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Sample records for 3a radiological engineering

  1. Applying industrial engineering practices to radiology.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Len

    2004-01-01

    Seven hospitals in Oregon and Washington have successfully adopted the Toyota Production System (TPS). Developed by Taiichi Ohno, TPS focuses on finding efficiencies and cost savings in manufacturing processes. A similar effort has occurred in Canada, where Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children has developed a database for its diagnostic imaging department built on the principles of TPS applied to patient encounters. Developed over the last 5 years, the database currently manages all interventional patient procedures for quality assurance, inventory, equipment, and labor. By applying industrial engineering methodology to manufacturing processes, it is possible to manage these constraints, eliminate the obstacles to achieving streamlined processes, and keep the cost of delivering products and services under control. Industrial engineering methodology has encouraged all stakeholders in manufacturing plants to become participants in dealing with constraints. It has empowered those on the shop floor as well as management to become partners in the change process. Using a manufacturing process model to organize patient procedures enables imaging department and imaging centers to generate reports that can help them understand utilization of labor, materials, equipment, and rooms. Administrators can determine the cost of individual procedures as well as the total and average cost of specific procedure types. When Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children first implemented industrial engineering methodology to medical imaging interventional radiology patient encounters, it focused on materials management. Early in the process, the return on investment became apparent as the department improved its management of more than 500,000 dollars of inventory. The calculated accumulated savings over 4 years for 10,000 interventional procedures alone amounted to more than 140,000 dollars. The medical imaging department in this hospital is only now beginning to apply what it has learned to

  2. Utilization of a radiology-centric search engine.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Richard E; Sharpe, Megan; Siegel, Eliot; Siddiqui, Khan

    2010-04-01

    Internet-based search engines have become a significant component of medical practice. Physicians increasingly rely on information available from search engines as a means to improve patient care, provide better education, and enhance research. Specialized search engines have emerged to more efficiently meet the needs of physicians. Details about the ways in which radiologists utilize search engines have not been documented. The authors categorized every 25th search query in a radiology-centric vertical search engine by radiologic subspecialty, imaging modality, geographic location of access, time of day, use of abbreviations, misspellings, and search language. Musculoskeletal and neurologic imagings were the most frequently searched subspecialties. The least frequently searched were breast imaging, pediatric imaging, and nuclear medicine. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were the most frequently searched modalities. A majority of searches were initiated in North America, but all continents were represented. Searches occurred 24 h/day in converted local times, with a majority occurring during the normal business day. Misspellings and abbreviations were common. Almost all searches were performed in English. Search engine utilization trends are likely to mirror trends in diagnostic imaging in the region from which searches originate. Internet searching appears to function as a real-time clinical decision-making tool, a research tool, and an educational resource. A more thorough understanding of search utilization patterns can be obtained by analyzing phrases as actually entered as well as the geographic location and time of origination. This knowledge may contribute to the development of more efficient and personalized search engines.

  3. Clinical evaluation of using semantic searching engine for radiological imaging services in RIS-integrated PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tonghui; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hua, Yanqing; Zhang, Jianguo

    2015-03-01

    We had designed a semantic searching engine (SSE) for radiological imaging to search both reports and images in RIS-integrated PACS environment. In this presentation, we present evaluation results of this SSE about how it impacting the radiologists' behaviors in reporting for different kinds of examinations, and how it improving the performance of retrieval and usage of historical images in RIS-integrated PACS.

  4. An Engineering View on Megatrends in Radiology: Digitization to Quantitative Tools of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaesoon; Yi, Jaeyoun; Choi, Seungwook; Park, Seyoun; Chang, Yongjun; Seo, Joon Beom

    2013-01-01

    Within six months of the discovery of X-ray in 1895, the technology was used to scan the interior of the human body, paving the way for many innovations in the field of medicine, including an ultrasound device in 1950, a CT scanner in 1972, and MRI in 1980. More recent decades have witnessed developments such as digital imaging using a picture archiving and communication system, computer-aided detection/diagnosis, organ-specific workstations, and molecular, functional, and quantitative imaging. One of the latest technical breakthrough in the field of radiology has been imaging genomics and robotic interventions for biopsy and theragnosis. This review provides an engineering perspective on these developments and several other megatrends in radiology. PMID:23482650

  5. Radiological effluents released from nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests at the Nevada Test Site 1959 through 1969: Fact Book

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, H.N.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 25 and Area 26, about 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, from July 1959 through September 1969. This document presents a brief history of the nuclear rocket engine tests, information on the off-site radiological monitoring, and descriptions of the tests.

  6. A Study to Identify the Optimum Method of Providing Biomedical Engineering/Maintenance Support of Radiologic Equipment at General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    This study was done to determine the optimum method of providing biomedical engineering /maintenance support of diagnostic radiologic equipment at...General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital (GLWACH). The study concluded that the optimum method of providing biomedical engineering /maintenance

  7. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radiological control performance indicator report. Third quarter, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This document provides a report and analysis of the Radiological Control Program through the third quarter of calendar year 1997 (CY-97) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) under the direction of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This Performance Indicator Report is provided in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. The INEEL collective occupational radiation exposure goal (deep dose) has been revised from 137 person-rem to 102.465 person-rem. Aggressive application of ALARA protective measures has resulted in a 66.834 person-rem deep dose compared to projected third quarter goal of 85.5 person-rem. Dose savings at the ICPP Tank Farm and rescheduling of some of the ROVER work account for most of the difference in the goal and actual dose year to date. Work at the ICPP Tank farm has resulted in about 14 rem dose savings. The RWMC has also reduced exposure by moving waste to new temporary storage facilities well ahead of schedule.

  8. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380{sup 3} corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  9. Radiological engineering services for the design of special contamination containments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to provide radiological engineering services for the design of special contamination containments. These containments were to be used during the replacement of leaking and damaged gaskets on the glove boxes in Technical Area-55 (TA-55). The damaged gaskets involved 18 windows and 5 interconnecting spool pieces in fuel processing glove boxes. The work scope included the design and manufacture of special contamination containment enclosures (containments), the preparation of procedures and tool lists to support gasket replacement while using the containments, and the training of appropriate TA-55 personnel in the proper installation, operation and removal of the containments. It was originally anticipated that two basic containment designs would be required, one for the windows and one for spool pieces. Upon examination of the glove boxes it was evident that the individual space envelopes and interferences associated with each glove box would require uniquely designed containments for effective gasket replacement. This resulted in 13 individual containment designs that accommodated the interferences and allowed gasket replacement within the containment. Successful use of the containments for glove box gasket replacement was a significant accomplishment. The operation has proven that a properly managed containment program can enhance routine maintenance of the glove boxes while preventing a contamination release. The ability to perform these operations in containments reduces costs by preventing a contaminant release and eliminating the associated cleanup expenses, reduced radioactive waste and fuel processing down time.

  10. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  11. An RL10A-3-3A rocket engine model using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulator (ROCETS) software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The RL10 engine is a critical component of past, present, and future space missions. The paper discusses the RL10A-3-3A engine system and its model created using the ROCETS computer code. The simulation model will give NASA an in-house capability to simulate the performance of the engine under various operating conditions and mission profiles. A comparison of steady-state model predictions with test-stand data is presented together with a comparison of predicted start transient behavior with flight data.

  12. An RL10A-3-3A rocket engine model using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulator (ROCETS) software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Michael

    1993-06-01

    The RL10 engine is a critical component of past, present, and future space missions. The paper discusses the RL10A-3-3A engine system and its model created using the ROCETS computer code. The simulation model will give NASA an in-house capability to simulate the performance of the engine under various operating conditions and mission profiles. A comparison of steady-state model predictions with test-stand data is presented together with a comparison of predicted start transient behavior with flight data.

  13. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, M.; Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Borsella, B.W.; Wright, K.C.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes calendar year 1995 environmental surveillance activities of Environmental Monitoring and Water Resources of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, performed at the following Waste Management Facilities: the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and tow surplus facilities. Results of the sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program, Site Environmental Surveillance Program, and the United States Geological Survey at these facilities are included in this report. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1995 environmental surveillance data with US DOE Derived Concentration Guides and with data form previous years.

  14. A transient model of the RL10A-3-3A rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    RL10A-3-3A rocket engines have served as the main propulsion system for Centaur upper stage vehicles since the early 1980's. This hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine continues to play a major role in the American launch industry. The Space Propulsion Technology Division at the NASA Lewis Research Center has created a computer model of the RL10 engine, based on detailed component analyses and available test data. This RL10 engine model can predict the performance of the engine over a wide range of operating conditions. The model may also be used to predict the effects of any proposed design changes and anticipated failure scenarios. In this paper, the results of the component analyses are discussed. Simulation results from the new system model are compared with engine test and flight data, including the start and shut-down transient characteristics.

  15. An RL10A-3-3A rocket engine model using the rocket engine transient simulator (ROCETS) software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Steady-state and transient computer models of the RL10A-3-3A rocket engine have been created using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) code. These models were created for several purposes. The RL10 engine is a critical component of past, present, and future space missions; the model will give NASA an in-house capability to simulate the performance of the engine under various operating conditions and mission profiles. The RL10 simulation activity is also an opportunity to further validate the ROCETS program. The ROCETS code is an important tool for modeling rocket engine systems at NASA Lewis. ROCETS provides a modular and general framework for simulating the steady-state and transient behavior of any desired propulsion system. Although the ROCETS code is being used in a number of different analysis and design projects within NASA, it has not been extensively validated for any system using actual test data. The RL10A-3-3A has a ten year history of test and flight applications; it should provide sufficient data to validate the ROCETS program capability. The ROCETS models of the RL10 system were created using design information provided by Pratt & Whitney, the engine manufacturer. These models are in the process of being validated using test-stand and flight data. This paper includes a brief description of the models and comparison of preliminary simulation output against flight and test-stand data.

  16. An RL10A-3-3A rocket engine model using the rocket engine transient simulator (ROCETS) software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Michael

    1993-07-01

    Steady-state and transient computer models of the RL10A-3-3A rocket engine have been created using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) code. These models were created for several purposes. The RL10 engine is a critical component of past, present, and future space missions; the model will give NASA an in-house capability to simulate the performance of the engine under various operating conditions and mission profiles. The RL10 simulation activity is also an opportunity to further validate the ROCETS program. The ROCETS code is an important tool for modeling rocket engine systems at NASA Lewis. ROCETS provides a modular and general framework for simulating the steady-state and transient behavior of any desired propulsion system. Although the ROCETS code is being used in a number of different analysis and design projects within NASA, it has not been extensively validated for any system using actual test data. The RL10A-3-3A has a ten year history of test and flight applications; it should provide sufficient data to validate the ROCETS program capability. The ROCETS models of the RL10 system were created using design information provided by Pratt & Whitney, the engine manufacturer. These models are in the process of being validated using test-stand and flight data. This paper includes a brief description of the models and comparison of preliminary simulation output against flight and test-stand data.

  17. Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-01-31

    This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios.

  18. RL10A-3-3A Rocket Engine Modeling Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael; Tomsik, Thomas; Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    Two RL10A-3-3A rocket engines comprise the main propulsion system for the Centaur upper stage vehicle. Centaur is used with bod Titan and Atlas launch vehicles, carrying military and civilian payloads from high altitudes into orbit and beyond. The RL10 has delivered highly reliable service for the past 30 years. Recently, however, there have been two in-flight failures which have refocused attention on the RL10. This heightened interest has sparked a desire for an independent RL10 modeling capability within NASA and th Air Force. Pratt & Whitney, which presently has the most detailed model of the RL10, also sees merit in having an independent model which could be used as a cross-check with their own simulations. The Space Propulsion Technology Division (SPTD) at the NASA Lewis Research Center has developed a computer model of the RL10A-3-3A. A project team was formed, consisting of experts in the areas of turbomachinery, combustion, and heat transfer. The overall goal of the project was to provide a model of the entire RL10 rocket engine for government use. In the course of the project, the major engine components have been modeled using a combination of simple correlations and detailed component analysis tools (computer codes). The results of these component analyses were verified with data provided by Pratt & Whitney. Select modeling results and test data curves were then integrated to form the RL10 engine system model The purpose of this report is to introduce the reader to the RL10 rocket engine and to describe the engine system model. The RL10 engine and its application to U.S. launch vehicles are described first, followed by a summary of the SPTD project organization, goals, and accomplishments. Simulated output from the system model are shown in comparison with test and flight data for start transient, steady state, and shut-down transient operations. Detailed descriptions of all component analyses, including those not selected for integration with the

  19. Westinghouse Hanford Company ALARA year-end report, Calendar Year 1994: Revision 3A, Radiological engineering and ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, O.D.

    1995-06-01

    It has long been the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Policy that radiation doses should be maintained as far below the dose limits as is reasonably achievable. This policy, known as the ``ALARA Principle of radiation protection,`` maintains that radiation exposures should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable, taking into account social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations. The ALARA Principle is based on the hypothesis that even very low radiation doses carry some risk. As a result, it is not enough to maintain doses at/or slightly below limits; the lower the doses, the lower the risks. Because it is not possible to reduce all doses at DOE facilities to zero, economic and social factors must be considered to determine the optimal level of radiation doses. According to the ALARA Principle, if doses are too high, resources should be well spent to reduce them. At some point, the resources being spent to maintain low doses are exactly balanced by the risks avoided. Reducing doses below this point results in a misallocation of resources; the resources could be spent elsewhere and have a greater positive impact on health and safety. The objective of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) ALARA/Contamination Control Improvement Project (CCIP) Program is to manage and control exposures (both individual and collective) to the work force, the general public, and the environment to levels as low as is reasonable using the aforementioned ALARA Principle.

  20. [Forensic radiology].

    PubMed

    Stein, K M; Grünberg, K

    2009-01-01

    Forensic radiology includes both clinical and postmortem forensic radiology. Clinical forensic radiology deals with imaging of healthy people from a legal point of view, such as for determining age or to prove and document injuries in victims of crime. Postmortem forensic radiology deals with the application of modern radiological methods in order to optimise post-mortem diagnosis. X-ray examination has for decades been routinely used in postmortem diagnosis. Newer developments include the application of postmortem computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging; these are the methods with the greatest information potential but also with the greatest deviations from diagnostics in living persons. Application of radiological methods for securing evidence in criminal procedures is still in its infancy. Radiologists' technical understanding and forensic doctors' knowledge of postmortem changes in a corpse must be synergised.

  1. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePlus

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  2. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.H.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

  3. Radiological engineering evaluation of the delay time line air scrubber located at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)

    SciTech Connect

    Huneycutt, Scott Edward

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the addition of an air scrubber to an already existing delay line and whether it would scrub 11CO2. There were three main objectives of this study. The first objective was to determine the scrubbing efficiency of the scrubber. The scrubbing efficiency was then used to predict the dose rates in the scrubber area and compare those values with measurements from radiological surveys. The third objective was to determine if the shield blocks were effective in reducing the dose rates in the scrubber area. The activities were measured before and during scrubber operation and this information was used to calculate the scrubbing efficiency and the efficiency of 11CO2 removal was determined to be around 50%. Microshield was then used to predict dose rates and compared those values with measurements from radiological surveys. This was also used to determine the that the shield blocks around the scrubber were effective in reducing the dose rates from the radiation field produced by the radionuclides in the scrubber.

  4. Human Cytochrome P450 3A4 as a Biocatalyst: Effects of the Engineered Linker in Modulation of Coupling Efficiency in 3A4-BMR Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Degregorio, Danilo; D'Avino, Serena; Castrignanò, Silvia; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Sadeghi, Sheila J.; Catucci, Gianluca; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    Human liver cytochrome P450 3A4 is the main enzyme involved in drug metabolism. This makes it an attractive target for biocatalytic applications, such as the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and drug metabolites. However, its poor solubility, stability and low coupling have limited its application in the biotechnological context. We previously demonstrated that the solubility of P450 3A4 can be increased by creating fusion proteins between the reductase from Bacillus megaterium BM3 (BMR) and the N-terminally modified P450 3A4 (3A4-BMR). In this work, we aim at increasing stability and coupling efficiency by varying the length of the loop connecting the two domains to allow higher inter-domain flexibility, optimizing the interaction between the domains. Starting from the construct 3A4-BMR containing the short linker Pro-Ser-Arg, two constructs were generated by introducing a 3 and 5 glycine hinge (3A4-3GLY-BMR and 3A4-5GLY-BMR). The three fusion proteins show the typical absorbance at 450 nm of the reduced heme-CO adduct as well as the correct incorporation of the FAD and FMN cofactors. Each of the three chimeric proteins were more stable than P450 3A4 alone. Moreover, the 3A4-BMR-3-GLY enzyme showed the highest NADPH oxidation rate in line with the most positive reduction potential. On the other hand, the 3A4-BMR-5-GLY fusion protein showed a Vmax increased by 2-fold as well as a higher coupling efficiency when compared to 3A4-BMR in the hydroxylation of the marker substrate testosterone. This protein also showed the highest rate value of cytochrome c reduction when this external electron acceptor is used to intercept electrons from BMR to P450. The data suggest that the flexibility and the interaction between domains in the chimeric proteins is a key parameter to improve turnover and coupling efficiency. These findings provide important guidelines in engineering catalytically self-sufficient human P450 for applications in biocatalysis. PMID:28377716

  5. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    ScienceCinema

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2016-07-12

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. Confirmatory radiological survey of the BORAX-V turbine building Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G.H.; Coleman, R.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A.; Egidi, P.V.; Mather, S.K.

    1993-07-01

    An independent assessment of the remediation of the BORAX-V (Boiling Water Reactor Experiment) turbine building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho, was accomplished by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group (ORNL/PAG). The purpose of the assessment was to confirm the site`s compliance with applicable Department of Energy guidelines. The assessment included reviews of both the decontamination and decommissioning Plan and data provided from the pre- and post-remedial action surveys and an independent verification survey of the facility. The independent verification survey included determination of background exposure rates and soil concentrations, beta-gamma and gamma radiation scans, smears for detection of removable contamination, and direct measurements for alpha and beta-gamma radiation activity on the basement and mezzanine floors and the building`s interior and exterior walls. Soil samples were taken, and beta-gamma and gamma radiation exposure rates were measured on areas adjacent to the building. Results of measurements on building surfaces at this facility were within established contamination guidelines except for elevated beta-gamma radiation levels located on three isolated areas of the basement floor. Following remediation of these areas, ORNL/PAG reviewed the remedial action contractor`s report and agreed that remediation was effective in removing the source of the elevated direct radiation. Results of all independent soil analyses for {sup 60}Co were below the detection limit. The highest {sup 137}Cs analysis result was 4.6 pCi/g; this value is below the INEL site-specific guideline of 10 pCi/g.

  8. Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Kamezawa, Hidemi; Jin, Ze; Nakamoto, Takahiro; Soufi, Mazen

    2015-09-01

    Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics have been constructed for increasing the accuracy of medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy in radiological physics. Computational image analysis has been established based on applied mathematics, physics, and engineering. This review paper will introduce how computational image analysis is useful in radiation therapy with respect to radiological physics.

  9. Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics

    SciTech Connect

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Kamezawa, Hidemi; Jin, Ze; Nakamoto, Takahiro; Soufi, Mazen

    2015-09-30

    Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics have been constructed for increasing the accuracy of medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy in radiological physics. Computational image analysis has been established based on applied mathematics, physics, and engineering. This review paper will introduce how computational image analysis is useful in radiation therapy with respect to radiological physics.

  10. Current radiology. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular.

  11. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  12. Workflow management systems in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Thomas; Meetz, Kirsten; Schmidt, Joachim

    1998-07-01

    In a situation of shrinking health care budgets, increasing cost pressure and growing demands to increase the efficiency and the quality of medical services, health care enterprises are forced to optimize or complete re-design their processes. Although information technology is agreed to potentially contribute to cost reduction and efficiency improvement, the real success factors are the re-definition and automation of processes: Business Process Re-engineering and Workflow Management. In this paper we discuss architectures for the use of workflow management systems in radiology. We propose to move forward from information systems in radiology (RIS, PACS) to Radiology Management Systems, in which workflow functionality (process definitions and process automation) is implemented through autonomous workflow management systems (WfMS). In a workflow oriented architecture, an autonomous workflow enactment service communicates with workflow client applications via standardized interfaces. In this paper, we discuss the need for and the benefits of such an approach. The separation of workflow management system and application systems is emphasized, and the consequences that arise for the architecture of workflow oriented information systems. This includes an appropriate workflow terminology, and the definition of standard interfaces for workflow aware application systems. Workflow studies in various institutions have shown that most of the processes in radiology are well structured and suited for a workflow management approach. Numerous commercially available Workflow Management Systems (WfMS) were investigated, and some of them, which are process- oriented and application independent, appear suitable for use in radiology.

  13. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

  14. Integrating IT into the radiology environment.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Rather than perpetuating the struggle, "who controls the PACS, Radiology or Information Technology (IT)," Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula (CHOMP) took the approach of incorporating IT support within the Radiology Department. CHOMP faced the challenge of staffing Radiology computer systems and networks by using a two-pronged approach; promoting and training clinical staff in IT functions and transferring an experienced IT person into the Radiology Department. Roles and responsibilities are divided. CHOMP's IT Department supports the Radiology Department's desktop devices, PCs, printers, and standard peripherals; while the department's DICOM print and archive network, specialized hardware (e.g., Merge DICOM interface computers), and applications are supported by the Radiology Department. The IT Department provides operating system support for multi-user VMS, Unix, and NT-based systems, e.g. Sun Solaris for the DICOM archive, and Windows NT for Mitra PACS Broker, the HL7/DICOM interface engine. IT also supports network communications, i.e., network electronics (routers, switches, etc.), TCP/IP communications, and network traffic analysis; and OS operations support for major Radiology systems, e.g. back-ups and off-site tape storage. Radiology staff provides applications support and troubleshooting, including analyst functions for RIS; and are the first point of contact with the Radiology systems vendors, e.g., GE Medical, or Siemens. The Radiology Department's senior IT person, the Clinical Technology Coordinator, transferred from CHOMP's IT Department after 7 years in that department. She performs analysis and design associated with Radiology's computer systems, coordinates development of the department's strategic plan, evaluates vendor proposals, and assists the department with product and application selection. Her IT experience and growing knowledge of Radiology's clinical tasks enhances communications between the Radiology and IT departments. Formal

  15. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education.

    PubMed

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  16. New trends in radiology workstation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Atkins, M. Stella

    2002-05-01

    In the radiology workstation design, the race for adding more features is now morphing into an iterative user centric design with the focus on ergonomics and usability. The extent of the list of features for the radiology workstation used to be one of the most significant factors for a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) vendor's ability to sell the radiology workstation. Not anymore is now very much the same between the major players in the PACS market. How these features work together distinguishes different radiology workstations. Integration (with the PACS/Radiology Information System (RIS) systems, with the 3D tool, Reporting Tool etc.), usability (user specific preferences, advanced display protocols, smart activation of tools etc.) and efficiency (what is the output a radiologist can generate with the workstation) are now core factors for selecting a workstation. This paper discusses these new trends in radiology workstation design. We demonstrate the importance of the interaction between the PACS vendor (software engineers) and the customer (radiologists) during the radiology workstation design. We focus on iterative aspects of the workstation development, such as the presentation of early prototypes to as many representative users as possible during the software development cycle and present the results of a survey of 8 radiologists on designing a radiology workstation.

  17. Historical Radiological Event Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    During and after radiological events EPA's RadNet monitors the environment for radiation. EPA monitored environmental radiation levels during and after Chernobyl, Fukushima and other international and domestic radiological incidents.

  18. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications.

  19. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  20. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  1. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  2. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  3. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  4. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  5. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... decoded SIR’s Health Policy and Economics team provides information on the varied activities the society engages in to ensure proper coding of interventional radiology services. SIR is committed to assisting you, your institution ...

  6. Interventional Radiology in China

    SciTech Connect

    Teng Gaojun Xu Ke; Ni Caifang; Li Linsun

    2008-03-15

    With more than 3000 members, the Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology (CSIR) is one of the world's largest societies for interventional radiology (IR). Nevertheless, compared to other societies such as CIRSE and SIR, the CSIR is a relatively young society. In this article, the status of IR in China is described, which includes IR history, structure and patient management, personnel, fellowship, training, modalities, procedures, research, turf battle, and insightful visions for IR from Chinese interventional radiologists.

  7. A survey of the role of the UK physicist in nuclear medicine: a report of a joint working group of the British Institute of Radiology, British Nuclear Medicine Society, and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Tindale, W B; Thorley, P J; Nunan, T O; Lewington, V; Shields, R A; Williams, N R

    2003-01-01

    Guidelines for the provision of physics support to nuclear medicine were published in 1999 by a joint working group of the British Institute of Radiology, the British Nuclear Medicine Society, and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. Following publication of the guidelines, a survey was conducted by the working group to gather data on the actual level of physicist support in UK hospitals of different types and on the activities undertaken by physicists. The data were collected in the 12 months following the publication of guidelines and cover different hospital models and seven UK regions. The results provide evidence that many of the smaller units - small teaching hospitals and, particularly, small district general hospitals - have insufficient physics support. Although, on average, there is good agreement between the guidelines and the survey data for medium and large district general hospitals, there is wide variation in the level of physics provision between hospitals delivering apparently similar services. This emphasizes the need for national guidelines, against which institutions may be bench-marked and which may be used as a recommendation for the staffing levels necessary to ensure services are delivered safely and standards are not compromised. The complexity and variety of workload is an important factor in determining the level of physics support. As services develop, it is vital that this aspect is recognized to ensure that appropriate resources are available for the required physics input, even if any new service represents only a modest clinical throughput in terms of patient numbers.

  8. Turf wars in radiology: what must academic radiology do?

    PubMed

    Rao, Vijay M; Levin, David C

    2007-09-01

    In a previous article in this series, the authors called on private practice radiology groups to better support radiology research financially but also pointed out that academic radiology must make some changes as well. In this article, the authors discuss those changes in detail. They include revising the structure of the radiology residency, changing the timing of the American Board of Radiology oral examinations, requiring that all residents receive research training, and emphasizing the value of clinical and translational research. The Society of Chairmen of Academic Radiology Departments needs to assume a leadership role in implementing these changes.

  9. Advances in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2010-12-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic radiology are discussed on the basis of current publications in Investigative Radiology. Publications in the journal during 2009 and 2010 are reviewed, evaluating developments by modality and anatomic region. Technological advances continue to play a major role in the evolution and clinical practice of diagnostic radiology, and as such constitute a major publication focus. In the past 2 years, this includes advances in both magnetic resonance and computed tomography (in particular, the advent of dual energy computed tomography). An additional major focus of publications concerns contrast media, and in particular continuing research involving nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, its etiology, and differentiation of the gadolinium chelates on the basis of in vivo stability.

  10. Radiology's value chain.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  11. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  12. [Radiological diagnosis of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Issever, A S; Link, T M

    2011-02-01

    Having at their disposal a wide range of imaging techniques, radiologists play a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with osteoporosis. The radiological tests range from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is the only reference method accepted by the WHO, to conventional radiographs for fracture characterization, to more recent techniques for analyzing trabecular structure, and the findings are decisive in initiating correct management of osteoporosis patients. This review provides an overview of established radiological techniques and an outline of new diagnostic approaches.

  13. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  14. Marketing a Radiology Practice.

    PubMed

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Flanders, Adam E; Sundaram, Baskaran; Colarossi, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In addition to being a profession, the practice of radiology is a business, and marketing is an important part of that business. There are many facets to marketing a radiology practice. The authors present a number of ideas on how to go about doing this. Some marketing methods can be directed to both patients and referring physicians. Others should be directed just to patients, while still others should be directed just to referring physicians. Aside from marketing, many of them provide value to both target audiences.

  15. Food Signs in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob; Al Damegh, Saleh

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Certain diseases show classic radiological signs that resemble various types of food items like fruits, meat, vegetables, eggs, bakery, grocery and confectionary items. In this article various food signs are discussed and correlated with the various food items in a pictorial way. The objective of this pictorial essay is to provide the information and learn the characteristic radiological signs resembling various food items. These food signs are easy to recognize and allows a confident diagnosis on the basis of imaging findings alone or can narrow down the differential diagnosis. PMID:21475464

  16. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  17. [Celedonio Calatayud-Costa and the birth of the specialty, the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology, and the journal: the beginning of a century of Spanish radiology].

    PubMed

    Puyalto de Pablo, P; Sánchez Fernández, J J; García Santos, J M

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Celedonio Calatayud-Costa, an eminent Spanish radiologist, electrical engineer, researcher, and co-founder of the Spanish Society of Electrical Engineering and Medical Radiology, was also the founder of the Spanish Journal of Electrical Engineering and Medical Radiology. The journal, the first journal dedicated specifically to the incipient specialty of electrology, from which radiology would later develop, was the official publication of that primordial Society, and was thus the first antecessor of Radiología, which is today the official journal of the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology. This article analyzes the figure of Dr. Calatayud, based on the scant information available about him, in the centennial of the publication of his journal. Criticized by some and eulogized by others, knowledge about this controversial figure is essential to any understanding of the beginnings of the specialty and its scientific publication in Spain.

  18. Radiologic Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a radiologic technology program. The guide contains four major sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining purpose and objectives; a program description,…

  19. Practical interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Von Sonnenberg, E.; Mueller, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes techniques employed in interventional radiology with emphasis on imaging leading to intervention. Includes the entire array of procedures available to the radiologist, discussing the indications, materials, technique, results, and complications for each. Covers the chest, abdomen, bone, pediatric considerations, and nursing care.

  20. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population. PMID:26235144

  1. Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobczak, James

    This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

  2. Radiology in emergency medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.; Barsan, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a discussion of radiologic modalities currently being used in emergency situations. Radiographs, echocardiographs, radionuclide scans and CT scans are systematically analyzed and evaluated to provide a step-by-step diagnostic process for emergency physicians to follow when a radiologist is not present.

  3. Collaborative Radiological Response Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Exercise and Evaluation Guide EMS Emergency Medical Services EPA Environmental Protection Agency FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation FEMA Federal...Investigation (FBI), water regulators, food regulators, agricultural agencies, hazardous waste regulators, local environmental health agencies...FEDERAL PLANNING EFFORTS The United States Environmental Protection Agency ( EPA ) has had radiological responsibilities since 1970.18 The General

  4. Research Training in Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

  5. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  6. Radiological Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

    Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

  7. Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

    2009-10-01

    One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health.

  8. Engineering of a Histone-Recognition Domain in Dnmt3a Alters the Epigenetic Landscape and Phenotypic Features of Mouse ESCs.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyung-Min; Wang, Haibo; Kim, Hyunjae R; Wenderski, Wendy; Fang, Fang; Li, Charles H; Dewell, Scott; Hughes, Stephen H; Melnick, Ari M; Patel, Dinshaw J; Li, Haitao; Allis, C David

    2015-07-02

    Histone modification and DNA methylation are associated with varying epigenetic "landscapes," but detailed mechanistic and functional links between the two remain unclear. Using the ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain of the DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a as a paradigm, we apply protein engineering to dissect the molecular interactions underlying the recruitment of this enzyme to specific regions of chromatin in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). By rendering the ADD domain insensitive to histone modification, specifically H3K4 methylation or H3T3 phosphorylation, we demonstrate the consequence of dysregulated Dnmt3a binding and activity. Targeting of a Dnmt3a mutant to H3K4me3 promoters decreases gene expression in a subset of developmental genes and alters ESC differentiation, whereas aberrant binding of another mutant to H3T3ph during mitosis promotes chromosome instability. Our studies support the general view that histone modification "reading" and DNA methylation are closely coupled in mammalian cells, and suggest an avenue for the functional assessment of chromatin-associated proteins.

  9. [Emphysematous pyelonephritis: radiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kably, M I; Elamraoui, F; Chikhaoui, N

    2003-10-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare and severe form of acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli accounts for 60% of the cases. Predisposing factors are: diabetus mellitus, recent urinary tract infection and obstruction. There is a female predominance (2/1). Conventional radiography reveals the renal emphysema in 85% of the cases. Ultrasonography shows hyperechoic areas corresponding to the gaz. CT scan is the best technique, allowing the exact localization of the gaz inside the renal parenchyma. The natural course of the disease allows its radiologic classification in 4 grades. EPN has a poor prognosis if only a medical treatment is initiated. Every urinary tract infection, in a diabetic patient must be treated, and must lead to a radiologic exploration, which allows an early detection of severe forms of the disease.

  10. Data mining in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

    2014-04-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining.

  11. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  12. Radiological Toolbox User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, KF

    2004-07-01

    A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  13. Radiological methods and instrumentation for the diagnosis and treatment of carcinomas. January, 1975-August, 1981 (Citations from the International Information Service for the Physics and Engineering Communities Data Base). Report for January 75-August 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Radiological methods and instrumentation for the diagnosis and treatment of carcinomas are presented. Emphasis are placed on the use of laser beams, ultraviolet radiation, electron beams, and ultrasonic techniques. The use of computerized tomographic scanning is also included. (Contains 168 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  14. Multilingual retrieval of radiology images.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Charles E

    2009-01-01

    The multilingual search engine ARRS GoldMiner Global was created to facilitate broad international access to a richly indexed collection of more than 200,000 radiologic images. Images are indexed according to key-words and medical concepts that appear in the unstructured text of their English-language image captions. GoldMiner Global exploits the Unicode standard, which allows the accurate representation of characters and ideographs from virtually any language and which supports both left-to-right and right-to-left text directions. The user interface supports queries in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish. GoldMiner Global incorporates an interface to the United States National Library of Medicine that translates queries into English-language Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms. The translated MeSH terms are then used to search the image index and retrieve relevant images. Explanatory text, pull-down menu choices, and navigational guides are displayed in the selected language; search results are displayed in English. GoldMiner Global is freely available on the World Wide Web.

  15. Radiological sinonasal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Alrumaih, Redha A.; Ashoor, Mona M.; Obidan, Ahmed A.; Al-Khater, Khulood M.; Al-Jubran, Saeed A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of common radiological variants of sinonasal anatomy among Saudi population and compare it with the reported prevalence of these variants in other ethnic and population groups. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 121 computerized tomography scans of the nose and paranasal sinuses of patients presented with sinonasal symptoms to the Department of Otorhinolarngology, King Fahad Hospital of the University, Khobar, Saudi Arabia, between January 2014 and May 2014. Results: Scans of 121 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria were reviewed. Concha bullosa was found in 55.4%, Haller cell in 39.7%, and Onodi cell in 28.9%. Dehiscence of the internal carotid artery was found in 1.65%. Type-1 and type-2 optic nerve were the prevalent types. Type-II Keros classification of the depth of olfactory fossa was the most common among the sample (52.9%). Frontal cells were found in 79.3%; type I was the most common. Conclusions: There is a difference in the prevalence of some radiological variants of the sinonasal anatomy between Saudi population and other study groups. Surgeon must pay special attention in the preoperative assessment of patients with sinonasal pathology to avoid undesirable complications. PMID:27146614

  16. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction.

  17. Radiology research and medical students.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Pat W; Agarwal, Ankit; Colucci, Andrew; Sherry, Steven J; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2013-12-01

    Fostering radiology research among medical students can enhance a student's interest and understanding of radiology and research. It increases the academic productivity of the mentor and the department. Radiology faculty and departments should actively seek to recruit and engage students in research. Once involved, students benefit greatly from being given clear responsibility, close supervision, timely feedback, and a degree of autonomy. At the heart of the student research process is the crucial mentor-mentee relationship, and mentors should be cognizant of their vital role and methods of encouraging and enhancing this relationship. Ultimately, the advancement of the field of radiology depends on constant innovation and improvement. Radiology research by medical students fuels both innovation and the development of future academic radiologists and physician-scientists, helping to secure future growth for our field.

  18. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

  19. Radiology today. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Heuck, F.H.W.; Donner, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    The book discusses the following contents: Advances in Cardiovascular Imaging: Digital Arteriography: Ongoing Developments. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cardiovascular System. Comparison of Vascular CT and MRI. Characterization of Vascular Lesions by Ultrasound - Progress in Vascular Interventions: Laser Angioplasty: A Review. Fibrinolytic Therapy Combined with Clot Extraction. Drugs Useful in Angioplasty. Developments in Cardiovascular Imaging: Blood Flow Measurements with Digital Arteriography. Selection of Imaging Techniques for Venous Thromboembolic Disease. Clinical Usefulness of High-Verus Low-Osmolality Contrast Agents. Developments in Angiographic and Interventional Instrumentation. Progress in Cardiovascular Interventions. Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Types, Placement, and Efficiency. Transluminal Vascular Stenting and Grafting. Venography and Sclerotherapy of Varioceles in Children and Adolescents. A New Catheter System - Important Hip Problems: Radiologic and Pathologic Correlation and Hip Disease. Comparison of Imaging Modalities in Femoral Head Necrosis. Osteoartrosis and Arthritis (Synovitis) of the Hip. Hip Anthrography.

  20. Risk management in radiology departments

    PubMed Central

    Craciun, Horea; Mankad, Kshitij; Lynch, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as a result of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients. PMID:26120383

  1. RADRELAY RADIOLOGICAL DATA LINK DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpring, L; Frank Heckendorn, F

    2007-11-06

    The RadRelay effort developed small, field appropriate, portable prototype devices that allow radiological spectra to be downloaded from field radiological detectors, like the identiFINDER-U, and transmitted to land based experts. This communications capability was designed for the U. S. Coast Guard (USCG) but is also applicable to the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) personnel working in remote locations. USCG Level II personnel currently use the identiFINDER-U Hand-Held Radioisotope ID Devices (HHRIID) to detect radiological materials during specific boarding operations. These devices will detect not only radiological emissions but will also evaluate those emissions against a table of known radiological spectra. The RadRelay has been developed to significantly improve the functionality of HHRIID, by providing the capability to download radiological spectra and then transmit them using satellite or cell phone technology. This remote wireless data transfer reduces the current lengthy delay often encountered between the shipboard detection of unknown radiological material and the evaluation of that data by technical and command personnel. That delay is reduced from hours to minutes and allows the field located personnel to remain on station during the inspection and evaluation process.

  2. ICPP radiological and toxicological sabotage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, V.R.; Mortensen, F.G.

    1995-10-01

    In June of 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued Notice 5630.3A, {open_quotes}Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,{close_quotes} which states that all significant radiological and toxicological hazards at Department facilities must be examined for potential sabotage. This analysis has been completed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The ICPP radiological and toxicological hazards include spent government and commercial fuels, Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), high-level liquid wastes, high-level solid wastes, and process and decontamination chemicals. The analysis effort included identification and assessment of quantities of hazardous materials present at the facility; identification and ranking of hazardous material targets; development of worst case scenarios detailing possible sabotage actions and hazard releases; performance of vulnerability assessments using table top and computer methodologies on credible threat targets; evaluation of potential risks to the public, workers, and the environment; evaluation of sabotage risk reduction options; and selection of cost effective prevention and mitigation options.

  3. The scope of forensic radiology.

    PubMed

    Brogdon, B G

    1998-06-01

    The use of x-ray in the solution of forensic problems commenced within days of Röntgen's discovery; indeed, most of the applications of radiology to the forensic sciences were accomplished or anticipated within the next two years. The scope of forensic radiology ranges widely and includes determination of identity, evaluation of injury and death, applications in both criminal and civil litigation and in administrative proceedings, detection of abuse, investigation of gunshot wounds, medical education and research. Newer modalities and techniques afford opportunity for the expansion of forensic radiology if problems of accessibility and cost can be resolved along with improvement in interdisciplinary cooperation and understanding.

  4. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 3A: High pressure oxidizer turbo-pump preburner pump housing stress analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, Robert V., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The model generation and structural analysis performed for the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) preburner pump volute housing located on the main pump end of the HPOTP in the space shuttle main engine are summarized. An ANSYS finite element model of the volute housing was built and executed. A static structural analysis was performed on the Engineering Analysis and Data System (EADS) Cray-XMP supercomputer

  5. Radiological design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-08-16

    The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design.

  6. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  7. Self-citation: comparison between Radiología, European Radiology and Radiology for 1997-1998.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Alberto; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2002-01-01

    Self-citation, considered as the number of times a paper cites other papers in the same journal, is an important criteria of journal quality. Our objective is to evaluate the self-citation in the official journal of the Spanish Society of Radiology (Radiología), and to compare it with the European Radiology and Radiology journals. Papers published in Radiología, European Radiology, and Radiology during 1997 and 1998 were analyzed. The Self Citation Index, considered as the ratio between self-references and total number of references per article, for the journals Radiología (SCIR), European Radiology (SCIER), and Radiology (SCIRY), were obtained and expressed as percentages. Also, the number of references to Radiología in European Radiology and Radiology papers were calculated. Stratification of the index per thematic area and article type was also performed. Mean SCIR, SCIER, and SCIRY values were compared with the ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls tests. The self-citation index was statistically higher in Radiology (23.2%; p<0.0001) than in Radiología (1.8%) and European Radiology (0.8%). There were no statistically significant differences between SCIR and SCIER indexes ( p=0.25). In the stratification per thematic areas and article type, self-citation in Radiology was statistically higher ( p<0.0001), with the only exception of "Radioprotection" area ( p=0.2), to SCIR and SCIER. Although there were no statistically significant differences, by thematic areas SCIR was always larger than SCIER, with the only exception of the "Genitourinary imaging" area, and by article type SCIR also went greater to SCIER, except in review articles. Radiología, The Spanish official radiological journal, although not included in Index Medicus and its database Medline, had a larger number of self-citing than European Radiology in the period 1997-1998.

  8. Environmental Tools and Radiological Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation details two tools (SADA and FRAMES) available for use in environmental assessments of chemicals that can also be used for radiological assessments of the environment. Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporate...

  9. Negotiating the radiologically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cummings, A; Chataway, J

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis, always challenging, hands down a particular gauntlet with the concept of the radiologically isolated syndrome. This article discusses what it is, recent developments in the field and how these patients should be managed.

  10. Peer review in cardiothoracic radiology.

    PubMed

    Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-09-01

    A variety of peer review methods can be used as part of quality assurance and quality improvement in cardiothoracic radiology. Traditionally, peer review in radiology is a retrospective process relying primarily on review of previously interpreted studies at the time of follow-up or additional imaging. However, peer review can be enhanced with other methods such as double reads, focused practice review, practice audit, and correlation with operative and pathologic findings. Furthermore, feedback from referring physicians can be extremely useful in improving the quality of a radiology practice. This article discusses peer review in radiology with a focus on cardiothoracic imaging. Types of peer review, advantages and shortcomings, and future challenges are addressed.

  11. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  12. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  13. Critiquing the process of radiologic differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, P L; Shaw, C; Rose, J R; Swett, H A

    1986-03-01

    ICON is a developmental expert system designed to critique the process of radiologic differential diagnosis. To use ICON, a physician outlines (1) findings observed in a chest radiograph, (2) a small amount of clinical information describing the patient, and (3) a proposed diagnosis. ICON critiques the appropriateness of that diagnosis in detail, analyzing why and how well the findings serve to confirm it, or to rule it out. ICON may also suggest further information to look for. ICON explores the design issues involved in critiquing the process of differential diagnosis, and is currently implemented in a limited domain: the radiographic diagnosis of a lung mass in a patient with Hodgkin's disease.

  14. Interventional Radiology: Equipment and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Scansen, Brian A

    2016-05-01

    The breadth of small animal diseases that can now be treated by a minimally invasive, transcatheter approach continues to expand. Interventional radiology is the field of medicine that affects a therapeutic outcome via minimally invasive catheterization of peripheral blood vessels or body orifices guided by imaging. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of the equipment required for interventional radiology in veterinary medicine with a discussion of technical uses in diseases of dogs and cats.

  15. FDH radiological design review guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Millsap, W.J.

    1998-09-29

    These guidelines discuss in more detail the radiological design review process used by the Project Hanford Management Contractors as described in HNF-PRO-1622, Radiological Design Review Process. They are intended to supplement the procedure by providing background information on the design review process and providing a ready source of information to design reviewers. The guidelines are not intended to contain all the information in the procedure, but at points, in order to maintain continuity, they contain some of the same information.

  16. Financial accounting for radiology executives.

    PubMed

    Seidmann, Abraham; Mehta, Tushar

    2005-03-01

    The authors review the role of financial accounting information from the perspective of a radiology executive. They begin by introducing the role of pro forma statements. They discuss the fundamental concepts of accounting, including the matching principle and accrual accounting. The authors then explore the use of financial accounting information in making investment decisions in diagnostic medical imaging. The paper focuses on critically evaluating the benefits and limitations of financial accounting for decision making in a radiology practice.

  17. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  18. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  19. Radiological Control Manual. Revision 0, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  20. Conversion of Radiology Reporting Templates to the MRRT Standard.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Charles E; Genereaux, Brad; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Radiology workgroup developed the Management of Radiology Report Templates (MRRT) profile, which defines both the format of radiology reporting templates using an extension of Hypertext Markup Language version 5 (HTML5), and the transportation mechanism to query, retrieve, and store these templates. Of 200 English-language report templates published by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), initially encoded as text and in an XML schema language, 168 have been converted successfully into MRRT using a combination of automated processes and manual editing; conversion of the remaining 32 templates is in progress. The automated conversion process applied Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) scripts, an XML parsing engine, and a Java servlet. The templates were validated for proper HTML5 and MRRT syntax using web-based services. The MRRT templates allow radiologists to share best-practice templates across organizations and have been uploaded to the template library to supersede the prior XML-format templates. By using MRRT transactions and MRRT-format templates, radiologists will be able to directly import and apply templates from the RSNA Report Template Library in their own MRRT-compatible vendor systems. The availability of MRRT-format reporting templates will stimulate adoption of the MRRT standard and is expected to advance the sharing and use of templates to improve the quality of radiology reports.

  1. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  2. Informatics in radiology: RADTF: a semantic search-enabled, natural language processor-generated radiology teaching file.

    PubMed

    Do, Bao H; Wu, Andrew; Biswal, Sandip; Kamaya, Aya; Rubin, Daniel L

    2010-11-01

    Storing and retrieving radiology cases is an important activity for education and clinical research, but this process can be time-consuming. In the process of structuring reports and images into organized teaching files, incidental pathologic conditions not pertinent to the primary teaching point can be omitted, as when a user saves images of an aortic dissection case but disregards the incidental osteoid osteoma. An alternate strategy for identifying teaching cases is text search of reports in radiology information systems (RIS), but retrieved reports are unstructured, teaching-related content is not highlighted, and patient identifying information is not removed. Furthermore, searching unstructured reports requires sophisticated retrieval methods to achieve useful results. An open-source, RadLex(®)-compatible teaching file solution called RADTF, which uses natural language processing (NLP) methods to process radiology reports, was developed to create a searchable teaching resource from the RIS and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The NLP system extracts and de-identifies teaching-relevant statements from full reports to generate a stand-alone database, thus converting existing RIS archives into an on-demand source of teaching material. Using RADTF, the authors generated a semantic search-enabled, Web-based radiology archive containing over 700,000 cases with millions of images. RADTF combines a compact representation of the teaching-relevant content in radiology reports and a versatile search engine with the scale of the entire RIS-PACS collection of case material.

  3. Integrated interdisciplinary training in the radiological sciences.

    PubMed

    Brenner, D J; Vazquez, M; Buonanno, M; Amundson, S A; Bigelow, A W; Garty, G; Harken, A D; Hei, T K; Marino, S A; Ponnaiya, B; Randers-Pehrson, G; Xu, Y

    2014-02-01

    The radiation sciences are increasingly interdisciplinary, both from the research and the clinical perspectives. Beyond clinical and research issues, there are very real issues of communication between scientists from different disciplines. It follows that there is an increasing need for interdisciplinary training courses in the radiological sciences. Training courses are common in biomedical academic and clinical environments, but are typically targeted to scientists in specific technical fields. In the era of multidisciplinary biomedical science, there is a need for highly integrated multidisciplinary training courses that are designed for, and are useful to, scientists who are from a mix of very different academic fields and backgrounds. We briefly describe our experiences running such an integrated training course for researchers in the field of biomedical radiation microbeams, and draw some conclusions about how such interdisciplinary training courses can best function. These conclusions should be applicable to many other areas of the radiological sciences. In summary, we found that it is highly beneficial to keep the scientists from the different disciplines together. In practice, this means not segregating the training course into sections specifically for biologists and sections specifically for physicists and engineers, but rather keeping the students together to attend the same lectures and hands-on studies throughout the course. This structure added value to the learning experience not only in terms of the cross fertilization of information and ideas between scientists from the different disciplines, but also in terms of reinforcing some basic concepts for scientists in their own discipline.

  4. Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 μg m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were

  5. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology.

    PubMed

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bücker, Arno; Hohl, Christian; Berlis, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Scope and clinical importance of interventional radiology markedly evolved over the last decades. Consequently it was acknowledged as independent subspecialty by the "European Union of Medical Specialists" (UEMS). Based on radiological imaging techniques Interventional Radiology is an integral part of Radiology. Materials und Methods In 2009 the German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a structured training in Interventional Radiology. In cooperation with the German Society of Neuroradiology (DGNR) this training was extended to also cover Interventional Neuroradiology in 2012. Tailored for this training in Interventional Radiology a structured curriculum was developed, covering the scope of this modular training. Results The curriculum is based on the DeGIR/DGNR modular training concept in Interventional Radiology. There is also an European Curriculum and Syllabus for Interventional Radiology developed by the "Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe" (CIRSE). The presented curriculum in Interventional Radiology is designed to provide a uniform base for the training in Interventional Radiology in Germany, based on the competencies obtained during residency. Conclusion This curriculum can be used as a basis for training in Interventional Radiology by all training sites. Key Points: · Interventional Radiology is an integral part of clinical radiology. · The German Society for Interventional Radiology and minimally-invasive therapy (DeGIR) developed a curriculum in Interventional Radiology. · This curriculum is an integrative basis for the training in interventional. Citation Format · Mahnken AH, Bücker A, Hohl C et al. White Paper: Curriculum in Interventional Radiology. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 309 - 311.

  6. [Useful radiological techniques in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Felizardo, Rufino; Thomas, Alexis; Foucart, Jean-Michel

    2012-03-01

    Specialists in dento-facial orthopedics have a large range of dental radiological techniques at their disposal to help them in their diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Peri-apical, occlusal, panoramic, and cephalometric X-Rays are two-dimensional techniques that orthodontists can complement, if necessary, with Multi slices CT scan or Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Orthodontists must apply and respect quality criteria for each type of film in order to derive the best information from every image and to avoid producing artifacts or false images that will reduce their diagnostic value and, accordingly, the service that they render to patients. Practitioners must be willing to spend the few moments it takes to position patients correctly in the radiological apparatus instead of taking multiple views to compensate for failing to scrupulously follow protocols of radiology.

  7. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  8. Analysis of radiology business models.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R; Schomer, Donald F

    2013-03-01

    As health care moves to value orientation, radiology's traditional business model faces challenges to adapt. The authors describe a strategic value framework that radiology practices can use to best position themselves in their environments. This simplified construct encourages practices to define their dominant value propositions. There are 3 main value propositions that form a conceptual triangle, whose vertices represent the low-cost provider, the product leader, and the customer intimacy models. Each vertex has been a valid market position, but each demands specific capabilities and trade-offs. The underlying concepts help practices select value propositions they can successfully deliver in their competitive environments.

  9. Interventional Radiology in Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Karani, John B. Yu, Dominic F.Q.C.; Kane, Pauline A.

    2005-04-15

    Radiology is a key specialty within a liver transplant program. Interventional techniques not only contribute to graft and recipient survival but also allow appropriate patient selection and ensure that recipients with severe liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or portal hypertension are transplanted with the best chance of prolonged survival. Equally inappropriate selection for these techniques may adversely affect survival. Liver transplantation is a dynamic field of innovative surgical techniques with a requirement for interventional radiology to parallel these developments. This paper reviews the current practice within a major European center for adult and pediatric transplantation.

  10. Industrial Pleuropulmonary Disorders: Radiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garland, L. Henry

    1965-01-01

    Industrial pleuropulmonary disorders may result from exposure of the human respiratory tract to diverse types of dusts and fumes, visible and invisible, benign and toxic, organic and inorganic. Meticulous radiological examination, combined with history and physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, and the exclusion of other disorders which could produce similar changes, is essential for correct diagnosis. Criteria for the radiological diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis, of generalized emphysema, and of cor pulmonale are outlined. The commoner types of pneumoconiosis are discussed in some detail, and the possible relationship of various inhaled noxa to primary bronchial carcinoma is considered. PMID:14288143

  11. [Radiological media and modern supporting tools in radiology].

    PubMed

    Sachs, A; Pokieser, P

    2014-01-01

    Radiology is a field with a high demand on information. Nowadays, a huge variety of electronic media and tools exists in addition to the classical media. Asynchronous and synchronous e-learning are constantly growing and support radiology with case collections, webinars and online textbooks. Various internet resources, social media and online courses have been established. Dynamic websites show a variety of interactive elements and it is easier and faster to access large amounts of data. Social media have an exponentially growing number of users and enable an efficient collaboration as well as forming professional networks. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) complete the offer of education and increase the opportunity to take part in educational activities. Apart from the existing variety of resources it is essential to focus on a critical selection for using these radiological media. It is reasonable to combine classical and electronic media instead of a one-sided use. As dynamic as the progress in the field of radiological media and its tools may be, the personal contact remains and should be maintained.

  12. Engineering of cytochrome P450 3A4 for enhanced peroxide-mediated substrate oxidation using directed evolution and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Liu, Hong; Halpert, James R

    2006-12-01

    CYP3A4 has been subjected to random and site-directed mutagenesis to enhance peroxide-supported metabolism of several substrates. Initially, a high-throughput screening method using whole cell suspensions was developed for H2O2-supported oxidation of 7-benzyloxyquinoline. Random mutagenesis by error-prone polymerase chain reaction and activity screening yielded several CYP3A4 mutants with enhanced activity. L216W and F228I showed a 3-fold decrease in Km, HOOH and a 2.5-fold increase in kcat/Km, HOOH compared with CYP3A4. Subsequently, T309V and T309A were created based on the observation that T309V in CYP2D6 has enhanced cumene hydroperoxide (CuOOH)-supported activity. T309V and T309A showed a > 6- and 5-fold higher kcat/Km, CuOOH than CYP3A4, respectively. Interestingly, L216W and F228I also exhibited, respectively, a > 4- and a > 3-fold higher kcat/Km, CuOOH than CYP3A4. Therefore, several multiple mutants were constructed from rationally designed and randomly isolated mutants; among them, F228I/T309A showed an 11-fold higher kcat/Km, CuOOH than CYP3A4. Addition of cytochrome b5, which is known to stimulate peroxide-supported activity, enhanced the kcat/Km, CuOOH of CYP3A4 by 4- to 7-fold. When the mutants were tested with other substrates, T309V and T433S showed enhanced kcat/Km, CuOOH with 7-benzyloxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin and testosterone, respectively, compared with CYP3A4. In addition, in the presence of cytochrome b5, T433S has the potential to produce milligram quantities of 6beta-hydroxytestosterone through peroxide-supported oxidation. In conclusion, a combination of random and site-directed mutagenesis approaches yielded CYP3A4 enzymes with enhanced peroxide-supported metabolism of several substrates.

  13. Mechanism of interactions of α-naphthoflavone with cytochrome P450 3A4 explored with an engineered enzyme bearing a fluorescent probe†

    PubMed Central

    Tsalkova, Tamara N.; Davydova, Nadezhda Y.; Halpert, James R.; Davydov, Dmitri R.

    2008-01-01

    Design of a partially cysteine-depleted C98S/C239S/C377S/C468A cytochrome P450 3A4 mutant designated CYP3A4(C58,C64) allowed site-directed incorporation of thiol-reactive fluorescent probes into α-helix A‥ The site of modification was identified as Cys-64 with the help of CYP3A4(C58) and CYP3A4(C64), each bearing only one accessible cysteine. Changes in the fluorescence of CYP3A4(C58,C64) labeled with 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (BADAN), 7-diethylamino-3-(4’-maleimidylphenyl)-4-methylcoumarin (CPM), or monobromobimane (mBBr) were used to study the interactions with bromocriptine (BCT), 1-pyrenebutanol (1-PB), testosterone (TST), and α-naphthoflavone (ANF). Of these substrates only ANF has a specific effect, causing a considerable decrease in fluorescence intensity of BADAN and CPM and increasing the fluorescence of mBBr. This ANF-binding event in the case of BADAN-modified enzyme is characterized by an S50 of 18.2 ± 0.7, compared with the value of 2.2 ± 0.3 for the ANF-induced spin transition, thus revealing an additional low affinity binding site. Studies of the effect of TST, 1-PB, and BCT on the interactions of ANF monitored by changes in fluorescence of CYP3A4(C58,C64)-BADAN or by the ANF-induced spin transition revealed no competition by these substrates. Investigation of the kinetics of fluorescence increase upon H2O2-dependent heme depletion suggests that labeled CYP3A4(C58,C64) is represented by two conformers, one of which has the fluorescence of the BADAN and CPM labels completely quenched, presumably by photoinduced electron transfer from the neighboring Trp-72 and/or Tyr-68 residues. The binding of ANF to the newly discovered binding site appears to affect the interactions of the label with the above residue(s), thus modulating the fraction of the fluorescent conformer. PMID:17198380

  14. International Data on Radiological Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

  15. Radiological Defense Officer. Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This student workbook includes the necessary administrative materials, briefs, exercises and answer sheets for the quizzes and final course examination as needed by the students during the conduct of the Radiological Defense Officer course. Among the briefs included are the following: (1) Reporting Forms; (2) Forecasting Dose Rates; (3) Dose…

  16. A Simulation Learning Approach to Training First Responders for Radiological Emergencies ? A Continuation of Work

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, Joe E; Cross, Butch; Sanders, Robert Lon

    2008-01-01

    Real-time gaming engines, such as Epic Game's Unreal Engine[1], provide an excellent resource as a training environment. These engines provide an alternate reality that can accurately depict not only real world geometry, but they can also achieve realistic physical effects such as radiation fields and blast physics. The real time photorealistic graphics available through the Unreal Engine add to its applicability to this project's needs. Moreover, this engine provides a very efficient means to modify the game's physics modeling, visual effects, and game play structure to fit the ever-evolving needs of a training curriculum. To this end, we have worked to extend the Unreal Engine to incorporate radiation effects dependent on distance from a radiological source, similar to what one would experience in the real world. In order to help better prepare first responders for using the radiological detection equipment vital for mission success, we have continued work, previously described by Sanders and Rhodes [2], on a Geiger counter readout display being implemented and added to the interface's Heads Up Display (HUD) as well as incorporating a physically accurate model within the engine that will allow the first responder to acclimate themselves to the sounds and possible size of the device. Moreover, the Karma Physics Engine, which works in conjunction with the Unreal Engine 2, accurately simulates fluid physics, blast effects, and basic player movements. It is this physics engine that has been the focus of our continued efforts and has been extended to include realistic modeling of radiological effects.

  17. The 1985 year book of diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides reviews of 343 significant articles from 79 journals. Topics include the following: expanding use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; sonography and pediatric radiology; radiographic evaluation of skeletal stress injuries; cost effectiveness of radiographic procedures; radiologic manifestations of iatrogenic complications; breast cancer diagnosis; interventional radiology and underutilization; and computed tomography in diagnosis and staging of neoplasms.

  18. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  1. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiologic table. 892.1980 Section 892.1980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A...

  3. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiological areas. 835.501 Section 835.501 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a... commensurate with existing and potential radiological hazards within the area. (c) One or more of the...

  4. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radiological areas. 835.501 Section 835.501 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a... commensurate with existing and potential radiological hazards within the area. (c) One or more of the...

  5. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radiological areas. 835.501 Section 835.501 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a... commensurate with existing and potential radiological hazards within the area. (c) One or more of the...

  6. 10 CFR 835.501 - Radiological areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radiological areas. 835.501 Section 835.501 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Entry Control Program § 835.501 Radiological areas. (a... commensurate with existing and potential radiological hazards within the area. (c) One or more of the...

  7. Natural Language Processing Technologies in Radiology Research and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tianrun; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Yu, Sheng; Kelil, Tatiana; Ripley, Beth; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The migration of imaging reports to electronic medical record systems holds great potential in terms of advancing radiology research and practice by leveraging the large volume of data continuously being updated, integrated, and shared. However, there are significant challenges as well, largely due to the heterogeneity of how these data are formatted. Indeed, although there is movement toward structured reporting in radiology (ie, hierarchically itemized reporting with use of standardized terminology), the majority of radiology reports remain unstructured and use free-form language. To effectively "mine" these large datasets for hypothesis testing, a robust strategy for extracting the necessary information is needed. Manual extraction of information is a time-consuming and often unmanageable task. "Intelligent" search engines that instead rely on natural language processing (NLP), a computer-based approach to analyzing free-form text or speech, can be used to automate this data mining task. The overall goal of NLP is to translate natural human language into a structured format (ie, a fixed collection of elements), each with a standardized set of choices for its value, that is easily manipulated by computer programs to (among other things) order into subcategories or query for the presence or absence of a finding. The authors review the fundamentals of NLP and describe various techniques that constitute NLP in radiology, along with some key applications.

  8. Natural Language Processing Technologies in Radiology Research and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tianrun; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Yu, Sheng; Kelil, Tatiana; Ripley, Beth; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    The migration of imaging reports to electronic medical record systems holds great potential in terms of advancing radiology research and practice by leveraging the large volume of data continuously being updated, integrated, and shared. However, there are significant challenges as well, largely due to the heterogeneity of how these data are formatted. Indeed, although there is movement toward structured reporting in radiology (ie, hierarchically itemized reporting with use of standardized terminology), the majority of radiology reports remain unstructured and use free-form language. To effectively “mine” these large datasets for hypothesis testing, a robust strategy for extracting the necessary information is needed. Manual extraction of information is a time-consuming and often unmanageable task. “Intelligent” search engines that instead rely on natural language processing (NLP), a computer-based approach to analyzing free-form text or speech, can be used to automate this data mining task. The overall goal of NLP is to translate natural human language into a structured format (ie, a fixed collection of elements), each with a standardized set of choices for its value, that is easily manipulated by computer programs to (among other things) order into subcategories or query for the presence or absence of a finding. The authors review the fundamentals of NLP and describe various techniques that constitute NLP in radiology, along with some key applications. ©RSNA, 2016 PMID:26761536

  9. Radiology education: a glimpse into the future.

    PubMed

    Scarsbrook, A F; Graham, R N J; Perriss, R W

    2006-08-01

    The digital revolution in radiology continues to advance rapidly. There are a number of interesting developments within radiology informatics which may have a significant impact on education and training of radiologists in the near future. These include extended functionality of handheld computers, web-based skill and knowledge assessment, standardization of radiological procedural training using simulated or virtual patients, worldwide videoconferencing via high-quality health networks such as Internet2 and global collaboration of radiological educational resources via comprehensive, multi-national databases such as the medical imaging resource centre initiative of the Radiological Society of North America. This article will explore the role of e-learning in radiology, highlight a number of useful web-based applications in this area, and explain how the current and future technological advances might best be incorporated into radiological training.

  10. Interventional radiology in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Ahmad, Farhan; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun; Adam, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiological percutaneous procedures are becoming all the more important in the curative or palliative management of elderly frail patients with multiple underlying comorbidities. They may serve either as alternative primary minimally invasive therapies or adjuncts to traditional surgical treatments. The present report provides a concise review of the most important interventional radiological procedures with a special focus on the treatment of the primary debilitating pathologies of the elderly population. The authors elaborate on the scientific evidence and latest developments of thermoablation of solid organ malignancies, palliative stent placement for gastrointestinal tract cancer, airway stenting for tracheobronchial strictures, endovascular management of aortic and peripheral arterial vascular disease, and cement stabilization of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The added benefits of high technical and clinical success coupled with lower procedural mortality and morbidity are highlighted. PMID:19503761

  11. A hypermedia radiological reporting system.

    PubMed

    De Simone, M; Drudi, F M; Lalle, C; Poggi, R; Ricci, F L

    1997-01-01

    Report is the main phase of a diagnostic process by images. The product of the process is the diagnostic report. We are proposing an hypermedia structure of diagnostic report in radiology, in order to facilitate exchange between radiologist and clinician (specialist in internal medicine or surgeon) on a clinical case, without anymore charge on the side of the radiologist but with an 'off-line' consultation. An hypermedia radiological report software will produce further advantages in many aspects: radiologist and clinician could access patient's data directly from DB on patients; radiologist could check DB on exemplary cases real-time; clinician could read preliminary and final reports available in network and make requests online. The proposed hyper-report system is modular. Starting from the 'report text' writing, edited by the radiologist on the basis of most significative images, it is possible to insert comments in text, drawing and 'external' images form.

  12. Radiology applications of financial accounting.

    PubMed

    Leibenhaut, Mark H

    2005-03-01

    A basic knowledge of financial accounting can help radiologists analyze business opportunities and examine the potential impacts of new technology or predict the adverse consequences of new competitors entering their service area. The income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement are the three basic financial statements that document the current financial position of the radiology practice and allow managers to monitor the ongoing financial operations of the enterprise. Pro forma, or hypothetical, financial statements can be generated to predict the financial impact of specific business decisions or investments on the profitability of the practice. Sensitivity analysis, or what-if scenarios, can be performed to determine the potential impact of changing key revenue, investment, operating cost or financial assumptions. By viewing radiology as both a profession and a business, radiologists can optimize their use of scarce economic resources and maximize the return on their financial investments.

  13. Environmental monitoring in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sol, S.; Garcia, R.; Sánchez, D.; Ramirez, G.; Chavarin, E. U.; Rivera, T.

    2017-01-01

    The procedures in Interventional Radiology involve long times of exposure and high number of radiographic images that bring higher radiation doses to patients, staff and environmental than those received in conventional Radiology. Currently for monitoring the dose, the thermoluminescent dosimetry use is recommended. The aim of this work was to carry out the monitoring of the environmental scattered radiation inside the IR room using two types of thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD-100 (reference dosimeter), CaSO4:Dy (synthesized in our laboratory). The results indicate that the TLD-100 is not effective for the environmental monitoring of low-energy Rx rooms. The CaSO4:Dy presented good behaviour over the 6 months of study. The results will be specific to each room so it is recommended such studies as part of the program of quality control of each Rx room.

  14. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    PubMed

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses.

  15. Otologic radiology with clinical correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Ruenes, R.; De la Cruz, A.

    1986-01-01

    This manual covers developments in the radiologic diagnosis of otologic problems. To demonstrate the appearance of each disorder comprehensively, a large number of radiographs are included, many of them annotated to highlight both diagnostic signs and the subtle aspects of normal pathologic anatomy. Contents: X-ray and Imaging Techniques and Anatomy. Congenital Malformations. Middle and External Ear Infections. Otosclerosis and Otospongiosis. Temporal Bone Fractures. The Facial Nerve. Tumors of the Temporal Bone and Skull Base. Tumors of the Cerebellopontine Angle. Cochlear Implants.

  16. Online social networking for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Heller, Matthew T; Nowitzki, Kristina M; Sherry, Steven J; Tillack, Allison A

    2015-01-01

    Online social networking services have changed the way we interact as a society and offer many opportunities to improve the way we practice radiology and medicine in general. This article begins with an introduction to social networking. Next, the latest advances in online social networking are reviewed, and areas where radiologists and clinicians may benefit from these new tools are discussed. This article concludes with several steps that the interested reader can take to become more involved in online social networking.

  17. Radiologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rubesin, Stephen E; Levine, Marc S

    2003-11-01

    Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract have many causes. Holes in the wall of gastrointestinal organs can be created by blunt or penetrating trauma, iatrogenic injury, inflammatory conditions that penetrate the serosa or adventitia, extrinsic neoplasms that invade the gastrointestinal tract, or primary neoplasms that penetrate outside the wall of gastrointestinal organs. This article provides a radiologic approach for investigating the wide variety of gastrointestinal perforations. General principles about contrast agents and studies are reviewed, and then perforations in specific gastrointestinal organs are discussed.

  18. Discovery of Klotho peptide antagonists against Wnt3 and Wnt3a target proteins using combination of protein engineering, protein-protein docking, peptide docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Shaher Bano; Ekhteiari Salmas, Ramin; Fatmi, M Qaiser; Durdagi, Serdar

    2017-12-01

    The Klotho is known as lifespan enhancing protein involved in antagonizing the effect of Wnt proteins. Wnt proteins are stem cell regulators, and uninterrupted exposure of Wnt proteins to the cell can cause stem and progenitor cell senescence, which may lead to aging. Keeping in mind the importance of Klotho in Wnt signaling, in silico approaches have been applied to study the important interactions between Klotho and Wnt3 and Wnt3a (wingless-type mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) integration site family members 3 and 3a). The main aim of the study is to identify important residues of the Klotho that help in designing peptides which can act as Wnt antagonists. For this aim, a protein engineering study is performed for Klotho, Wnt3 and Wnt3a. During the theoretical analysis of homology models, unexpected role of number of disulfide bonds and secondary structure elements has been witnessed in case of Wnt3 and Wnt3a proteins. Different in silico experiments were carried out to observe the effect of correct number of disulfide bonds on 3D protein models. For this aim, total of 10 molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for each system. Based on the protein-protein docking simulations of selected protein models of Klotho with Wnt3 and Wnt3a, different peptides derived from Klotho have been designed. Wnt3 and Wnt3a proteins have three important domains: Index finger, N-terminal domain and a patch of ∼10 residues on the solvent exposed surface of palm domain. Protein-peptide docking of designed peptides of Klotho against three important domains of palmitoylated Wnt3 and Wnt3a yields encouraging results and leads better understanding of the Wnt protein inhibition by proposed Klotho peptides. Further in vitro studies can be carried out to verify effects of novel designed peptides as Wnt antagonists.

  19. Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr.

    2002-10-01

    Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide a quick look at the extent and severity of the event. The primary result of the AMS Incident Response over flight is a map of estimated exposure rate on the ground along the flight path. Formerly, it was necessary to wait for the airplane to land before the map could be seen. Now, while the flight is still in progress, data are relayed via satellite directly from the aircraft to an operations center, where they are displayed and disseminated. This permits more timely utilization of results by decision makers and redirection of the mission to optimize its value. The current telemetry capability can cover all of North America. Extension to a global capability is under consideration.

  20. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dhatt, Harpreet S.; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, CT findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In this chapter we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and non-occlusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. In the setting of an acute abdomen, rapid evaluation is necessary to identify intraabdominal processes that require emergent surgical intervention (1). While a wide-range of intraabdominal diseases may be present from trauma to inflammation, one of the most feared disorders is mesenteric ischemia, also known as intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel (2). Initial imaging evaluation for intestinal ischemia is typically obtained with CT. Close attention to technique and search for key radiologic features with relation to the CT technique is required. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the vascular anatomy, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of various forms of mesenteric ischemia and their corresponding radiological findings on MDCT. At imaging, not only is inspection of the bowel itself important, but evaluation of the mesenteric fat, vasculature, and surrounding peritoneal cavity also helps improves accuracy in the diagnosis of bowel ischemia. PMID:26526436

  1. Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Maheras, S.J.; Rood, A.S.; Magnuson, S.O.; Sussman, M.E.; Bhatt, R.N.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals inadvertently intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed. The results of the analyses indicate compliance with established radiological criteria and provide reasonable assurance that public health and safety will be protected.

  2. Virtual management of radiology examinations in the virtual radiology environment using common object request broker architecture services.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K; Timboe, H L

    1999-05-01

    In the Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Medical Command is now embarking on an extremely exciting new project--creating a virtual radiology environment (VRE) for the management of radiology examinations. The business of radiology in the military is therefore being reengineered on several fronts by the VRE Project. In the VRE Project, a set of intelligent agent algorithms determine where examinations are to routed for reading bases on a knowledge base of the entire VRE. The set of algorithms, called the Meta-Manager, is hierarchical and uses object-based communications between medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and medical centers that have digital imaging network picture archiving and communications systems (DIN-PACS) networks. The communications is based on use of common object request broker architecture (CORBA) objects and services to send patient demographics and examination images from DIN-PACS networks in the MTFs to the DIN-PACS networks at the medical centers for diagnosis. The Meta-Manager is also responsible for updating the diagnosis at the originating MTF. CORBA services are used to perform secure message communications between DIN-PACS nodes in the VRE network. The Meta-Manager has a fail-safe architecture that allows the master Meta-Manager function to float to regional Meta-Manager sites in case of server failure. A prototype of the CORBA-based Meta-Manager is being developed by the University of Arizona's Computer Engineering Research Laboratory using the unified modeling language (UML) as a design tool. The prototype will implement the main functions described in the Meta-Manager design specification. The results of this project are expected to reengineer the process of radiology in the military and have extensions to commercial radiology environments.

  3. Nucleating emergency radiology specialization in India.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anjali; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2016-04-01

    Emergency radiology is being recognized as an important and distinct specialty of radiology which merits utmost attention of educators, radiology program curricula committees, and radiology practices in India. Providing an accurate but timely diagnosis requires a skilled judgement and a strong process framework, particularly in acute trauma setting or a life-threatening acute illness. However, due to a shortage of radiologists in India and lack of awareness and suitable opportunities, there has been no concerted movement towards emergency radiology subspecialty training or dedicated emergency radiology positions. It was with these gaps in mind that the Society for Emergency Radiology was envisioned in 2012 and formulated in 2013. The proposed role of the Society for Emergency Radiology is to identify deficiencies in the field, namely, lack of adequate exposure, lack of mentorship by experienced emergency radiologists, lack of suitable opportunities for emergency radiologists; establish standards of practice; and promote education and implementation research to bridge the gaps. Through collaboration with other societies and partnership with the journal Emergency Radiology, the Society for Emergency Radiology hopes to promote a free exchange of ideas, protocols, and multi-institutional trials across continents.

  4. Radiological/toxicological sabotage assessments at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.D.; Pascal, M.D.; Richardson, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the methods being employed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform graded assessments of radiological and toxicological sabotage vulnerability at Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. These assessments are conducted to ensure that effective measures are in place to prevent, mitigate, and respond to a potential sabotage event which may cause an airborne release of radiological/toxicological material, causing an adverse effect on the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. Department of Energy (DOE) Notice 5630.3A, {open_quotes}Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,{close_quotes} and the associated April 1993 DOE-Headquarters guidance provide the requirements and outline an eight-step process for hazardous material evaluation. The process requires the integration of information from a variety of disciplines, including safety, safeguards and security, and emergency preparedness. This paper summarizes WSRC`s approach towards implementation of the DOE requirements, and explains the inter-relationships between the Radiological and Toxicological Assessments developed using this process, and facility Hazard Assessment Reports (HAs), Safety Analysis Reports (SARs), and Facility Vulnerability Assessments (VAs).

  5. [European curriculum for further education in radiology].

    PubMed

    Ertl-Wagner, B

    2014-11-01

    The European training curriculum for radiology of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) aims to harmonize training in radiology in Europe. Levels I and II constitute the centerpiece of the curriculum. The ESR recommends a 5-year training period in radiology with 3 years of level I and 2 years of level II training. The undergraduate (U) level curriculum is conceived as a basis for teaching radiology in medical schools and consists of a modality-oriented U1 level and an organ-based U2 level. Level III curricula provide contents for subspecialty and fellowship training after board certification in radiology. The curricular contents of all parts of the European Training Curriculum are divided into the sections knowledge, skills as well as competences and attitudes. The European training curriculum is meant to be a recommendation and a basis for the development of national curricula, but is not meant to replace existing national regulations.

  6. Computer network security for the radiology enterprise.

    PubMed

    Eng, J

    2001-08-01

    As computer networks become an integral part of the radiology practice, it is appropriate to raise concerns regarding their security. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of computer network security risks and preventive strategies as they pertain to the radiology enterprise. A number of technologies are available that provide strong deterrence against attacks on networks and networked computer systems in the radiology enterprise. While effective, these technologies must be supplemented with vigilant user and system management.

  7. [Interventional radiology: current problems and new directions].

    PubMed

    Santos Martín, E; Crespo Vallejo, E

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, vascular and interventional radiology has become one of the fastest growing diagnostic and therapeutic specialties. This growth has been based on a fundamental concept: performing minimally invasive procedures under imaging guidance. This attractive combination has led to the interest of professionals from other clinical specialties outside radiology in performing this type of intervention. The future of vascular and interventional radiology, although uncertain, must be linked to clinical practice and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  8. A Simulation Learning Approach to Training First Responders for Radiological Emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Robert Lon; Rhodes, Graham S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the application of simulation learning technology, popularized by the emerging serious games industry, for training first responders to properly act in the event of a radiological emergency. Using state-of-the-art video game production tools and runtime engines as an enabling technology, simulation learning combines interactive virtual worlds based on validated engineering models with engaging storylines and scenarios that invoke the emotional response-and the corresponding human stress level-that first responders would encounter during a real-world emergency. For the application discussed here, in addition to providing engaging instruction about the fundamentals of radiological environments and the proper usage of radiological equipment, simulation learning prepares first responders to perform effectively under high stress and enables them to practice in teams.

  9. Radiology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan; Wallace, Roxanne; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Hip and groin pain are a common complaint among athletes of all ages, and may result from an acute injury or from chronic, repetitive trauma. Hip injuries can be intraarticular, extraarticular, or both. Labral abnormalities may occur in asymptomatic patients as well as in those with incapacitating symptoms and signs. Athletic hip injury leading to disabling intraarticular hip pain most commonly involves labral tear. The extraarticular causes are usually the result of overuse activity, leading to inflammation, tendonitis, or bursitis. In clinical practice, the term athletic pubalgia is used to describe exertional pubic or groin pain.

  10. Techniques and indications in radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, S.

    1987-01-01

    The stated purpose of this book is to review modern radiologic diagnostic techniques as applied to the study of the kidney and urinary tract, and their pertinent indications. This goal is partially accomplished in the first two segments of the book, which consist of about 100 pages. These include a synoptic description of various techniques - including classic uroradiologic studies such as excretory urography and retrograde pyelography, plus sonography, computed tomography, angiography, and nuclear medicine. The diagnostic signs and the differential diagnoses are fairly well described, aided by a profusion of tables and diagrams. The overall quality of the reproduction of the illustrations is good.

  11. Managerial accounting applications in radiology.

    PubMed

    Lexa, Frank James; Mehta, Tushar; Seidmann, Abraham

    2005-03-01

    We review the core issues in managerial accounting for radiologists. We introduce the topic and then explore its application to diagnostic imaging. We define key terms such as fixed cost, variable cost, marginal cost, and marginal revenue and discuss their role in understanding the operational and financial implications for a radiology facility by using a cost-volume-profit model. Our work places particular emphasis on the role of managerial accounting in understanding service costs, as well as how it assists executive decision making.

  12. Nuclear and radiological Security: Introduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James Christopher

    2016-02-24

    Nuclear security includes the prevention and detection of, and response to, theft, sabotage, unauthorized access, illegal transfer, or other malicious acts involving nuclear or other radioactive substances or their associated facilities. The presentation begins by discussing the concept and its importance, then moves on to consider threats--insider threat, sabotage, diversion of materials--with considerable emphasis on the former. The intrusion at Pelindaba, South Africa, is described as a case study. The distinction between nuclear security and security of radiological and portable sources is clarified, and the international legal framework is touched upon. The paper concludes by discussing the responsibilities of the various entities involved in nuclear security.

  13. Ebola virus disease: radiology preparedness.

    PubMed

    Bluemke, David A; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2015-02-01

    At present, there is a major emphasis on Ebola virus disease (EVD) preparedness training at medical facilities throughout the United States. Failure to have proper EVD procedures in place was cited as a major reason for infection of medical personnel in the United States. Medical imaging does not provide diagnosis of EVD, but patient assessment in the emergency department and treatment isolation care unit is likely to require imaging services. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of relevant aspects of EVD disease and preparedness relevant to the radiologic community.

  14. Essential radiology for head injury

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, D.W.H.; Kreel, L.

    1988-01-01

    The book covers the guidelines established by the Royal College of Radiologists for the radiographic evaluation of head injuries. It presents a chapter reviewing the normal radiologic anatomy of the skull in six different projections. The advantages and limitations of each projection are addressed. The third chapter, contains 43 radiographs dedicated to the calcified pineal gland and other intracranial calcifications. The book reports on specific types of fractures: linear fractures of the vault, depressed fractures of the vault, fractures in children, fractures of the base of the skull, and fractures of the facial bones.

  15. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Messick, C.; Pham, M.; Ridgeway, J.; Smith, R.

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this response time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.

  16. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    SciTech Connect

    Konzen, K.K.; Langsted, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  17. Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Consequence Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear CMAD provides scientific support and technical expertise for decontamination of buildings, building contents, public infrastructure, agriculture, and associated environmental media.

  18. Radiation exposure in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, N. G. V.; Braz, D.; Vallim, M. A.; Filho, L. G. P.; Azevedo, F. S.; Barroso, R. C.; Lopes, R. T.

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate dose values in patients and staff involved in some interventional radiology procedures. Doses have been measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters for single procedures (such as renal and cerebral arteriography, transjungular intrahepatic portasystemic shunt (TIPS) and chemoembolization). The magnitude of doses through the hands of interventional radiologists has been studied. Dose levels were evaluated in three points for patients (eye, thyroid and gonads). The dose-area product (DAP) was also investigated using a Diamentor (PTW-M2). The dose in extremities was estimated for a professional who generally performed one TIPS, two chemoembolizations, two cerebral arteriographies and two renal arteriographies in a week. The estimated annual radiation dose was converted to effective dose as suggested by the 453-MS/Brazil norm The annual dose values were 137.25 mSv for doctors, 40.27 mSv for nurses and 51.95 mSv for auxiliary doctors, and all these annual dose values are below the limit established. The maximum values of the dose obtained for patients were 6.91, 10.92 and 15.34 mGy close to eye, thyroid and gonads, respectively. The DAP values were evaluated for patients in the same interventional radiology procedures. The dose and DAP values obtained are in agreement with values encountered in the literature.

  19. Forensic aspects of maxillofacial radiology.

    PubMed

    Wood, R E

    2006-05-15

    Radiology has been used extensively in conventional dental identification, anatomically based identification and identification using maxillofacial skeletal landmarks such as the frontal sinus. Examples of these are well documented in the literature. The purpose of this paper was to revisit the methods where radiographic methods may be used to determine identity using the teeth, the root structures and the frontal sinuses. Additionally suggestions are offered for management of radiography in mass disasters and cases where age determination is required. Computer assisted tomography can be used in the assessment of the degree of fit of a weapon to a wound in cases of blunt force skull injury and plane films can assist in depicting the pattern of post mortem skull fractures. Micro-computed tomography has been used in matching weapons to wounds in sharp-force injury cases. The radiologist's role in cases of civil litigation and fraud is discussed and case examples are given. There are gaps in the science where radiological methods are used. The author offers several suggestions for possible research projects to close some of these gaps.

  20. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery.

  1. Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken place–techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation–the so-called second line of defense.

  2. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  3. Undergraduate radiology education in the era of dynamism in medical curriculum: an educational perspective.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Thomas N B; Chhem, Rethy; Wang, Shih-Chang; Vujnovic, Sasa

    2011-06-01

    Radiology undergraduate curriculum has undergone a tremendous transformation in the decades reflecting a change in the structure, content and delivery of instruction. These changes are not unique to the discipline, but rather a response in the cycle of the re-engineering process in the medical curriculum in order to ensure its proper role into the ever-changing context. Radiology education is now more integrated across the curriculum than ever. The diversity of how radiology is being taught within the medical undergraduate curriculum is extensive and promising with the expanding role of the radiologist in the spectrum within the medical curriculum. A strong interface between the medical student and the clinicians must always be integrated in the learning process in order to convey the essential and practical use of the different aspects of radiology essential to the student's career as a future clinician. With the recent advancement in educational and technological innovations, radiology education is mobilized in the most pioneering ways, stimulating a rekindled interest in the field of medical imaging. This paper describes the increasing interest in current role of undergraduate radiology education in the context of constant medical curriculum innovations and in the digital age.

  4. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless otherwise specified, the quantities used in the records required by this part shall be clearly indicated...

  5. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units. Unless otherwise specified, the quantities used in the records required by this part shall be clearly indicated...

  6. 10 CFR 835.4 - Radiological units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... other conventional units, such as, dpm, dpm/100 cm2 or mass units. The SI units, becquerel (Bq), gray... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radiological units. 835.4 Section 835.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION General Provisions § 835.4 Radiological units....

  7. Radiological assistance program: Region I. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Musolino, S.V.; Kuehner, A.V.; Hull, A.P.

    1985-07-15

    The purpose of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is to make DOE resources available and provide emergency assistance to state and local agencies in order to control radiological hazards, protect the public health and safety, and minimize the loss of property. This plan is an integral part of a nationwide program of radiological assistance established by the US DOE, and is implemented on a regional basis. The Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) Radiological Assistance Program is applicable to DOE Region I, which consists of the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia. The BHO RAP-1 has been developed to: (a) ensure the availability of an effective radiological assistance capability to ensure the protection of persons and property; (b) provide guidelines to RAP-1 Team personnel for the evaluation of radiological incidents and implementation of corrective actions; (c) maintain liaison with other DOE installations, Federal, State and local organizations which may become involved in radiological assistance operations in Region I; and (d) encourage development of a local capability to cope with radiological incidents.

  8. Radiological Defense. Planning and Operations Guide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This guide is a reprint of published and draft materials from the Federal Civil Defense Guide. This guide is intended to assist the student in planning, developing, implementing and operating a local, county, or state radiological defense (RADEF) system. The state and local radiological defense program objectives are to create an effective and…

  9. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

    2009-10-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  10. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Auxiliary Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    AADS curricular guidelines suggest objectives for these areas of dental auxiliary radiology: physical principles of X-radiation in dentistry, related radiobiological concepts, principles of radiologic health, radiographic technique, x-ray films and intensifying screens, factors contributing to film quality, darkroom, and normal variations in…

  11. Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

    This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

  12. 76 FR 49458 - TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments AGENCY... hospitals of an opportunity for net adjusted payments for radiology services for which TRICARE payments were... radiology services specified in the regulation as being reimbursed under the allowable charge...

  13. Offsite dose calculation manual guidance: Standard radiological effluent controls for pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, W.W.; Essig, T.H.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains guidance which may be voluntarily used by licensees who choose to implement the provision of Generic Letter 89-01, which allows Radiological Effect Technical Specifications (RETS) to be removed from the main body of the Technical Specifications and placed in the Offsite Dose Calculation Manual (ODCM). Guidance is provided for Standard Effluent Controls definitions, Controls for effluent monitoring instrumentation, Controls for effluent releases, Controls for radiological environmental monitoring, and the basis for Controls. Guidance on the formulation of RETS has been available in draft from (NUREG-0471 and -0473) for a number of years; the current effort simply recasts those RETS into Standard Radiological Effluent Controls for application to the ODCM. Also included for completeness are: (1) radiological environmental monitoring program guidance previously which had been available as a Branch Technical Position (Rev. 1, November 1979); (2) existing ODCM guidance; and (3) a reproduction of generic Letter 89-01.

  14. Radiological Illustration of Spontaneous Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kartik; Koticha, Raj; Dey, Amit K.; Anandpara, Karan; Agrawal, Rajat; Sarvothaman, Madhva P.; Thakkar, Hemangini

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The role of radiology is of utmost importance not only in diagnosing s-OHSS but also in ruling out other cystic ovarian diseases and to determine the underlying etiology and course of the disease. We presented a radiological algorithm for diagnosing the various causes of s-OHSS. Case Report A 26-year-old female, gravida one was referred to radiology department with history of lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting since 2 days which was gradual in onset and progression. The patient had no significant medical and surgical history. Conclusions This article illustrates and emphasizes that diagnosis of s-OHSS and its etiology can be completely evaluated radiologically. Biochemical markers will confirm the radiological diagnosis. PMID:25960820

  15. Radiological characterization of Yankee Nuclear Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.X.; Cumming, E.R.; Hollenbeck, P. )

    1993-01-01

    The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is the determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. This paper describes the site radiological characterization program that has been implemented for decommissioning the Yankee plant. Radiological scoping surveys were completed to support submittal of a decommissioning plan to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by October 1, 1993. These surveys were designed to provide sufficient detail to estimate the extent of contamination, volume of radiological waste, activity of radiological waste, and personnel dose estimates for removal activities. Surveys were conducted both inside and on the grounds outside of the Yankee plant buildings. Survey results were combined with analytical evaluations to characterize the Yankee site.

  16. American diagnostic radiology residency and fellowship programmes.

    PubMed

    Rumack, Carol Masters

    2011-03-01

    American Diagnostic Radiology Residency and Fellowship programmes are Graduate Medical Education programmes in the United States (US) equivalent to the Postgraduate Medical Education programmes in Singapore. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited diagnostic radiology residency programmes require 5 years total with Post Graduate Year (PGY) 1 year internship in a clinical specialty, e.g. Internal Medicine following medical school. PGY Years 2 to 5 are the core years which must include Radiology Physics, Radiation Biology and rotations in 9 required subspecialty rotations: Abdominal, Breast, Cardiothoracic, Musculoskeletal, Neuroradiology, Nuclear and Paediatric Radiology, Obstetric & Vascular Ultrasound and Vascular Interventional Radiology. A core curriculum of lectures must be organised by the required 9 core subspecialty faculty. All residents (PGY 2 to 4) take a yearly American College of Radiology Diagnostic In-Training Examination based on national benchmarks of medical knowledge in each subspecialty. Because the American Board of Radiology (ABR) examinations are changing, until 2012, residents have to take 3 ABR examinations: (i) ABR physics examination in the PGY 2 to 3 years, (ii) a written examination at the start of the PGY 5 year and (iii) an oral exam at the end of the PGY 5 year. Beginning in 2013, there will be only 2 examinations: (i) the physics and written examinations after PGY 4 will become a combined core radiology examination. Beginning in 2015, the final certifying examination will be given 15 months after the completion of residency. After residency, ACGME fellowships in PGY 6 are all one-year optional programmes which focus on only one subspecialty discipline. There are 4 ACGME accredited fellowships which have a Board Certifi cation Examination: Neuroradiology, Nuclear, Paediatric and Vascular Interventional Radiology. Some ACGME fellowships do not have a certifying examination: Abdominal, Endovascular

  17. The interventional radiology business plan.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Michael V; Meek, Mary E; Kaufman, John A

    2012-09-01

    Strategic planning and business planning are processes commonly employed by organizations that exist in competitive environments. Although it is difficult to prove a causal relationship between formal strategic/business planning and positive organizational performance, there is broad agreement that formal strategic and business plans are components of successful organizations. The various elements of strategic plans and business plans are not common in the vernacular of practicing physicians. As health care becomes more competitive, familiarity with these tools may grow in importance. Herein we provide an overview of formal strategic and business planning, and offer a roadmap for an interventional radiology-specific plan that may be useful for organizations confronting competitive and financial threats.

  18. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  19. Branching out with filmless radiology.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, R; Honea, R

    1999-05-01

    Texas Children's Hospital, a 456 bed pediatric hospital located in the Texas Medical Center, has been constructing a large-scale picture archiving and communications system (PACS), including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and computed radiography (CR). Until recently, filmless radiology operations have been confined to the imaging department, the outpatient treatment center, and the emergency center. As filmless services expand to other clinical services, the PACS staff must engage each service in a dialog to determine the appropriate level of support required. The number and type of image examinations, the use of multiple modalities and comparison examinations, and the relationship between viewing and direct patient care activities have a bearing on the number and type of display stations provided. Some of the information about customer services is contained in documentation already maintained by the imaging department. For example, by a custom report from the radiology information system (RIS), we were able to determine the number and type of examinations ordered by each referring physician for the previous 6 months. By compiling these by clinical service, we were able to determine our biggest customers by examination type and volume. Another custom report was used to determine who was requesting old examinations from the film library. More information about imaging usage was gathered by means of a questionnaire. Some customers view images only where patients are also seen, while some services view images independently from the patient. Some services use their conference rooms for critical image viewing such as treatment planning. Additional information was gained from geographical surveys of where films are currently produced, delivered by the film library, and viewed. In some areas, available space dictates the type and configuration of display station that can be used. Active participation in the decision process by the

  20. 76 FR 64960 - Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... INFORMATION: The role and functions of the Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee (FRPCC... for the FRPCC meeting includes: (1) Introductions, (2) Radiological and Emergency Preparedness...

  1. Technical basis for removal of 221-T tunnel from airborne radiological area status

    SciTech Connect

    Geuther, W.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-30

    This document provides the technical basis for removal of the 221-T Tunnel from airborne radiological control. T Plant Radiological Control has evaluated air sampling data and engineering controls, and determined the necessary administrative controls to make this transition. With these administrative controls (specified within document) in place, the tunnel can be removed from Airborne Radioactive Area status. The removal of the tunnel from airborne status will allow work to be performed within the tunnel under controlled conditions, as outlined in this technical basis, without the use of respiratory protection equipment.

  2. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  3. Justification and radiology: some ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Sia, Santiago

    2009-07-01

    This paper, which seeks to address the issue of justification in radiology, intends firstly to comment on the current discussion of the ethical foundation of radiological practice that focuses on the move from utilitarianism to the rights-centred criterion. Secondly, and this constitutes the bulk of the paper, it aims to offer a philosophical perspective, which is hoped will lead to a consideration of certain specific areas in ethical decision-making in the attempts here to deal with the main issue of justification in radiology.

  4. AP600 containment purge radiological analysis

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, M.; Schulz, J.; Tan, C.

    1995-02-01

    The AP600 Project is a passive pressurized water reactor power plant which is part of the Design Certification and First-of-a-Kind Engineering effort under the Advanced Light Water Reactor program. Included in this process is the design of the containment air filtration system which will be the subject of this paper. We will compare the practice used by previous plants with the AP600 approach to meet the goals of industry standards in sizing the containment air filtration system. The radiological aspects of design are of primary significance and will be the focus of this paper. The AP600 Project optimized the design to combine the functions of the high volumetric flow rate, low volumetric flow rate, and containment cleanup and other filtration systems into one multi-functional system. This achieves a more simplified, standardized, and lower cost design. Studies were performed to determine the possible concentrations of radioactive material in the containment atmosphere and the effectiveness of the purge system to keep concentrations within 10CFR20 limits and within offsite dose objectives. The concentrations were determined for various reactor coolant system leakage rates and containment purge modes of operation. The resultant concentrations were used to determine the containment accessibility during various stages of normal plant operation including refueling. The results of the parametric studies indicate that a dual train purge system with a capacity of 4,000 cfm per train is more than adequate to control the airborne radioactivity levels inside containment during normal plant operation and refueling, and satisfies the goals of ANSI/ANS-56.6-1986 and limits the amount of radioactive material released to the environment per ANSI/ANS 59.2-1985 to provide a safe environment for plant personnel and offsite residents.

  5. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    LANL

    2008-05-12

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane

  6. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    ScienceCinema

    LANL

    2016-07-12

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane

  7. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  8. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1989-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  9. Environmental Protection Agency Radiological Emergency Response Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this Plan is to describe EPA's concept of operations to implement the various actions, when responding to a threatened or actual radiological releases in emergencies and terrorist incidents.

  10. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Mohd Abd Wahab; Ali, Hamrah Mohd

    2011-07-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency.

  11. Apparatus for safeguarding a radiological source

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M

    2014-10-07

    A tamper detector is provided for safeguarding a radiological source that is moved into and out of a storage location through an access porthole for storage and use. The radiological source is presumed to have an associated shipping container approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for transporting the radiological source. The tamper detector typically includes a network of sealed tubing that spans at least a portion of the access porthole. There is an opening in the network of sealed tubing that is large enough for passage therethrough of the radiological source and small enough to prevent passage therethrough of the associated shipping cask. Generally a gas source connector is provided for establishing a gas pressure in the network of sealed tubing, and a pressure drop sensor is provided for detecting a drop in the gas pressure below a preset value.

  12. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options.

  13. Data Standards in Tele-radiology

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Mansoor; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Jebraeily, Mohamad; Habibi-koolaee, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Data standards play an important role to provide interoperability among different system. As other applications of telemedicine, the tele-radiology needs these standards to work properly. In this article, we conducted a review to introduce some data standards about tele-radiology. By searching PUBMED and Google Scholar database, we find more relevant articles about data standards in tele-radiology. Three categories of standards identified, including data interchange, document and terminology standards. Data interchange standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of the format of a massage between systems, such as DICOM and HL7. Document standards, including those which facilitate the contents of a massage, such as DICOM SR and HL7 CDA. And terminology standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of concepts of the domain. Since, the harmonization between different standards are important to meet interoperability, so the more effort is needed to conduct harmonization between tele-radiology standards and other domain. PMID:26236084

  14. Data Standards in Tele-radiology.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mansoor; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Jebraeily, Mohamad; Habibi-Koolaee, Mahdi

    2015-06-01

    Data standards play an important role to provide interoperability among different system. As other applications of telemedicine, the tele-radiology needs these standards to work properly. In this article, we conducted a review to introduce some data standards about tele-radiology. By searching PUBMED and Google Scholar database, we find more relevant articles about data standards in tele-radiology. Three categories of standards identified, including data interchange, document and terminology standards. Data interchange standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of the format of a massage between systems, such as DICOM and HL7. Document standards, including those which facilitate the contents of a massage, such as DICOM SR and HL7 CDA. And terminology standards, including those which facilitate the understanding of concepts of the domain. Since, the harmonization between different standards are important to meet interoperability, so the more effort is needed to conduct harmonization between tele-radiology standards and other domain.

  15. Radiological safety training for uranium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

  16. What is Diagnostic Radiology's Place in Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Bull, J. W. D.

    1974-01-01

    The question that the title of this lecture poses must depend considerably on the attitude of physicians and surgeons. I have indicated the very low position diagnostic radiology holds in this country relative to our peers in medicine elsewhere. If its improvement is considered to be warranted, we must: (1) Interest medical students at the beginning of their career. (2) Bear in mind that radiologists are likely to be able to teach some anatomy but the reciprocal seldom applies. (3) Obtain chairs in radiology, which are desperately needed. (4) Obtain the acceptance by the medical establishment of the proper place of radiology in clinical medicine. (5) See to the reduction in numbers of unnecessary x-ray examinations. (6) Press for the improvement and enlargement of radiological departments with proper provision for expansion. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 5 PMID:4855415

  17. Corporate social responsibility of future radiology professionals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2011-01-01

    Plagued by difficult economic times, many radiology managers may find themselves faced with ethical dilemmas surrounding ongoing organizational pressures to maintain high levels of productivity with restricted resources. This often times tests the level of moral resilience and corporate social consciousness of even the most experienced radiology professionals. A study was conducted to determine what Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) orientation and viewpoint future radiology professionals may have. The results of the study indicate that these study participants may initially consider patient care more important than profit maximization. Study results indicate that these specific future radiology professionals will not need laws, legal sanctions, and intensified rules to force them to act ethically. However,they may need ongoing training as to the necessity of profit maximization if they seek the highest quality of care possible for their patients.

  18. How to Read Your Radiology Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... prepare a report summarizing the findings and impressions. Electronic Health Records Many patients today can access their health records — including radiology reports — electronically online. Electronic access to health records allows patients to make ...

  19. 42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards for patients and... qualified full-time, part-time, or consulting radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and... osteopathy who is qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel designated...

  20. 42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards for patients and... qualified full-time, part-time, or consulting radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and... osteopathy who is qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel designated...

  1. 42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards for patients and... qualified full-time, part-time, or consulting radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and... osteopathy who is qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel designated...

  2. 42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards for patients and... qualified full-time, part-time, or consulting radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and... osteopathy who is qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel designated...

  3. 42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards for patients and... qualified full-time, part-time, or consulting radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and... osteopathy who is qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel designated...

  4. Radiologic Professionalism in Modern Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Hanneman, Kate; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Meyer, Elaine C; Brown, Stephen D

    2015-10-01

    Modern radiology is at the forefront of technological progress in medicine, a position that often places unique challenges on its professional character. This article uses "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," a document published in 2002 and endorsed by several major radiology organizations, as a lens for exploring professional challenges in modern radiology. The three main tenets of the Charter emphasize patient welfare, patient autonomy, and the reduction of disparities in health care distribution. This article reviews the ways in which modern technology and financial structures potentially create stressors on professionalism in radiology, while highlighting the opportunities they provide for radiologists seeking to fulfill the professional goals articulated in the Charter. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and voice recognition systems have transformed the speed of radiology and enhanced the ability of radiologists to improve patient care but also have brought new tensions to the workplace. Although teleradiology may improve global access to radiologists, it may also promote the commoditization of radiology, which diminishes the professional stature of radiologists. Social media and patient portals provide radiologists with new forums for interacting with the public and patients, potentially promoting patient welfare. However, patient privacy and autonomy are important considerations. Finally, modern financial structures provide radiologists with both entrepreneurial opportunities as well as the temptation for unprofessional conduct. Each of these advances carries the potential for professional growth while testing the professional stature of radiology. By considering the risks and benefits of emerging technologies in the modern radiology world, radiologists can chart an ethical and professional future path.

  5. Radiological interventions in malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction is commonly caused by gall bladder carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic nodes. Percutaneous interventions play an important role in managing these patients. Biliary drainage, which forms the major bulk of radiological interventions, can be palliative in inoperable patients or pre-operative to improve liver function prior to surgery. Other interventions include cholecystostomy and radiofrequency ablation. We present here the indications, contraindications, technique and complications of the radiological interventions performed in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27247718

  6. Radiological Survey and Remediation Report DRMO Yard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-11-01

    as "affected" areas as defined by NUREG /CR-5849 Manual for Conducting Radiological Surveys in Support of License Termination, (NRC, 1992): The tire...requiring survey as defined by NUREG /CR-5849, due to the uncertainty of the boundary where crushing was performed in the north end of the yard. i The...identified the following areas as "affected" areas as defined by NUREG /CR-5849 Manual for Conducting Radiological Surveys in Support of I License

  7. A Design Protocol to Develop Radiology Dashboards

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Mahtab

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The main objective of this descriptive and development research was to introduce a design protocol to develop radiology dashboards. Material and methods: The first step was to determine key performance indicators for radiology department. The second step was to determine required infrastructure for implementation of radiology dashboards. Infrastructure was extracted from both data and technology perspectives. The third step was to determine main features of the radiology dashboards. The fourth step was to determine the key criteria for evaluating the dashboards. In all these steps, non-probability sampling methods including convenience and purposive were employed and sample size determined based on a persuasion model. Results: Results showed that there are 92 KPIs, 10 main features for designing dashboards and 53 key criteria for dashboards evaluation. As well as, a Prototype of radiology management dashboards in four aspects including services, clients, personnel and cost-income were implemented and evaluated. Applying such dashboards could help managers to enhance performance, productivity and quality of services in radiology department. PMID:25568585

  8. Assessment of radiological protection systems among diagnostic radiology facilities in North East India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Thokchom Dewan; Jayaraman, T; Arunkumar Sharma, B

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to assess the adequacy level of radiological protection systems available in the diagnostic radiology facilities located in three capital cities of North East (NE) India. It further attempts to understand, using a multi-disciplinary approach, how the safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology framed by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to achieve adequate radiological protection in facilities, have been perceived, conceptualized, and applied accordingly in these facilities. About 30 diagnostic radiology facilities were randomly selected from three capitals of states in NE India; namely Imphal (Manipur), Shillong (Meghalaya) and Guwahati (Assam). A semi-structured questionnaire developed based on a multi-disciplinary approach was used for this study. It was observed that radiological practices undertaken in these facilities were not exactly in line with safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology of the AERB and the IAEA. About 50% of the facilities had registered/licensed x-ray equipment with the AERB. More than 80% of the workers did not use radiation protective devices, although these devices were available in the facilities. About 85% of facilities had no institutional risk management system. About 70% of the facilities did not carry out periodic quality assurance testing of their x-ray equipment or surveys of radiation leakage around the x-ray room, and did not display radiation safety indicators in the x-ray rooms. Workers in these facilities exhibited low risk perception about the risks associated with these practices. The majority of diagnostic radiology facilities in NE India did not comply with the radiological safety codes/standards framed by the AERB and IAEA. The study found inadequate levels of radiological protection systems in the majority of facilities. This study suggests a need to establish firm measures that comply with the radiological safety codes/standards of the

  9. Radiologic diagnosis of explosion casualties.

    PubMed

    Eastridge, Brian J; Blackbourne, Lorne; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2008-01-01

    The threat of terrorist events on domestic soil remains an ever-present risk. Despite the notoriety of unconventional weapons, the mainstay in the armament of the terrorist organization is the conventional explosive. Conventional explosives are easily weaponized and readily obtainable, and the recipes are widely available over the Internet. According to the US Department of State and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, over one half of the global terrorist events involve explosions, averaging two explosive events per day worldwide in 2005 (Terrorism Research Center. Available at www.terrorism.com. Accessed April 1, 2007). The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System: Emergency Medical Services at the Crossroads, published by the Institute of Medicine, states that explosions were the most common cause of injuries associated with terrorism (Institute of Medicine Report: The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System: Emergency Medical Services at the Crossroads. Washington DC: National Academic Press, 2007). Explosive events have the potential to inflict numerous casualties with multiple injuries. The complexity of this scenario is exacerbated by the fact that few providers or medical facilities have experience with mass casualty events in which human and material resources can be rapidly overwhelmed. Care of explosive-related injury is based on same principles as that of standard trauma management paradigms. The basic difference between explosion-related injury and other injury mechanisms are the number of patients and multiplicity of injuries, which require a higher allocation of resources. With this caveat, the appropriate utilization of radiology resources has the potential to impact in-hospital diagnosis and triage and is an essential element in optimizing the management of the explosive-injured patients.

  10. Development of automated detection of radiology reports citing adrenal findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zopf, Jason; Langer, Jessica; Boonn, William; Kim, Woojin; Zafar, Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Indeterminate incidental findings pose a challenge to both the radiologist and the ordering physician as their imaging appearance is potentially harmful but their clinical significance and optimal management is unknown. We seek to determine if it is possible to automate detection of adrenal nodules, an indeterminate incidental finding, on imaging examinations at our institution. Using PRESTO (Pathology-Radiology Enterprise Search tool), a newly developed search engine at our institution that mines dictated radiology reports, we searched for phrases used by attendings to describe incidental adrenal findings. Using these phrases as a guide, we designed a query that can be used with the PRESTO index. The results were refined using a modified version of NegEx to eliminate query terms that have been negated within the report text. In order to validate these findings we used an online random date generator to select two random weeks. We queried our RIS database for all reports created on those dates and manually reviewed each report to check for adrenal incidental findings. This survey produced a ground- truth dataset of reports citing adrenal incidental findings against which to compare query performance. We further reviewed the false positives and negatives identified by our validation study, in an attempt to improve the performance query. This algorithm is an important step towards automating the detection of incidental adrenal nodules on cross sectional imaging at our institution. Subsequently, this query can be combined with electronic medical record data searches to determine the clinical significance of these findings through resultant follow-up.

  11. The End of Radiology? Three Threats to the Future Practice of Radiology.

    PubMed

    Chockley, Katie; Emanuel, Ezekiel

    2016-12-01

    Radiology faces at least three major, potentially fatal, threats. First, as care moves out of the hospital, there will be a decrease in demand for imaging. More care in patients' homes and in other nonhospital settings means fewer medical tests, including imaging. Second, payment reform and, in particular, bundled payments and capitation mean that imaging will become a cost rather than a profit center. These shifts in provider payment will decrease the demand for imaging and disrupt the practice of radiology. Potentially, the ultimate threat to radiology is machine learning. Machine learning will become a powerful force in radiology in the next 5 to 10 years and could end radiology as a thriving specialty.

  12. Evidence-based radiology: review and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Medina, L Santiago; Blackmore, C Craig

    2007-08-01

    Evidence-based radiology (EBR) is an important tool for the practice of radiology. The user of the EBR approach identifies evidence in a systematic fashion and then assimilates information through in-depth, explicit critical review of the best-designed and most recent literature on the subject in question. Clinical decision making is then based on the best current evidence, clinical expertise, and patient values. Substantial progress has been made in the review and dissemination of EBR. Dissemination of EBR within radiology has two critical aspects. The first is increased understanding of the methods required for EBR and of the appropriate use of EBR. The second important component is the dissemination of the data and critical literature reviews necessary to allow use of the EBR approach. Resources available for both EBR methods and EBR data in radiology include societies, journals, medical meetings, Web sites, and textbooks. Although radiology has made important progress in this field in recent years, the specialty is still behind other specialties that have been at the forefront of evidence-based medicine in the past decade.

  13. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake.

  14. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Overview of FRMAC Operations

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    In the event of a major radiological emergency, 17 federal agencies with various statutory responsibilities have agreed to coordinate their efforts at the emergency scene under the umbrella of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This cooperative effort will ensure that all federal radiological assistance fully supports their efforts to protect the public. the mandated federal cooperation ensures that each agency can obtain the data critical to its specific responsibilities. This Overview of Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) describes the FRMAC response activities to a major radiological emergency. It also describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the off-site areas.

  15. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  16. Diagnostic radiology in the tropics: technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; McLean, Ian Donald

    2011-11-01

    An estimated two thirds of the world's population is currently without access to diagnostic radiology services, and most of them live in resource-limited tropical regions with harsh environments. Most patients are diagnosed and treated in poorly equipped government-funded hospitals and clinics that have insufficiently trained staff and are barely operational. Any available imaging equipment is likely to be functioning suboptimally and be poorly maintained. The root of the problem is usually a lack of know-how and a quality culture, combined with insufficient basic equipment and infrastructure. Radiological imaging is an essential aspect of primary care and used in the critical diagnosis and management of trauma, tuberculosis, pneumonia, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, cancer, and other respiratory and abdominal diseases. Considerations such as quality management and infrastructure, personnel, equipment, and radiation protection and safety are important to ensure the proper functioning and rational use of a diagnostic radiology facility in the tropics.

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking Klatskin tumour on radiology.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Yousaf Bashir; Sohail, Abdul Malik Amir Humza; Haider, Zishan

    2015-04-09

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is categorised into two distinct types, AIP type 1 and 2. Although there can be multisystem involvement, rarely, the cholangitis associated with AIP can present radiologically in a manner similar to that of Klatskin tumour. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who was almost misdiagnosed with a Klatskin tumour because of the similarity in radiological features of the two aforementioned clinical entities. The patient presented with a history of jaundice, pruritus and abdominal pain, and work up showed deranged liver function tests, elevated cancer antigen 19-9 levels and positive antinuclear antibodies. CT scan of the abdomen showed findings suggestive of Klatskin tumour but due to diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and surrounding low-attenuation halo found on a closer review, a diagnosis of AIP was performed. The patient was started on standard corticosteroid therapy and responded well, with complete resolution of the radiological findings.

  18. What Does Competence Entail in Interventional Radiology?

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran; Keeling, Aoife N.; Khan, Reenam S.; Ashrafian, Hutan; Arora, Sonal; Nagpal, Kamal; Burrill, Joshua; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos; Hamady, Mohamad

    2010-02-15

    Interventional radiology is a relatively new speciality and may be referred to as 'image-guided surgery without a scalpel.' Training and accreditation bodies regard interventional radiology training as being 'different' from general radiology because of the additional need for dexterity and clinical acumen. Due to the multidimensional role of an interventional radiologist, a practitioner in this discipline must have a number of the competencies of anesthetists, surgeons, and radiologists. The attributes required of an interventional radiologist are akin to those required of a surgeon. This paper gives an overview of the skills required to be a competent interventional radiologist along with a succinct introduction to methods of assessment of technical and non-technical skills.

  19. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Iaccarino, Vittorio Venetucci, Pietro

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  20. Radiology: "killer app" for next generation networks?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Kevin M

    2004-03-01

    The core principles of digital radiology were well developed by the end of the 1980 s. During the following decade tremendous improvements in computer technology enabled realization of those principles at an affordable cost. In this decade work can focus on highly distributed radiology in the context of the integrated health care enterprise. Over the same period computer networking has evolved from a relatively obscure field used by a small number of researchers across low-speed serial links to a pervasive technology that affects nearly all facets of society. Development directions in network technology will ultimately provide end-to-end data paths with speeds that match or exceed the speeds of data paths within the local network and even within workstations. This article describes key developments in Next Generation Networks, potential obstacles, and scenarios in which digital radiology can become a "killer app" that helps to drive deployment of new network infrastructure.

  1. Image Sharing in Radiology-A Primer.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Arindam R; Stalcup, Seth; Sharma, Arjun; Sato, T Shawn; Gupta, Pushpender; Lee, Yueh Z; Malone, Christopher; McBee, Morgan; Hotaling, Elise L; Kansagra, Akash P

    2017-03-01

    By virtue of its information technology-oriented infrastructure, the specialty of radiology is uniquely positioned to be at the forefront of efforts to promote data sharing across the healthcare enterprise, including particularly image sharing. The potential benefits of image sharing for clinical, research, and educational applications in radiology are immense. In this work, our group-the Association of University Radiologists (AUR) Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on Image Sharing-reviews the benefits of implementing image sharing capability, introduces current image sharing platforms and details their unique requirements, and presents emerging platforms that may see greater adoption in the future. By understanding this complex ecosystem of image sharing solutions, radiologists can become important advocates for the successful implementation of these powerful image sharing resources.

  2. Advanced Neutron Source radiological design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    The operation of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) facility will present a variety of radiological protection problems. Because it is desired to design and operate the ANS according to the applicable licensing standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), it must be demonstrated that the ANS radiological design basis is consistent not only with state and Department of Energy (DOE) and other usual federal regulations, but also, so far as is practicable, with NRC regulations and with recommendations of such organizations as the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Also, the ANS radiological design basis is in general to be consistent with the recommendations of authoritative professional and scientific organizations, specifically the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As regards radiological protection, the principal goals of DOE regulations and guidance are to keep occupational doses ALARA [as low as (is) reasonably achievable], given the current state of technology, costs, and operations requirements; to control and monitor contained and released radioactivity during normal operation to keep public doses and releases to the environment ALARA; and to limit doses to workers and the public during accident conditions. Meeting these general design objectives requires that principles of dose reduction and of radioactivity control by employed in the design, operation, modification, and decommissioning of the ANS. The purpose of this document is to provide basic radiological criteria for incorporating these principles into the design of the ANS. Operations, modification, and decommissioning will be covered only as they are affected by design.

  3. Interventional radiology in living donor liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Fan; Ou, Hsin-You; Yu, Chun-Yen; Tsang, Leo Leung-Chit; Huang, Tung-Liang; Chen, Tai-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Wen; Concerjero, Allan M; Wang, Chih-Chi; Wang, Shih-Ho; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Yong, Chee-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Che; Chiu, King-Wah; Jawan, Bruno; Eng, Hock-Liew; Chen, Chao-Long

    2014-05-28

    The shortage of deceased donor liver grafts led to the use of living donor liver transplant (LDLT). Patients who undergo LDLT have a higher risk of complications than those who undergo deceased donor liver transplantation (LT). Interventional radiology has acquired a key role in every LT program by treating the majority of vascular and non-vascular post-transplant complications, improving graft and patient survival and avoiding, in the majority of cases, surgical revision and/or re-transplant. The aim of this paper is to review indications, diagnostic modalities, technical considerations, achievements and potential complications of interventional radiology procedures after LDLT.

  4. Medical Ethics and Law in Radiologic Technology.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Eric P; Matthews, Tracy M

    2015-01-01

    At every stage of their careers, radiologic technologists and student technologists must adhere to high ethical standards, obey the law, and consistently conduct themselves with professionalism. This article explains how modern health care ethics evolved, focusing on 8 important theorists. It also describes the ethical responsibilities of health care providers and the rights of patients. Important civil rights laws are discussed, focusing on the rights of health care workers as employees. A brief overview of the U.S. legal system follows, including the causes of action that most commonly involve health care professionals. Finally, this article discusses professionalism and its implications for radiologic technologists.

  5. History and Organizations for Radiological Protection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Keon Wook

    2016-02-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), an independent international organization established in 1925, develops, maintains, and elaborates radiological protection standards, legislation, and guidelines. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) provides scientific evidence. World Health Organization (WHO) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) utilise the ICRP recommendations to implement radiation protection in practice. Finally, radiation protection agencies in each country adopt the policies, and adapt them to each situation. In Korea, Nuclear Safety and Security Commission is the governmental body for nuclear safety regulation and Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety is a public organization for technical support and R&D in nuclear safety and radiation protection.

  6. Medical student radiology education: summary and recommendations from a national survey of medical school and radiology department leadership.

    PubMed

    Straus, Christopher M; Webb, Emily M; Kondo, Kimi L; Phillips, Andrew W; Naeger, David M; Carrico, Caroline W; Herring, William; Neutze, Janet A; Haines, G Rebecca; Dodd, Gerald D

    2014-06-01

    The ACR Task Force on Medical Student Education in Radiology, in partnership with the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology, investigated the current status of how and to what extent medical imaging was being taught in medical schools. The task force executed a 3-part survey of medical school deans, radiology department chairs, and intern physicians. The results provided an updated understanding of the status of radiology education in medical schools in the United States. This summary includes recommendations about how individual radiology departments and ACR members can assist in advancing the specialty of diagnostic radiology through medical student education.

  7. Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

  8. A Model Curriculum for Multiskilled Education in the Radiologic Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Steven C.; Grey, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Explains how multiskilled cross-trained health professionals provide cost-effective health care. Outlines a baccalaureate program in radiologic science with specialization in radiology therapy, medical sonography, or advanced imaging. (SK)

  9. Comparison of toxicological and radiological aspects of K basins sludge

    SciTech Connect

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-10-27

    The composition of various K Basins sludge is evaluated for its toxicological and radiological impacts downwind from accidents. It is shown that the radiological risk evaluation guidelines are always more limiting than the toxicological risk evaluation guidelines.

  10. Downgrading Nuclear Facilities to Radiological Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jarry, Jeffrey F.; Farr, Jesse Oscar; Duran, Leroy

    2015-08-01

    Based on inventory reductions and the use of alternate storage facilities, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) downgraded 4 SNL Hazard Category 3 (HC-3) nuclear facilities to less-than-HC-3 radiological facilities. SNL’s Waste Management and Pollution Prevention Department (WMPPD) managed the HC-3 nuclear facilities and implemented the downgrade. This paper will examine the downgrade process,

  11. Interventional radiology residency: steps to implementation.

    PubMed

    Marx, M Victoria; Sabri, Saher S

    2015-08-01

    Implementation of an interventional radiology (IR) residency program requires significant planning, as well as clear communication and consensus among departmental and institutional stakeholders. The goal of this short article is to highlight key decisions and steps that are needed to launch an IR residency, and to illustrate a possible timeline for implementation of the integrated and independent IR residency models.

  12. Recommendations for Radiologic Technology Workforce Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Dale E.

    A literature review was conducted to establish criteria for the development and establishment of an associate degree program in radiologic technology in Alaska, where traditional education programs had been slow to respond to the current personnel shortage. The information was obtained from a variety of state, regional, and national organizations…

  13. Skeletal Radiology: the year in review 2016.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Daniel I; Kransdorf, Mark; Astrom, Gunnar

    2017-03-01

    A look back at Skeletal Radiology in 2016 reveals a sizable number of publications that significantly advanced the state of knowledge about diseases of the musculoskeletal system. This review summarizes the content of some of the most intriguing papers of the year.

  14. Initial experiences in radiology e-learning.

    PubMed

    Sparacia, Gianvincenzo; Cannizzaro, Floreana; D'Alessandro, Donna M; D'Alessandro, Michael P; Caruso, Giuseppe; Lagalla, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The use of two different educator-centric learning management systems (LMSs), Moodle and Manila, for radiology e-learning was formatively evaluated and the implications of the future use of LMSs in radiology education were explored. NeuroRAD, a neuroradiologic digital library and learning community, is implemented with Moodle, one of the most popular open-source educator-centric LMSs. Pediatric-Education.org, a pediatric digital library and learning community, is implemented with Manila, a commercial educator-centric LMS. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of these LMSs were performed with World Wide Web server log file statistical programs and user-submitted comment forms. In 2005, NeuroRAD was used by 9959 visitors, who read 98,495 pages of information, whereas PediatricEducation .org was used by 91,000 visitors, who read 186,000 pages of information. Visitors represented a wide spectrum of medical learners and used the sites to answer clinical questions; to prepare for lectures, conferences, and informal teaching sessions; and to stay up-to-date and prepare for examinations. Early results indicate that radiology learning communities can be implemented with educator-centric LMSs relatively easily and at low cost by radiologists with minimal computer expertise, and can find receptive and appreciative audiences. Online radiology learning communities could play a significant role in providing education to radiologists the world over throughout their careers.

  15. Radiological Monitoring for Instructors. Student Workbook. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This student workbook includes the necessary materials and some of the references needed by each student during the conduct of the Radiological Monitoring for Instructors (RMI) course. The contents include a radiation exposure record, instrument exercise materials, fallout forecasting problems, dose and dose rate problems, source handling…

  16. Radiological protection in equine radiography and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoxall, A T

    1977-10-01

    The principles of radiological protection are summarised and consideration is then given to problems, which may confront the equine practitioner, in the fulfillment of these principles during diagnostic radiography of the limbs, head, and spine of the horse. The place of anaesthesia in such procedures is discussed and the special problems associated with therapeutic radiography of the horse are considered.

  17. Sedation/anaesthesia in paediatric radiology

    PubMed Central

    Arlachov, Y; Ganatra, R H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In this article we will give a comprehensive literature review on sedation/general anaesthesia (S/GA) and discuss the international variations in practice and options available for S/GA for imaging children. Methods The key articles were obtained primarily from PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, NHS Evidence and The Cochrane Library. Results Recently, paediatric radiology has seen a surge of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, some of which require children to be still and compliant for up to 1 h. It is difficult and sometimes even impossible to obtain quick and high-quality images without employing sedating techniques in certain children. As with any medical procedure, S/GA in radiological practice is not without risks and can have potentially disastrous consequences if mismanaged. In order to reduce any complications and practice safety in radiological units, it is imperative to carry out pre-sedation assessments of children, obtain parental/guardian consent, monitor them closely before, during and after the procedure and have adequate equipment, a safe environment and a well-trained personnel. Conclusion Although the S/GA techniques, sedative drugs and personnel involved vary from country to country, the ultimate goal of S/GA in radiology remains the same; namely, to provide safety and comfort for the patients. Advances in knowledge Imaging children under general anaesthesia is becoming routine and preferred by operators because it ensures patient conformity and provides a more controlled environment. PMID:22898157

  18. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for oral radiology curricula give an overview of the field and its interrelationships with other fields and outline the primary educational objectives, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards to be considered in…

  19. Role of radiology in geriatric care

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jeremy; Baerlocher, Mark O.; Asch, Murray; Myers, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To present family physicians with the options available for diagnosing and treating a selection of common diseases in the elderly using diagnostic and interventional radiology. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE Articles providing level I or II evidence were included in our review. Most articles presented results from randomized or other case-controlled studies. MAIN MESSAGE Geriatric care has become a complicated, multidisciplinary effort, with the family physician often leading the team. The expanding cohort of patients is not only better informed than their predecessors, but also more demanding of better care through cutting-edge technology and treatment. Specifically, the role of radiology has expanded quickly in geriatric medicine. Because of complex clinical presentations and rising costs, it is essential for primary care physicians to understand the appropriate use of imaging and radiological intervention. CONCLUSION There are a number of new and innovative radiological techniques and procedures available for elderly patients. This review aims to inform primary care physicians of a selected number of these techniques. PMID:19155363

  20. Radiological Dispersion Devices and Basic Radiation Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevelacqua, Joseph John

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics courses present the basic concepts of radioactivity and an overview of nuclear physics that emphasizes the basic decay relationship and the various types of emitted radiation. Although this presentation provides insight into radiological science, it often fails to interest students to explore these concepts in a more rigorous…

  1. Is radiology presented to medical students as a fulfilling career?

    PubMed

    Gunderman, Richard B; Huynh, Justin

    2007-10-01

    The Pathway Evaluation Program is a resource that provides profiles of 42 different medical specialities, including diagnostic radiology. It is widely used by medical students. The portrait of radiologic practice it presents is a sobering one and has the potential to deflect top students from careers in radiology. Radiologic educators and practicing radiologists need to understand its findings to improve educational experience and enhance professional fulfillment in the field.

  2. Radiologic features of lumbar spine in ochronosis in late stages.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Petek; Yilmaz Ovali, Gülgün; Pabuşçu, Yüksel; Temiz, Cüneyt; Duruoz, Tuncay

    2006-07-01

    Ochronosis is a rare hereditary disorder of tyrosine metabolism. Severe degenerative arthritis and spondylosis occur in the later stages of this disease. Radiologic examinations may reveal changes considered almost pathognomonic for ochronosis. We present the radiologic features of the lumbar spine in two ochronotic patients who were diagnosed after radiologic examinations in the late stages of the disease.

  3. Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology Use in Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Maher, Michael M.; Cryan, John F.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on…

  4. An Overview of Dental Radiology. NCHCT Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manny, Edward F.; And Others

    This overview of dental radiology contains sections on demographics, equipment, dental radiology quality assurance, efficacy, dental radiology education curricula, professional organizations' guidelines for training and use, and state activities. In section 1 dental personnel, population of dental personnel, employment and earning prospects,…

  5. 42 CFR 415.120 - Conditions for payment: Radiology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Radiology services. 415.120... Physician Services to Beneficiaries in Providers § 415.120 Conditions for payment: Radiology services. (a) Services to beneficiaries. The carrier pays for radiology services furnished by a physician to...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiologic patient cradle. 892.1830 Section 892.1830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle....

  7. 21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiologic quality assurance instrument. 892.1940 Section 892.1940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality...

  8. 42 CFR 415.120 - Conditions for payment: Radiology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Radiology services. 415.120... Services to Beneficiaries in Providers § 415.120 Conditions for payment: Radiology services. (a) Services to beneficiaries. The carrier pays for radiology services furnished by a physician to a...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiologic patient cradle. 892.1830 Section 892.1830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle....

  10. 21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiologic patient cradle. 892.1830 Section 892.1830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle....

  11. 42 CFR 415.120 - Conditions for payment: Radiology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Radiology services. 415.120... Physician Services to Beneficiaries in Providers § 415.120 Conditions for payment: Radiology services. (a) Services to beneficiaries. The carrier pays for radiology services furnished by a physician to...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiologic patient cradle. 892.1830 Section 892.1830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle....

  13. 21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiologic quality assurance instrument. 892.1940 Section 892.1940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiologic quality assurance instrument. 892.1940 Section 892.1940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiologic quality assurance instrument. 892.1940 Section 892.1940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality...

  16. 42 CFR 415.120 - Conditions for payment: Radiology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Radiology services. 415.120... Physician Services to Beneficiaries in Providers § 415.120 Conditions for payment: Radiology services. (a) Services to beneficiaries. The carrier pays for radiology services furnished by a physician to...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiologic patient cradle. 892.1830 Section 892.1830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle....

  18. 42 CFR 415.120 - Conditions for payment: Radiology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Radiology services. 415.120... Services to Beneficiaries in Providers § 415.120 Conditions for payment: Radiology services. (a) Services to beneficiaries. The carrier pays for radiology services furnished by a physician to a...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiologic quality assurance instrument. 892.1940 Section 892.1940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality...

  20. Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

    2005-05-19

    The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable

  1. [Micro-wave local area network for radiological image transmission].

    PubMed

    Takizawa, M; Sone, S; Kasuga, T; Oguchi, K; Kondo, S; Fuwa, Y; Yamaura, I; Wako, T; Okazaki, Y; Maruyama, Y

    1994-10-25

    Shinshu University consists of five campuses in different locations, a situation that presents some problems in communication. To solve this problem, the Shinshu University Video and Data Network System (SUNS), which includes a high-speed audio-visual transfer function, has been developed and utilized for pre- and postgraduate education, administrative teleconferences, and local telephone (PBX) and Fax services. In 1988, a cooperative group for the study of radiographic image processing was organized, consisting of staff members of Shinshu University Hospital in Matsumoto, the Faculty of Engineering in Nagano (75 km from Matsumoto) and the Faculty of Textile Science and Technology in Ueda (45 km from Matsumoto). The system has been developed with a pair of personal computer (PC)-based interactive image workstations and high-speed digital telecommunication interfaces to the SUNS. A transmission time of 878 kbps has been attained, including the time needed for read/write onto the PC hard disk. Image data thus transferred from the hospital have been utilized for the study of image processing by researchers in the Faculty of Engineering, and the processed images have been sent back to the hospital for evaluation of clinical efficacy of the processing by diagnostic radiologists. This kind of microwave network is a promising alternative for high-speed data transmission for radiological images and their processing.

  2. Asbestotic radiological abnormalities among United States merchant marine seamen.

    PubMed

    Selikoff, I J; Lilis, R; Levin, G

    1990-05-01

    There has been limited information concerning the prevalence of radiologically evident parenchymal and pleural fibrosis consistent with prior exposure to asbestos among merchant marine seamen, despite the wide use of asbestos in ship construction until the late 1970s and subsequent exposure of seamen to the asbestos that had been installed. A total of 3324 chest radiographs (1985-7) of long term United States seamen were reviewed. One third (34.8%) had parenchymal or pleural abnormalities, or both (ILO classification); pleural changes were predominant. Abnormalities increased with longer duration from onset of shipboard exposure (as defined by first year at sea). The prevalence of asbestotic changes was greater among seamen who had served in the engine department (391/420; 42.5%) compared with seamen in other departments, including deck (301/820; 36.6%), steward (278/981; 28.4%), or with service in multiple departments (167/541; 30.9%). Since many vessels, particularly those built before 1978, contain asbestos materials, appropriate engineering controls (including complete removal, if possible) are required as well as appropriate medical surveillance for those who served aboard such ships.

  3. Paint for detection of radiological or chemical agents

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Brunk, James L.; Day, Sumner Daniel

    2010-08-24

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  4. Motivation and compensation in academic radiology.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Jui G; Ondategui-Parra, Silvia; Zou, Kelly H; Gogate, Adheet; Intriere, Lisa A; Kelly, Pauline; Seltzer, Steven E; Ros, Pablo R

    2004-07-01

    As radiologists are increasingly faced with the challenges of rising demand for imaging services and staff shortages, the implementation of incentive plans in radiology is gaining importance. A key factor to be considered while developing an incentive plan is the strategic goal of the department. In academic radiology, management should decide whether it will reward research and teaching productivity in addition to clinical productivity. Various models have been suggested for incentive plans based on (1) clinical productivity, (2) multifactor productivity, (3) individual productivity, (4) section productivity, and (5) chair's discretion. Although fiscal rewards are most common, managers should consider other incentives, such as research time, resources for research, vacation time, and recognition awards, because academic radiologists may be motivated by factors other than financial gains.

  5. Feminist theoretical perspectives on ethics in radiology.

    PubMed

    Condren, Mary

    2009-07-01

    The substantive safety of radiological and other medical procedures can be radically reduced by unconscious factors governing scientific thought. In addition, the historical exclusion of women from these disciplines has possibly skewed their development in directions that now need to be addressed. This paper focuses on three such factors: gendered libidos that privilege risk taking over prevention, fragmented forms of knowledge that encourage displaced forms of responsibility and group dynamics that discourage critique of accepted practices and limit the definition of one's group. The substantive safety of the practice and scientific contribution of radiologists might be considerably enhanced were the focus to switch from radiology to diagnosis. Such enlargement might redefine the brief of radiologists towards preventing as well as curing; evaluating some non-invasive and low-tech options, adopting some inclusive paradigms of clinical ecology and enlarging group identities to include those currently excluded through geography or social class from participating in the benefits of science.

  6. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  7. NV/YMP RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE; BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-11-01

    This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and the Yucca Mountain Office of Repository Development (YMORD). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835), Occupational Radiation Protection. Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Pleasanton, California; and at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, field work by NNSA/NSO at other locations is also covered by this manual.

  8. Interventional radiology: a half century of innovation.

    PubMed

    Baum, Richard A; Baum, Stanley

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of modern interventional radiology began over half century ago with a simple question. Was it possible to use the same diagnostic imaging tools that had revolutionized the practice of medicine to guide the real-time treatment of disease? This disruptive concept led to rapid treatment advances in every organ system of the body. It became clear that by utilizing imaging some patients could undergo targeted procedures, eliminating the need for major surgery, while others could undergo procedures for previously unsolvable problems. The breadth of these changes now encompasses all of medicine and has forever changed the way we think about disease. In this brief review article, major advances in the field, as chronicled in the pages of Radiology, will be described.

  9. Radiological intervention of the hand and wrist

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Annu; Rowbotham, Emma L

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiological guided intervention is integral in the management of patients with musculoskeletal pathologies. The key to image-guided procedures is to achieve an accurately placed intervention with minimal invasion. This review article specifically concentrates on radiological procedures of the hand and wrist using ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. A systematic literature review of the most recent publications relevant to image-guided intervention of the hand and wrist was conducted. During this search, it became clear that there is little consensus regarding all aspects of image-guided intervention, from the technique adopted to the dosage of injectate and the specific drugs used. The aim of this article is to formulate an evidence-based reference point which can be utilized by radiologists and to describe the most commonly employed techniques. PMID:26313500

  10. Radiology of the eye and orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, T.H.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and computed tomography to evaluate ocular and orbital disorders. The book gives a complete understanding of the capabilities of these techniques, the normal orbital anatomy shown by each modality, and the radiologic features and clinical aspects of orbital diseases, enabling radiologists and clinicians to choose the optimum diagnostic modality and accurately interpret abnormalities seen on scans. Included are more than 900 detail-revealing scans depicting normal anatomy and pathologic finds. For each of the three imaging modalities, a clear explanation of technique is followed by chapters thoroughly describing and illustrating ocular and orbital anatomy and pathology. The chapters on pathology discuss radiologic differential diagnosis in detail and briefly describe disease entities and their clinical manifestations.

  11. User questionnaire to evaluate the radiological workspace.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Peter M A; Koesoema, Allya P; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years, an increase in digitalization of radiology departments can be seen, which has a large impact on the work of the radiologists. This impact is not only demonstrated by the increased use of digital images but also by changing demands on the whole reading environment. In this study, we evaluated the satisfaction of our radiologists with our digital Picture Archival and Communication System environment and their workspace. This evaluation was performed by distribution of a questionnaire consisting of a score sheet and some open questions to all radiologists and residents. Out of 25 questionnaires, 12 were adequately answered and returned. Results clearly showed that most problems were present in the area of reading room design and layout and comfort and ergonomics. Based on the results from this study, adaptations were made and the results were also used in the planning of the redesign of the entire department of radiology.

  12. Multidimensional Interactive Radiology Report and Analysis: standardization of workflow and reporting for renal mass tracking and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Darryl H.; Ma, Kevin; Yepes, Fernando; Nadamuni, Mridula; Nayyar, Megha; Liu, Brent; Duddalwar, Vinay; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    A conventional radiology report primarily consists of a large amount of unstructured text, and lacks clear, concise, consistent and content-rich information. Hence, an area of unmet clinical need consists of developing better ways to communicate radiology findings and information specific to each patient. Here, we design a new workflow and reporting system that combines and integrates advances in engineering technology with those from the medical sciences, the Multidimensional Interactive Radiology Report and Analysis (MIRRA). Until recently, clinical standards have primarily relied on 2D images for the purpose of measurement, but with the advent of 3D processing, many of the manually measured metrics can be automated, leading to better reproducibility and less subjective measurement placement. Hence, we make use this newly available 3D processing in our workflow. Our pipeline is used here to standardize the labeling, tracking, and quantifying of metrics for renal masses.

  13. Nevada Test Site Area 25, Radiological Survey and Cleanup Project, 1974-1983 (a revised final report). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for beta plus gamma and alpha radioactive contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 9 references, 23 figures.

  14. Preparedness for radiological emergency situations in Austria.

    PubMed

    Ditto, Manfred

    2012-02-01

    This article presents the Austrian system of emergency preparedness for nuclear and radiological emergency situations. It demonstrates, in particular, the legal basis, the roles and competencies of the competent authorities, international and bilateral conventions on early notification of nuclear accidents, the Austrian emergency plans, the Austrian radiation monitoring system, the operated prognosis and decision support systems and the results of an estimation of possible impacts of nuclear power plant disasters on Austria.

  15. Current radiological status of Utirik Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W L

    1998-08-01

    A preliminary radiological survey was conducted at Utirik Atoll in 1978 as part of the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS). A dose assessment based on these limited data indicated a relatively low dose of about 0.12 mSv to people living on Utirik in 1978 (Robison et al., 1982). A much more detailed radiological survey was conducted in April of both 1993 and 1994. Aerial photos of the islands of Utirik Atoll were taken as part of the 1978 NMIRS. The sampling grids for the 1993 and 1994 surveys are shown overlaid on these aerial photos in Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4. External gamma measurements and a collection of either drinking coconuts or copra coconuts were made at each location. Pandanus, breadfruit, lime, and banana were collected where available. Ground water was collected in 1993/94 from four wells on Utirik Island and two wells on Aon Island. Surface soil and soil profiles were collected at some of the grid points on each of the islands at the atoll in 1993/94. A comparison of the number of samples collected in 1978 and 1993/94 are shown in Table 1. A detailed listing of the samples collected in the 1993/94 radiological survey at Utirik Atoll is given in Table 2. The number of vegetation samples collected in 1993/94 is nearly a factor of 7 greater than in 1978. Soil samples collected in 1993/94 exceeded the number collected in 1978 by more than a factor of 4. Consequently, extensive data are now available for the islands at Utirik Atoll and form the basis for the current dose assessment for the atoll.

  16. Radiology of orthopedic procedures, problems and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Gelman, M.I.; Saunders, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    This work is volume 24 in a series on clinical radiology. Eight sections cover fractures in general, thoracolumbar spine, upper extremities, hand and wrist, trauma to pelvis, hip and femur, knee and lower leg, and ankle and foot. These sections vary from 15 to 36 pages and contain adequate text, 18 to 54 x-ray films per section, and appropriate references (306 in sum). There are 275 radiographs, most of which are well printed, some with accompanying line sketches.

  17. Interventional radiology in bone and joint

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, M.; Laredo, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Recent radiologic procedures in bone and joints, some of which eliminate the need for surgery are exposed, including: trephine biopsies of the thoracic and lumbar spine, sacro-iliac joints, peripheral bones synovial membrane and soft tissues, using either fluoroscopic echographic or CT guidance - chemonucleolysis - vascular embolization of skeletal tumors and management of vertebral hemangiomas - selective steroid injection in a broad spectrum of diseases including vertebral facet syndrome, cervicobrachial nerve root pain, rotator cuff calcium deposit, bone cysts.

  18. Use of Process Improvement Tools in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Rawson, James V; Kannan, Amogha; Furman, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Process improvement techniques are common in manufacturing and industry. Over the past few decades these principles have been slowly introduced in select health care settings. This article reviews the Plan, Do, Study, and Act cycle, Six Sigma, the System of Profound Knowledge, Lean, and the theory of constraints. Specific process improvement tools in health care and radiology are presented in the order the radiologist is likely to encounter them in an improvement project.

  19. Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Demmer

    2013-03-01

    A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

  20. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  1. Questionnaire surveys of dentists on radiology

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, AM; Brunton, P; Horner, K

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Survey by questionnaire is a widely used research method in dental radiology. A major concern in reviews of questionnaires is non-response. The objectives of this study were to review questionnaire studies in dental radiology with regard to potential survey errors and to develop recommendations to assist future researchers. Methods A literature search with the software search package PubMed was used to obtain internet-based access to Medline through the website www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. A search of the English language peer-reviewed literature was conducted of all published studies, with no restriction on date. The search strategy found articles with dates from 1983 to 2010. The medical subject heading terms used were “questionnaire”, “dental radiology” and “dental radiography”. The reference sections of articles retrieved by this method were hand-searched in order to identify further relevant papers. Reviews, commentaries and relevant studies from the wider literature were also included. Results 53 questionnaire studies were identified in the dental literature that concerned dental radiography and included a report of response rate. These were all published between 1983 and 2010. In total, 87 articles are referred to in this review, including the 53 dental radiology studies. Other cited articles include reviews, commentaries and examples of studies outside dental radiology where they are germane to the arguments presented. Conclusions Non-response is only one of four broad areas of error to which questionnaire surveys are subject. This review considers coverage, sampling and measurement, as well as non-response. Recommendations are made to assist future research that uses questionnaire surveys. PMID:22517994

  2. Clinical and radiologic features of pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Gluecker, T; Capasso, P; Schnyder, P; Gudinchet, F; Schaller, M D; Revelly, J P; Chiolero, R; Vock, P; Wicky, S

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary edema may be classified as increased hydrostatic pressure edema, permeability edema with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), permeability edema without DAD, or mixed edema. Pulmonary edema has variable manifestations. Postobstructive pulmonary edema typically manifests radiologically as septal lines, peribronchial cuffing, and, in more severe cases, central alveolar edema. Pulmonary edema with chronic pulmonary embolism manifests as sharply demarcated areas of increased ground-glass attenuation. Pulmonary edema with veno-occlusive disease manifests as large pulmonary arteries, diffuse interstitial edema with numerous Kerley lines, peribronchial cuffing, and a dilated right ventricle. Stage 1 near drowning pulmonary edema manifests as Kerley lines, peribronchial cuffing, and patchy, perihilar alveolar areas of airspace consolidation; stage 2 and 3 lesions are radiologically nonspecific. Pulmonary edema following administration of cytokines demonstrates bilateral, symmetric interstitial edema with thickened septal lines. High-altitude pulmonary edema usually manifests as central interstitial edema associated with peribronchial cuffing, ill-defined vessels, and patchy airspace consolidation. Neurogenic pulmonary edema manifests as bilateral, rather homogeneous airspace consolidations that predominate at the apices in about 50% of cases. Reperfusion pulmonary edema usually demonstrates heterogeneous airspace consolidations that predominate in the areas distal to the recanalized vessels. Postreduction pulmonary edema manifests as mild airspace consolidation involving the ipsilateral lung, whereas pulmonary edema due to air embolism initially demonstrates interstitial edema followed by bilateral, peripheral alveolar areas of increased opacity that predominate at the lung bases. Familiarity with the spectrum of radiologic findings in pulmonary edema from various causes will often help narrow the differential diagnosis.

  3. Financing radiology graduate medical education: today's challenges.

    PubMed

    Otero, Hansel J; Ondategui-Parra, Silvia; Erturk, Sukru Mehmet; Ros, Pablo R

    2006-03-01

    Radiology graduate medical education (GME) is exposed to huge financial challenges. First, there is a continuous increase in demand for imaging services by referring doctors and the general population, aggravating the staff shortage. Second, there has been an important decline in reimbursements. Third and probably most important is the progressive reduction of federal funds subsidizing GME. Medicare is the largest single contributor to GME. The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 introduced reductions in Medicare payments to the major teaching hospitals calculated at $5.6 billion over the first 5 years after implementation. The BBA also brought other changes directly affecting GME. Financial changes in health care over the past decade have increased the pressure on academic institutions, which must preserve or improve the quality of training and the quality of care and manage an increased workload with fewer funds available and a narrow margin for errors. Yet the use of new technology promises to help simplify processes, decreasing workloads for residents and faculty members and increasing overall productivity, and new sources of funding have been suggested. By reviewing the financial challenges of radiologic training in today's academic centers, the authors reach the conclusion that there is still space for improving academic quality and the quality of care within current financial boundaries. But more reliable data about the specific benefits and drawbacks of having a residency program in a clinical radiology department are required.

  4. Interventional Radiologic Treatment for Idiopathic Portal Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Shozo; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Motohara, Tomofumi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Takeshi

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of interventional radiological treatment for idiopathic portal hypertension. Methods: Between 1995 and 1998, we performed an interventional radiological treatment in five patients with idiopathic portal hypertension, four of whom had refused surgery and one of whom had undergone surgery. Three patients with gastroesophageal varices (GEV) were treated by partial splenic embolization (PSE), one patient with esophageal varices (EV) and massive ascites by transjugular intrahepatic portosytemic shunt (TIPS) and PSE, and one patient with GEV by percutaneous transhepatic obliteration (PTO). Midterm results were analyzed in terms of the effect on esophageal and/or gastric varices. Results: In one woman with severe GEV who underwent three sessions of PSE, there was endoscopic confirmation that the GEV had disappeared. In one man his EV shrunk markedly after two sessions of PSE. In two patients slight reduction of the EV was obtained with one application of PSE combined with endoscopic variceal ligation therapy. PTO for GV in one patient resulted in good control of the varices. All patients have survived for 16-42 months since the first interventional treatment, and varices are well controlled. Conclusion: Interventional radiological treatment is effective for patients with idiopathic portal hypertension, whether or not they have undergone surgery.

  5. Safety of Conscious Sedation In Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Arepally, Aravind; Oechsle, Denise; Kirkwood, Sharon; Savader, Scott J.

    2001-05-15

    Purpose: To identify rates of adverse events associated with the use of conscious sedation in interventional radiology.Methods: In a 5-month period, prospective data were collected on patients undergoing conscious sedation for interventional radiology procedures (n = 594). Adverse events were categorized as respiratory, sedative, or major adverse events. Respiratory adverse events were those that required oral airway placement, ambu bag, or jaw thrust. Sedation adverse events were unresponsiveness, oxygen saturation less than 90%, use of flumazenil/naloxone, or agitation. Major adverse events were hypotension, intubation, CPR, or cardiac arrest. The frequency of adverse events for the five most common radiology procedures were determined.Results: The five most common procedures (total n = 541) were biliary tube placement/exchange (n = 182), tunneled catheter placement (n 135), diagnostic arteriography (n = 125), vascular interventions (n = 52), and other catheter insertions (n = 46). Rates for respiratory, sedation, and major adverse events were 4.7%, 4.2%, and 2.0%, respectively. The most frequent major adverse event was hypotension (2.0%). Biliary procedures had the highest rate of total adverse events (p < .05) and respiratory adverse events (p < .05).Conclusion: The frequency of adverse events is low with the use of conscious sedation during interventional procedures. The highest rates occurred during biliary interventions.

  6. Workplace Bullying in Radiology and Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Jay R; Harolds, Jay A; Bluth, Edward I

    2017-02-06

    Workplace bullying is common in health care and has recently been reported in both radiology and radiation oncology. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness of bullying and its potential consequences in radiology and radiation oncology. Bullying behavior may involve abuse, humiliation, intimidation, or insults; is usually repetitive; and causes distress in victims. Workplace bullying is more common in health care than in other industries. Surveys of radiation therapists in the United States, student radiographers in England, and physicians-in-training showed that substantial proportions of respondents had been subjected to workplace bullying. No studies were found that addressed workplace bullying specifically in diagnostic radiology or radiation oncology residents. Potential consequences of workplace bullying in health care include anxiety, depression, and health problems in victims; harm to patients as a result of victims' reduced ability to concentrate; and reduced morale and high turnover in the workplace. The Joint Commission has established leadership standards addressing inappropriate behavior, including bullying, in the workplace. The ACR Commission on Human Resources recommends that organizations take steps to prevent bullying. Those steps include education, including education to ensure that the line between the Socratic method and bullying is not crossed, and the establishment of policies to facilitate reporting of bullying and support victims of bullying.

  7. FORENSIC RADIOLOGY AND IMAGING FOR VETERINARY RADIOLOGISTS.

    PubMed

    Watson, Elizabeth; Heng, Hock Gan

    2017-02-24

    Imaging studies are often of evidentiary value in medicolegal investigations involving animals and the role of the veterinary radiologist is to interpret those images for courts as an expert or opinion witness. With progressing interest in prosecuting animal crimes and strengthening of penalties for crimes against animals, the participation of veterinary radiologists in medicolegal investigations is expected to increase. Veterinary radiologists who are aware of radiographic and imaging signs that result in animal suffering, abuse, or neglect; knowledgeable in ways radiology and imaging may support cause of death determinations; conversant in postmortem imaging; comfortable discussing mechanisms and timing of blunt or sharp force and projectile trauma in imaging; and prepared to identify mimics of abuse can assist court participants in understanding imaging evidence. The goal of this commentary review is to familiarize veterinary radiologists with the forensic radiology and imaging literature and with the advantages and disadvantages of various imaging modalities utilized in forensic investigations. Another goal is to provide background information for future research studies in veterinary forensic radiology and imaging.

  8. Mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The robotics development group at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is developing a mobile autonomous robot that performs radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot is called SIMON, which stands for Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator. Certain areas of SRL are classified as radiologically controlled areas (RCAs). In an RCA, radioactive materials are frequently handled by workers, and thus, the potential for contamination is ever present. Current methods used for floor radiological surveying includes labor-intensive manual scanning or random smearing of certain floor locations. An autonomous robot such as SIMON performs the surveying task in a much more efficient manner and will track down contamination before it is contacted by humans. SIMON scans floors at a speed of 1 in./s and stops and alarms upon encountering contamination. Its environment is well defined, consisting of smooth building floors with wide corridors. The kind of contaminations that SIMON is capable of detecting are alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels of interest are low to moderate.

  9. The American Board of Radiology Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program in Radiologic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Stephen R.; Hendee, William R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC) recognizes that in addition to medical knowledge, several essential elements involved in delivering quality care must be developed and maintained throughout one's career. The MOC process is designed to facilitate and document the professional development of each diplomate of The American Board of Radiology (ABR) through its focus on the essential elements of quality care in Diagnostic Radiology and its subspecialties, and in the specialties of Radiation Oncology and Radiologic Physics. The initial elements of the ABR-MOC have been developed in accord with guidelines of The American Board of Medical Specialties. All diplomates with a ten-year, time-limited primary certificate in Diagnostic Radiologic Physics, Therapeutic Radiologic Physics, or Medical Nuclear Physics who wish to maintain certification must successfully complete the requirements of the appropriate ABR-MOC program for their specialty. Holders of multiple certificates must meet ABR-MOC requirements specific to the certificates held. Diplomates with lifelong certificates are not required to participate in the MOC, but are strongly encouraged to do so. MOC is based on documentation of individual participation in the four components of MOC: (1) professional standing, (2) lifelong learning and self-assessment, (3) cognitive expertise, and (4) performance in practice. Within these components, MOC addresses six competencies: medical knowledge, patient care, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice.

  10. Informatics in radiology: radiology gamuts ontology: differential diagnosis for the Semantic Web.

    PubMed

    Budovec, Joseph J; Lam, Cesar A; Kahn, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    The Semantic Web is an effort to add semantics, or "meaning," to empower automated searching and processing of Web-based information. The overarching goal of the Semantic Web is to enable users to more easily find, share, and combine information. Critical to this vision are knowledge models called ontologies, which define a set of concepts and formalize the relations between them. Ontologies have been developed to manage and exploit the large and rapidly growing volume of information in biomedical domains. In diagnostic radiology, lists of differential diagnoses of imaging observations, called gamuts, provide an important source of knowledge. The Radiology Gamuts Ontology (RGO) is a formal knowledge model of differential diagnoses in radiology that includes 1674 differential diagnoses, 19,017 terms, and 52,976 links between terms. Its knowledge is used to provide an interactive, freely available online reference of radiology gamuts ( www.gamuts.net ). A Web service allows its content to be discovered and consumed by other information systems. The RGO integrates radiologic knowledge with other biomedical ontologies as part of the Semantic Web.

  11. Picture archiving and communication in radiology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marzia; Nanni, Marinella; Cimarra, Stefania; Crisafulli, Letizia; Campioni, Paolo; Marano, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    After over 80 years of exclusive archiving of radiologic films, at present, in Radiology, digital archiving is increasingly gaining ground. Digital archiving allows a considerable reduction in costs and space saving, but most importantly, immediate or remote consultation of all examinations and reports in the hospital clinical wards, is feasible. The RIS system, in this case, is the starting point of the process of electronic archiving which however is the task of PACS. The latter can be used as radiologic archive in accordance with the law provided that it is in conformance with some specifications as the use of optical long-term storage media or with electronic track of change. PACS archives, in a hierarchical system, all digital images produced by each diagnostic imaging modality. Images and patient data can be retrieved and used for consultation or remote consultation by the reporting radiologist who requires images and reports of previous radiologic examinations or by the referring physician of the ward. Modern PACS owing to the WEB server allow remote access to extremely simplified images and data however ensuring the due regulations and access protections. Since the PACS enables a simpler data communication within the hospital, security and patient privacy should be protected. A secure and reliable PACS should be able to minimize the risk of accidental data destruction, and should prevent non authorized access to the archive with adequate security measures in relation to the acquired knowledge and based on the technological advances. Archiving of data produced by modern digital imaging is a problem now present also in small Radiology services. The technology is able to readily solve problems which were extremely complex up to some years ago as the connection between equipment and archiving system owing also to the universalization of the DICOM 3.0 standard. The evolution of communication networks and the use of standard protocols as TCP/IP can minimize

  12. Radiology system evolution in the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Nauert, R C

    2001-01-01

    For many decades the practice of radiology grew slowly in America and was largely a secondary function under the control of hospitals. In more recent times it has vastly expanded its array of diagnostic, interventional, and therapeutic abilities. There is increasing consumer logic for direct access. Motivations have grown to create large independent entities with broadly diverse capabilities in order to succeed in the new millennium. Most regional markets are evolving rapidly in terms of managed care penetration, health system formation, physician practice consolidation and aggressive purchaser behavior by employers and consumers. To understand the enormity of healthcare evolution, it is useful to look at the industry's paradigm shifts in recent decades. Virtually every aspect of organizational infrastructure, delivery approaches, and the business environment has evolved markedly during the past fifty years. These changes will accelerate. To succeed financially, radiology groups must strengthen their market positions, technical capabilities, continuums of care and geographic dominance. Equally important is the wisdom of diversifying incomes into related services and businesses that provide additional related revenues. Key factors for successful development include facility market growth, full coverage of managed care contracts, high efficiency and aggressive diversification. A fully evolved system generates significant revenues and profitability by protecting and strengthening its financial position in this environment. That is accomplished through the development of strategically located radiology groups, aggressive alliances with medical practices in allied disciplines, and managed radiology departments and facilities for partner health systems. Organizational success ultimately depends on the ability to accept capitated payments under risk-bearing arrangements. The strategic business plan should be organized with the appropriate levels of detail needed to

  13. Engineering Encounters: Engineering Adaptations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatling, Anne; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2015-01-01

    Engineering is not a subject that has historically been taught in elementary schools, but with the emphasis on engineering in the "Next Generation Science Standards," curricula are being developed to explicitly teach engineering content and design. However, many of the scientific investigations already conducted with students have…

  14. ICRP publication 121: radiological protection in paediatric diagnostic and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Khong, P-L; Ringertz, H; Donoghue, V; Frush, D; Rehani, M; Appelgate, K; Sanchez, R

    2013-04-01

    Paediatric patients have a higher average risk of developing cancer compared with adults receiving the same dose. The longer life expectancy in children allows more time for any harmful effects of radiation to manifest, and developing organs and tissues are more sensitive to the effects of radiation. This publication aims to provide guiding principles of radiological protection for referring clinicians and clinical staff performing diagnostic imaging and interventional procedures for paediatric patients. It begins with a brief description of the basic concepts of radiological protection, followed by the general aspects of radiological protection, including principles of justification and optimisation. Guidelines and suggestions for radiological protection in specific modalities - radiography and fluoroscopy, interventional radiology, and computed tomography - are subsequently covered in depth. The report concludes with a summary and recommendations. The importance of rigorous justification of radiological procedures is emphasised for every procedure involving ionising radiation, and the use of imaging modalities that are non-ionising should always be considered. The basic aim of optimisation of radiological protection is to adjust imaging parameters and institute protective measures such that the required image is obtained with the lowest possible dose of radiation, and that net benefit is maximised to maintain sufficient quality for diagnostic interpretation. Special consideration should be given to the availability of dose reduction measures when purchasing new imaging equipment for paediatric use. One of the unique aspects of paediatric imaging is with regards to the wide range in patient size (and weight), therefore requiring special attention to optimisation and modification of equipment, technique, and imaging parameters. Examples of good radiographic and fluoroscopic technique include attention to patient positioning, field size and adequate collimation, use

  15. Region 1: Radiological Assistance Program (RAP). Revision 2, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, A.P.; Kuehner, A.V.

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is established under DOE Order 5530.3 to: (a) Establish and maintain response plans and resources to provide radiological assistance to other Federal agencies, State, local, and tribal governments, and private groups requesting such assistance. (b) Assist State, local, and tribal jurisdictions in preparing for radiological emergencies. (c) In the event of a real, or potential radiological accident, provide resources and monitoring and assessment assistance to other federal agencies, State, local, and tribal Governments. This plan is an integral part of a nationwide program of regionally based radiological assistance which has been established by DOE. The Brookhaven Area Office is the Regional Coordinating Office (RCO) for the Radiological Assistance Program in DOE Region 1, which consists of the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia.

  16. [The editorial process for Radiología].

    PubMed

    Corral de la Calle, M A

    2011-01-01

    Radiología is the official journal of the Spanish Society of Diagnostic Imaging. It aims to contribute to the education of Spanish-speaking radiologists and to disseminate radiological research and knowledge in Spanish. The journal has an Editorial Board organized into areas or sections, and material published in the journal is chosen and improved through peer review. This article discusses the model of the scientific journal Radiología and the characteristics of its Editorial Board, comparing Radiología with official general radiology journals of other scientific societies. Moreover, the details of the journal's editorial process are revealed, including the editorial circuit, the reviewers' work, and the technical aspects of the final edition process. Finally, the article lists qualitative and quantitative data about the material that Radiología receives and publishes.

  17. 78 FR 46932 - Notice of Intent to Grant Exclusive Patent License; Safe Environment Engineering

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... license to practice Safe Environment Engineering's proprietary sensor systems for the field of use of..., Biological and Radiological Threats by Optimizing Sensor Placement, Navy Case No. 097,281.//U.S....

  18. Strategies for incorporating radiology into early medical school curricula.

    PubMed

    Naeger, David M; Webb, Emily M; Zimmerman, Leslie; Elicker, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    Clinically oriented material is being incorporated increasingly early into medical school curricula. Traditional models of incorporating radiology early on, mainly as an adjunct to pathology or anatomy instruction, are not focused on learning important aspects of clinical radiology. Medical students can be better served by an integrated curriculum that focuses on appropriate ordering of radiology studies, an intuitive understanding of imaging modalities, and understanding the patient experience.

  19. Medical student perceptions of radiology use in anatomy teaching.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kevin P; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Maher, Michael M; Cryan, John F; O'Connor, Owen J

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on students' abilities to correctly identify imaging modalities and anatomical structures on radiological images. First-year medical students completed questionnaires at the beginning and end of the first academic year that incorporated ten hours of radiologic anatomy teaching in the anatomy curriculum. Questions used a combination of Likert scales, rankings, and binary options. Students were tested on their ability to identify radiology modalities and anatomical structures on radiology images. Preresponse and postresponse rates were 93% (157/168) and 85% (136/160), respectively. Postmodule, 96.3% of students wanted the same or more radiology integration. Furthermore, 92.4% premodule and 96.2% postmodule agreed that "Radiology is important in medical undergraduate teaching." Modality and structure identification scores significantly increased from 59.8% to 64.3% (P < 0.001) and from 47.4% to 71.2% (P < 0.001), respectively. The top three preferred teaching formats premodule and postmodule were (1) anatomy laboratory instruction, (2) interactive sessions combining radiology with anatomy, and (3) anatomy lectures. Postmodule, 38.3% of students were comfortable reviewing radiology images. Students were positive about integrating radiology into anatomy teaching and most students wanted at least the same level of assimilation but that it is used as an adjunct rather than primary method of teaching anatomy.

  20. [The application of radiological image in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Zong; Che, Hong-Min; Xu, Li-Xiang

    2006-04-01

    Personal identification is an important work in forensic investigation included sex discrimination, age and stature estimation. Human identification depended on radiological image technique analysis is a practice and proper method in forensic science field. This paper intended to understand the advantage and defect by reviewed the employing of forensic radiology in forensic science field broadly and provide a reference to perfect the application of forensic radiology in forensic science field.

  1. Radiological Weapons: How Great Is The Danger?

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G M

    2003-06-01

    One of the underlying purposes of this paper is to provoke thinking about the interplay between the regulation of radioactive materials and the risk of their use in an radiological weapon (RW). Also considered in this paper are the types of RWs that a terrorist might use, the nature of the threat and danger posed by the various types of RWs, the essential elements that must be considered in responding to the terrorist use of an RW, and what steps may need to be taken a priori to minimize the consequences of the inevitable use of an RW. Because radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) have been the focus of so much recent concern and because RDDs are arguably the most likely of RWs to be used by a terrorist group, a major focus of this paper will be on RDDs. Radiological weapons are going to be used by some individual or group, if not this year then next year, or at some time in the foreseeable future. A policy of focusing resources solely on prevention of their use would leave any government open to significant economic disruption when the inevitable use occurs. Preplanning can limit the injuries, property damage, and economic losses that might result from the use of an RW. Moreover, a combination of efforts to prevent and to minimize the impact of RWs may significantly discourage potential users. The dangers from RWs can be dealt with while society continues to enjoy the benefits of nuclear technology that were promised under Atoms for Peace. However, some restructuring of our use of radioactive materials is necessary to ensure that the current and future uses of radioactive materials outweigh the potential disruption caused by misuse of the materials in RWs.

  2. Improved robotic equipment for radiological emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, C.V.

    1984-09-01

    A study has been made of the requirements for an improved mobile manipulator for use by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in radiological emergencies. Emergency personnel with experience in past or present (Three Mile Island) radiological emergencies were interviewed to determine the shortcomings of present equipment and features most desired in future equipment. The present technology of mobile manipulators was reviewed. The existing DOE remotely controlled mobile manipulators are single-arm, nonforce-reflecting and have inherent limitations to their mobility and ease of operation. A survey of past radiological emergencies and routine operations at DOE facilities and two commercial power reactors, including TMI, indicates that great improvements in mobility and manipulator dexterity will be required if mobile manipulators are to be more useful in reducing radiation exposure to operating and emergency personnel. In particular, the ability to climb stairs and climb over airlock thresholds is required. Bilateral, force-feedback manipulators would greatly increase the speed, reliability, and safety of manipulator operations. In recent years dramatic advances have been made in manipulator technology with the development of digital control and force feedback. The development of a six-legged, computer-controlled walker by the Odetic Corporation is a quantum improvement in mobility. Unfortunately the Odex walker will likely require another $1 million in development funds before it will be ready for commercial production. The cost of the first-advanced capability, walker-mounted mobile manipulator will likely be between $1 and $2 million dollars but holds the promise of removing the need for men in a variety of hazardous environments. In 1984 NTG Nukleartechnik of West Germany offered a bilateral, force-reflecting master/slave-controlled manipulator mounted on a variable-geometry crawler for only $250,000.

  3. Radiological properties of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Venning, A.J.; Nitschke, K.N.; Keall, P.J.; Baldock, C.

    2005-04-01

    The radiological properties of the normoxic polymer gel dosimeters MAGIC, MAGAS, and MAGAT [methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper; methacrylic acid gelatine gel with ascorbic acid; and methacrylic acid gelatine and tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride, respectively] have been investigated. The radiological water equivalence was determined by comparing the polymer gel macroscopic photon and electron interaction cross sections over the energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV and by Monte Carlo modeling of depth doses. Normoxic polymer gel dosimeters have a high gelatine and monomer concentration and therefore mass density (kg m{sup -3}) up to 3.8% higher than water. This results in differences between the cross-section ratios of the normoxic polymer gels and water of up to 3% for the attenuation, energy absorption, and collision stopping power coefficient ratios through the Compton dominant energy range. The mass cross-section ratios were within 2% of water except for the mass attenuation and energy absorption coefficients ratios, which showed differences with water of up to 6% for energies less than 100 keV. Monte Carlo modeling was undertaken for the polymer gel dosimeters to model the electron and photon transport resulting from a 6 MV photon beam. The absolute percentage differences between gel and water were within 1% and the relative percentage differences were within 3.5%. The results show that the MAGAT gel formulation is the most radiological water equivalent of the normoxic polymer gel dosimeters investigated due to its lower mass density measurement compared with MAGAS and MAGIC gels.

  4. Assessment of Chemical and Radiological Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    SETH, S.S.

    2000-05-17

    Following the May 14, 1997 chemical explosion at Hanford's Plutonium Reclamation Facility, the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and its prime contractor, Fluor Hanford, Inc., completed an extensive assessment to identify and address chemical and radiological safety vulnerabilities at all facilities under the Project Hanford Management Contract. This was a challenging undertaking because of the immense size of the problem, unique technical issues, and competing priorities. This paper focuses on the assessment process, including the criteria and methodology for data collection, evaluation, and risk-based scoring. It does not provide details on the facility-specific results and corrective actions, but discusses the approach taken to address the identified vulnerabilities.

  5. Storage media for computers in radiology.

    PubMed

    Dandu, Ravi Varma

    2008-11-01

    The introduction and wide acceptance of digital technology in medical imaging has resulted in an exponential increase in the amount of data produced by the radiology department. There is an insatiable need for storage space to archive this ever-growing volume of image data. Healthcare facilities should plan the type and size of the storage media that they needed, based not just on the volume of data but also on considerations such as the speed and ease of access, redundancy, security, costs, as well as the longevity of the archival technology. This article reviews the various digital storage media and compares their merits and demerits.

  6. Application of MM wave therapy in radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, R.S.; Gasparyan, L.V.

    1995-12-31

    The authors studied the effects of MM wave electromagnetic radiation influence on patients, affected by X-ray radiation during the reparation works after Chernobyl nuclear power plant exposure. They compared results of treatment of two groups of patients: (1) control group patients received only basis therapy; (2) testing group, 10 patients received basis therapy and MM wave influence. The authors used the wide band noise generator `Artsakh - 2` for local irradiation on the acupuncture points. Their data proved that low intensity MM waves have immunocorrective, antioxidant effects, and MM wave therapy is a perspective method for treatment of patients with radiological pathology.

  7. Establishing a new radiology residency research track.

    PubMed

    Costello, James R; Mullins, Mark E; Votaw, John R; Karolyi, Dan R; Kalb, Bobby; Gonzales, Patrick; Fornwalt, Brandon; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2013-02-01

    The authors describe the establishment of a radiology residency research track at their institution. Based on growing biomedical technology needs and the tremendous increase in imaging-based research, the importance of training and cultivating future clinical investigators continues to grow. Within the framework of a supportive environment, a residency research track exposes motivated radiologists-in-training to the tools, challenges, and successes of a career in academics. The authors describe their program's design, admissions process, curriculum, and expectations. Lastly, the authors share the insight of their experience and seek feedback from readers who have been involved in similar endeavors.

  8. Mayo Clinic Jacksonville electronic radiology practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Richard L.; Berquist, Thomas H.; Rueger, Wolfgang

    1996-05-01

    We have begun a project to implement an Electronic (Filmless) Radiology Practice (ERP) at Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. This project is integrated with the implementation of a project (Automated Clinical Practice--ACP) to eliminate circulation and archival of the current paper Medical Record. The ERP will result in elimination of screen/film radiography and the transmittal of film throughout the institution by the end of 1996. In conjunction with the ACP, paper and film will not circulate within the clinic by the end of this year.

  9. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty: radiological-pathological correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Saffitz, J.E.; Totty, W.G.; McClennan, B.L.; Gilula, L.A.

    1981-12-01

    Radiological and pathological assessment of the degree and extent of arterial injury caused by balloon angioplasty was performed in 20 renal arteries obtained at autopsy. Intact arteries were studied angiographically before and after dilatation and then examined histologically. Both normal and diseased arteries were subjected to varying degrees of dilatation. Damage ranged from minimal inimal disruption to major tears of the muscular media. Equivalent dilatory force created greater damage in the distal (muscular) than in the proximal (elastic) portion of the renal artery. There was no evidence of plaque remodling or compression.

  10. Storage media for computers in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Dandu, Ravi Varma

    2008-01-01

    The introduction and wide acceptance of digital technology in medical imaging has resulted in an exponential increase in the amount of data produced by the radiology department. There is an insatiable need for storage space to archive this ever-growing volume of image data. Healthcare facilities should plan the type and size of the storage media that they needed, based not just on the volume of data but also on considerations such as the speed and ease of access, redundancy, security, costs, as well as the longevity of the archival technology. This article reviews the various digital storage media and compares their merits and demerits. PMID:19774182

  11. Radiologic Diagnosis of Asbestosis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Yookyung; Kim, Yoon Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Asbestosis is the most important change noted in the lung parenchyma after environmental and occupational exposure to asbestos fibers. It is characterized by diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. In Korea, the incidence of asbestosis will continue to increase for many years to come and the government enacted the Asbestos Damage Relief Law in 2011 to provide compensation to those suffering from asbestos-related diseases. Radiologic evaluation is necessary for diagnosis of asbestosis, and radiologists play a key role in this process. Therefore, it is important for radiologists to be aware of the various imaging features of asbestosis. PMID:27587956

  12. Facial reanimation procedures depicted on radiologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ginat, D T; Bhama, P; Cunnane, M E; Hadlock, T A

    2014-09-01

    Various facial reanimation procedures can be performed for treating patients with chronic facial nerve paralysis. The radiologic imaging features of static and dynamic techniques are reviewed in this article with clinical correlation, including brow lift, eyelid weights and springs, gracilis free flaps, fascia lata grafts, temporalis flaps, and Gore-Tex suspension slings. Although the anatomic alterations resulting from facial reanimation surgery may not necessarily be the focus of the imaging examination, it is important to recognize such changes and be familiar with MR imaging compatibility of the associated implanted materials. Furthermore, imaging is sometimes used to specifically evaluate the postoperative results, such as vessel patency following free gracilis transfer.

  13. Mastocytosis: unusual manifestation; clinical and radiologic changes.

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, J. H.; Kalz, F.; Kadri, A. M.; Graefe, I. V.

    1975-01-01

    Two patients with mast cell disease presented with unusual features. In one the absence of skin lesions made the diagnositic problem a challenging one. Certain of the laboratory findings, especially those related to the serum cholesterol concentration and platelet function tests, were particularyl interesting. Chemotherapy induced partial remission. The second patient had a long, relatively benign course complicated by two episodes of herpes zoster, the last being associated with the Landry-Guillain-Barre syndrome. In both patients the skeletal abnormalities were radiologically similar. When these are present they should be considereed sufficiently characteristic to indicate strongly a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:804988

  14. Patient exposures in Saudi diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayad, M.; Melibary, Abdulrahman; Malabary, Tajuddin

    1994-07-01

    Diagnostic X-ray radiography patients exposures have been studied during 1412 (H) (1992) in the Riyadh area, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Dose imparted as well as doses to the thyroid, breast, lung, bone marrow, ovary and testis have been calculated for many types of radiographic examinations, Collective doses have been calculated. The dose imparted corresponds to an annual absorbed dose to the Saudi population, in the Riyadh area, of about 280 μGy, and a genetically significant dose of 108.8 μGy per person per year due to diagnostic radiology.

  15. Radiological Assistance Program plan, Region 8. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) since the late 1950`s. When a radiological incident occurs and exceeds the capability of the Federal, tribal, State, or local authorities, DOE resources are made available through the RAP to provide assistance to those authorities. The explicit purpose of the RAP is to assist in monitoring and assessing activities associated with radiological incidents or emergencies. The DOE`s philosophy is that assistance wig be provided in radiological accidents and will normally end when the need for assistance is over or if there are other sufficient resources available to handle the situation. The design of RAP is so that DOE`s response to a small incident can smoothly scale up for a major radiological emergency. In the event of a major radiological emergency, the law requires DOE to provide resources through the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) (FEMA 1985). The FRERP is a comprehensive Federal plan that describes the overall coordination of a Federal government response to a major radiological emergency. Implementation of RAP is done on a regional basis, with regional coordination between States and DOE response elements. This regional coordination is intended to foster a working relationship between DOE radiological response elements and those State, local, or other Federal agencies.

  16. Radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices for breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Luciana Batista; de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, the radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was investigated for future applications in brachytherapy. The main goal was to determine the radiological viability of ceramic and polymeric devices in vitro by performing simple radiological diagnostic methods such as conventional X-ray analysis and mammography due to its easy access to the population. The radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was determined using conventional X-ray, mammography and CT analysis.

  17. Clinical narrative and clinical organisation: properties of radiology reports.

    PubMed

    Rooksby, J; Kay, S

    2001-01-01

    Radiology reports, as a form of clinical narrative, are more than a repository of patient information but are active in patient care. They are not unique and individual to each patient but have structured content suitable for supporting the activities of care. We consider these activities of care and how they manifest in the report. This recognition of the infusion of clinical organisation in clinical narrative leads to the recognition of seven properties of radiology reports: labels, concepts, genre, structure, author, subject, reader. These properties exist across two relationships: the intertextual relationship between radiology reports and the interpersonal relationship between a radiology report and people.

  18. Population behavioral scenarios influencing radiological disaster preparedness and planning.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Ayse I; Lambert, James H; Guterbock, Thomas M; Clements, Janet L

    2012-09-01

    Considerable attention is focused on plans for sheltering or evacuating the population of the US national capital region in response to a regional emergency such as a terrorist attack or natural disaster. Such planning engages multiple disciplines spanning infrastructure engineering, emergency management, health care, mass communication, water and food supply, logistics, and others. Knowledge of population behaviors should influence the many dimensions of protection, prevention, response, and recovery. Of particular interest are the behaviors and needs of the resident and non-resident populations in the aftermath of a regional disaster, including those at home, at work, and traveling. The authors deployed a 30-min telephone survey to 2700 residents of the region to gain knowledge of their intended behaviors in the event of a variety of potential dirty bomb attacks. The survey provides a unique foundation for the current paper. The paper will identify and model the assumptions of population behaviors that most affect agency priorities for emergency planning including regional sheltering and evacuation following a radiological disaster such as a dirty bomb. The technical approach assessed several planning initiatives across performance criteria derived from strategic plans and applied combinations of behavioral assumptions to vary the relative importance of each criterion. The results reveal the behavioral scenarios that are most significant to the prioritization of planning initiatives and identify the highest and lowest priority initiatives across the criteria used.

  19. Radiological design aspects of the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Kohut, Thomas R; Brereton, Sandra J; Khater, Hesham

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been designed to accommodate some challenging radiological conditions. The high prompt neutron source (up to 1.6 × 10(19) neutrons per shot) results in the need for significant fixed shielding. Concrete shielding approximately 2 m thick is used for the primary (target bay) shield. Penetrations in this shield, including those required for 192 laser beams, utilities, diagnostics, and 19 shielded personnel access doors, make the design challenging. An additional 28 shield doors are part of the secondary shield. In addition, the prompt neutron pulse results in activated air within the target bay, requiring special ventilation considerations. Finally, targets can use a number of hazardous and radioactive materials including tritium, beryllium, and depleted uranium (the latter of which results in the generation of small quantities of fission products). Frequent access is required to the associated potentially contaminated volumes for experimental setup, facilitating the need for local exhaust ventilation to manage these hazards. This paper reviews some of these challenges, design considerations, and the engineering solutions to these design requirements.

  20. Nuclear and Radiological Forensics and Attribution Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K; Niemeyer, S

    2005-11-04

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Nuclear and Radiological Forensics and Attribution Program is to develop the technical capability for the nation to rapidly, accurately, and credibly attribute the origins and pathways of interdicted or collected materials, intact nuclear devices, and radiological dispersal devices. A robust attribution capability contributes to threat assessment, prevention, and deterrence of nuclear terrorism; it also supports the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in its investigative mission to prevent and respond to nuclear terrorism. Development of the capability involves two major elements: (1) the ability to collect evidence and make forensic measurements, and (2) the ability to interpret the forensic data. The Program leverages the existing capability throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory complex in a way that meets the requirements of the FBI and other government users. At the same time the capability is being developed, the Program also conducts investigations for a variety of sponsors using the current capability. The combination of operations and R&D in one program helps to ensure a strong linkage between the needs of the user community and the scientific development.

  1. [Business intelligence in radiology. Challenges and opportunities].

    PubMed

    Escher, A; Boll, D

    2015-10-01

    Due to economic pressures and need for higher transparency, a ubiquitous availability of administrative information is needed. Therefore radiology managers should consider implementing business intelligence (BI) solutions. BI is defined as a systemic approach to support decision-making in business administration. It is an important part of the overall strategy of an organization. Implementation and operation is initially associated with costs and for a successful launch important prerequisites must be fulfilled. First, a suitable product must be selected, followed by the technical and organizational implementation. After consideration of the type of data to be collected and a system of key performance indicators must be established. BI replaces classic retrospective business reporting with multidimensional and multifactorial analyses, real-time monitoring, and predictive analyses. The benefits of BI include the rapid availability of important information and the depth of possible data analysis. The simple and intuitive use of modern BI applications by the users themselves (!) combined with a continuous availability of information is the key to success. Professional BI will be an important part of management in radiology in the future.

  2. Teaching Communication Skills to Radiology Residents.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N; Yacob, Sammy; Mithqal, Ayman

    2017-01-17

    The transition of health care in the United States from volume to value requires a systems-based approach aligning clinical services across the continuum of care. The ability to communicate effectively and resolve conflict is a critical skill within the systems-based model. Recognizing the essential role of communication in medicine, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education has designated interpersonal and communication skills a core competency for all residents regardless of specialty. Yet, communication skills are often developed through on-the-job training or not at all. Traditional educational curricula use a predominantly didactic approach without opportunities for trainees to observe, actively experiment, or reflect on what is learned as a part of the learning process. In this article, we describe a 1-day experiential communication skills workshop customized for radiology residents that consists of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and conflict management sessions designed to develop interpersonal, communication, and conflict management skills through group discussion, role-play, and simulation. The purpose of this educational initiative was to determine the perceived value of an experiential communication skills workshop designed for radiology trainees.

  3. Incorporating intelligence into structured radiology reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Charles E.

    2014-03-01

    The new standard for radiology reporting templates being developed through the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) and DICOM organizations defines the storage and exchange of reporting templates as Hypertext Markup Language version 5 (HTML5) documents. The use of HTML5 enables the incorporation of "dynamic HTML," in which documents can be altered in response to their content. HTML5 documents can employ JavaScript, the HTML Document Object Model (DOM), and external web services to create intelligent reporting templates. Several reporting templates were created to demonstrate the use of scripts to perform in-template calculations and decision support. For example, a template for adrenal CT was created to compute contrast washout percentage from input values of precontrast, dynamic postcontrast, and delayed adrenal nodule attenuation values; the washout value can used to classify an adrenal nodule as a benign cortical adenoma. Dynamic templates were developed to compute volumes and apply diagnostic criteria, such as those for determination of internal carotid artery stenosis. Although reporting systems need not use a web browser to render the templates or their contents, the use of JavaScript creates innumerable opportunities to construct highly sophisticated HTML5 reporting templates. This report demonstrates the ability to incorporate dynamic content to enhance the use of radiology reporting templates.

  4. [Oral and maxillofacial radiology: laws and regulations].

    PubMed

    van der Stelt, P F

    2015-05-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays, medical imaging has been one of its most important applications. In the course of years, understanding of the potentially harmful effects of radiation on tissue has substantially increased as a result of experience and scientific studies. This has led to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the organisation that is now regarded as the most authoritative in the field of information on radiation and radiation protection. In most countries the law governing radiation is based on the 3 principles of the ICRP: justification, ALARA and dosage limits. For the Dutch situation, these are the Nuclear Energy Act (Kernenergiewet) and the Radiation Protection Decree (Besluit stralingsbescherming). The Practice Guidelines on Radiology are available for the practical implementation of the regulations. By working according to the Practice Guidelines, the dentist satisfies the legal regulations, but, more importantly, he can apply X-ray diagnostics in a manner that is safe for him, the dental team, the patients and all other visitors of the practice.

  5. Renal Papillary Necrosis: Role of Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Vaidehi K.

    2016-01-01

    Renal Papillary Necrosis (RPN) is idefined as Ischemic necrobiosis of the papilla in the medulla of the kidneys. Variety of etiological factors are recognized which cause papillary necrosis, such as analgesic nephropathy, diabetes mellitus, urinary obstruction and sickle cell haemoglobinopathy. The early diagnosis of RPN is important to improve prognosis and reduce morbidity. Radiological Imaging offers early diagnosis and can guide prompt treatment of papillary necrosis and can minimize a decline in renal function. Here we report three cases of RPN with typical imaging findings. One of them was diabetic and hypertensive female with recurrent Urinary tract Infections and other was a male with no known co-morbidity. Both of them were diagnosed to have renal papillary necrosis on CT scan and were managed operatively and conservatively, respectively. Third case was a healthy female being investigated to be renal donor for her son. Here RPN was an incidental finding and was treated conservatively. Thus CT scan could detect it pre-operatively and complications due to transplantation of a kidney with papillary necrosis were avoided. So, we want to emphasize the importance of Radiology, particularly CT scanning in detection of RPN and to guide early and prompt treatment. PMID:26894147

  6. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Angiomatous Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Juyoung; Kong, Doo-Sik; Seol, Ho Jun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Angiomatous meningioma is a rare histological subtype of meningioma. Therefore, this specific medical condition is rarely reviewed in the literature. In the present work, we report the clinical and radiological features with postoperative outcomes of angiomatous meningioma. Methods This retrospective study included the patients who were pathologically diagnosed with angiomatous meningioma after surgical resection between February 2010 and September 2015 in our institute. We analyzed the clinical data, radiological manifestation, treatment and prognosis of all patients. Results The 15 patients (5 males and 10 females) were diagnosed with angiomatous meningioma during the study period. The median age of patients at the time of surgery was 63 years (range: 40 to 80 years). According to Simpson classification, 7, 5, and 3 patients achieved Simpson grade I, II, and IV resection, respectively. In the follow-up period, recurrence was noted in one patient. Ten out of the 15 patients showed homogeneous enhancement. Two patients demonstrated cystic changes. There was no occurrence of calcification or hemorrhage in our patients. Characteristically, 14 out of 15 patients showed signal voids of vessels. Significant peritumoral edema was observed in the majority of tumors (67%). Conclusion Angiomatous meningiomas are rare benign meningioma. Brain images of angiomatous meningioma usually demonstrate signal void signs and peritumoral edema. In the present study, angiomatous meningiomas showed good prognosis after surgical resection. PMID:27867918

  7. Recent advances in radiology and medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, R.E.; Sherwood, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first chapter, on the radiology of arthritis, is an overview. The second and seventh chapters are on the chest the former, on adult respiratory distress syndrome, is a brief summary, and the latter, on digital radiography of the chest with the prototype slit-scanning technique. The third chapter reviews computed tomography of the lumbar spine. The following two chapters are on MR imaging, one on the central nervous system (covering demyelinating diseases, cardiovascular disease, infections, and tumors), with excellent illustrations; and one on MR imaging of the body. The illustrations are good. The following chapter is on extracardiac digital subtraction angiography (DSA), with an interesting table comparing and contrasting conventional angiography with both intraveneous and intraarterial DSA. The eighth chapter on pediatric imaging fits a world of experience. Chapter 9 is an update on contrast media, while the next chapter is on barium infusion examination of the small intestine. The final three chapters are concerned with the present state of angioplasty, interventional radiology in the urinary tract.

  8. Consensus Paper: Radiological Biomarkers of Cerebellar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baldarçara, Leonardo; Currie, Stuart; Hadjivassiliou, M.; Hoggard, Nigel; Jack, Allison; Jackowski, Andrea P.; Mascalchi, Mario; Parazzini, Cecilia; Reetz, Kathrin; Righini, Andrea; Schulz, Jörg B.; Vella, Alessandra; Webb, Sara Jane; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic cerebellar ataxias represent a vast and still growing group of diseases whose diagnosis and differentiation cannot only rely on clinical evaluation. Brain imaging including magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine techniques allows for characterization of structural and functional abnormalities underlying symptomatic ataxias. These methods thus constitute a potential source of radiological biomarkers, which could be used to identify these diseases and differentiate subgroups of them, and to assess their severity and their evolution. Such biomarkers mainly comprise qualitative and quantitative data obtained from MR including proton spectroscopy, diffusion imaging, tractography, voxel-based morphometry, functional imaging during task execution or in a resting state, and from SPETC and PET with several radiotracers. In the current article, we aim to illustrate briefly some applications of these neuroimaging tools to evaluation of cerebellar disorders such as inherited cerebellar ataxia, fetal developmental malformations, and immune-mediated cerebellar diseases and of neurodegenerative or early-developing diseases, such as dementia and autism in which cerebellar involvement is an emerging feature. Although these radiological biomarkers appear promising and helpful to better understand ataxia-related anatomical and physiological impairments, to date, very few of them have turned out to be specific for a given ataxia with atrophy of the cerebellar system being the main and the most usual alteration being observed. Consequently, much remains to be done to establish sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of available MR and nuclear medicine features as diagnostic, progression and surrogate biomarkers in clinical routine. PMID:25382714

  9. History, heresy and radiology in scientific discovery.

    PubMed

    McCredie, J

    2009-10-01

    Nowadays, most drugs reach the market after research has established their pharmacology, safety and efficacy. That was not always the case 50 years ago. Thalidomide was used before its target cell or mode of action were known. Commencing with the thalidomide catastrophe--an epidemic of gross birth defects (1958-1962)--thalidomide's origins are revisited to show how this drug came to be made and sold in the 1950s. Thalidomide intersected with Australian radiology in the 1970s. The site and mode of action of the drug was deduced from X-rays of thalidomide-induced bone defects, which have classical radiological signs of sensory neuropathic osteoarthropathy. The longitudinal reduction deformities follow the distribution of segmental sensory innervation of the limb skeleton, indicating neural crest as the target organ. Injury to one level of neural crest halts normal neurotrophism and deletes the dependent segment--a previously unrecognised embryonic mechanism that explains most non-genetic birth defects. The final common pathway is neural crest injury and failure of normal neurotrophism to result in longitudinal reduction deformities, for example, phocomelia.

  10. The new radiology workforce: changing expectations.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John J

    2004-05-01

    The zeitgeist of the new radiology workforce can best be described by a Bob Dylan song title: "The Times They Are A-Changin'." The new generation of physicians, although embracing the same foundations of medical practice as previous generations, places greater emphasis on personal satisfaction than its predecessors. Gone are the days when physicians operated as sole practitioners; today's workforce member is content to function in the role of "employee" in a trade-off for more lifestyle flexibility. This change has occurred not because of one specific factor but because of a change in the profession of medicine coupled with a combination of factors; familial responsibilities, avocational activities, and personal satisfaction have surfaced as motivating factors in choosing a profession. Today's workforce has a personal perception of success that may not be fulfilled solely by the contemporary practice of medicine. With the radiologist shortages that are now occurring and anticipated increased demand for staff radiologists, today's radiology workforce has helped shape the specialty into one that is altering its structure to attract and retain its workforce.

  11. [Vocal recognition in dental and oral radiology].

    PubMed

    La Fianza, A; Giorgetti, S; Marelli, P; Campani, R

    1993-10-01

    Speech reporting benefits by units which can recognize sentences in any natural language in real time. The use of this method in the everyday practice of radiology departments shows its possible application fields. We used the speech recognition method to report orthopantomographic exams in order to evaluate the advantages the method offers to the management and quality of reporting the exams which are difficult to fit in other closed computed reporting systems. Both speech recognition and the conventional reporting method (tape recording and typewriting) were used to report 760 orthopantomographs. The average time needed to make the report, the legibility (or Flesch) index, as adapted for the Italian language, and finally a clinical index (the subjective opinion of 4 odontostomatologists) were evaluated for each exam, with both techniques. Moreover, errors in speech reporting (crude, human and overall errors) were also evaluated. The advantages of speech reporting consisted in the shorter time needed for the report to become available (2.24 vs 2.99 minutes) (p < 0.0005), in the improved Flesch index (30.62 vs 28.9) and in the clinical index. The data obtained from speech reporting in odontostomatologic radiology were useful not only to reduce the mean reporting time of orthopantomographic exams but also to improve report quality by reducing both grammar and transmission mistakes. However, the basic condition for such results to be obtained is the speaker's skills to make a good report.

  12. Using Keynote to present radiology images.

    PubMed

    Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Techasith, Tust; Choy, Garry; Rojas, Carlos A; Pomerantz, Stuart R

    2011-10-01

    Numerous articles have offered instructions for working with advanced radiology images in Microsoft PowerPoint (Redmond, WA); however, no articles have detailed instructions to do the same on alternative presentation software. Apple Macintosh (Cupertino, CA) computers are gaining popularity with many radiologists, due in part to the availability of a powerful, free, open-source Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) viewing and manipulating software OsiriX ( http://www.osirix-viewer.com ). Apple's own presentation software, Keynote, is particularly effective in dealing with medical images and cine clips. This article demonstrates how to use Apple's Keynote software to present radiology images and scrollable image stacks, without third-party add-on software. The article also illustrates how to compress media files and protect patient information in Keynote presentations. Lastly, it addresses the steps to converting between PowerPoint and Keynote file formats. Apple's Keynote software enables quick and efficient addition of multiple static images or scrollable image stacks, compression of media files, and removal of patient information. These functions can be accomplished by inexperienced users with no software modifications.

  13. Towards case-based medical learning in radiological decision making using content-based image retrieval

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Radiologists' training is based on intensive practice and can be improved with the use of diagnostic training systems. However, existing systems typically require laboriously prepared training cases and lack integration into the clinical environment with a proper learning scenario. Consequently, diagnostic training systems advancing decision-making skills are not well established in radiological education. Methods We investigated didactic concepts and appraised methods appropriate to the radiology domain, as follows: (i) Adult learning theories stress the importance of work-related practice gained in a team of problem-solvers; (ii) Case-based reasoning (CBR) parallels the human problem-solving process; (iii) Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) can be useful for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). To overcome the known drawbacks of existing learning systems, we developed the concept of image-based case retrieval for radiological education (IBCR-RE). The IBCR-RE diagnostic training is embedded into a didactic framework based on the Seven Jump approach, which is well established in problem-based learning (PBL). In order to provide a learning environment that is as similar as possible to radiological practice, we have analysed the radiological workflow and environment. Results We mapped the IBCR-RE diagnostic training approach into the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA) framework, resulting in the proposed concept of the IRMAdiag training application. IRMAdiag makes use of the modular structure of IRMA and comprises (i) the IRMA core, i.e., the IRMA CBIR engine; and (ii) the IRMAcon viewer. We propose embedding IRMAdiag into hospital information technology (IT) infrastructure using the standard protocols Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and Health Level Seven (HL7). Furthermore, we present a case description and a scheme of planned evaluations to comprehensively assess the system. Conclusions The IBCR-RE paradigm incorporates a

  14. ALARA Center of Technology promotes good radiological work practices at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

    1997-10-31

    The central Radiological Control Organization, originally under the previous Management and Operations contractor (Westinghouse Hanford Company) decided that a significant improvement in ALARA implementation would result if examples of engineered controls used for radiological work were assembled in one location to provide a ``showcase`` for workers and managers. The facility would be named the ALARA Center of Technology (ACT) and would include the latest technologies used to accomplish radiological work, as well as proven techniques, tools, and equipment. A location for the Center was selected in the 200 East Area of Hanford in a central location to be easily accessible to all facilities and contractors. Since there was little money available for this project, a decision was made to contact several vendors and request loans of their tools, equipment, and materials. In return, the center would help market products on site and assist with product demonstrations when the vendors visited Hanford. Out of 28 vendors originally contacted, 16 responded with offers to loan products. This included a containment tent, several glove bags, BEPA filtered vacuum cleaners, portable ventilation systems, fixatives, temporary shielding, pumps, and several special tools. Vendors who could not provide products sent videos and brochures. Westinghouse Hanford Company began using the ACT in June 1996. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., the present Management and Integrating Contractor for the Hanford Site, held the formal opening ceremony of the ALARA Center of Technology on October 1, 1996. The Center now has about 1200 ft{sup 2} of floor space fi Iled with tools, equipment and material used to perform radiological work.

  15. FRMAC Interactions During a Radiological or Nuclear Event

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C T

    2011-01-27

    During a radiological or nuclear event of national significance the Federal Radiological Emergency Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) assists federal, state, tribal, and local authorities by providing timely, high-quality predictions, measurements, analyses and assessments to promote efficient and effective emergency response for protection of the public and the environment from the consequences of such an event.

  16. Region 8 radiological assistance program team response manual

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.E.

    1997-04-15

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidance so that a request for radiological assistance is responded to in an effective and consistent manner. These procedures are specific to the trained and qualified members of the Region 8 Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team. Procedures provide steps for responding to the request, notification and activation of the team members, position descriptions, and checklists.

  17. Radiation protection in radiologic technology: Apathy versus active involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, K.H.

    1982-11-01

    The lack of active participation in radiation protection is a serious problem in Radiologic Technology today. Underlying the problem is professional apathy. An overview of the historical changes, as well as various recent developments in radiology, accentuate the importance of necessary changes in technologists' attitudes and activities. 22 references.

  18. Texture analysis in radiology: Does the emperor have no clothes?

    PubMed

    Summers, Ronald M

    2017-02-01

    Texture analysis is more and more frequently used in radiology research. Is this a new technology, and if not, what has changed? Is texture analysis the great diagnostic and prognostic tool we have been searching for in radiology? This commentary answers these questions and places texture analysis into its proper perspective.

  19. The Correlated Lecture Laboratory Series in Diagnostic Radiological Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamel, David A.; And Others

    This series in diagnostic radiological physics has been designed to provide the physics background requisite for the proper conduct of medical diagnostic x-ray examinations. The basic goal of the series is to bridge physics theory and radiological practice, achieved by combining pertinent lecture material with laboratory exercises that illustrate…

  20. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  1. History of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.

    PubMed

    Frommer, H H; Fortier, P

    1995-11-01

    In celebrating the centennial of the discovery of the x-ray it is fitting to relate the history of organized Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology. The American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology has evolved through four name changes and now has expanded its scope to include all modalities of diagnostic imaging.

  2. Radiological Scoping Survey of the Scotia Depot Scotia, New York

    SciTech Connect

    E. N. Bailey

    2005-02-05

    At the request of the Defense Logistics Agency, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education conducted radiological scoping surveys of the Scotia Depot during the period of September 24 through 27, 2007. The scoping survey included visual inspections and limited radiological surveys performed in accordance with area classification that included surface scans, total and removable activity measurements, and soil sampling.

  3. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

  4. Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-08-18

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

  5. Predictive Radiological Background Distributions from Geochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, D.; Burnley, P. C.; Marsac, K.; Malchow, R.

    2014-12-01

    Gamma ray surveys are an important tool for both national security interests as well as industry in determininglocations of both anthropogenic radiological sources and natural occurrences of radiologic material. The purpose ofthis project is to predict the radiologic exposure rate of geologic materials by creating a model using publishedgeochemical data, geologic data, GIS software, and freely available remote sensing data sets. If K, U, and Thabundance values are known for a given geologic unit, the expected radiation exposure rate can be calculated. Oneof the primary challenges surrounding this project is that alluvial units are classified by age rather than rock type. Itis therefore important to determine sediment sources and estimate their relative contribution to alluvial units.ASTER data from the Terra satellite can differentiate between surface mineralogies and can aid us in calculating therelative percentage of sediment from each source and by extension the geochemical concentrations of challengingsurfaces such as alluvium. An additional problem is that U and Th do not directly contribute to the measuredradiation exposure rate. Instead, daughter isotopes of these radioelements emit detectable gamma rays and may nothave reached equilibrium in younger surfaces. U can take up to 1.5 Ma to come to equilibrium with its daughterisotopes while Th takes only about 40 years. Further modeling with software such as Monte Carlo N-ParticleTransport from Los Alamos National Laboratory, will help us correct for this disequilibrium in our models. Once the predicted exposure rate is calculated for a geologic unit, it can then be assigned to a geographic area basedon geologic and geomorphic trends. This prediction will be subtracted from data collected through aerial surveys,effectively ignoring geology, and allowing areas of interest to be narrowed down considerably. The study areasinclude the alluvium on the west shore of Lake Mohave and Government Wash north of Lake Mead

  6. DOE Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, F.M.

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) since the 1950`s. The RAP is designed to make DOE resources available to other DOE facilities, state, tribal, local, private businesses, and individuals for the explicit purpose of assisting during radiological incidents. The DOE has an obligation, through the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, to provide resources through the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP, Nov. 1985) in the event of a radiological incident. Toward this end, the RAP program is implemented on a regional basis, and has planned for an incremental response capability with regional coordination between states and DOE response elements. This regional coordination is intended to foster a working relationship between DOE radiological assistance elements and those state, tribal, and local agencies responsible for first response to protect public health and safety.

  7. Academic opportunities in radiology education and education research.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2002-07-01

    Education can be the focus of a rewarding and successful career in academic radiology. Educational opportunities for academic radiologists include teaching medical students, residents, nursing students, physician assistant students, radiology technologist students, and other allied health profession students. Teaching can occur in large or small groups, or as a one-on-one encounter. Teaching is the very best way to learn a subject well; thus, educators are often considered experts in their fields. Educators can develop innovative teaching materials that are passed on to generations of students. Opportunities in educational administration and personal development are available both locally and nationally. Participation in radiology education research allows a radiologist to contribute to the body of knowledge in radiology education and advance the field of radiology education through science.

  8. Opportunities for Patient-centered Outcomes Research in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Zygmont, Matthew E; Lam, Diana L; Nowitzki, Kristina M; Burton, Kirsteen R; Lenchik, Leon; McArthur, Tatum A; Sekhar, Aarti K; Itri, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Recently created in 2010, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) supports patient-centered comparative effectiveness research with a focus on prioritizing high-impact studies and improving trial design methodology. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on patient-centered outcomes research in Radiology aims to review recently funded imaging-centric projects that adhere to the methodologies established by PCORI. We provide an overview of the successful application of PCORI standards to radiology topics, highlight how these methodologies differ from other forms of radiology research, and identify opportunities for new projects as well as potential barriers for involvement. Our hope is that review of specific case examples in radiology will clarify the use and value of PCORI methods mandated and supported nationally by the Affordable Care Act.

  9. Clinical and radiological findings in chlorfenapyr poisoning.

    PubMed

    Tharaknath, Vemuri Rama; Prabhakar, Y V S; Kumar, K Suseel; Babu, Noorthi Kalyan

    2013-04-01

    This is a case report of suicidal ingestion of chlorfenapyr, presenting with neurological complications after a latent period of more than a week, and rapidly progressing to death within days of symptoms. Chlorfenapyr is a moderately hazardous pesticide according to World Health Organization toxicity classification, and kills target organism by depriving it of energy through interference with oxidative phosphorylation at mitochondrial level. A pro-pesticide, chlorfenapyr takes time to convert to its active form and either this active form or a toxic metabolite causes delayed neurological symptoms. It causes significant neurotoxicity in rat models. This case report provides for the first time from India (second worldwide), clinical and "radiological evidence" (magnetic resonance imaging showing demyelinating/oedematous changes) of "chlorfenapyr neurotoxicity in humans." It also highlights the "latent period" between ingestion and onset of fatal manifestations. Earlier, similar case reports of human deaths with delayed onset neurological symptoms, due to chlorfenapyr poisoning have been reported, from Japan, Columbia, and Korea.

  10. Motivation in a multigenerational radiologic science workplace.

    PubMed

    Kalar, Traci

    2008-01-01

    For the first time in history, radiologic science (RS) workplaces consist of 4 generational cohorts. As each cohort possess their own attitudes, values, work habits, and expectations, motivating a generational diverse workplace is challenging. Through the understanding of generational differences, managers are better able to accommodate individual as well as generational needs and help create a more productive and higher performing workplace. The purpose of this paper is to assist managers in the understanding and utilization of generational differences to effectively motivate staff in an RS workplace. Generational cohorts will be defined and discussed along with an in-depth discussion on each of the generations performing in today's RS workplace. Motivators and how they impact the different generational cohorts will be addressed along with how to best motivate a multigenerational RS workplace.

  11. Chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Otten, Edward J

    2004-03-01

    A by-product of the uranium enrichment process, depleted uranium (DU) contains approximately 40% of the radioactivity of natural uranium yet retains all of its chemical properties. After its use in the 1991 Gulf War, public concern increased regarding its potential radiotoxicant properties. Whereas in vitro and rodent data have suggested the potential for uranium-induced carcinogenesis, human cohort studies assessing the health effects of natural and DU have failed to validate these findings. Heavy-metal nephrotoxicity has not been noted in either animal studies or Gulf War veteran cohort studies despite markedly elevated urinary uranium excretion. No significant residual environmental contamination has been found in geographical areas exposed to DU. As such, although continued surveillance of exposed cohorts and environments (particularly water sources) are recommended, current data would support the position that DU poses neither a radiological nor chemical threat.

  12. Radiological residua of healed diabetic arthropathies

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, K.

    1981-12-01

    Diabetic arthropathy is a relatively rare manifestation of neuropathic disease, occurring in fewer than 5% of cases. Abnormalities of this type are confined largely to the small joints of the feet, although the larger joints of the lower limbs and the spine occasionally are affected. Some lesions, particularly in the feet, repair spontaneously, leaving radiological residua sufficiently characteristic to prompt suspicion of an unrecognised diabetic state. These include deformity of the head of the second metatarsal (akin to a Freiberg lesion), shortening of the great toe, painless deforming arthrosis of the knee, and ankylosis of interphalangeal joints. In the presence of these signs the patient should be interrogated concerning diabetes and blood sugar estimates, with provocation if necessary, obtained. Should such a diagnosis be sustained, appropriate protective measures may be undertaken to avoid a relapse of the arthropathy.

  13. Radiological criteria for underground nuclear tests

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, J.S.; Brownlee, R.R.; Costa, C.F.; Mueller, H.F.; Newman, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    The radiological criteria for the conduct of nuclear tests have undergone many revisions with the current criteria being 0.17 rad for uncontrolled populations and 0.5 rad for controllable populations. Their effect upon operations at the Nevada Test Site and the current off-site protective plans are reviewed for areas surrounding the Site. The few accidental releases that have occurred are used to establish estimates of probability of release and of hazard to the population. These are then put into context by comparing statistical data on other accidents and cataclysms. The guidelines established by DOE Manual Chapter MC-0524 have never been exceeded during the entire underground nuclear test program. The probability of real hazard to off-site populations appears to be sufficiently low as not to cause undue concern to the citizenry.

  14. Using simulation for interventional radiology training

    PubMed Central

    Gould, D

    2010-01-01

    Debate on the existence of innate skills has all but evaporated in the light of evidence that it is only the hours spent in deliberate practice that correlate with even the most elite levels of expertise. A range of simple to advanced technologies stands to address some of the many challenges to effective training of 21st century, procedural medicine. Simulation could train and assess behaviours remotely from patients, in complete safety, reducing the risks of inexperienced trainees learning critical tasks in patients while contributing to certification and revalidation. Understanding the strengths and limitations of these devices, determining and improving their effectiveness and identifying their roles, as well as those of individuals and teams, represents a cornerstone of successful adoption into the interventional radiology curriculum. This requires a simulation strategy that includes standards for simulator documentation. PMID:20603407

  15. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Non-Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR), which includes variety of procedures done under image guidance has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions, plays a significant role in the delivery of safe and effective care by reducing surgical risks, decreasing the length of hospital stay and reducing costs. The application of interventional techniques in children has been delayed over years as compared to adults due to lack of special hardwares/equipments, lack of adequately trained physicians and also the lack of awareness among the pediatric practitioners. This situation is gradually changing now owing to the advancements in technology. In this review, authors will discuss various non-vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients.

  16. Conventional radiological strategy of common gastrointestinal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Zhuo; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the clinical characteristics and imaging features of common gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasms in terms of conventional radiological imaging methods. Barium studies are readily available for displaying primary malignancies and are minimally or not at all invasive. A neoplasm may be manifested as various imaging findings, including mucosal disruption, soft mass, ulcer, submucosal invasion and lumen stenosis on barium studies. Benign tumors typically appear as smoothly marginated intramural masses. Malignant neoplasms most often appear as irregular infiltrative lesions on barium examination. Tumor extension to adjacent GI segments may be indistinct on barium images. Cross-sectional images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may provide more accurate details of the adjacent organ invasion, omental or peritoneal spread. PMID:25628800

  17. Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, A.D.; Sciubba, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Malamud, H. )

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices.

  18. Wilms tumor in horseshoe kidneys: radiologic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, B.B. Jr.; Dawes, R.K.; Atkinson, G.O. Jr.; Ball, T.I. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    Two cases of nephroblastoma occurring in a horseshoe kidney are reported, and 32 cases from the literature are reviewed. The radiologic signs of horseshoe kidney may be difficult to evaluate with excretory urography when the mass is large. Rotational abnormalities of the opposite kidney that is not involved by tumor should suggest the possibility of an associated horseshoe kidney. Real-time ultrasonography and computed tomography are helpful in identifying the isthmus of the horseshoe kidney. Aortography confirms the presence of the horseshoe kidney and demonstrates the arterial supply to the isthmus and the tumor. Radionuclide scans demonstrate the isthmus when the tumor arises from an upper pole, but may not be diagnostic if the tumor arises from the isthmus.

  19. Radiological evaluation of hepatic cavernous hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, W.E.; Floyd, J.L.; Jackson, D.E.; Gilliland, J.D.

    1987-05-08

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the liver are sufficiently common that they will often be incidentally discovered during hepatic imaging by ultrasound, computed tomography, or radiocolloid scintigraphy. The differentiation of these benign tumors from primary or metastatic hepatic malignancy is mandatory, but often it is not possible on the study in which the lesion was originally detected. There are several routes by which to arrive at the correct diagnosis, but the optimum study or sequence of studies may elude the physician caring for the patient. Knowledge of the imaging options, and the strengths and weaknesses of each of these options, will facilitate a rapid diagnosis and ensure proper treatment, with maximum patient safety and minimum expenditure of resources. This article examines these radiological options.

  20. The Application of the Radiological Defense Capabilities to Peacetime Radiological Incidents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    protection professionals within the state. I.- *.~. . 0 0.~ 0. . ~ ~ P~d .P J l.A~ F .S ~ -. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1% THE APPLICATION OF THE... protection groups, federal agencies, and private organizations. 1.2 BACKGROUND INFORMATION Radiological defense (RADEF) prograis were developed to save...occurred without any protective actions being takpn, some early deaths due to radiation exposure might occur. A large area could be contaminated with

  1. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of this section— (i) Radiology services include diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, nuclear medicine, CAT scan procedures, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and other imaging services; and...

  2. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of this section— (i) Radiology services include diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, nuclear medicine, CAT scan procedures, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and other imaging services; and...

  3. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of this section— (i) Radiology services include diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, nuclear medicine, CAT scan procedures, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and other imaging services; and...

  4. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of this section— (i) Radiology services include diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, nuclear medicine, CAT scan procedures, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and other imaging services; and...

  5. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of this section— (i) Radiology services include diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, nuclear medicine, CAT scan procedures, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and other imaging services; and...

  6. 2000 RSNA annual oration in diagnostic radiology: The future of interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Becker, G J

    2001-08-01

    Origins in imaging, procedural emphasis, and dependence on innovation characterize interventional radiology, which will continue as the field of image-guided minimally invasive therapies. A steady supply of innovators will be needed. Current workforce shortages demand that this problem be addressed and in an ongoing fashion. Interventional radiology's major identity problem will require multiple corrective measures, including a name change. Diagnostic radiologists must fully embrace the concept of the dedicated interventionalist. Interspecialty turf battles will continue, especially with cardiologists and vascular surgeons. To advance the discipline, interventional radiologists must remain involved in cutting-edge therapies such as endograft repair of aortic aneurysms and carotid stent placement. As the population ages, interventionalists will experience a shift toward a greater emphasis on cancer treatment. Political agendas and public pressure will improve access to care and result in managed health care reforms. Academic centers will continue to witness a decline in time and resources available to pursue academic missions. The public outcry for accountability will result in systems changes aimed at reducing errors and process changes in the way physicians are trained, certified, and monitored. Evidence-based medicine will be the watchword of this century. Interventional radiology will maintain its role through development of methods for delivery of genes, gene products, and drugs to specific target sites; control of angiogenesis and other biologic processes; and noninvasive image-guided delivery of various forms of energy for ablation.

  7. Technology assessment in radiology: putting the evidence in evidence-based radiology.

    PubMed

    Hollingworth, William; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2007-07-01

    In this review, which is part of a larger series on evidence-based practice in radiology, the relationship between technology assessment (TA) and the practice of evidence-based radiology (EBR) is discussed. TA guides researchers in the methods required to be reliable providers of unbiased and relevant evidence. Meanwhile, EBR equips radiologists with the skills needed to be discerning consumers of that evidence. Both paradigms aim to improve the effectiveness of health care spending. In this review, it is argued that EBR can be only as good as the TA on which it is based. However, TA is particularly complex in regard to diagnostic radiology because of the many links in the chain between the interim objective (to make the correct diagnosis) and the ultimate goal (to improve patient health). In this article, the development of TA in medicine in general and, more specifically, the TA hierarchy for the evaluation of diagnostic imaging are described. Some of the improvements in the pool of evidence during the past 30 years are documented, and some of the remaining tensions between TA and EBR are highlighted.

  8. Subinternship in Radiology - A Practical Start to the Specialization?

    PubMed

    Kasch, R; Wirkner, J; Hosten, N; Hinz, P; Napp, M; Kessler, R

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To identify factors influencing medical students to choose radiology in the four-month clinical elective in the final year of medical school following radiology subinternships. Materials and Methods: A subsample of medical students in a nationwide German online survey evaluated a subinternship in radiology (19 items). They were divided into four groups: Students who could imagine doing a clinical elective in radiology in the practical year based on their experiences during the subinternship ("yes, based on subinternship"), students who could not ("no, based on subinternship") and students who had made this decision prior to the subinternship ("yes, prior to subinternship" and "no, prior to subinternship"). Results: 94 medical students evaluated a radiology subinternship (54.4 % females). Based on their experiences during the subinternship, 54 students (57.4 %) intended to do a final year clinical elective in radiology, 39 of them (41.5 %) being encouraged by the subinternship. 40 (42.6 %) reported having a negative attitude towards a clinical elective in radiology, 16 of them (17.0 %) having made this decision based on their subinternship experience. Groups did not differ regarding gender (p = 0.396) and age (p = 0.853). Students motivated to do a final year clinical elective in radiology experienced excellent academic teaching (p = 0.001) and practical involvement (p = 0.003), achieved their learning goals more often (p = 0.001), were better integrated into the team (p = 0.001), and acquired more practical skills (p = 0.003). Overall satisfaction was higher in these groups (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Satisfaction with a radiology subinternship is crucial for motivating medical students to do a final year clinical elective in radiology. A structured subinternship and continuous mentoring should be targeted to keep students connected to radiology. Key Points: • Radiology subinternships influence further

  9. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Addendum D1

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junctions Project Office in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. The objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on- pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra- 226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  10. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  11. Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS) Pilot Course Summary and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Alai, M.; Askin, A.; Buddemeier, B.; Wogan, L.; Doshi, P.; Tai, L.

    2016-09-30

    In support of the Department of Homeland Security / Science and Technology Directorate’s (DHS/S&T) creation of a new position called the Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Sub-task 1.1 and 1.2 has assisted in the development of the ROSS skills, knowledge, and abilities (SKAs); identified potentially relevant training; cross-mapped the training to the SKAs; and identified gaps in the training related to the SKAs, as well as their respective level of training knowledge - current versus desired. In the follow on task, Sub-task 1.3, a 5 day ROSS Pilot Training course was developed to fill the priority gaps identified in Sub-Task 1.2. Additionally, in Sub-Task 1.5, LLNL has performed a gap analysis of electronic tools, handbooks, and job-aides currently available to the ROSS and developed recommendations for additional and next generation tools to ensure the operational effectiveness of the ROSS position. This document summarizes the feedback received from the instructors and pilot course observers on what worked in the course and what could be improved as well as an assessment of the Pre- and Post-Test administered to the students.

  12. Understanding and Applying the Concept of Value Creation in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Larson, David B; Durand, Daniel J; Siegal, Daniel S

    2017-04-01

    The concept of value in radiology has been strongly advocated in recent years as a means of advancing patient care and decreasing waste. This article explores the concept of value creation in radiology and offers a framework for how radiology practices can create value according to the needs of their referring clinicians. Value only exists in the eyes of a customer. We propose that the primary purpose of diagnostic radiology is to answer clinical questions using medical imaging to help guide management of patient care. Because they are the direct recipient of this service, we propose that referring clinicians are the direct customers of a radiology practice and patients are indirect customers. Radiology practices create value as they understand and fulfill their referring clinicians' needs. To narrow those needs to actionable categories, we propose a framework consisting of four major dimensions: (1) how quickly the clinical question needs to be answered, (2) the degree of specialization required to answer the question, (3) how often the referring clinician uses imaging, and (4) the breadth of imaging that the referring clinician uses. We further identify three major settings in which referring clinicians utilize radiological services: (1) emergent or urgent care, (2) primary care, and (3) specialty care. Practices best meet these needs as they engage with their referring clinicians, create a shared vision, work together as a cohesive team, structure the organization to meet referring clinicians' needs, build the tools, and continually improve in ways that help referring clinicians care for patients.

  13. White Paper: Radiological Curriculum for Undergraduate Medical Education in Germany.

    PubMed

    Ertl-Wagner, B; Barkhausen, J; Mahnken, A H; Mentzel, H J; Uder, M; Weidemann, J; Stumpp, P

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Radiology represents a highly relevant part of undergraduate medical education from preclinical studies to subinternship training. It is therefore important to establish a content base for teaching radiology in German Medical Faculties. Materials and Methods: The German Society of Radiology (DRG) developed a model curriculum for radiological teaching at German medical universities, which is presented in this article. There is also a European model curriculum for undergraduate teaching (U-level curriculum of the European Society of Radiology). In a modular concept, the students shall learn important radiological core principles in the realms of knowledge, skills and competences as well as core scientific competences in the imaging sciences. Results: The curriculum is divided into two modules. Module 1 includes principles of radiation biology, radiation protection and imaging technology, imaging anatomy as well as the risks and side effects of radiological methods, procedures and contrast media. This module is modality-oriented. Module 2 comprises radiological diagnostic decision-making and imaging-based interventional techniques for various disease entities. This module is organ system-oriented. Conclusion: The curriculum is meant as a living document to be amended and revised at regular intervals. The curriculum can be used as a basis for individual curricular development at German Medical Faculties. It can be integrated into traditional or reformed medical teaching curricula. Key Points: • Radiology is an integral and important part of medical education.• The German Society of Radiology (DRG) developed a model curriculum for teaching radiology at German Medical Faculties to help students develop the ability to make medical decisions based on scientific knowledge and act accordingly.• This curriculum can be used for individual curricular development at medical departments. It is divided into two modules with several chapters. Citation Format

  14. [Update on the radiological study of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro Ballester, A; Marco Domenech, S F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis has made a comeback in recent years. This upsurge has been attributed to factors such as increased immigration and the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifests radiologically with parenchymal involvement, lymph node involvement, pleural effusion, and/or miliary disease. In post-primary tuberculosis, the earliest radiological sign is small nodules and branching centrilobular lesions that increase in size and coalesce to form ill-defined patchy consolidations; cavitations are very characteristic of active disease. The aim of this article is to describe the radiologic findings for pulmonary tuberculosis and its complications.

  15. Updates on Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy/Gastrojejunostomy and Jejunostomy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Auh-Whan

    2010-01-01

    Gastrostomy placement for nutritional support for patients with inadequate oral intake has been attempted using surgical, endoscopic, and, more recently, percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Surgical gastrostomy has been superseded by both endoscopic and radiologic gastrostomy. We describe herein the indications, contraindications, patient preparations, techniques, complications, and aftercare with regard to radiologic gastrostomy. In addition, we discuss the available tube types and their perceived advantages. There remain some controversies regarding gastropexy performance and primary percutaneous gastrojejunostomy. Percutaneous jejunostomy is indicated for patients whose stomach is inaccessible for gastrostomy placement or for those who have had a previous gastrectomy. PMID:21103291

  16. A Platform-Independent Plugin for Navigating Online Radiology Cases.

    PubMed

    Balkman, Jason D; Awan, Omer A

    2016-06-01

    Software methods that enable navigation of radiology cases on various digital platforms differ between handheld devices and desktop computers. This has resulted in poor compatibility of online radiology teaching files across mobile smartphones, tablets, and desktop computers. A standardized, platform-independent, or "agnostic" approach for presenting online radiology content was produced in this work by leveraging modern hypertext markup language (HTML) and JavaScript web software technology. We describe the design and evaluation of this software, demonstrate its use across multiple viewing platforms, and make it publicly available as a model for future development efforts.

  17. Updates on percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy and jejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Park, Auh-Whan

    2010-09-01

    Gastrostomy placement for nutritional support for patients with inadequate oral intake has been attempted using surgical, endoscopic, and, more recently, percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Surgical gastrostomy has been superseded by both endoscopic and radiologic gastrostomy. We describe herein the indications, contraindications, patient preparations, techniques, complications, and aftercare with regard to radiologic gastrostomy. In addition, we discuss the available tube types and their perceived advantages. There remain some controversies regarding gastropexy performance and primary percutaneous gastrojejunostomy. Percutaneous jejunostomy is indicated for patients whose stomach is inaccessible for gastrostomy placement or for those who have had a previous gastrectomy.

  18. Bismuth Infusion of ABS Enables Additive Manufacturing of Complex Radiological Phantoms and Shielding Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Ceh, Justin; Youd, Tom; Mastrovich, Zach; Peterson, Cody; Khan, Sarah; Sasser, Todd A.; Sander, Ian M.; Doney, Justin; Turner, Clark; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Radiopacity is a critical property of materials that are used for a range of radiological applications, including the development of phantom devices that emulate the radiodensity of native tissues and the production of protective equipment for personnel handling radioactive materials. Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a fabrication platform that is well suited to creating complex anatomical replicas or custom labware to accomplish these radiological purposes. We created and tested multiple ABS (Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) filaments infused with varied concentrations of bismuth (1.2–2.7 g/cm3), a radiopaque metal that is compatible with plastic infusion, to address the poor gamma radiation attenuation of many mainstream 3D printing materials. X-ray computed tomography (CT) experiments of these filaments indicated that a density of 1.2 g/cm3 of bismuth-infused ABS emulates bone radiopacity during X-ray CT imaging on preclinical and clinical scanners. ABS-bismuth filaments along with ABS were 3D printed to create an embedded human nasocranial anatomical phantom that mimicked radiological properties of native bone and soft tissue. Increasing the bismuth content in the filaments to 2.7 g/cm3 created a stable material that could attenuate 50% of 99mTechnetium gamma emission when printed with a 2.0 mm wall thickness. A shielded test tube rack was printed to attenuate source radiation as a protective measure for lab personnel. We demonstrated the utility of novel filaments to serve multiple radiological purposes, including the creation of anthropomorphic phantoms and safety labware, by tuning the level of radiation attenuation through material customization. PMID:28245589

  19. Using technology assessment as the picture archiving and communication system spreads outside radiology to the enterprise.

    PubMed

    Maliff, R P; Launders, J

    2000-05-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) are being implemented within radiology departments, and many facilities are entering the next stage of PACS use by deploying PACS to departments outside of radiology and to other facilities located at a distance. Many PACS vendors and department administrators have based cost-justification analyses on the anticipated savings from expanding PACS to these areas. However, many of these cost-savings analyses can be highly suspect in their assumptions and findings. Technology assessment (TA) at the hospital/health system level is an organized, systematic approach to examining the efficacy of a technology in relation to the health system's mission and clinical needs. It can be an organized and unifying approach to aid in the distribution of limited capital resources. As extra-radiology PACS deployment is a costly endeavor, TA may be used to plan for PACS implementation throughout the enterprise. In many organizations, PACS is thought of as a radiology domain as its first uses were centered on this image-producing service. Now, as PACS technology spreads to other service areas, such as cardiology, dermatology, pathology, orthopedics, obstetrics, etc, the need to incorporate other viewpoints in a system-based PACS is necessary to avoid having independent PACS that may duplicate archives and may not communicate with each other. How to meet the diverse PACS needs of clinical services can be a challenging task; a TA program has been demonstrated to effectively handle the clinical needs, demands, and timeframes of PACS planning and support throughout hospitals and health systems. A hospital-based TA program can assist health care organizations to present PACS as a system-wide need and program rather than a radiology-based program gobbling up the capital budget. Submitting PACS to the TA review process can identify essential elements in planning and help avoid many of the pitfalls of PACS implementation and operations. Thorough

  20. Vision and benefits of a virtual radiology environment for the U.S. Army

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Anna K.; Griffin, Robert; Cook, Jay F.; Martinez, Ralph; Lollar, H. William; Perez, Guadalupe

    1998-07-01

    The changes that have overtaken the U.S. healthcare industry in the last five years could be best characterized as tectonic shifts. Every aspect of the healthcare market has been affected by the changes in Government policy and the attitude of society to issues in Healthcare. Most of these changes have been viewed as adversarial both to the health care provider and to the consumer. Healthcare reform was to have made healthcare more affordable and more available. Although healthcare reform was not passed, attempts have been made nationwide to address the ills of the system. These attempts have been largely half-hearted and weak-kneed. In most instances, only half a solution has been provided. There has been no improvement in the quality of care. In fact, in many instances, there has been degradation in quality and it has not become more available. We are faced with seemingly conflicting mandates -- providing quality care making it more available working under severe capitation constraints and attracting and retaining a quality workforce. How do we address these problems? We have to change. We have to adopt the military paradigm of agility, adaptability and flexibility applicable to military science to our field of endeavor. We have to consider achieving all our goals without sacrificing any aspect. The most obvious step is to improve efficiency. This can be done best by incorporating the advantages that information technology has bestowed on other fields of endeavor. Properly applied information technology will provide the answer to improving efficiency in the Healthcare field. In the Department of Defense (DoD), we are now embarking on an extremely exciting new idea -- rendering the entire Virtual Radiology Environment (VRE). The business of radiology in the military therefore, is being re-engineered on several fronts. This is achieved in several sequential steps: (1) Equipping every radiology department to become digital and PACS-network capable. (2) Information

  1. Vascular Closure Devices in Interventional Radiology Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rafiuddin; Muller-Hulsbeck, Stefan; Uberoi, Raman

    2015-08-15

    Manual compression (MC) is a well-established technique for haemostasis following percutaneous arterial intervention. However, MC is labour and time intensive with potential limitations, particularly for patients who are coagulopathic, unable to comply with bed rest or obese and when large sheaths or anti-coagulants are used. There are a variety of vascular closure devices (VCDs) available to overcome these limitations. This review gives an overview of current VCDs, their mechanism of action, individual strengths and weaknesses, evidence base and utility in interventional radiology (IR) practice. The majority of the published evidence on VCDs is derived from patients undergoing cardiac interventions, which should be borne in mind when considering the applicability and transfer of this data for general IR practice. Overall, the evidence suggests that most VCDs are effective in achieving haemostasis with a similar rate of complications to MC although the complication profile associated with VCDs is distinct to that of MC. There is insufficient evidence to comparatively analyse the different types of VCDs currently available or reliably judge their cost-effectiveness. The interventional radiologist should have a thorough understanding of the available techniques for haemostasis and be able to identify and utilise the most appropriate strategy and closure technique for the individual patient.

  2. Clinical and radiological findings in chlorfenapyr poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Tharaknath, Vemuri Rama; Prabhakar, Y. V. S.; Kumar, K. Suseel; Babu, Noorthi Kalyan

    2013-01-01

    This is a case report of suicidal ingestion of chlorfenapyr, presenting with neurological complications after a latent period of more than a week, and rapidly progressing to death within days of symptoms. Chlorfenapyr is a moderately hazardous pesticide according to World Health Organization toxicity classification, and kills target organism by depriving it of energy through interference with oxidative phosphorylation at mitochondrial level. A pro-pesticide, chlorfenapyr takes time to convert to its active form and either this active form or a toxic metabolite causes delayed neurological symptoms. It causes significant neurotoxicity in rat models. This case report provides for the first time from India (second worldwide), clinical and “radiological evidence” (magnetic resonance imaging showing demyelinating/oedematous changes) of “chlorfenapyr neurotoxicity in humans.” It also highlights the “latent period” between ingestion and onset of fatal manifestations. Earlier, similar case reports of human deaths with delayed onset neurological symptoms, due to chlorfenapyr poisoning have been reported, from Japan, Columbia, and Korea. PMID:23956576

  3. Laboratory Demonstration of Radiological Decontamination Using Radpro

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, P.; Greene, R.; Isham, J.; Martin, R.; Norton, C.

    2007-07-01

    In the event of terrorist activity involving the explosive dispersion of radioactive materials (a 'dirty' bomb), a number of different types of surfaces and substrates, including concrete, granite, brick, cinder block, tile, asphalt, wood, glass, plastic, iron, and steel, may become radiologically contaminated. Incident cleanup is assumed to involve decontamination of these surfaces. Laboratory testing was conducted using samples of concrete, ferrous metal, steel, aluminum, lead, tin, glass, lexan, vinyl, asphalt shingle, wood, and rubber surfaces. The surfaces were sprayed with Cs-137 or Co-60 solutions to simulate contamination. The entire surface area of the samples was surveyed using a Ludlum Model 2360 scaler/ratemeter with Ludlum Model 43-93-2 100 cm{sup 2} open area alpha/beta scintillation probe. The surfaces were then decontaminated using RadPro{sup R} chemical decontamination technology that is currently field proven and ready to deploy. The entire surface area of the samples was re-surveyed following decontamination. The RadPro{sup R} chemical decontamination technology was able to remove virtually all of the removable contamination and over 90% of the fixed contamination from these surfaces during the laboratory testing. (authors)

  4. Impact: development of a radiological mummy database.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andrew John; Wade, Andrew David

    2015-06-01

    The Internet Mummy Picture Archiving and Communication Technology (IMPACT) radiological and context database, is a large-scale, multi-institutional, collaborative research project devoted to the digital preservation and scientific study of mummified remains, and the mummification traditions that produced them, using non-destructive medical imaging technologies. Owing to the importance of non-destructive analyses to the study of mummified human remains, the IMPACT database, website, and wiki provide a basis for anthropological and palaeopathological investigations, grounded in the most current technological imaging and communication standards, accessible through any internet connection, and protected against rapidly changing media standards. Composed of paired online radiographic and contextual databases, the IMPACT project is intended to provide researchers with large-scale primary data samples for anthropological and palaeopathological investigations. IMPACT addresses the limitations of the case-study approach to mummified human remains and contributes to the development of standards of practice in imaging of mummified remains. Furthermore, IMPACT allows researchers a greater appreciation of, and engagement with, patterns of health and disease in ancient times as well as the variability present in the mummification traditions of ancient Egypt and other cultures that sought to preserve their dead for eternity.

  5. Clinical and radiological characteristics of SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colina, Matteo; Trotta, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The peculiar bone involvement, represented by osteitis, is the common denominator of SAPHO syndrome. Hyperostosis and osteitis are chronic inflammatory reactions involving the cortical and trabecular bone respectively; both are characterised by increased sclerosis. Hyperostosis appears radiologically as chronic endosteal and periosteal thickening with narrowing of the medullary canal, but areas of ostelysis may also be present. Conversely, osteitis appears as increased osteosclerosis involving the trabecular infrastructure of cancellous bone. The occurrence of hyperostosis with little or no osteitis is not uncommon. SAPHO syndrome may have a prolonged course with phases of reacutization and remission; the long-term prognosis is usually fairly good, but sometimes a disabling course may occur. Our experience demonstrated that the majority of patients suffering from SAPHO syndrome experienced a chronic course, requiring continous treatment, whilst in a third of the cases the patients reported multiple remission and exacerbations of the disease with flares lasting till to 8 months. Only in a minority of cases the bone inflammation faded and never recurred. Female sex, peripheral arthritis, ACW involvement, the coexistence of more than one cutaneous symptoms, and high inflammatory indices are correlated with a chronic disease course and involvement of new osteoarticular sites.

  6. Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L.

    1995-10-01

    This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

  7. Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys

    DOEpatents

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

    1994-06-28

    An apparatus is described for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm. 5 figures.

  8. Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization

    DOEpatents

    Dudar, A.M.; Ward, C.R.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.; Harpring, L.J.; Collins, M.X.; Anderson, E.K.

    1999-08-10

    A mobile robotic system is described that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console. 4 figs.

  9. The infected liver: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Mortelé, Koenraad J; Segatto, Enrica; Ros, Pablo R

    2004-01-01

    Recent technologic advances have significantly enhanced the role of imaging in the detection, characterization, and management of infectious diseases involving the liver. In addition, imaging-guided percutaneous drainage has greatly improved the clinical treatment of patients with focal liver abscess. Infectious liver diseases can be accurately evaluated with ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Characteristic changes in US echogenicity, CT attenuation, or MR imaging signal intensity and typical enhancement patterns can contribute to the diagnosis of specific infectious diseases, including abscesses, parasitic diseases, fungal diseases, granulomatous diseases, viral hepatitis, and other less common infections. CT is particularly helpful in revealing the presence of calcifications and gas and in detailing the enhancement pattern. The multiplanar capability of MR imaging and its sensitivity to small differences in tissue composition increase its specificity for certain hepatic infections, including hydatid cyst and candidiasis. Radiologic findings may be sufficient to obviate aspiration or histologic examination, although in most instances they are less specific. Nevertheless, imaging findings taken together with appropriate clinical information may provide the most likely diagnosis, even if biopsy is sometimes required for confirmation.

  10. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick

    2012-02-15

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  11. Network infrastructure for a large radiology environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, Louis M.; Do Van, Minh; Ravin, Carl E.

    1996-05-01

    As image transmission becomes a more important part of the way radiology departments operate, the need for a high speed network infrastructure has become more important. We have installed a high speed network in the department that uses the latest Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) networking technology combined with Ethernet switching. This network combination is capable of handling a tremendous amount of data traffic while maintaining compatibility with the existing Ethernet environment. These network changes have significantly improved Ethernet throughput on some of the most heavily used segments of the network by effectively isolating common traffic onto different network segments using new network management software and capabilities that are the result of the ATM backbone. Additional capabilities have allowed us to provide a number of serves that would not have been available using older techniques and architecture. Careful planning of the network before any new installations or changes is important for overall network and traffic management. The installation of this high speed network has allowed us to make imaging within the department and throughout the Medical Center and the connected region a reality.

  12. Imaging in rheumatology: reconciling radiology and rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Tins, Bernhard J; Butler, Robin

    2013-12-01

    Imaging in rheumatology was in the past largely confined to radiographs of the hands and sacroiliac joints (SIJs) helping to establish the diagnosis and then monitoring disease progression. Radiographs are not very sensitive for early inflammation in inflammatory rheumatic disorders and the demand on imaging services was therefore limited. However, over the last 10-15 years new drugs and new technologies have brought new challenges and opportunities to rheumatology and radiology as specialties. New drug treatments allow more effective treatment, preventing many complications. Early diagnosis and disease monitoring has become the challenge for the rheumatologist and radiologist alike. The best possible patient outcome is only achieved if the two specialties understand each other's viewpoint. This article reviews the role of imaging-in particular radiography, magnet resonance imaging, computer tomography, ultrasound and nuclear medicine-for the diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatological disorders, concentrating on rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory spondylarthropathies and gout. Teaching Points • New drugs for the treatment of inflammatory disorders has led to greatly improved outcomes. • Imaging often allows for earlier diagnosis of inflammatory disorders. • Early diagnosis and treatment can often prevent the development of crippling disease manifestations. • Tailored imaging examinations are best achieved by consultation of rheumatologist and radiologist.

  13. Pulmonary drug toxicity: radiologic and pathologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S E; Erasmus, J J; McAdams, H P; Sporn, T A; Goodman, P C

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary drug toxicity is increasingly being diagnosed as a cause of acute and chronic lung disease. Numerous agents including cytotoxic and noncytotoxic drugs have the potential to cause pulmonary toxicity. The clinical and radiologic manifestations of these drugs generally reflect the underlying histopathologic processes and include diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), eosinophilic pneumonia, obliterative bronchiolitis, pulmonary hemorrhage, edema, hypertension, or veno-occlusive disease. DAD is a common manifestation of pulmonary drug toxicity and is frequently caused by cytotoxic drugs, especially cyclophosphamide, bleomycin, and carmustine. It manifests radiographically as bilateral hetero- or homogeneous opacities usually in the mid and lower lungs and on high-resolution computed tomographic (CT) scans as scattered or diffuse areas of ground-glass opacity. NSIP occurs most commonly as a manifestation of carmustine toxicity or of toxicity from noncytotoxic drugs such as amidarone. At radiography, it appears as diffuse areas of heterogeneous opacity, whereas early CT scans show diffuse ground-glass opacity and late CT scans show fibrosis in a basal distribution. BOOP, which is commonly caused by bleomycin and cyclophosphamide (as well as gold salts and methotrexate), appears on radiographs as hetero- and homogeneous peripheral opacities in both upper and lower lobes and on CT scans as poorly defined nodular consolidation, centrilobular nodules, and bronchial dilatation. Knowledge of these manifestations and of the drugs most frequently involved can facilitate diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment.

  14. Radiological and clinicopathological features of orbital xanthogranuloma

    PubMed Central

    Miszkiel, K; Sohaib, S; Rose, G; Cree, I; Moseley, I

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Orbital xanthogranuloma, a diagnosis confirmed histologically, occurs rarely in adults and children. With its characteristic macroscopic appearance the adult form may be associated with a spectrum of biochemical and haematological abnormalities including lymphoproliferative malignancies.
METHOD—The clinicopathological features and imaging appearances on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of this condition are described in eight adults and a child.
RESULTS—Radiological evidence of proptosis was present in seven patients. In all nine patients an abnormal infiltrative soft tissue mass was seen, with increased fat in six cases. All patients had associated enlargement of extraocular muscles suggestive of infiltration and five had lacrimal gland involvement. Encasement of the optic nerve, bone destruction, and intracranial extension was present only in the child with juvenile xanthogranuloma. Haematological and/or biochemical abnormalities were detected in seven patients and seven patients had other systemic diseases which were considered to have an immune basis. One patient subsequently developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
CONCLUSION—The investigation and management of orbital xanthogranulomas requires a multidisciplinary approach even though the diagnosis may be suspected clinically. Imaging delineates the extent of disease and involvement of local structures and may influence the differential diagnosis. The juvenile form may be more locally aggressive, causing bone destruction with consequent intracranial extension.

 PMID:10684833

  15. MRI simulator: a teaching tool for radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, Debra A.; Kishore, Sheel; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    1990-08-01

    The increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a clinical modality has put an enormous burden on medical institutions to cost-effectively teach Mill scanning techniques to technologists and physicians. Since MRI scanner time is a scarce resource, it would be ideal if the teaching could be effectively performed off-line. In order to meet this goal, the Radiology Department has designed and developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Simulator. The Simulator in its current implementation mimics the General Electric Signa scanner's user-interface for image acquisition. The design is general enough to be applied to other MRI scanners. One unique feature of the simulator is its incorporation of an image-synthesis module which permits the user to derive images for any arbitrary combination of pulsing parameters for spin-echo, gradient-echo, and inversion recovery pulse sequences. These images are computed in five seconds. The development platform chosen is a standard Apple Macintosh-Il computer with no specialized hardware peripherals. The user-interface is implemented in HyperCard. All other software development including synthesis and display functions are implemented under the MPW 'C' environment. The scan parameters, demographics and images are tracked using an Oracle database. Images are currently stored on magnetic disk but could be stored on optical media with minimal effort.

  16. Radiological control technician implementing continuing training

    SciTech Connect

    Killand, B.

    1993-12-31

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed and is implementing a continuing training program for RCTs. This program was designed to meet the requirements of the DOE and Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual. The program is scheduled on a biennial (two year), six cycle format, where each cycle is seventeen weeks in length. This enables the technician to be in the classroom three times per year, for an average of four days each cycle. Content emphasis is placed on: academics review; lessons learned; new equipment and procedures; practical skills training; and oral board preparation. Academic reviews provide refresher training on core and site academics in both lecture and overview formats. During the first five cycles, an average of six lessons are presented. A preparatory exam is administered along with a quiz covering previous cycles. The sixth cycle is dedicated to an academic review of all previous lesson content, the final comprehensive exam, and the oral examination boards. In conjunction with continuing training, technicians receive additional company required training, providing a substantial cost savings to WHC. WHC employs approximately 300 RCTs.

  17. Patient satisfaction: what works in radiology.

    PubMed

    Lester, B

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, patient satisfaction in healthcare has been criticized as much as poor customer satisfaction in other industries. Many times, the financial problems that exist are used as an excuse for poor patient satisfaction. This excuse can never justify treating a patient rudely or with disrespect. Patients are the essence of why we exist in radiology. Their increasing scrutiny--over the care they receive and the services we provide--will significantly impact the future of healthcare in the United States. Healthcare employees need to focus on teamwork and respect for patients as well as co-workers as foundations for improving patient satisfaction. True leaders will set the mood of the healthcare facility by "practicing what they preach." Some basic rules to follow to improve customer satisfaction include listening to employees, recognizing exceptional behavior, correcting negative behavior, communicating expectations to employees and listening to patients' needs and concerns. The secret to successful patient satisfaction is not only exceeding the expectations of our patients, but also exceeding the expectations of our employees who take care of patients.

  18. Radiological imaging in pediatric rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matuszewska, Genowefa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Włodkowska-Korytkowska, Monika; Smorawińska, Patrycja; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Summary Radiological imaging plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatic diseases. The basic method of imaging is a classic X-ray picture, which for many years has been used as a single method for the recognition and evaluation of the effects of disease management. In today’s modern day treatment of rheumatic diseases, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance are more commonly performed for early detection of inflammatory changes in the region of soft tissue, subchondral bone and bone marrow. In spite of their usefulness and fundamental role in the diagnosis, X-ray still remains an essential tool in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in children and is complementary to today’s methods of imaging diagnostics. In clinical practice, X-ray imaging is still an important examination performed not only to recognize the disorders, but also to provide a differential diagnosis. It helps estimate disease progression and is used to monitor the effects of treatment and the development of possible complications. Differential diagnosis of rheumatic diseases is performed on the basis of localization and type of radiographic changes. The surrounding periarticular soft tissues, bone structures, joint space, with special attention to articular bone surfaces and epiphyses, are analyzed. The aim of this work is to describe characteristic inflammatory changes present on X-ray imaging typical for the most commonly diagnosed rheumatic diseases in children, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile spondyloarthropathy and systemic vascular disease. PMID:24669280

  19. Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization

    DOEpatents

    Dudar, Aed M.; Ward, Clyde R.; Jones, Joel D.; Mallet, William R.; Harpring, Larry J.; Collins, Montenius X.; Anderson, Erin K.

    1999-01-01

    A mobile robotic system that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console.

  20. Personnel real time dosimetry in interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Servoli, L; Bissi, L; Fabiani, S; Magalotti, D; Placidi, P; Scorzoni, A; Calandra, A; Cicioni, R; Chiocchini, S; Dipilato, A C; Forini, N; Paolucci, M; Di Lorenzo, R; Cappotto, F P; Scarpignato, M; Maselli, A; Pentiricci, A

    2016-12-01

    Interventional radiology and hemodynamic procedures have rapidly grown in number in the past decade, increasing the importance of personnel dosimetry not only for patients but also for medical staff. The optimization of the absorbed dose during operations is one of the goals that fostered the development of real-time dosimetric systems. Indeed, introducing proper procedure optimization, like correlating dose rate measurements with medical staff position inside the operating room, the absorbed dose could be reduced. Real-time dose measurements would greatly facilitate this task through real-time monitoring and automatic data recording. Besides real-time dose monitoring could allow automatic data recording. In this work, we will describe the calibration and validation of a wireless real-time prototype dosimeter based on a new sensor device (CMOS imager). The validation measurement campaign in clinical conditions has demonstrated the prototype capability of measuring dose-rates with a frequency in the range of few Hz, and an uncertainty smaller than 10%.

  1. Access control and confidentiality in radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noumeir, Rita; Chafik, Adil

    2005-04-01

    A medical record contains a large amount of data about the patient such as height, weight and blood pressure. It also contains sensitive information such as fertility, abortion, psychiatric data, sexually transmitted diseases and diagnostic results. Access to this information must be carefully controlled. Information technology has greatly improved patient care. The recent extensive deployment of digital medical images made diagnostic images promptly available to healthcare decision makers, regardless of their geographic location. Medical images are digitally archived, transferred on telecommunication networks, and visualized on computer screens. However, with the widespread use of computing and communication technologies in healthcare, the issue of data security has become increasingly important. Most of the work until now has focused on the security of data communication to ensure its integrity, authentication, confidentiality and user accountability. The mechanisms that have been proposed to achieve the security of data communication are not specific to healthcare. Data integrity can be achieved with data signature. Data authentication can be achieved with certificate exchange. Data confidentiality can be achieved with encryption. User accountability can be achieved with audits. Although these mechanisms are essential to ensure data security during its transfer on the network, access control is needed in order to ensure data confidentiality and privacy within the information system application. In this paper, we present and discuss an access control mechanism that takes into account the notion of a care process. Radiology information is categorized and a model to enforce data privacy is proposed.

  2. Radiological dosimetry measurements in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, M.; Santos, F.

    2016-07-01

    The main cause of human exposure to artificial radiation corresponds to medical applications, so it is essential to reduce the dose to patients, workers and consequently the entire population [1]. Although there is no dose limit for patients, is necessary to reduce it to a minimum possible while still getting all the necessary diagnostic information, taking economic and social factors into account [2]. Based on this proposal, agencies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency has been dedicated to providing guidelines levels, whose function is to serve as standards for the optimization of the medical exposure [3]. This research was created as a preliminary survey with the claim of eventually determine the guidance levels in Costa Rica for three different studies of general radiology: Lumbar Spine-AP, Chest - PA and Thoracic Spine - AP (for screens with speeds of 400 and 800), and cranio-caudal study in mammography, applied to Costa Rica's adult population, perform properly in the institutions of Caja Costarricense del Seguro Social (CCSS).

  3. Radiological survey of San Diego Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, M.O.; Blanchard, R.L.

    1989-06-01

    A radiological survey of three sites in San Diego Bay provided the basis for the following conclusions: 1. Small quantities of Co-60 (0.02-0.05 pCi/g) are present in the bottom sediments in some areas of the harbor at the Submarine Base. Most, if not all, of the Co-60 contamination present probably originated prior to the earlier 1967 survey that reported Co-60 levels as much as 300 times larger than those observed in this study. The highest Co-60 concentration measured is now less than one percent of the normal background radioactivity in harbor sediment samples. 2. No tritium or gamma-ray emitters, other than trace amounts of those occurring naturally, were detected in surface water from the dock areas or in nearby drinking water supplies. 3. Only radionuclides of natural origin and trace amounts of Cs-137 from fallout of previous nuclear weapons tests were detected in samples of kelp, algae, and fish taken from the harbor at the Submarine Base. 4. Gamma-ray surveys of the harbors near the docking areas and along shorelines and beaches near the shipyards failed to detect any exposure rates above background. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The radiological management of bomb blast injury.

    PubMed

    Hare, S S; Goddard, I; Ward, P; Naraghi, A; Dick, E A

    2007-01-01

    A need to understand the nature and patterns of bomb blast injury, particularly in confined spaces, has come to the fore with the current worldwide threat from terrorism. The purpose of this review article is to familiarize the radiologist with the imaging they might expect to see in a mass casualty terrorist event, illustrated by examples from two of the main institutions receiving patients from the London Underground tube blasts of 7 July 2005. We present examples of injuries that are typical in blast victims, as well as highlighting some blast sequelae that might also be found in other causes of multiple trauma. This should enable the radiologist to seek out typical injuries, including those that may not be initially clinically apparent. Terror-related injuries are often more severe than those seen in other trauma cases, and multi-system trauma at distant anatomical sites should be anticipated. We highlight the value of using a standardized imaging protocol to find clinically undetected traumatic effects and include a discussion on management of multiple human and non-human flying fragments. This review also discusses the role of radiology in the management and planning for a mass casualty terrorist incident and the optimal deployment of radiographic services during such an event.

  5. A mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot (SIMON) to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A base, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It uses an ultrasonic ranging system for collision avoidance. In addition, two safety bumpers located in the front and the back of the robot will stop the robots motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robots motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/0 interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A.

  6. A mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

    1992-10-01

    The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot (SIMON) to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A base, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It uses an ultrasonic ranging system for collision avoidance. In addition, two safety bumpers located in the front and the back of the robot will stop the robots motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robots motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/0 interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A.

  7. Radiological features of azygous vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Moore, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Mediastinal masses are most commonly associated with malignancy. Azygous vein aneurysm is a very rare differential diagnosis of mediastinal mass. We report here three cases of azygous vein aneurysm including children and adult patients. In the pediatric patient it was further complicated by thrombosis and secondary pulmonary embolism. We describe the radiological features on CXR, MRI, CT, PET-CT, US and angiogram and their differential diagnosis. Imaging findings of continuity with azygous vein, layering of contrast medium on enhanced CT and dynamic MRA showing filling of the mass at the same time as the azygous vein without prior enhancement will be strongly suggestive of azygous vein aneurysm with transtracheal ultrasound being the definitive test in these patients. It is important to keep a vascular origin mass in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal masses. Also, in young healthy patients with pulmonary embolism, a vascular etiology such as azygous vein aneurysm should be carefully evaluated. This article will help the clinicians to learn about the imaging features of azygous vein aneurysm on different imaging modalities.

  8. Radiological and practical aspects of body packing

    PubMed Central

    Reginelli, A; Pinto, F; Sica, G; Scaglione, M; Berger, F H; Romano, L; Brunese, L

    2014-01-01

    Body packing represents the concealment of illegal substances in a person's body with the aim of smuggling. “Body packers” either swallow drug-filled packets or introduce drug-filled packets into their bodies rectally or vaginally with the purpose of concealing them. The three main smuggled drugs are cocaine, heroin and cannabis products. Body packing represents a serious risk of acute narcotic toxicity from drug exposure, intestinal obstruction owing to pellet impaction and bowel perforation with consequent abdominal sepsis. A suspected body packer is generally admitted to hospital to perform imaging investigations and confirm the presence of drugs in his/her body. Radiological imaging methods are essential to diagnose body packing and to detect potential complications. Increasing sophistication of traffickers and improvements in packaging add to the detection difficulty. Radiologists should be aware of the appearance of drug packets in a range of imaging modalities. This article informs physicians about the challenging aspects of body packing, its background and medicolegal issues, what imaging methods can be used and what criteria are necessary to perform a correct diagnosis. PMID:24472727

  9. Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys

    DOEpatents

    Dudar, Aed M.; Wagner, David G.; Teese, Gregory D.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm.

  10. [Radiological considerations of malpractice in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S D; Lojacono, A; Balma, E

    1996-11-01

    Several branches of competence are needed to evaluate malpractice in dentistry: first a complete case history, secondly careful clinical observation and finally a correct procedure of radiographic documentation. This latter is able to prove existence of the treatment and its evolution, moreover it shows the bone, the dental components underneath the surface and the treatment becomes appraisable by different observers. In restorative dentistry, radiological findings allow us to demonstrate overcontoured restorations in approximal sites and, if necessary, identify the biological width. In endodontics the insufficient filling or the overfilling of the root channel can be demonstrated along with the material used for the filling and the presence of fractured instruments inside the channel. In prosthodontics, on the other hand, the quality of the abutments, fractured roots and/or prosthesis, symptoms of inadequate charge on the bone and overcontours with the subsequent periodontal damage can be seen. In orthodontics one can assess the appearance of infrabone pockets, reabsorptions and horizontal recessions. In extractive surgery it is again possible to identify through radiographic documentation small root fragments in the maxillary sinus (possible sinusitis associated) and maxillary fractures as a consequence of extractions. In the field of implantology, damage to noble structures due to inadequate case planning can be highlighted.

  11. Efficiency Of Information Transfer In Diagnostic Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, I.; Gutcheck, R. A.

    1981-11-01

    Pictorial information theory is restated in a form that predicts, with fair precision, the minimum radiation required to detect a given feature size in diagnostic radiology. In contrast to conventional approaches, the probability of detection is made a visible variable in the calculation--an aspect of prime importance for diagnostic interpretation. An accurate knowledge of the absorption coefficients of the tissue concerned and the sizes one wishes to detect is required, but the calculation is relatively easy to carry out with a programmable calculator or microcomputer. The concept of "viewing efficiency" is introduced to compare the performance of a real radiographic system with that of a perfect radiographic system. The theory is applied to mammography, where the viewing efficiencies of film, film/ screen combinations, and xeroradiography are compared. It is shown that a more efficient method for detecting the latent charge image in xeroradiography, coupled with digital data storage and appropriate viewing methods, should result in substantial reductions in exposure compared to the present toning methods.

  12. [Decision analysis in radiology using Markov models].

    PubMed

    Golder, W

    2000-01-01

    Markov models (Multistate transition models) are mathematical tools to simulate a cohort of individuals followed over time to assess the prognosis resulting from different strategies. They are applied on the assumption that persons are in one of a finite number of states of health (Markov states). Each condition is given a transition probability as well as an incremental value. Probabilities may be chosen constant or varying over time due to predefined rules. Time horizon is divided into equal increments (Markov cycles). The model calculates quality-adjusted life expectancy employing real-life units and values and summing up the length of time spent in each health state adjusted for objective outcomes and subjective appraisal. This sort of modeling prognosis for a given patient is analogous to utility in common decision trees. Markov models can be evaluated by matrix algebra, probabilistic cohort simulation and Monte Carlo simulation. They have been applied to assess the relative benefits and risks of a limited number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in radiology. More interventions should be submitted to Markov analyses in order to elucidate their cost-effectiveness.

  13. Radiological accident and incident in Thailand: lesson to be learned.

    PubMed

    Ya-anant, Nanthavan; Tiyapun, Kanokrat; Saiyut, Kittiphong

    2011-07-01

    Radioactive materials in Thailand have been used in medicine, research and industry for more than 50 y. Several radiological accident and incidents happened in the past 10 y. A serious one was the radiological accident that occurred in Samut Prakan, Thailand in 2000. The serious radiological accident occurred when the (60)Co head was partially dismantled, taken from that storage to sell as scrap metal. Three victims died and 10 people received high dose from the source. The lesson learned from the radiological accident in Samut Prakan was to improve in many subjects, such as efficiency in Ministerial Regulations and Atomic Energy Act, emergency response and etc. In addition to the serious accident, there are also some small incidents that occurred, such as detection of contaminated scrap metals from the re-cycling of scrap metals from steel factories. Therefore, the radiation protection infrastructure was established after the accident. Laws and regulations of radiation safety and the relevant regulatory procedures must be revised.

  14. Automatic Annotation of Radiological Observations in Liver CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Francisco; Xu, Jiajing; Liu, Yi; Liu, Tiffany; Beaulieu, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Napel, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    We aim to predict radiological observations using computationally-derived imaging features extracted from computed tomography (CT) images. We created a dataset of 79 CT images containing liver lesions identified and annotated by a radiologist using a controlled vocabulary of 76 semantic terms. Computationally-derived features were extracted describing intensity, texture, shape, and edge sharpness. Traditional logistic regression was compared to L1-regularized logistic regression (LASSO) in order to predict the radiological observations using computational features. The approach was evaluated by leave one out cross-validation. Informative radiological observations such as lesion enhancement, hypervascular attenuation, and homogeneous retention were predicted well by computational features. By exploiting relationships between computational and semantic features, this approach could lead to more accurate and efficient radiology reporting. PMID:23304295

  15. 77 FR 7597 - Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Federal..., Program Specialist (Emergency Management), DHS/FEMA, 1800 South Bell Street--CC858, Mail Stop...

  16. Imaging Guidelines for Enhancing Justifications for Radiologic Studies.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Baek, Jung Hwan; Jung, Seung Eun; Do, Kyung Hyun; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Min-Jeong; Choi, Miyoung; Lee, Min; Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A

    2016-02-01

    Justification in the field of radiology refers to the appropriate use of radiologic imaging modalities, and may be achieved by establishing clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs). Recently, CIGs have been shown to be useful in selecting the proper medical imaging modality, resulting in the reduction of inappropriate radiologic examinations, thereby enhancing justifications. However, the development of CIGs is both time-consuming and difficult as the methodology of evidence-based medicine should be adhered to. Thus, although the radiologic societies in developed countries such as the United Kingdom and USA are already developing and implementing CIGs in their clinical practices, CIGs are not yet readily available in many other countries owing to differences in medical circumstances and resources. In this review, we assess the role and limitations of CIGs by examining the current status of CIGs in developed countries, and also describe the specific efforts made to establish CIGs in Korea.

  17. Radiological characterization of a uranium mine with no mining activity

    PubMed

    Lozano; Vera Tome F; Gomez Escobar V; Blanco Rodriguez P

    2000-07-01

    We report a radiological study of a uranium mine located in Extremadura, in the south-west of Spain, in which mining work had ceased. One interest in the work is that the results can be used as a reference for the future evaluation of the effects produced by the restoration program. The radiological parameters selected to estimate the impact of the inactive mine were: 222Rn in air and water, 222Rn exhalation, effective 226Ra in soils and sediments, and natural uranium and 226Ra in water. Chemical analyses of water samples and measurements of meteorological variables were also made. Average values of these radiological parameters are presented. We characterize the zone radiologically and estimate the influence of the mine on the basis of some of these parameters, while others are used to reflect the status of the installation, information which could be very useful in the near future when restoration is complete.

  18. Radiological Source Terms for Tank Farms Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    2000-06-27

    This document provides Unit Liter Dose factors, atmospheric dispersion coefficients, breathing rates and instructions for using and customizing these factors for use in calculating radiological doses for accident analyses in the Hanford Tank Farms.

  19. The impact of a nuclear crisis on a radiology department.

    PubMed

    Weidner, W A; Miller, K L; Latshaw, R F; Rohrer, G V

    1980-06-01

    The experiences of the radiology department at the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center of the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine during the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant accident are presented. Emergency plans are reviewed.

  20. Guidelines for selection of radiological protective head covering

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, G.R. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    The hood is recognized throughout the nuclear industry as the standard radiological protective head covering for use in radioactively contaminated work environments. As of June 15, 1995, hoods were required for all activities performed in contaminated areas at the Y-12 Plant. The use of hoods had historically been limited to those radiological activities with a high potential for personnel contamination. Due to the large size of many posted contaminated areas at the Y-12 Plant, and compounding safety factors, requirements for the use of hoods are being reevaluated. The purpose of the evaluation is to develop technically sound guidelines for the selection of hoods when prescribing radiological protective head covering. This report presents the guidelines for selection of radiological protective hoods.

  1. Radium and Other Radiological Chemicals: Drinking Water Treatment Strategies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radium and Other Radiological Chemicals: Drinking Water Treatment Technologies Topics include: Introduction to Rad Chemistry, Summary of the Rad, Regulations Treatment Technology, and Disposal. The introductions cover atoms, ions, radium and uranium and the removal of radioac...

  2. Dental diagnostic radiology in the forensic sciences: two case presentations.

    PubMed

    Nicopoulou-Karayianni, K; Mitsea, A G; Horner, K

    2007-06-01

    Dentomaxillofacial radiology is a useful tool in forensic science to reveal characteristics of the structures of the dentomaxillofacial region. Postmortem radiographs are valuable to the forensic odontologist for comparison with antemortem radiographs, which are the most consistent part of the antemortem records that can be transmitted during forensic examination procedures. By using dentomaxillofacial radiology we can, therefore, give answers to problems dealing with identification cases, mass disasters and dental age estimation. We present the contribution of dentomaxillofacial radiology to the forensic sciences through two cases of deceased persons, where identification was based on information provided by radiographs. The right performance, interpretation and reportage of dentomaxillofacial radiological examination and procedures can be extremely valuable in solving forensic problems.

  3. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    SciTech Connect

    C. Riland; D. R. Bowman; R. Lambert; R. Tighe

    1999-09-30

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions.

  4. Imaging Guidelines for Enhancing Justifications for Radiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Justification in the field of radiology refers to the appropriate use of radiologic imaging modalities, and may be achieved by establishing clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs). Recently, CIGs have been shown to be useful in selecting the proper medical imaging modality, resulting in the reduction of inappropriate radiologic examinations, thereby enhancing justifications. However, the development of CIGs is both time-consuming and difficult as the methodology of evidence-based medicine should be adhered to. Thus, although the radiologic societies in developed countries such as the United Kingdom and USA are already developing and implementing CIGs in their clinical practices, CIGs are not yet readily available in many other countries owing to differences in medical circumstances and resources. In this review, we assess the role and limitations of CIGs by examining the current status of CIGs in developed countries, and also describe the specific efforts made to establish CIGs in Korea. PMID:26908986

  5. Academic pediatric radiology in 2010: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Taylor, George A

    2010-04-01

    Academic pediatric radiology is under considerable stress as the result of ongoing financial pressures and recent health-care legislation. This article reviews the current challenges, and suggests both departmental and individual strategies important in sustaining our academic mission.

  6. Cost-benefit analysis in decision making for diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Hilberg, A.W.

    1982-02-01

    This paper reviews certain current concepts and methods relating to benefit-risk analysis, in terms of economic costs and raidation risks to health, in relation to the benefits from diagnostic radiology in clinical medicine.

  7. The interventional radiology clinic: key ingredients for success.

    PubMed

    Siskin, Gary P; Bagla, Sandeep; Sansivero, Gail E; Mitchell, Nancy L

    2004-07-01

    During the past two decades, the practice of interventional radiology has evolved into one that mandates longitudinal patient care taking place before, during, and after interventional procedures. This requires the establishment of relationships between physicians and patients that often must be fostered in an outpatient clinic setting. Recognition of this practice shift was formally made by the American College of Radiology with the publication of a document concerning the importance of clinical patient management within the practice of interventional radiology. This article will review the clinical patient management as it relates to the practice of interventional radiology, with a focus on the physician-patient relationship and the components of a successful outpatient clinic.

  8. Balancing the three missions and the impact on academic radiology.

    PubMed

    Rawson, James V; Baron, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    The three missions of academic radiology compete with one another for time and funding. Revenue for the clinical mission often subsidizes education and research. Given the internal and external drivers/pressures on health care and, more particularly, on academic health centers, the current model is unsustainable. Trends seen in other industries are entering academic health care. The radiology department of the future will need to be more efficient with increasingly fewer resources while meeting its missions at higher levels of expectation.

  9. [Radiology and endoscopy in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Scerpella, E; Penny, E

    1990-01-01

    Over a 5-year period, 64 patients with a primary colorectal carcinoma were studied by means of radiographic or endoscopic diagnostic techniques. The overall accuracy rates of the barium contrast enema and endoscopy were 86% and 93%, respectively. A comparison of diagnostic accuracy between radiology and endoscopy yield a 75% correlation rate. Whenever possible, both radiology and digestive endoscopy should be carried out to assess the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma.

  10. Computerized Monitoring and Analysis of Radiology Report Turnaround Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yen

    1989-05-01

    A computerized Radiology Management System was used to monitor the turnaround time of radiology reports in a large university hospital. The time from patient entry into the department until the printing and distribution of the final examination report was monitored periodically for two-week time intervals. Total turnaround time was divided into four separate components. Analysis of the data enabled us to assess individual and departmental performance and thereby improve important patient service functions.

  11. Optimizing the Domestic Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Response Enterprise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    OPTIMIZING THE DOMESTIC CHEMICAL , BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR RESPONSE ENTERPRISE THESIS MARCH 2015 Nick Paul, Captain, USA AFIT-ENS-MS-15...of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-143 OPTIMIZING THE DOMESTIC CHEMICAL ...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-143 OPTIMIZING THE DOMESTIC CHEMICAL , BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR RESPONSE ENTERPRISE THESIS Nick Paul

  12. Materiel management and radiology: building a teamwork relationship.

    PubMed

    Burke, M D; Cirino, J C

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Burke and Mr. Cirino explain how a teamwork relationship between radiology and materiel management can serve both well--radiology can continually strive to provide high quality diagnostic data and superior patient care, while materiel management can provide a continuous flow of supplies and services, keep inventory investment low, and develop a competent supplier base. Effective communication is the necessary element that will allow each to achieve its respective goals.

  13. Radiology trainees in the UK and Ireland: academic background, publication rates and research plans.

    PubMed

    McWeeney, D M; Walker, T W M; Gilbert, F J; McCarthy, P A

    2009-12-01

    To assess the level of achievement of current trainees, we investigated the academic qualifications, publication rates and future research plans of 240 radiology trainees in the UK and Ireland. All radiology trainees in the UK and Ireland were surveyed by a questionnaire enquiring about academic record and career ambitions. Our study shows that the level of academic achievement of radiology trainees is high, and provides interesting information concerning the current group of radiology trainees in these regions. It will be of interest both to radiology trainers and to doctors hoping to pursue a career in radiology. It also demonstrates that a potential recruitment crisis in academic radiology exists.

  14. RADIOLOGICAL SEALED SOURCE LIBRARY: A NUCLEAR FORENSICS TOOL

    SciTech Connect

    Canaday, Jodi; Chamberlain, David; Finck, Martha; Carney, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    If a terrorist were to obtain and possibly detonate a device that contained radiological material, radiological forensic analysis of the material and source capsule could provide law enforcement with valuable clues about the origin of the radiological material; this information could then provide further leads on where the material and sealed source was obtained, and the loss of control point. This information could potentially be utilized for attribution and prosecution. Analyses of nuclear forensic signatures for radiological materials are generally understood to include isotopic ratios, trace element concentrations, the time since irradiation or purification, and morphology. Radiological forensic signatures for sealed sources provide additional information that leverages information on the physical design and chemical composition of the source capsule and containers, physical markings indicative of an owner or manufacturer. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratory (INL), has been working since 2003 to understand signatures that could be used to identify specific source manufacturers. These signatures include the materials from which the capsule is constructed, dimensions, weld details, elemental composition, and isotopic abundances of the radioactive material. These signatures have been compiled in a library known as the Argonne/INL Radiological Sealed Source Library. Data collected for the library has included open-source information from vendor catalogs and web pages; discussions with source manufacturers and touring of production facilities (both protected through non-disclosure agreements); technical publications; and government registries such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Sealed Source and Device Registry.

  15. A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Koetser, Inge C. J.; Vries, Eefje N. de; Delden, Otto M. van; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-04-15

    To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

  16. Natural Language Processing in Radiology: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Pons, Ewoud; Braun, Loes M M; Hunink, M G Myriam; Kors, Jan A

    2016-05-01

    Radiological reporting has generated large quantities of digital content within the electronic health record, which is potentially a valuable source of information for improving clinical care and supporting research. Although radiology reports are stored for communication and documentation of diagnostic imaging, harnessing their potential requires efficient and automated information extraction: they exist mainly as free-text clinical narrative, from which it is a major challenge to obtain structured data. Natural language processing (NLP) provides techniques that aid the conversion of text into a structured representation, and thus enables computers to derive meaning from human (ie, natural language) input. Used on radiology reports, NLP techniques enable automatic identification and extraction of information. By exploring the various purposes for their use, this review examines how radiology benefits from NLP. A systematic literature search identified 67 relevant publications describing NLP methods that support practical applications in radiology. This review takes a close look at the individual studies in terms of tasks (ie, the extracted information), the NLP methodology and tools used, and their application purpose and performance results. Additionally, limitations, future challenges, and requirements for advancing NLP in radiology will be discussed.

  17. Radiology Education of Physician Extenders: What Role Should Radiologists Play?

    PubMed

    RiChard, Jamie L; Liu, Benjamin P; Casalino, David D; Russell, Eric J; Horowitz, Jeanne M

    2017-02-08

    As physician extenders (PEs) enter the medical community in large numbers, they have an increasing impact on imaging utilization and imaging-based procedures. Physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) have an advanced level of education and some practice autonomously. However, PA and NP programs are not required to provide any basic radiology education. For PEs who did receive basic radiology education during their graduate program, the curriculum is nonstandard and there is a wide variation. PEs working in primary care and nonradiology specialties place imaging orders, review report findings, and answer patient questions. Other PEs working within radiology practices operate as liaisons with patients in diagnostic radiology or perform an increasing number of interventional procedures. Basic radiology education in formal PE certificate programs as well as on-the-job education about radiology may benefit patients, radiologists, and the health-care system. What role, if any, should the radiologist assume for educating PE students and practicing PAs and NPs? This review analyzes the benefits and drawbacks of radiologists educating PEs.

  18. Engineering Practice and Engineering Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, William T.; Kline, Ronald

    2000-01-01

    Offers ways of applying science and technology studies to the teaching of engineering ethics. Suggests modifications of both detailed case studies on engineering disasters and hypothetical, ethical dilemmas employed in engineering ethics classes. (Author/CCM)

  19. Informatics in radiology: automated Web-based graphical dashboard for radiology operational business intelligence.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Paul G; Warnock, Max J; Daly, Mark; Toland, Christopher; Meenan, Christopher D; Mezrich, Reuben S

    2009-11-01

    Radiology departments today are faced with many challenges to improve operational efficiency, performance, and quality. Many organizations rely on antiquated, paper-based methods to review their historical performance and understand their operations. With increased workloads, geographically dispersed image acquisition and reading sites, and rapidly changing technologies, this approach is increasingly untenable. A Web-based dashboard was constructed to automate the extraction, processing, and display of indicators and thereby provide useful and current data for twice-monthly departmental operational meetings. The feasibility of extracting specific metrics from clinical information systems was evaluated as part of a longer-term effort to build a radiology business intelligence architecture. Operational data were extracted from clinical information systems and stored in a centralized data warehouse. Higher-level analytics were performed on the centralized data, a process that generated indicators in a dynamic Web-based graphical environment that proved valuable in discussion and root cause analysis. Results aggregated over a 24-month period since implementation suggest that this operational business intelligence reporting system has provided significant data for driving more effective management decisions to improve productivity, performance, and quality of service in the department.

  20. The Faces in Radiological Images: Fusiform Face Area Supports Radiological Expertise.

    PubMed

    Bilalić, Merim; Grottenthaler, Thomas; Nägele, Thomas; Lindig, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) has often been used as an example of a brain module that was developed through evolution to serve a specific purpose-face processing. Many believe, however, that FFA is responsible for holistic processing associated with any kind of expertise. The expertise view has been tested with various stimuli, with mixed results. One of the main stumbling blocks in the FFA controversy has been the fact that the stimuli used have been similar to faces. Here, we circumvent the problem by using radiological images, X-rays, which bear no resemblance to faces. We demonstrate that FFA can distinguish between X-rays and other stimuli by employing multivariate pattern analysis. The sensitivity to X-rays was significantly better in experienced radiologists than that in medical students with limited radiological experience. For the radiologists, it was also possible to use the patterns of FFA activations obtained on faces to differentiate X-ray stimuli from other stimuli. The overlap in the FFA activation is not based on visual similarity of faces and X-rays but rather on the processes necessary for expertise with both kinds of stimulus. Our results support the expertise view that FFA's main function is related to holistic processing.

  1. Employing the radiological and nuclear risk assessment methods (RNRAM) for assessing radiological and nuclear detection architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Brigantic, Robert T.; Eddy, Ryan R.

    2014-03-20

    The United States Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) is charged with implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts to protect the U.S. from radiological and nuclear threats. DNDO is also responsible for coordinating the development of the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture (GNDA). DNDO utilizes a unique risk analysis tool to conduct a holistic risk assessment of the GNDA known as the Radiological and Nuclear Risk Assessment Methods (RNRAM). The capabilities of this tool will be used to support internal DNDO analyses and has also been used for other entities such as the International Atomic Energy Agency. The model uses a probabilistic risk assessment methodology and includes the ability to conduct a risk assessment of the effectiveness of layered architectures in the GNDA against an attack by an intelligent, adaptive adversary. This paper overviews the basic structure, capabilities, and use of RNRAM as used to assess different architectures and how various risk components are calculated through a series of interconnected modules. Also highlighted is flexible structure of RNRAM which can accommodate new modules in order to examine a variety of threat detection architectures and concepts.

  2. [Diagnostic reference levels in interventional radiology].

    PubMed

    Vañó Carruana, E; Fernández Soto, J M; Sánchez Casanueva, R M; Ten Morón, J I

    2013-12-01

    This article discusses the diagnostic reference levels for radiation exposure proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to facilitate the application of the optimization criteria in diagnostic imaging and interventional procedures. These levels are normally established as the third quartile of the dose distributions to patients in an ample sample of centers and are supposed to be representative of good practice regarding patient exposure. In determining these levels, it is important to evaluate image quality as well to ensure that it is sufficient for diagnostic purposes. When the values for the dose received by patients are systematically higher or much lower than the reference levels, an investigation should determine whether corrective measures need to be applied. The European and Spanish regulations require the use of these reference values in quality assurance programs. For interventional procedures, the dose area product (or kerma area product) values are usually used as reference values together with the time under fluoroscopy and the total number of images acquired. The most modern imaging devices allow the value of the accumulated dose at the entrance to the patient to be calculated to optimize the distribution of the dose on the skin. The ICRP recommends that the complexity of interventional procedures be taken into account when establishing reference levels. In the future, diagnostic imaging departments will have automatic systems to manage patient dosimetric data; these systems will enable continuous dosage auditing and alerts about individual procedures that might involve doses several times above the reference values. This article also discusses aspects that need to be clarified to take better advantage of the reference levels in interventional procedures.

  3. Interactive learning in oral and maxillofacial radiology

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Rumpa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of electronic tools in teaching is growing rapidly in all fields, and there are many options to choose from. We present one such platform, Learning Catalytics™ (LC) (Pearson, New York, NY, USA), which we utilized in our oral and maxillofacial radiology course for second-year dental students. Materials and Methods The aim of our study was to assess the correlation between students' performance on course exams and self-assessment LC quizzes. The performance of 354 predoctoral dental students from 2 consecutive classes on the course exams and LC quizzes was assessed to identify correlations using the Spearman rank correlation test. The first class was given in-class LC quizzes that were graded for accuracy. The second class was given out-of-class quizzes that were treated as online self-assessment exercises. The grading in the self-assessment exercises was for participation only and not accuracy. All quizzes were scheduled 1-2 weeks before the course examinations. Results A positive but weak correlation was found between the overall quiz scores and exam scores when the two classes were combined (P<0.0001). A positive but weak correlation was likewise found between students' performance on exams and on in-class LC quizzes (class of 2016) (P<0.0001) as well as on exams and online LC quizzes (class of 2017) (P<0.0001). Conclusion It is not just the introduction of technological tools that impacts learning, but also their use in enabling an interactive learning environment. The LC platform provides an excellent technological tool for enhancing learning by improving bidirectional communication in a learning environment. PMID:27672617

  4. Radiologic features of primary intracranial ectopic germinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xin-Hua; Shen, Hui-Cong; Tang, Shou-Xian; Gao, Cui-Hua; Ren, Ji-Liang; Ai, Lin; Dai, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Germinomas are sensitive to radiation therapy and chemotherapy; therefore, correct imaging diagnosis is crucial for them. However, the imaging findings of germinomas originating from off-midline regions displayed different patterns from those originating from midline areas. Patient concerns: The objective of this study is to describe the radiologic features of primary ectopic germinoma. We reviewed the MR and CT findings of 12 patients with histologically proven off-midline ectopic germinomas with off-midline locations. Interventions: All of these patients underwent conventional MR images and 3 of them underwent diffusion images. Additional CT images were available in 3 patients. Analysis was focused on the shape and entity of tumors in images, signs of hemiatrophy, and the involvement of fibers in diffusion images. Outcomes: Well-defined (8/12) and ill-defined margin masses (4/12) were identified according to the shape of the mass. Multicystic masses were seen in 11 of the 12 patients. The solid component of the tumors had a high density (3/3) with calcifications (2/3) on CT images, iso- to hypointensity in T2WI (11/12) and restricted diffusion on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps (3/3). Hemiatrophy was observed in 5 cases and progressive hemiatrophy was observed in 1 case. Other signs included mild peritumoral edema (10/12), and hydrocephalus (7/12). Additionally, infiltration of the corticospinal tract (CST) was identified on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) (2/2). Lessons: The results indicate that multicysitic entities and hypointensities in solid components on T2WI and hemiatrophy are the imaging features of ectopic germinomas. DTI has potential for assessing CST involvement. PMID:28033250

  5. Radiological considerations of phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeken, C.L.

    1980-10-31

    The radiological concerns associated with phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture have been placed in perspective by considering the consequences of a hypothetical case involving heavy long term applications of phosphogypsum. In California, such a schedule might consist of an initial gypsum application of 10 tons/acre followed by alternate year applications of 5 tons/acre. If the radium content of the gypsum were 15 pCi/g and the till depth 6 inches, this schedule could be maintained for more than 100 years before the radium buildup in the soil would reach a proposed federal concentration limit of 5 pCi/g. An agricultural worker spending 40 h a week in a field containing 5 pCi/g of radium would be exposed to terrestrial radiation of about 7 ..mu..R/h above background. This exposure would result in an annual radiation dose of about 15 mrem, which is 3% of the recommended limit for an individual working in an uncontrolled area. Five pCi/g of radium in the soil could generate airborne radon daughter concentrations exceeding the concentration limit proposed for residential exposure. However, as residential exposure limits are predicated on 75% of continuous occupancy, these limits should not be applied to agricultural workers because of the seasonal nature of their work. Radium uptake by food crops grown in the hypothetical soil would result in a 50 year integrated dose to the bone surface of 1.4 rem. This dose is conservatively based on the assumption that an adult's total vegetable diet comes from this source and that consumption was continuous during the 50 year period.

  6. Radiological imaging findings of scheuermann disease

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Erkan; Beyhan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    AIM To find accompanying anomalies of typical and atypical Scheuermann’s disease (SD) is reported in the present study. METHODS Study included 20 patients (16 men and 4 women) who had radiological imaging radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, if available, due to back pain, curved back and low back pain in November 2011-February 2016 period. Patients were categorized into typical and atypical patterns based on the region involved. Thoracic kyphosis values were measured using real Cobb angle. Accompanying disc degeneration, herniations and spinal cord pathologies were studied using MRI. RESULTS Age of the patients ranged from 11.0 to 23.0 (mean 17.2 ± 3.0). Typical pattern of SD were detected in 15 patients while atypical pattern were detected in 5 patients. Cobb angle range was 40.2-67.2 (mean 55.5 ± 8.7) in typical Scheuermann’s patients and 24.7-49.9 (mean 36.7 ± 10.8) in atypical ones. Intervertebral level was affected and had the measures of 3-8 (mean 5.3 ± 1.6) and 7-9 (mean 8.2 ± 0.8) in typical and atypical Scheuermann’s patients, respectively. Level of degenerative disc disease in MRI was 1-7 discs (mean 4.1 ± 1.7) in typical patients and 5-10 discs (mean 7.6 ± 1.9) in atypical patients. CONCLUSION SD can be seen in typical and atypical patterns, typical being more frequent. Because degenerative disc diseases, herniations and cord pathologies such as syringomyelia can accompany SD (albeit more common in atypical pattern), it is necessary to evaluate these patients with plain radiography and MRI together. PMID:27928471

  7. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

  8. The business of radiology: cost accounting.

    PubMed

    Camponovo, Ernest J

    2004-08-01

    Radiology practices confront questions of resource allocation every day. Unfortunately, practices frequently fail to adequately analyze revenues and expenses, which are at the heart of success or failure in any business endeavor. Cost allocation problems permeate nearly all aspects of cost analysis and accumulation and exist throughout all types of private-sector and public-sector organizations. "Managerial" or "cost" accounting is the discipline concerned with measuring and assigning the costs of delivering services or producing products. In contrast to financial accounting, management accounting produces relevant information for internal decision making and in general is designed to answer a firm's specific operational questions. Because costs play such a critical role in deriving and planning for revenues and profits, managerial accounting is in large part devoted to measuring and accumulating costs with the aims of control and continuous cost reduction. Because radiologists' salaries are at record highs, when accounting for a practice's clinical activities, such as the provision of mammography services, some allocation of radiologist costs themselves must be made, or the practice will not be able to achieve its goal of efficient allocation of resources. Whatever cost-accounting method is used should be specific enough to allow the differentiation of costs to as detailed a level as necessary for the strategic decision at hand. It is imperative that a practice use some rational method to gather and analyze costs and that management then use these data in decision making. Successful practices will be those most aware of their costs and the minimum acceptable reimbursements necessary for their success.

  9. The Quality Assurance in Diagnostic Radiology and their Effect in the Quality Image and Radiological Protection of the Patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, Enrique

    2002-08-01

    The quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in Mexico before 1997 was virtually nonexistent except in few academic institutions and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of the issue of quality control parameters of general and fluoroscopy x-ray systems in the Mexican Republic and their effects in the quality image and radiological protection of the patient. A general result of the survey is that there is not significant difference in the observed frequencies among public and private radiology departments for α = 0.05, then the results are valid for both departments. 37% of x-ray systems belong to public radiology departments. In the radiology departments that didn't agree with the Mexican regulations in: light field to mach the x-ray field, light field intensity, kV, time and output. In those cases, we found a repeat rate of radiography studies >30% with non necessary dose to patient, low quality image and high operating costs of the radiology service. We found in x-ray fiuoroscopy systems that 62% had a low quality image due to electronic noise in the television chain. In general the x-ray systems that didn't agree with Mexican regulations are 35% and they can affect in a way or other the quality image and the dose to patient.

  10. Noise control of radiological monitoring equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Rubick, R.D.; Stevens, W.W.; Burke, L.L.

    1998-12-31

    Although vacuum pumps on continuous air monitors (CAMs) do not produce noise levels above regulatory limits, engineering controls were used to establish a safer work environment. Operations performed in areas where CAMs are located are highly specialized and require precision work when handling nuclear materials, heavy metals, and inert gases. Traditional methods for controlling noise such as enclosing or isolating the source and the use of personal protection equipment were evaluated. An innovative solution was found by retrofitting CAMs with air powered multistage ejectors pumps. By allowing the air to expand in several chambers to create a vacuum, one can eliminate the noise hazard altogether. In facilities with adequate pressurized air, use of these improved ejector pumps may be a cost-effective replacement for noisy vacuum pumps. A workplace designed or engineered with noise levels as low as possible or as close to background adds to increased concentration, attention to detail, and increased production.

  11. Technology in radiology: advances in diagnostic imaging & therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Stern, S M

    1993-01-01

    Nearly 100 years from its birth, radiology continues to grow as though still in adolescence. Although some radiologic technologies have matured more than others, new applications and techniques appear regularly in the literature. Radiology has evolved from purely diagnostic devices to interventional technologies. New contrast agents in MRI, X ray and ultrasound enable physicians to make diagnoses and plan therapies with greater precision than ever before. Techniques are less and less invasive. Advances in computer technology have given supercomputer-like power to high-end nuclear medicine and MRI systems. Imaging systems in most modalities are now designed with upgrades in mind instead of "planned obsolescence." Companies routinely upgrade software and other facets of their products, sometimes at no additional charge to existing customers. Hospitals, radiology groups and imaging centers will face increasing demands to justify what they do according to patient outcomes and management criteria. Did images make the diagnosis or confirm it? Did the images determine optimal treatment strategies or confirm which strategies might be appropriate? Third-party payers, especially the government, will view radiology in those terms. The diagnostic imaging and therapy systems of today require increasingly sophisticated technical support for maintenance and repair. Hospitals, radiology groups and imaging centers will have to determine the most economic and effective ways to guarantee equipment up-time. Borrowing from the automotive industry, some radiology manufacturers have devised transtelephonic software systems to facilitate remote troubleshooting. To ensure their fiscal viability, hospitals continue to acquire new imaging and therapy technologies for competitive and access-to-services reasons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Risk communication and radiological/nuclear terrorism: a strategic view.

    PubMed

    Becker, Steven M

    2011-11-01

    It is now widely recognized that effective communication is a crucial element in radiological/nuclear terrorism preparedness. Whereas in the past, communication and information issues were sometimes viewed as secondary in comparison with technical concerns, today the need to improve risk communication, public information, and emergency messaging is seen as a high priority. The process of improving radiological/nuclear terrorism risk communication can be conceptualized as occurring in four overlapping phases. The first phase involves the recognition that communication and information issues will be pivotal in shaping how a radiological/nuclear terrorism incident unfolds and in determining its outcome. This recognition has helped shape the second phase, in which various research initiatives have been undertaken to provide an empirical basis for improved communication. In the third and most recent phase, government agencies, professional organizations and others have worked to translate research findings into better messages and informational materials. Like the first and second phases, the third phase is still unfolding. The fourth phase in risk communication for radiological/nuclear terrorism-a mature phase-is only now just beginning. Central to this phase is a developing understanding that for radiological/nuclear terrorism risk communication to be fully effective, it must go beyond crafting better messages and materials (as essential as that may be). This emerging fourth phase seeks to anchor radiological/nuclear communication in a broader approach: one that actively engages and partners with the public. In this article, each of the four stages is discussed, and future directions for improving radiological/nuclear terrorism risk communication are explored.

  13. Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Reader, G.T.; Hooper

    1983-01-01

    The Stirling engine was invented by a Scottish clergyman in 1816, but fell into disuse with the coming of the diesel engine. Advances in materials science and the energy crisis have made a hot air engine economically attractive. Explanations are full and understandable. Includes coverage of the underlying thermodynamics and an interesting historical section. Topics include: Introduction to Stirling engine technology, Theoretical concepts--practical realities, Analysis, simulation and design, Practical aspects, Some alternative energy sources, Present research and development, Stirling engine literature.

  14. Neural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.

  15. The essence of the Japan Radiological Society/Japanese College of Radiology Imaging Guideline.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Murayama, Sadayuki; Okada, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kataoka, Masako; Kaji, Yasushi; Imamura, Keiko; Takehara, Yasuo; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Ohno, Kazuko; Awai, Kazuo; Hirai, Toshinori; Kojima, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Shuji; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Murakami, Takamichi; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Gabata, Toshifumi; Matsuzaki, Kenji; Tohno, Eriko; Kawahara, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Takeo; Monzawa, Shuichi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging is undoubtedly important in modern medicine, and final clinical decisions are often made based on it. Fortunately, Japan has the highest numbers of diagnostic imaging instruments, such as CT and MRI devices, and boasts easy access to them as well as a high level of diagnostic accuracy. In consequence, a very large number of imaging examinations are performed, but diagnostic instruments are installed in so many medical facilities that expert management of these examinations tends to be insufficient. Particularly, in order to avoid risks, clinicians have recently become indifferent to indications of imaging modalities and tend to rely on CT or MRI resulting in increasing the number of imaging examinations in Japan. This is a serious problem from the viewpoints of avoidance of unnecessary exposure and medical economy. Under these circumstances, the Japan Radiological Society and Japanese College of Radiology jointly initiated the preparation of new guidelines for diagnostic imaging. However, the field of diagnostic imaging is extremely wide, and it is impossible to cover all diseases. Therefore, in drafting the guidelines, we selected important diseases and focused on "showing evidence and suggestions in the form of clinical questions (CQs)" concerning clinically encountered questions and "describing routine imaging techniques presently considered to be standards to guarantee the quality of imaging examinations". In so doing, we adhered to the basic principles of assuming the readers to be "radiologists specializing in diagnostic imaging", "simultaneously respecting the global standards and attending to the situation in Japan", and "making the guidelines consistent with those of other scientific societies related to imaging". As a result, the guidelines became the largest ever, consisting of 152 CQs, nine areas of imaging techniques, and seven reviews, but no other guidelines in the world summarize problems concerning diagnostic imaging in the form

  16. Named entity recognition of follow-up and time information in 20 000 radiology reports

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Tsujii, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a system to extract follow-up information from radiology reports. The method may be used as a component in a system which automatically generates follow-up information in a timely fashion. Methods A novel method of combining an LSP (labeled sequential pattern) classifier with a CRF (conditional random field) recognizer was devised. The LSP classifier filters out irrelevant sentences, while the CRF recognizer extracts follow-up and time phrases from candidate sentences presented by the LSP classifier. Measurements The standard performance metrics of precision (P), recall (R), and F measure (F) in the exact and inexact matching settings were used for evaluation. Results Four experiments conducted using 20 000 radiology reports showed that the CRF recognizer achieved high performance without time-consuming feature engineering and that the LSP classifier further improved the performance of the CRF recognizer. The performance of the current system is P=0.90, R=0.86, F=0.88 in the exact matching setting and P=0.98, R=0.93, F=0.95 in the inexact matching setting. Conclusion The experiments demonstrate that the system performs far better than a baseline rule-based system and is worth considering for deployment trials in an alert generation system. The LSP classifier successfully compensated for the inherent weakness of CRF, that is, its inability to use global information. PMID:22771530

  17. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 54 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 54 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated, and can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual release report for each GJO building.

  18. Automatically correlating clinical findings and body locations in radiology reports using MedLEE.

    PubMed

    Sevenster, Merlijn; van Ommering, Rob; Qian, Yuechen

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a system that extracts clinical findings and body locations from radiology reports and correlates them. The system uses Medical Language Extraction and Encoding System (MedLEE) to map the reports' free text to structured semantic representations of their content. A lightweight reasoning engine extracts the clinical findings and body locations from MedLEE's semantic representation and correlates them. Our study is illustrative for research in which existing natural language processing software is embedded in a larger system. We manually created a standard reference based on a corpus of neuro and breast radiology reports. The standard reference was used to evaluate the precision and recall of the proposed system and its modules. Our results indicate that the precision of our system is considerably better than its recall (82.32-91.37% vs. 35.67-45.91%). We conducted an error analysis and discuss here the practical usability of the system given its recall and precision performance.

  19. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, Mª Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm3 × 103, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter

  20. Radiological analysis of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.S.

    1993-10-26

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be capable of providing a laser output pulse at 0.35 {mu}m wavelength with an energy of 1.8 MJ and a power of 500 TW. The NIF will house a multi-beamline, Nd-doped-glass laser capable of delivering such pulses into a target chamber. In the target chamber, a positioner will center a target containing fusion fuel (a deuterium-tritium mixture) for each ignition shot. Diagnostics in the chamber will provide the test data (e.g., neutron and x-ray yields). The NIF baseline case would result in deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron yields of about 10{sup 16} to 10{sup 19} per fusion shot. The baseline fusion shots would use 2 Ci of tritium per capsule, with an annual input of about 600 Ci (60 mg). The resulting anticipated annual airborne emissions would consist of approximately 10 Ci of tritium and small amounts of activated air species. The NEF shielding configuration would limit the direct and skyshine radiation intensities around the facility to less than 0.1 rem/y on site and to less than 0.001 rem/y off site. This report presents the results of atmospheric transport calculations for tritium and activated air emissions; neutron and secondary gamma-ray shielding calculations; and results of benchmark studies for validating the EPA CAP88-PC code (for the transport of tritium) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory neutron-photon transport code TART. All calculations were normalized to the annual baseline case of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 20} DT-fusion neutrons. Tritium emissions were normalized to 10 Ci/y. Radiological analyses show that normal NIF operations would result in off-site radiation intensities that would represent insignificant increases over the natural background radiation intensity. The NIF is a national facility, and the DOE has not completed the site evaluation process. Although the results presented in this report are for LLNL, the analytical approach is applicable to any site.

  1. Gray Matter Involvement in Radiologically Isolated Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, M Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-03-01

    The unanticipated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection in the brain of asymptomatic subjects of white matter lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis has recently been named as radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS). The pathophysiological processes of RIS remain largely unknown and questions as to whether gray matter alterations actually occur in this entity are yet to be investigated in more detail. By means of a 3 T multimodal MRI approach, we searched for cortical and deep gray matter changes in a cohort of RIS patients. Seventeen RIS patients, 17 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients (median disease duration from symptom onset = 12 months), and 17 healthy controls underwent MRI and neuropsychological testing. Normalized deep gray matter volumes and regional cortical thickness were assessed using FreeSurfer. SIENAX was used to obtain normalized global and cortical brain volumes. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed by using SPM8 software to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Although no differences were observed between CIS and healthy controls groups, RIS patients showed significantly lower normalized cortical volume (673 ± 27.07 vs 641 ± 35.88 [cm³ × 10³, Tukey P test = 0.009) and mean thalamic volume (0.0051 ± 0.4 vs 0.0046 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.014) compared with healthy controls. RIS patients also showed significant thinning in a number of cortical areas, that were primarily distributed in frontal and temporal lobes (P < 0.05, uncorrected). Strong correlations were observed between T2-white matter lesion volume and regional cortical thickness (rho spearman ranging from 0.60 to 0.80). Our data suggest that white matter lesions on T2-weighted images are not the only hallmark of RIS. Future longitudinal studies with larger samples are warranted to better clarify the effect of RIS-related white matter lesions on gray matter tissue.

  2. Radiological investigation of phosphate fertilizers: Leaching studies.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Miklós; Tóth-Bodrogi, Edit; Németh, Szabolcs; Somlai, János; Kovács, Tibor

    2016-10-19

    The raw materials of the phosphate fertilizer industry are the various apatite minerals. Some of these have high levels of natural radionuclides, and thus phosphate fertilizers contain significant amounts of U-238, K-40 and Ra-226. These can leach out of the fertilizers used in large quantities for resupplying essential nutrients in the soil and can then enter the food chain through plants, thereby increasing the internal dose of the affected population. In the current study, the radiological risk of eight commercially available phosphate fertilizers (superphosphate, NPK, PK) and their leaching behaviours were investigated using different techniques (gamma and alpha spectrometry), and the dose contributions of using these fertilizers were estimated. To characterize the leaching behaviour, two leaching procedures were applied and compared -the MSZ 21470-50 (Hungarian standard) and the Tessier five-step sequential extraction method. Based on the evaluation of the gamma-spectra, it is found that the level of Th-232 in the samples was low (max.7 ± 6 Bq kg(-1)), the average Ra-226 activity concentration was 309 ± 39 Bq kg(-1) (min. 10 ± 8 Bq kg(-1), max. 570 ± 46 Bq kg(-1)), while the K-40 concentrations (average 3139 ± 188 Bq kg(-1), min. 51 ± 36 Bq kg(-1)) could be as high as 7057 ± 427 Bq kg(-1). The high K-40 can be explained by reference to the composition of the investigated fertilizers (NPK, PK). U concentrations were between 15 and 361 Bq kg(-1), with the average of 254 Bq kg(-1), measured using alpha spectrometry. The good correlation between P2O5 content and radioactivity reported previously is not found in our data. The leaching studies reveal that the mobility of the fertilizer's uranium content is greatly influenced by the parameters of the leaching methods. The availability of U to water ranged between 3 and 28 m/m%, while the Lakanen-Erviö solution mobilized between 10 and 100% of the U content.

  3. Semantic information extracting system for classification of radiological reports in radiology information system (RIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liehang; Ling, Tonghui; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists currently use a variety of terminologies and standards in most hospitals in China, and even there are multiple terminologies being used for different sections in one department. In this presentation, we introduce a medical semantic comprehension system (MedSCS) to extract semantic information about clinical findings and conclusion from free text radiology reports so that the reports can be classified correctly based on medical terms indexing standards such as Radlex or SONMED-CT. Our system (MedSCS) is based on both rule-based methods and statistics-based methods which improve the performance and the scalability of MedSCS. In order to evaluate the over all of the system and measure the accuracy of the outcomes, we developed computation methods to calculate the parameters of precision rate, recall rate, F-score and exact confidence interval.

  4. Renal relevant radiology: radiologic imaging in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  5. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R.

    1983-09-01

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

  6. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Bowman

    2002-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability.

  7. Emergency department digital radiology: moving from photos to pixels.

    PubMed

    White, Faber A; Zwemer, Frank L; Beach, Christopher; Westesson, Per-Lennart; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Scialdone, Gary

    2004-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) patient care relies heavily on radiologic imaging. As advances in technologic innovation continue to present opportunities to streamline and simplify the delivery of care, emergency medicine (EM) practitioners face the challenge of transitioning from a system of primarily film-based radiography to one that utilizes digitized images. The move to digital radiology can result in enhanced quality of patient care, reduction of errors, and increased ED efficiency; however, making this transition will necessarily involve changes in EM practice. As the technology evolves, digital radiology will gradually become ingrained into everyday practice because of these and other notable benefits; however, EM practitioners will need to overcome several challenges to make the transition smoothly and consider the potential impacts that this change will have on ED workflow. The authors discuss the benefits, challenges, and other operational considerations involved with the ED implementation of digital radiology and close by presenting guiding principles for current and future users. Despite the unresolved issues, digital radiology will mature as a technology and improve EM practice, making it one of the great information technology advances in EM.

  8. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    SciTech Connect

    E.C. Nielsen

    2003-04-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations.

  9. Consent to forensic radiologic examinations by living crime victims.

    PubMed

    Scheurer, Eva; Schoelzke, Stefanie

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate whether people approve radiological examinations specifically for the documentation of findings for the use in criminal proceedings. Forty two crime victims and 42 controls without a history of sustained violence were asked via telephone interview whether they would agree to forensic radiological examinations and if radiation exposure and the duration of the examination were factors influencing their consent. The consent to specifically forensic radiological examinations was high in both groups, however, higher in victims than in controls (85-96% compared to 64-77%, respectively, depending on the imaging modality). All of the victims and 93% of the controls consented to at least one of the proposed imaging modalities, i.e. X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Most of the interviewees did not consider the duration of the examination to be relevant to their consent (79% of the crime victims and 93% of the controls); however, the radiation exposure associated with the examination was relevant for 55% of the controls but only for 19% of the victims. These results show that there is a great consent to the application of radiological methods for forensic purposes. This is important for the growing field of forensic radiology as the approval of the examination by the victim is a legal prerequisite.

  10. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology--part II: vascular.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this second part of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary vasculature, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake.

  11. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: part III--interstitium.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in the medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in the medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the science of medicine. In this third installment of this series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to the pulmonary interstitium, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographical information of the respective eponym's namesake.

  12. Credentialing in radiology: Current practice and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Adam; McCoubrie, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Radiology has changed significantly in recent years. The volume of work has increased dramatically as has its complexity. Future radiologists need an adequate training and expertise in conventional practice as well as new techniques. This comes at a time when other stakeholders outside of radiology are voicing their own concerns. The rightly justified increasing focus on patient safety has placed even more emphasis on the demonstration of competent practice by all health care professionals. Credentialing has been put forward as a way to ensure a doctor is competent in specific areas. Credentialing may be an alien concept to many radiology trainees but moves are afoot in the United Kingdom to bring it to the forefront of its postgraduate medical training. Credentialing began in 20th century North America where it was linked to the process of privileging. It subsequently garnered a strong patient safety focus and has become a part of the international healthcare agenda. Not everyone agrees with credentialing, it has many criticisms including the risk of speciality “turf wars” and the stifling of medical excellence to name just a couple. Is credentialing in radiology here to stay or will it pass by quietly? This paper reviews the global credentialing movement and discusses how this may impact on future radiology training, using the United Kingdom as its case example. PMID:27247716

  13. [No exchange of information without technology : modern infrastructure in radiology].

    PubMed

    Hupperts, H; Hermann, K-G A

    2014-01-01

    Modern radiology cannot accomplish the daily numbers of examinations without supportive technology. Even though technology seems to be becoming increasingly more indispensable, business continuity should be ensured at any time and if necessary even with a limited technical infrastructure by business continuity management. An efficient information security management system forms the basis. The early radiology information systems were islands of information processing. A modern radiology department must be able to be modularly integrated into an informational network of a bigger organization. The secondary use of stored data for clinical decision-making support poses new challenges for the integrity of the data or systems because medical knowledge is displayed and provided in a context of treatment. In terms of imaging the creation and distribution radiology services work in a fully digital manner which is often different for radiology reports. Legally secure electronic diagnostic reports require a complex technical infrastructure; therefore, diagnostic findings still need to be filed as a paper document. The internal exchange and an improved dose management can be simplified by systems which continuously and automatically record the doses and thus provide the possibility of permanent analysis and reporting. Communication between patient and radiologist will gain ongoing importance. Intelligent use of technology will convey this to the radiologist and it will facilitate the understanding of the information by the patient.

  14. From the radiologic pathology archives imaging of osteonecrosis: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Mark D; Foreman, Kristopher L; Klassen-Fischer, Mary K; Fox, Michael G; Chung, Ellen M; Kransdorf, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is common and represents loss of blood supply to a region of bone. Common sites affected include the femoral head, humeral head, knee, femoral/tibial metadiaphysis, scaphoid, lunate, and talus. Symptomatic femoral head osteonecrosis accounts for 10,000-20,000 new cases annually in the United States. In contradistinction, metadiaphyseal osteonecrosis is often occult and asymptomatic. There are numerous causes of osteonecrosis most commonly related to trauma, corticosteroids, and idiopathic. Imaging of osteonecrosis is frequently diagnostic with a serpentine rim of sclerosis on radiographs, photopenia in early disease at bone scintigraphy, and maintained yellow marrow at MR imaging with a serpentine rim of high signal intensity (double-line sign) on images obtained with long repetition time sequences. These radiologic features correspond to the underlying pathology of osseous response to wall off the osteonecrotic process and attempts at repair with vascularized granulation tissue at the reactive interface. The long-term clinical importance of epiphyseal osteonecrosis is almost exclusively based on the likelihood of overlying articular collapse. MR imaging is generally considered the most sensitive and specific imaging modality both for early diagnosis and identifying features that increase the possibility of this complication. Treatment subsequent to articular collapse and development of secondary osteoarthritis typically requires reconstructive surgery. Malignant transformation of osteonecrosis is rare and almost exclusively associated with metadiaphyseal lesions. Imaging features of this dire sequela include aggressive bone destruction about the lesion margin, cortical involvement, and an associated soft-tissue mass. Recognizing the appearance of osteonecrosis, which reflects the underlying pathology, improves radiologic assessment and is important to guide optimal patient management.

  15. What makes a great radiology review course lecture: the Ottawa radiology resident review course experience

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Little objective evidence exists regarding what makes a good lecture. Our purpose was to determine qualities of radiology review course lectures that are associated with positive audience evaluation. Methods 57 presentations from the Ottawa Resident Review Course (2012) were analyzed by a PGY4 radiology resident blinded to the result of audience evaluation. Objective data extracted were: slides per minute, lines of text per text slide, words per text slide, cases per minute, images per minute, images per case, number of audience laughs, number of questions posed to the audience, number of summaries, inclusion of learning objectives, ending on time, use of pre/post-test and use of special effects. Mean audience evaluation scores for each talk from daily audience evaluations (up to 60 per talk) were standardized out of 100. Correlation coefficient was calculated between continuous variables and audience evaluation scores. Student T test was performed on categorical variables and audience evaluation scores. Results Strongest positive association with audience evaluation scores was for image quality (r = 0.57) and number of times the audience laughed (r = 0.3). Strongest negative association was between images per case and audience scores (r = -0.25). Talks with special effects were rated better (mean score 94.3 vs. 87.1, p < 0.001). Talks with the highest image quality were rated better (mean score 94.1 vs. 87.5, p < 0.001). Talks which contained a pre/post-test were rated better (mean score 92 vs. 87.8, p = 0.004). Conclusion Many factors go into making a great review course lecture. At the University of Ottawa Resident Review Course, high quality images, use of special effects, use of pre/post-test and humor were most strongly associated with high audience evaluation scores. High image volume per case may be negatively associated with audience evaluation scores. PMID:24485044

  16. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    Results of radiological surveys of two inactive uranium-mill sites near Rifle, Colorado, in May 1976 are presented. These sites are referred to as Old Rifle and New Rifle. The calculated /sup 226/Ra inventory of the latter site is much higher than at the older mill location. Data on above-ground measurements of gamma exposure rates, surface and near-surface concentration of /sup 226/Ra in soil and sediment samples, concentration of /sup 226/Ra in water, calculated subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra, and particulate radionuclide concentrations in air samples are given. The data serve to define the extent of contamination in the vicinity of the mill sites and their immediate surrounding areas with tailings particles. Results of these measurements were utilized as technical input for an engineering assessment of these two sites.

  17. Computer modeling and design of diagnostic workstations and radiology reading rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Amato, Carlos L.; Balbona, Joseph A.; Boots, Kevin; Valentino, Daniel J.

    2000-05-01

    We used 3D modeling techniques to design and evaluate the ergonomics of diagnostic workstation and radiology reading room in the planning phase of building a new hospital at UCLA. Given serious space limitations, the challenge was to provide more optimal working environment for radiologists in a crowded and busy environment. A particular attention was given to flexibility, lighting condition and noise reduction in rooms shared by multiple users performing diagnostic tasks as well as regular clinical conferences. Re-engineering workspace ergonomics rely on the integration of new technologies, custom designed cabinets, indirect lighting, sound-absorbent partitioning and geometric arrangement of workstations to allow better privacy while optimizing space occupation. Innovations included adjustable flat monitors, integration of videoconferencing and voice recognition, control monitor and retractable keyboard for optimal space utilization. An overhead compartment protecting the monitors from ambient light is also used as accessory lightbox and rear-view projection screen for conferences.

  18. Phase III Randomized Study of 4 Weeks of High-Dose Interferon-α-2b in Stage T2bNO, T3a-bNO, T4a-bNO, and T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic) Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E1697).

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Lee, Sandra J; Yip, Waiki; Rao, Uma N; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Cohen, Gary I; Reintgen, Douglas S; Evans, Terry L; Brell, Joanna M; Albertini, Mark R; Atkins, Michael B; Dakhil, Shaker R; Conry, Robert M; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Flaherty, Lawrence E; Sondak, Vernon K; Carson, William E; Smylie, Michael G; Pappo, Alberto S; Kefford, Richard F; Kirkwood, John M

    2017-03-10

    Purpose To test the efficacy of 4 weeks of intravenous (IV) induction with high-dose interferon (IFN) as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group regimen compared with observation (OBS) in patients with surgically resected intermediate-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods In this intergroup international trial, eligible patients had surgically resected cutaneous melanoma in the following categories: (1) T2bN0, (2) T3a-bN0, (3) T4a-bN0, and (4) T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic). Patients were randomly assigned to receive IFN α-2b at 20 MU/m(2)/d IV for 5 days (Monday to Friday) every week for 4 weeks (IFN) or OBS. Stratification factors were pathologic lymph node status, lymph node staging procedure, Breslow depth, ulceration of the primary lesion, and disease stage. The primary end point was relapse-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, toxicity, and quality of life. Results A total of 1,150 patients were randomly assigned. At a median follow-up of 7 years, the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for OBS and 0.70, (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for IFN ( P = .964). The 5-year overall survival rate was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.86) for OBS and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.80 to 0.86) for IFN ( P = .558). Treatment-related grade 3 and higher toxicity was 4.6% versus 57.9% for OBS and IFN, respectively ( P < .001). Quality of life was worse for the treated group. Conclusion Four weeks of IV induction as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group high-dose IFN regimen is not better than OBS alone for patients with intermediate-risk melanoma as defined in this trial.

  19. Optical engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T T

    1998-01-01

    The Optical Engineering thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in the summer of 1996 with the following main objectives: (1) to foster and stimulate leading edge optical engineering research and efforts key to carrying out LLNL's mission and enabling major new programs; (2) to bring together LLNL's broad spectrum of high level optical engineering expertise to support its programs. Optical engineering has become a pervasive and key discipline, with applications across an extremely wide range of technologies, spanning the initial conception through the engineering refinements to enhance revolutionary application. It overlaps other technologies and LLNL engineering thrust areas.

  20. Radiological Disaster Simulators for Field and Aerial Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr

    2002-11-01

    Simulators have been developed to dramatically improve the fidelity of play for field monitors and aircraft participating in radiological disaster drills and exercises. Simulated radiological measurements for the current Global Positioning System (GPS) location are derived from realistic models of radiological consequences for accidents and malicious acts. The aerial version outputs analog pulses corresponding to the signal that would be produced by various NaI (Tl) detectors at that location. The field monitor version reports the reading for any make/model of survey instrument selected. Position simulation modes are included in the aerial and field versions. The aerial version can generate a flight path based on input parameters or import an externally generated sequence of latitude and longitude coordinates. The field version utilizes a map-based point and click/drag interface to generate individual or a sequence of evenly spaced instrument measurements.

  1. [Initial medical management in radiological accidents and nuclear disaster].

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Koichi

    2012-03-01

    Major radiological emergencies include criticality in nuclear power plants or terrorist attacks using dirty bombs or nuclear device detonation. Because irradiation itself does not cause any immediate death of the victims, and there is a minimum risk of secondary irradiation to medical personnel during decontamination procedures, lifesaving treatments should be prioritized. When a major radiological accident occurs, information is scarce and/or becomes intricate. We might face with significant difficulties in determining the exact culprits of the event, i.e., radiological or chemical or others. Therefore, it is strongly recommended for the national and local governments, related organizations and hospitals to develop comprehensive systems to cope with all hazards(chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear, and explosion) under the common incident command system.

  2. Nanotechnology and its relationship to interventional radiology. Part I: imaging.

    PubMed

    Power, Sarah; Slattery, Michael M; Lee, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology refers to the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. Interventional radiology stands to benefit greatly from advances in nanotechnology because much of the ongoing research is focused toward novel methods of imaging and delivery of therapy through minimally invasive means. Through the development of new techniques and therapies, nanotechnology has the potential to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and ensure its continued success. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part I of the article deals with an introduction to some of the basic concepts of nanotechnology and outlines some of the potential imaging applications, concentrating mainly on advances in oncological and vascular imaging.

  3. The radiology of adverse drug reactions and toxic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Ansell, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dr. Ansell has produced a scholarly review of the radiology of drug reactions and toxic hazards in his latest book, which is based on over 1,200 articles in the world literature. About 800 of these articles are taken from outside the radiology literature, which indicates the need for this subject to be brought to the attention of the radiologist, particularly as concern about drug reactions and toxic hazards is always increasing. The book includes sections covering the chest, gastrointestinal tract, renal tract, skeletal system and soft tissues, and skull and central nervous system. Each section treats specific substances, such as steroids and heavy metals; specific radiologic signs, such as ureteric dilation; specific symptoms, such as dysphagia; industrial toxins; radiographic abnormalities are discussed; and numerous high-quality radiographs.

  4. CSU-FDA collaborative radiological health laboratory annual report 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the Division of Biological Effects, Bureau of Radiological Health, and the Department of Radiology and Radiation Biology, Colorado State University, to assess possible long-term effects in the beagle from low-level whole-body gamma irradiation. The first section of this annual report summarizes the current status of the long-term effects of irradiation during development in the beagle. The second section addresses studies of radiation-induced and spontaneous disease in the beagle. Cardiovascular disease has also been noted to be a significant clinical disease problem in the aging beagle. The third section describes the CRHL data processing system as it existed and the current changes being made. Several aspects of the methods and procedures available for statistical analysis of data are discussed.

  5. Coping in a calamity: Radiology during the cloudburst at Leh

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Debraj

    2013-01-01

    The service hospital at Leh is a multispeciality hospital situated at an altitude of 11000 feet above mean sea level. On the nights of 4 and 5 Aug 2010, Leh was struck by a cloudburst leading to mudslides and consequently extensive damage to life and property. Being the only functional hospital, over a period of about 48 hours, 331 casualties were received. 549 casualties were received over the week with 108 admissions, 16 major surgeries and 138 minor surgeries. 178 radiographs, 17 CT scans and 09 ultrasound-colour Doppler examinations were performed on an urgent basis over 48 hours apart from the routine radiological investigations. Apart from chronicling the event, we hope that sharing the unique experience of the Radiology Department in dealing with the large influx of patients would provide an insight into the role of Radiology during the disaster and help in planning and developing management protocols during other calamities. PMID:23986626

  6. Solutions in radiology services management: a literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Aline Garcia; Vergara, Lizandra Garcia Lupi; Merino, Eugenio Andrés Díaz; Wagner, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at reviewing the literature to identify solutions for problems observed in radiology services. Materials and Methods Basic, qualitative, exploratory literature review at Scopus and SciELO databases, utilizing the Mendeley and Illustrator CC Adobe softwares. Results In the databases, 565 papers – 120 out of them, pdf free – were identified. Problems observed in the radiology sector are related to procedures scheduling, humanization, lack of training, poor knowledge and use of management techniques, and interaction with users. The design management provides the services with interesting solutions such as Benchmarking, CRM, Lean Approach, ServiceBlueprinting, continued education, among others. Conclusion Literature review is an important tool to identify problems and respective solutions. However, considering the small number of studies approaching management of radiology services, this is a great field of research for the development of deeper studies. PMID:26543281

  7. Big Data and the Future of Radiology Informatics.

    PubMed

    Kansagra, Akash P; Yu, John-Paul J; Chatterjee, Arindam R; Lenchik, Leon; Chow, Daniel S; Prater, Adam B; Yeh, Jean; Doshi, Ankur M; Hawkins, C Matthew; Heilbrun, Marta E; Smith, Stacy E; Oselkin, Martin; Gupta, Pushpender; Ali, Sayed

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in the amount of data that is electronically recorded as part of routine clinical operations has generated great interest in the use of Big Data methodologies to address clinical and research questions. These methods can efficiently analyze and deliver insights from high-volume, high-variety, and high-growth rate datasets generated across the continuum of care, thereby forgoing the time, cost, and effort of more focused and controlled hypothesis-driven research. By virtue of an existing robust information technology infrastructure and years of archived digital data, radiology departments are particularly well positioned to take advantage of emerging Big Data techniques. In this review, we describe four areas in which Big Data is poised to have an immediate impact on radiology practice, research, and operations. In addition, we provide an overview of the Big Data adoption cycle and describe how academic radiology departments can promote Big Data development.

  8. Utilization management in radiology, part 2: perspectives and future directions.

    PubMed

    Duszak, Richard; Berlin, Jonathan W

    2012-10-01

    Increased utilization of medical imaging in the early part of the last decade has resulted in numerous efforts to reduce associated spending. Recent initiatives have focused on managing utilization with radiology benefits managers and real-time order entry decision support systems. Although these approaches might seem mutually exclusive and their application to radiology appears unique, the historical convergence and broad acceptance of both programs within the pharmacy sector may offer parallels for their potential future in medical imaging. In this second installment of a two-part series, anticipated trends in radiology utilization management are reviewed. Perspectives on current and future potential roles of radiologists in such initiatives are discussed, particularly in light of emerging physician payment models.

  9. Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, G.T.

    1997-04-01

    This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

  10. Observational research in trauma radiology: should patients be informed?

    PubMed

    Brink, Monique; Deunk, Jaap; van Tongeren, Paul; Blickman, Johan G

    2009-01-01

    The need for prospective studies in trauma radiology emerges as knowledge on the appropriate use of imaging becomes increasingly important in this field. Prospective observational studies enroll patients after research questions are articulated but only observe medical practice and should not compromise or change patient treatment. However, controversy exists regarding the requirement of informed consent from trauma patients in this type of study. This is reflected not only in differences in reporting informed consent in recent scientific publications on trauma radiology but also by the fact that policies regarding this topic vary in different parts of the world. The authors consider whether requesting informed consent is appropriate in prospective observational studies in trauma radiology from practical and different ethical perspectives.

  11. Prophylactic Antibiotic Guidelines in Modern Interventional Radiology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunice; Tam, Matthew D.B.S.; Kikano, Raghid N.; Karuppasamy, Karunakaravel

    2010-01-01

    Modern interventional radiology practice is continuously evolving. Developments include increases in the number of central venous catheter placements and tumor treatments (uterine fibroid therapy, radio- and chemoembolization of liver tumor, percutaneous radiofrequency and cryoablation), and new procedures such as abdominal aortic aneurysm stent-graft repair, vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty, and varicose vein therapies. There have also been recent advancements in standard biliary and urinary drainage procedures, percutaneous gastrointestinal feeding tube placement, and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Prophylactic antibiotics have become the standard of care in many departments, with little clinical data to support its wide acceptance. The rise in antibiotic-resistant strains of organisms in all hospitals worldwide have forced every department to question the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The authors review the evidence behind use of prophylactic antibiotics in standard interventional radiology procedures, as well as in newer procedures that have only recently been incorporated into interventional radiology practice. PMID:22550374

  12. Radiology and the Health Policy Agenda for the American People.

    PubMed

    MacEwan, D W

    1987-05-01

    Eleven radiologists appointed by the major radiological societies participated for the past 5 years in the development of the Health Policy Agenda for the American People. The Agenda is an action plan to address a wide variety of serious problems in medicine. The first phase involved establishment of 159 principles, broad value statements that were the foundation of the project. Phase 2 involved the development of policy proposals on 38 urgent issues for action in medical science; education; health resources; delivery mechanisms; evaluation, assessment, and control; and payment for services. These proposals are summarized in this report. The activities and recommendations of representatives for the field of radiology are described. The Agenda has been released, and an implementation phase has begun. It will likely be of great importance to the practice of radiology over the next decade. Important issues can be addressed by acting with the coalitions that are being formed from among the more than 150 participating organizations.

  13. National radiology fellowship match program: success or failure?

    PubMed

    Arenson, Ronald L

    2004-03-01

    In early 2003, with strong support from radiology leaders, the first national fellowship match was conducted in radiology. Most programs (358 programs in 9 categories) in the country participated, and 411 positions were filled out of 769 available in the match. Residents who selected to stay at their home departments were chosen before the match. A survey was conducted after the match to assess the satisfaction of chairpersons, program directors, and residents. Overall, the match was rated a success. However, a number of the pediatric fellowship programs remained outside of the match, possibly threatening its future. The initial radiology fellowship match that involved all fellowship specialties was deemed by residents and program leaders to be an overall success. Future matches will attempt to deal with such issues as incomplete participation. A significant problem is the continuing excess of offered fellowship positions over the number of applicants.

  14. WE-D-16A-01: ACR Radiology Leadership Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, G

    2014-06-15

    The Radiology Leadership Institute (RLI) was established in 2011 by the American College of Radiology with a mission to prepare leaders who will shape the future of radiology to ensure quality, elevate service and deliver extraordinary patient care. Leadership skills are critical to medical physicists in order for them to assure that imaging and therapy are safe and of the highest quality possible. This session will provide an introduction to the RLI and its programs with an emphasis on how medical physicists can get involved and what they might expect to gain through their engagement with the RLI. The session will also provide a framework for leadership in healthcare with an emphasis on roles and opportunities for medical physicists to enhance their effectiveness as members of the healthcare, medical education, and research communities.

  15. A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the second volume of this comprehensive report of the inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Appendix B contains a complete printout of contaminant inventory and other information from the CIDRA Database and is presented in volumes 2 and 3 of the report.

  16. Frequency of radiologic procedures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Venegas-Pont, Marcia; Davis, John M.; Crowson, Cynthia S; Gabriel, Sherine E.; Matteson, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) undergo radiologic investigations for disease and comorbidity evaluation. The actual use of radiologic imaging in RA is unknown. Methods Using the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical record linkage system, adult patients from previously assembled population-based cohorts of Olmsted County, Minnesota residents who fulfilled 1987 ACR criteria for RA in 1988-2007, and comparator subjects without RA of similar age and sex were studied. Data on all radiologic procedures performed were collected. Results The study included 650 patients with RA and 650 patients without RA. Patients with RA had significantly more radiographs of the chest (RR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.28-1.38), upper extremity (RR: 2.97, 95% CI: 2.80-3.17), lower extremity (RR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.94-2.16), spine (RR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.35-1.59), and hip, pelvis or sacroiliac joints (RR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03-1.26), as well as bone radionuclide (RR: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.50-2.44) and DXA imaging (RR: 1.77, 95% CI: 1.59-1.98) compared to patients without RA. Among patients with RA, having RF+ was associated with an increased likelihood of undergoing radiologic procedures (RR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.07). Women with RA underwent more imaging procedures than men (RR: 1.20 95% CI: 1.16-1.23). Conclusions Patients with RA undergo more radiologic procedures than patients without RA. Among patients with RA, women and patients with positive RF have more radiologic procedures. The utilization of radiography is likely a reflection of overall disease burden; the role of various imaging modalities is in flux and will likely change in ensuing years. PMID:25539428

  17. Lack of security of networked medical equipment in radiology.

    PubMed

    Moses, Vinu; Korah, Ipeson

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. There are few articles in the literature describing the security and safety aspects of networked medical equipment in radiology departments. Most radiologists are unaware of the security issues. We review the security of the networked medical equipment of a typical radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS. All networked medical equipment in a radiology department was scanned for vulnerabilities with a port scanner and a network vulnerability scanner, and the vulnerabilities were classified using the Common Vulnerability Scoring System. A network sniffer was used to capture and analyze traffic on the radiology network for exposure of confidential patient data. We reviewed the use of antivirus software and firewalls on the networked medical equipment. USB ports and CD and DVD drives in the networked medical equipment were tested to see whether they allowed unauthorized access. Implementation of the virtual private network (VPN) that vendors use to access the radiology network was reviewed. RESULTS. Most of the networked medical equipment in our radiology department used vulnerable software with open ports and services. Of the 144 items scanned, 64 (44%) had at least one critical vulnerability, and 119 (83%) had at least one high-risk vulnerability. Most equipment did not encrypt traffic and allowed capture of confidential patient data. Of the 144 items scanned, two (1%) used antivirus software and three (2%) had a firewall enabled. The USB ports were not secure on 49 of the 58 (84%) items with USB ports, and the CD or DVD drive was not secure on 17 of the 31 (55%) items with a CD or DVD drive. One of three vendors had an insecure implementation of VPN access. CONCLUSION. Radiologists and the medical industry need to urgently review and rectify the security issues in existing networked medical equipment. We hope that the results of our study and this article also raise awareness among radiologists about the security issues of networked medical equipment.

  18. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m{sup −3} to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m{sup −3} to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m{sup −3}, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m{sup −3} to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m{sup −3}, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m{sup −3} to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m{sup −3} and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m{sup −3} to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m{sup −3}, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m{sup −3} and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the

  19. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of radon gas (222Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the 226Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m-3 to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m-3, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m-3 to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m-3, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m-3 to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m-3, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m-3 to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m-3 and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m-3 to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m-3, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m-3, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m-3, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m-3 and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m-3, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m-3 proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas

  20. HOW DO RADIOLOGISTS USE THE HUMAN SEARCH ENGINE?

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Jeremy M; Evans, Karla K; Drew, Trafton; Aizenman, Avigael; Josephs, Emilie

    2016-06-01

    Radiologists perform many 'visual search tasks' in which they look for one or more instances of one or more types of target item in a medical image (e.g. cancer screening). To understand and improve how radiologists do such tasks, it must be understood how the human 'search engine' works. This article briefly reviews some of the relevant work into this aspect of medical image perception. Questions include how attention and the eyes are guided in radiologic search? How is global (image-wide) information used in search? How might properties of human vision and human cognition lead to errors in radiologic search?