in compensated animals. The portion of type I neurons on the ipsilesional side is reduced in compensated animals, which likely accounts for the asymmetries in vestibular reflexes and perception that characterize vestibular function after UL.

  17. Responses of central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min

    2013-01-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral measures of vestibular function partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of macaque vestibular nucleus neurons in the compensated state (>6 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). The responses of neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation at a series of frequencies (0.1–2.0 Hz) and peak velocities (7.5–210°/s) were examined to determine how the behavior of these cells differed from those in animals with intact labyrinths. The sensitivity of neurons responding to ipsilateral rotation (type I) did not differ between the intact and injured sides after UL, although this sensitivity was lower bilaterally after lesion than before lesion. The sensitivity of neurons that increase firing with contralateral rotation (type II) was higher ipsilateral to the UL than before lesion or in the nucleus contralateral to the UL. UL did not increase asymmetry in the responses of individual type I or II neurons to ipsilateral vs. contralateral rotation, nor does it change the power law relationship between neuronal firing and level of stimulation. Increased sensitivities of contralesional type I neurons to the remaining vestibular nerve input and increased efficacy of inhibitory vestibular commissures projecting to the ipsilesional vestibular nucleus appear to be responsible for recovery of dynamic function of central vestibular neurons in compensated animals. The portion of type I neurons on the ipsilesional side is reduced in compensated animals, which likely accounts for the asymmetries in vestibular reflexes and perception that characterize vestibular function after UL. PMID:23864379

  18. Plasticity of Fear and Safety Neurons of the Amygdala in Response to Fear Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Sangha, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Fear inhibition learning induces plasticity and remodeling of circuits within the amygdala. Most studies examine these changes in nondiscriminative fear conditioning paradigms. Using a discriminative fear, safety, and reward conditioning task, Sangha et al. (2013) have previously reported several neural microcircuits within the basal amygdala (BA) which discriminate among these cues, including a subpopulation of neurons responding selectively to a safety cue and not a fear cue. Here, the hypothesis that these “safety” neurons isolated during discriminative conditioning are biased to become fear cue responsive as a result of extinction, when fear behavior diminishes, was tested. Although 41% of “safety” neurons became fear cue responsive as a result of extinction, the data revealed that there was no bias for these neurons to become preferentially responsive during fear extinction compared to the other identified subgroups. In addition to the plasticity seen in the “safety” neurons, 44% of neurons unresponsive to either the fear cue or safety cue during discriminative conditioning became fear cue responsive during extinction. Together these emergent responses to the fear cue as a result of extinction support the hypothesis that new learning underlies extinction. In contrast, 47% of neurons responsive to the fear cue during discriminative conditioning became unresponsive to the fear cue during extinction. These findings are consistent with a suppression of neural responding mediated by inhibitory learning, or, potentially, by direct unlearning. Together, the data support extinction as an active process involving both gains and losses of responses to the fear cue and suggests the final output of the integrated BA circuit in influencing fear behavior is a balance of excitation and inhibition, and perhaps reversal of learning-induced changes. PMID:26733838

  19. Normalization of neuronal responses in cortical area MT across signal strengths and motion directions

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianbo; Niu, Yu-Qiong; Wiesner, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Multiple visual stimuli are common in natural scenes, yet it remains unclear how multiple stimuli interact to influence neuronal responses. We investigated this question by manipulating relative signal strengths of two stimuli moving simultaneously within the receptive fields (RFs) of neurons in the extrastriate middle temporal (MT) cortex. Visual stimuli were overlapping random-dot patterns moving in two directions separated by 90°. We first varied the motion coherence of each random-dot pattern and characterized, across the direction tuning curve, the relationship between neuronal responses elicited by bidirectional stimuli and by the constituent motion components. The tuning curve for bidirectional stimuli showed response normalization and can be accounted for by a weighted sum of the responses to the motion components. Allowing nonlinear, multiplicative interaction between the two component responses significantly improved the data fit for some neurons, and the interaction mainly had a suppressive effect on the neuronal response. The weighting of the component responses was not fixed but dependent on relative signal strengths. When two stimulus components moved at different coherence levels, the response weight for the higher-coherence component was significantly greater than that for the lower-coherence component. We also varied relative luminance levels of two coherently moving stimuli and found that MT response weight for the higher-luminance component was also greater. These results suggest that competition between multiple stimuli within a neuron's RF depends on relative signal strengths of the stimuli and that multiplicative nonlinearity may play an important role in shaping the response tuning for multiple stimuli. PMID:24899674

  20. Responses of Nucleus Tractus Solitarius (NTS) early and late neurons to blood pressure changes in anesthetized F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Jeffrey T.; Gu, He; Zhang, Xueguo; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2017-01-01

    Previously, many different types of NTS barosensitive neurons were identified. However, the time course of NTS barosensitive neuronal activity (NA) in response to arterial pressure (AP) changes, and the relationship of NA-AP changes, have not yet been fully quantified. In this study, we made extracellular recordings of single NTS neurons firing in response to AP elevation induced by occlusion of the descending aorta in anesthetized rats. Our findings were that: 1) Thirty-five neurons (from 46 neurons) increased firing, whereas others neurons either decreased firing upon AP elevation, or were biphasic: first decreased firing upon AP elevation and then increased firing during AP decrease. 2) Fourteen neurons with excitatory responses were activated and rapidly increased their firing during the early phase of AP increase (early neurons); whereas 21 neurons did not increase firing until the mean arterial pressure changes (ΔMAP) reached near/after the peak (late neurons). 3) The early neurons had a significantly higher firing rate than late neurons during AP elevation at a similar rate. 4) Early neuron NA-ΔMAP relationship could be well fitted and characterized by the sigmoid logistic function with the maximal gain of 29.3. 5) The increase of early NA correlated linearly with the initial heart rate (HR) reduction. 6) The late neurons did not contribute to the initial HR reduction. However, the late NA could be well correlated with HR reduction during the late phase. Altogether, our study demonstrated that the NTS excitatory neurons could be grouped into early and late neurons based on their firing patterns. The early neurons could be characterized by the sigmoid logistic function, and different neurons may differently contribute to HR regulation. Importantly, the grouping and quantitative methods used in this study may provide a useful tool for future assessment of functional changes of early and late neurons in disease models. PMID:28384162

  1. Responses of Nucleus Tractus Solitarius (NTS) early and late neurons to blood pressure changes in anesthetized F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Kolpakova, Jenya; Li, Liang; Hatcher, Jeffrey T; Gu, He; Zhang, Xueguo; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2017-01-01

    Previously, many different types of NTS barosensitive neurons were identified. However, the time course of NTS barosensitive neuronal activity (NA) in response to arterial pressure (AP) changes, and the relationship of NA-AP changes, have not yet been fully quantified. In this study, we made extracellular recordings of single NTS neurons firing in response to AP elevation induced by occlusion of the descending aorta in anesthetized rats. Our findings were that: 1) Thirty-five neurons (from 46 neurons) increased firing, whereas others neurons either decreased firing upon AP elevation, or were biphasic: first decreased firing upon AP elevation and then increased firing during AP decrease. 2) Fourteen neurons with excitatory responses were activated and rapidly increased their firing during the early phase of AP increase (early neurons); whereas 21 neurons did not increase firing until the mean arterial pressure changes (ΔMAP) reached near/after the peak (late neurons). 3) The early neurons had a significantly higher firing rate than late neurons during AP elevation at a similar rate. 4) Early neuron NA-ΔMAP relationship could be well fitted and characterized by the sigmoid logistic function with the maximal gain of 29.3. 5) The increase of early NA correlated linearly with the initial heart rate (HR) reduction. 6) The late neurons did not contribute to the initial HR reduction. However, the late NA could be well correlated with HR reduction during the late phase. Altogether, our study demonstrated that the NTS excitatory neurons could be grouped into early and late neurons based on their firing patterns. The early neurons could be characterized by the sigmoid logistic function, and different neurons may differently contribute to HR regulation. Importantly, the grouping and quantitative methods used in this study may provide a useful tool for future assessment of functional changes of early and late neurons in disease models.

  2. Neurotoxin-induced selective ubiquitination and regulation of MEF2A isoform in neuronal stress response

    PubMed Central

    She, Hua; Yang, Qian; Mao, Zixu

    2014-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A-D (MEF2) proteins are members of the MCM1-agamous-deficiens-serum (MADS) response factor family of transcription factors. Various MEF2 isoform proteins are enriched in neurons and exhibit distinct patterns of expression in different regions of the brain. In neurons, MEF2 functions as a converging factor to regulate many neuronal functions including survival. MEF2 activities are tightly controlled in neurons in response to stress. Whether stress signal may differentially regulate MEF2s remains largely unknown. In this work, we showed that MEF2A but not MEF2C or MEF2D was modified by ubiquitination in dopaminergic neuronal cell line SN4741 cells. MEF2A was ubiquitinated at its N’-terminus, and the ubiquitination of MEF2A was first detectable in the nuclear compartment and later in the cytoplasm. Ubiquitination of MEF2A correlated with reduced DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity. More importantly, disturbing the degradation of ubiquitinated MEF2A through proteasome pathway by neurotoxins known to induce Parkinson’s disease (PD) features in model animals caused accumulation of ubiquitinated MEF2A, reduced MEF2 activity, and impaired cellular viability. Our work thus provides the first evidence to demonstrate an isoforms specific regulation of MEF2s by ubiquitination-proteasome pathway in dopaminergic neuronal cell by neurotoxins, suggesting that stress signal and cellular context dependent dysregulation of MEF2s may underlie the loss of neuronal viability. PMID:22764880

  3. The Rai (Shc C) adaptor protein regulates the neuronal stress response and protects against cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Troglio, Flavia; Echart, Cinara; Gobbi, Alberto; Pawson, Tony; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; De Simoni, Maria Grazia; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2004-01-01

    Rai (Shc C or N-Shc) is a neuron-specific member of the family of Shc-like adaptor proteins. Rai functions in the cytoplasmic propagation of Ret-dependent survival signals and regulates, in vivo, the number of sympathetic neurons. We report here a function of Rai, i.e., the regulation of the neuronal adaptive response to environmental stresses. We demonstrate that (i) primary cultures of cortical neurons from Rai-/- mice are more sensitive to apoptosis induced by hypoxia or oxidative stress; (ii) in Rai-/- mice, ischemia/reperfusion injury induces severe neurological deficits, increased apoptosis and size of the infarct area, and significantly higher mortality; and (iii) Rai functions as a stress-response gene that increases phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation and Akt phosphorylation after hypoxic or oxidation insults. These data suggest that Rai has a functional neuroprotective role in brain injury, with possible implications in the treatment of stroke. PMID:15494442

  4. Comparative responses of the central adrenaline- and noradrenaline-containing neurons after reserpine injections.

    PubMed

    Lambás-Seńas, L; Chamba, G; Fety, R; Renaud, B

    1986-07-01

    The responses of the noradrenaline (NA)- and adrenaline (A)-containing neurons to a reserpine treatment have been studied in the rat brain by using biochemical indices of the neuronal activity. Three days after multiple reserpine injections, tyrosine hydroxylase activity was significantly increased in the locus coeruleus (LC), A1-C1 and C2 regions. No change in this activity was observed in the A2 region. Furthermore, the NA and A endogenous levels were markedly reduced both in NA and A cell bodies and/or terminals, suggesting a reserpine action on NA and A neurons. The NA turnover was unchanged in all the regions analyzed. Conversely, the A turnover was reduced in the LC, A2 and C2 regions and in the nucleus periventricularis of the hypothalamus. This result suggests a different degree of sensitivity and/or response of the NA and A neurons following reserpine administration.

  5. A model for experience-dependent changes in the responses of inferotemporal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sohal, V S; Hasselmo, M E

    2000-08-01

    Neurons in inferior temporal (IT) cortex exhibit selectivity for complex visual stimuli and can maintain activity during the delay following the presentation of a stimulus in delayed match to sample tasks. Experimental work in awake monkeys has shown that the responses of IT neurons decline during presentation of stimuli which have been seen recently (within the past few seconds). In addition, experiments have found that the responses of IT neurons to visual stimuli also decline as the stimuli become familiar, independent of recency. Here a biologically based neural network simulation is used to model these effects primarily through two processes. The recency effects are caused by adaptation due to a calcium-dependent potassium current, and the familiarity effects are caused by competitive self-organization of modifiable feedforward synapses terminating on IT cortex neurons.

  6. Escape behavior and neuronal responses to looming stimuli in the crab Chasmagnathus granulatus (Decapoda: Grapsidae).

    PubMed

    Oliva, Damián; Medan, Violeta; Tomsic, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Behavioral responses to looming stimuli have been studied in many vertebrate and invertebrate species, but neurons sensitive to looming have been investigated in very few animals. In this paper we introduce a new experimental model using the crab Chasmagnathus granulatus, which allows investigation of the processes of looming detection and escape decision at both the behavioral and neuronal levels. By analyzing the escape response of the crab in a walking simulator device we show that: (i) a robust and reliable escape response can be elicited by computer-generated looming stimuli in all tested animals; (ii) parameters such as distance, speed, timing and directionality of the escape run, are easy to record and quantify precisely in the walking device; (iii) although the magnitude of escape varies between animals and stimulus presentations, the timing of the response is remarkably consistent and does not habituate at 3 min stimulus intervals. We then study the response of neurons from the brain of the crab by means of intracellular recordings in the intact animal and show that: (iv) two subclasses of previously identified movement detector neurons from the lobula (third optic neuropil) exhibit robust and reliable responses to the same looming stimuli that trigger the behavioral response; (v) the neurons respond to the object approach by increasing their rate of firing in a way that closely matches the dynamics of the image expansion. Finally, we compare the neuronal with the behavioral response showing that: (vi) differences in the neuronal responses to looming, receding or laterally moving stimuli closely reflect the behavioral differences to such stimuli; (vii) during looming, the crab starts to run soon after the looming-sensitive neurons begin to increase their firing rate. The increase in the running speed during stimulus approach faithfully follows the increment in the firing rate, until the moment of maximum stimulus expansion. Thereafter, the neurons abruptly

  7. Aging and amyloid β oligomers enhance TLR4 expression, LPS-induced Ca(2+) responses, and neuron cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Rodríguez, María; de la Fuente, Carmen; García-Durillo, Mónica; García-Rodríguez, Carmen; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2017-01-31

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system recognizing diverse pathogen-derived and tissue damage-related ligands. It has been suggested that TLR signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related, neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is associated to oligomers of the amyloid β peptide (Aβo) that cause intracellular Ca(2+) dishomeostasis and neuron cell death in rat hippocampal neurons. Here we assessed the interplay between inflammation and Aβo in long-term cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, an in vitro model of neuron aging and/or senescence. Ca(2+) imaging and immunofluorescence against annexin V and TLR4 were applied in short- and long-term cultures of rat hippocampal neurons to test the effects of TLR4-agonist LPS and Aβo on cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and on apoptosis as well as on expression of TLR4. LPS increases cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and promotes apoptosis in rat hippocampal neurons in long-term culture considered aged and/or senescent neurons, but not in short-term cultured neurons considered young neurons. TLR4 antagonist CAY10614 prevents both effects. TLR4 expression in rat hippocampal neurons is significantly larger in aged hippocampal cultures. Treatment of aged hippocampal cultures with Aβo increases TLR4 expression and enhances LPS-induced Ca(2+) responses and neuron cell death. Aging and amyloid β oligomers, the neurotoxin involved in Alzheimer's disease, enhance TLR4 expression as well as LPS-induced Ca(2+) responses and neuron cell death in rat hippocampal neurons aged in vitro.

  8. Response of cat inferior colliculus neurons to binaural beat stimuli: possible mechanisms for sound localization.

    PubMed

    Kuwada, S; Yin, T C; Wickesberg, R E

    1979-11-02

    The interaural phase sensitivity of neurons was studied through the use of binaural beat stimuli. The response of most cells was phase-locked to the beat frequency, which provides a possible neural correlate to the human sensation of binaural beats. In addition, this stimulus allowed the direction and rate of interaural phase change to be varied. Some neurons in our sample responded selectively to manipulations of these two variables, which suggests a sensitivity to direction or speed of movement.

  9. Leptin-responsive GABAergic neurons regulate fertility through pathways that result in reduced kisspeptinergic tone.

    PubMed

    Martin, Cecilia; Navarro, Víctor M; Simavli, Serap; Vong, Linh; Carroll, Rona S; Lowell, Bradford B; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2014-04-23

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin plays a critical role in the central transmission of energy balance to modulate reproductive function. However, the neurocircuitry underlying this interaction remains elusive, in part due to incomplete knowledge of first-order leptin-responsive neurons. To address this gap, we explored the contribution of predominantly inhibitory (GABAergic) neurons versus excitatory (glutamatergic) neurons in the female mouse by selective ablation of the leptin receptor in each neuronal population: Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) and Vglut2-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice, respectively. Female Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) but not Vglut2-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice were obese. Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice had delayed or absent vaginal opening, persistent diestrus, and atrophic reproductive tracts with absent corpora lutea. In contrast, Vglut2-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) females exhibited reproductive maturation and function comparable to Lepr(lox/lox) control mice. Intracerebroventricular administration of kisspeptin-10 to Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) female mice elicited robust gonadotropin responses, suggesting normal gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal and gonadotrope function. However, adult ovariectomized Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice displayed significantly reduced levels of Kiss1 (but not Tac2) mRNA in the arcuate nucleus, and a reduced compensatory luteinizing hormone increase compared with control animals. Estradiol replacement after ovariectomy inhibited gonadotropin release to a similar extent in both groups. These animals also exhibited a compromised positive feedback response to sex steroids, as shown by significantly lower Kiss1 mRNA levels in the AVPV, compared with Lepr(lox/lox) mice. We conclude that leptin-responsive GABAergic neurons, but not glutamatergic neurons, act as metabolic sensors to regulate fertility, at least in part through modulatory effects on kisspeptin neurons.

  10. Quantification and classification of neuronal responses in kernel-smoothed peristimulus time histograms

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Itzhak; Koch, Christof

    2014-01-01

    Peristimulus time histograms are a widespread form of visualizing neuronal responses. Kernel convolution methods transform these histograms into a smooth, continuous probability density function. This provides an improved estimate of a neuron's actual response envelope. We here develop a classifier, called the h-coefficient, to determine whether time-locked fluctuations in the firing rate of a neuron should be classified as a response or as random noise. Unlike previous approaches, the h-coefficient takes advantage of the more precise response envelope estimation provided by the kernel convolution method. The h-coefficient quantizes the smoothed response envelope and calculates the probability of a response of a given shape to occur by chance. We tested the efficacy of the h-coefficient in a large data set of Monte Carlo simulated smoothed peristimulus time histograms with varying response amplitudes, response durations, trial numbers, and baseline firing rates. Across all these conditions, the h-coefficient significantly outperformed more classical classifiers, with a mean false alarm rate of 0.004 and a mean hit rate of 0.494. We also tested the h-coefficient's performance in a set of neuronal responses recorded in humans. The algorithm behind the h-coefficient provides various opportunities for further adaptation and the flexibility to target specific parameters in a given data set. Our findings confirm that the h-coefficient can provide a conservative and powerful tool for the analysis of peristimulus time histograms with great potential for future development. PMID:25475352

  11. Temperature response of the neuronal cytoskeleton mapped via atomic force and fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedden, Elise; Kaplan, David L.; Staii, Cristian

    2013-10-01

    Neuronal cells change their growth properties in response to external physical stimuli such as variations in external temperature, stiffness of the growth substrate, or topographical guidance cues. Detailed knowledge of the mechanisms that control these biomechanical responses is necessary for understanding the basic principles that underlie neuronal growth and regeneration. Here, we present elasticity maps of living cortical neurons (embryonic rat) as a function of temperature, and correlate these maps to the locations of internal structural components of the cytoskeleton. Neurons display a significant increase in the average elastic modulus upon a decrease in ambient temperature from 37 to 25 °C. We demonstrate that the dominant mechanism by which the elasticity of the neurons changes in response to temperature is the stiffening of the actin components of the cytoskeleton induced by myosin II. We also report a reversible shift in the location and composition of the high-stiffness areas of the neuron cytoskeleton with temperature. At 37 °C the areas of the cell displaying high elastic modulus overlap with the tubulin-dense regions, while at 25 °C these high-stiffness areas correspond to the actin-dense regions of the cytoskeleton. These results demonstrate the importance of considering temperature effects when investigating cytoskeletal dynamics in cells.

  12. Activation of the type I interferon pathway is enhanced in response to human neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Jocelyn R; Altschaefl, Kate M; O'Shea, K Sue; Miller, David J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of innate immunity in preventing or controlling pathogen-induced damage in most, if not all, cell types, very little is known about the activity of this essential defense system in central nervous system neurons, especially in humans. In this report we use both an established neuronal cell line model and an embryonic stem cell-based system to examine human neuronal innate immunity and responses to neurotropic alphavirus infection in cultured cells. We demonstrate that neuronal differentiation is associated with increased expression of crucial type I interferon signaling pathway components, including interferon regulatory factor-9 and an interferon receptor heterodimer subunit, which results in enhanced interferon stimulation and subsequent heightened antiviral activity and cytoprotective responses against neurotropic alphaviruses such as western equine encephalitis virus. These results identify important differentiation-dependent changes in innate immune system function that control cell-autonomous neuronal responses. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the utility of human embryonic stem cell-derived cultures as a platform to study the interactions between innate immunity, virus infection, and pathogenesis in central nervous system neurons.

  13. Temperature response of the neuronal cytoskeleton mapped via atomic force and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Spedden, Elise; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2013-10-01

    Neuronal cells change their growth properties in response to external physical stimuli such as variations in external temperature, stiffness of the growth substrate, or topographical guidance cues. Detailed knowledge of the mechanisms that control these biomechanical responses is necessary for understanding the basic principles that underlie neuronal growth and regeneration. Here, we present elasticity maps of living cortical neurons (embryonic rat) as a function of temperature, and correlate these maps to the locations of internal structural components of the cytoskeleton. Neurons display a significant increase in the average elastic modulus upon a decrease in ambient temperature from 37 to 25 °C. We demonstrate that the dominant mechanism by which the elasticity of the neurons changes in response to temperature is the stiffening of the actin components of the cytoskeleton induced by myosin II. We also report a reversible shift in the location and composition of the high-stiffness areas of the neuron cytoskeleton with temperature. At 37 °C the areas of the cell displaying high elastic modulus overlap with the tubulin-dense regions, while at 25 °C these high-stiffness areas correspond to the actin-dense regions of the cytoskeleton. These results demonstrate the importance of considering temperature effects when investigating cytoskeletal dynamics in cells.

  14. Custom astrocyte-mediated vasomotor responses to neuronal energy demand

    PubMed Central

    LeMaistre, Jillian L; Anderson, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Astrocytes mediate either constriction or dilation of local brain arterioles in response to synaptic activity. Recent work indicates that the directionality of this response may be dictated by ambient oxygen levels. PMID:19232077

  15. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-09-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long-term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization was also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals were observed for the 2.5 and 10.0mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure and

  16. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2016-01-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0 mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization were also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals was observed for the 2.5 and 10.0 mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5 mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0 mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0 mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure

  17. Tactile responses of hindpaw, forepaw and whisker neurons in the thalamic ventrobasal complex of anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, J; Morales-Botello, M L; Foffani, G

    2008-01-01

    The majority of studies investigating responses of thalamocortical neurons to tactile stimuli have focused on the whisker representation of the rat thalamus: the ventral-posterior-medial nucleus (VPM). To test whether the basic properties of thalamocortical responses to tactile stimuli could be extended to the entire ventrobasal complex, we recorded single neurons from the whisker, forepaw and hindpaw thalamic representations. We performed a systematic analysis of responses to stereotyped tactile stimuli--500 ms pulses (i.e. ON-OFF stimuli) or 1 ms pulses (i.e. impulsive stimuli)--under two different anesthetics (pentobarbital or urethane). We obtained the following main results: (i) the tuning of cells to ON vs. OFF stimuli displayed a gradient across neurons, so that two-thirds of cells responded more to ON stimuli and one-third responded more to OFF stimuli; (ii) on average, response magnitudes did not differ between ON and OFF stimuli, whereas latencies of response to OFF stimuli were a few milliseconds longer; (iii) latencies of response to ON and OFF stimuli were highly correlated; (iv) responses to impulsive stimuli and ON stimuli showed a strong correlation, whereas the relationship between the responses to impulsive stimuli and OFF stimuli was subtler; (v) unlike ON responses, OFF responses did not decrease when stimuli were moved from the receptive field center to a close location in the excitatory surround. We obtained the same results for hindpaw, forepaw and whisker neurons. Our results support the view of a neurophysiologically homogeneous ventrobasal complex, in which OFF responses participate in the structure of the spatiotemporal receptive field of thalamocortical neurons for tactile stimuli.

  18. Tactile responses of hindpaw, forepaw and whisker neurons in the thalamic ventrobasal complex of anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, J; Morales-Botello, M L; Foffani, G

    2008-01-01

    The majority of studies investigating responses of thalamocortical neurons to tactile stimuli have focused on the whisker representation of the rat thalamus: the ventral–posterior–medial nucleus (VPM). To test whether the basic properties of thalamocortical responses to tactile stimuli could be extended to the entire ventrobasal complex, we recorded single neurons from the whisker, forepaw and hindpaw thalamic representations. We performed a systematic analysis of responses to stereotyped tactile stimuli − 500 ms pulses (i.e. ON–OFF stimuli) or 1 ms pulses (i.e. impulsive stimuli) − under two different anesthetics (pentobarbital or urethane). We obtained the following main results: (i) the tuning of cells to ON vs. OFF stimuli displayed a gradient across neurons, so that two-thirds of cells responded more to ON stimuli and one-third responded more to OFF stimuli; (ii) on average, response magnitudes did not differ between ON and OFF stimuli, whereas latencies of response to OFF stimuli were a few milliseconds longer; (iii) latencies of response to ON and OFF stimuli were highly correlated; (iv) responses to impulsive stimuli and ON stimuli showed a strong correlation, whereas the relationship between the responses to impulsive stimuli and OFF stimuli was subtler; (v) unlike ON responses, OFF responses did not decrease when stimuli were moved from the receptive field center to a close location in the excitatory surround. We obtained the same results for hindpaw, forepaw and whisker neurons. Our results support the view of a neurophysiologically homogeneous ventrobasal complex, in which OFF responses participate in the structure of the spatiotemporal receptive field of thalamocortical neurons for tactile stimuli. PMID:18190520

  19. Long-term memory and response generalization in mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Haehnel, Melanie; Menzel, Randolf

    2012-02-01

    Honeybees learn to associate an odor with sucrose reward under conditions that allow the monitoring of neural activity by imaging Ca(2+) transients in morphologically identified neurons. Here we report such recordings from mushroom body extrinsic neurons - which belong to a recurrent tract connecting the output of the mushroom body with its input, potentially providing inhibitory feedback - and other extrinsic neurons. The neurons' responses to the learned odor and two novel control odors were measured 24 h after learning. We found that calcium responses to the learned odor and an odor that was strongly generalized with it were enhanced compared with responses to a weakly generalized control. Thus, the physiological responses measured in these extrinsic neurons accurately reflect what is observed in behavior. We conclude that the recorded recurrent neurons feed information back to the mushroom body about the features of learned odor stimuli. Other extrinsic neurons may signal information about learned odors to different brain regions.

  20. Intradermal endothelin-1 excites bombesin-responsive superficial dorsal horn neurons in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, T; Nagamine, M; Davoodi, A; Iodi Carstens, M; Cevikbas, F; Steinhoff, M; Carstens, E

    2015-10-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been implicated in nonhistaminergic itch. Here we used electrophysiological methods to investigate whether mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons respond to intradermal (id) injection of ET-1 and whether ET-1-sensitive neurons additionally respond to other pruritic and algesic stimuli or spinal superfusion of bombesin, a homolog of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) that excites spinal itch-signaling neurons. Single-unit recordings were made from lumbar dorsal horn neurons in pentobarbital-anesthetized C57BL/6 mice. We searched for units that exhibited elevated firing after id injection of ET-1 (1 μg/μl). Responsive units were further tested with mechanical stimuli, bombesin (spinal superfusion, 200 μg·ml(-1)·min(-1)), heating, cooling, and additional chemicals [histamine, chloroquine, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), capsaicin]. Of 40 ET-1-responsive units, 48% responded to brush and pinch [wide dynamic range (WDR)] and 52% to pinch only [high threshold (HT)]. Ninety-three percent responded to noxious heat, 50% to cooling, and >70% to histamine, chloroquine, AITC, and capsaicin. Fifty-seven percent responded to bombesin, suggesting that they participate in spinal itch transmission. That most ET-1-sensitive spinal neurons also responded to pruritic and algesic stimuli is consistent with previous studies of pruritogen-responsive dorsal horn neurons. We previously hypothesized that pruritogen-sensitive neurons signal itch. The observation that ET-1 activates nociceptive neurons suggests that both itch and pain signals may be generated by ET-1 to result in simultaneous sensations of itch and pain, consistent with observations that ET-1 elicits both itch- and pain-related behaviors in animals and burning itch sensations in humans.

  1. Intradermal endothelin-1 excites bombesin-responsive superficial dorsal horn neurons in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, T.; Nagamine, M.; Davoodi, A.; Iodi Carstens, M.; Cevikbas, F.; Steinhoff, M.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been implicated in nonhistaminergic itch. Here we used electrophysiological methods to investigate whether mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons respond to intradermal (id) injection of ET-1 and whether ET-1-sensitive neurons additionally respond to other pruritic and algesic stimuli or spinal superfusion of bombesin, a homolog of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) that excites spinal itch-signaling neurons. Single-unit recordings were made from lumbar dorsal horn neurons in pentobarbital-anesthetized C57BL/6 mice. We searched for units that exhibited elevated firing after id injection of ET-1 (1 μg/μl). Responsive units were further tested with mechanical stimuli, bombesin (spinal superfusion, 200 μg·ml−1·min−1), heating, cooling, and additional chemicals [histamine, chloroquine, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), capsaicin]. Of 40 ET-1-responsive units, 48% responded to brush and pinch [wide dynamic range (WDR)] and 52% to pinch only [high threshold (HT)]. Ninety-three percent responded to noxious heat, 50% to cooling, and >70% to histamine, chloroquine, AITC, and capsaicin. Fifty-seven percent responded to bombesin, suggesting that they participate in spinal itch transmission. That most ET-1-sensitive spinal neurons also responded to pruritic and algesic stimuli is consistent with previous studies of pruritogen-responsive dorsal horn neurons. We previously hypothesized that pruritogen-sensitive neurons signal itch. The observation that ET-1 activates nociceptive neurons suggests that both itch and pain signals may be generated by ET-1 to result in simultaneous sensations of itch and pain, consistent with observations that ET-1 elicits both itch- and pain-related behaviors in animals and burning itch sensations in humans. PMID:26311187

  2. Neurons responsive to face-view in the Primate Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Romanski, Lizabeth M.; Diehl, Maria M.

    2011-01-01

    Studies have indicated that temporal and prefrontal brain regions process face and vocal information. Face-selective and vocalization-responsive neurons have been demonstrated in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and some prefrontal cells preferentially respond to combinations of face and corresponding vocalizations. These studies suggest VLPFC in non-human primates may play a role in communication that is similar to the role of inferior frontal regions in human language processing. If VLPFC is involved in communication, information about a speaker's face including identity, face-view, gaze and emotional expression might be encoded by prefrontal neurons. In the following study, we examined the effect of face-view in ventrolateral prefrontal neurons by testing cells with auditory, visual, and a set of human and monkey faces rotated through 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and −30°. Prefrontal neurons responded selectively to either the identity of the face presented (human or monkey) or to the specific view of the face/head, or to both identity and face-view. Neurons which were affected by the identity of the face most often showed an increase in firing in the second part of the stimulus period. Neurons that were selective for face-view typically preferred forward face-view stimuli (0° and 30° rotation). The neurons which were selective for forward face-view were also auditory responsive compared to other neurons which responded to other views or were unselective which were not auditory responsive. Our analysis showed that the human forward face (0°) was decoded better and also contained the most information relative to other face-views. Our findings confirm a role for VLPFC in the processing and integration of face and vocalization information and add to the growing body of evidence that the primate ventrolateral prefrontal cortex plays a prominent role in social communication and is an important model in understanding the cellular mechanisms of communication

  3. In vivo responses of mouse superficial dorsal horn neurones to both current injection and peripheral cutaneous stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Graham, B A; Brichta, A M; Callister, R J

    2004-01-01

    In the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) processing of noxious and innocuous stimuli is critically dependent on the input–output relationship of its component neurones. Such relationships are routinely examined by assessing neuronal responses to somatic current injection or activation of synaptic inputs. A more complete understanding of input–output relationships would be achieved by comparing, in the same neurone, how the two forms of activation contribute to neuronal output. Therefore, we examined how SDH neurones transform depolarizing current injections and synaptic excitation via peripheral cutaneous stimuli (brush and pinch of the hindpaw) into trains of action potentials, in an in vivo preparation of the adult mouse spinal cord. Under whole-cell current clamp recording conditions four action potential discharge patterns were observed during depolarizing current injection: tonic firing neurones (21/93) discharged spikes throughout the step; initial bursting neurones (35/93) discharged several spikes at step onset; single spiking neurones (16/93) discharged one or two spikes at step onset; and delayed firing neurones (21/93) discharged spikes delayed from the step onset. Four characteristic profiles were observed in response to application of noxious (pinch) and innocuous (brush) cutaneous stimuli: nociceptive neurones (20/37) responded maximally to pinch stimulation; light touch neurones (9/37) responded maximally to brush stimulation; subthreshold neurones (4/37) exhibited depolarizing responses without firing action potentials; and hyperpolarizing neurones (4/37) exhibited a sustained pinch-induced hyperpolarization. Comparisons of current-evoked discharge patterns with peripherally evoked responses indicate SDH neurones expressing each of the four discharge patterns could receive, and therefore participate in the processing of information concerning, either noxious or innocuous stimuli. These data suggest that a neurone's response to current injection does

  4. De-repression of FOXO3a death axis by microRNA-132 and -212 causes neuronal apoptosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hon-Kit Andus; Veremeyko, Tatiana; Patel, Nehal; Lemere, Cynthia A; Walsh, Dominic M; Esau, Christine; Vanderburg, Charles; Krichevsky, Anna M

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial and fatal neurodegenerative disorder for which the mechanisms leading to profound neuronal loss are incompletely recognized. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recently discovered small regulatory RNA molecules that repress gene expression and are increasingly acknowledged as prime regulators involved in human brain pathologies. Here we identified two homologous miRNAs, miR-132 and miR-212, downregulated in temporal cortical areas and CA1 hippocampal neurons of human AD brains. Sequence-specific inhibition of miR-132 and miR-212 induces apoptosis in cultured primary neurons, whereas their overexpression is neuroprotective against oxidative stress. Using primary neurons and PC12 cells, we demonstrate that miR-132/212 controls cell survival by direct regulation of PTEN, FOXO3a and P300, which are all key elements of AKT signaling pathway. Silencing of these three target genes by RNAi abrogates apoptosis caused by the miR-132/212 inhibition. We further demonstrate that mRNA and protein levels of PTEN, FOXO3a, P300 and most of the direct pro-apoptotic transcriptional targets of FOXO3a are significantly elevated in human AD brains. These results indicate that the miR-132/miR-212/PTEN/FOXO3a signaling pathway contributes to AD neurodegeneration.

  5. Polymodal Responses in C. elegans Phasmid Neurons Rely on Multiple Intracellular and Intercellular Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wenjuan; Cheng, Hankui; Li, Shitian; Yue, Xiaomin; Xue, Yadan; Chen, Sixi; Kang, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Animals utilize specialized sensory neurons enabling the detection of a wide range of environmental stimuli from the presence of toxic chemicals to that of touch. However, how these neurons discriminate between different kinds of stimuli remains poorly understood. By combining in vivo calcium imaging and molecular genetic manipulation, here we investigate the response patterns and the underlying mechanisms of the C. elegans phasmid neurons PHA/PHB to a variety of sensory stimuli. Our observations demonstrate that PHA/PHB neurons are polymodal sensory neurons which sense harmful chemicals, hyperosmotic solutions and mechanical stimulation. A repulsive concentration of IAA induces calcium elevations in PHA/PHB and both OSM-9 and TAX-4 are essential for IAA-sensing in PHA/PHB. Nevertheless, the PHA/PHB neurons are inhibited by copper and post-synaptically activated by copper removal. Neuropeptide is likely involved in copper removal-induced calcium elevations in PHA/PHB. Furthermore, mechanical stimulation activates PHA/PHB in an OSM-9-dependent manner. Our work demonstrates how PHA/PHB neurons respond to multiple environmental stimuli and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms of polymodal signaling, such as nociception, in more complex organisms. PMID:28195191

  6. Predation risk modifies behaviour by shaping the response of identified brain neurons.

    PubMed

    Magani, Fiorella; Luppi, Tomas; Nuñez, Jesus; Tomsic, Daniel

    2016-04-15

    Interpopulation comparisons in species that show behavioural variations associated with particular ecological disparities offer good opportunities for assessing how environmental factors may foster specific functional adaptations in the brain. Yet, studies on the neural substrate that can account for interpopulation behavioural adaptations are scarce. Predation is one of the strongest driving forces for behavioural evolvability and, consequently, for shaping structural and functional brain adaptations. We analysed the escape response of crabs ITALIC! Neohelice granulatafrom two isolated populations exposed to different risks of avian predation. Individuals from the high-risk area proved to be more reactive to visual danger stimuli (VDS) than those from an area where predators are rare. Control experiments indicate that the response difference was specific for impending visual threats. Subsequently, we analysed the response to VDS of a group of giant brain neurons that are thought to play a main role in the visually guided escape response of the crab. Neurons from animals of the population with the stronger escape response were more responsive to VDS than neurons from animals of the less reactive population. Our results suggest a robust linkage between the pressure imposed by the predation risk, the response of identified neurons and the behavioural outcome.

  7. Intradermal capsaicin inhibits lumbar dorsal horn neuronal responses to colorectal distention.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Motohiro; Al-Chaer, Elie D

    2003-05-23

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of cutaneous inflammation on the responses of viscerosomatic convergent dorsal horn neurons to graded colorectal distension (CRD) and cutaneous mechanical stimulation. Responses of single viscerosomatic neurons in the lumbar dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord to CRD and to cutaneous stimuli were recorded before and 50 min after cutaneous inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in the receptive field (RF) or in the ipsilateral and contralateral forepaw. Capsaicin injection in the RF induced an increase in the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurons, an expansion in the size of their RF and facilitated their responses to cutaneous stimuli. An injection placed in the center of the RF attenuated the responses to noxious CRD. Capsaicin injection in the forepaw caused a significant decrease in the responses to CRD but not to cutaneous stimuli. These results indicate that the inhibitory effects, evoked by cutaneous inflammation, can modulate the responses of dorsal horn neurons to CRD, independent of its effect on the responses to cutaneous mechanical stimuli.

  8. Stimulation of medial prefrontal cortex decreases the responsiveness of central amygdala output neurons.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Gregory J; Likhtik, Ekaterina; Pelletier, Joe Guillaume; Paré, Denis

    2003-09-24

    In extinction of auditory fear conditioning, rats learn that a tone no longer predicts the occurrence of a footshock. Recent lesion and unit recording studies suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays an essential role in the inhibition of conditioned fear following extinction. mPFC has robust projections to the amygdala, a structure that is known to mediate the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. Fear conditioning potentiates the tone responses of neurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), which excite neurons in the central nucleus (Ce) of the amygdala. In turn, the Ce projects to the brainstem and hypothalamic areas that mediate fear responses. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the mPFC inhibits conditioned fear via feedforward inhibition of Ce output neurons. Recording extracellularly from physiologically identified brainstem-projecting Ce neurons, we tested the effect of mPFC prestimulation on Ce responsiveness to synaptic input. In support of our hypothesis, mPFC prestimulation dramatically reduced the responsiveness of Ce output neurons to inputs from the insular cortex and BLA. Thus, our findings support the idea that mPFC gates impulse transmission from the BLA to Ce, perhaps through GABAergic intercalated cells, thereby gating the expression of conditioned fear.

  9. The superior paraolivary nucleus shapes temporal response properties of neurons in the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Richard A.; Magnusson, Anna K.; Berrebi, Albert S.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian superior paraolivary nucleus (SPON) is a major source of GABAergic inhibition to neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC), a well-studied midbrain nucleus that is the site of convergence and integration for the majority ascending auditory pathways en route to the cortex. Neurons in the SPON and IC exhibit highly precise responses to temporal sound features, which are important perceptual cues for naturally occurring sounds. To determine how inhibitory input from the SPON contributes to the encoding of temporal information in the IC, a reversible inactivation procedure was conducted to silence SPON neurons while recording responses to amplitude-modulated tones and silent gaps between tones in the IC. The results show that SPON-derived inhibition shapes responses of onset and sustained units in the IC via different mechanisms. Onset neurons appear to be driven primarily by excitatory inputs and their responses are shaped indirectly by SPON-derived inhibition, whereas sustained neurons are heavily influenced directly by transient offset inhibition from the SPON. The findings also demonstrate that a more complete dissection of temporal processing pathways is critical for understanding how biologically important sounds are encoded by the brain. PMID:24973970

  10. Changing the responses of cortical neurons from sub- to suprathreshold using single spikes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, Verena; Greenberg, David S; Sprekeler, Henning; Gerstner, Wulfram; Kerr, Jason ND

    2013-01-01

    Action Potential (APs) patterns of sensory cortex neurons encode a variety of stimulus features, but how can a neuron change the feature to which it responds? Here, we show that in vivo a spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) protocol—consisting of pairing a postsynaptic AP with visually driven presynaptic inputs—modifies a neurons' AP-response in a bidirectional way that depends on the relative AP-timing during pairing. Whereas postsynaptic APs repeatedly following presynaptic activation can convert subthreshold into suprathreshold responses, APs repeatedly preceding presynaptic activation reduce AP responses to visual stimulation. These changes were paralleled by restructuring of the neurons response to surround stimulus locations and membrane-potential time-course. Computational simulations could reproduce the observed subthreshold voltage changes only when presynaptic temporal jitter was included. Together this shows that STDP rules can modify output patterns of sensory neurons and the timing of single-APs plays a crucial role in sensory coding and plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00012.001 PMID:23359858

  11. Learning shapes the aversion and reward responses of lateral habenula neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daqing; Li, Yi; Feng, Qiru; Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Luo, Minmin

    2017-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is believed to encode negative motivational values. It remains unknown how LHb neurons respond to various stressors and how learning shapes their responses. Here, we used fiber-photometry and electrophysiology to track LHb neuronal activity in freely-behaving mice. Bitterness, pain, and social attack by aggressors intensively excite LHb neurons. Aversive Pavlovian conditioning induced activation by the aversion-predicting cue in a few trials. The experience of social defeat also conditioned excitatory responses to previously neutral social stimuli. In contrast, fiber photometry and single-unit recordings revealed that sucrose reward inhibited LHb neurons and often produced excitatory rebound. It required prolonged conditioning and high reward probability to induce inhibition by reward-predicting cues. Therefore, LHb neurons can bidirectionally process a diverse array of aversive and reward signals. Importantly, their responses are dynamically shaped by learning, suggesting that the LHb participates in experience-dependent selection of behavioral responses to stressors and rewards. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23045.001 PMID:28561735

  12. Control of dopaminergic neuron survival by the unfolded protein response transcription factor XBP1

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, Pamela; Mercado, Gabriela; Vidal, Rene L.; Molina, Claudia; Parsons, Geoffrey; Court, Felipe A.; Martinez, Alexis; Galleguillos, Danny; Armentano, Donna; Schneider, Bernard L.; Hetz, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Although growing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a hallmark of PD, its exact contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Here we report that developmental ablation of X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in the nervous system, a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), protects dopaminergic neurons against a PD-inducing neurotoxin. This survival effect was associated with a preconditioning condition that resulted from induction of an adaptive ER stress response in dopaminergic neurons of the SNpc, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, silencing XBP1 in adult animals triggered chronic ER stress and dopaminergic neuron degeneration. Supporting this finding, gene therapy to deliver an active form of XBP1 provided neuroprotection and reduced striatal denervation in animals injected with 6-hydroxydopamine. Our results reveal a physiological role of the UPR in the maintenance of protein homeostasis in dopaminergic neurons that may help explain the differential neuronal vulnerability observed in PD. PMID:24753614

  13. Apoptotic neurons induce proliferative responses of progenitor cells in the postnatal neocortex.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Volodymyr; Mihhailova, Jevgenia; Salmon, Patrick; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2015-11-01

    Apoptotic cell death is the leading cause of neuronal loss after neonatal brain injury. Little is known about the intrinsic capacity of the immature cerebral cortex for replacing dead cells. Here we test the hypothesis that neuronal apoptosis is able to trigger compensatory proliferation in surrounding cells. In order to establish a "pure" apoptotic cell death model and to avoid the confounding effects of broken blood-brain barrier and inflammatory reactions, we used a diphtheria toxin (DT) and diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) system to induce ablation of layer IV neurons in the rodent somatosensory cortex during the early postnatal period. We found that DT-triggered apoptosis is a slowly progressing event lasting about for 7 days. While dying cells expressed the morphological features of apoptosis, we could not detect immunoreactivity for activated caspase-3 in these cells. Microglia activation and proliferation represented the earliest cellular responses to apoptotic cell death. In addition, we found that induced apoptosis triggered a massive proliferation of undifferentiated progenitor cell pool including Sox2 as well as NG2 cells. The default differentiation pattern of proliferating progenitors appears to be the glial phenotype; we could not find evidence for newly generated neurons in response to apoptotic neuronal death. These results suggest that mitotically active progenitor populations are intrinsically capable to contribute to the repair process of injured cortical tissue and may represent a potential target for neuronal replacement strategies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gefei; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia; Dai, Jianping; Li, Kangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  15. Spatiotemporal processing of linear acceleration: primary afferent and central vestibular neuron responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Spatiotemporal convergence and two-dimensional (2-D) neural tuning have been proposed as a major neural mechanism in the signal processing of linear acceleration. To examine this hypothesis, we studied the firing properties of primary otolith afferents and central otolith neurons that respond exclusively to horizontal linear accelerations of the head (0.16-10 Hz) in alert rhesus monkeys. Unlike primary afferents, the majority of central otolith neurons exhibited 2-D spatial tuning to linear acceleration. As a result, central otolith dynamics vary as a function of movement direction. During movement along the maximum sensitivity direction, the dynamics of all central otolith neurons differed significantly from those observed for the primary afferent population. Specifically at low frequencies (neurons peaked in phase with linear velocity, in contrast to primary afferents that peaked in phase with linear acceleration. At least three different groups of central response dynamics were described according to the properties observed for motion along the maximum sensitivity direction. "High-pass" neurons exhibited increasing gains and phase values as a function of frequency. "Flat" neurons were characterized by relatively flat gains and constant phase lags (approximately 20-55 degrees ). A few neurons ("low-pass") were characterized by decreasing gain and phase as a function of frequency. The response dynamics of central otolith neurons suggest that the approximately 90 degrees phase lags observed at low frequencies are not the result of a neural integration but rather the effect of nonminimum phase behavior, which could arise at least partly through spatiotemporal convergence. Neither afferent nor central otolith neurons discriminated between gravitational and inertial components of linear acceleration. Thus response sensitivity was indistinguishable during 0.5-Hz pitch oscillations and fore-aft movements

  16. Neuronal responses to face-like and facial stimuli in the monkey superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Nui; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Hori, Etsuro; Maior, Rafael Souto; Tomaz, Carlos; Tran, Anh H.; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    The superficial layers of the superior colliculus (sSC) appear to function as a subcortical visual pathway that bypasses the striate cortex for the rapid processing of coarse facial information. We investigated the responses of neurons in the monkey sSC during a delayed non-matching-to-sample (DNMS) task in which monkeys were required to discriminate among five categories of visual stimuli [photos of faces with different gaze directions, line drawings of faces, face-like patterns (three dark blobs on a bright oval), eye-like patterns, and simple geometric patterns]. Of the 605 sSC neurons recorded, 216 neurons responded to the visual stimuli. Among the stimuli, face-like patterns elicited responses with the shortest latencies. Low-pass filtering of the images did not influence the responses. However, scrambling of the images increased the responses in the late phase, and this was consistent with a feedback influence from upstream areas. A multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of the population data indicated that the sSC neurons could separately encode face-like patterns during the first 25-ms period after stimulus onset, and stimulus categorization developed in the next three 25-ms periods. The amount of stimulus information conveyed by the sSC neurons and the number of stimulus-differentiating neurons were consistently higher during the 2nd to 4th 25-ms periods than during the first 25-ms period. These results suggested that population activity of the sSC neurons preferentially filtered face-like patterns with short latencies to allow for the rapid processing of coarse facial information and developed categorization of the stimuli in later phases through feedback from upstream areas. PMID:24672448

  17. Increased response to glutamate in small diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Magni, Giulia; Bhargava, Aditi; Jasmin, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate in the peripheral nervous system is involved in neuropathic pain, yet we know little how nerve injury alters responses to this neurotransmitter in primary sensory neurons. We recorded neuronal responses from the ex-vivo preparations of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) one week following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in adult rats. We found that small diameter DRG neurons (<30 µm) exhibited increased excitability that was associated with decreased membrane threshold and rheobase, whereas responses in large diameter neurons (>30 µm) were unaffected. Puff application of either glutamate, or the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainic acid (KA), or the group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR) agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), induced larger inward currents in CCI DRGs compared to those from uninjured rats. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced currents were unchanged. In addition to larger inward currents following CCI, a greater number of neurons responded to glutamate, AMPA, NMDA, and DHPG, but not to KA. Western blot analysis of the DRGs revealed that CCI resulted in a 35% increase in GluA1 and a 60% decrease in GluA2, the AMPA receptor subunits, compared to uninjured controls. mGluR1 receptor expression increased by 60% in the membrane fraction, whereas mGluR5 receptor subunit expression remained unchanged after CCI. These results show that following nerve injury, small diameter DRG neurons, many of which are nociceptive, have increased excitability and an increased response to glutamate that is associated with changes in receptor expression at the neuronal membrane. Our findings provide further evidence that glutamatergic transmission in the periphery plays a role in nociception.

  18. Synaptic responses of neurons in heterotopic gray matter in an animal model of cortical dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, B N; Dudek, F E; Roper, S N

    1999-11-01

    Neuronal heterotopia is a malformation of cortical development that is closely associated with epilepsy in humans. Despite emerging interest in the structure and function of the heterotopic cortex, little is known about the membrane properties and synaptic connections of these displaced neurons. We used whole-cell patch-clamp and extracellular field potential recordings from heterotopic neurons in slices from young adult rats with experimentally induced cortical dysgenesis to determine if local synaptic connections were present in nodular heterotopia. Complex synaptic responses were observed after electrical stimulation of adjacent white matter. The results suggest that neurons in nodular heterotopic gray matter can form local excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connections and may participate in epileptiform events.

  19. Initiation of Behavioral Response to Antidepressants by Cholecystokinin Neurons of the Dentate Gyrus.

    PubMed

    Medrihan, Lucian; Sagi, Yotam; Inde, Zintis; Krupa, Oleh; Daniels, Chelsea; Peyrache, Adrien; Greengard, Paul

    2017-08-02

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly used class of antidepressant drugs, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which their therapeutic action is initiated are poorly understood. Here we show that serotonin 5-HT1B receptors in cholecystokinin (CCK) inhibitory interneurons of the mammalian dentate gyrus (DG) initiate the therapeutic response to antidepressants. In these neurons, 5-HT1B receptors are expressed presynaptically, and their activation inhibits GABA release. Inhibition of GABA release from CCK neurons disinhibits parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and, as a consequence, reduces the neuronal activity of the granule cells. Finally, inhibition of CCK neurons mimics the antidepressant behavioral effects of SSRIs, suggesting that these cells may represent a novel cellular target for the development of fast-acting antidepressant drugs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The neuronal response at extended timescales: long-term correlations without long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Soudry, Daniel; Meir, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Long term temporal correlations frequently appear at many levels of neural activity. We show that when such correlations appear in isolated neurons, they indicate the existence of slow underlying processes and lead to explicit conditions on the dynamics of these processes. Moreover, although these slow processes can potentially store information for long times, we demonstrate that this does not imply that the neuron possesses a long memory of its input, even if these processes are bidirectionally coupled with neuronal response. We derive these results for a broad class of biophysical neuron models, and then fit a specific model to recent experiments. The model reproduces the experimental results, exhibiting long term (days-long) correlations due to the interaction between slow variables and internal fluctuations. However, its memory of the input decays on a timescale of minutes. We suggest experiments to test these predictions directly. PMID:24744724

  1. In Vivo Profiling Reveals a Competent Heat Shock Response in Adult Neurons: Implications for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Carnemolla, Alisia; Lazell, Hayley; Moussaoui, Saliha; Bates, Gillian P

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is the main pathway used by cells to counteract proteotoxicity. The inability of differentiated neurons to induce an HSR has been documented in primary neuronal cultures and has been proposed to play a critical role in ageing and neurodegeneration. However, this accepted dogma has not been demonstrated in vivo. We used BAC transgenic mice generated by the Gene Expression Nervous System Atlas project to investigate the capacity of striatal medium sized spiny neurons to induce an HSR as compared to that of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. We found that all cell populations were competent to induce an HSR upon HSP90 inhibition. We also show the presence and relative abundance of heat shock-related genes and proteins in these striatal cell populations. The identification of a competent HSR in adult neurons supports the development of therapeutics that target the HSR pathway as treatments for neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Targeted deletion of the mouse POU domain gene Brn-3a causes selective loss of neurons in the brainstem and trigeminal ganglion, uncoordinated limb movement, and impaired suckling.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, M; Gan, L; Zhou, L; Klein, W H; Nathans, J

    1996-01-01

    The Brn-3 subfamily of POU domain genes are expressed in sensory neurons and in select brainstem nuclei. Earlier work has shown that targeted deletion of the Brn-3b and Brn-3c genes produce, respectively, defects in the retina and in the inner ear. We show herein that targeted deletion of the Brn-3a gene results in defective suckling and in uncoordinated limb and trunk movements, leading to early postnatal death. Brn-3a (-/-) mice show a loss of neurons in the trigeminal ganglia, the medial habenula, the red nucleus, and the caudal region of the inferior olivary nucleus but not in the retina and dorsal root ganglia. In the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, but not in the retina, there is a marked decrease in the frequency of neurons expressing Brn-3b and Brn-3c, suggesting that Brn-3a positively regulates Brn-3b and Brn-3c expression in somatosensory neurons. Thus, Brn-3a exerts its major developmental effects in somatosensory neurons and in brainstem nuclei involved in motor control. The pheno-types of Brn-3a, Brn-3b, and Brn-3c mutant mice indicate that individual Brn-3 genes have evolved to control development in the auditory, visual, or somatosensory systems and that despite differences between these systems in transduction mechanisms, sensory organ structures, and central information processing, there may be fundamental homologies in the genetic regulatory events that control their development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:8876243

  3. Chronic intermittent nicotine treatment dose-dependently alters serotonergic neurons response to citalopram in the rat.

    PubMed

    Touiki, Khalid; Rat, Pascal; Arib, Ouafa; Molimard, Robert; Chait, Abderrahman; de Beaurepaire, Renaud

    2008-05-01

    Acetylcholine nicotinic systems and serotonergic systems are known to interact. In rodents, acute and chronic nicotine treatments have consequences on several aspects of the activity of dorsal raphe serotonin (DRN 5-HT) neurons. One hypothesis is that states of functioning of DRN 5-HT neurons (firing rate and sensitivity) vary as a function of nicotine dose and mode of administration during chronic nicotine treatment. In the present study, the firing rate and sensitivity of DRN 5-HT neurons were investigated using single (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) or multiple (3 injections of 0.7 mg/kg) daily injections of nicotine over 10 days. The sensitivity of neurons was tested by the cumulative dose of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram necessary to inhibit their firing. The activity of neurons was tested during treatment, and then 24 and 48 h after nicotine withdrawal. The results show that, on day 10, DRN 5-HT neurons were desensitized (reduced response to citalopram) after chronic single daily injection treatments with the high dose of nicotine (1 mg/kg), while their sensitivity remained unaltered after single daily injections with the low dose (0.5 mg/kg), and after the multiple daily injection paradigm. None of the treatments altered the firing rate of DRN 5-HT neurons. The dose-dependent and time-dependent alterations of serotonergic neurons sensitivity after chronic nicotine treatments are likely the consequences of long-term adaptations of nicotinic receptors. The desensitization of DRN 5-HT neurons after chronic single daily injections of 1 mg/kg of nicotine suggests an antidepressant-like effect of chronic nicotine.

  4. Fos induction in lamina I projection neurons in response to noxious thermal stimuli.

    PubMed

    Todd, A J; Spike, R C; Young, S; Puskár, Z

    2005-01-01

    Lamina I of the spinal cord contains many projection neurons: the majority of these are activated by noxious stimulation, although some respond to other stimuli, such as innocuous cooling. In the rat, approximately 80% of lamina I projection neurons express the neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor, on which substance P acts. Lamina I neurons can be classified into three main morphological classes: pyramidal, fusiform and multipolar cells. It has been reported that in the cat, pyramidal cells respond to innocuous cooling, and whilst both fusiform and multipolar cells are activated by noxious mechanical and heat stimuli, only cells in the latter group respond to noxious cold [Nat Neurosci 1 (1998) 218]. However, we have previously shown that NK1 receptor-immunoreactive projection neurons belonging to each morphological class are equally likely to up-regulate the transcription factor Fos after noxious chemical stimulation, and that the density of innervation by substance P-containing (nociceptive) afferents is similar for cells of each type [J Neurosci 22 (2002) 4103]. This suggests that the morphological-physiological correlation that has been reported in the cat may not apply in the rat. We have tested this further by examining Fos expression in lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons in the rat after application of noxious heat or noxious cold stimuli under general anesthesia. Following noxious heat, 57-69% of NK1 receptor-immunoreactive spinoparabrachial neurons expressed Fos, and the proportion did not differ significantly between morphological groups. However, after noxious cold stimulation Fos was present in 63% of multipolar neurons, but only 19-26% of fusiform or pyramidal cells. These results suggest that although most NK1 receptor-expressing spinoparabrachial neurons are activated by noxious stimuli, responsiveness to noxious cold is significantly more common in those of the multipolar type. There therefore appears to be a correlation between morphology and function for

  5. Activity of Somatosensory-Responsive Neurons in High Subdivisions of SI Cortex during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Favorov, Oleg V.; Nilaweera, Wijitha U.; Miasnikov, Alexandre A.

    2015-01-01

    Responses of neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex during movements are poorly understood, even during such simple tasks as walking on a flat surface. In this study, we analyzed spike discharges of neurons in the rostral bank of the ansate sulcus (areas 1–2) in 2 cats while the cats walked on a flat surface or on a horizontal ladder, a complex task requiring accurate stepping. All neurons (n = 82) that had receptive fields (RFs) on the contralateral forelimb exhibited frequency modulation of their activity that was phase locked to the stride cycle during simple locomotion. Neurons with proximal RFs (upper arm/shoulder) and pyramidal tract-projecting neurons (PTNs) with fast-conducting axons tended to fire at peak rates in the middle of the swing phase, whereas neurons with RFs on the distal limb (wrist/paw) and slow-conducting PTNs typically showed peak firing at the transition between swing and stance phases. Eleven of 12 neurons with tactile RFs on the volar forepaw began firing toward the end of swing, with peak activity occurring at the moment of foot contact with floor, thereby preceding the evoked sensory volley from touch receptors. Requirement to step accurately on the ladder affected 91% of the neurons, suggesting their involvement in control of accuracy of stepping. During both tasks, neurons exhibited a wide variety of spike distributions within the stride cycle, suggesting that, during either simple or ladder locomotion, they represent the cycling somatosensory events in their activity both predictively before and reflectively after these events take place. PMID:25995465

  6. Activity of somatosensory-responsive neurons in high subdivisions of SI cortex during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Favorov, Oleg V; Nilaweera, Wijitha U; Miasnikov, Alexandre A; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2015-05-20

    Responses of neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex during movements are poorly understood, even during such simple tasks as walking on a flat surface. In this study, we analyzed spike discharges of neurons in the rostral bank of the ansate sulcus (areas 1-2) in 2 cats while the cats walked on a flat surface or on a horizontal ladder, a complex task requiring accurate stepping. All neurons (n = 82) that had receptive fields (RFs) on the contralateral forelimb exhibited frequency modulation of their activity that was phase locked to the stride cycle during simple locomotion. Neurons with proximal RFs (upper arm/shoulder) and pyramidal tract-projecting neurons (PTNs) with fast-conducting axons tended to fire at peak rates in the middle of the swing phase, whereas neurons with RFs on the distal limb (wrist/paw) and slow-conducting PTNs typically showed peak firing at the transition between swing and stance phases. Eleven of 12 neurons with tactile RFs on the volar forepaw began firing toward the end of swing, with peak activity occurring at the moment of foot contact with floor, thereby preceding the evoked sensory volley from touch receptors. Requirement to step accurately on the ladder affected 91% of the neurons, suggesting their involvement in control of accuracy of stepping. During both tasks, neurons exhibited a wide variety of spike distributions within the stride cycle, suggesting that, during either simple or ladder locomotion, they represent the cycling somatosensory events in their activity both predictively before and reflectively after these events take place.

  7. Increased acid responsiveness in vagal sensory neurons in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Youtian; Liu, Zhenyu; Yu, Xiaoyun; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Undem, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized with eosinophils and mast cells predominated allergic inflammation in the esophagus and present with esophageal dysfunctions such as dysphagia, food impaction, and heartburn. However, the underlying mechanism of esophageal dysfunctions is unclear. This study aims to determine whether neurons in the vagal sensory ganglia are modulated in a guinea pig model of EoE. Animals were actively sensitized by ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with aerosol OVA inhalation for 2 wk. This results in a mild esophagitis with increases in mast cells and eosinophils in the esophageal wall. Vagal nodose and jugular neurons were disassociated, and their responses to acid, capsaicin, and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist AMG-9810 were studied by calcium imaging and whole cell patch-clamp recording. Compared with naïve animals, antigen challenge significantly increased acid responsiveness in both nodose and jugular neurons. Their responses to capsaicin were also increased after antigen challenge. AMG-9810, at a concentration that blocked capsaicin-evoked calcium influx, abolished the increase in acid-induced activation in both nodose and jugular neurons. Vagotomy strongly attenuated those increased responses of nodose and jugular neurons to both acid and capsaicin induced by antigen challenge. These data for the first time demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge significantly increases acid responsiveness in vagal nodose and jugular ganglia neurons. This sensitization effect is mediated largely through TRPV1 and initiated at sensory nerve endings in the peripheral tissues. Allergen-induced enhancement of responsiveness to noxious stimulation by acid in sensory nerve may contribute to the development of esophageal dysfunctions such as heartburn in EoE. PMID:24875100

  8. Modification of Hypoxic Respiratory Response by Protein Tyrosine Kinase in Brainstem Ventral Respiratory Neuron Group

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Huai, Ruituo; Yang, Junqing; Li, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) mediated the tyrosine phosphorylation modification of neuronal receptors and ion channels. Whether such modification resulted in changes of physiological functions was not sufficiently studied. In this study we examined whether the hypoxic respiratory response—which is the enhancement of breathing in hypoxic environment could be affected by the inhibition of PTK at brainstem ventral respiratory neuron column (VRC). Experiments were performed on urethane anesthetized adult rabbits. Phrenic nerve discharge was recorded as the central respiratory motor output. Hypoxic respiratory response was produced by ventilating the rabbit with 10% O2-balance 90% N2 for 5 minutes. The responses of phrenic nerve discharge to hypoxia were observed before and after microinjecting PTK inhibitor genistein, AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX, or inactive PTK inhibitor analogue daidzein at the region of ambiguus nucleus (NA) at levels 0–2 mm rostral to obex where the inspiratory subgroup of VRC were recorded. Results were as follows: 1. the hypoxic respiratory response was significantly attenuated after microinjection of genistein and/or CNQX, and no additive effect (i.e., further attenuation of hypoxic respiratory response) was observed when genistein and CNQX were microinjected one after another at the same injection site. Microinjection of daidzein had no effect on hypoxic respiratory response. 2. Fluorescent immunostaining showed that hypoxia significantly increased the number of phosphotyrosine immunopositive neurons in areas surrounding NA and most of these neurons were also immunopositive to glutamate AMPA receptor subunit GluR1. These results suggested that PTK played an important role in regulating the hypoxic respiratory response, possibly through the tyrosine phosphorylation modification of glutamate AMPA receptors on the respiratory neurons of ventral respiratory neuron column. PMID:27798679

  9. Environmental enrichment improves response strength, threshold, selectivity, and latency of auditory cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Navzer D; Percaccio, Cherie R; Pandya, Pritesh K; Moucha, Raluca; Rathbun, Daniel L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2004-07-01

    Over the last 50 yr, environmental enrichment has been shown to generate more than a dozen changes in brain anatomy. The consequences of these physical changes on information processing have not been well studied. In this study, rats were housed in enriched or standard conditions either prior to or after reaching sexual maturity. Evoked potentials from awake rats and extracellular recordings from anesthetized rats were used to document responses of auditory cortex neurons. This report details several significant, new findings about the influence of housing conditions on the responses of rat auditory cortex neurons. First, enrichment dramatically increases the strength of auditory cortex responses. Tone-evoked potentials of enriched rats, for example, were more than twice the amplitude of rats raised in standard laboratory conditions. Second, cortical responses of both young and adult animals benefit from exposure to an enriched environment and are degraded by exposure to an impoverished environment. Third, housing condition resulted in rapid remodeling of cortical responses in <2 wk. Fourth, recordings made under anesthesia indicate that enrichment increases the number of neurons activated by any sound. This finding shows that the evoked potential plasticity documented in awake rats was not due to differences in behavioral state. Finally, enrichment made primary auditory cortex (A1) neurons more sensitive to quiet sounds, more selective for tone frequency, and altered their response latencies. These experiments provide the first evidence of physiologic changes in auditory cortex processing resulting from generalized environmental enrichment.

  10. Integration of visual and auditory information by superior temporal sulcus neurons responsive to the sight of actions.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Nick E; Xiao, Dengke; Baker, Chris I; Oram, Mike W; Perrett, David I

    2005-03-01

    Processing of complex visual stimuli comprising facial movements, hand actions, and body movements is known to occur in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) of humans and nonhuman primates. The STS is also thought to play a role in the integration of multimodal sensory input. We investigated whether STS neurons coding the sight of actions also integrated the sound of those actions. For 23% of neurons responsive to the sight of an action, the sound of that action significantly modulated the visual response. The sound of the action increased or decreased the visually evoked response for an equal number of neurons. In the neurons whose visual response was increased by the addition of sound (but not those neurons whose responses were decreased), the audiovisual integration was dependent upon the sound of the action matching the sight of the action. These results suggest that neurons in the STS form multisensory representations of observed actions.

  11. The Response of Retinal Neurons to High-Frequency Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changsi; Twyford, Perry; Fried, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    Objective High-rate pulse trains have proven to be effective in cochlear prosthetics and, more recently, have been shown to elicit a wide range of interesting response properties in axons of the PNS. Surprisingly, the effectiveness of such trains for use in retinal prostheses has not been explored. Approach Using cell-attached patch clamp methods, we measured the in vitro response of two rabbit retinal ganglion cell (RGC) types, OFF-Brisk Transient (OFF-BT) and ON-OFF Directionally Selective (DS), to trains of biphasic pulses delivered at 2000 pulses per second (PPS). Main Results For OFF-BT cells, response onset occurred at ~20 uA, and maximum response occurred at ~40 uA. Interestingly, spiking levels decreased for further increases in amplitude. In contrast, DS cells had a spiking onset at ~25 uA and maintained strong spiking as stimulus amplitude was increased, even at the highest levels tested. Thus, a low-amplitude stimulus train at 2000 PPS (~25 μA) will activate OFF-BT cells strongly, while simultaneously activating DS cells only weakly. In contrast, a high amplitude train (~75 μA) will activate DS cells strongly while suppressing responses in OFF-BT cells. Significance The response differences between cell types suggest some forms of preferential activation may be possible, and further testing is warranted. Further, the scope of the response differences found here suggests activation mechanisms that are more complex than those described in previous studies. PMID:23594620

  12. TRPA1-mediated responses in trigeminal sensory neurons: interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margaux M; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Akopian, Armen N

    2009-04-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP)A1 channel is involved in the transduction of inflammation-induced noxious stimuli from the periphery. Previous studies have characterized the properties of TRPA1 in heterologous expression systems. However, there is little information on the properties of TRPA1-mediated currents in sensory neurons. A capsaicin-sensitive subset of rat and mouse trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons was activated with TRPA1-specific agonists, mustard oil and the cannabinoid WIN55,212. Mustard oil- and WIN55,212-gated currents exhibited marked variability in their kinetics of activation and acute desensitization. TRPA1-mediated responses in neurons also possess a characteristic voltage dependency with profound outward rectification that is influenced by extracellular Ca(2+) and the type and concentration of TRPA1-specific agonists. Examination of TRPA1-mediated responses in TRPA1-containing cells indicated that the features of neuronal TRPA1 are not duplicated in cells expressing only TRPA1 and, instead, can be restored only when TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are coexpressed. In summary, our results suggest that TRPA1-mediated responses in sensory neurons have distinct characteristics that can be accounted for by the coexpression of the TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels.

  13. Serum response factor mediated gene activity in physiological and pathological processes of neuronal motility.

    PubMed

    Knöll, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) was shown to contribute to various physiological processes linked to neuronal motility. The latter include cell migration, axon guidance, and, e.g., synapse function relying on cytoskeletal dynamics, neurite outgrowth, axonal and dendritic differentiation, growth cone motility, and neurite branching. SRF teams up with myocardin related transcription factors (MRTFs) and ternary complex factors (TCFs) to mediate cellular actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the immediate-early gene (IEG) response, a bona fide indicator of neuronal activation. Herein, I will discuss how SRF and cofactors might modulate physiological processes of neuronal motility. Further, potential mechanisms engaged by neurite growth promoting molecules and axon guidance cues to target SRF's transcriptional machinery in physiological neuronal motility will be presented. Of note, altered cytoskeletal dynamics and rapid initiation of an IEG response are a hallmark of injured neurons in various neurological disorders. Thus, SRF and its MRTF and TCF cofactors might emerge as a novel trio modulating peripheral and central axon regeneration.

  14. Serum Response Factor Mediated Gene Activity in Physiological and Pathological Processes of Neuronal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Knöll, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) was shown to contribute to various physiological processes linked to neuronal motility. The latter include cell migration, axon guidance, and, e.g., synapse function relying on cytoskeletal dynamics, neurite outgrowth, axonal and dendritic differentiation, growth cone motility, and neurite branching. SRF teams up with myocardin related transcription factors (MRTFs) and ternary complex factors (TCFs) to mediate cellular actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the immediate-early gene (IEG) response, a bona fide indicator of neuronal activation. Herein, I will discuss how SRF and cofactors might modulate physiological processes of neuronal motility. Further, potential mechanisms engaged by neurite growth promoting molecules and axon guidance cues to target SRF’s transcriptional machinery in physiological neuronal motility will be presented. Of note, altered cytoskeletal dynamics and rapid initiation of an IEG response are a hallmark of injured neurons in various neurological disorders. Thus, SRF and its MRTF and TCF cofactors might emerge as a novel trio modulating peripheral and central axon regeneration. PMID:22164132

  15. Complete Firing-Rate Response of Neurons with Complex Intrinsic Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Puelma Touzel, Maximilian; Wolf, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The response of a neuronal population over a space of inputs depends on the intrinsic properties of its constituent neurons. Two main modes of single neuron dynamics–integration and resonance–have been distinguished. While resonator cell types exist in a variety of brain areas, few models incorporate this feature and fewer have investigated its effects. To understand better how a resonator’s frequency preference emerges from its intrinsic dynamics and contributes to its local area’s population firing rate dynamics, we analyze the dynamic gain of an analytically solvable two-degree of freedom neuron model. In the Fokker-Planck approach, the dynamic gain is intractable. The alternative Gauss-Rice approach lifts the resetting of the voltage after a spike. This allows us to derive a complete expression for the dynamic gain of a resonator neuron model in terms of a cascade of filters on the input. We find six distinct response types and use them to fully characterize the routes to resonance across all values of the relevant timescales. We find that resonance arises primarily due to slow adaptation with an intrinsic frequency acting to sharpen and adjust the location of the resonant peak. We determine the parameter regions for the existence of an intrinsic frequency and for subthreshold and spiking resonance, finding all possible intersections of the three. The expressions and analysis presented here provide an account of how intrinsic neuron dynamics shape dynamic population response properties and can facilitate the construction of an exact theory of correlations and stability of population activity in networks containing populations of resonator neurons. PMID:26720924

  16. Response pattern of cutaneous postganglionic neurones to the hindlimb on spinal cord heating and cooling in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gregor, M; Jänig, W; Riedel, W

    1976-05-12

    Single postganglionic neurones to hairy skin and hairless skin of the hindleg were investigated on spinal cord heating and spinal cord cooling in chloralose anesthetized cats. 1. Spontaneously active postganglionic neurones which were classified as vasoconstrictor neurones were depressed by spinal cord heating and excited by spinal cord cooling. The overall response to spinal cord cooling was smaller than that to spinal cord heating. 2. Postganglionic neurones to the hairless skin, which had most likely sudomotor function, responded initially to spinal cord heating with a few impulses or not at all. As judged by the skin potentials recorded from the hairless skin the sweat glands were also only weakly activated at the beginning of the heat stimuli. 3. Six silent postganglionic neurones, 3 each to the hairy skin and to the hairless skin, were excited during spinal cord heating. The response of these neurones consisted of a dynamic and a static component and started at the beginning of the heating stimuli with latencies of less than 10S. The neurones could not be excited by any other stimuli and were classified as cutaneous vasodilator neurones. 4. Quantitative analysis of 4 spontaneously active postganglionic (vasoconstrictor) neurones and 3 silent postganglionic (vasodilator) neurones revealed that the threshold of the responses of these neurones to spinal cord heating was 40-42 degrees C (on the dorsal spinal cord) and that the response increase was maximal at the highest temperatures tested (43-44 degrees C).¿

  17. Responses of tonically active neurons in the monkey striatum discriminate between motivationally opposing stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ravel, Sabrina; Legallet, Eric; Apicella, Paul

    2003-09-17

    The striatum is involved in the control of appetitively motivated behavior. We found previously that tonically active neurons (TANs) in the monkey striatum show discriminative responses to different stimuli that are appetitive or aversive. However, these differential responses may reflect the sensory qualities of the stimulus rather than its motivational value. In the present study, we sought to define more precisely the relationship between the particular aspect of the response of TANs and the motivational value of stimuli. For this purpose, three monkeys were presented with two types of aversive stimuli (loud sound and air puff) and one appetitive stimulus (fruit juice). In most instances, the TAN responses to the loud sound and the air puff were similar, in terms of response pattern and duration, whereas responses to the liquid reward showed distinct features. Using classical appetitive conditioning, we reversed the motivational value of a stimulus so that a previously aversive stimulus was now associatively paired with a reward and found that this manipulation selectively modifies the expression of TAN responses to the stimulus. These data indicate that the characteristics of neuronal responses undergo modifications when the valence of the stimulus is changed from aversive to appetitive during associative learning, suggesting that TANs may contribute to a form of stimulus encoding that is dependent on motivational attributes. The adaptation of TAN responses such as observed in the present study likewise reflects a neuronal system that adjusts to the motivational information about environmental events.

  18. Influence of probe flexibility and gelatin embedding on neuronal density and glial responses to brain implants.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Per; Wolff, Anette; Ejserholm, Fredrik; Wallman, Lars; Schouenborg, Jens; Linsmeier, Cecilia E

    2015-01-01

    To develop long-term high quality communication between brain and computer, a key issue is how to reduce the adverse foreign body responses. Here, the impact of probe flexibility and gelatine embedding on long-term (6w) tissue responses, was analyzed. Probes of same polymer material, size and shape, flexible mainly in one direction, were implanted in rat cerebral cortex (nimplants = 3 x 8) in two orientations with respect to the major movement direction of the brain relative to the skull: parallel to (flex mode) or transverse to (rigid mode). Flex mode implants were either embedded in gelatin or non-embedded. Neurons, activated microglia and astrocytes were visualized using immunohistochemistry. The astrocytic reactivity, but not microglial response, was significantly lower to probes implanted in flex mode as compared to rigid mode. The microglial response, but not astrocytic reactivity, was significantly smaller to gelatin embedded probes (flex mode) than non-embedded. Interestingly, the neuronal density was preserved in the inner zone surrounding gelatin embedded probes. This contrasts to the common reports of reduced neuronal density close to implanted probes. In conclusion, sheer stress appears to be an important factor for astrocytic reactivity to implanted probes. Moreover, gelatin embedding can improve the neuronal density and reduce the microglial response close to the probe.

  19. Female snake sex pheromone induces membrane responses in vomeronasal sensory neurons of male snakes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guang-Zhe; Zhang, Jing-Ji; Wang, Dalton; Mason, Robert T; Halpern, Mimi

    2006-07-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is important for activating accessory olfactory pathways that are involved in sexually dimorphic mating behavior. The VNO of male garter snakes is critically important for detection of, and response to, female sex pheromones. In the present study, under voltage-clamp conditions, male snake VNO neurons were stimulated with female sexual attractiveness pheromone. Thirty-nine of 139 neurons exhibited inward current responses (reversal potential: -10.6 +/- 2.8 mV). The amplitude of the inward current was dose dependent, and the relationship could be fitted by the Hill equation. Under current-clamp conditions, application of pheromone produced membrane depolarizing responses and increases in firing frequency. These results suggest that the female pheromone directly affects male snake VNO neurons and results in opening of ion channels, thereby converting the pheromone signal to an electrical signal. The response to female pheromone is sexually dimorphic, that is, the pheromone does not evoke responses in VNO neurons of female snakes. An associated finding of the present study is that the female sex pheromone, which is insoluble in aqueous solutions, became soluble in the presence of Harderian gland homogenate.

  20. Mouse V1 population correlates of visual detection rely on heterogeneity within neuronal response patterns

    PubMed Central

    Montijn, Jorrit S; Goltstein, Pieter M; Pennartz, Cyriel MA

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of the primary sensory cortex for the detection, discrimination, and awareness of visual stimuli, but it is unknown how neuronal populations in this area process detected and undetected stimuli differently. Critical differences may reside in the mean strength of responses to visual stimuli, as reflected in bulk signals detectable in functional magnetic resonance imaging, electro-encephalogram, or magnetoencephalography studies, or may be more subtly composed of differentiated activity of individual sensory neurons. Quantifying single-cell Ca2+ responses to visual stimuli recorded with in vivo two-photon imaging, we found that visual detection correlates more strongly with population response heterogeneity rather than overall response strength. Moreover, neuronal populations showed consistencies in activation patterns across temporally spaced trials in association with hit responses, but not during nondetections. Contrary to models relying on temporally stable networks or bulk signaling, these results suggest that detection depends on transient differentiation in neuronal activity within cortical populations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10163.001 PMID:26646184

  1. The response of retinal neurons to high-frequency stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changsi; Twyford, Perry; Fried, Shelley

    2013-06-01

    Objective. High-rate pulse trains have proven to be effective in cochlear prosthetics and, more recently, have been shown to elicit a wide range of interesting response properties in axons of the peripheral nervous system. Surprisingly, the effectiveness of such trains for use in retinal prostheses has not been explored. Approach. Using cell-attached patch clamp methods, we measured the in vitro response of two rabbit retinal ganglion cell types, OFF-brisk transient (OFF-BT) and ON-OFF directionally selective (DS), to trains of biphasic pulses delivered at 2000 pulses per second (PPS). Main Results. For OFF-BT cells, response onset occurred at ˜20 µA, and maximum response occurred at ˜40 µA. Interestingly, spiking levels decreased for further increases in amplitude. In contrast, DS cells had a spiking onset at ˜25 µA and maintained strong spiking as stimulus amplitude was increased, even at the highest levels tested. Thus, a low-amplitude stimulus train at 2000 PPS (˜25 µA) will activate OFF-BT cells strongly, while simultaneously activating DS cells only weakly. In contrast, a high amplitude train (˜75 µA) will activate DS cells strongly while suppressing responses in OFF-BT cells. Significance. The response differences between cell types suggest some forms of preferential activation may be possible, and further testing is warranted. Further, the scope of the response differences found here suggests activation mechanisms that are more complex than those described in previous studies.

  2. Stereotyped responses of Drosophila peptidergic neuronal ensemble depend on downstream neuromodulators.

    PubMed

    Mena, Wilson; Diegelmann, Sören; Wegener, Christian; Ewer, John

    2016-12-15

    Neuropeptides play a key role in the regulation of behaviors and physiological responses including alertness, social recognition, and hunger, yet, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. Here, we focus on the endocrine control ecdysis behavior, which is used by arthropods to shed their cuticle at the end of every molt. Ecdysis is triggered by ETH (Ecdysis triggering hormone), and we show that the response of peptidergic neurons that produce CCAP (crustacean cardioactive peptide), which are key targets of ETH and control the onset of ecdysis behavior, depends fundamentally on the actions of neuropeptides produced by other direct targets of ETH and released in a broad paracrine manner within the CNS; by autocrine influences from the CCAP neurons themselves; and by inhibitory actions mediated by GABA. Our findings provide insights into how this critical insect behavior is controlled and general principles for understanding how neuropeptides organize neuronal activity and behaviors.

  3. Odorant response properties of individual neurons in an olfactory glomerular module

    PubMed Central

    Kikuta, Shu; Fletcher, Max L.; Homma, Ryota; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Nagayama, Shin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neuronal networks that are directly associated with glomeruli in the olfactory bulb are thought to comprise functional modules. However, this has not yet been experimentally proven. In this study, we explored the anatomical and functional architecture of glomerular modules using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging. Surprisingly, the deep portions of the glomerular modules showed considerable spatial overlap with other modules. Juxtaglomerular cells showed similar excitatory odorant response profiles to presynaptic olfactory sensory neuron inputs. Mitral cells exhibited a more sharply tuned molecular receptive range compared to juxtaglomerular cells, and their odorant response profiles varied depending on their interneuronal horizontal distances. These data suggest that glomerular modules are composed of functionally distinct neurons, and that homogenous odor inputs to each glomerulus may be parsed and processed in different fashions within the modules before being sent to higher olfactory centers. PMID:23522047

  4. Postnatal development of neuronal responses to frequency-modulated tones in chinchilla auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Brown, Trecia A; Harrison, Robert V

    2010-01-14

    Responses to cortical neurons to frequency-modulated (FM) stimuli have been described in various adult animal models. Here, we ask whether FM coding at the cortical level is innate or if it is influenced by postnatal environmental experience. We report on the FM response properties of neurons in core auditory cortex of newborn (P3), 1-month-old (P28) and adult (>1-year-old) anesthetized chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger). Upward and downward linear FM sweeps spanning frequencies from 0.1 to 20 kHz were presented monaurally at speeds of 0.05 to 0.82 kHz/ms. Results indicated that neurons in neonatal pups were responsive to FM stimulation. While we observed a developmental increase in the selectivity of units for FM sweep direction (p<0.01, one-way ANOVA), selectivity for sweep speed appeared to be established early in development. Chinchilla pup neurons also demonstrated single-peak (single dominant response during FM sweep presentation) and multi-peak (multiple distinct responses during FM sweep) temporal response patterns to FM stimuli similar to those observed in adults. A developmental increase in the proportion of multi-peak units closely paralleled a previously reported increase in the complexity of pure tone receptive fields. We suggest that units in core auditory cortex of the chinchilla are not uniquely activated by FM sounds but that FM responses are largely predictable based on how changing frequency stimuli interact with the tonal receptive fields of neurons in the auditory cortex.

  5. Imprinted expression of UBE3A in non-neuronal cells from a Prader–Willi syndrome patient with an atypical deletion

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Taylor, Kristen; Hsiao, Jack S.; Chen, Pin-Fang; Glatt-Deeley, Heather; De Smith, Adam J.; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Lalande, Marc; Chamberlain, Stormy J.

    2014-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are two neurodevelopmental disorders most often caused by deletions of the same region of paternally inherited and maternally inherited human chromosome 15q, respectively. AS is a single gene disorder, caused by the loss of function of the ubiquitin ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene, while PWS is still considered a contiguous gene disorder. Rare individuals with PWS who carry atypical microdeletions on chromosome 15q have narrowed the critical region for this disorder to a 108 kb region that includes the SNORD116 snoRNA cluster and the Imprinted in Prader–Willi (IPW) non-coding RNA. Here we report the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a PWS patient with an atypical microdeletion that spans the PWS critical region. We show that these iPSCs express brain-specific portions of the transcripts driven by the PWS imprinting center, including the UBE3A antisense transcript (UBE3A-ATS). Furthermore, UBE3A expression is imprinted in most of these iPSCs. These data suggest that UBE3A imprinting in neurons only requires UBE3A-ATS expression, and no other neuron-specific factors. These data also suggest that a boundary element lying within the PWS critical region prevents UBE3A-ATS expression in non-neural tissues. PMID:24363065

  6. [Responses of dorsal and ventral thalamic neurons to visual stimulation in Emys orbicularis tortoises].

    PubMed

    Morenkov, E D; Pivovarov, A S

    1975-01-01

    Extracellular studies have been made on the background activity and reactions to visual stimuli in neurons of nucleus rotundus and nucleus suprapeduncularis of the thalamus in the tortoise E. orbicularis. Reactions of on-off type to diffuse light flashes were recorded predominantly in both of the nuclei, whereas specific reactions to movement stimuli were found in the neurons of n. rotundus. The receptive area of the neurons in both of the nuclei involves all the visual field of one or both of the eyes. The structure of the receptive area of the neurons of n. suprapeduncularis is relatively homogeneous, whereas the receptive area of the neurons in n. rotundus exhibits a zone with an increased excitability under the horizontal meridian. After a damage of tectum opticum, the heterogeneity of the receptive areas and the specific responses to movement in cells of n. rotundus disappeared, while thresholds of the reactions increased. In the neurons of n. suprapeduncularis homogeneous structure of the receptive area remained unaffected, the thresholds of the reactions being increased as well.

  7. Rapid neuroinflammatory response localized to injured neurons after diffuse traumatic brain injury in swine.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Kathryn L; Harris, James P; Browne, Kevin D; Brown, Daniel P; Grovola, Michael R; Mietus, Constance J; Wolf, John A; Duda, John E; Putt, Mary E; Spiller, Kara L; Cullen, D Kacy

    2017-04-01

    Despite increasing appreciation of the critical role that neuroinflammatory pathways play in brain injury and neurodegeneration, little is known about acute microglial reactivity following diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) - the most common clinical presentation that includes all concussions. Therefore, we investigated acute microglial reactivity using a porcine model of closed-head rotational velocity/acceleration-induced TBI that closely mimics the biomechanical etiology of inertial TBI in humans. We observed rapid microglial reactivity within 15min of both mild and severe TBI. Strikingly, microglial activation was restrained to regions proximal to individual injured neurons - as denoted by trauma-induced plasma membrane disruption - which served as epicenters of acute reactivity. Single-cell quantitative analysis showed that in areas free of traumatically permeabilized neurons, microglial density and morphology were similar between sham or following mild or severe TBI. However, microglia density increased and morphology shifted to become more reactive in proximity to injured neurons. Microglial reactivity around injured neurons was exacerbated following repetitive TBI, suggesting further amplification of acute neuroinflammatory responses. These results indicate that neuronal trauma rapidly activates microglia in a highly localized manner, and suggest that activated microglia may rapidly influence neuronal stability and/or pathophysiology after diffuse TBI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of mesenchymal stem cell modulation of trigeminal neuronal responses to cold.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Michael A; Takimoto, Koyo; Diogenes, Anibal

    2017-09-30

    Tissue engineering protocols, such as regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs), comprise biologically based procedures designed to restore normal physiologic function. For REPs, the goal is reconstitution of the pulp-dentin complex by delivering mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), including the stem cells of the apical papilla (SCAP) into a root canal system. Many patients regain cold sensitivity after REPs, but the mechanism is not understood. We hypothesized that SCAP modulate nociceptive function through a paracrine mechanism that activates cold-sensitive ion channels in neurons. We established a co-culture system with human SCAP and rat trigeminal (TG) sensory neurons in order to determine the effect of SCAP co-culture on neuronal responses using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. TG neurons co-cultured with SCAP demonstrated increased TRPA1-mediated (p<0.01) and TRPM8-mediated inward current densities (p<0.01) at 24h in co-culture. Cold stimulation to SCAP significantly increased ATP release (p<0.01), and supernatant collected after cold stimulation to SCAP was able to activate cultured TG neurons. Co-culture with SCAP significantly increased sustained ATP-evoked inward current density (p<0.05). These data suggest that SCAP release trophic factors that act on afferent neurons to enhance cold-sensitive ion channel activity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MeCP2 regulates activity-dependent transcriptional responses in olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wooje; Yun, Jung-Mi; Woods, Rima; Dunaway, Keith; Yasui, Dag H.; Lasalle, Janine M.; Gong, Qizhi

    2014-01-01

    During postnatal development, neuronal activity controls the remodeling of initially imprecise neuronal connections through the regulation of gene expression. MeCP2 binds to methylated DNA and modulates gene expression during neuronal development and MECP2 mutation causes the autistic disorder Rett syndrome. To investigate a role for MeCP2 in neuronal circuit refinement and to identify activity-dependent MeCP2 transcription regulations, we leveraged the precise organization and accessibility of olfactory sensory axons to manipulation of neuronal activity through odorant exposure in vivo. We demonstrate that olfactory sensory axons failed to develop complete convergence when Mecp2 is deficient in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in an otherwise wild-type animal. Furthermore, we demonstrate that expression of selected adhesion genes was elevated in Mecp2-deficient glomeruli, while acute odor stimulation in control mice resulted in significantly reduced MeCP2 binding to these gene loci, correlating with increased expression. Thus, MeCP2 is required for both circuitry refinement and activity-dependent transcriptional responses in OSNs. PMID:25008110

  10. Menthol response and adaptation in nociceptive-like and nonnociceptive-like neurons: role of protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Menthol-sensitive/capsaicin-insensitive neurons (MS/CI) and menthol-sensitive/capsaicin-sensitive neurons (MS/CS) are thought to represent two functionally distinct populations of cold-sensing neurons that use TRPM8 receptors to convey innocuous and noxious cold information respectively. However, TRPM8-mediated responses have not been well characterized in these two neuron populations. Using rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, here we show that MS/CI neurons had larger menthol responses with greater adaptation. In contrast, MS/CS neurons had smaller menthol responses with less adaptation. All menthol-sensitive neurons showed significant reduction of menthol responses following the treatment of cells with the protein kinase C (PKC) activator PDBu (Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate). PDBu-induced reduction of menthol responses was completely abolished in the presence of PKC inhibitors BIM (bisindolylmaleimide) or staurosporine. When menthol responses were examined in the presence of protein kinase inhibitors, it was found that the adaptation was significantly attenuated by either BIM or staurosporine and also by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CamKII) inhibitor KN62 (N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-N-methyl-L-tyrosyl]-4-phenylpiperazine) in MS/CI neurons. In contrast, in MS/CS neurons menthol response was not affected significantly by BIM, staurosporine or KN62. In both MS/CI and MS/CS neurons, the menthol responses were not affected by PKA activators forskolin and 8-Br-cAMP (8-Bromoadenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate) or by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor Rp-cAMPs (Rp-Adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate). Taken together, these results suggest that TRPM8-mediated responses are significantly different between non-nociceptive-like and nociceptive-like neurons. PMID:20727164

  11. Minimal Peroxide Exposure of Neuronal Cells Induces Multifaceted Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Wayne; Zhou, Yu; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Mitchell, Nicholas; Stone, Matthew D.; Becker, Kevin G.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative exposure of cells occurs naturally and may be associated with cellular damage and dysfunction. Protracted low level oxidative exposure can induce accumulated cell disruption, affecting multiple cellular functions. Accumulated oxidative exposure has also been proposed as one of the potential hallmarks of the physiological/pathophysiological aging process. We investigated the multifactorial effects of long-term minimal peroxide exposure upon SH-SY5Y neural cells to understand how they respond to the continued presence of oxidative stressors. We show that minimal protracted oxidative stresses induce complex molecular and physiological alterations in cell functionality. Upon chronic exposure to minimal doses of hydrogen peroxide, SH-SY5Y cells displayed a multifactorial response to the stressor. To fully appreciate the peroxide-mediated cellular effects, we assessed these adaptive effects at the genomic, proteomic and cellular signal processing level. Combined analyses of these multiple levels of investigation revealed a complex cellular adaptive response to the protracted peroxide exposure. This adaptive response involved changes in cytoskeletal structure, energy metabolic shifts towards glycolysis and selective alterations in transmembrane receptor activity. Our analyses of the global responses to chronic stressor exposure, at multiple biological levels, revealed a viable neural phenotype in-part reminiscent of aged or damaged neural tissue. Our paradigm indicates how cellular physiology can subtly change in different contexts and potentially aid the appreciation of stress response adaptations. PMID:21179406

  12. Superficial dorsal horn neurons identified by intracutaneous histamine: chemonociceptive responses and modulation by morphine.

    PubMed

    Jinks, S L; Carstens, E

    2000-08-01

    We have investigated whether neurons in superficial laminae of the spinal dorsal horn respond to intracutaneous (ic) delivery of histamine and other irritant chemicals, and thus might be involved in signaling sensations of itch or chemogenic pain. Single-unit recordings were made from superficial lumbar dorsal horn neurons in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats. Chemoresponsive units were identified using ic microinjection of histamine (3%, 1 microl) into the hindpaw as a search stimulus. All superficial units so identified [9 nociceptive-specific (NS), 26 wide-dynamic-range (WDR)] responded to subsequent ic histamine. A comparison group of histamine-responsive deep dorsal horn neurons (n = 16) was similarly identified. The mean histamine-evoked discharge decayed to 50% of the maximal rate significantly more slowly for the superficial (92.2 s +/- 65.5, mean +/- SD) compared with deep dorsal horn neurons (28. 2 s +/- 11.6). In addition to responding to histamine, most superficial dorsal horn neurons were also excited by ic nicotine (22/25 units), capsaicin (21/22), topical mustard oil (5/6), noxious heat (26/30), and noxious and/or innocuous mechanical stimuli (except for 1 unit that did not have a mechanosensitive receptive field). Application of a brief noxious heat stimulus during the response to ic histamine evoked an additive response in all but two cases, followed by transient depression of firing in 11/20 units. Intrathecal (IT) administration of morphine had mixed effects on superficial dorsal horn neuronal responses to ic histamine and noxious heat. Low morphine concentrations (100 nM to 1 microM) facilitated histamine-evoked responses (to >130% of control) in 9/24 units, depressed the responses (by >70%) in 11/24, and had no effect in 4. Naloxone reversed morphine-induced effects in some but not all cases. A higher morphine concentration (10 microM) had a largely depressant, naloxone-reversible effect on histamine responses. Responses of the same

  13. Responses from two firing patterns in inferior colliculus neurons to stimulation of the lateral lemniscus dorsal nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-ting; Wang, Ning-yu; Wang, Yan-jun; Xu, Zhi-qing; Liu, Jin-feng; Bai, Yun-fei; Dai, Jin-sheng; Zhao, Jing-yi

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid neurons (GABAergic neurons) in the inferior colliculus are classified into various patterns based on their intrinsic electrical properties to a constant current injection. Although this classification is associated with physiological function, the exact role for neurons with various firing patterns in acoustic processing remains poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed characteristics of inferior colliculus neurons in vitro, and recorded responses to stimulation of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Seven inferior colliculus neurons were tested and were classified into two firing patterns: sustained-regular (n = 4) and sustained-adapting firing patterns (n = 3). The majority of inferior colliculus neurons exhibited slight changes in response to stimulation and bicuculline. The responses of one neuron with a sustained-adapting firing pattern were suppressed after stimulation, but recovered to normal levels following application of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonist. One neuron with a sustained-regular pattern showed suppressed stimulation responses, which were not affected by bicuculline. Results suggest that GABAergic neurons in the inferior colliculus exhibit sustained-regular or sustained-adapting firing patterns. Additionally, GABAergic projections from the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to the inferior colliculus are associated with sound localization. The different neuronal responses of various firing patterns suggest a role in sound localization. A better understanding of these mechanisms and functions will provide better clinical treatment paradigms for hearing deficiencies. PMID:27335563

  14. Functional Phase Response Curves: A Method for Understanding Synchronization of Adapting Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jianxia; Canavier, Carmen C.; Butera, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) for a single neuron are often used to predict the synchrony of mutually coupled neurons. Previous theoretical work on pulse-coupled oscillators used single-pulse perturbations. We propose an alternate method in which functional PRCs (fPRCs) are generated using a train of pulses applied at a fixed delay after each spike, with the PRC measured when the phasic relationship between the stimulus and the subsequent spike in the neuron has converged. The essential information is the dependence of the recovery time from pulse onset until the next spike as a function of the delay between the previous spike and the onset of the applied pulse. Experimental fPRCs in Aplysia pacemaker neurons were different from single-pulse PRCs, principally due to adaptation. In the biological neuron, convergence to the fully adapted recovery interval was slower at some phases than that at others because the change in the effective intrinsic period due to adaptation changes the effective phase resetting in a way that opposes and slows the effects of adaptation. The fPRCs for two isolated adapting model neurons were used to predict the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked network activity when the two neurons were coupled. A stability criterion was derived by linearizing a coupled map based on the fPRC and the existence and stability criteria were successfully tested in two-simulated-neuron networks with reciprocal inhibition or excitation. The fPRC is the first PRC-based tool that can account for adaptation in analyzing networks of neural oscillators. PMID:19420126

  15. Functional phase response curves: a method for understanding synchronization of adapting neurons.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianxia; Canavier, Carmen C; Butera, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) for a single neuron are often used to predict the synchrony of mutually coupled neurons. Previous theoretical work on pulse-coupled oscillators used single-pulse perturbations. We propose an alternate method in which functional PRCs (fPRCs) are generated using a train of pulses applied at a fixed delay after each spike, with the PRC measured when the phasic relationship between the stimulus and the subsequent spike in the neuron has converged. The essential information is the dependence of the recovery time from pulse onset until the next spike as a function of the delay between the previous spike and the onset of the applied pulse. Experimental fPRCs in Aplysia pacemaker neurons were different from single-pulse PRCs, principally due to adaptation. In the biological neuron, convergence to the fully adapted recovery interval was slower at some phases than that at others because the change in the effective intrinsic period due to adaptation changes the effective phase resetting in a way that opposes and slows the effects of adaptation. The fPRCs for two isolated adapting model neurons were used to predict the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked network activity when the two neurons were coupled. A stability criterion was derived by linearizing a coupled map based on the fPRC and the existence and stability criteria were successfully tested in two-simulated-neuron networks with reciprocal inhibition or excitation. The fPRC is the first PRC-based tool that can account for adaptation in analyzing networks of neural oscillators.

  16. Effect of feature-selective attention on neuronal responses in macaque area MT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.; Hoffmann, K.-P.; Albright, T. D.

    2012-01-01

    Attention influences visual processing in striate and extrastriate cortex, which has been extensively studied for spatial-, object-, and feature-based attention. Most studies exploring neural signatures of feature-based attention have trained animals to attend to an object identified by a certain feature and ignore objects/displays identified by a different feature. Little is known about the effects of feature-selective attention, where subjects attend to one stimulus feature domain (e.g., color) of an object while features from different domains (e.g., direction of motion) of the same object are ignored. To study this type of feature-selective attention in area MT in the middle temporal sulcus, we trained macaque monkeys to either attend to and report the direction of motion of a moving sine wave grating (a feature for which MT neurons display strong selectivity) or attend to and report its color (a feature for which MT neurons have very limited selectivity). We hypothesized that neurons would upregulate their firing rate during attend-direction conditions compared with attend-color conditions. We found that feature-selective attention significantly affected 22% of MT neurons. Contrary to our hypothesis, these neurons did not necessarily increase firing rate when animals attended to direction of motion but fell into one of two classes. In one class, attention to color increased the gain of stimulus-induced responses compared with attend-direction conditions. The other class displayed the opposite effects. Feature-selective activity modulations occurred earlier in neurons modulated by attention to color compared with neurons modulated by attention to motion direction. Thus feature-selective attention influences neuronal processing in macaque area MT but often exhibited a mismatch between the preferred stimulus dimension (direction of motion) and the preferred attention dimension (attention to color). PMID:22170961

  17. Effect of feature-selective attention on neuronal responses in macaque area MT.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Hoffmann, K-P; Albright, T D; Thiele, A

    2012-03-01

    Attention influences visual processing in striate and extrastriate cortex, which has been extensively studied for spatial-, object-, and feature-based attention. Most studies exploring neural signatures of feature-based attention have trained animals to attend to an object identified by a certain feature and ignore objects/displays identified by a different feature. Little is known about the effects of feature-selective attention, where subjects attend to one stimulus feature domain (e.g., color) of an object while features from different domains (e.g., direction of motion) of the same object are ignored. To study this type of feature-selective attention in area MT in the middle temporal sulcus, we trained macaque monkeys to either attend to and report the direction of motion of a moving sine wave grating (a feature for which MT neurons display strong selectivity) or attend to and report its color (a feature for which MT neurons have very limited selectivity). We hypothesized that neurons would upregulate their firing rate during attend-direction conditions compared with attend-color conditions. We found that feature-selective attention significantly affected 22% of MT neurons. Contrary to our hypothesis, these neurons did not necessarily increase firing rate when animals attended to direction of motion but fell into one of two classes. In one class, attention to color increased the gain of stimulus-induced responses compared with attend-direction conditions. The other class displayed the opposite effects. Feature-selective activity modulations occurred earlier in neurons modulated by attention to color compared with neurons modulated by attention to motion direction. Thus feature-selective attention influences neuronal processing in macaque area MT but often exhibited a mismatch between the preferred stimulus dimension (direction of motion) and the preferred attention dimension (attention to color).

  18. Estrogen regulates responses of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Die; Yang, Shen; Yang, Chunhao; Jin, Guozhang; Zhen, Xuechu

    2008-09-01

    Sex differences in cocaine abuse have been well documented. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To explore the potential role of ovarian hormones in the regulation of dopamine (DA) neuron firing activity in ventral tegmental area (VTA) induced by acute cocaine in intact female or ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The basal firing activity of VTA DA neurons was changed in a manner phase-locked to the estrous cycle: being highest in estrus and lowest in proestrus. Acute cocaine produced greater inhibition (P < 0.05) on the firing of VTA DA neurons during proestrus than during estrus. The inhibitory effect was completely blocked by OVX and restored by replacement of 17-beta-estradiol or, to a less extent, by replacement of progesterone. In addition, we also detected female hormone-associated changes in slow oscillation in VTA DA neurons. The results indicate that ovarian hormones, particularly estrogen, not only synergize with the inhibitory effect of cocaine on VTA DA neuron activity but also play an essential role in maintaining the sensitivity of DA neurons to cocaine-mediated inhibition on firing. Moreover, pretreatment of estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist raloxifene or a selective ERalpha antagonist Y134 largely attenuated the cocaine-inhibited DA neuron firing. We also found that cocaine-induced locomotor activity was estrous cycle dependent; 17-beta-estradiol but not progesterone replacement restored the cocaine-induced locomotor activity in OVX rats. The present results demonstrated that ovarian hormones, particularly estrogen, produce profound effect on VTA DA neuron activity, which, in turn, may contribute to the sex differences in response to psychostimulants.

  19. The dynamical response properties of neocortical neurons to temporally modulated noisy inputs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Köndgen, Harold; Geisler, Caroline; Fusi, Stefano; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Lüscher, Hans-Rudolf; Giugliano, Michele

    2008-09-01

    Cortical neurons are often classified by current-frequency relationship. Such a static description is inadequate to interpret neuronal responses to time-varying stimuli. Theoretical studies suggested that single-cell dynamical response properties are necessary to interpret ensemble responses to fast input transients. Further, it was shown that input-noise linearizes and boosts the response bandwidth, and that the interplay between the barrage of noisy synaptic currents and the spike-initiation mechanisms determine the dynamical properties of the firing rate. To test these model predictions, we estimated the linear response properties of layer 5 pyramidal cells by injecting a superposition of a small-amplitude sinusoidal wave and a background noise. We characterized the evoked firing probability across many stimulation trials and a range of oscillation frequencies (1-1000 Hz), quantifying response amplitude and phase-shift while changing noise statistics. We found that neurons track unexpectedly fast transients, as their response amplitude has no attenuation up to 200 Hz. This cut-off frequency is higher than the limits set by passive membrane properties (approximately 50 Hz) and average firing rate (approximately 20 Hz) and is not affected by the rate of change of the input. Finally, above 200 Hz, the response amplitude decays as a power-law with an exponent that is independent of voltage fluctuations induced by the background noise.

  20. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I–Forkhead Box O Transcription Factor 3a Counteracts High Glucose/Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Mediated Neuronal Damage: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Anna; Urbanska, Katarzyna; Yang, Shuo; Wang, Jin Ying; Amini, Shohreh; Del Valle, Luis; Peruzzi, Francesca; Meggs, Leonard; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    In HIV patients, antiretroviral medications trigger metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance. In addition, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is elevated in human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (HIVE), also induces insulin resistance and inflicts neuronal damage in vitro. In differentiated PC12 cells and rat cortical neurons, high glucose (HG; 25 mM) triggers reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, contributing to the retraction of neuronal processes, with only a minimal involvement of neuronal apoptosis. In the presence of TNFα, HG-treated neurons undergo massive apoptosis. Because mammalian homolog of the Forkhead family of transcription factors, Forkhead box O transcription factor 3a (FOXO3a), controls ROS metabolism, we asked whether FOXO3a could affect the fate of differentiated neurons in the paradigm of HIVE. We observed FOXO3a nuclear translocation in HG-treated neuronal cultures, accompanied by partial loss of mitochondrial potential and gradual retraction of neuronal processes. Addition of TNFα to HG-treated neurons increased expression of the FOXO-dependent proapoptotic gene Bim, which resulted in extensive apoptotic death. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) significantly lowered intracellular ROS, which was accompanied by IGF-I-mediated FOXO3a nuclear export and decrease in its transcriptional activity. The clinical relevance of these findings is supported by detection of nuclear FOXO3a in TUNEL-positive cortical neurons from HIVE, especially in brain areas characterized by elevated TNFα. PMID:21162126

  1. Somatostatin modulates mast cell-induced responses in murine spinal neurons and satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Van Op den bosch, Joeri; Van Nassauw, Luc; Van Marck, Eric; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2009-08-01

    The course of intestinal inflammatory responses is tightly coordinated by the extensive communication between the immune system and the enteric nervous system, among which the bidirectional mast cell-neuron interaction within the intestinal wall plays a prominent role. Recent research suggests that somatostatin (SOM) is able to inhibit this self-reinforcing network by simultaneously suppressing the inflammatory activities of both neurons and mast cells. Therefore, we assessed the modulatory effects of SOM on both the short-term and long-term effects induced by the main mast cell mediators histamine (HIS) and 5-HT on spinal sensory neurons. Short-term incubation of dorsal root ganglion cultures with HIS and 5-HT induced neuronal CGRP-release and calcium-mediated activation of both neurons and nonneuronal cells, both of which effects were significantly reduced by SOM. In addition, SOM was also able to suppress the increased neuronal expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory peptides induced by long-term exposure to HIS and 5-HT. Immunocytochemical and molecular-biological experiments revealed the possible involvement of somatostatin receptor 1 (SSTR1) and SSTR2A in these profound SOM-dependent effects. These data, combined with the increased expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory peptides and several SSTRs in murine dorsal root ganglia following intestinal inflammation, reveal that intestinal inflammation not only induces the onset of proinflammatory cascades but simultaneously triggers endogenous systems destined to prevent excessive tissue damage. Moreover, these data provide for the first time functional evidence that SOM is able to directly modulate intestinal inflammatory responses by interference with the coordinating mast cell-neuron communication.

  2. Neurotoxin-induced selective ubiquitination and regulation of MEF2A isoform in neuronal stress response.

    PubMed

    She, Hua; Yang, Qian; Mao, Zixu

    2012-09-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A-D (MEF2) proteins are members of the MCM1-agamous-deficiens-serum response factor family of transcription factors. Various MEF2 isoform proteins are enriched in neurons and exhibit distinct patterns of expression in different regions of the brain. In neurons, MEF2 functions as a converging factor to regulate many neuronal functions including survival. MEF2 activities are tightly controlled in neurons in response to stress. Whether stress signal may differentially regulate MEF2s remains largely unknown. In this work, we showed that MEF2A, but not MEF2C or MEF2D, was modified by ubiquitination in dopaminergic neuronal cell line SN4741 cells. MEF2A was ubiquitinated at its N'-terminus, and the ubiquitination of MEF2A was first detectable in the nuclear compartment and later in the cytoplasm. Ubiquitination of MEF2A correlated with reduced DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity. More importantly, disturbing the degradation of ubiquitinated MEF2A through proteasome pathway by neurotoxins known to induce Parkinson's disease features in model animals caused accumulation of ubiquitinated MEF2A, reduced MEF2 activity, and impaired cellular viability. Our work thus provides the first evidence to demonstrate an isoforms-specific regulation of MEF2s by ubiquitination-proteasome pathway in dopaminergic neuronal cell by neurotoxins, suggesting that stress signal and cellular context-dependent dysregulation of MEF2s may underlie the loss of neuronal viability. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. [Response of sensorimotor cortex neurons to weak disturbances of the magnetic field in Wistar rats. Cytochemical study].

    PubMed

    Shpin'kova, V N; Nikol'skaia, K A; Gershteĭn, L M

    2000-01-01

    The influence of weak disturbances (up to 300 microT) of natural magnetic field on the protein metabolism in neurons of sensomotor cortex (layers III and V) in Wistar rats upon learning in a complex maze was studied. It was found that sensomotor neurons were very sensitive to weak disturbances of magnetic field. The protein content increased, while the nucleus-cytoplasm ratio and osmotic state of neurons remained unchanged. The specificity of neuron's reaction manifested itself in a sharp increase of nucleus and cytoplasm dimensions. In associative neurons (layer III), both the nucleus and cytoplasm were involved in the response; in efferent neurons (layer V), only nuclear parameters changed. The variance coefficients of all parameters of protein metabolism in sensomotor neurons, independently of their functional properties, were much higher than in control, which resulted in a wide diversity of cytochemical response.

  4. The pre-states, the time precision and the response pattern of oscillatory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xing

    1998-03-01

    Rate and temporal codes are two main strategies for encoding neural information. The temporal code contains more information but requires substantial timing precision of the spike discharges. Cortical neurons can respond to stimulation with good time precision. However, action potential responses depend not only upon the stimulus but also upon the history of a neuron. We have studied this problem with an oscillatory system: the primary afferent cells that innervate the ampullary electroreceptors in the paddlefish. The endogenous discharges represent a noisy oscillator. We demonstrate how the pre-state of a neuron affects the response timing precision to an applied stimulus, by re-ordering the data according to the time between the last endogenous spike and the delivery of the stimulus. Raster plots of discharges show clear striped patterns for the re-ordered data. In contrast, plots of the original data show random distributions or broadened stripes. We confirm this phenomenon by numerical simulation using a noisy Hodgkin-Huxley model with and without an endogenous oscillator. This technique can also be applied to other systems, e.g. cortical neurons, where oscillations are thought to be important. Oscillatory neurons demonstrate that the pre-state of the system is crucial in determining the post stimulus spike timing and precision.

  5. ATP- and ACh-induced responses in isolated cat petrosal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Alcayaga, Carmen; Varas, Rodrigo; Valdés, Viviana; Cerpa, Verónica; Arroyo, Jorge; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Alcayaga, Julio

    2007-02-02

    Chemoreceptor (glomus) cells of the carotid body are synaptically connected to the sensory nerve endings of petrosal ganglion (PG) neurons. In response to natural stimuli, the glomus cells release transmitters, which acting on the nerve terminals of petrosal neurons increases the chemosensory afferent discharge. Among several transmitter molecules present in glomus cells, acetylcholine (ACh) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) are considered to act as excitatory transmitter in this synapse. To test if ACh and ATP play a role as excitatory transmitters in the cat CB, we recorded the electrophysiological responses from PG neurons cultured in vitro. Under voltage clamp, ATP induces a concentration-dependent inward current that partially desensitizes during 20-30 s application pulses. The ATP-induced current has a threshold near 100 nM and saturates between 20-50 muM. ACh induces a fast, inactivating inward current, with a threshold between 10-50 muM, and saturates around 1 mM. A large part of the population of PG neurons (60%) respond to both ATP and ACh. Present results support the hypothesis that ACh and ATP act as excitatory transmitters between cat glomus cells and PG neurons.

  6. The serotonin releaser fenfluramine alters the auditory responses of inferior colliculus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ian C.; Hurley, Laura M.

    2007-01-01

    Local direct application of the neuromodulator serotonin strongly influences auditory response properties of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC), but endogenous stores of serotonin may be released in a distinct spatial or temporal pattern. To explore this issue, the serotonin releaser fenfluramine was iontophoretically applied to extracellularly recorded neurons in the IC of the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). Fenfluramine mimicked the effects of serotonin on spike count and first spike latency in most neurons, and its effects could be blocked by co-application of serotonin receptor antagonists, consistent with fenfluramine-evoked serotonin release. Responses to fenfluramine did not vary during single applications or across multiple applications, suggesting that fenfluramine did not deplete serotonin stores. A predicted gradient in the effects of fenfluramine with serotonin fiber density was not observed, but neurons with fenfluramine-evoked increases in latency occurred at relatively greater recording depths compared to other neurons with similar characteristic frequencies. These findings support the conclusion that there may be spatial differences in the effects of exogenous and endogenous sources of serotonin, but that other factors such as the identities and locations of serotonin receptors are also likely to play a role in determining the dynamics of serotonergic effects. PMID:17339086

  7. Corneal dry-responsive neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus respond to innocuous cooling in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kurose, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Corneal primary afferent neurons that respond to drying of the ocular surface have been previously characterized and found to respond to innocuous cooling, menthol, and hyperosmotic stimuli. The purpose of the present study was to examine the receptive field properties of second-order neurons in the trigeminal nucleus that respond to drying of the ocular surface. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings were performed in anesthetized rats, and dry-responsive corneal units were isolated in the brain stem at the transition zone between the spinal trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and subnucleus interpolaris. Corneal units were characterized according to their responses to changes in temperature (cooling and heating), hyperosmotic artificial tears, menthol, and low pH. All dry-responsive neurons (n = 18) responded to cooling of the ocular surface. In addition, these neurons responded to hyperosmotic stimuli and menthol application to the cornea. One-half of the neurons were activated by low pH, and these acid-sensitive neurons were also activated by noxious heat. Furthermore, neurons that were activated by low pH had a significantly lower response to cooling and menthol. These results indicate that dry-responsive neurons recorded in the trigeminal nucleus receive input from cold, sensitive primary afferent neurons, with a subset of these neurons receiving input from corneal primary afferent neurons sensitive to acid and noxious heat. It is proposed that acid-insensitive corneal neurons represent a labeled line for lacrimation in response to evaporation of tears from the ocular surface, whereas acid-sensitive neurons are involved in tearing, elicited by damaging or potentially damaging stimuli. PMID:23446686

  8. Corneal dry-responsive neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus respond to innocuous cooling in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kurose, Masayuki; Meng, Ian D

    2013-05-01

    Corneal primary afferent neurons that respond to drying of the ocular surface have been previously characterized and found to respond to innocuous cooling, menthol, and hyperosmotic stimuli. The purpose of the present study was to examine the receptive field properties of second-order neurons in the trigeminal nucleus that respond to drying of the ocular surface. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings were performed in anesthetized rats, and dry-responsive corneal units were isolated in the brain stem at the transition zone between the spinal trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and subnucleus interpolaris. Corneal units were characterized according to their responses to changes in temperature (cooling and heating), hyperosmotic artificial tears, menthol, and low pH. All dry-responsive neurons (n = 18) responded to cooling of the ocular surface. In addition, these neurons responded to hyperosmotic stimuli and menthol application to the cornea. One-half of the neurons were activated by low pH, and these acid-sensitive neurons were also activated by noxious heat. Furthermore, neurons that were activated by low pH had a significantly lower response to cooling and menthol. These results indicate that dry-responsive neurons recorded in the trigeminal nucleus receive input from cold, sensitive primary afferent neurons, with a subset of these neurons receiving input from corneal primary afferent neurons sensitive to acid and noxious heat. It is proposed that acid-insensitive corneal neurons represent a labeled line for lacrimation in response to evaporation of tears from the ocular surface, whereas acid-sensitive neurons are involved in tearing, elicited by damaging or potentially damaging stimuli.

  9. Progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons induced by inflammatory responses to fipronil.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Park, Youn Sun; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2016-09-06

    Inflammatory responses are involved in mechanisms of neuronal cell damage in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the mechanisms whereby inflammatory responses contribute to loss of dopaminergic neurons in fipronil (FPN)-treated rats. After stereotaxic injection of FPN in the substantia nigra (SN), the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons and the levels of TH expression in the SN decreased at 7days, and a significant decrease was observed at 14days with a subsequent reduction in striatal TH expression. Decreases in dopamine (DA) levels, however, began at 3days post-injection, preceding the changes in TH expression. In contrast, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was significantly increased at 3days and persisted for up to 14days post-lesion; these changes in GFAP expression appeared to be inversely correlated with TH expression. Furthermore, we found that FPN administration induced an inflammatory response characterized by increased levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which was mediated by activated microglia following infusion of FPN unilaterally into the SN. Intranigral injection of FPN underwent an inflammatory response with a resultant ongoing loss of dopaminergic neurons, indicating that pesticides may have important implication for the study of PD. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Relating Neuronal to Behavioral Performance: Variability of Optomotor Responses in the Blowfly

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Ronny; Warzecha, Anne-Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral responses of an animal vary even when they are elicited by the same stimulus. This variability is due to stochastic processes within the nervous system and to the changing internal states of the animal. To what extent does the variability of neuronal responses account for the overall variability at the behavioral level? To address this question we evaluate the neuronal variability at the output stage of the blowfly's (Calliphora vicina) visual system by recording from motion-sensitive interneurons mediating head optomotor responses. By means of a simple modelling approach representing the sensory-motor transformation, we predict head movements on the basis of the recorded responses of motion-sensitive neurons and compare the variability of the predicted head movements with that of the observed ones. Large gain changes of optomotor head movements have previously been shown to go along with changes in the animals' activity state. Our modelling approach substantiates that these gain changes are imposed downstream of the motion-sensitive neurons of the visual system. Moreover, since predicted head movements are clearly more reliable than those actually observed, we conclude that substantial variability is introduced downstream of the visual system. PMID:22066014

  11. GABAergic signaling induces divergent neuronal Ca2+ responses in the suprachiasmatic nucleus network

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular communication between γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons facilitates light-induced phase changes and synchronization of individual neural oscillators within the SCN network. We used ratiometric Ca2+ imaging techniques to record changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) to study the role of GABA in interneuronal communication and the response of the SCN neuronal network to optic nerve stimulations that mimic entraining light signals. Stimulation of the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) evoked divergent Ca2+ responses in neurons that varied regionally within the SCN with a pattern that correlated with those evoked by pharmacological GABA applications. GABAA and GABAB receptor agonists and antagonists were used to evaluate components of the GABA-induced changes in [Ca2+]i. Application of the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine induced changes in baseline [Ca2+]i in a direction opposite to that evoked by GABA, and similarly altered the RHT stimulation-induced Ca2+ response. GABA application induced Ca2+ responses varied in time and region within the SCN network. The NKCC1 cotransporter blocker, bumetanide, and L-type calcium channel blocker, nimodipine, attenuated the GABA-induced rise of [Ca2+]i. These results suggest that physiological GABA induces opposing effects on [Ca2+]i based on the chloride equilibrium potential, and may play an important role in neuronal Ca2+ balance, synchronization and modulation of light input signaling in the SCN network. PMID:19821838

  12. Dietary Restriction Affects Neuronal Response Property and GABA Synthesis in the Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qingyan; Hua, Tianmiao; Xi, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent effects of dietary restriction (DR) on cortical inhibition. To clarify this issue, we examined the response properties of neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of DR and control groups of cats using in vivo extracellular single-unit recording techniques, and assessed the synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the V1 of cats from both groups using immunohistochemical and Western blot techniques. Our results showed that the response of V1 neurons to visual stimuli was significantly modified by DR, as indicated by an enhanced selectivity for stimulus orientations and motion directions, decreased visually-evoked response, lowered spontaneous activity and increased signal-to-noise ratio in DR cats relative to control cats. Further, it was shown that, accompanied with these changes of neuronal responsiveness, GABA immunoreactivity and the expression of a key GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 in the V1 were significantly increased by DR. These results demonstrate that DR may retard brain aging by increasing the intracortical inhibition effect and improve the function of visual cortical neurons in visual information processing. This DR-induced elevation of cortical inhibition may favor the brain in modulating energy expenditure based on food availability. PMID:26863207

  13. Effects of betahistine on the spatiotemporal response properties of vestibulospinal neurons to labyrinthine volleys.

    PubMed

    Barresi, Massimo; Bruschini, Luca; Li Volsi, Guido; Manzoni, Diego

    2005-05-16

    Betahistine, a drug used in the treatment of vestibular disorders, speeds-up the recovery from hemilabyrinthectomy in experimental animals, likely through the activation of histamine receptors. In order to better understand the mechanism of action of this drug we investigated, in adult, urethane anesthetized rats, whether betahistine modifies the spatial (directional) and temporal response properties of vestibular nuclear neurons to the labyrinthine input, as well as the convergence of different labyrinthine signals on single units. Extracellular single-unit activity was recorded from the caudal, spinal-projecting region of the vestibular nuclei during tilt of the animal, before and after i.p. injection of betahistine. The two orthogonal directions of maximal and minimal response to tilt, as well as the corresponding gains were determined for each neuron. Betahistine reduced the maximal response gain of units showing larger basal values of this parameter and increased it in neurons with smaller basal values, while the minimal response gain was on the average raised. These changes led to a significant decrease in the spatial specificity of the neurons, suggesting that betahistine affects the process of spatiotemporal convergence on vestibular units, likely through a rearrangement of the various inputs. This could be related to the effect of the drug on vestibular compensation.

  14. Modulation of Neuronal Responses by Exogenous Attention in Macaque Primary Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Chen, Minggui; Yan, Yin; Zhaoping, Li; Li, Wu

    2015-09-30

    Visual perception is influenced by attention deployed voluntarily or triggered involuntarily by salient stimuli. Modulation of visual cortical processing by voluntary or endogenous attention has been extensively studied, but much less is known about how involuntary or exogenous attention affects responses of visual cortical neurons. Using implanted microelectrode arrays, we examined the effects of exogenous attention on neuronal responses in the primary visual cortex (V1) of awake monkeys. A bright annular cue was flashed either around the receptive fields of recorded neurons or in the opposite visual field to capture attention. A subsequent grating stimulus probed the cue-induced effects. In a fixation task, when the cue-to-probe stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) was <240 ms, the cue induced a transient increase of neuronal responses to the probe at the cued location during 40-100 ms after the onset of neuronal responses to the probe. This facilitation diminished and disappeared after repeated presentations of the same cue but recurred for a new cue of a different color. In another task to detect the probe, relative shortening of monkey's reaction times for the validly cued probe depended on the SOA in a way similar to the cue-induced V1 facilitation, and the behavioral and physiological cueing effects remained after repeated practice. Flashing two cues simultaneously in the two opposite visual fields weakened or diminished both the physiological and behavioral cueing effects. Our findings indicate that exogenous attention significantly modulates V1 responses and that the modulation strength depends on both novelty and task relevance of the stimulus. Significance statement: Visual attention can be involuntarily captured by a sudden appearance of a conspicuous object, allowing rapid reactions to unexpected events of significance. The current study discovered a correlate of this effect in monkey primary visual cortex. An abrupt, salient, flash enhanced neuronal

  15. An in vivo investigation of inferior colliculus single neuron responses to cochlear nucleus pulse train stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Rathbone, Graeme D; Paolini, Antonio G

    2012-12-01

    The auditory brain stem implant (ABI) is being used clinically to restore hearing to patients unable to benefit from a cochlear implant (CI). Speech perception outcomes for ABI users are typically poor compared with most CI users. The ABI is implanted either on the surface of or penetrating through the cochlear nucleus in the auditory brain stem and uses stimulation strategies developed for auditory nerve stimulation with a CI. Although the stimulus rate may affect speech perception outcomes with current stimulation strategies, no studies have systematically investigated the effect of stimulus rate electrophysiologically or clinically. We therefore investigated rate response properties and temporal response properties of single inferior colliculus (IC) neurons from penetrating ABI stimulation using stimulus rates ranging from 100 to 1,600 pulses/s in the rat. We found that the stimulus rate affected the proportion of response types, thresholds, and dynamic ranges of IC activation. The stimulus rate was also found to affect the temporal properties of IC responses, with higher rates providing more temporally similar responses to acoustic stimulation. Suppression of neural firing and inhibition in IC neurons was also found, with response properties varying with the stimulus rate. This study demonstrated that changes in the ABI stimulus rate results in significant differences in IC neuron response properties. Due to electrophysiological differences, the stimulus rate may also change perceptual properties. We suggest that clinical evaluation of the ABI stimulus rate should be performed.

  16. Analysis of BH3-only proteins upregulated in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation in cortical neurons identifies Bmf but not Noxa as potential mediator of neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, S; Anilkumar, U; Chen, G; Ramírez-Peinado, S; Galindo-Moreno, J; Muñoz-Pinedo, C; Prehn, J H M

    2014-10-09

    Stress signaling in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) and ischemic injury activates a group of pro-apoptotic genes, the Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins, which are capable of activating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Targeted studies previously identified the BH3-only proteins Puma, Bim and Bid to have a role in ischemic/hypoxic neuronal injury. We here investigated the transcriptional activation of pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins after OGD-induced injury in murine neocortical neurons. We observed a potent and early upregulation of noxa at mRNA and protein level, and a significant increase in Bmf protein levels during OGD in neocortical neurons and in the ipsilateral cortex of mice subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Surprisingly, gene deficiency in noxa reduced neither OGD- nor glutamate-induced neuronal injury in cortical neurons and failed to influence infarct size or neurological deficits after tMCAO. In contrast, bmf deficiency induced significant protection against OGD- or glutamate-induced injury in cultured neurons, and bmf-deficient mice showed reduced neurological deficits after tMCAO in vivo. Collectively, our data not only point to a role of Bmf as a BH3-only protein contributing to excitotoxic and ischemic neuronal injury but also demonstrate that the early and potent induction of noxa does not influence ischemic neuronal injury.

  17. Nociceptive Afferent Activity Alters the SI RA Neuron Response to Mechanical Skin Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Favorov, O.V.; Li, Y.; Lee, J.; Quibrera, P.M.; Tommerdahl, M.

    2010-01-01

    Procedures that reliably evoke cutaneous pain in humans (i.e., 5–7 s skin contact with a 47–51 °C probe, intradermal algogen injection) are shown to decrease the mean spike firing rate (MFR) and degree to which the rapidly adapting (RA) neurons in areas 3b/1 of squirrel monkey primary somatosensory cortex (SI) entrain to a 25-Hz stimulus to the receptive field center (RFcenter) when stimulus amplitude is “near-threshold” (i.e., 10–50 μm). In contrast, RA neuron MFR and entrainment are either unaffected or enhanced by 47–51 °C contact or intradermal algogen injection when the amplitude of 25-Hz stimulation is 100–200 μm (suprathreshold). The results are attributed to an “activity dependence” of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) action on the GABAA receptors of RA neurons. The nociceptive afferent drive triggered by skin contact with a 47–51 °C probe or intradermal algogen is proposed to activate nociresponsive neurons in area 3a which, via corticocortical connections, leads to the release of GABA in areas 3b/1. It is hypothesized that GABA is hyperpolarizing/inhibitory and suppresses stimulus-evoked RA neuron MFR and entrainment whenever RA neuron activity is low (as when the RFcenter stimulus is weak/near-threshold) but is depolarizing/excitatory and augments MFR and entrainment when RA neuron activity is high (when the stimulus is strong/suprathreshold). PMID:20308203

  18. Thermo-responsive polymeric nanoparticles for enhancing neuronal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye In; Cho, Ann-Na; Jang, Jiho; Kim, Dong-Wook; Cho, Seung-Woo; Chung, Bong Geun

    2015-10-01

    We report thermo-responsive retinoic acid (RA)-loaded poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-acrylamide (PNIPAM-co-Am) nanoparticles for directing human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) fate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance analysis confirmed that RA was efficiently incorporated into PNIAPM-co-Am nanoparticles (PCANs). The size of PCANs dropped with increasing temperatures (300-400 nm at room temperature, 80-90 nm at 37°C) due to its phase transition from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. Due to particle shrinkage caused by this thermo-responsive property of PCANs, RA could be released from nanoparticles in the cells upon cellular uptake. Immunocytochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that neuronal differentiation of hiPSC-derived neuronal precursors was enhanced after treatment with 1-2 μg/ml RA-loaded PCANs. Therefore, we propose that this PCAN could be a potentially powerful carrier for effective RA delivery to direct hiPSC fate to neuronal lineage. The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has been at the forefront of research in the field of regenerative medicine, as these cells have the potential to differentiate into various terminal cell types. In this article, the authors utilized a thermo-responsive polymer, Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), as a delivery platform for retinoic acid. It was shown that neuronal differentiation could be enhanced in hiPSC-derived neuronal precursor cells. This method may pave a way for future treatment of neuronal diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancing perception of contaminated food through acid-mediated modulation of taste neuron responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Amrein, Hubert

    2014-09-08

    Natural foods contain not only nutrients, but also nonnutritious and potentially harmful chemicals. Thus, animals need to evaluate food content in order to make adequate feeding decisions. Here, we investigate the effects of acids on the taste neuron responses and on taste behavior of desirable, nutritious sugars and sugar/bitter compound mixtures in Drosophila melanogaster. Using Ca2+ imaging, we show that acids activate neither sweet nor bitter taste neurons in tarsal taste sensilla. However, they suppress responses to bitter compounds in bitter-sensing neurons. Moreover, acids reverse suppression of bitter compounds exerted on sweet-sensing neurons. Consistent with these observations, behavioral analyses show that bitter-compound-mediated inhibition on feeding behavior is alleviated by acids. To investigate the cellular mechanism by which acids modulate these effects, we silenced bitter-sensing gustatory neurons. Surprisingly, this intervention had little effect on acid-mediated derepression of sweet neuron or feeding responses to either sugar/bitter compound mixtures or sugar/bitter compound/acid mixtures, suggesting that there are two independent pathways by which bitter compounds are sensed. Our investigations reveal that acids, when presented in dietary relevant concentrations, enhance the perception of sugar/bitter compound mixtures. Drosophila's natural food sources-fruits and cohabitating yeast-are rich in sugars and acids but are rapidly colonized by microorganisms, such as fungi, protozoan parasites, and bacteria, many of which produce bitter compounds. We propose that the acids present in most fruits counteract the inhibitory effects of these bitter compounds during feeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing Perception of Contaminated Food through Acid-Mediated Modulation of Taste Neuron Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Amrein, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Natural foods not only contain nutrients, but also non-nutritious and potentially harmful chemicals. Thus, animals need to evaluate food content in order to make adequate feeding decisions. Results Here, we investigate the effects of acids on the taste neuron responses and on taste behavior of desirable, nutritious sugars and sugar/bitter compound mixtures in Drosophila melanogaster. Using Ca2+ imaging, we show that acids neither activate sweet nor bitter taste neurons in tarsal taste sensilla. However, they suppress responses to bitter compounds in bitter-sensing neurons. Moreover, acids reverse suppression of bitter compounds exerted on sweet-sensing neurons. Consistent with these observations, behavioral analyses show that bitter compound-mediated inhibition on feeding behavior is alleviated by acids. To investigate the cellular mechanism by which acids modulate these effects, we silenced bitter sensing gustatory neurons. Surprisingly, this intervention had little effect on acid-mediated de-repression of sweet neuron or feeding responses to either sugar/bitter compound mixtures, or sugar/bitter compound/acid mixtures, suggesting two independent pathways by which bitter compounds are sensed. Conclusions Our investigations reveal that acids, when presented in dietary relevant concentrations, enhance the perception of sugar/bitter compound mixtures. Drosophila’s natural food sources - fruits and cohabitating yeast - are rich in sugars and acids, but are rapidly colonized by microorganisms, such as fungi, protozoan parasites and bacteria, many of which produce bitter compounds. We propose that acids present in most fruits counteract the inhibitory effects of these bitter compounds during feeding. PMID:25131671

  1. Arc mRNA induction in striatal efferent neurons associated with response learning.

    PubMed

    Daberkow, D P; Riedy, M D; Kesner, R P; Keefe, K A

    2007-07-01

    The dorsal striatum is involved in motor-response learning, but the extent to which distinct populations of striatal efferent neurons are differentially involved in such learning is unknown. Activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) protein is an effector immediate-early gene implicated in synaptic plasticity. We examined arc mRNA expression in striatopallidal vs. striatonigral efferent neurons in dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum of rats engaged in reversal learning on a T-maze motor-response task. Male Sprague-Dawley rats learned to turn right or left for 3 days. Half of the rats then underwent reversal training. The remaining rats were yoked to rats undergoing reversal training, such that they ran the same number of trials but ran them as continued-acquisition trials. Brains were removed and processed using double-label fluorescent in situ hybridization for arc and preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA. In the reversal, but not the continued-acquisition, group there was a significant relation between the overall arc mRNA signal in dorsomedial striatum and the number of trials run, with rats reaching criterion in fewer trials having higher levels of arc mRNA expression. A similar relation was seen between the numbers of PPE(+) and PPE(-) neurons in dorsomedial striatum with cytoplasmic arc mRNA expression. Interestingly, in behaviourally activated animals significantly more PPE(-) neurons had cytoplasmic arc mRNA expression. These data suggest that Arc in both striatonigral and striatopallidal efferent neurons is involved in striatal synaptic plasticity mediating motor-response learning in the T-maze and that there is differential processing of arc mRNA in distinct subpopulations of striatal efferent neurons.

  2. Effects of spinally administered adenine on dorsal horn neuronal responses in a rat model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Elizabeth A; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2004-02-19

    A novel G-protein-coupled receptor with adenine identified as the endogenous ligand has recently been described. In vivo electrophysiological techniques in the rat were used to record the response of dorsal horn neurones in response to transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the hindpaw receptive field. Spinal adenine (1-1000 microg) exerted facilitatory effects on the electrically-evoked neuronal responses, in a mildly dose-related manner. After establishment of carrageenan-induced inflammation to the hindpaw this excitatory effect of adenine was still apparent, yet reduced. C-fibre-evoked responses and other nociceptive related measures were most susceptible to the effects of adenine, whereas non-nociceptive Abeta-fibre evoked activity remained unaffected. Thus, activation of the adenine receptor site, via spinally applied adenine, suggests a pronociceptive role in nociceptive sensory transmission.

  3. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2012-01-10

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes relevant to neuronal metabolism and survival in the cortex and hippocampus of dietary-restricted animals. Biochemical studies reveal a complex interplay between CREB and Sirt-1: CREB directly regulates the transcription of the sirtuin in neuronal cells by binding to Sirt-1 chromatin; Sirt-1, in turn, is recruited by CREB to DNA and promotes CREB-dependent expression of target gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and neuronal NO Synthase. Accordingly, expression of these CREB targets is markedly reduced in the brain of Sirt KO mice that are, like CREB-deficient mice, poorly responsive to calorie restriction. Thus, the above circuitry, modulated by nutrient availability, links energy metabolism with neurotrophin signaling, participates in brain adaptation to nutrient restriction, and is potentially relevant to accelerated brain aging by overnutrition and diabetes.

  4. Two classes of excitatory synaptic responses in rat thalamic reticular neurons.

    PubMed

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Huguenard, John R

    2016-09-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRt), composed of GABAergic cells providing inhibition of relay neurons in the dorsal thalamus, receives excitation from the neocortex and thalamus. The two excitatory pathways promoting feedback or feedforward inhibition of thalamocortical neurons contribute to sensory processing and rhythm generation. While synaptic inhibition within the nRt has been carefully characterized, little is known regarding the biophysics of synaptic excitation. To characterize the functional properties of thalamocortical and corticothalamic connections to the nRt, we recorded minimal electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents from nRt cells in vitro. A hierarchical clustering algorithm distinguished two types of events. Type 1 events had larger amplitudes and faster kinetics, largely mediated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, whereas type 2 responses had more prominent N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor contribution. Type 1 responses showed subnormal axonal propagation and paired pulse depression, consistent with thalamocortical inputs. Furthermore, responses kinetically similar to type 1 events were evoked by glutamate-mediated activation of thalamic neurons. Type 2 responses, in contrast, likely arise from corticothalamic inputs, with larger NMDA conductance and weak Mg(2+)-dependent block, suggesting that NMDA receptors are critical for the cortical excitation of reticular neurons. The long-lasting action of NMDA receptors would promote reticular cell burst firing and produce powerful inhibitory output to relay neurons proposed to be important in triggering epilepsy. This work provides the first complete voltage-clamp analysis of the kinetics and voltage dependence of AMPA and NMDA responses of thalamocortical and corticothalamic synapses in the nRt and will be critical in optimizing biologically realistic neural network models of thalamocortical circuits relevant to sensory processing and

  5. TRPA1 Channels Modify TRPV1-Mediated Current Responses in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Kudo, Makiko; Yamashita, Yuka; Yoshida, Junko; Imaizumi, Noriko; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Nishio, Matomo; Ishibashi, Takaharu

    2017-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is highly expressed in a subset of sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia of experimental animals, responsible for nociception. Many researches have revealed that some TRPV1-positive neurons co-express the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel whose activities are closely modulated by TRPV1 channel. However, it is less investigated whether the activities of TRPV1 channel are modulated by the presence of TRPA1 channel in primary sensory neurons. This study clarified the difference in electrophysiological responses induced by TRPV1 channel activation between TRPA1-positive and TRPA1-negative DRG. TRPV1 and TRPA1 channel activations were evoked by capsaicin (1 μM), a TRPV1 agonist, and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC; 500 μM), a TRPA1 agonist, respectively. Capsaicin perfusion for 15 s caused a large inward current without a desensitization phase at a membrane potential of -70 mV in AITC-insensitive DRG (current density; 29.6 ± 5.6 pA/pF, time constant of decay; 12.8 ± 1.8 s). The capsaicin-induced currents in AITC-sensitive DRG had a small current density (12.7 ± 2.9 pA/pF) with a large time constant of decay (24.3 ± 5.4 s). In calcium imaging with Fura-2, the peak response by capsaicin was small and duration reaching the peak response was long in AITC-sensitive neurons. These electrophysiological differences were completely eliminated by HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist, in an extracellular solution or 10 mM EGTA, a Ca(2+) chelator, in an internal solution. Capsaicin perfusion for 120 s desensitized the inward currents after a transient peak. The decay during capsaicin perfusion was notably slow in AITC-sensitive DRG; ratio of capsaicin-induced current 60 s after the treatment per the peak current in AITC-sensitive neurons (78 ± 9%) was larger than that in AITC-insensitive neurons (48 ± 5%). The capsaicin-induced current in the desensitization phase was

  6. Effects of trunk-to-head rotation on the labyrinthine responses of rat reticular neurons.

    PubMed

    Barresi, M; Grasso, C; Bruschini, L; Berrettini, S; Manzoni, D

    2012-11-08

    Vestibulospinal reflexes elicited by head displacement become appropriate for body stabilization owing to the integration of neck input by the cerebellar anterior vermis. Due to this integration, the preferred direction of spinal motoneurons' responses to animal tilt rotates by the same angle and by the same direction as the head over the body, which makes it dependent on the direction of body displacement rather than on head displacement. It is known that the cerebellar control of spinal motoneurons involves the reticular formation. Since the preferred directions of corticocerebellar units' responses to animal tilt are tuned by neck rotation, as occuring in spinal motoneurons, we investigated whether a similar tuning can be observed also in the intermediate station of reticular formation. In anaesthetized rats, the activity of neurons in the medullary reticular formation was recorded during wobble of the whole animal at 0.156 Hz, a stimulus that tilted the animal's head by a constant amplitude (5°), in a direction rotating clockwise or counter clockwise over the horizontal plane. The response gain and the direction of tilt eliciting the maximal activity were evaluated with the head and body axes aligned and during a maintained body-to-head displacement of 5-20° over the horizontal plane, in either direction. We found that the neck displacement modified the response gain and/or the average activity of most of the responsive neurons. Rotation of the response direction was observed only in a minor percentage of the recorded neurons. The modifications of reticular neurons' responses were different from those observed in the P-cells of the cerebellar anterior vermis, which rarely showed gain and activity changes and often exhibited a rotation of their response directions. In conclusion, reticular neurons take part in the neck tuning of vestibulospinal reflexes by transforming a head-driven sensory input into a body-centred postural response. The present findings

  7. Light-Induced Responses of Slow Oscillatory Neurons of the Rat Olivary Pretectal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Szkudlarek, Hanna J.; Orlowska, Patrycja; Lewandowski, Marian H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN) is a small midbrain structure responsible for pupil constriction in response to eye illumination. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that OPN neurons code light intensity levels and therefore are called luminance detectors. Recently, we described an additional population of OPN neurons, characterized by a slow rhythmic pattern of action potentials in light-on conditions. Rhythmic patterns generated by these cells last for a period of approximately 2 minutes. Methodology To answer whether oscillatory OPN cells are light responsive and whether oscillatory activity depends on retinal afferents, we performed in vivo electrophysiology experiments on urethane anaesthetized Wistar rats. Extracellular recordings were combined with changes in light conditions (light-dark-light transitions), brief light stimulations of the contralateral eye (diverse illuminances) or intraocular injections of tetrodotoxin (TTX). Conclusions We found that oscillatory neurons were able to fire rhythmically in darkness and were responsive to eye illumination in a manner resembling that of luminance detectors. Their firing rate increased together with the strength of the light stimulation. In addition, during the train of light pulses, we observed two profiles of responses: oscillation-preserving and oscillation-disrupting, which occurred during low- and high-illuminance stimuli presentation respectively. Moreover, we have shown that contralateral retina inactivation eliminated oscillation and significantly reduced the firing rate of oscillatory cells. These results suggest that contralateral retinal innervation is crucial for the generation of an oscillatory pattern in addition to its role in driving responses to visual stimuli. PMID:22427957

  8. Equilibrium and Response Properties of the Integrate-and-Fire Neuron in Discrete Time

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Deger, Moritz; Diesmann, Markus; Rotter, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The integrate-and-fire neuron with exponential postsynaptic potentials is a frequently employed model to study neural networks. Simulations in discrete time still have highest performance at moderate numerical errors, which makes them first choice for long-term simulations of plastic networks. Here we extend the population density approach to investigate how the equilibrium and response properties of the leaky integrate-and-fire neuron are affected by time discretization. We present a novel analytical treatment of the boundary condition at threshold, taking both discretization of time and finite synaptic weights into account. We uncover an increased membrane potential density just below threshold as the decisive property that explains the deviations found between simulations and the classical diffusion approximation. Temporal discretization and finite synaptic weights both contribute to this effect. Our treatment improves the standard formula to calculate the neuron's equilibrium firing rate. Direct solution of the Markov process describing the evolution of the membrane potential density confirms our analysis and yields a method to calculate the firing rate exactly. Knowing the shape of the membrane potential distribution near threshold enables us to devise the transient response properties of the neuron model to synaptic input. We find a pronounced non-linear fast response component that has not been described by the prevailing continuous time theory for Gaussian white noise input. PMID:20130755

  9. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Neuronal Response Characteristics in Deep Layers of Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Narjes; Mohammadi, Elham; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a chemical often used as a solvent for water-insoluble drugs. In this study, we evaluated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of DMSO on neural response characteristics (in 1200–1500 μm depth) of the rat barrel cortex. Methods: DMSO solution was prepared in 10% v/v concentration and injected into the lateral ventricle of rats. Neuronal spontaneous activity and neuronal responses to deflection of the principal whisker (PW) and adjacent whisker (AW) were recorded in barrel cortex. A condition test ratio (CTR) was used to measure inhibitory receptive fields in barrel cortex. Results: The results showed that both PW and AW evoked ON and OFF responses, neuronal spontaneous activity and inhibitory receptive fields did not change following ICV administration of DMSO. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that acute ICV administration of 10% DMSO did not modulate the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons in the l deep ayers of rat barrel cortex. PMID:27563414

  10. Neuronal migration in the murine rostral migratory stream requires serum response factor

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Siegfried; Krause, Sven M.; Kretz, Oliver; Philippar, Ulrike; Lemberger, Thomas; Casanova, Emilio; Wiebel, Franziska F.; Schwarz, Heinz; Frotscher, Michael; Schütz, Günther; Nordheim, Alfred

    2005-01-01

    The central nervous system is fundamentally dependent on guided cell migration, both during development and in adulthood. We report an absolute requirement of the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) for neuronal migration in the mouse forebrain. Conditional, late-prenatal deletion of Srf causes neurons to accumulate ectopically at the subventricular zone (SVZ), a prime neurogenic region in the brain. SRF-deficient cells of the SVZ exhibit impaired tangential chain migration along the rostral migratory stream into the olfactory bulb. SVZ explants display retarded chain migration in vitro. Regarding target genes, SRF deficiency impairs expression of the β-actin and gelsolin genes, accompanied by reduced cytoskeletal actin fiber density. At the posttranslational level, cofilin, a key regulator of actin dynamics, displays dramatically elevated inhibitory phosphorylation at Ser-3. Our studies indicate that SRF-controlled gene expression directs both the structure and dynamics of the actin microfilament, thereby determining cell-autonomous neuronal migration. PMID:15837932

  11. Attenuation of Responses to Self-Generated Sounds in Auditory Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Rummell, Brian P; Klee, Jan L; Sigurdsson, Torfi

    2016-11-23

    Many of the sounds that we perceive are caused by our own actions, for example when speaking or moving, and must be distinguished from sounds caused by external events. Studies using macroscopic measurements of brain activity in human subjects have consistently shown that responses to self-generated sounds are attenuated in amplitude. However, the underlying manifestation of this phenomenon at the cellular level is not well understood. To address this, we recorded the activity of neurons in the auditory cortex of mice in response to sounds generated by their own behavior. We found that the responses of auditory cortical neurons to these self-generated sounds were consistently attenuated, compared with the same sounds generated independently of the animals' behavior. This effect was observed in both putative pyramidal neurons and in interneurons and was stronger in lower layers of auditory cortex. Downstream of the auditory cortex, we found that responses of hippocampal neurons to self-generated sounds were almost entirely suppressed. Responses to self-generated optogenetic stimulation of auditory thalamocortical terminals were also attenuated, suggesting a cortical contribution to this effect. Further analyses revealed that the attenuation of self-generated sounds was not simply due to the nonspecific effects of movement or behavioral state on auditory responsiveness. However, the strength of attenuation depended on the degree to which self-generated sounds were expected to occur, in a cell-type-specific manner. Together, these results reveal the cellular basis underlying attenuated responses to self-generated sounds and suggest that predictive processes contribute to this effect.

  12. Neuronal detection thresholds during vestibular compensation: contributions of response variability and sensory substitution.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mohsen; Mitchell, Diana E; Dale, Alexis; Carriot, Jerome; Sadeghi, Soroush G; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-04-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for processing self-motion, allowing normal subjects to discriminate the direction of rotational movements as slow as 1-2 deg s(-1). After unilateral vestibular injury patients' direction-discrimination thresholds worsen to ∼20 deg s(-1), and despite some improvement thresholds remain substantially elevated following compensation. To date, however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this recovery have not been addressed. Here, we recorded from first-order central neurons in the macaque monkey that provide vestibular information to higher brain areas for self-motion perception. Immediately following unilateral labyrinthectomy, neuronal detection thresholds increased by more than two-fold (from 14 to 30 deg s(-1)). While thresholds showed slight improvement by week 3 (25 deg s(-1)), they never recovered to control values - a trend mirroring the time course of perceptual thresholds in patients. We further discovered that changes in neuronal response variability paralleled changes in sensitivity for vestibular stimulation during compensation, thereby causing detection thresholds to remain elevated over time. However, we found that in a subset of neurons, the emergence of neck proprioceptive responses combined with residual vestibular modulation during head-on-body motion led to better neuronal detection thresholds. Taken together, our results emphasize that increases in response variability to vestibular inputs ultimately constrain neural thresholds and provide evidence that sensory substitution with extravestibular (i.e. proprioceptive) inputs at the first central stage of vestibular processing is a neural substrate for improvements in self-motion perception following vestibular loss. Thus, our results provide a neural correlate for the patient benefits provided by rehabilitative strategies that take advantage of the convergence of these multisensory cues.

  13. Synaptic responsiveness of cortical and thalamic neurones during various phases of slow sleep oscillation in cat.

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, I; Contreras, D; Steriade, M

    1996-01-01

    1. The fluctuations during various phases of the slow sleep oscillation (< 1 Hz) in synaptic responsiveness of motor cortical (Cx), thalamic reticular (RE) and thalamocortical (TC) neurones were investigated intracellularly in cats under ketamine-xylazine anaesthesia. Orthodromic responses to stimuli applied to brachium conjunctivum (BC) axons and corticothalamic pathways were studied. The phases of slow oscillation consist of a long-hyperpolarized, followed by a sharp depth-negative EEG deflection and a series of faster waves that are associated with the depolarization of Cx and RE neurones, while TC cells display a sequence of IPSPs within the spindle frequency. 2. BC-evoked bisynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in Cx and RE neurones were drastically reduced in amplitude during the long-lasting hyperpolarization and the early part of the depolarizing phase. By contrast, the BC-evoked monosynaptic EPSPs of TC cells were not diminished during the depth-positive EEG wave, but the hyperpolarization during this phase of the slow oscillation prevented TC neurones transferring prethalamic signals to the cortex. 3. At variance with the diminished bisynaptic EPSPs evoked in response to BC stimuli during the long-lasting hyperpolarization, Cx-evoked monosynaptic EPSPs in Cx cells increased linearly with hyperpolarization during this phase of the slow oscillation. Similarly, the amplitudes of Cx-evoked EPSPs in RE and TC cells were not diminished during the long-lasting hyperpolarization. 4. The diminished responsiveness of Cx and RE neurones to prethalamic volleys during the long-lasting hyperpolarization is attributed to gating processes at the level of TC cells that, because of their hyperpolarization, do not transfer prethalamic information to further relays. PMID:8814620

  14. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals distinct injury responses in different types of DRG sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ganlu; Huang, Kevin; Hu, Youjin; Du, Guizhen; Xue, Zhigang; Zhu, Xianmin; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury leads to various injury-induced responses in sensory neurons including physiological pain, neuronal cell death, and nerve regeneration. In this study, we performed single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) analysis of mouse nonpeptidergic nociceptors (NP), peptidergic nociceptors (PEP), and large myelinated sensory neurons (LM) under both control and injury conditions at 3 days after sciatic nerve transection (SNT). After performing principle component and weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we categorized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons into different subtypes and discovered co-regulated injury-response genes including novel regeneration associated genes (RAGs) in association with neuronal development, protein translation and cytoplasm transportation. In addition, we found significant up-regulation of the genes associated with cell death such as Pdcd2 in a subset of NP neurons after axotomy, implicating their actions in neuronal cell death upon nerve injury. Our study revealed the distinctive and sustained heterogeneity of transcriptomic responses to injury at single neuron level, implicating the involvement of different gene regulatory networks in nerve regeneration, neuronal cell death and neuropathy in different population of DRG neurons. PMID:27558660

  15. Lateral orbitofrontal neurons acquire responses to upshifted, downshifted, or blocked cues during unblocking

    PubMed Central

    Lopatina, Nina; McDannald, Michael A; Styer, Clay V; Sadacca, Brian F; Cheer, Joseph F; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC) has been described as signaling either outcome expectancies or value. Previously, we used unblocking to show that lOFC neurons respond to a predictive cue signaling a ‘valueless’ change in outcome features (McDannald, 2014). However, many lOFC neurons also fired to a cue that simply signaled more reward. Here, we recorded lOFC neurons in a variant of this task in which rats learned about cues that signaled either more (upshift), less (downshift) or the same (blocked) amount of reward. We found that neurons acquired responses specifically to one of the three cues and did not fire to the other two. These results show that, at least early in learning, lOFC neurons fire to valued cues in a way that is more consistent with signaling of the predicted outcome’s features than with signaling of a general, abstract or cached value that is independent of the outcome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11299.001 PMID:26670544

  16. Cell-type-specific resonances shape the responses of striatal neurons to synaptic input

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Joseph A.; Song, Soomin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons respond to synaptic inputs in cell-type-specific ways. Each neuron type may thus respond uniquely to shared patterns of synaptic input. We applied statistically identical barrages of artificial synaptic inputs to four striatal cell types to assess differences in their responses to a realistic input pattern. Each interneuron type fired in phase with a specific input-frequency component. The fast-spiking interneuron fired in relation to the gamma-band (and higher) frequencies, the low-threshold spike interneuron to the beta-band frequencies, and the cholinergic neurons to the delta-band frequencies. Low-threshold spiking and cholinergic interneurons showed input impedance resonances at frequencies matching their spiking resonances. Fast-spiking interneurons showed resonance of input impedance but at lower than gamma frequencies. The spiny projection neuron's frequency preference did not have a fixed frequency but instead tracked its own firing rate. Spiny cells showed no input impedance resonance. Striatal interneurons are each tuned to a specific frequency band corresponding to the major frequency components of local field potentials. Their influence in the circuit may fluctuate along with the contribution of that frequency band to the input. In contrast, spiny neurons may tune to any of the frequency bands by a change in firing rate. PMID:25411465

  17. Electroacupuncture reduces the evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in ankle-sprained rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2011-05-01

    Acupuncture is shown to be effective in producing analgesia in ankle sprain pain in humans and animals. To examine the underlying mechanisms of the acupuncture-induced analgesia, the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on weight-bearing forces (WBR) of the affected foot and dorsal horn neuron activities were examined in a rat model of ankle sprain. Ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending ligaments of the left ankle in the rat. Dorsal horn neuron responses to ankle movements or compression were recorded from the lumbar spinal cord using an in vivo extracellular single unit recording setup 1 day after ankle sprain. EA was applied to the SI-6 acupoint on the right forelimb (contralateral to the sprained ankle) by trains of electrical pulses (10 Hz, 1-ms pulse width, 2-mA intensity) for 30 min. After EA, WBR of the sprained foot significantly recovered and dorsal horn neuron activities were significantly suppressed in ankle-sprained rats. However, EA produced no effect in normal rats. The inhibitory effect of EA on hyperactivities of dorsal horn neurons of ankle-sprained rats was blocked by the α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (5 mg/kg ip) but not by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (10 mg/kg ip). These data suggest that EA-induced analgesia in ankle sprain pain is mediated mainly by suppressing dorsal horn neuron activities through α-adrenergic descending inhibitory systems at the spinal level.

  18. Electroacupuncture reduces the evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in ankle-sprained rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hee Young; Chung, Kyungsoon

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture is shown to be effective in producing analgesia in ankle sprain pain in humans and animals. To examine the underlying mechanisms of the acupuncture-induced analgesia, the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on weight-bearing forces (WBR) of the affected foot and dorsal horn neuron activities were examined in a rat model of ankle sprain. Ankle sprain was induced manually by overextending ligaments of the left ankle in the rat. Dorsal horn neuron responses to ankle movements or compression were recorded from the lumbar spinal cord using an in vivo extracellular single unit recording setup 1 day after ankle sprain. EA was applied to the SI-6 acupoint on the right forelimb (contralateral to the sprained ankle) by trains of electrical pulses (10 Hz, 1-ms pulse width, 2-mA intensity) for 30 min. After EA, WBR of the sprained foot significantly recovered and dorsal horn neuron activities were significantly suppressed in ankle-sprained rats. However, EA produced no effect in normal rats. The inhibitory effect of EA on hyperactivities of dorsal horn neurons of ankle-sprained rats was blocked by the α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (5 mg/kg ip) but not by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (10 mg/kg ip). These data suggest that EA-induced analgesia in ankle sprain pain is mediated mainly by suppressing dorsal horn neuron activities through α-adrenergic descending inhibitory systems at the spinal level. PMID:21389301

  19. Receptor neuron responses to potential sex pheromone components in the caddisfly Rhyacophila nubila (Trichoptera: Rhyacophilidae).

    PubMed

    Hansson, B S.; Larsson, M C.

    1998-02-01

    Olfactory single sensillum responses of male and female caddisflies Rhyacophila nubila (Trichoptera: Rhyacophilidae) were examined with the tungsten penetration technique to investigate the presence of receptor neurons tuned to potential sex pheromone components. The compounds tested in the experiment were heptan-2-one, nonan-2-one, (R)-heptan-2-ol, and (R)-nonan-2-ol, which have all been found to be present in female abdominal glands, plus the two antipodes (S)-heptan-2-ol and (S)-nonan-2-ol. Four types of receptor neurons were found in equal proportions in males and females. One type responded primarily to heptan-2-one. A second type responded primarily to (R)-heptan-2-ol and a third type primarily to its enantiomer (S)-heptan-2-ol. The fourth type of receptor neuron responded to nonan-2-one, (R)-nonan-2-one, and (S)-nonan-2-ol, with a bias to nonan-2-one. The receptor neurons responding to the tested compounds made up a great majority of the contacted neurons in both males and females.

  20. Single Cell Transcriptomics of Hypothalamic Warm Sensitive Neurons that Control Core Body Temperature and Fever Response

    PubMed Central

    Eberwine, James; Bartfai, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    We report on an ‘unbiased’ molecular characterization of individual, adult neurons, active in a central, anterior hypothalamic neuronal circuit, by establishing cDNA libraries from each individual, electrophysiologically identified warm sensitive neuron (WSN). The cDNA libraries were analyzed by Affymetrix microarray. The presence and frequency of cDNAs was confirmed and enhanced with Illumina sequencing of each single cell cDNA library. cDNAs encoding the GABA biosynthetic enzyme. GAD1 and of adrenomedullin, galanin, prodynorphin, somatostatin, and tachykinin were found in the WSNs. The functional cellular and in vivo studies on dozens of the more than 500 neurotransmitter -, hormone- receptors and ion channels, whose cDNA was identified and sequence confirmed, suggest little or no discrepancy between the transcriptional and functional data in WSNs; whenever agonists were available for a receptor whose cDNA was identified, a functional response was found.. Sequencing single neuron libraries permitted identification of rarely expressed receptors like the insulin receptor, adiponectin receptor2 and of receptor heterodimers; information that is lost when pooling cells leads to dilution of signals and mixing signals. Despite the common electrophysiological phenotype and uniform GAD1 expression, WSN- transcriptomes show heterogenity, suggesting strong epigenetic influence on the transcriptome. Our study suggests that it is well-worth interrogating the cDNA libraries of single neurons by sequencing and chipping. PMID:20970451

  1. Neurons responsive to face-view in the primate ventrolateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Romanski, L M; Diehl, M M

    2011-08-25

    Studies have indicated that temporal and prefrontal brain regions process face and vocal information. Face-selective and vocalization-responsive neurons have been demonstrated in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and some prefrontal cells preferentially respond to combinations of face and corresponding vocalizations. These studies suggest VLPFC in nonhuman primates may play a role in communication that is similar to the role of inferior frontal regions in human language processing. If VLPFC is involved in communication, information about a speaker's face including identity, face-view, gaze, and emotional expression might be encoded by prefrontal neurons. In the following study, we examined the effect of face-view in ventrolateral prefrontal neurons by testing cells with auditory, visual, and a set of human and monkey faces rotated through 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and -30°. Prefrontal neurons responded selectively to either the identity of the face presented (human or monkey) or to the specific view of the face/head, or to both identity and face-view. Neurons which were affected by the identity of the face most often showed an increase in firing in the second part of the stimulus period. Neurons that were selective for face-view typically preferred forward face-view stimuli (0° and 30° rotation). The neurons which were selective for forward face-view were also auditory responsive compared to other neurons which responded to other views or were unselective which were not auditory responsive. Our analysis showed that the human forward face (0°) was decoded better and also contained the most information relative to other face-views. Our findings confirm a role for VLPFC in the processing and integration of face and vocalization information and add to the growing body of evidence that the primate ventrolateral prefrontal cortex plays a prominent role in social communication and is an important model in understanding the cellular mechanisms of communication

  2. ROLES OF INHIBITION IN COMPLEX AUDITORY RESPONSES IN THE INFERIOR COLLICULUS: INHIBITED COMBINATION-SENSITIVE NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Kiran; Wenstrup, Jeffrey J.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the functional properties and underlying neural mechanisms associated with inhibitory combination-sensitive neurons in the mustached bat’s inferior colliculus (IC). In these neurons, the excitatory response to best frequency tones was suppressed by lower frequency signals (usually in the range 12-30 kHz) in a time-dependant manner. Of 143 inhibitory units, the majority (71%) were type I, in which low frequency sounds evoked inhibition only. In the remainder, however, the low frequency inhibitory signal also evoked excitation. Of these, excitation preceded the inhibition in type E/I units (16%), while in type I/E units (13%) excitation followed the inhibition. Type E/I and I/E units were distinct in the tuning and threshold sensitivity of low frequency responses, while type I units overlapped the other types in these features. In 71 neurons, antagonists to receptors for glycine (strychnine, STRY) or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) (bicuculline, BIC) were applied micro-iontophoretically. These antagonists failed to eliminate combination-sensitive inhibition in 92% (STRY), 93% (BIC), and 87% (BIC+STRY) of the type I units tested. However, inhibition was reduced in many neurons. Results were similar for type E/I and I/E inhibitory neurons. The results indicate that there are distinct populations of combination-sensitive inhibited neurons in the IC, and that these populations are at least partly independent of glycine or GABAA receptors in the IC. We propose that these populations originate in different brainstem auditory nuclei, that they may be modified by interactions within the IC, and that they may perform different spectrotemporal analyses of vocal signals. PMID:16371455

  3. Heterogeneity of Voltage- and Chemosignal-Activated Response Profiles in Vomeronasal Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Labra, Antonieta; Brann, Jessica H.; Fadool, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Liolaemus lizards were explored to ascertain whether they would make an amenable model to study single-cell electrophysiology of neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Despite a rich array of chemosensory-related behaviors chronicled for this genus, no anatomical or functional data exist for the VNO, the organ mediating these types of behaviors. Two Liolaemus species (L. bellii and L. nigroviridis) were collected in Central Chile in the Farellones Mountains and transported to the United States. Lizards were subjected to hypothermia and then a lethal injection of sodium pentabarbitol prior to all experiments described in the following text. Retrograde dye perfusion combined with histological techniques demonstrated a compartmentalization of the proportionally large VNO from the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) in cryosections of L. bellii. SDS-PAGE analysis of the VNO of both species demonstrated the expression of three G protein subunits, namely, Gαo, Gαi2, and Gβ, and the absence of Gαolf, Gα11, and Gq, the latter of which are traditionally found in the MOE. Vomeronasal (VN) neurons were enzymatically isolated for whole cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology of single neurons. Both species demonstrated a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, rapidly inactivating sodium current and a tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive potassium current that had a transient and sustained component. VN neurons were classified into two types dependent on the ratio of sodium over sustained potassium current. VN neurons exhibited outward and inward chemosignal-evoked currents when stimulated with pheromone-containing secretions taken from the feces, skin, and precloacal pores. Fifty-nine percent of the neurons were responsive to at least one compound when presented with a battery of five different secretions. The breadth of responsiveness (H metric) demonstrated a heterogeneous population of tuning with a mean of 0.29. PMID:15972830

  4. Responses of midbrain auditory neurons in rats to FM and AM tones presented simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Lee, M F; So, Edmund C; Poon, Paul W F

    2010-12-31

    Speech and other communication signals contain components of frequency and amplitude modulations (FM, AM) that often occur together. Auditory midbrain (or inferior colliculus, IC) is an important center for coding time-varying features of sounds. It remains unclear how IC neurons respond when FM and AM stimuli are both presented. Here we studied IC neurons in the urethane-anesthetized rats when animals were simultaneously stimulated with FM and AM tones. Of 122 units that were sensitive to the dual stimuli, the responses could be grossly divided into two types: one that resembled the respective responses to FM or AM stimuli presented separately ("simple" sensitivity, 45% of units), and another that appeared markedly different from their respective responses to FM or AM tones ("complex" sensitivity, 55%). These types of combinational sensitivities were further correlated with individual cell's frequency tuning pattern (response area) and with their common response pattern to FM and AM sounds. Results suggested that such combinational sensitivity could reflect local synaptic interactions on IC neurons and that the neural mechanisms could underlie more developed sensitivities to acoustic combinations found at the auditory cortex.

  5. Response of autaptic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with noise to subthreshold sinusoidal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hengtong; Chen, Yong

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we investigated the response of a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuron with an autapse to subthreshold sinusoidal signals. It is found that the autapse not only adjusts the stochastic responses, but also improves the detection of subthreshold signals. In the case of weak noise, the autapse facilitates the response of neuron to the subthreshold sinusoidal signals with a small parameter region in tdelay- ω space. The increased noise intensity enlarges this parameter region and increases the corresponding response frequency in such range. As the autaptic intensity increases, however, this parameter region shrunks. We also observed that there is an optimal range of the delay time of autapse, within which the stochastic HH neuron fires action potentials with high frequency. The corresponding response spike train for the optimal delay time is nearly a regular sequence with the interspike intervals approximated to the delay time. The current results reveal a novel resonance phenomenon facilitated by autapse, named autaptic delay-induced coherence resonance.

  6. Duration differences of corticostriatal responses in striatal projection neurons depend on calcium activated potassium currents

    PubMed Central

    Arias-García, Mario A.; Tapia, Dagoberto; Flores-Barrera, Edén; Pérez-Ortega, Jesús E.; Bargas, José; Galarraga, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    The firing of striatal projection neurons (SPNs) exhibits afterhyperpolarizing potentials (AHPs) that determine discharge frequency. They are in part generated by Ca2+-activated K+-currents involving BK and SK components. It has previously been shown that suprathreshold corticostriatal responses are more prolonged and evoke more action potentials in direct pathway SPNs (dSPNs) than in indirect pathway SPNs (iSPNs). In contrast, iSPNs generate dendritic autoregenerative responses. Using whole cell recordings in brain slices, we asked whether the participation of Ca2+-activated K+-currents plays a role in these responses. Secondly, we asked if these currents may explain some differences in synaptic integration between dSPNs and iSPNs. Neurons obtained from BAC D1 and D2 GFP mice were recorded. We used charybdotoxin and apamin to block BK and SK channels, respectively. Both antagonists increased the depolarization and delayed the repolarization of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses in both neuron classes. We also used NS 1619 and NS 309 (CyPPA), to enhance BK and SK channels, respectively. Current enhancers hyperpolarized and accelerated the repolarization of corticostriatal responses in both neuron classes. Nevertheless, these drugs made evident that the contribution of Ca2+-activated K+-currents was different in dSPNs as compared to iSPNs: in dSPNs their activation was slower as though calcium took a diffusion delay to activate them. In contrast, their activation was fast and then sustained in iSPNs as though calcium flux activates them at the moment of entry. The blockade of Ca2+-activated K+-currents made iSPNs to look as dSPNs. Conversely, their enhancement made dSPNs to look as iSPNs. It is concluded that Ca2+-activated K+-currents are a main intrinsic determinant causing the differences in synaptic integration between corticostriatal polysynaptic responses between dSPNs and iSPNs. PMID:24109439

  7. Emotion processing fails to modulate putative mirror neuron response to trained visuomotor associations.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M; Kirkovski, Melissa; Fornito, Alex; Paton, Bryan; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Enticott, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that activation of the putative human mirror neuron system (MNS) can be elicited via visuomotor training. This is generally interpreted as supporting an associative learning account of the mirror neuron system (MNS) that argues against the ontogeny of the MNS to be an evolutionary adaptation for social cognition. The current study assessed whether a central component of social cognition, emotion processing, would influence the MNS activity to trained visuomotor associations, which could support a broader role of the MNS in social cognition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we assessed repetition suppression to the presentation of stimulus pairs involving a simple hand action and a geometric shape that was either congruent or incongruent with earlier association training. Each pair was preceded by an image of positive, negative, or neutral emotionality. In support of an associative learning account of the MNS, repetition suppression was greater for trained pairs compared with untrained pairs in several regions, primarily supplementary motor area (SMA) and right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG). This response, however, was not modulated by the valence of the emotional images. These findings argue against a fundamental role of emotion processing in the mirror neuron response, and are inconsistent with theoretical accounts linking mirror neurons to social cognition.

  8. Neuronal Responses in Visual Area V2 (V2) of Macaque Monkeys with Strabismic Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Bi, H.; Zhang, B.; Tao, X.; Harwerth, R. S.; Smith, E. L.

    2011-01-01

    Amblyopia, a developmental disorder of spatial vision, is thought to result from a cascade of cortical deficits over several processing stages beginning at the primary visual cortex (V1). However, beyond V1, little is known about how cortical development limits the visual performance of amblyopic primates. We quantitatively analyzed the monocular and binocular responses of V1 and V2 neurons in a group of strabismic monkeys exhibiting varying depths of amblyopia. Unlike in V1, the relative effectiveness of the affected eye to drive V2 neurons was drastically reduced in the amblyopic monkeys. The spatial resolution and the orientation bias of V2, but not V1, neurons were subnormal for the affected eyes. Binocular suppression was robust in both cortical areas, and the magnitude of suppression in individual monkeys was correlated with the depth of their amblyopia. These results suggest that the reduced functional connections beyond V1 and the subnormal spatial filter properties of V2 neurons might have substantially limited the sensitivity of the amblyopic eyes and that interocular suppression was likely to have played a key role in the observed alterations of V2 responses and the emergence of amblyopia. PMID:21263036

  9. Autophagy-mediated stress response in motor neurons after hypothermic spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Satoshi; Sakurai, Masahiro; Baba, Hironori; Abe, Koji; Tominaga, Ryuji

    2015-11-01

    of BCLN1 and GABARAP and neuronal cell survival. The double-label fluorescent immunocytochemical study revealed that immunoreactivitiy for BCLN1, Bcl-2, and GABARAP was induced in the same motor neurons. These data suggest that the prolonged induction of autophagy might be a potential factor responsible for delayed motor neuron death, and the induction of the autophagy inhibitory protein Bcl-2 using hypothermia might limit autophagy and protect against delayed motor neuron death. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Chronic Sleep Fragmentation on Wake-Active Neurons and the Hypercapnic Arousal Response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanpeng; Panossian, Lori A.; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Guanxia; Chou, Yu-Ting; Fenik, Polina; Bhatnagar, Seema; Piel, David A.; Beck, Sheryl G.; Veasey, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Delayed hypercapnic arousals may occur in obstructive sleep apnea. The impaired arousal response is expected to promote more pronounced oxyhemoglobin desaturations. We hypothesized that long-term sleep fragmentation (SF) results in injury to or dysfunction of wake-active neurons that manifests, in part, as a delayed hypercapnic arousal response. Design: Adult male mice were implanted for behavioral state recordings and randomly assigned to 4 weeks of either orbital platform SF (SF4wk, 30 events/h) or control conditions (Ct4wk) prior to behavioral, histological, and locus coeruleus (LC) whole cell electrophysiological evaluations. Measurements and Results: SF was successfully achieved across the 4 week study, as evidenced by a persistently increased arousal index, P < 0.01 and shortened sleep bouts, P < 0.05, while total sleep/wake times and plasma corticosterone levels were unaffected. A multiple sleep latency test performed at the onset of the dark period showed a reduced latency to sleep in SF4wk mice (P < 0.05). The hypercapnic arousal latency was increased, Ct4wk 64 ± 5 sec vs. SF4wk 154 ± 6 sec, P < 0.001, and remained elevated after a 2 week recovery (101 ± 4 sec, P < 0.001). C-fos activation in noradrenergic, orexinergic, histaminergic, and cholinergic wake-active neurons was reduced in response to hypercapnia (P < 0.05-0.001). Catecholaminergic and orexinergic projections into the cingulate cortex were also reduced in SF4wk (P < 0.01). In addition, SF4wk resulted in impaired LC neuron excitability (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Four weeks of sleep fragmentation (SF4wk) impairs arousal responses to hypercapnia, reduces wake neuron projections and locus coeruleus neuronal excitability, supporting the concepts that some effects of sleep fragmentation may contribute to impaired arousal responses in sleep apnea, which may not reverse immediately with therapy. Citation: Li Y; Panossian LA; Zhang J; Zhu Y; Zhan G; Chou YT; Fenik P; Bhatnagar S; Piel

  11. Nerve Growth Factor Gene Therapy: Activation of Neuronal Responses in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Tuszynski, Mark H; Yang, Jennifer H; Barba, David; U, Hoi-Sang; Bakay, Roy A E; Pay, Mary M; Masliah, Eliezer; Conner, James M; Kobalka, Peter; Roy, Subhojit; Nagahara, Alan H

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and lacks effective disease-modifying therapies. In 2001, we initiated a clinical trial of nerve growth factor (NGF) gene therapy in AD, the first effort at gene delivery in an adult neurodegenerative disorder. This program aimed to determine whether a nervous system growth factor prevents or reduces cholinergic neuronal degeneration in patients with AD. We present postmortem findings in 10 patients with survival times ranging from 1 to 10 years after treatment. To determine whether degenerating neurons in AD retain an ability to respond to a nervous system growth factor delivered after disease onset. Patients in this anatomicopathological study were enrolled in clinical trials from March 2001 to October 2012 at the University of California, San Diego, Medical Center in La Jolla. Ten patients with early AD underwent NGF gene therapy using ex vivo or in vivo gene transfer. The brains of all 8 patients in the first phase 1 ex vivo trial and of 2 patients in a subsequent phase 1 in vivo trial were examined. Brains were immunolabeled to evaluate in vivo gene expression, cholinergic neuronal responses to NGF, and activation of NGF-related cell signaling. In 2 patients, NGF protein levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Among 10 patients, degenerating neurons in the AD brain responded to NGF. All patients exhibited a trophic response to NGF in the form of axonal sprouting toward the NGF source. Comparing treated and nontreated sides of the brain in 3 patients who underwent unilateral gene transfer, cholinergic neuronal hypertrophy occurred on the NGF-treated side (P < .05). Activation of cellular signaling and functional markers was present in 2 patients who underwent adeno-associated viral vectors (serotype 2)-mediated NGF gene transfer. Neurons exhibiting tau pathology and neurons free of tau expressed NGF, indicating that degenerating cells can be infected with therapeutic

  12. Neuronal encoding of meaning: establishing category-selective response patterns in the avian 'prefrontal cortex'.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Janina A; Vlachos, Ioannis; Hausmann, Markus; Rose, Jonas; Yim, Man Yi; Aertsen, Ad; Güntürkün, Onur

    2009-03-02

    Forebrain association areas interweave perceived stimuli with acquired representations of own actions and their outcome. Often, relevant stimuli come in a bewildering variety of shapes and sizes and we slowly have to learn to group them into meaningful categories. Therefore, the aim of the present study was twofold: First, to reveal how single units in the pigeon's nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL), a functional analogue of the mammalian prefrontal cortex (PFC), encode stimuli that differ in visual features but not in behavioral relevance. The second aim was to understand how these categorical representations are established during learning. Recordings were made from NCL neurons while pigeons performed a go-nogo categorization paradigm. Responses during presentation of the two S+ stimuli and non-responding during presentation of the two S- stimuli were followed by reward. We recorded from two pigeons at different learning stages. In the beginning of the learning process, neurons were active during and shortly before reward, but only in go trials. These data suggest that during the early phase of learning avian 'prefrontal' neurons code for rewards associated with the same behavioral demand, while ignoring feature differences of stimuli within one category. When learning progressed, (1) category selectivity became stronger, (2) responses selective for nogo stimuli appeared, and (3) reward-related responses disappeared in favor of category-selective responses during the stimulus phase. This backward shift in time resembles response patterns assumed by the temporal difference (TD) model of reinforcement learning, but goes beyond it, since it reflects the neuronal correlate of functional categories.

  13. Receptive field focus of visual area V4 neurons determines responses to illusory surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Michele A.; Schmid, Michael C.; Peters, Andrew J.; Saunders, Richard C.; Leopold, David A.; Maier, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Illusory figures demonstrate the visual system’s ability to infer surfaces under conditions of fragmented sensory input. To investigate the role of midlevel visual area V4 in visual surface completion, we used multielectrode arrays to measure spiking responses to two types of visual stimuli: Kanizsa patterns that induce the perception of an illusory surface and physically similar control stimuli that do not. Neurons in V4 exhibited stronger and sometimes rhythmic spiking responses for the illusion-promoting configurations compared with controls. Moreover, this elevated response depended on the precise alignment of the neuron’s peak visual field sensitivity (receptive field focus) with the illusory surface itself. Neurons whose receptive field focus was over adjacent inducing elements, less than 1.5° away, did not show response enhancement to the illusion. Neither receptive field sizes nor fixational eye movements could account for this effect, which was present in both single-unit signals and multiunit activity. These results suggest that the active perceptual completion of surfaces and shapes, which is a fundamental problem in natural visual experience, draws upon the selective enhancement of activity within a distinct subpopulation of neurons in cortical area V4. PMID:24085849

  14. Sex-Based Differences in the Behavioral and Neuronal Responses to Food

    PubMed Central

    Cornier, Marc-Andre; Salzberg, Andrea K; Endly, Dawnielle C.; Bessesen, Daniel H.; Tregellas, Jason R.

    2010-01-01

    Sex-based differences in food intake related behaviors have been observed previously. The objective of this study was to examine sex-based differences in the behavioral and neuronal responses to food. 22 women and 21 men were studied. After 6 days of controlled eucaloric feeding, ad libitum energy intake (EI) was measured for three days. Appetite ratings using visual analog scales were obtained before and after each meal. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in the overnight fasted state on the last day of eucaloric feeding while subjects were presented visual stimuli of food and neutral nonfood objects. While hunger and prospective consumption were not different between sexes, women had higher post-meal satiety ratings and dietary restraint than men. Images of hedonic foods resulted in significantly greater activation of lateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and parietal cortex in women as compared to men. No brain regions were more activated in men as compared to women. Men increased their EI during the ad libitum diet phase. While measures of appetite or feeding behaviors did not correlate with either neuronal activation or subsequent EI, DLPFC activation in response to hedonic foods was negatively correlated with EI. In summary, greater prefrontal neuronal responses to food cues in women may suggest increased cognitive processing related to executive function, such as planning, guidance or evaluation of behavior. Finally, increased DLPFC activation, perhaps relating to inhibitory cognitive control in response to food cues may be a better predictor of food intake than behavioral measures. PMID:20096712

  15. Effect of autaptic activity on the response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hengtong; Wang, Longfei; Chen, Yueling; Chen, Yong

    2014-09-01

    An autapse is a special synapse that connects a neuron to itself. In this study, we investigated the effect of an autapse on the responses of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to different forms of external stimuli. When the neuron was subjected to a DC stimulus, the firing frequencies and the interspike interval distributions of the output spike trains showed periodic behaviors as the autaptic delay time increased. When the input was a synaptic pulse-like train with random interspike intervals, we observed low-pass and band-pass filtering behaviors. Moreover, the region over which the output ISIs are distributed and the mean firing frequency display periodic behaviors with increasing autaptic delay time. When specific autaptic parameters were chosen, most of the input ISIs could be filtered, and the response spike trains were nearly regular, even with a highly random input. The background mechanism of these observed dynamics has been analyzed based on the phase response curve method. We also found that the information entropy of the output spike train could be modified by the autapse. These results also suggest that the autapse can serve as a regulator of information response in the nervous system.

  16. Changes in the Response Properties of Inferior Colliculus Neurons Relating to Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Joel I.; Coomber, Ben; Wells, Tobias T.; Wallace, Mark N.; Palmer, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus is often identified in animal models by using the gap prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle. Impaired gap detection following acoustic over-exposure (AOE) is thought to be caused by tinnitus “filling in” the gap, thus, reducing its salience. This presumably involves altered perception, and could conceivably be caused by changes at the level of the neocortex, i.e., cortical reorganization. Alternatively, reduced gap detection ability might reflect poorer temporal processing in the brainstem, caused by AOE; in which case, impaired gap detection would not be a reliable indicator of tinnitus. We tested the latter hypothesis by examining gap detection in inferior colliculus (IC) neurons following AOE. Seven of nine unilaterally noise-exposed guinea pigs exhibited behavioral evidence of tinnitus. In these tinnitus animals, neural gap detection thresholds (GDTs) in the IC significantly increased in response to broadband noise stimuli, but not to pure tones or narrow-band noise. In addition, when IC neurons were sub-divided according to temporal response profile (onset vs. sustained firing patterns), we found a significant increase in the proportion of onset-type responses after AOE. Importantly, however, GDTs were still considerably shorter than gap durations commonly used in objective behavioral tests for tinnitus. These data indicate that the neural changes observed in the IC are insufficient to explain deficits in behavioral gap detection that are commonly attributed to tinnitus. The subtle changes in IC neuron response profiles following AOE warrant further investigation. PMID:25346722

  17. Effect of autaptic activity on the response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengtong; Wang, Longfei; Chen, Yueling; Chen, Yong

    2014-09-01

    An autapse is a special synapse that connects a neuron to itself. In this study, we investigated the effect of an autapse on the responses of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to different forms of external stimuli. When the neuron was subjected to a DC stimulus, the firing frequencies and the interspike interval distributions of the output spike trains showed periodic behaviors as the autaptic delay time increased. When the input was a synaptic pulse-like train with random interspike intervals, we observed low-pass and band-pass filtering behaviors. Moreover, the region over which the output ISIs are distributed and the mean firing frequency display periodic behaviors with increasing autaptic delay time. When specific autaptic parameters were chosen, most of the input ISIs could be filtered, and the response spike trains were nearly regular, even with a highly random input. The background mechanism of these observed dynamics has been analyzed based on the phase response curve method. We also found that the information entropy of the output spike train could be modified by the autapse. These results also suggest that the autapse can serve as a regulator of information response in the nervous system.

  18. Negative hemodynamic response without neuronal inhibition investigated by combining optical imaging and electrophysiological recording.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zengguang; Cao, Pengjia; Sun, Pengcheng; Lu, Zhuofan; Li, Liming; Chen, Yao; Chai, Xinyu

    2017-01-10

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying negative hemodynamic responses is critical for the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Negative imaging signals have been found in the visual, somatosensory and motor cortices in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and intrinsic signal optical imaging (ISOI) studies. However, the origin of negative imaging signals is still controversial. The present study investigated the visual cortical responses to peripheral grating stimuli using multi-wavelength ISOI and electrophysiological recording. We found an increased cerebral blood volume (CBV) in the stimulus-induced regions and a decreased CBV in the adjacent regions in the visual cortex. Nevertheless, there was no significant change in blood oxygenation in the negative CBV regions. Furthermore, by combining the planar and laminar electrophysiological recordings, we did not observe significantly decreased neuronal activity in the negative CBV regions. Our results suggest that the negative hemodynamic response does not necessarily originate in decreased neuronal activity. Therefore, caution should be taken when interpreting a negative hemodynamic response as neuronal inhibition.

  19. SOMATIC VERSUS DENDRITIC RESPONSES TO HYPERCAPNIA IN CHEMOSENSITIVE LOCUS COERULEUS NEURONS FROM NEONATAL RATS

    PubMed Central

    Ritucci, Nick A.; Dean, Jay B.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory control is mediated in part by central chemosensitive neurons that respond to increased CO2 (hypercapnia). Activation of these neurons is believed to involve hypercapnia-induced decreases in intracellular pH (pHi). All previous measurements of hypercapnia-induced pHi changes in chemosensitive neurons have been made from the soma, but chemosensitive signaling could be initiated in the dendrites of these neurons. In this study, membrane potential (Vm) and pHi were measured simultaneously in chemosensitive locus coeruleus (LC) neurons from neonatal rat brainstem slices using whole-cell pipettes and the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye pyranine. We measured pHi from the soma as well as from primary dendrites to a distance of 160 μm from the edge of the soma. Hypercapnia (15% CO2, pHo 7.00; control: 5% CO2, pHo 7.45) resulted in an acidification of similar magnitude in dendrites and soma (about 0.26 pH unit), but that was faster in the more distal regions of the dendrites. Neither the dendrites nor the soma exhibited pHi recovery during hypercapnia-induced acidification, but both regions contain pH-regulating transporters since they exhibit pHi recovery from an NH4Cl prepulse-induced acidification (at constant pHo 7.45). Exposing a portion of the dendrites to hypercapnic solution did not increase firing rate, but exposing the soma to hypercapnic solution resulted in a near maximal increase in firing rate. These data show that while the pHi response to hypercapnia is similar in the dendrites and soma, somatic exposure to hypercapnia plays a major role in the activation of chemosensitive LC neurons from neonatal rats. PMID:16014703

  20. Response properties of neighboring neurons in the auditory midbrain for pure-tone stimulation: a tetrode study.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri, Chandran V; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2007-10-01

    The complex anatomical structure of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC), the principal auditory nucleus in the midbrain, may provide the basis for functional organization of auditory information. To investigate this organization, we used tetrodes to record from neighboring neurons in the ICC of anesthetized cats and studied the similarity and difference among the responses of these neurons to pure-tone stimuli using widely used physiological characterizations. Consistent with the tonotopic arrangement of neurons in the ICC and reports of a threshold map, we found a high degree of correlation in the best frequencies (BFs) of neighboring neurons, which were mostly <3 kHz in our sample, and the pure-tone thresholds among neighboring neurons. However, width of frequency tuning, shapes of the frequency response areas, and temporal discharge patterns showed little or no correlation among neighboring neurons. Because the BF and threshold are measured at levels near the threshold and the characteristic frequency (CF), neighboring neurons may receive similar primary inputs tuned to their CF; however, at higher levels, additional inputs from other frequency channels may be recruited, introducing greater variability in the responses. There was also no correlation among neighboring neurons' sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITD) measured with binaural beats. However, the characteristic phases (CPs) of neighboring neurons revealed a significant correlation. Because the CP is related to the neural mechanisms generating the ITD sensitivity, this result is consistent with segregation of inputs to the ICC from the lateral and medial superior olives.

  1. Improved system identification using artificial neural networks and analysis of individual differences in responses of an identified neuron.

    PubMed

    Costalago Meruelo, Alicia; Simpson, David M; Veres, Sandor M; Newland, Philip L

    2016-03-01

    Mathematical modelling is used routinely to understand the coding properties and dynamics of responses of neurons and neural networks. Here we analyse the effectiveness of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) as a modelling tool for motor neuron responses. We used ANNs to model the synaptic responses of an identified motor neuron, the fast extensor motor neuron, of the desert locust in response to displacement of a sensory organ, the femoral chordotonal organ, which monitors movements of the tibia relative to the femur of the leg. The aim of the study was threefold: first to determine the potential value of ANNs as tools to model and investigate neural networks, second to understand the generalisation properties of ANNs across individuals and to different input signals and third, to understand individual differences in responses of an identified neuron. A metaheuristic algorithm was developed to design the ANN architectures. The performance of the models generated by the ANNs was compared with those generated through previous mathematical models of the same neuron. The results suggest that ANNs are significantly better than LNL and Wiener models in predicting specific neural responses to Gaussian White Noise, but not significantly different when tested with sinusoidal inputs. They are also able to predict responses of the same neuron in different individuals irrespective of which animal was used to develop the model, although notable differences between some individuals were evident. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Response of pontomedullary reticulospinal neurons to vestibular stimuli in vertical planes. Role in vertical vestibulospinal reflexes of the decerebrate cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, P. S.; Goto, T.; Schor, R. H.; Wilson, V. J.; Yamagata, Y.; Yates, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. To investigate the neural substrate of vestibulospinal reflexes in decerebrate cats, we studied the responses of pontomedullary reticulospinal neurons to natural stimulation of the labyrinth in vertical planes. Our principal aim was to determine whether reticulospinal neurons that terminate in, or are likely to give off collaterals to, the upper cervical segments had properties similar to those of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR). 2. Antidromic stimulation was used to determine whether the neurons projected to the neck, lower cervical, thoracic, or lumbar levels. Dynamics of the responses of spontaneously firing neurons were studied with sinusoidal stimuli delivered at 0.05-1 Hz and aligned to the plane of body rotation, that produced maximal modulation of the neuron (response vector orientation). Each neuron was assigned a vestibular input classification of otolith, vertical canal, otolith + canal, or spatial-temporal convergence (STC). 3. We found, in agreement with previous studies, that the largest fraction of pontomedullary reticulospinal neurons projected to the lumbar cord, and that only a small number ended in the neck segments. Neurons projecting to all levels of the spinal cord had similar responses to labyrinth stimulation. 4. Reticulospinal neurons that received only vertical canal inputs were rare (1 of 67 units). Most reticulospinal neurons (48%) received predominant otolith inputs, 18% received otolith + canal input, and only 9% had STC behavior. These data are in sharp contrast to the results of our previous studies of vestibulospinal neurons. A considerable portion of vestibulospinal neurons receives vertical canal input (38%), fewer receive predominantly otolith input (22%), whereas the proportion that have otolith + canal input or STC behavior is similar to our present reticulospinal data. 5. The response vector orientations of our reticulospinal neurons, particularly those with canal inputs (canal, otolith + canal, STC) were predominantly in

  3. Proteomic Profiling in Drosophila Reveals Potential Dube3a Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton and Neuronal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Laura; Farook, M. Febin; Reiter, Lawrence T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular defects associated with Angelman syndrome (AS) and 15q duplication autism are directly correlated to expression levels of the E3 ubiquitin ligase protein UBE3A. Here we used Drosophila melanogaster to screen for the targets of this ubiquitin ligase under conditions of both decreased (as in AS) or increased (as in dup(15)) levels of the fly Dube3a or human UBE3A proteins. Using liquid phase isoelectric focusing of proteins from whole fly head extracts we identified a total of 50 proteins that show changes in protein, and in some cases transcriptional levels, when Dube3a fluctuates. We analyzed head extracts from cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane fractions for Dube3a regulated proteins. Our results indicate that Dube3a is involved in the regulation of cellular functions related to ATP synthesis/metabolism, actin cytoskeletal integrity, both catabolism and carbohydrate metabolism as well as nervous system development and function. Sixty-two percent of the proteins were >50% identical to homologous human proteins and 8 have previously be shown to be ubiquitinated in the fly nervous system. Eight proteins may be regulated by Dube3a at the transcript level through the transcriptional co-activation function of Dube3a. We investigated one autism-associated protein, ATPα, and found that it can be ubiquitinated in a Dube3a dependent manner. We also found that Dube3a mutants have significantly less filamentous actin than wild type larvae consistent with the identification of actin targets regulated by Dube3a. The identification of UBE3A targets is the first step in unraveling the molecular etiology of AS and duplication 15q autism. PMID:23626758

  4. Adaptive responses of neuronal mitochondria to bioenergetic challenges: Roles in neuroplasticity and disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Raefsky, Sophia M; Mattson, Mark P

    2017-01-01

    An important concept in neurobiology is "neurons that fire together, wire together" which means that the formation and maintenance of synapses is promoted by activation of those synapses. Very similar to the effects of the stress of exercise on muscle cells, emerging findings suggest that neurons respond to activity by activating signaling pathways (e.g., Ca(2+), CREB, PGC-1α, NF-κB) that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular stress resistance. These pathways are also activated by aerobic exercise and food deprivation, two bioenergetic challenges of fundamental importance in the evolution of the brains of all mammals, including humans. The metabolic 'switch' in fuel source from liver glycogen store-derived glucose to adipose cell-derived fatty acids and their ketone metabolites during fasting and sustained exercise, appears to be a pivotal trigger of both brain-intrinsic and peripheral organ-derived signals that enhance learning and memory and underlying synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Brain-intrinsic extracellular signals include the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and the neurotrophic factor BDNF, and peripheral signals may include the liver-derived ketone 3-hydroxybutyrate and the muscle cell-derived protein irisin. Emerging findings suggest that fasting, exercise and an intellectually challenging lifestyle can protect neurons against the dysfunction and degeneration that they would otherwise suffer in acute brain injuries (stroke and head trauma) and neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Among the prominent intracellular responses of neurons to these bioenergetic challenges are up-regulation of antioxidant defenses, autophagy/mitophagy and DNA repair. A better understanding of such fundamental hormesis-based adaptive neuronal response mechanisms is expected to result in the development and implementation of novel interventions to promote optimal brain function and healthy brain aging.

  5. The cortical innate immune response increases local neuronal excitability leading to seizures

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Krista M.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Northcutt, Alexis; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2009-01-01

    Brain glial cells, five times more prevalent than neurons, have recently received attention for their potential involvement in epileptic seizures. Microglia and astrocytes, associated with inflammatory innate immune responses, are responsible for surveillance of brain damage that frequently results in seizures. Thus, an intriguing suggestion has been put forward that seizures may be facilitated and perhaps triggered by brain immune responses. Indeed, recent evidence strongly implicates innate immune responses in lowering seizure threshold in experimental models of epilepsy, yet, there is no proof that they can play an independent role in initiating seizures in vivo. Here, we show that cortical innate immune responses alone produce profound increases of brain excitability resulting in focal seizures. We found that cortical application of lipopolysaccharide, binding to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), triples evoked field potential amplitudes and produces focal epileptiform discharges. These effects are prevented by pre-application of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Our results demonstrate how the innate immune response may participate in acute seizures, increasing neuronal excitability through interleukin-1 release in response to TLR4 detection of the danger signals associated with infections of the central nervous system and with brain injury. These results suggest an important role of innate immunity in epileptogenesis and focus on glial inhibition, through pharmacological blockade of TLR4 and the pro-inflammatory mediators released by activated glia, in the study and treatment of seizure disorders in humans. PMID:19567702

  6. Visual deviant stimuli produce mismatch responses in the amplitude dynamics of neuronal oscillations.

    PubMed

    Tugin, Sergei; Hernandez-Pavon, Julio C; Ilmoniemi, Risto J; Nikulin, Vadim V

    2016-11-15

    Auditory and visual deviant stimuli evoke mismatch negativity (MMN) responses, which can be recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). However, little is known about the role of neuronal oscillations in encoding of rare stimuli. We aimed at verifying the existence of a mechanism for the detection of deviant visual stimuli on the basis of oscillatory responses, so-called visual mismatch oscillatory response (vMOR). Peripheral visual stimuli in an oddball paradigm, standard vs. deviant (7:1), were presented to twenty healthy subjects. The oscillatory responses to an infrequent change in the direction of moving peripheral stimuli were recorded with a 60-channel EEG system. In order to enhance the detection of oscillatory responses, we used the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm, designed for the optimal extraction of changes in the amplitude of oscillations. Both standard and deviant visual stimuli produced Event-Related Desynchronization (ERD) and Synchronization (ERS) primarily in the occipito-parietal cortical areas. ERD and ERS had overlapping time-courses and peaked at about 500-730 ms. These oscillatory responses, however, were significantly stronger for the deviant than for the standard stimuli. A difference between the oscillatory responses to deviant and standard stimuli thus reflects the presence of vMOR. The present study shows that the detection of visual deviant stimuli can be reflected in both synchronization and desynchronization of neuronal oscillations. This broadens our knowledge about the brain mechanisms encoding deviant sensory stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Caudal ventrolateral medulla mediates baroreceptor afferent inputs to subfornical organ angiotensin II responsive neurons.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-01-23

    Although anatomical data indicates that the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) projects directly to the subfornical organ (SFO), little is known about the afferent information relayed through the CVLM to SFO. Experiments were done in the anesthetized rat to investigate whether CVLM neurons mediate baroreceptor afferent information to SFO and whether this afferent information alters the response of SFO neurons to systemic injections of angiotensin II (ANG II). Extracellular single unit recordings were made from 78 spontaneously discharging single units in SFO. Of these, 32 (41%) responded to microinjection of L-glutamate (L-Glu; 0.25M; 10nl) into CVLM (27/32 were inhibited and 5/32 were excited). All 32 units also were excited by systemic injections of ANG II (250ng/0.1ml, ia). However, only those units inhibited by CVLM (n=27) were found to be inhibited by the reflex activation of baroreceptors following systemic injections of phenylephrine (2μg/kg, iv). Activation of CVLM or arterial baroreceptors in conjunction with ANG II resulted in an attenuation of the SFO unit's response to ANG II. Finally, microinjections (100nl) of the synaptic blocker CoCl(2) or the non-specific glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid into CVLM attenuated (10/13 units tested) the SFO neuron's response to activation of baroreceptors, but not the unit's response evoked by systemic ANG II. Taken together, these data suggest that baroreceptor afferent information relayed through CVLM functions to modulate of the activity of neurons within SFO to extracellular signals of body fluid balance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuron's eye view: Inferring features of complex stimuli from neural responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Beck, Jeffrey M; Pearson, John M

    2017-08-01

    Experiments that study neural encoding of stimuli at the level of individual neurons typically choose a small set of features present in the world-contrast and luminance for vision, pitch and intensity for sound-and assemble a stimulus set that systematically varies along these dimensions. Subsequent analysis of neural responses to these stimuli typically focuses on regression models, with experimenter-controlled features as predictors and spike counts or firing rates as responses. Unfortunately, this approach requires knowledge in advance about the relevant features coded by a given population of neurons. For domains as complex as social interaction or natural movement, however, the relevant feature space is poorly understood, and an arbitrary a priori choice of features may give rise to confirmation bias. Here, we present a Bayesian model for exploratory data analysis that is capable of automatically identifying the features present in unstructured stimuli based solely on neuronal responses. Our approach is unique within the class of latent state space models of neural activity in that it assumes that firing rates of neurons are sensitive to multiple discrete time-varying features tied to the stimulus, each of which has Markov (or semi-Markov) dynamics. That is, we are modeling neural activity as driven by multiple simultaneous stimulus features rather than intrinsic neural dynamics. We derive a fast variational Bayesian inference algorithm and show that it correctly recovers hidden features in synthetic data, as well as ground-truth stimulus features in a prototypical neural dataset. To demonstrate the utility of the algorithm, we also apply it to cluster neural responses and demonstrate successful recovery of features corresponding to monkeys and faces in the image set.

  9. Responses of neurons in chinchilla auditory cortex to frequency-modulated tones.

    PubMed

    Brown, Trecia A; Harrison, Robert V

    2009-04-01

    Frequency-modulated (FM) stimuli have been used to explore the behavior of neurons in the auditory cortex of several animal models; however, the properties of FM-sensitive auditory cortical neurons in the chinchilla are still unknown. Single-unit responses to FM stimulation were obtained from the auditory cortex of anesthetized adult chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger). Upward and downward linear FM sweeps spanning frequencies from 0.1 to 20 kHz were presented at speeds of 0.05 to 0.82 kHz/ms. Results indicated that >90% of sampled neurons were responsive to FM sweeps. The population preference was for upward FM sweeps and for medium to fast speeds (> or =0.3 kHz/ms). Few units (3%) were selective for downward FM sweeps, whereas <22% of units preferred slow speeds (< or =0.1 kHz/ms). Velocity preference and direction sensitivity were positively correlated for upward sweeps only (r = 0.40, P = 0.0021, t-test). Three types of firing rate patterns were observed in the FM response peristimulus time histograms: a single peak at sweep onset/offset ("onset") and a single peak ("late") or multiple peaks ("burst") during the sweep. "Late" units expressed the highest mean values for direction sensitivity and speed selectivity; "onset" units were selective only for direction and "burst" units were not selective for either direction or speed. The robust responsiveness of these neurons to FM sweeps suggests a functional role for FM detection such as the identification of FM sweeps present in vocalizations of other organisms within the chinchilla's natural environment.

  10. Smoking-Relevant Nicotine Concentration Attenuates the Unfolded Protein Response in Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Rahul; Henley, Beverley M.; Henderson, Brandon J.; Indersmitten, Tim; Cohen, Bruce N.; Kim, Charlene H.; McKinney, Sheri; Deshpande, Purnima; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective epidemiological studies show an inverse correlation between susceptibility to Parkinson's disease and a person's history of tobacco use. Animal model studies suggest nicotine as a neuroprotective agent and nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) as targets for neuroprotection, but the underlying neuroprotective mechanism(s) are unknown. We cultured mouse ventral midbrain neurons for 3 weeks. Ten to 20% of neurons were dopaminergic (DA), revealed by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity. We evoked mild endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin (Tu), producing modest increases in the level of nuclear ATF6, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, nuclear XBP1, and the downstream proapoptotic effector nuclear C/EBP homologous protein. We incubated cultures for 2 weeks with 200 nm nicotine, the approximate steady-state concentration between cigarette smoking or vaping, or during nicotine patch use. Nicotine incubation suppressed Tu-induced ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Study of mice with fluorescent nAChR subunits showed that the cultured TH+ neurons displayed α4, α6, and β3 nAChR subunit expression and ACh-evoked currents. Gene expression profile in cultures from TH-eGFP mice showed that the TH+ neurons also express several other genes associated with DA release. Nicotine also upregulated ACh-induced currents in DA neurons by ∼2.5-fold. Thus, nicotine, at a concentration too low to activate an appreciable fraction of plasma membrane nAChRs, induces two sequelae of pharmacological chaperoning in the ER: UPR suppression and nAChR upregulation. Therefore, one mechanism of neuroprotection by nicotine is pharmacological chaperoning, leading to UPR suppression. Measuring this pathway may help in assessing neuroprotection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) cannot yet be cured or prevented. However, many retrospective epidemiological studies reveal that PD is diagnosed less frequently in

  11. Cortical Hypoexcitation Defines Neuronal Responses in the Immediate Aftermath of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Victoria Philippa Anne; Yan, Edwin Bingbing; Alwis, Dasuni Sathsara; Rajan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) from a blow to the head is often associated with complex patterns of brain abnormalities that accompany deficits in cognitive and motor function. Previously we reported that a long-term consequence of TBI, induced with a closed-head injury method modelling human car and sporting accidents, is neuronal hyper-excitation in the rat sensory barrel cortex that receives tactile input from the face whiskers. Hyper-excitation occurred only in supra-granular layers and was stronger to complex than simple stimuli. We now examine changes in the immediate aftermath of TBI induced with same injury method. At 24 hours post-trauma significant sensorimotor deficits were observed and characterisation of the cortical population neuronal responses at that time revealed a depth-dependent suppression of neuronal responses, with reduced responses from supragranular layers through to input layer IV, but not in infragranular layers. In addition, increased spontaneous firing rate was recorded in cortical layers IV and V. We postulate that this early post-injury suppression of cortical processing of sensory input accounts for immediate post-trauma sensory morbidity and sets into train events that resolve into long-term cortical hyper-excitability in upper sensory cortex layers that may account for long-term sensory hyper-sensitivity in humans with TBI. PMID:23667624

  12. Effects of dynamic synapses on noise-delayed response latency of a single neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzuntarla, M.; Ozer, M.; Ileri, U.; Calim, A.; Torres, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The noise-delayed decay (NDD) phenomenon emerges when the first-spike latency of a periodically forced stochastic neuron exhibits a maximum for a particular range of noise intensity. Here, we investigate the latency response dynamics of a single Hodgkin-Huxley neuron that is subject to both a suprathreshold periodic stimulus and a background activity arriving through dynamic synapses. We study the first-spike latency response as a function of the presynaptic firing rate f . This constitutes a more realistic scenario than previous works, since f provides a suitable biophysically realistic parameter to control the level of activity in actual neural systems. We first report on the emergence of classical NDD behavior as a function of f for the limit of static synapses. Second, we show that when short-term depression and facilitation mechanisms are included at the synapses, different NDD features can be found due to their modulatory effect on synaptic current fluctuations. For example, an intriguing double NDD (DNDD) behavior occurs for different sets of relevant synaptic parameters. Moreover, depending on the balance between synaptic depression and synaptic facilitation, single NDD or DNDD can prevail, in such a way that synaptic facilitation favors the emergence of DNDD whereas synaptic depression favors the existence of single NDD. Here we report the existence of the DNDD effect in the response latency dynamics of a neuron.

  13. Metabolic communication between astrocytes and neurons via bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun B; Gordon, Grant R J; Zhou, Ning; Tai, Chao; Rungta, Ravi L; Martinez, Jennifer; Milner, Teresa A; Ryu, Jae K; McLarnon, James G; Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; MacVicar, Brian A

    2012-09-20

    Astrocytes are proposed to participate in brain energy metabolism by supplying substrates to neurons from their glycogen stores and from glycolysis. However, the molecules involved in metabolic sensing and the molecular pathways responsible for metabolic coupling between different cell types in the brain are not fully understood. Here we show that a recently cloned bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) sensor, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC), is highly expressed in astrocytes and becomes activated in response to HCO₃⁻ entry via the electrogenic NaHCO₃ cotransporter (NBC). Activated sAC increases intracellular cAMP levels, causing glycogen breakdown, enhanced glycolysis, and the release of lactate into the extracellular space, which is subsequently taken up by neurons for use as an energy substrate. This process is recruited over a broad physiological range of [K⁺](ext) and also during aglycemic episodes, helping to maintain synaptic function. These data reveal a molecular pathway in astrocytes that is responsible for brain metabolic coupling to neurons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic Communication between Astrocytes and Neurons via Bicarbonate-Responsive Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun B.; Gordon, Grant R.J.; Zhou, Ning; Tai, Chao; Rungta, Ravi L.; Martinez, Jennifer; Milner, Teresa A.; Ryu, Jae K.; McLarnon, James G.; Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; MacVicar, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Astrocytes are proposed to participate in brain energy metabolism by supplying substrates to neurons from their glycogen stores and from glycolysis. However, the molecules involved in metabolic sensing and the molecular pathways responsible for metabolic coupling between different cell types in the brain are not fully understood. Here we show that a recently cloned bicarbonate (HCO3−) sensor, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC), is highly expressed in astrocytes and becomes activated in response to HCO3− entry via the electrogenic NaHCO3 cotransporter (NBC). Activated sAC increases intracellular cAMP levels, causing glycogen breakdown, enhanced glycolysis, and the release of lactate into the extracellular space, which is subsequently taken up by neurons for use as an energy substrate. This process is recruited over a broad physiological range of [K+]ext and also during aglycemic episodes, helping to maintain synaptic function. These data reveal a molecular pathway in astrocytes that is responsible for brain metabolic coupling to neurons. PMID:22998876

  15. Neuronal spike-train responses in the presence of threshold noise.

    PubMed

    Coombes, S; Thul, R; Laudanski, J; Palmer, A R; Sumner, C J

    2011-03-01

    The variability of neuronal firing has been an intense topic of study for many years. From a modelling perspective it has often been studied in conductance based spiking models with the use of additive or multiplicative noise terms to represent channel fluctuations or the stochastic nature of neurotransmitter release. Here we propose an alternative approach using a simple leaky integrate-and-fire model with a noisy threshold. Initially, we develop a mathematical treatment of the neuronal response to periodic forcing using tools from linear response theory and use this to highlight how a noisy threshold can enhance downstream signal reconstruction. We further develop a more general framework for understanding the responses to large amplitude forcing based on a calculation of first passage times. This is ideally suited to understanding stochastic mode-locking, for which we numerically determine the Arnol'd tongue structure. An examination of data from regularly firing stellate neurons within the ventral cochlear nucleus, responding to sinusoidally amplitude modulated pure tones, shows tongue structures consistent with these predictions and highlights that stochastic, as opposed to deterministic, mode-locking is utilised at the level of the single stellate cell to faithfully encode periodic stimuli.

  16. Dopamine Neurons Change the Type of Excitability in Response to Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Gutkin, Boris S.; Lapish, Christopher C.; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of neuronal excitability determine the neuron’s response to stimuli, its synchronization and resonance properties and, ultimately, the computations it performs in the brain. We investigated the dynamical mechanisms underlying the excitability type of dopamine (DA) neurons, using a conductance-based biophysical model, and its regulation by intrinsic and synaptic currents. Calibrating the model to reproduce low frequency tonic firing results in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) excitation balanced by γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibition and leads to type I excitable behavior characterized by a continuous decrease in firing frequency in response to hyperpolarizing currents. Furthermore, we analyzed how excitability type of the DA neuron model is influenced by changes in the intrinsic current composition. A subthreshold sodium current is necessary for a continuous frequency decrease during application of a negative current, and the low-frequency “balanced” state during simultaneous activation of NMDA and GABA receptors. Blocking this current switches the neuron to type II characterized by the abrupt onset of repetitive firing. Enhancing the anomalous rectifier Ih current also switches the excitability to type II. Key characteristics of synaptic conductances that may be observed in vivo also change the type of excitability: a depolarized γ-Aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) reversal potential or co-activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) leads to an abrupt frequency drop to zero, which is typical for type II excitability. Coactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) together with AMPARs and GABARs shifts the type I/II boundary toward more hyperpolarized GABAR reversal potentials. To better understand how altering each of the aforementioned currents leads to changes in excitability profile of DA neuron, we provide a thorough dynamical analysis. Collectively, these results imply that type I

  17. Cross-desensitization of responses of rat trigeminal subnucleus caudalis neurons to cinnamaldehyde and menthol

    PubMed Central

    Zanotto, Karen L.; Iodi Carstens, M.; Carstens, E.

    2008-01-01

    Most cold-sensitive subnucleus caudalis (Vc) neurons are also excited by the TRPM8 agonist menthol and the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde (CA). We investigated how interactions among menthol, CA and noxious cooling and heating of the tongue affected responses of superficial Vc units recorded in thiopental-anesthetized rats. Units responded to 1% CA which enhanced cold- and heat-evoked responses 5 min later. They responded more strongly to 10% CA which initially depressed cold responses, followed by enhancement at 5 min without affecting responses to heat. Following 10% CA, the mean response to 1% menthol was significantly lower than when menthol was tested first. After menthol, the subsequent response to CA was significantly weaker compared to the mean CA-evoked response when it was tested first. These results demonstrate mutual cross-desensitization between CA and menthol. The response to CA was enhanced following prior application of 10% ethanol (menthol vehicle). Prior application of menthol did not prevent the biphasic effect of 10% CA on cold-evoked responses, nor did prior application of CA prevent menthol enhancement of cold-evoked responses. Responses to noxious heat were unaffected by 10% CA and menthol regardless of the order of chemical presentation. These data indicate that superficial Vc neurons receive convergent input from primary afferents expressing TRPM8 and TRPA1. The mutual cross-desensitization between CA and menthol, and differential modulation of cold- vs. heat-evoked responses, suggests a direct inhibition of TRPM8 and TRPA1 expressed in peripheral nerve endings by CA and menthol, respectively, rather than a central site of interaction. PMID:18060696

  18. What Response Properties Do Individual Neurons Need to Underlie Position and Clutter “Invariant” Object Recognition?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nuo; Cox, David D.; Zoccolan, Davide; DiCarlo, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Primates can easily identify visual objects over large changes in retinal position—a property commonly referred to as position “invariance.” This ability is widely assumed to depend on neurons in inferior temporal cortex (IT) that can respond selectively to isolated visual objects over similarly large ranges of retinal position. However, in the real world, objects rarely appear in isolation, and the interplay between position invariance and the representation of multiple objects (i.e., clutter) remains unresolved. At the heart of this issue is the intuition that the representations of nearby objects can interfere with one another and that the large receptive fields needed for position invariance can exacerbate this problem by increasing the range over which interference acts. Indeed, most IT neurons' responses are strongly affected by the presence of clutter. While external mechanisms (such as attention) are often invoked as a way out of the problem, we show (using recorded neuronal data and simulations) that the intrinsic properties of IT population responses, by themselves, can support object recognition in the face of limited clutter. Furthermore, we carried out extensive simulations of hypothetical neuronal populations to identify the essential individual-neuron ingredients of a good population representation. These simulations show that the crucial neuronal property to support recognition in clutter is not preservation of response magnitude, but preservation of each neuron's rank-order object preference under identity-preserving image transformations (e.g., clutter). Because IT neuronal responses often exhibit that response property, while neurons in earlier visual areas (e.g., V1) do not, we suggest that preserving the rank-order object preference regardless of clutter, rather than the response magnitude, more precisely describes the goal of individual neurons at the top of the ventral visual stream. PMID:19439676

  19. Charge-Tunable Silk-Tropoelastin Protein Alloys That Control Neuron Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Tang-Schomer, Min D.; Huang, Wenwen; Xia, Xiao-Xia; Weiss, Anthony S.

    2014-01-01

    Tunable protein composites are important for constructing extracellular matrix mimics of human tissues with control of biochemical, structural, and mechanical properties. Molecular interaction mechanisms between silk fibroin protein and recombinant human tropoelastin, based on charge, are utilized to generate a new group of multifunctional protein alloys (mixtures of silk and tropoelastin) with different net charges. These new biomaterials are then utilized as a biomaterial platform to control neuron cell response. With a +38 net charge in water, tropoelastin molecules provide extraordinary elasticity and selective interactions with cell surface integrins. In contrast, negatively charged silk fibroin protein (net charge −36) provides remarkable toughness and stiffness with morphologic stability in material formats via autoclaving-induced beta-sheet crystal physical crosslinks. The combination of these properties in alloy format extends the versatility of both structural proteins, providing a new biomaterial platform. The alloys with weak positive charges (silk/tropoelastin mass ratio 75/25, net charge around +16) significantly improved the formation of neuronal networks and maintained cell viability of rat cortical neurons after 10 days in vitro. The data point to these protein alloys as an alternative to commonly used poly-L-lysine (PLL) coatings or other charged synthetic polymers, particularly with regard to the versatility of material formats (e.g., gels, sponges, films, fibers). The results also provide a practical example of physically designed protein materials with control of net charge to direct biological outcomes, in this case for neuronal tissue engineering. PMID:25093018

  20. Yokukansan Inhibits Neuronal Death during ER Stress by Regulating the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shingo; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Kakehi, Kazuaki; Nishida, Shinji; Katayama, Taiichi; Tohyama, Masaya

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, several studies have reported Yokukansan (Tsumura TJ-54), a traditional Japanese medicine, as a potential new drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD, particularly in neuronal death. Therefore, we examined the effect of Yokukansan on ER stress-induced neurotoxicity and on familial AD-linked presenilin-1 mutation-associated cell death. Methods We employed the WST-1 assay and monitored morphological changes to evaluate cell viability following Yokukansan treatment or treatment with its components. Western blotting and PCR were used to observe the expression levels of GRP78/BiP, caspase-4 and C/EBP homologous protein. Results Yokukansan inhibited neuronal death during ER stress, with Cnidii Rhizoma (Senkyu), a component of Yokukansan, being particularly effective. We also showed that Yokukansan and Senkyu affect the unfolded protein response following ER stress and that these drugs inhibit the activation of caspase-4, resulting in the inhibition of ER stress-induced neuronal death. Furthermore, we found that the protective effect of Yokukansan and Senkyu against ER stress could be attributed to the ferulic acid content of these two drugs. Conclusions Our results indicate that Yokukansan, Senkyu and ferulic acid are protective against ER stress-induced neuronal cell death and may provide a possible new treatment for AD. PMID:20967273

  1. The neuronal response at extended timescales: a linearized spiking input–output relation

    PubMed Central

    Soudry, Daniel; Meir, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Many biological systems are modulated by unknown slow processes. This can severely hinder analysis – especially in excitable neurons, which are highly non-linear and stochastic systems. We show the analysis simplifies considerably if the input matches the sparse “spiky” nature of the output. In this case, a linearized spiking Input–Output (I/O) relation can be derived semi-analytically, relating input spike trains to output spikes based on known biophysical properties. Using this I/O relation we obtain closed-form expressions for all second order statistics (input – internal state – output correlations and spectra), construct optimal linear estimators for the neuronal response and internal state and perform parameter identification. These results are guaranteed to hold, for a general stochastic biophysical neuron model, with only a few assumptions (mainly, timescale separation). We numerically test the resulting expressions for various models, and show that they hold well, even in cases where our assumptions fail to hold. In a companion paper we demonstrate how this approach enables us to fit a biophysical neuron model so it reproduces experimentally observed temporal firing statistics on days-long experiments. PMID:24765073

  2. Leptin-inhibited PBN neurons enhance responses to hypoglycemia in negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    Flak, Jonathan N; Patterson, Christa M; Garfield, Alastair S; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Goforth, Paulette B; Sutton, Amy K; Malec, Paige A; Wong, Jenny-Marie T; Germani, Mark; Jones, Justin C; Rajala, Michael; Satin, Leslie; Rhodes, Christopher J; Olson, David P; Kennedy, Robert T; Heisler, Lora K; Myers, Martin G

    2014-12-01

    Hypoglycemia initiates the counter-regulatory response (CRR), in which the sympathetic nervous system, glucagon and glucocorticoids restore glucose to appropriate concentrations. During starvation, low leptin levels restrain energy utilization, enhancing long-term survival. To ensure short-term survival during hypoglycemia in fasted animals, the CRR must overcome this energy-sparing program and nutrient depletion. Here we identify in mice a previously unrecognized role for leptin and a population of leptin-regulated neurons that modulate the CRR to meet these challenges. Hypoglycemia activates neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) that coexpress leptin receptor (LepRb) and cholecystokinin (CCK) (PBN LepRb(CCK) neurons), which project to the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. Leptin inhibits these cells, and Cck(cre)-mediated ablation of LepRb enhances the CRR. Inhibition of PBN LepRb cells blunts the CRR, whereas their activation mimics the CRR in a CCK-dependent manner. PBN LepRb(CCK) neurons are a crucial component of the CRR system and may be a therapeutic target in hypoglycemia.

  3. Responses of Ventral Posterior Thalamus Neurons to Three-Dimensional Vestibular and Optic Flow Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Multisensory neurons tuned to both vestibular and visual motion (optic flow) signals are found in several cortical areas in the dorsal visual stream. Here we examine whether such convergence occurs subcortically in the macaque thalamus. We searched the ventral posterior nuclei, including the anterior pulvinar, as well as the ventro-lateral and ventral posterior lateral nuclei, areas that receive vestibular signals from brain stem and deep cerebellar nuclei. Approximately a quarter of cells responded to three-dimensional (3D) translational and/or rotational motion. More than half of the responsive cells were convergent, thus responded during both rotation and translation. The preferred axes of translation/rotation were distributed throughout 3D space. The majority of the neurons were excited, but some were inhibited, during rotation/translation in darkness. Only a couple of neurons were multisensory being tuned to both vestibular and optic flow stimuli. We conclude that multisensory vestibular/optic flow neurons, which are commonly found in cortical visual and visuomotor areas, are rare in the ventral posterior thalamus. PMID:19955294

  4. Responses of blowfly motion-sensitive neurons to reconstructed optic flow along outdoor flight paths.

    PubMed

    Boeddeker, N; Lindemann, J P; Egelhaaf, M; Zeil, J

    2005-12-01

    The retinal image flow a blowfly experiences in its daily life on the wing is determined by both the structure of the environment and the animal's own movements. To understand the design of visual processing mechanisms, there is thus a need to analyse the performance of neurons under natural operating conditions. To this end, we recorded flight paths of flies outdoors and reconstructed what they had seen, by moving a panoramic camera along exactly the same paths. The reconstructed image sequences were later replayed on a fast, panoramic flight simulator to identified, motion sensitive neurons of the so-called horizontal system (HS) in the lobula plate of the blowfly, which are assumed to extract self-motion parameters from optic flow. We show that under real life conditions HS-cells not only encode information about self-rotation, but are also sensitive to translational optic flow and, thus, indirectly signal information about the depth structure of the environment. These properties do not require an elaboration of the known model of these neurons, because the natural optic flow sequences generate--at least qualitatively--the same depth-related response properties when used as input to a computational HS-cell model and to real neurons.

  5. Differential expression of connexins in trigeminal ganglion neurons and satellite glial cells in response to chronic or acute joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Filip G; Durham, Paul L

    2008-11-01

    Trigeminal nerve activation in response to inflammatory stimuli has been shown to increase neuron-glia communication via gap junctions in trigeminal ganglion. The goal of this study was to identify changes in the expression of gap junction proteins, connexins (Cxs), in trigeminal ganglia in response to acute or chronic joint inflammation. Although mRNA for Cxs 26, 36, 40 and 43 was detected under basal conditions, protein expression of only Cxs 26, 36 and 40 increased following capsaicin or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). While Cx26 plaque formation between neurons and satellite glia was transiently increased following capsaicin injections, Cx26 plaque formation between neurons and satellite glia was sustained in response to CFA. Interestingly, levels of Cx36 and Cx40 were only elevated in neurons following capsaicin or CFA injections, but the temporal response was similar to that observed for Cx26. In contrast, Cx43 expression was not increased in neurons or satellite glial cells in response to CFA or capsaicin. Thus, trigeminal ganglion neurons and satellite glia can differentially regulate Cx expression in response to the type and duration of inflammatory stimuli, which likely facilitates increased neuron-glia communication during acute and chronic inflammation and pain in the TMJ.

  6. Responses of primate caudal parabrachial nucleus and Kolliker-fuse nucleus neurons to whole body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaban, Carey D.; McGee, David M.; Zhou, Jianxun; Scudder, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial (PBN) and Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nuclei receive vestibular nuclear and visceral afferent information and are connected reciprocally with the spinal cord, hypothalamus, amygdala, and limbic cortex. Hence, they may be important sites of vestibulo-visceral integration, particularly for the development of affective responses to gravitoinertial challenges. Extracellular recordings were made from caudal PBN cells in three alert, adult female Macaca nemestrina through an implanted chamber. Sinusoidal and position trapezoid angular whole body rotation was delivered in yaw, roll, pitch, and vertical semicircular canal planes. Sites were confirmed histologically. Units that responded during rotation were located in lateral and medial PBN and KF caudal to the trochlear nerve at sites that were confirmed anatomically to receive superior vestibular nucleus afferents. Responses to whole-body angular rotation were modeled as a sum of three signals: angular velocity, a leaky integration of angular velocity, and vertical position. All neurons displayed angular velocity and integrated angular velocity sensitivity, but only 60% of the neurons were position-sensitive. These responses to vertical rotation could display symmetric, asymmetric, or fully rectified cosinusoidal spatial tuning about a best orientation in different cells. The spatial properties of velocity and integrated velocity and position responses were independent for all position-sensitive neurons; the angular velocity and integrated angular velocity signals showed independent spatial tuning in the position-insensitive neurons. Individual units showed one of three different orientations of their excitatory axis of velocity rotation sensitivity: vertical-plane-only responses, positive elevation responses (vertical plane plus ipsilateral yaw), and negative elevation axis responses (vertical plane plus negative yaw). The interactions between the velocity and integrated velocity components

  7. Responses of primate caudal parabrachial nucleus and Kolliker-fuse nucleus neurons to whole body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaban, Carey D.; McGee, David M.; Zhou, Jianxun; Scudder, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial (PBN) and Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nuclei receive vestibular nuclear and visceral afferent information and are connected reciprocally with the spinal cord, hypothalamus, amygdala, and limbic cortex. Hence, they may be important sites of vestibulo-visceral integration, particularly for the development of affective responses to gravitoinertial challenges. Extracellular recordings were made from caudal PBN cells in three alert, adult female Macaca nemestrina through an implanted chamber. Sinusoidal and position trapezoid angular whole body rotation was delivered in yaw, roll, pitch, and vertical semicircular canal planes. Sites were confirmed histologically. Units that responded during rotation were located in lateral and medial PBN and KF caudal to the trochlear nerve at sites that were confirmed anatomically to receive superior vestibular nucleus afferents. Responses to whole-body angular rotation were modeled as a sum of three signals: angular velocity, a leaky integration of angular velocity, and vertical position. All neurons displayed angular velocity and integrated angular velocity sensitivity, but only 60% of the neurons were position-sensitive. These responses to vertical rotation could display symmetric, asymmetric, or fully rectified cosinusoidal spatial tuning about a best orientation in different cells. The spatial properties of velocity and integrated velocity and position responses were independent for all position-sensitive neurons; the angular velocity and integrated angular velocity signals showed independent spatial tuning in the position-insensitive neurons. Individual units showed one of three different orientations of their excitatory axis of velocity rotation sensitivity: vertical-plane-only responses, positive elevation responses (vertical plane plus ipsilateral yaw), and negative elevation axis responses (vertical plane plus negative yaw). The interactions between the velocity and integrated velocity components

  8. The Effect of Attention on Neuronal Responses to High and Low Contrast Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joonyeol

    2010-01-01

    It remains unclear how attention affects the tuning of individual neurons in visual cerebral cortex. Some observations suggest that attention preferentially enhances responses to low contrast stimuli, whereas others suggest that attention proportionally affects responses to all stimuli. Resolving how attention affects responses to different stimuli is essential for understanding the mechanism by which it acts. To explore the effects of attention on stimuli of different contrasts, we recorded from individual neurons in the middle temporal visual area (MT) of rhesus monkeys while shifting their attention between preferred and nonpreferred stimuli within their receptive fields. This configuration results in robust attentional modulation that makes it possible to readily distinguish whether attention acts preferentially on low contrast stimuli. We found no evidence for greater enhancement of low contrast stimuli. Instead, the strong attentional modulations were well explained by a model in which attention proportionally enhances responses to stimuli of all contrasts. These data, together with observations on the effects of attention on responses to other stimulus dimensions, suggest that the primary effect of attention in visual cortex may be to simply increase the strength of responses to all stimuli by the same proportion. PMID:20538780

  9. Correlation of 125I-LSD autoradiographic labeling with serotonin voltage clamp responses in Aplysia neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.; Kadan, M.J.; Hartig, P.R.; Carpenter, D.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Autoradiographic receptor binding studies using 125I-LSD (2-(125I)lysergic acid diethyamide) revealed intense labelling on the soma of a symmetrically located pair of cells in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. This binding was blocked by micromolar concentrations of serotonin and lower concentrations of the serotonergic antagonists, cyproheptadine and mianserin. Electrophysiological investigation of responses to serotonin of neurons in the left upper quadrant, where one of the labeled neurons is located, revealed a range of serotonin responses. Cells L3 and L6 have a K+ conductance increase in response to serotonin that is not blocked by cyproheptadine or mianserin. Cells L2 and L4 have a biphasic response to serotonin: a Na+ conductance increase, which can be blocked by cyproheptadine and mianserin, followed by a voltage dependent Ca2+ conductance which is blocked by Co2+ but not the serotonergic antagonists. Cell L1, and its symmetrical pair, R1, have in addition to the Na+ and Ca2+ responses observed in L2 and L4, a Cl- conductance increase blocked by LSD, cyproheptadine and mianserin. LSD had little effect on the other responses. The authors conclude that the symmetrically located cells L1 and R1 have a Cl- channel linked to a cyproheptadine- and mianserin-sensitive serotonin receptor that is selectively labelled by 125I-LSD. This receptor has many properties in common with the mammalian serotonin 1C receptor.

  10. Neurons derived from patients with bipolar disorder divide into intrinsically different sub-populations of neurons, predicting the patients' responsiveness to lithium.

    PubMed

    Stern, S; Santos, R; Marchetto, M C; Mendes, A P D; Rouleau, G A; Biesmans, S; Wang, Q-W; Yao, J; Charnay, P; Bang, A G; Alda, M; Gage, F H

    2017-02-28

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a progressive psychiatric disorder with more than 3% prevalence worldwide. Affected individuals experience recurrent episodes of depression and mania, disrupting normal life and increasing the risk of suicide greatly. The complexity and genetic heterogeneity of psychiatric disorders have challenged the development of animal and cellular models. We recently reported that hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived fibroblasts of BD patients are electrophysiologically hyperexcitable. Here we used iPSCs derived from Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B-lymphocytes to verify that the hyperexcitability of DG-like neurons is reproduced in this different cohort of patients and cells. Lymphocytes are readily available for research with a large number of banked lines with associated patient clinical description. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of over 460 neurons to characterize neurons derived from control individuals and BD patients. Extensive functional analysis showed that intrinsic cell parameters are very different between the two groups of BD neurons, those derived from lithium (Li)-responsive (LR) patients and those derived from Li-non-responsive (NR) patients, which led us to partition our BD neurons into two sub-populations of cells and suggested two different subdisorders. Training a Naïve Bayes classifier with the electrophysiological features of patients whose responses to Li are known allows for accurate classification with more than 92% success rate for a new patient whose response to Li is unknown. Despite their very different functional profiles, both populations of neurons share a large, fast after-hyperpolarization (AHP). We therefore suggest that the large, fast AHP is a key feature of BD and a main contributor to the fast, sustained spiking abilities of BD neurons. Confirming our previous report with fibroblast-derived DG neurons, chronic Li treatment reduced

  11. Response properties of neurons in the core of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Hermann; Mazer, James A; von Campenhausen, Mark

    2002-04-01

    The central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) is particularly important for the processing of interaural time differences (ITDs). In the barn owl, neuronal best frequencies in a subnucleus of the ICC, the ICCcore, span the animal's entire hearing range (approximately equal to 200-10 000 Hz). This means that low-frequency ITD-sensitive ICCcore neurons in the owl can be directly compared to ITD-sensitive mammalian ICC neurons with similar best frequencies as well as to the high-frequency ITD-sensitive neurons usually studied in owls. This report represents a first attempt to systematically describe important physiological properties of ICCcore neurons in the barn owl, with particular attention to the low-frequency region (< 2 kHz). Responses were obtained from 133 neurons or small clusters of neurons; recording sites were confirmed by histological reconstruction of electrode tracks based on electrolytic lesions. Iso-intensity frequency response functions were typically approximately equal to 1 octave wide in the low-frequency range and approximately equal to 1/3 octave wide in the high-frequency range. Most neurons were ITD-tuned; both noise and pure tone stimuli yielded periodic ITD tuning curves with several equivalent response maxima. In most cases ITD tuning curves had a response peak within the barn owl's physiological ITD range. ITD tuning widths were inversely correlated with neuronal best frequency. None of the ICCcore neurons studied were sensitive to interaural level differences. Monaural inputs to ICCcore cells were typically binaurally balanced, i.e. they exhibited similar response thresholds, dynamic ranges, slopes and saturation levels, for both left and right ear monaural stimulation.

  12. Loss of UBE3A from TH-expressing neurons suppresses GABA co-release and enhances VTA-NAc optical self-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, Janet; Stamatakis, Alice M.; Kantak, Pranish A.; McElligott, Zoe A.; Judson, Matthew C.; Aita, Megumi; Rougie, Marie; Stuber, Garret D.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated reward-seeking behaviours are governed by dopaminergic ventral tegmental area projections to the nucleus accumbens. In addition to dopamine, these mesoaccumbal terminals co-release other neurotransmitters including glutamate and GABA, whose roles in regulating motivated behaviours are currently being investigated. Here we demonstrate that loss of the E3-ubiquitin ligase, UBE3A, from tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons impairs mesoaccumbal, non-canonical GABA co-release and enhances reward-seeking behaviour measured by optical self-stimulation. PMID:26869263

  13. Responses of non-eye movement central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal horizontal translation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nan; Wei, Min

    2014-01-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral deficits partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of the macaque vestibular system in the compensated state (>7 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Three groups of vestibular nucleus neurons were included: pre-UL control neurons, neurons ipsilateral to the lesion, and neurons contralateral to the lesion. The firing responses of neurons sensitive to linear acceleration in the horizontal plane were recorded during sinusoidal horizontal translation directed along six different orientations (30° apart) at 0.5 Hz and 0.2 g peak acceleration (196 cm/s2). This data defined the vector of best response for each neuron in the horizontal plane, along which sensitivity, symmetry, detection threshold, and variability of firing were determined. Additionally, the responses of the same cells to translation over a series of frequencies (0.25–5.0 Hz) either in the interaural or naso-occipital orientation were obtained to define the frequency response characteristics in each group. We found a decrease in sensitivity, increase in threshold, and alteration in orientation of best responses in the vestibular nuclei after UL. Additionally, the phase relationship of the best neural response to translational stimulation changed with UL. The symmetry of individual neuron responses in the excitatory and inhibitory directions was unchanged by UL. Bilateral central utricular neurons still demonstrated two-dimension tuning after UL, consistent with spatio-temporal convergence from a single vestibular end-organ. These neuronal data correlate with known behavioral deficits after unilateral vestibular compromise. PMID:24717349

  14. Sleep-deprivation regulates α-2 adrenergic responses of rat hypocretin/orexin neurons.

    PubMed

    Uschakov, Aaron; Grivel, Jeremy; Cvetkovic-Lopes, Vesna; Bayer, Laurence; Bernheim, Laurent; Jones, Barbara E; Mühlethaler, Michel; Serafin, Mauro

    2011-02-08

    We recently demonstrated, in rat brain slices, that the usual excitation by noradrenaline (NA) of hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx) neurons was changed to an inhibition following sleep deprivation (SD). Here we describe that in control condition (CC), i.e. following 2 hours of natural sleep in the morning, the α(2)-adrenergic receptor (α(2)-AR) agonist, clonidine, had no effect on hcrt/orx neurons, whereas following 2 hours of SD (SDC), it hyperpolarized the neurons by activating G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels. Since concentrations of clonidine up to a thousand times (100 µM) higher than those effective in SDC (100 nM), were completely ineffective in CC, a change in the availability of G-proteins is unlikely to explain the difference between the two conditions. To test whether the absence of effect of clonidine in CC could be due to a down-regulation of GIRK channels, we applied baclofen, a GABA(B) agonist known to also activate GIRK channels, and found that it hyperpolarized hcrt/orx neurons in that condition. Moreover, baclofen occluded the response to clonidine in SDC, indicating that absence of effect of clonidine in CC could not be attributed to down-regulation of GIRK channels. We finally tested whether α(2)-ARs were still available at the membrane in CC and found that clonidine could reduce calcium currents, indicating that α(2)-ARs associated with calcium channels remain available in that condition. Taken together, these results suggest that a pool of α(2)-ARs associated with GIRK channels is normally down-regulated (or desensitized) in hcrt/orx neurons to only become available for their inhibition following sleep deprivation.

  15. Intensity invariant dynamics and odor-specific latencies in olfactory receptor neuron response.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Carlotta; Carlson, John R; Emonet, Thierry

    2013-04-10

    Odors elicit spatiotemporal patterns of activity in the brain. Spatial patterns arise from the specificity of the interaction between odorants and odorant receptors expressed in different olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), but the origin of temporal patterns of activity and their role in odor coding remain unclear. We investigate how physiological aspects of ORN response and physical aspects of odor stimuli give rise to diverse responses in Drosophila ORNs. We show that odor stimuli have intrinsic dynamics that depend on odor type and strongly affect ORN response. Using linear-nonlinear modeling to remove the contribution of the stimulus dynamics from the ORN dynamics, we study the physiological properties of the response to different odorants and concentrations. For several odorants and receptor types, the ORN response dynamics normalized by the peak response are independent of stimulus intensity for a large portion of the dynamic range of the neuron. Adaptation to a background odor changes the gain and dynamic range of the response but does not affect normalized response dynamics. Stimulating ORNs with various odorants reveals significant odor-dependent delays in the ORN response functions. However, these differences can be dominated by differences in stimulus dynamics. In one case the response of one ORN to two odorants is predicted solely from measurements of the odor signals. Within a large portion of their dynamic range, ORNs can capture information about stimulus dynamics independently from intensity while introducing odor-dependent delays. How insects might use odor-specific stimulus dynamics and ORN dynamics in discrimination and navigation tasks remains an open question.

  16. La3+ Alters the Response Properties of Neurons in the Mouse Primary Somatosensory Cortex to Low-Temperature Noxious Stimulation of the Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yanjiao

    2015-01-01

    Although dental pain is a serious health issue with high incidence among the human population, its cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are assumed to be involved in the generation of dental pain. However, most of the studies were conducted with molecular biological or histological methods. In vivo functional studies on the role of TRP channels in the mechanisms of dental pain are lacking. This study uses in vivo cellular electrophysiological and neuropharmacological method to directly disclose the effect of LaCl3, a broad spectrum TRP channel blocker, on the response properties of neurons in the mouse primary somatosensory cortex to low-temperature noxious stimulation of the dental pulp. It was found that LaCl3 suppresses the high-firing-rate responses of all nociceptive neurons to noxious low-temperature stimulation and also inhibits the spontaneous activities in some nonnociceptive neurons. The effect of LaCl3 is reversible. Furthermore, this effect is persistent and stable unless LaCl3 is washed out. Washout of LaCl3 quickly revitalized the responsiveness of neurons to low-temperature noxious stimulation. This study adds direct evidence for the hypothesis that TRP channels are involved in the generation of dental pain and sensation. Blockade of TRP channels may provide a novel therapeutic treatment for dental pain. PMID:26604777

  17. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE2 induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE2 effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE2 itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE2-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type 4 (EP4) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type 1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE2 effects. PGE2 induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE2 potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors by selectively targeting EP4 receptor/PKA pathway without interrupt prostaglandin synthesis.

  18. Multiphasic Temporal Dynamics in Responses of Midbrain Dopamine Neurons to Appetitive and Aversive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Christopher D.; Song, Minryung R.; Yun, Sora R.

    2013-01-01

    The transient response of dopamine neurons has been described as reward prediction error (RPE), with activation or suppression by events that are better or worse than expected, respectively. However, at least a minority of neurons are activated by aversive or high-intensity stimuli, casting doubt on the generality of RPE in describing the dopamine signal. To overcome limitations of previous studies, we studied neuronal responses to a wider variety of high-intensity and aversive stimuli, and we quantified and controlled aversiveness through a choice task in which macaques sacrificed juice to avoid aversive stimuli. Whereas most previous work has portrayed the RPE as a single impulse or “phase,” here we demonstrate its multiphasic temporal dynamics. Aversive or high-intensity stimuli evoked a triphasic sequence of activation-suppression-activation extending over a period of 40–700 ms. The initial activation at short latencies (40–120 ms) reflected sensory intensity.The influence of motivational value became dominant between 150 and 250 ms, with activation in the case of appetitive stimuli, and suppression in the case of aversive and neutral stimuli. The previously unreported late activation appeared to be a modest “rebound” after strong suppression. Similarly, strong activation by reward was often followed by suppression. We suggest that these “rebounds” may result from overcompensation by homeostatic mechanisms in some cells. Our results are consistent with a realistic RPE, which evolves over time through a dynamic balance of excitation and inhibition PMID:23486944

  19. Stereotyped responses of Drosophila peptidergic neuronal ensemble depend on downstream neuromodulators

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Wilson; Diegelmann, Sören; Wegener, Christian; Ewer, John

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play a key role in the regulation of behaviors and physiological responses including alertness, social recognition, and hunger, yet, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. Here, we focus on the endocrine control ecdysis behavior, which is used by arthropods to shed their cuticle at the end of every molt. Ecdysis is triggered by ETH (Ecdysis triggering hormone), and we show that the response of peptidergic neurons that produce CCAP (crustacean cardioactive peptide), which are key targets of ETH and control the onset of ecdysis behavior, depends fundamentally on the actions of neuropeptides produced by other direct targets of ETH and released in a broad paracrine manner within the CNS; by autocrine influences from the CCAP neurons themselves; and by inhibitory actions mediated by GABA. Our findings provide insights into how this critical insect behavior is controlled and general principles for understanding how neuropeptides organize neuronal activity and behaviors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19686.001 PMID:27976997

  20. Spatio-temporal skin strain distributions evoke low variability spike responses in cuneate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Vincent; Terekhov, Alexander V.; Wong, Sheng-Chao; Geborek, Pontus; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Jörntell, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A common method to explore the somatosensory function of the brain is to relate skin stimuli to neurophysiological recordings. However, interaction with the skin involves complex mechanical effects. Variability in mechanically induced spike responses is likely to be due in part to mechanical variability of the transformation of stimuli into spiking patterns in the primary sensors located in the skin. This source of variability greatly hampers detailed investigations of the response of the brain to different types of mechanical stimuli. A novel stimulation technique designed to minimize the uncertainty in the strain distributions induced in the skin was applied to evoke responses in single neurons in the cat. We show that exposure to specific spatio-temporal stimuli induced highly reproducible spike responses in the cells of the cuneate nucleus, which represents the first stage of integration of peripheral inputs to the brain. Using precisely controlled spatio-temporal stimuli, we also show that cuneate neurons, as a whole, were selectively sensitive to the spatial and to the temporal aspects of the stimuli. We conclude that the present skin stimulation technique based on localized differential tractions greatly reduces response variability that is exogenous to the information processing of the brain and hence paves the way for substantially more detailed investigations of the brain's somatosensory system. PMID:24451390

  1. Spike-train variability of auditory neurons in vivo: dynamic responses follow predictions from constant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Schaette, Roland; Gollisch, Tim; Herz, Andreas V M

    2005-06-01

    Reliable accounts of the variability observed in neural spike trains are a prerequisite for the proper interpretation of neural dynamics and coding principles. Models that accurately describe neural variability over a wide range of stimulation and response patterns are therefore highly desirable, especially if they can explain this variability in terms of basic neural observables and parameters such as firing rate and refractory period. In this work, we analyze the response variability recorded in vivo from locust auditory receptor neurons under acoustic stimulation. In agreement with results from other systems, our data suggest that neural refractoriness has a strong influence on spike-train variability. We therefore explore a stochastic model of spike generation that includes refractoriness through a recovery function. Because our experimental data are consistent with a renewal process, the recovery function can be derived from a single interspike-interval histogram obtained under constant stimulation. The resulting description yields quantitatively accurate predictions of the response variability over the whole range of firing rates for constant-intensity as well as amplitude-modulated sound stimuli. Model parameters obtained from constant stimulation can be used to predict the variability in response to dynamic stimuli. These results demonstrate that key ingredients of the stochastic response dynamics of a sensory neuron are faithfully captured by a simple stochastic model framework.

  2. Spatial Attention and Temporal Expectation Under Timed Uncertainty Predictably Modulate Neuronal Responses in Monkey V1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jitendra; Sugihara, Hiroki; Katz, Yarden; Schummers, James; Tenenbaum, Joshua; Sur, Mriganka

    2015-01-01

    The brain uses attention and expectation as flexible devices for optimizing behavioral responses associated with expected but unpredictably timed events. The neural bases of attention and expectation are thought to engage higher cognitive loci; however, their influence at the level of primary visual cortex (V1) remains unknown. Here, we asked whether single-neuron responses in monkey V1 were influenced by an attention task of unpredictable duration. Monkeys covertly attended to a spot that remained unchanged for a fixed period and then abruptly disappeared at variable times, prompting a lever release for reward. We show that monkeys responded progressively faster and performed better as the trial duration increased. Neural responses also followed monkey's task engagement—there was an early, but short duration, response facilitation, followed by a late but sustained increase during the time monkeys expected the attention spot to disappear. This late attentional modulation was significantly and negatively correlated with the reaction time and was well explained by a modified hazard function. Such bimodal, time-dependent changes were, however, absent in a task that did not require explicit attentional engagement. Thus, V1 neurons carry reliable signals of attention and temporal expectation that correlate with predictable influences on monkeys' behavioral responses. PMID:24836689

  3. Distinct Spatiotemporal Response Properties of Excitatory Versus Inhibitory Neurons in the Mouse Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Maor, Ido; Shalev, Amos; Mizrahi, Adi

    2016-01-01

    In the auditory system, early neural stations such as brain stem are characterized by strict tonotopy, which is used to deconstruct sounds to their basic frequencies. But higher along the auditory hierarchy, as early as primary auditory cortex (A1), tonotopy starts breaking down at local circuits. Here, we studied the response properties of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the auditory cortex of anesthetized mice. We used in vivo two photon-targeted cell-attached recordings from identified parvalbumin-positive neurons (PVNs) and their excitatory pyramidal neighbors (PyrNs). We show that PyrNs are locally heterogeneous as characterized by diverse best frequencies, pairwise signal correlations, and response timing. In marked contrast, neighboring PVNs exhibited homogenous response properties in pairwise signal correlations and temporal responses. The distinct physiological microarchitecture of different cell types is maintained qualitatively in response to natural sounds. Excitatory heterogeneity and inhibitory homogeneity within the same circuit suggest different roles for each population in coding natural stimuli. PMID:27600839

  4. Pheromone responsiveness threshold depends on temporal integration by antennal lobe projection neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, Masashi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Namiki, Shigehiro; Minegishi, Ryo; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Tamura, Toshiki; Haupt, Stephan Shuichi; Nakatani, Kei; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The olfactory system of male moths has an extreme sensitivity with the capability to detect and recognize conspecific pheromones dispersed and greatly diluted in the air. Just 170 molecules of the silkmoth (Bombyx mori) sex pheromone bombykol are sufficient to induce sexual behavior in the male. However, it is still unclear how the sensitivity of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is relayed through the brain to generate high behavioral responsiveness. Here, we show that ORN activity that is subthreshold in terms of behavior can be amplified to suprathreshold levels by temporal integration in antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) if occurring within a specific time window. To control ORN inputs with high temporal resolution, channelrhodopsin-2 was genetically introduced into bombykol-responsive ORNs. Temporal integration in PNs was only observed for weak inputs, but not for strong inputs. Pharmacological dissection revealed that GABAergic mechanisms inhibit temporal integration of strong inputs, showing that GABA signaling regulates PN responses in a stimulus-dependent fashion. Our results show that boosting of the PNs’ responses by temporal integration of olfactory information occurs specifically near the behavioral threshold, effectively defining the lower bound for behavioral responsiveness. PMID:24006366

  5. [The effect of electroacupuncture on the neuronal responses of the oral trigeminal nucleus in the cat during nociceptive and non-nociceptive stimulation].

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, V G; Reshetniak, V K

    1989-12-01

    Effects of electroacupuncture (EAP) on the responses of different functional types of neurons of the oral trigeminal nucleus (OTN) by nociceptive and non-nociceptive stimulation were studied in acute experiments on adult cats. It was demonstrated that the main part of neurons of the OTN is a wide dynamic range of neurons. Characteristic feature of the OTN is neurons with low-threshold pulp afferent input. EAP inhibit nociceptive responses of neurons (preferentially nonspecific neurons), while responses to non-nociceptive stimulation are not changed at all. The results are discussed from the point of view that OTN takes part in nociceptive and non-nociceptive reactions.

  6. Responses of olfactory bulb neurones to odour stimulation of small nasal areas in the salamander

    PubMed Central

    Kauer, John S.; Moulton, David G.

    1974-01-01

    1. Previous experiments have suggested that one way odours may be discriminated is by different spatial patterns of response at both the olfactory bulb and receptor level. The present experiments were designed to test to what extent the position of an odour on the receptor mucosa can influence the activity of olfactory bulb neurones. 2. To deliver odours to small areas on the nasal receptor sheet a new method for local application of odour was developed. The flow rate, concentration, and time course of the odour were controlled using the olfactometer described in the preceding paper. 3. In thirty olfactory bulb units in the salamander it was found that if the response of a unit to odour delivered to the entire exposed receptor epithelium were suppression (type S), then the unit tended to be suppressed when odour was delivered to a number of localized epithelial regions. If the response were excitation (type E) to stimulation of the entire epithelium, then stimulation to only one or two localized regions would elicit the maximum response. 4. Different epithelial regions had the ability to cause excitation in the same bulbar unit depending on the odour being used. Two odours, camphor and amyl acetate, elicited maximum excitation when they were presented to different mucosal areas. The areas at which presentation of these odours gave excitation were surprisingly consistent from unit to unit and animal to animal. 5. The data presented here suggest the presence of restricted excitatory receptive fields for some olfactory bulb neurones for a particular odour. 6. The presence of spatial response patterns using odour delivery to small nasal receptor regions and thus the presence of receptive fields is discussed with reference to bulbar neuronal circuitry. ImagesText-fig. 2Plate 1A, B PMID:4548721

  7. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) effect was tested on visceral afferent neurons. • PGE{sub 2} did not evoke response but potentiated serotonin (5-HT) currents up to 167%. • PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation was blocked by E-prostanoid type 4 receptors antagonist. • PGE{sub 2} effect on 5-HT response was also blocked by protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720. • Thus, PGE{sub 2} modulate visceral afferent neurons via synergistic signaling with 5-HT. - Abstract: Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE{sub 2} induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE{sub 2} effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE{sub 2} itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type4 (EP{sub 4}) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE{sub 2} effects. PGE{sub 2} induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE{sub 2} potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin

  8. Correlation of hippocampal theta rhythm with changes in cutaneous temperature. [evoked neuron response in thermoregulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Saleh, M. A.; Karem, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A possible role for the hippocampus in alerting an animal to changes in cutaneous temperature was examined. Following local warming or cooling of the ears of unanesthetized, loosely restrained rabbits, theta waves (4-7 Hz EEG waves) were recorded from electrodes straddling the hippocampus. The onset of the hippocampal theta rhythm was correlated with changes in cutaneous temperature, an observation consistent with studies indicating that the theta rhythm is a nonspecific response evoked by stimulation of several sensory modalities. Additional data from cats and rabbits were correlated with specific neurons within the hippocampus, namely pyramidal cells. Post stimulus time histograms obtained by excitation of the dorsal fornix were interpreted in terms of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to pyramidal cells. Thus, the theta rhythm, which appears to be evoked by changes in cutaneous temperature, can be related to a specific type of hippocampal neuron which is in turn connected with other areas of the brain involved in temperature regulation.

  9. Contribution of the T1r3 taste receptor to the response properties of central gustatory neurons.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Christian H; Margolskee, Robert F

    2009-05-01

    T1r3 is a critical subunit of T1r sweet taste receptors. Here we studied how the absence of T1r3 impacts responses to sweet stimuli by taste neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the mouse. The consequences bear on the multiplicity of sweet taste receptors and how T1r3 influences the distribution of central gustatory neurons. Taste responses to glycine, sucrose, NaCl, HCl, and quinine were electrophysiologically recorded from single NTS neurons in anesthetized T1r3 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. Other stimuli included l-proline, d-fructose, d-glucose, d-sorbitol, Na-saccharin, acesulfame-K, monosodium glutamate, NaNO(3), Na-acetate, citric acid, KCl, denatonium, and papaverine. Forty-one WT and 41 KO neurons were recorded. Relative to WT, KO responses to all sweet stimuli were significantly lower, although the degree of attenuation differed among stimuli, with near zero responses to sugars but salient residual activity to artificial sweeteners and glycine. Residual KO across-neuron responses to sweet stimuli were variably similar to nonsweet responses, as indexed by multivariate and correlation analyses. In some cases, this suggested that residual KO activity to "sweet" stimuli could be mediated by nonsweet taste receptors, implicating T1r3 receptors as primary contributors to NTS sweet processing. The influence of T1r3 on the distribution of NTS neurons was evaluated by comparing neuron types that emerged between WT and KO cells. Neurons tuned toward sweet stimuli composed 34% of the WT sample but did not appear among KO cells. Input from T1r3-containing receptors critically guides the normal development of NTS neurons oriented toward sweet tastants.

  10. Interaural attenuation using etymotic ER-3A insert earphones in auditory brain stem response testing.

    PubMed

    Van Campen, L E; Sammeth, C A; Peek, B F

    1990-02-01

    Click interaural attenuation (IA) was measured behaviorally and with the auditory brain stem response (ABR) in two unilaterally deaf adults with Etymotic ER-3A insert earphones, and TDH-39P and TDH-49P supraaural earphones. Stimulus crossover for each set of earphones was also determined with pure-tone audiometry. Pure-tone results agreed with previous research, showing that the ER-3A provided substantially greater IA than the supraaural earphones, particularly for low frequencies. For click stimuli, behavioral and ABR results revealed only modest, if any, improvement in IA with the ER-3A relative to the supraaural earphones. The results of this study suggest that while the ER-3A earphones provide a clear IA advantage for behavioral pure-tone audiometry, they do not eliminate the need for contralateral masking of click stimuli in ABR testing.

  11. Relationship of membrane properties, spike burst responses, laminar location, and functional class of dorsal horn neurons recorded in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Patrick M; Chen, Jinghong

    2016-09-01

    The input-output and discharge properties of neurons are shaped by both passive and active electrophysiological membrane properties. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings in lamina I-III neurons in an isolated preparation of the whole spinal cord of juvenile rats with attached dorsal roots and dorsal root ganglia were used to further define which of these properties provides the most impactful classification strategy. A total of 95 neurons were recorded in segment L5 and were classified based on the responses to L4 dorsal root stimulation. The results showed that high-threshold and silent neurons had higher membrane resistance and more negative resting membrane potential than low-threshold or wide-dynamic-range neurons. Rheobase in low-threshold and wide-dynamic-range neurons was significantly lower than that of high-threshold or silent neurons. Four types of firing patterns were identified in response to depolarizing current injections. Low-threshold cells most frequently showed a phasic firing pattern characterized by a short initial burst of action potentials, single spiking or irregular firing bursts at the onset of a depolarizing pulse. High-threshold and wide-dynamic-range neurons were characterized by tonic firing with trains of spikes occurring at regular intervals throughout the current pulse. The majority of silent neurons displayed a delayed onset of firing in response to current injection. These results indicate that the passive membrane properties of spinal neurons are tuned to optimize the responses to particular subsets of afferent stimuli. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Responses of spinothalamic tract neurons to mechanical and thermal stimuli in an experimental model of peripheral neuropathy in primates.

    PubMed

    Palecek, J; Dougherty, P M; Kim, S H; Palecková, V; Lekan, H; Chung, J M; Carlton, S M; Willis, W D

    1992-12-01

    1. An experimental peripheral neuropathy (EPN) was induced in three monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) by ligation of spinal nerve L7. Behavioral responses to innocuous mechanical stimuli were tested before and after the surgery. Two weeks after the nerve ligation, the activity of spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons was recorded on both sides of the spinal cord with the animal under general anesthesia. Responses of the STT neurons to the following stimuli applied to the skin were recorded: graded mechanical stimuli (brush, press, pinch and squeeze), von Frey filaments of different bending forces (0.077-19.05 g), 5-s heat stimuli ranging from 39 to 53 degrees C, and 15 s cold stimuli (32-8 degrees C). 2. Innocuous mechanical stimulation of the foot did not evoke hindlimb withdrawal in the animals before surgery. Within 24-48 h after nerve ligation, the animals showed hindlimb withdrawal to the same innocuous stimuli. This behavior was more pronounced on the side of the ligation than on the sham-operated side and more frequent during the second week after the surgery. 3. Responses of 51 STT neurons recorded on the side of the ligation (EPN all group) were compared with responses of 33 STT cells recorded on the sham-operated side (control group) and with records from STT neurons in unoperated animals obtained earlier (reference group). Neurons from the EPN all group were divided into two sets according to their rostrocaudal location (EPN R, rostral to L6/7 border, n = 40; EPN C, caudal to L6/7 border, n = 11). 4. Neurons from the EPN all and EPN R groups had significantly higher background frequencies than those from the control and reference groups. Innocuous brush stimuli evoked mean discharge frequencies of approximately 35 Hz in EPN R neurons and only approximately 15 Hz in both control and reference groups. Increased responsiveness of EPN R neurons to innocuous stimuli was also demonstrated by lower thresholds and higher discharge frequencies to von Frey filament

  13. Development of spontaneous activity and response properties of primary lagenar neurons in the chick.

    PubMed

    Galicia, Salvador; Cortes, Celso; Galindo, Fabian; Flores, Amira

    2010-04-01

    Here, we report for the first time developmental changes in spontaneous activity and in response properties of single nerve fibers from the macular chick lagena. Such aspects are important in order to get insight into the functional role of the lagena which remains undetermined. For this purpose, we used intracellular and extracellular single-unit recording techniques in an isolated inner ear preparation from the chicken at ages E15 and P1. At E15, afferent fibers displayed a low irregular spontaneous discharge rate (41 +/- 14 spikes/s, CV = 1.17 +/- 0.1), which was replaced by regular high frequency spontaneous activity at P1 (CV = 0.48 +/- 0.8, 89 +/- 27 spikes/s). During the developmental period including E15, the percentage of silent neurons was 60% while that of P1 was 40%. The synaptic activity was higher at E15 than at P1. The action potential waveform generated at E15 had small amplitude and derivative depolarization, and consequently, a large duration in correlation with respect to action potential waveform at P1 (respectively: 53 +/- 2 vs. 65 +/- 3 mV, 60 +/- 11 vs. 109 +/- 20 mV/ms, 3.6 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.12 ms). In addition, we recognized two response dynamics to the injection of current steps: phasic, or rapidly adapting neurons and tonic, or slowly adapting neurons. Our results indicate similar developmental processes for the lagena as described for the vestibular system in other species, in agreement with the known morphological characteristics of this otholitic end organ. The presence of more than one subtype of afferent neuron also correlates with previous reports on vestibular afferents with analogous electrophysiological properties, strongly suggesting the vestibular nature of the lagena.

  14. Trial-to-trial variability in the responses of neurons carries information about stimulus location in the rat whisker thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Alessandro; Moxon, Karen A.; Aguilar, Juan; Foffani, Guglielmo

    2011-01-01

    From the perspective of neural coding, the considerable trial-to-trial variability in the responses of neurons to sensory stimuli is puzzling. Trial-to-trial response variability is typically interpreted in terms of “noise” (i.e., it represents either intrinsic noise of the system or information unrelated to the stimuli). However, trial-to-trial response variability can be considerably different across stimuli, suggesting that it could also provide an important contribution to the information conveyed by the neural responses about the stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we addressed the problem of discriminating stimulus location from the spike-count responses of neurons recorded in the ventro-postero-medial (VPM) nucleus of the thalamus in anesthetized rats. Using a recently developed information theory approach, we verified that differences between stimuli in the trial-to-trial spike-count variability of the responses provided an important contribution to the overall information carried by the neurons. In addition, we found that the relatively reliable (sub-Poisson) firing regime of our VPM neurons was not only more informative, but also more redundant between neurons compared with a more variable (Poisson) firing regime with the same total number of spikes. The typical increase in trial-to-trial response variability from the periphery to the cortex could therefore serve as a strategy to reduce redundancy between neurons and promote efficient sparse coding distributed in large populations of neurons. Overall, our data suggest that the trial-to-trial response variability plays a critical role in establishing the trade-off between total information and redundancy between neurons in population codes. PMID:21873241

  15. Visual Responsiveness of Neurons in the Secondary Somatosensory Area and its Surrounding Parietal Operculum Regions in Awake Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hihara, Sayaka; Taoka, Miki; Tanaka, Michio; Iriki, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Previous neurophysiological studies performed in macaque monkeys have shown that the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) is essentially engaged in the processing of somatosensory information and no other sensory input has been reported. In contrast, recent human brain-imaging studies have revealed the effects of visual and auditory stimuli on SII activity, which suggest multisensory integration in the human SII. To determine whether multisensory responses of the SII also exist in nonhuman primates, we recorded single-unit activity in response to visual and auditory stimuli from the SII and surrounding regions in 8 hemispheres from 6 awake monkeys. Among 1157 recorded neurons, 306 neurons responded to visual stimuli. These visual neurons usually responded to rather complex stimuli, such as stimulation of the peripersonal space (40.5%), observation of human action (29.1%), and moving-object stimulation outside the monkey's reach (23.9%). We occasionally applied auditory stimuli to visual neurons and found 10 auditory-responsive neurons that exhibited somatosensory responses. The visual neurons were distributed continuously along the lateral sulcus covering the entire SII, along with other somatosensory neurons. These results highlight the need to investigate novel functional roles—other than somesthetic sensory processing—of the SII. PMID:25962920

  16. Visual Responsiveness of Neurons in the Secondary Somatosensory Area and its Surrounding Parietal Operculum Regions in Awake Macaque Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hihara, Sayaka; Taoka, Miki; Tanaka, Michio; Iriki, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Previous neurophysiological studies performed in macaque monkeys have shown that the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) is essentially engaged in the processing of somatosensory information and no other sensory input has been reported. In contrast, recent human brain-imaging studies have revealed the effects of visual and auditory stimuli on SII activity, which suggest multisensory integration in the human SII. To determine whether multisensory responses of the SII also exist in nonhuman primates, we recorded single-unit activity in response to visual and auditory stimuli from the SII and surrounding regions in 8 hemispheres from 6 awake monkeys. Among 1157 recorded neurons, 306 neurons responded to visual stimuli. These visual neurons usually responded to rather complex stimuli, such as stimulation of the peripersonal space (40.5%), observation of human action (29.1%), and moving-object stimulation outside the monkey's reach (23.9%). We occasionally applied auditory stimuli to visual neurons and found 10 auditory-responsive neurons that exhibited somatosensory responses. The visual neurons were distributed continuously along the lateral sulcus covering the entire SII, along with other somatosensory neurons. These results highlight the need to investigate novel functional roles-other than somesthetic sensory processing-of the SII.

  17. [Specific modulation of neuronal responses to light of different intensities by sound in the rabbit's primary visual cortex].

    PubMed

    Polianskiĭ, V B; Alymkulov, D É; Evtikhin, D V; Chernyshev, B V

    2012-01-01

    Changes in activity of 92 neurons in the primary visual cortex of four rabbits (Orictolagus cuniculus) were analyzed. In the first series of experiments, we recorded discharges of 63 neurons in response to replacement of visual stimuli in pairs (pairs of 0.28 - 1, 1 - 3, 3 - 6, 6 - 8.5, 8.5 - 14, 14 - 17, 17 - 20 cd/m2). Then the same stimuli were presented simultaneously with sound (70 dB, 2000 Hz, 40 ms). Neurons did not respond directly to the sound. Two groups of neurons were found. In the first group of neurons (31%), responses to the complex "light and sound" (40-100 ms from the moment of substitution of stimuli) increased on average by 41% (p < 0.0001) under conditions of the lowest stimuli intensities. With increasing light intensities, discharges to the complex were reduced to the background level of responses to light and even lower. The second group of neurons (19%) showed the opposite properties: at low intensities, responses to the complex were comparable to responses to light (or even lower). At high intensities (14-20 cd/m2), discharges to the complex were significantly (p < 0.05) different from the responses to light (20% and higher, up to 39%). In the second series of experiments, we reconstructed vector sensory spaces on the basis of responses of 29 neurons to light of different intensities and eight complexes of "light and sound." It was found that the sound had also a dual effect on the sensory space of complexes. Some neurons showed an enhancement of the angular distance between the two lowest light intensities (0.28 and 1 cd/m2). Other neurons showed an increase in the angular distance between the highest intensities. Such changes in the space structure are consistent with the groups of neurons revealed in the first two series of the experiments. Comparison of the dynamics of neuronal responses and the amplitudes of evoked potentials under the same conditions of stimulation revealed their considerable similarity. Thus, modulation of neuronal

  18. Parabrachial nucleus neuronal responses to off-vertical axis rotation in macaques

    PubMed Central

    McCandless, Cyrus H.; Balaban, Carey D.

    2010-01-01

    The caudal aspect of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) contains neurons responsive to whole body, periodic rotational stimulation in alert monkeys. This study characterizes the angular and linear motion-sensitive response properties of PBN unit responses during off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) and position trapezoid stimulation. The OVAR responses displayed a constant firing component which varied from the firing rate at rest. Nearly two-thirds of the units also modulated their discharges with respect to head orientation (re: gravity) during constant velocity OVAR stimulation. The modulated response magnitudes were equal during ipsilateral and contralateral OVARs, indicative of a one-dimensional accelerometer. These response orientations during OVAR divided the units into three spatially tuned populations, with peak modulation responses centered in the ipsilateral ear down, contralateral anterior semicircular canal down, and occiput down orientations. Because the orientation of the OVAR modulation response was opposite in polarity to the orientation of the static tilt component of responses to position trapezoids for the majority of units, the linear acceleration responses were divided into colinear dynamic linear and static tilt components. The orientations of these unit responses formed two distinct population response axes: (1) units with an interaural linear response axis and (2) units with an ipsilateral anterior semicircular canal-contralateral posterior semicircular canal plane linear response axis. The angular rotation sensitivity of these units is in a head-vertical plane that either contains the linear acceleration response axis or is perpendicular to the linear acceleration axis. Hence, these units behave like head-based (‘strap-down’) inertial guidance sensors. Because the PBN contributes to sensory and interoceptive processing, it is suggested that vestibulo-recipient caudal PBN units may detect potentially dangerous anomalies in control of postural

  19. Sustained conditioned responses in prelimbic prefrontal neurons are correlated with fear expression and extinction failure.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Robles, Anthony; Vidal-Gonzalez, Ivan; Quirk, Gregory J

    2009-07-01

    During auditory fear conditioning, it is well established that lateral amygdala (LA) neurons potentiate their response to the tone conditioned stimulus, and that this potentiation is required for conditioned fear behavior. Conditioned tone responses in LA, however, last only a few hundred milliseconds and cannot be responsible for sustained fear responses to a tone lasting tens of seconds. Recent evidence from inactivation and stimulation studies suggests that the prelimbic (PL) prefrontal cortex is necessary for expression of learned fears, but the timing of PL tone responses and correlations with fear behavior have not been studied. Using multichannel unit recording techniques in behaving rats, we observed sustained conditioned tone responses in PL that were correlated with freezing behavior on a second-to-second basis during the presentation of a 30 s tone. PL tone responses were also correlated with conditioned freezing across different experimental phases (habituation, conditioning, extinction). Moreover, the persistence of PL responses after extinction training was associated with failure to express extinction memory. Together with previous inactivation findings, the present results suggest that PL transforms transient amygdala inputs to a sustained output that drives conditioned fear responses and gates the expression of extinction. Given the relatively long latency of conditioned responses we observed in PL (approximately 100 ms after tone onset), we propose that PL integrates inputs from the amygdala, hippocampus, and other cortical sources to regulate the expression of fear memories.

  20. Ventral Lamina Terminalis Mediates Enhanced Cardiovascular Responses of RVLM Neurons During Increased Dietary Salt

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Julye M.; Bardgett, Megan E.; Stocker, Sean D.

    2009-01-01

    Increased dietary salt enhances sympathoexcitatory and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether neurons of the forebrain lamina terminalis (LT) mediated these changes in the RVLM. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with and without LT lesions were fed normal chow and given access to water or 0.9% NaCl for 14-15 days. Unilateral injection of L-glutamate into the RVLM produced significantly larger increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) of sham rats ingesting 0.9% NaCl versus water. However, these differences were not observed between ventral LT-lesioned rats drinking 0.9% NaCl versus water. Similar findings were observed when angiotensin II or GABA were injected into the RVLM. Interestingly, a subset of animals drinking 0.9% but with damage restricted to the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis did not show enhanced responses to L-glutamate or GABA. In marked contrast, RVLM injection of L-glutamate or GABA produced exaggerated SNA and ABP responses in animals drinking 0.9% NaCl versus water after an acute ventral LT lesion or chronic lesion of the subfornical organ. Additional experiments demonstrate plasma sodium concentration and osmolality were increased at night in rats ingesting 0.9% NaCl. These findings suggest that neurons of the ventral LT mediate the ability of increased dietary salt to enhance the responsiveness of RVLM sympathetic neurons. PMID:19506102

  1. Dose Response Effects of 810 nm Laser Light on Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kharkwal, Gitika B.; Sajo, Mari; Huang, Ying-Ying; De Taboada, Luis; McCarthy, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives In the past four decades numerous studies have reported the efficacy of low level light (laser) therapy (LLLT) as a treatment for diverse diseases and injuries. Recent studies have shown that LLLT can biomodulate processes in the central nervous system and has been extensively studied as a stroke treatment. However there is still a lack of knowledge on the effects of LLLT at the cellular level in neurons. The present study aimed to study the effect of 810 nm laser on several cellular processes in primary cortical neurons cultured from embryonic mouse brains. Study Design/Materials and Methods Neurons were irradiated with fluences of 0.03, 0.3, 3, 10, or 30 J/cm2 of 810-nm laser delivered over varying times at 25 mW/cm2 and intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide and calcium were measured using fluorescent probes within 5 minutes of the end of irradiation. The changes in mitochondrial function in response to light were studied in terms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Results Light induced a significant increase in calcium, ATP and MMP at lower fluences and a decrease at higher fluences. ROS was significantly induced at low fluences, followed by a decrease and a second larger increase at 30 J/cm2. Nitric oxide levels showed a similar pattern of a double peak but values were less significant compared to ROS. Conclusions The results suggest that LLLT at lower fluences is capable of inducing mediators of cell signaling processes which in turn may be responsible for the beneficial stimulatory effects of the low level laser. At higher fluences beneficial mediators are reduced and high levels of Janus-type mediators such as ROS and NO (beneficial at low concentrations and harmful at high concentrations) may be responsible for the damaging effects of high-fluence light and the overall biphasic dose response. PMID:21956634

  2. Reactive nucleolar and Cajal body responses to proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Palanca, Ana; Casafont, Iñigo; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-06-01

    The dysfunction of the ubiquitin proteasome system has been related to a broad array of neurodegenerative disorders in which the accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates causes proteotoxicity. The ability of proteasome inhibitors to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis has emerged as a powerful strategy for cancer therapy. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor used as an antineoplastic drug, although its neurotoxicity frequently causes a severe sensory peripheral neuropathy. In this study we used a rat model of bortezomib treatment to study the nucleolar and Cajal body responses to the proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons that are major targets of bortezomib-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment with bortezomib induced dose-dependent dissociation of protein synthesis machinery (chromatolysis) and nuclear retention of poly(A) RNA granules resulting in neuronal dysfunction. However, as a compensatory response to the proteotoxic stress, both nucleoli and Cajal bodies exhibited reactive changes. These include an increase in the number and size of nucleoli, strong nucleolar incorporation of the RNA precursor 5'-fluorouridine, and increased expression of both 45S rRNA and genes encoding nucleolar proteins UBF, fibrillarin and B23. Taken together, these findings appear to reflect the activation of the nucleolar transcription in response to proteotoxic stress Furthermore, the number of Cajal bodies, a parameter related to transcriptional activity, increases upon proteasome inhibition. We propose that nucleoli and Cajal bodies are important targets in the signaling pathways that are activated by the proteotoxic stress response to proteasome inhibition. The coordinating activity of these two organelles in the production of snRNA, snoRNA and rRNA may contribute to neuronal survival after proteasome inhibition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease.

  3. Blocking miRNA Biogenesis in Adult Forebrain Neurons Enhances Seizure Susceptibility, Fear Memory, and Food Intake by Increasing Neuronal Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Fiorenza, Anna; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Rovira, Victor; Scandaglia, Marilyn; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio; Barco, Angel

    2016-04-01

    The RNase Dicer is essential for the maturation of most microRNAs, a molecular system that plays an essential role in fine-tuning gene expression. To gain molecular insight into the role of Dicer and the microRNA system in brain function, we conducted 2 complementary RNA-seq screens in the hippocampus of inducible forebrain-restricted Dicer1 mutants aimed at identifying the microRNAs primarily affected by Dicer loss and their targets, respectively. Functional genomics analyses predicted the main biological processes and phenotypes associated with impaired microRNA maturation, including categories related to microRNA biology, signal transduction, seizures, and synaptic transmission and plasticity. Consistent with these predictions, we found that, soon after recombination, Dicer-deficient mice exhibited an exaggerated seizure response, enhanced induction of immediate early genes in response to different stimuli, stronger and more stable fear memory, hyperphagia, and increased excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the long term, we also observed slow and progressive excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Overall, our results indicate that interfering with microRNA biogenesis causes an increase in neuronal responsiveness and disrupts homeostatic mechanisms that protect the neuron against overactivation, which may explain both the initial and late phenotypes associated with the loss of Dicer in excitatory neurons.

  4. Contrasting responses within a single neuron class enable sex-specific attraction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Anusha; Venkatachalam, Vivek; Durak, Omer; Reilly, Douglas K.; Bose, Neelanjan; Schroeder, Frank C.; Samuel, Aravinthan D. T.; Srinivasan, Jagan; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Animals find mates and food, and avoid predators, by navigating to regions within a favorable range of available sensory cues. How are these ranges set and recognized? Here we show that male Caenorhabditis elegans exhibit strong concentration preferences for sex-specific small molecule cues secreted by hermaphrodites, and that these preferences emerge from the collective dynamics of a single male-specific class of neurons, the cephalic sensory neurons (CEMs). Within a single worm, CEM responses are dissimilar, not determined by anatomical classification and can be excitatory or inhibitory. Response kinetics vary by concentration, suggesting a mechanism for establishing preferences. CEM responses are enhanced in the absence of synaptic transmission, and worms with only one intact CEM show nonpreferential attraction to all concentrations of ascaroside for which CEM is the primary sensor, suggesting that synaptic modulation of CEM responses is necessary for establishing preferences. A heterogeneous concentration-dependent sensory representation thus appears to allow a single neural class to set behavioral preferences and recognize ranges of sensory cues. PMID:26903633

  5. Receptor expression and sympatric speciation: unique olfactory receptor neuron responses in F1 hybrid Rhagoletis populations.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Shannon B; Linn, Charles E; Michel, Andrew; Dambroski, Hattie R; Berlocher, Stewart H; Feder, Jeffrey L; Roelofs, Wendell L

    2006-10-01

    The Rhagoletis pomonella species complex is one of the foremost examples supporting the occurrence of sympatric speciation. A recent study found that reciprocal F(1) hybrid offspring from different host plant-infesting populations in the complex displayed significantly reduced olfactory host preference in flight-tunnel assays. Behavioral and electrophysiological studies indicate that olfactory cues from host fruit are important chemosensory signals for flies to locate fruit for mating and oviposition. The reduced olfactory abilities of hybrids could therefore constitute a significant post-mating barrier to gene flow among fly populations. The present study investigated the source of changes in the hybrid olfactory system by examining peripheral chemoreception in F(1) hybrid flies, using behaviorally relevant volatiles from the parent host fruit. Single-sensillum electrophysiological analyses revealed significant changes in olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) response specificities in hybrid flies when compared to parent ORN responses. We report that flies from F(1) crosses of apple-, hawthorn- and flowering dogwood-origin populations of R. pomonella exhibited distinct ORN response profiles absent from any parent population. These peripheral alterations in ORN response profiles could result from misexpression of multiple receptors in hybrid neurons as a function of genomic incompatibilities in receptor-gene pathways in parent populations. We conclude that these changes in peripheral chemoreception could impact olfactory host preference and contribute directly to reproductive isolation in the Rhagoletis complex, or could be genetically coupled to other host-associated traits.

  6. Contrasting responses within a single neuron class enable sex-specific attraction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Anusha; Venkatachalam, Vivek; Durak, Omer; Reilly, Douglas K; Bose, Neelanjan; Schroeder, Frank C; Samuel, Aravinthan D T; Srinivasan, Jagan; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-03-08

    Animals find mates and food, and avoid predators, by navigating to regions within a favorable range of available sensory cues. How are these ranges set and recognized? Here we show that male Caenorhabditis elegans exhibit strong concentration preferences for sex-specific small molecule cues secreted by hermaphrodites, and that these preferences emerge from the collective dynamics of a single male-specific class of neurons, the cephalic sensory neurons (CEMs). Within a single worm, CEM responses are dissimilar, not determined by anatomical classification and can be excitatory or inhibitory. Response kinetics vary by concentration, suggesting a mechanism for establishing preferences. CEM responses are enhanced in the absence of synaptic transmission, and worms with only one intact CEM show nonpreferential attraction to all concentrations of ascaroside for which CEM is the primary sensor, suggesting that synaptic modulation of CEM responses is necessary for establishing preferences. A heterogeneous concentration-dependent sensory representation thus appears to allow a single neural class to set behavioral preferences and recognize ranges of sensory cues.

  7. On the Firing Rate Dependency of the Phase Response Curve of Rat Purkinje Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Couto, João; Linaro, Daniele; De Schutter, E; Giugliano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous spiking during cerebellar tasks has been observed across Purkinje cells: however, little is known about the intrinsic cellular mechanisms responsible for its initiation, cessation and stability. The Phase Response Curve (PRC), a simple input-output characterization of single cells, can provide insights into individual and collective properties of neurons and networks, by quantifying the impact of an infinitesimal depolarizing current pulse on the time of occurrence of subsequent action potentials, while a neuron is firing tonically. Recently, the PRC theory applied to cerebellar Purkinje cells revealed that these behave as phase-independent integrators at low firing rates, and switch to a phase-dependent mode at high rates. Given the implications for computation and information processing in the cerebellum and the possible role of synchrony in the communication with its post-synaptic targets, we further explored the firing rate dependency of the PRC in Purkinje cells. We isolated key factors for the experimental estimation of the PRC and developed a closed-loop approach to reliably compute the PRC across diverse firing rates in the same cell. Our results show unambiguously that the PRC of individual Purkinje cells is firing rate dependent and that it smoothly transitions from phase independent integrator to a phase dependent mode. Using computational models we show that neither channel noise nor a realistic cell morphology are responsible for the rate dependent shift in the phase response curve. PMID:25775448

  8. Sleep restriction increases the neuronal response to unhealthy food in normal-weight individuals.

    PubMed

    St-Onge, M-P; Wolfe, S; Sy, M; Shechter, A; Hirsch, J

    2014-03-01

    Sleep restriction alters responses to food. However, the underlying neural mechanisms for this effect are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a neural system that is preferentially activated in response to unhealthy compared with healthy foods. Twenty-five normal-weight individuals, who normally slept 7-9 h per night, completed both phases of this randomized controlled study. Each participant was tested after a period of five nights of either 4 or 9 h in bed. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in the fasted state, presenting healthy and unhealthy food stimuli and objects in a block design. Neuronal responses to unhealthy, relative to healthy food stimuli after each sleep period were assessed and compared. After a period of restricted sleep, viewing unhealthy foods led to greater activation in the superior and middle temporal gyri, middle and superior frontal gyri, left inferior parietal lobule, orbitofrontal cortex, and right insula compared with healthy foods. These same stimuli presented after a period of habitual sleep did not produce marked activity patterns specific to unhealthy foods. Further, food intake during restricted sleep increased in association with a relative decrease in brain oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) activity observed in the right insula. This inverse relationship between insula activity and food intake and enhanced activation in brain reward and food-sensitive centers in response to unhealthy foods provides a model of neuronal mechanisms relating short sleep duration to obesity.

  9. Sucralose Promotes Food Intake through NPY and a Neuronal Fasting Response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao-Ping; Lin, Yong Qi; Zhang, Lei; Wilson, Yana A; Oyston, Lisa J; Cotterell, James; Qi, Yue; Khuong, Thang M; Bakhshi, Noman; Planchenault, Yoann; Browman, Duncan T; Lau, Man Tat; Cole, Tiffany A; Wong, Adam C N; Simpson, Stephen J; Cole, Adam R; Penninger, Josef M; Herzog, Herbert; Neely, G Gregory

    2016-07-12

    Non-nutritive sweeteners like sucralose are consumed by billions of people. While animal and human studies have demonstrated a link between synthetic sweetener consumption and metabolic dysregulation, the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Here we use a diet supplemented with sucralose to investigate the long-term effects of sweet/energy imbalance. In flies, chronic sweet/energy imbalance promoted hyperactivity, insomnia, glucose intolerance, enhanced sweet taste perception, and a sustained increase in food and calories consumed, effects that are reversed upon sucralose removal. Mechanistically, this response was mapped to the ancient insulin, catecholamine, and NPF/NPY systems and the energy sensor AMPK, which together comprise a novel neuronal starvation response pathway. Interestingly, chronic sweet/energy imbalance promoted increased food intake in mammals as well, and this also occurs through an NPY-dependent mechanism. Together, our data show that chronic consumption of a sweet/energy imbalanced diet triggers a conserved neuronal fasting response and increases the motivation to eat.

  10. Evidence that hypothalamic RFamide related peptide-3 neurones are not leptin-responsive in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, M Z; Harbid, A A; Inglis, M A; Quennell, J H; Anderson, G M

    2014-04-01

    Leptin, a permissive hormonal regulator of fertility, provides information about the body's energy reserves to the hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal system that drives reproduction. Leptin does not directly act on GnRH neurones, and the neuronal pathways that it uses remain unclear. RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3) neurones project to GnRH neurones and primarily inhibit their activity. We tested whether leptin could act via RFRP-3 neurones to potentially modulate GnRH activity. First, the effects of leptin deficiency or high-fat diet-induced obesity on RFRP-3 cell numbers and gene expression were assessed in male and female mice. There was no significant difference in Rfrp mRNA levels or RFRP-3-immunoreactive cell counts in wild-type versus leptin-deficient ob/ob animals, or in low-fat versus high-fat diet fed wild-type mice. Second, the presence of leptin-induced signalling in RFRP-3 neurones was examined in male and female wild-type mice and rats. Dual label immunohistochemistry revealed leptin-induced phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in close proximity to RFRP-3 neurones, although there was very little (2-13%) colocalisation and no significant differences between vehicle and leptin-treated animals. Furthermore, we were unable to detect leptin receptor mRNA in a semi-purified RFRP-3 cell preparation. Because GABA neurones form critical leptin-responsive GnRH inputs, we also determined whether RFRP-3 and GABA cells were colocalised. No such colocalisation was detected. These results support the concept that leptin has little or no effects on RFRP-3 neurones, and that these neurones are unlikely to be an important neuronal pathway for the metabolic regulation of fertility by leptin. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  11. Sensitization of capsaicin and icilin responses in oxaliplatin treated adult rat DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin chemotherapy induced neuropathy is a dose related cumulative toxicity that manifests as tingling, numbness, and chronic pain, compromising the quality of life and leading to discontinued chemotherapy. Patients report marked hypersensitivity to cold stimuli at early stages of treatment, when sensory testing reveals cold and heat hyperalgesia. This study examined the morphological and functional effects of oxaliplatin treatment in cultured adult rat DRG neurons. Results 48 hour exposure to oxaliplatin resulted in dose related reduction in neurite length, density, and number of neurons compared to vehicle treated controls, using Gap43 immunostaining. Neurons treated acutely with 20 μg/ml oxaliplatin showed significantly higher signal intensity for cyclic AMP immunofluorescence (160.5 ± 13 a.u., n = 3, P < 0.05), compared to controls (120.3 ± 4 a.u.). Calcium imaging showed significantly enhanced capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist), responses after acute 20 μg/ml oxaliplatin treatment where the second of paired capsaicin responses increased from 80.7 ± 0.6% without oxaliplatin, to 171.26 ± 29% with oxaliplatin, (n = 6 paired t test, P < 0.05); this was reduced to 81.42 ± 8.1% (P < 0.05), by pretretreatment with the cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist GW 833972. Chronic oxaliplatin treatment also resulted in dose related increases in capsaicin responses. Similarly, second responses to icilin (TRPA1/TRPM8 agonist), were enhanced after acute (143.85 ± 7%, P = 0.004, unpaired t test, n = 3), and chronic (119.7 ± 11.8%, P < 0.05, n = 3) oxaliplatin treatment, compared to control (85.3 ± 1.7%). Responses to the selective TRPM8 agonist WS-12 were not affected. Conclusions Oxaliplatin treatment induces TRP sensitization mediated by increased intracellular cAMP, which may cause neuronal damage. These effects may be mitigated by co-treatment with adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, like CB2 agonists, to alleviate the neurotoxic effects of oxaliplatin. PMID:21106058

  12. Morphological features and responses to AMPA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity of mouse motor neurons: comparison in purified, mixed anterior horn or motor neuron/glia cocultures.

    PubMed

    De Paola, Massimiliano; Diana, Valentina; Bigini, Paolo; Mennini, Tiziana

    2008-05-15

    Primary motor neuron cultures are widely used as in vitro model to study the early mechanisms involved in the aetiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, we directly compared the morphological features and the responses to AMPA receptor (AMPAR) activation of mouse spinal cord motor neurons under different culture conditions (OptiPrep-purified, mixed anterior horn or motor neuron/glia cocultures). Motor neurons cocultured with a confluent glial layer had significant improvements in axonal length and in somata perimeter and area, compared both to mixed anterior horn cultures and to purified cultures, suggesting that the presence of more "mature" glial cells was determinant to obtain healthier motor neurons. By immuno-cytochemical assays we found that both in mixed anterior horn cultures and in cocultures, lower AMPA (0.3 microM) or kainate (5 microM) concentrations, but not the higher (1 or 15 microM, respectively), induced classical apoptotic events such as the nuclear fragmentation, the membrane externalization of phosphatidylserine residues and the activation of caspases-9 and -3. The morphological features and the different degenerative pathways induced by AMPAR agonist concentrations suggest that the experimental conditions used for in vitro studies are key factors that should be deeply considered to obtain more valid and reproducible results.

  13. Serotonergic chemosensory neurons modify the C. elegans immune response by regulating G-protein signaling in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alexandra; Laurenson-Schafer, Henry; Partridge, Frederick A; Hodgkin, Jonathan; McMullan, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems influence each other, allowing animals to rapidly protect themselves from changes in their internal and external environment. However, the complex nature of these systems in mammals makes it difficult to determine how neuronal signaling influences the immune response. Here we show that serotonin, synthesized in Caenorhabditis elegans chemosensory neurons, modulates the immune response. Serotonin released from these cells acts, directly or indirectly, to regulate G-protein signaling in epithelial cells. Signaling in these cells is required for the immune response to infection by the natural pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum. Here we show that serotonin signaling suppresses the innate immune response and limits the rate of pathogen clearance. We show that C. elegans uses classical neurotransmitters to alter the immune response. Serotonin released from sensory neurons may function to modify the immune system in response to changes in the animal's external environment such as the availability, or quality, of food.

  14. The cellular and genomic response of rat dopaminergic neurons (N27) to coated nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Chorley, Brian; Ward, William; Simmons, Steven O; Vallanat, Beena; Veronesi, Bellina

    2014-12-01

    This study examined if nanosilver (nanoAg) of different sizes and coatings were differentially toxic to oxidative stress-sensitive neurons. N27 rat dopaminergic neurons were exposed (0.5-5 ppm) to a set of nanoAg of different sizes (10nm, 75 nm) and coatings (PVP, citrate) and their physicochemical, cellular and genomic response measured. Both coatings retained their manufactured sizes in culture media, however, the zeta potentials of both sizes of PVP-coated nanoAg were significantly less electronegative than those of their citrate-coated counterparts. Markers of oxidative stress, measured at 0.5-5 ppm exposure concentrations, indicated that caspase 3/7 activity and glutathione levels were significantly increased by both sizes of PVP-coated nanoAg and by the 75 nm citrate-coated nanoAg. Both sizes of PVP-coated nanoAg also increased intra-neuronal nitrite levels and activated ARE/NRF2, a reporter gene for the oxidative stress-protection pathway. Global gene expression on N27 neurons, exposed to 0.5 ppm for 8h, indicated a dominant effect by PVP-coated nanoAg over citrate. The 75 nm PVP-coated material altered 196 genes that were loosely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, the 10nm PVP-coated nanoAg altered 82 genes that were strongly associated with NRF2 oxidative stress pathways. Less that 20% of the affected genes were shared by both sizes of PVP-coated nanoAg. These cellular and genomic findings suggest that PVP-coated nanoAg is more bioactive than citrate-coated nanoAg. Although both sizes of PVP-coated nanoAg altered the genomic expression of N27 neurons along oxidative stress pathways, exposure to the 75 nm nanoAg favored pathways associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas the 10nm PVP-coated nanoAg affected NRF2 neuronal protective pathways.

  15. Spectrotemporal Response Properties of Core Auditory Cortex Neurons in Awake Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Massoudi, Roohollah; Van Wanrooij, Marc M.; Versnel, Huib; Van Opstal, A. John

    2015-01-01

    So far, most studies of core auditory cortex (AC) have characterized the spectral and temporal tuning properties of cells in non-awake, anesthetized preparations. As experiments in awake animals are scarce, we here used dynamic spectral-temporal broadband ripples to study the properties of the spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) of AC cells in awake monkeys. We show that AC neurons were typically most sensitive to low ripple densities (spectral) and low velocities (temporal), and that most cells were not selective for a particular spectrotemporal sweep direction. A substantial proportion of neurons preferred amplitude-modulated sounds (at zero ripple density) to dynamic ripples (at non-zero densities). The vast majority (>93%) of modulation transfer functions were separable with respect to spectral and temporal modulations, indicating that time and spectrum are independently processed in AC neurons. We also analyzed the linear predictability of AC responses to natural vocalizations on the basis of the STRF. We discuss our findings in the light of results obtained from the monkey midbrain inferior colliculus by comparing the spectrotemporal tuning properties and linear predictability of these two important auditory stages. PMID:25680187

  16. Models of Neuronal Stimulus-Response Functions: Elaboration, Estimation, and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Arne F; Williamson, Ross S; Linden, Jennifer F; Sahani, Maneesh

    2016-01-01

    Rich, dynamic, and dense sensory stimuli are encoded within the nervous system by the time-varying activity of many individual neurons. A fundamental approach to understanding the nature of the encoded representation is to characterize the function that relates the moment-by-moment firing of a neuron to the recent history of a complex sensory input. This review provides a unifying and critical survey of the techniques that have been brought to bear on this effort thus far-ranging from the classical linear receptive field model to modern approaches incorporating normalization and other nonlinearities. We address separately the structure of the models; the criteria and algorithms used to identify the model parameters; and the role of regularizing terms or "priors." In each case we consider benefits or drawbacks of various proposals, providing examples for when these methods work and when they may fail. Emphasis is placed on key concepts rather than mathematical details, so as to make the discussion accessible to readers from outside the field. Finally, we review ways in which the agreement between an assumed model and the neuron's response may be quantified. Re-implemented and unified code for many of the methods are made freely available.

  17. Activation of Direct and Indirect Pathway Medium Spiny Neurons Drives Distinct Brain-wide Responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Weitz, Andrew J; Bernal-Casas, David; Duffy, Ben A; Choy, ManKin; Kravitz, Alexxai V; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-07-20

    A central theory of basal ganglia function is that striatal neurons expressing the D1 and D2 dopamine receptors exert opposing brain-wide influences. However, the causal influence of each population has never been measured at the whole-brain scale. Here, we selectively stimulated D1 or D2 receptor-expressing neurons while visualizing whole-brain activity with fMRI. Excitation of either inhibitory population evoked robust positive BOLD signals within striatum, while downstream regions exhibited significantly different and generally opposing responses consistent with-though not easily predicted from-contemporary models of basal ganglia function. Importantly, positive and negative signals within the striatum, thalamus, GPi, and STN were all associated with increases and decreases in single-unit activity, respectively. These findings provide direct evidence for the opposing influence of D1 and D2 receptor-expressing striatal neurons on brain-wide circuitry and extend the interpretability of fMRI studies by defining cell-type-specific contributions to the BOLD signal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Models of Neuronal Stimulus-Response Functions: Elaboration, Estimation, and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Arne F.; Williamson, Ross S.; Linden, Jennifer F.; Sahani, Maneesh

    2017-01-01

    Rich, dynamic, and dense sensory stimuli are encoded within the nervous system by the time-varying activity of many individual neurons. A fundamental approach to understanding the nature of the encoded representation is to characterize the function that relates the moment-by-moment firing of a neuron to the recent history of a complex sensory input. This review provides a unifying and critical survey of the techniques that have been brought to bear on this effort thus far—ranging from the classical linear receptive field model to modern approaches incorporating normalization and other nonlinearities. We address separately the structure of the models; the criteria and algorithms used to identify the model parameters; and the role of regularizing terms or “priors.” In each case we consider benefits or drawbacks of various proposals, providing examples for when these methods work and when they may fail. Emphasis is placed on key concepts rather than mathematical details, so as to make the discussion accessible to readers from outside the field. Finally, we review ways in which the agreement between an assumed model and the neuron's response may be quantified. Re-implemented and unified code for many of the methods are made freely available. PMID:28127278

  19. Anticipated synchronization in neuronal circuits unveiled by a phase-response-curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, Fernanda S.; Carelli, Pedro V.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Copelli, Mauro

    2017-05-01

    Anticipated synchronization (AS) is a counterintuitive behavior that has been observed in several systems. When AS occurs in a sender-receiver configuration, the latter can predict the future dynamics of the former for certain parameter values. In particular, in neuroscience AS was proposed to explain the apparent discrepancy between information flow and time lag in the cortical activity recorded in monkeys. Despite its success, a clear understanding of the mechanisms yielding AS in neuronal circuits is still missing. Here we use the well-known phase-response-curve (PRC) approach to study the prototypical sender-receiver-interneuron neuronal motif. Our aim is to better understand how the transitions between delayed to anticipated synchronization and anticipated synchronization to phase-drift regimes occur. We construct a map based on the PRC method to predict the phase-locking regimes and their stability. We find that a PRC function of two variables, accounting simultaneously for the inputs from sender and interneuron into the receiver, is essential to reproduce the numerical results obtained using a Hodgkin-Huxley model for the neurons. On the contrary, the typical approximation that considers a sum of two independent single-variable PRCs fails for intermediate to high values of the inhibitory coupling strength of the interneuron. In particular, it loses the delayed-synchronization to anticipated-synchronization transition.

  20. A three-dimensional spatiotemporal receptive field model explains responses of area MT neurons to naturalistic movies.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Shinji; Gallant, Jack L

    2011-10-12

    Area MT has been an important target for studies of motion processing. However, previous neurophysiological studies of MT have used simple stimuli that do not contain many of the motion signals that occur during natural vision. In this study we sought to determine whether views of area MT neurons developed using simple stimuli can account for MT responses under more naturalistic conditions. We recorded responses from macaque area MT neurons during stimulation with naturalistic movies. We then used a quantitative modeling framework to discover which specific mechanisms best predict neuronal responses under these challenging conditions. We find that the simplest model that accurately predicts responses of MT neurons consists of a bank of V1-like filters, each followed by a compressive nonlinearity, a divisive nonlinearity, and linear pooling. Inspection of the fit models shows that the excitatory receptive fields of MT neurons tend to lie on a single plane within the three-dimensional spatiotemporal frequency domain, and suppressive receptive fields lie off this plane. However, most excitatory receptive fields form a partial ring in the plane and avoid low temporal frequencies. This receptive field organization ensures that most MT neurons are tuned for velocity but do not tend to respond to ambiguous static textures that are aligned with the direction of motion. In sum, MT responses to naturalistic movies are largely consistent with predictions based on simple stimuli. However, models fit using naturalistic stimuli reveal several novel properties of MT receptive fields that had not been shown in prior experiments.

  1. A three-dimensional spatiotemporal receptive field model explains responses of area MT neurons to naturalistic movies

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Shinji; Gallant, Jack L.

    2012-01-01

    Area MT has been an important target for studies of motion processing. However, previous neurophysiological studies of MT have used simple stimuli that do not contain many of the motion signals that occur during natural vision. In this study we sought to determine whether views of area MT neurons developed using simple stimuli can account for MT responses under more naturalistic conditions. We recorded responses from macaque area MT neurons during stimulation with naturalistic movies. We then used a quantitative modeling framework to discover which specific mechanisms best predict neuronal responses under these challenging conditions. We find that the simplest model that accurately predicts responses of MT neurons consists of a bank of V1-like filters, each followed by a compressive nonlinearity, a divisive nonlinearity and linear pooling. Inspection of the fit models shows that the excitatory receptive fields of MT neurons tend to lie on a single plane within the three-dimensional spatiotemporal frequency domain, and suppressive receptive fields lie off this plane. However, most excitatory receptive fields form a partial ring in the plane and avoid low temporal frequencies. This receptive field organization ensures that most MT neurons are tuned for velocity but do not tend to respond to ambiguous static textures that are aligned with the direction of motion. In sum, MT responses to naturalistic movies are largely consistent with predictions based on simple stimuli. However, models fit using naturalistic stimuli reveal several novel properties of MT receptive fields that had not been shown in prior experiments. PMID:21994372

  2. Context-dependent place-selective responses of the neurons in the medial parietal region of macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sato, Nobuya; Sakata, Hideo; Tanaka, Yuji L; Taira, Masato

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the role of the medial parietal region (MPR), comprising area 7 m and the retrosplenial and posterior cingulate cortices, in spatial navigation, we analyzed the spatial aspect of the responses of the MPR neurons in monkeys while they actively performed a navigation task in a virtual environment. One-third of the analyzed MPR neurons were activated depending on the location of the monkeys in the environment, that is, showed place-selective responses. Some neurons showed varying responses based on the starting point (SP) or destination. We further investigated the responses of the place-selective neurons when the monkeys were shown animations of the entire navigation route, including the preferred field, and a segment of the route, including an area around the preferred field, and a still image of the preferred field. We observed that the responses of some place-selective neurons reduced when the monkeys viewed the preferred field in the segmented animation or in the still image compared with when they viewed the entire animation. These results suggested that the knowledge about the SP or destination, that is, context, is necessary to activate place-selective neurons. The effect of such contextual information suggests that the MPR plays decisive roles in spatial processing such as navigation.

  3. [HOMOCYSTEINE-INDUCED MEMBRANE CURRENTS, CALCIUM RESPONSES AND CHANGES OF MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL IN RAT CORTICAL NEURONS].

    PubMed

    Abushik, P A; Karelina, T V; Sibarov, D A; Stepanenko, J D; Giniatullin, R; Antonov, S M

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, exhibits neurotoxic effects and is involved in the pathogenesis of several major neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to well studied excitoxicity of glutamate, the mechanism of homocysteine neurotoxicity is not clearly understood. By using whole-cell patch-clamp, calcium imaging (fluo-3) and measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (rhodamine 123) we studied transmembrane currents, calcium signals and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential induced by homocysteine versus responses induced by NMDA and glutamate in cultured rat cortical neurons. L-homocysteine (50 µM) induced inward currents that could be completely blocked by the selective antagonist of NMDA receptors - AP-5. In contrast to NMDA-induced currents, homocysteine-induced currents had a smaller steady-state amplitude. Comparison of calcium responses to homocysteine, NMDA or glutamate demonstrated that in all cortical neurons homocysteine elicited short, oscillatory-type calcium responses, whereas NMDA or glutamate induced sustained increase of intracellular calcium. Analysis of mitochondrial changes demonstrated that in contrast to NMDA homocysteine did not cause a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential at the early stages of action. However, after its long-term action, as in the case of NMDA and glutamate, the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were comparable with the full drop of respiratory chain induced by protonophore FCCP. Our data suggest that in cultured rat cortical neuron homocysteine at the first stages of action induces neurotoxic effects through activation of NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors with strong calcium influx through the channels of these receptors. The long-term action of homocysteine may lead to mitochondrial disfuction and appears as a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential.

  4. The iso-response method: measuring neuronal stimulus integration with closed-loop experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gollisch, Tim; Herz, Andreas V. M.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the nervous system, neurons integrate high-dimensional input streams and transform them into an output of their own. This integration of incoming signals involves filtering processes and complex non-linear operations. The shapes of these filters and non-linearities determine the computational features of single neurons and their functional roles within larger networks. A detailed characterization of signal integration is thus a central ingredient to understanding information processing in neural circuits. Conventional methods for measuring single-neuron response properties, such as reverse correlation, however, are often limited by the implicit assumption that stimulus integration occurs in a linear fashion. Here, we review a conceptual and experimental alternative that is based on exploring the space of those sensory stimuli that result in the same neural output. As demonstrated by recent results in the auditory and visual system, such iso-response stimuli can be used to identify the non-linearities relevant for stimulus integration, disentangle consecutive neural processing steps, and determine their characteristics with unprecedented precision. Automated closed-loop experiments are crucial for this advance, allowing rapid search strategies for identifying iso-response stimuli during experiments. Prime targets for the method are feed-forward neural signaling chains in sensory systems, but the method has also been successfully applied to feedback systems. Depending on the specific question, “iso-response” may refer to a predefined firing rate, single-spike probability, first-spike latency, or other output measures. Examples from different studies show that substantial progress in understanding neural dynamics and coding can be achieved once rapid online data analysis and stimulus generation, adaptive sampling, and computational modeling are tightly integrated into experiments. PMID:23267315

  5. Responses of neurons in the nucleus of the basal optic root to translational and rotational flowfields.

    PubMed

    Wylie, D R; Frost, B J

    1999-01-01

    The nucleus of the basal optic root (nBOR) receives direct input from the contralateral retina and is the first step in a pathway dedicated to the analysis of optic flowfields resulting from self-motion. Previous studies have shown that most nBOR neurons exhibit direction selectivity in response to large-field stimuli moving in the contralateral hemifield, but a subpopulation of nBOR neurons has binocular receptive fields. In this study, the activity of binocular nBOR neurons was recorded in anesthetized pigeons in response to panoramic translational and rotational optic flow. Translational optic flow was produced by the "translator" projector described in the companion paper, and rotational optic flow was produced by a "planetarium projector" described by Wylie and Frost. The axis of rotation or translation could be positioned to any orientation in three-dimensional space. We recorded from 37 cells, most of which exhibited a strong contralateral dominance. Most of these cells were located in the caudal and dorsal aspects of the nBOR complex and many were localized to the subnucleus nBOR dorsalis. Other units were located outside the boundaries of the nBOR complex in the adjacent area ventralis of Tsai or mesencephalic reticular formation. Six cells responded best to rotational flowfields, whereas 31 responded best to translational flowfields. Of the rotation cells, three preferred rotation about the vertical axis and three preferred horizontal axes. Of the translation cells, 3 responded best to a flowfield simulating downward translation of the bird along a vertical axis, whereas the remaining 28 responded best to flowfields resulting from translation along axes in the horizontal plane. Seventeen of these cells preferred a flowfield resulting from the animal translating backward along an axis oriented approximately 45 degrees to the midline, but the best axes of the remaining eleven cells were distributed throughout the horizontal plane with no definitive

  6. Nicotine Dependence Reveals Distinct Responses from Neurons and Their Resident Nicotinic Receptors in Medial Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Pei-Yu; McIntosh, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the molecular target of nicotine. nAChRs in the medial habenula (MHb) have recently been shown to play a role in nicotine dependence, but it is not clear which nAChR subtypes or MHb neuron types are most important. To identify MHb nAChRs and/or cell types that play a role in nicotine dependence, we studied these receptors and cells with brain slice electrophysiology using both acute and chronic nicotine application. Cells in the ventroinferior (MHbVI) and ventrolateral MHb (MHbVL) subregions expressed functional nAChRs with different pharmacology. Further, application of nicotine to cells in these subregions led to different action potential firing patterns. The latter result was correlated with a differing ability of nicotine to induce nAChR desensitization. Chronic nicotine caused functional upregulation of nAChRs selectively in MHbVI cells, but did not change nAChR function in MHbVL. Importantly, firing responses were also differentially altered in these subregions following chronic nicotine. MHbVI neurons treated chronically with nicotine exhibited enhanced basal pacemaker firing but a blunted nicotine-induced firing response. MHbVL neurons did not change their firing properties in response to chronic nicotine. Together, these results suggest that acute and chronic nicotine differentially affect nAChR function and output of cells in MHb subregions. Because the MHb extensively innervates the interpeduncular nucleus, an area critical for both affective and somatic signs of withdrawal, these results could reflect some of the neurophysiological changes thought to occur in the MHb to the interpeduncular nucleus circuit in human smokers. PMID:26429939

  7. The responses of pericruciate cortical neurones to distal forepaw electrical stimulation in the unanaesthetized, unrestrained cat.

    PubMed

    Palmer, C I; Massion, J; Dufossé, M

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the responses of cortical neurons in the pericruciate cortex to cutaneous afferent input from the distal forepaw. Ninety-nine cortical neurons responding to electrical stimulation of the forepaw were recorded from four cats. Their response latencies ranged from 6 to 23 ms. The units had cutaneous receptive fields which ranged in size from those restricted to one digit to those extending over the whole forelimb. They were recorded from area 4 and area 3. Intracortical microstimulation at the recording sites activated either the distal or proximal musculature of the forelimb. When the characteristics obtained from each recording site were examined as a group of features, a uniform population emerged which was significantly different from the rest of the sample. These units had the shortest latency responses to distal forepaw electrical stimulation, the shortest duration of evoked discharge, the smallest distal cutaneous receptive fields. Such units were recorded at the border between areas 3 and 4, at sites which on microstimulation resulted in movements of the distal forepaw musculature.

  8. Arsenic moiety in gallium arsenide is responsible for neuronal apoptosis and behavioral alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Flora, Swaran J S; Bhatt, Kapil; Mehta, Ashish

    2009-10-15

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), an intermetallic semiconductor finds widespread applications in high frequency microwave and millimeter wave, and ultra fast supercomputers. Extensive use of GaAs has led to increased exposure to humans working in semiconductor industry. GaAs has the ability to dissociate into its constitutive moieties at physiological pH and might be responsible for the oxidative stress. The present study was aimed at evaluating, the principle moiety (Ga or As) in GaAs to cause neurological dysfunction based on its ability to cause apoptosis, in vivo and in vitro and if this neuronal dysfunction translated to neurobehavioral changes in chronically exposed rats. Result indicated that arsenic moiety in GaAs was mainly responsible for causing oxidative stress via increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation, both in vitro and in vivo. Increased ROS further caused apoptosis via mitochondrial driven pathway. Effects of oxidative stress were also confirmed based on alterations in antioxidant