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Sample records for 3a4 protein stability

  1. The Nuclear Factor-kB Pathway Regulates Cytochrome P450 3A4 Protein Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Bollinger, Nikki; Verma, Seema; Karin, Norm J.; Lu, Yi

    2008-06-01

    We have previously observed that CYP3A4 protein levels are suppressed by inhibition of the proteasome in primary cultured hepatocytes. Because this result is opposite of what would be expected if CYP3A4 is degraded by the proteasome, it seems likely that there is another protein that is susceptible to proteasomal degradation that regulates CYP3A4 expression. In this study, we evaluate whether the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway is involved in that process. Our model system uses an adenovirus system to express CYP3A4 protein in HepG2 cells, which are derived from human cancer cells. Similar to results in primary hepatocytes, we found that inhibition of the proteasome with MG132 suppresses CYP3A4. Consistent with reports that proteasome inhibition suppresses the NF-kB pathway, we also observe a suppression of inhibitory kB kinase protein levels after treatment with MG132. Treatment of the HepG2 cells with NK-kB Activation Inhibitor also suppresses CYP3A4 proteins levels. In contrast, inhibition of either the proteasome or NF-kB pathways increases CYP3A4 mRNA levels. When the HepG2 cells are treated with cycloheximide, a general inhibitor of translation, the loss of CYP3A4 protein is accelerated by co-treatment with an NF-kB Activation Inhibitor. These results indicate that NF-kB activity regulates CYP3A4 protein stability and suggest that the NF-kB pathway is responsible for the decrease in CYP3A4 protein levels that results from the inhibition of proteasomal activity.

  2. A Role for Protein Phosphorylation in Cytochrome P450 3A4 Ubiquitin-dependent Proteasomal Degradation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YongQiang; Liao, Mingxiang; Hoe, Nicholas; Acharya, Poulomi; Deng, Changhui; Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Correia, Maria Almira

    2009-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) incur phosphorylation. Although the precise role of this post-translational modification is unclear, marking P450s for degradation is plausible. Indeed, we have found that after structural inactivation, CYP3A4, the major human liver P450, and its rat orthologs are phosphorylated during their ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Peptide mapping coupled with mass spectrometric analyses of CYP3A4 phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C (PKC) previously identified two target sites, Thr264 and Ser420. We now document that liver cytosolic kinases additionally target Ser478 as a major site. To determine whether such phosphorylation is relevant to in vivo CYP3A4 degradation, wild type and CYP3A4 with single, double, or triple Ala mutations of these residues were heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae pep4Δ strains. We found that relative to CYP3A4wt, its S478A mutant was significantly stabilized in these yeast, and this was greatly to markedly enhanced for its S478A/T264A, S478A/S420A, and S478A/T264A/S420A double and triple mutants. Similar relative S478A/T264A/S420A mutant stabilization was also observed in HEK293T cells. To determine whether phosphorylation enhances CYP3A4 degradation by enhancing its ubiquitination, CYP3A4 ubiquitination was examined in an in vitro UBC7/gp78-reconstituted system with and without cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and PKC, two liver cytosolic kinases involved in CYP3A4 phosphorylation. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A/PKC-mediated phosphorylation of CYP3A4wt but not its S478A/T264A/S420A mutant enhanced its ubiquitination in this system. Together, these findings indicate that phosphorylation of CYP3A4 Ser478, Thr264, and Ser420 residues by cytosolic kinases is important both for its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation and suggest a direct link between P450 phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation. PMID:19095658

  3. THE EFFECTS OF TYPE II BINDING ON METABOLIC STABILITY AND BINDING AFFINITY IN CYTOCHROME P450 CYP3A4

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chi-Chi; Pearson, Josh T.; Rock, Dan A.; Joswig-Jones, Carolyn A.; Jones, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    One goal in drug design is to decrease clearance due to metabolism. It has been suggested that a compound’s metabolic stability can be increased by incorporation of a sp2 nitrogen into an aromatic ring. Nitrogen incorporation is hypothesized to increase metabolic stability by coordination of nitrogen to the heme iron (termed type II binding). However, questions regarding binding affinity, metabolic stability, and how metabolism of type II binders occurs remain unanswered. Herein, we use pyridinyl quinoline-4-carboxamide analogs to answer these questions. We show that type II binding can have a profound influence on binding affinity for CYP3A4, and the difference in binding affinity can be as high as 1,200 fold. We also find that type II binding compounds can be extensively metabolized, which is not consistent with the dead-end complex kinetic model assumed for type II binders. Two alternate kinetic mechanisms are presented to explain the results. The first involves a rapid equilibrium between the type II bound substrate and a metabolically oriented binding mode. The second involves direct reduction of the nitrogen-coordinated heme followed by oxygen binding. PMID:20346909

  4. Altered CYP2C9 Activity Following Modulation of CYP3A4 Levels in Human Hepatocytes: an Example of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tweedie, Donald J.; Chan, Tom S.; Tracy, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) protein-protein interactions resulting in modulation of enzyme activities have been well documented using recombinant isoforms. This interaction has been less clearly demonstrated in a more physiologic in vitro system such as human hepatocytes. As an expansion of earlier work (Subramanian et al., 2010), in which recombinant CYP2C9 activity decreased with increasing levels of CYP3A4, the current study modulated CYP3A4 content in human hepatocytes to determine the impact on CYP2C9. Modulation of CYP3A4 levels in situ was enabled by the use of a long-term human hepatocyte culture model (HepatoPac) shown to retain phenotypic hepatocyte function over a number of weeks. The extended period of culture allowed time for knockdown of CYP3A4 protein by small interfering RNA (siRNA) with subsequent recovery, as well as upregulation through induction with a recovery period. CYP3A4 gene silencing resulted in a 60% decrease in CYP3A4 activity and protein levels with a concomitant 74% increase in CYP2C9 activity, with no change in CYP2C9 mRNA levels. Upon removal of siRNA, both CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 activities returned to pre-knockdown levels. Importantly, modulation of CYP3A4 protein levels had no impact on cytochrome P450 reductase activities or levels. However, the possibility for competition for limiting reductase cannot be ruled out. Interestingly, lowering CYP3A4 levels also increased UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 activity. These studies clearly demonstrate that alterations in CYP3A4 levels can modulate CYP2C9 activity in situ and suggest that further studies are warranted to evaluate the possible clinical consequences of these findings. PMID:25157098

  5. [Protein-protein interactions of cytochromes P450 3A4 and 3A5 with their intermediate redox partners cytochromes b5].

    PubMed

    Gnedenko, O V; Ivanov, A S; Iablokov, E O; Usanov, S A; Mukha, D V; Sergeev, G V; Kuzikov, A V; Moskaleva, N E; Bulko, T V; Shumiantseva, V V; Archakov, A I

    2014-01-01

    Molecular interactions between proteins redox partners (cytochromes P450 3A4, 3A5 and cytochrome b5) within the monooxygenase system, which is known to be involved in drug biotransformation, were investigated. Human cytochromes P450 3A4 and 3A5 (CYP3A4 and CYP3A5) form complexes with various cytochromes b5: the microsomal (b5mc) and mitochondrial (b5om) forms of this protein, as well as with 2 "chimeric" proteins, b5(om-mc), b5(mc-om). Kinetic constants and equilibrium dissociation constants were determined by the SPR biosensor. Essential distinction between CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 was only observed upon their interactions with cytochrome b5om. Electroanalytical characteristics of electrodes with immobilized hemoproteins were obtained. The electrochemical analysis of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, b5mc, b5om, b5(om-mc), and b5(mc-om) immobilized on screen printed graphite electrodes modified with membranous matrix revealed that these proteins have very close reduction potentials -0.435 - -0.350 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Cytochrome b5mc was shown to be capable of stimulating the electrocatalytic activity of CYP3A4 to testosterone.

  6. [Protein-protein interactions of cytochromes P450 3A4 and 3A5 with their intermediate redox partners cytochromes b5].

    PubMed

    Gnedenko, O V; Ivanov, A S; Yablokov, E O; Usanov, S A; Mukha, D V; Sergeev, G V; Kuzikov, A V; Bulko, T V; Moskaleva, N E; Shumyantseva, V V; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Molecular interactions between proteins redox partners (cytochromes Р450 3А4, 3А5 and cytochrome b5) within the monooxygenase system, which is known to be involved in drug biotransformation, were investigated. Human cytochromes Р450 3А4 and 3А5 (CYP3A4 and CYP3A5) form complexes with various cytochromes b5: the microsomal (b5mc) and mitochondrial (b5om) forms of this protein, as well as with 2 "chimeric" proteins, b5(om-mc), b5(mc-om). Kinetic constants and equilibrium dissociation constants were determined by the SPR biosensor. Essential distinction between CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 was only observed upon their interactions with cytochrome b5om. Electroanalytical characteristics of electrodes with immobilized hemoproteins were obtained. The electrochemical analysis of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, b5mc, b5om, b5(om-mc), and b5(mc-om) immobilized on screen printed graphite electrodes modified with membranous matrix revealed that these proteins have very close reduction potentials -0.435  -0.350 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Cytochrome b5mc was shown to be capable of stimulating the electrocatalytic activity of CYP3A4 in the presence of its substrate testosterone.

  7. Electron transfer properties and catalytic competence of cytochrome b5 in the fusion protein Hmwb5-EGFP in reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    Yantsevich, A V; Gilep, A A; Usanov, S A

    2009-08-01

    In the present paper we describe studies on molecular mechanisms of protein-protein interactions between cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and cytochrome b(5), the latter being incorporated into the artificial recombinant protein Hmwb(5)-EGFP containing full-length cytochrome b(5) (functional module) and a mutant form of the green fluorescent protein EGFP (signal module) fused into a single polypeptide chain. It is shown that cytochrome b(5) within the fusion protein Hmwb(5)-EGFP can be reduced by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase in the presence of NADPH, the rate of reduction being dependent on solution ionic strength, indicating that the signal module does not prevent the interaction of the flavo- and hemeproteins. Interaction of cytochrome P450 3A4 and Hmwb(5)-EGFP was estimated based on spin equilibrium shift of cytochrome P450 3A4 to high-spin state in the presence of Hmwb(5)-EGFP, as well as based on steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of the EGFP component of the fusion protein in the presence of CYP3A4. The engineering of chimeric protein Hmwb(5)-EGFP gives an independent method to determine dissociation constant for the complex of cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b(5) that is less sensitive to environmental factors compared to spectrophotometric titration used before. Reconstitution of catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 3A4 in the reaction of testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation in the presence of Hmwb(5)-EGFP indicates that cytochrome b(5) in the fusion protein is able to stimulate the hydroxylation reaction. Using other fusion proteins containing either cytochrome b(5) or its hydrophilic domain to reconstitute catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 3A4 showed that the hydrophobic domain of cytochrome b(5) participates not only in hemeprotein interaction, but also in electron transfer from cytochrome b(5) to cytochrome P450.

  8. 7,8-benzoflavone binding to human cytochrome P450 3A4 reveals complex fluorescence quenching, suggesting binding at multiple protein sites.

    PubMed

    Marsch, Glenn A; Carlson, Benjamin T; Guengerich, F Peter

    2017-03-20

    Human cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 is involved in the metabolism of one-half of marketed drugs and shows cooperative interactions with some substrates and other ligands. The interaction between P450 3A4 and the known allosteric effector 7,8-benzoflavone (α-naphthoflavone, αNF) was characterized using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The binding interaction of P450 3A4 and αNF effectively quenched the fluorescence of both the enzyme and ligand. The Hill Equation and Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching models were used to evaluate binding of ligand to enzyme. P450 3A4 fluorescence was quenched by titration with αNF; at the relatively higher [αNF]/[P450 3A4] ratios in this experiment, two weaker quenching interactions were revealed (Kd 1.8-2.5 and 6.5 μM). A range is given for the stronger interaction since αNF quenching of P450 3A4 fluorescence changed the protein spectral profile: quenching of 315 nm emission was slightly more efficient (Kd 1.8 μM) than the quenching of protein fluorescence at 335 and 355 nm (Kd 2.5 and 2.1 μM, respectively). In the reverse titration, αNF fluorescence was quenched by P450 3A4; at the lower [αNF]/[P450 3A4] ratios here, two strong quenching interactions were revealed (Kd 0.048 and 1.0 μM). Thus, four binding interactions of αNF to P450 3A4 are suggested by this study, one of which may be newly recognized and which could affect studies of drug oxidations by this important enzyme.

  9. Selective and sensitive quantification of the cytochrome P450 3A4 protein in human liver homogenates through multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cieślak, Anna; Kelly, Isabelle; Trottier, Jocelyn; Verreault, Mélanie; Wunsch, Ewa; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Poirier, Guy; Droit, Arnaud; Barbier, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed at establishing a sensitive multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) method for the quantification of the drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 enzyme in human liver homogenates. Liver samples were subjected to trypsin digestion. MRM-MS analyses were performed using three transitions optimized on one purified synthetic peptide unique to CYP3A4 and the standardizing protein, calnexin. Coefficient of variations for the precision and reproducibility of the MRM-MS measurement were also determined. The method was applied to liver samples from ten non-cholestatic donors and 34 cholestatic patients with primary biliary cholangitis (n = 12; PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (n = 10; PSC) or alcoholic liver disease (n = 12; ALD). The established method presented high sensitivity with limit of detection lower than 5 fmol, and was successfully applied for the absolute and relative quantification of CYP3A4 in both whole liver homogenate and microsomal fractions. When all groups were analyzed together, a significant correlation was observed for the MRM-based CYP3A4 protein quantification in homogenates and microsomes (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). No statistically significant difference was detected between CYP3A4 levels in PSC, PBC, ALD and control samples. Finally, the MRM-MS quantification of CYP3A4 in homogenates also correlated (r = 0.44; p < 0.05) with the level of enzyme activity in the same samples, as determined by measuring the chenodeoxycholic to hyocholic acid conversion. The established method provides a sensitive tool to evaluate the CYP3A4 protein in human liver homogenates from patients with normal or chronic/severe hepatic injury.

  10. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  11. Piperine activates human pregnane X receptor to induce the expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 and multidrug resistance protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yue-Ming; Lin, Wenwei; Chai, Sergio C.; Wu, Jing; Ong, Su Sien; Schuetz, Erin G.; Chen, Taosheng

    2013-10-01

    Activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and subsequently its target genes, including those encoding drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes, while playing substantial roles in xenobiotic detoxification, might cause undesired drug-drug interactions. Recently, an increased awareness has been given to dietary components for potential induction of diet–drug interactions through activation of PXR. Here, we studied, whether piperine (PIP), a major component extracted from the widely-used daily spice black pepper, could induce PXR-mediated expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1). Our results showed that PIP activated human PXR (hPXR)-mediated CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression in human hepatocytes, intestine cells, and a mouse model; PIP activated hPXR by recruiting its coactivator SRC-1 in both cellular and cell-free systems; PIP bound to the hPXR ligand binding domain in a competitive ligand binding assay in vitro. The dichotomous effects of PIP on induction of CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression observed here and inhibition of their activity reported elsewhere challenges the potential use of PIP as a bioavailability enhancer and suggests that caution should be taken in PIP consumption during drug treatment in patients, particularly those who favor daily pepper spice or rely on certain pepper remedies. - Highlights: • Piperine induces PXR-mediated CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression. • Piperine activates PXR by binding to PXR and recruiting coactivator SRC-1. • Piperine induces PXR activation in vivo. • Caution should be taken in piperine consumption during drug treatment.

  12. Thiazide-like diuretic drug metolazone activates human pregnane X receptor to induce cytochrome 3A4 and multidrug-resistance protein 1.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Monimoy; Chen, Taosheng

    2014-11-15

    Human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and drug transporters such as multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MDR1). PXR can be modulated by small molecules, including Federal Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, thus altering drug metabolism and causing drug-drug interactions. To determine the role of FDA-approved drugs in PXR-mediated regulation of drug metabolism and clearance, we screened 1481 FDA-approved small-molecule drugs by using a luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells and identified the diuretic drug metolazone as an activator of hPXR. Our data showed that metolazone activated hPXR-mediated expression of CYP3A4 and MDR1 in human hepatocytes and intestine cells and increased CYP3A4 promoter activity in various cell lines. Mammalian two-hybrid assays showed that hPXR recruits its co-activator SRC-1 upon metolazone binding in HepG2 cells, explaining the mechanism of hPXR activation. To understand the role of other commonly-used diuretics in hPXR activation and the structure-activity relationship of metolazone, thiazide and non-thiazide diuretics drugs were also tested but only metolazone activates hPXR. To understand the molecular mechanism, docking studies and mutational analysis were carried out and showed that metolazone binds in the ligand-binding pocket and interacts with mostly hydrophobic amino acid residues. This is the first report showing that metolazone activates hPXR. Because activation of hPXR might cause drug-drug interactions, metolazone should be used with caution for drug treatment in patients undergoing combination therapy.

  13. Lactococcus lactis is an Efficient Expression System for Mammalian Membrane Proteins Involved in Liver Detoxification, CYP3A4, and MGST1.

    PubMed

    Bakari, Sana; Lembrouk, Mehdi; Sourd, Laura; Ousalem, Fares; André, François; Orlowski, Stéphane; Delaforge, Marcel; Frelet-Barrand, Annie

    2016-04-01

    Despite the great importance of human membrane proteins involved in detoxification mechanisms, their wide use for biochemical approaches is still hampered by several technical difficulties considering eukaryotic protein expression in order to obtain the large amounts of protein required for functional and/or structural studies. Lactococcus lactis has emerged recently as an alternative heterologous expression system to Escherichia coli for proteins that are difficult to express. The aim of this work was to check its ability to express mammalian membrane proteins involved in liver detoxification, i.e., CYP3A4 and two isoforms of MGST1 (rat and human). Genes were cloned using two different strategies, i.e., classical or Gateway-compatible cloning, and we checked the possible influence of two affinity tags (6×-His-tag and Strep-tag II). Interestingly, all proteins could be successfully expressed in L. lactis at higher yields than those previously obtained for these proteins with classical expression systems (E. coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) or those of other eukaryotic membrane proteins expressed in L. lactis. In addition, rMGST1 was fairly active after expression in L. lactis. This study highlights L. lactis as an attractive system for efficient expression of mammalian detoxification membrane proteins at levels compatible with further functional and structural studies.

  14. Protein Stability in Ice

    PubMed Central

    Strambini, Giovanni B.; Gonnelli, Margherita

    2007-01-01

    This study presents an experimental approach, based on the change of Trp fluorescence between native and denatured states of proteins, which permits to monitor unfolding equilibria and the thermodynamic stability (ΔG°) of these macromolecules in frozen aqueous solutions. The results obtained by guanidinium chloride denaturation of the azurin mutant C112S from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in the temperature range from −8 to −16°C, demonstrate that the stability of the native fold may be significantly perturbed in ice depending mainly on the size of the liquid water pool (VL) in equilibrium with the solid phase. The data establish a threshold, around VL = 1.5%, below which in ice ΔG° decreases progressively relative to liquid state, up to 3 kcal/mole for VL = 0.285%. The sharp dependence of ΔG° on VL is consistent with a mechanism based on adsorption of the protein to the ice surface. The reduction in ΔG° is accompanied by a corresponding decrease in m-value indicating that protein-ice interactions increase the solvent accessible surface area of the native fold or reduce that of the denatured state, or both. The method opens the possibility for examining in a more quantitative fashion the influence of various experimental conditions on the ice perturbation and in particular to test the effectiveness of numerous additives used in formulations to preserve labile pharmaco proteins. PMID:17189314

  15. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and cytochrome P450 3A4 improves the oral absorption of octreotide in rats with portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Liu, Zhen; Tang, Shun-Xiong; Li, Yang; He, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Qiu-Ming; Chang, Qing-Yong

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to increase the intestinal transport of octreotide (OCT) by targeting the first-pass impact to identify a potential method for decreasing portal vein pressure (PVP) using oral OCT. Thus, the bioavailability of intestinally absorbed OCT was evaluated in normal rats and rats with portal hypertension (PH) that had been administered P-glycoprotein/multidrug resistance-associated protein 2/cytochrome P450 3A4 (P-gp/MRP2/CYP3A4) inhibitors. The mRNA and protein expression levels of P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 were evaluated in normal and PH rats with or without OCT and the inhibitors using RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The potential effects of the inhibitor administration on PVP were also examined. The results suggest that P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 play important roles in prohibiting the enteral absorption of OCT, particularly under a PH environment. Moreover, inhibitors of P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 decrease the first-pass effects of OCT and effectively reduce PVP under PH conditions. Therefore, the present results suggest P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 are key factors in the intestinal absorption of OCT. The inhibition of P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 can markedly decrease the first-pass effects of OCT, and their use may facilitate the use of orally administered OCT.

  16. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and cytochrome P450 3A4 improves the oral absorption of octreotide in rats with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Liu, Zhen; Tang, Shun-Xiong; Li, Yang; He, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Qiu-Ming; Chang, Qing-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to increase the intestinal transport of octreotide (OCT) by targeting the first-pass impact to identify a potential method for decreasing portal vein pressure (PVP) using oral OCT. Thus, the bioavailability of intestinally absorbed OCT was evaluated in normal rats and rats with portal hypertension (PH) that had been administered P-glycoprotein/multidrug resistance-associated protein 2/cytochrome P450 3A4 (P-gp/MRP2/CYP3A4) inhibitors. The mRNA and protein expression levels of P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 were evaluated in normal and PH rats with or without OCT and the inhibitors using RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The potential effects of the inhibitor administration on PVP were also examined. The results suggest that P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 play important roles in prohibiting the enteral absorption of OCT, particularly under a PH environment. Moreover, inhibitors of P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 decrease the first-pass effects of OCT and effectively reduce PVP under PH conditions. Therefore, the present results suggest P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 are key factors in the intestinal absorption of OCT. The inhibition of P-gp, MRP2 and CYP3A4 can markedly decrease the first-pass effects of OCT, and their use may facilitate the use of orally administered OCT. PMID:28105103

  17. Stabilized polyacrylic saccharide protein conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, Matthew R.; Bednarski, Mark D.; Gruber, Patrick R.

    1996-01-01

    This invention is directed to water soluble protein polymer conjugates which are stabile in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises a protein which is linked to an acrylic polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups.

  18. Septins: Regulators of Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Vagin, Olga; Beenhouwer, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Septins are small GTPases that play a role in several important cellular processes. In this review, we focus on the roles of septins in protein stabilization. Septins may regulate protein stability by: (1) interacting with proteins involved in degradation pathways, (2) regulating the interaction between transmembrane proteins and cytoskeletal proteins, (3) affecting the mobility of transmembrane proteins in lipid bilayers, and (4) modulating the interaction of proteins with their adaptor or signaling proteins. In this context, we discuss the role of septins in protecting four different proteins from degradation. First we consider botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) and the contribution of septins to its extraordinarily long intracellular persistence. Next, we discuss the role of septins in stabilizing the receptor tyrosine kinases EGFR and ErbB2. Finally, we consider the contribution of septins in protecting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) from degradation. PMID:28066764

  19. Macromolecular crowding and protein stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqiang; Sarkar, Mohona; Smith, Austin E; Krois, Alexander S; Pielak, Gary J

    2012-10-10

    An understanding of cellular chemistry requires knowledge of how crowded environments affect proteins. The influence of crowding on protein stability arises from two phenomena, hard-core repulsions and soft (i.e., chemical) interactions. Most efforts to understand crowding effects on protein stability, however, focus on hard-core repulsions, which are inherently entropic and stabilizing. We assessed these phenomena by measuring the temperature dependence of NMR-detected amide proton exchange and used these data to extract the entropic and enthalpic contributions of crowding to the stability of ubiquitin. Contrary to expectations, the contribution of chemical interactions is large and in many cases dominates the contribution from hardcore repulsions. Our results show that both chemical interactions and hard-core repulsions must be considered when assessing the effects of crowding and help explain previous observations about protein stability and dynamics in cells.

  20. Human Cytochrome P450 3A4 as a Biocatalyst: Effects of the Engineered Linker in Modulation of Coupling Efficiency in 3A4-BMR Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Degregorio, Danilo; D'Avino, Serena; Castrignanò, Silvia; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Sadeghi, Sheila J.; Catucci, Gianluca; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    Human liver cytochrome P450 3A4 is the main enzyme involved in drug metabolism. This makes it an attractive target for biocatalytic applications, such as the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and drug metabolites. However, its poor solubility, stability and low coupling have limited its application in the biotechnological context. We previously demonstrated that the solubility of P450 3A4 can be increased by creating fusion proteins between the reductase from Bacillus megaterium BM3 (BMR) and the N-terminally modified P450 3A4 (3A4-BMR). In this work, we aim at increasing stability and coupling efficiency by varying the length of the loop connecting the two domains to allow higher inter-domain flexibility, optimizing the interaction between the domains. Starting from the construct 3A4-BMR containing the short linker Pro-Ser-Arg, two constructs were generated by introducing a 3 and 5 glycine hinge (3A4-3GLY-BMR and 3A4-5GLY-BMR). The three fusion proteins show the typical absorbance at 450 nm of the reduced heme-CO adduct as well as the correct incorporation of the FAD and FMN cofactors. Each of the three chimeric proteins were more stable than P450 3A4 alone. Moreover, the 3A4-BMR-3-GLY enzyme showed the highest NADPH oxidation rate in line with the most positive reduction potential. On the other hand, the 3A4-BMR-5-GLY fusion protein showed a Vmax increased by 2-fold as well as a higher coupling efficiency when compared to 3A4-BMR in the hydroxylation of the marker substrate testosterone. This protein also showed the highest rate value of cytochrome c reduction when this external electron acceptor is used to intercept electrons from BMR to P450. The data suggest that the flexibility and the interaction between domains in the chimeric proteins is a key parameter to improve turnover and coupling efficiency. These findings provide important guidelines in engineering catalytically self-sufficient human P450 for applications in biocatalysis. PMID:28377716

  1. Human Cytochrome P450 3A4 as a Biocatalyst: Effects of the Engineered Linker in Modulation of Coupling Efficiency in 3A4-BMR Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Degregorio, Danilo; D'Avino, Serena; Castrignanò, Silvia; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Catucci, Gianluca; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    Human liver cytochrome P450 3A4 is the main enzyme involved in drug metabolism. This makes it an attractive target for biocatalytic applications, such as the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and drug metabolites. However, its poor solubility, stability and low coupling have limited its application in the biotechnological context. We previously demonstrated that the solubility of P450 3A4 can be increased by creating fusion proteins between the reductase from Bacillus megaterium BM3 (BMR) and the N-terminally modified P450 3A4 (3A4-BMR). In this work, we aim at increasing stability and coupling efficiency by varying the length of the loop connecting the two domains to allow higher inter-domain flexibility, optimizing the interaction between the domains. Starting from the construct 3A4-BMR containing the short linker Pro-Ser-Arg, two constructs were generated by introducing a 3 and 5 glycine hinge (3A4-3GLY-BMR and 3A4-5GLY-BMR). The three fusion proteins show the typical absorbance at 450 nm of the reduced heme-CO adduct as well as the correct incorporation of the FAD and FMN cofactors. Each of the three chimeric proteins were more stable than P450 3A4 alone. Moreover, the 3A4-BMR-3-GLY enzyme showed the highest NADPH oxidation rate in line with the most positive reduction potential. On the other hand, the 3A4-BMR-5-GLY fusion protein showed a Vmax increased by 2-fold as well as a higher coupling efficiency when compared to 3A4-BMR in the hydroxylation of the marker substrate testosterone. This protein also showed the highest rate value of cytochrome c reduction when this external electron acceptor is used to intercept electrons from BMR to P450. The data suggest that the flexibility and the interaction between domains in the chimeric proteins is a key parameter to improve turnover and coupling efficiency. These findings provide important guidelines in engineering catalytically self-sufficient human P450 for applications in biocatalysis.

  2. Protein stability in extremophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, R; Consalvi, V; Chiaraluce, R; Politi, L; Engel, P C

    2000-09-01

    Extremophilic microorganisms have adapted their molecular machinery to grow and thrive under the most adverse environmental conditions. These microorganisms have found their natural habitat at the boiling and freezing point of water, in high salt concentration and at extreme pH values. The extremophilic proteins, selected by Nature to withstand this evolutionary pressure, represent a wide research field for scientists from different disciplines and the study of the determinants of their stability has been an important task for basic and applied research. A surprising conclusion emerges from these studies: there are no general rules to achieve protein stabilization. Each extremophilic protein adopts various strategies and the outstanding adaptation to extreme temperature and solvent conditions is realized through the same weak electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions among the ordinary amino acid residues which are also responsible for the proper balance between protein stability and flexibility in mesophilic proteins.

  3. The role of stabilization centers in protein thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Magyar, Csaba; Gromiha, M. Michael; Sávoly, Zoltán; Simon, István

    2016-02-26

    The definition of stabilization centers was introduced almost two decades ago. They are centers of noncovalent long range interaction clusters, believed to have a role in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of proteins by preventing their decay due to their cooperative long range interactions. Here, this hypothesis is investigated from the viewpoint of thermal stability for the first time, using a large protein thermodynamics database. The positions of amino acids belonging to stabilization centers are correlated with available experimental thermodynamic data on protein thermal stability. Our analysis suggests that stabilization centers, especially solvent exposed ones, do contribute to the thermal stabilization of proteins. - Highlights: • Stabilization centers contribute to thermal stabilization of protein structures. • Stabilization center content correlates with melting temperature of proteins. • Exposed stabilization center content correlates with stability even in hyperthermophiles. • Stability changing mutations are frequently found at stabilization centers.

  4. Protein stability: a crystallographer’s perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Deller, Marc C.; Kong, Leopold; Rupp, Bernhard

    2016-01-26

    An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. Protein stability is a topic of major interest for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food industries, in addition to being a daily consideration for academic researchers studying proteins. An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification, formulation, storage and structural studies of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability, on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. The differences between protein conformational stability and protein compositional stability will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to key methods useful for analyzing protein stability. Finally, tactics for addressing protein-stability issues during protein expression, purification and crystallization will be discussed.

  5. Monitoring protein stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya

    2005-08-24

    Reduced protein stability in vivo is a prerequisite to aggregation. While this is merely a nuisance factor in recombinant protein production, it holds a serious impact for man. This review focuses on specific approaches to selectively determine the solubility and/or stability of a target protein within the complex cellular environment using different detection techniques. Noninvasive techniques mapping folding/misfolding events on a fast time scale can be used to unravel the complexity and dynamics of the protein aggregation process and factors altering protein solubility in vivo. The development of approaches to screen for folding and solubility in vivo should facilitate the identification of potential components that improve protein solubility and/or modulate misfolding and aggregation and may provide a therapeutic benefit.

  6. CYP3A4 intronic SNP rs35599367 (CYP3A4*22) alters RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danxin; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) metabolizes 30-50% of clinically used drugs. Large interperson variability in CYP3A4 activity affects response to CYP3A4 substrate drugs. We had demonstrated that an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism rs35599367 (CYP3A4*22, located in intron 6) reduces mRNA/protein expression; however, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here we show that CYP3A4*22 is associated with a two-fold or greater increase in formation of a nonfunctional CYP3A4 alternative splice variant with partial intron 6 retention in human liver (P=0.006), but not in small intestines. Consistent with this observation, in-vitro transfection experiments with a CYP3A4 minigene (spanning from intron 5 to intron 7) demonstrated that plasmids carrying the rs35599367 minor T allele caused significantly greater intron 6 retention than the C allele in liver derived HepG2 cells, but not in intestine-derived LS-174T cells. These results indicate that tissue-specific increased formation of nonfunctional alternative splice variant causes reduced CYP3A4 mRNA/protein expression in CYP3A4*22 carriers.

  7. The role of stabilization centers in protein thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Csaba; Gromiha, M Michael; Sávoly, Zoltán; Simon, István

    2016-02-26

    The definition of stabilization centers was introduced almost two decades ago. They are centers of noncovalent long range interaction clusters, believed to have a role in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of proteins by preventing their decay due to their cooperative long range interactions. Here, this hypothesis is investigated from the viewpoint of thermal stability for the first time, using a large protein thermodynamics database. The positions of amino acids belonging to stabilization centers are correlated with available experimental thermodynamic data on protein thermal stability. Our analysis suggests that stabilization centers, especially solvent exposed ones, do contribute to the thermal stabilization of proteins.

  8. Kinetic stability of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    González Flecha, F Luis

    2017-09-18

    Although membrane proteins constitute an important class of biomolecules involved in key cellular processes, study of the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of their structures is far behind that of soluble proteins. It is known that many membrane proteins become unstable when removed by detergent extraction from the lipid environment. In addition, most of them undergo irreversible denaturation, even under mild experimental conditions. This process was found to be associated with partial unfolding of the polypeptide chain exposing hydrophobic regions to water, and it was proposed that the formation of kinetically trapped conformations could be involved. In this review, we will describe some of the efforts toward understanding the irreversible inactivation of membrane proteins. Furthermore, its modulation by phospholipids, ligands, and temperature will be herein discussed.

  9. Protein stability: a crystallographer’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Deller, Marc C.; Kong, Leopold; Rupp, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is a topic of major interest for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food industries, in addition to being a daily consideration for academic researchers studying proteins. An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification, formulation, storage and structural studies of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability, on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. The differences between protein conformational stability and protein compositional stability will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to key methods useful for analyzing protein stability. Finally, tactics for addressing protein-stability issues during protein expression, purification and crystallization will be discussed. PMID:26841758

  10. Cosolvent Effects on Protein Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canchi, Deepak R.; García, Angel E.

    2013-04-01

    Proteins are marginally stable, and the folding/unfolding equilibrium of proteins in aqueous solution can easily be altered by the addition of small organic molecules known as cosolvents. Cosolvents that shift the equilibrium toward the unfolded ensemble are termed denaturants, whereas those that favor the folded ensemble are known as protecting osmolytes. Urea is a widely used denaturant in protein folding studies, and the molecular mechanism of its action has been vigorously debated in the literature. Here we review recent experimental as well as computational studies that show an emerging consensus in this problem. Urea has been shown to denature proteins through a direct mechanism, by interacting favorably with the peptide backbone as well as the amino acid side chains. In contrast, the molecular mechanism by which the naturally occurring protecting osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) stabilizes proteins is not clear. Recent studies have established the strong interaction of TMAO with water. Detailed molecular simulations, when used with force fields that incorporate these interactions, can provide insight into this problem. We present the development of a model for TMAO that is consistent with experimental observations and that provides physical insight into the role of cosolvent-cosolvent interaction in determining its preferential interaction with proteins.

  11. Homotropic cooperativity of monomeric cytochrome P450 3A4

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, Bradley J.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2010-11-16

    Mechanistic studies of mammalian cytochrome P450s are often obscured by the phase heterogeneity of solubilized preparations of membrane enzymes. The various protein-protein aggregation states of microsomes, detergent solubilized cytochrome or a family of aqueous multimeric complexes can effect measured substrate binding events as well as subsequent steps in the reaction cycle. In addition, these P450 monooxygenases are normally found in a membrane environment and the bilayer composition and dynamics can also effect these catalytic steps. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a homogeneous monomeric population of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP 3A4) in a soluble nanoscale membrane bilayer, or Nanodisc [Nano Lett. 2 (2002) 853]. Cytochrome P450 3A4:Nanodisc assemblies were formed and purified to yield a 1:1 ratio of CYP 3A4 to Nanodisc. Solution small angle X-ray scattering was used to structurally characterize this monomeric CYP 3A4 in the membrane bilayer. The purified CYP 3A4:Nanodiscs showed a heretofore undescribed high level of homotropic cooperativity in the binding of testosterone. Soluble CYP 3A4:Nanodisc retains its known function and shows prototypic hydroxylation of testosterone when driven by hydrogen peroxide. This represents the first functional characterization of a true monomeric preparation of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase in a phospholipid bilayer and elucidates new properties of the monomeric form.

  12. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Protein Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Nick

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(Δ G), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A (1.1Å), Y51F(1.5Å), and T95A(1.3Å). The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners always form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in the mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions: 1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. 2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. 5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein.

  13. Contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Schell, David; Thurlkill, Richard L; Imura, Satoshi; Scholtz, J Martin; Gajiwala, Ketan; Sevcik, Jozef; Urbanikova, Lubica; Myers, Jeffery K; Takano, Kazufumi; Hebert, Eric J; Shirley, Bret A; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(ΔG), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A, Y51F, and T95A. The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in all three mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions. (1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. (2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. (5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein. PMID:24591301

  14. Selection of mutations for increased protein stability.

    PubMed

    van den Burg, Bertus; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2002-08-01

    There are many ways to select mutations that increase the stability of proteins, including rational design, functional screening of randomly generated mutant libraries, and comparison of naturally occurring homologous proteins. The protein engineer's toolbox is expanding and the number of successful examples of engineered protein stability is increasing. Still, the selection of thermostable mutations is not a standard process. Selection is complicated by lack of knowledge of the process that leads to thermal inactivation and by the fact that proteins employ a large variety of structural tricks to achieve stability.

  15. Human Liver Cytochrome P450 3A4 Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YongQiang; Kim, Sung-Mi; Trnka, Michael J.; Liu, Yi; Burlingame, A. L.; Correia, Maria Almira

    2015-01-01

    CYP3A4 is an abundant and catalytically dominant human liver endoplasmic reticulum-anchored cytochrome P450 enzyme engaged in the biotransformation of endo- and xenobiotics, including >50% of clinically relevant drugs. Alterations of CYP3A4 protein turnover can influence clinically relevant drug metabolism and bioavailability and drug-drug interactions. This CYP3A4 turnover involves endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent 26 S proteasomal system that relies on two highly complementary E2 Ub-conjugating-E3 Ub-ligase (UBC7-gp78 and UbcH5a-C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP)-Hsc70-Hsp40) complexes, as well as protein kinases (PK) A and C. We have documented that CYP3A4 Ser/Thr phosphorylation (Ser(P)/Thr(P)) by PKA and/or PKC accelerates/enhances its Lys ubiquitination by either of these E2-E3 systems. Intriguingly, CYP3A4 Ser(P)/Thr(P) and ubiquitinated Lys residues reside within the cytosol-accessible surface loop and/or conformationally assembled acidic Asp/Glu clusters, leading us to propose that such post-translational Ser/Thr protein phosphorylation primes CYP3A4 for ubiquitination. Herein, this possibility was examined through various complementary approaches, including site-directed mutagenesis, chemical cross-linking, peptide mapping, and LC-MS/MS analyses. Our findings reveal that such CYP3A4 Asp/Glu/Ser(P)/Thr(P) surface clusters are indeed important for its intermolecular electrostatic interactions with each of these E2-E3 subcomponents. By imparting additional negative charge to these Asp/Glu clusters, such Ser/Thr phosphorylation would generate P450 phosphodegrons for molecular recognition by the E2-E3 complexes, thereby controlling the timing of CYP3A4 ubiquitination and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Although the importance of phosphodegrons in the CHIP targeting of its substrates is known, to our knowledge this is the first example of phosphodegron involvement in gp78-substrate

  16. Cytosolic selection systems to study protein stability.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Mueller-Schickert, Antje; Bardwell, James C A

    2014-12-01

    Here we describe biosensors that provide readouts for protein stability in the cytosolic compartment of prokaryotes. These biosensors consist of tripartite sandwich fusions that link the in vitro stability or aggregation susceptibility of guest proteins to the in vivo resistance of host cells to the antibiotics kanamycin, spectinomycin, and nourseothricin. These selectable markers confer antibiotic resistance in a wide range of hosts and are easily quantifiable. We show that mutations within guest proteins that affect their stability alter the antibiotic resistances of the cells expressing the biosensors in a manner that is related to the in vitro stabilities of the mutant guest proteins. In addition, we find that polyglutamine tracts of increasing length are associated with an increased tendency to form amyloids in vivo and, in our sandwich fusion system, with decreased resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that our approach allows the in vivo analysis of protein stability in the cytosolic compartment without the need for prior structural and functional knowledge.

  17. Contribution of Hydrophobic Interactions to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R.; Shirley, Bret A.; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compare our results with previous studies and reach the following conclusions. 1. Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mole per –CH2– group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mol per –CH2– group). 2. Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kcal/mol): Phe 18 (3.9), Met 13 (3.1), Phe 7 (2.9), Phe 11 (2.7), and Leu 21 (2.7). 3. Based on Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔGtr values from water to cyclohexane. 5. For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60 ± 4% and hydrogen bonds 40 ± 4% to protein stability. 6. Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominately by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  18. Contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Shirley, Bret A; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2011-05-06

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compared our results with those of previous studies and reached the following conclusions: (1) Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group). (2) Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kilocalories per mole) Phe18 (3.9), Met13 (3.1), Phe7 (2.9), Phe11 (2.7), and Leu21 (2.7). (3) Based on the Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a -CH(2)- group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔG(tr) values from water to cyclohexane. (5) For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60±4% and hydrogen bonds contribute 40±4% to protein stability. (6) Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominantly by hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein stabilization utilizing a redefined codon

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Kazumasa; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Mukai, Takahito; Kashimura, Hiroki; Hirano, Nobutaka; Haruki, Mitsuru; Kohashi, Sosuke; Yamagishi, Kenji; Murayama, Kazutaka; Tomabechi, Yuri; Itagaki, Takashi; Akasaka, Ryogo; Kawazoe, Masahito; Takemoto, Chie; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances have fundamentally changed the ways in which synthetic amino acids are incorporated into proteins, enabling their efficient and multiple-site incorporation, in addition to the 20 canonical amino acids. This development provides opportunities for fresh approaches toward addressing fundamental problems in bioengineering. In the present study, we showed that the structural stability of proteins can be enhanced by integrating bulky halogenated amino acids at multiple selected sites. Glutathione S-transferase was thus stabilized significantly (by 5.2 and 5.6 kcal/mol) with 3-chloro- and 3-bromo-l-tyrosines, respectively, incorporated at seven selected sites. X-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that the bulky halogen moieties filled internal spaces within the molecules, and formed non-canonical stabilizing interactions with the neighboring residues. This new mechanism for protein stabilization is quite simple and applicable to a wide range of proteins, as demonstrated by the rapid stabilization of the industrially relevant azoreductase. PMID:25985257

  20. Protein stabilization utilizing a redefined codon.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Kazumasa; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Mukai, Takahito; Kashimura, Hiroki; Hirano, Nobutaka; Haruki, Mitsuru; Kohashi, Sosuke; Yamagishi, Kenji; Murayama, Kazutaka; Tomabechi, Yuri; Itagaki, Takashi; Akasaka, Ryogo; Kawazoe, Masahito; Takemoto, Chie; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2015-05-18

    Recent advances have fundamentally changed the ways in which synthetic amino acids are incorporated into proteins, enabling their efficient and multiple-site incorporation, in addition to the 20 canonical amino acids. This development provides opportunities for fresh approaches toward addressing fundamental problems in bioengineering. In the present study, we showed that the structural stability of proteins can be enhanced by integrating bulky halogenated amino acids at multiple selected sites. Glutathione S-transferase was thus stabilized significantly (by 5.2 and 5.6 kcal/mol) with 3-chloro- and 3-bromo-l-tyrosines, respectively, incorporated at seven selected sites. X-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that the bulky halogen moieties filled internal spaces within the molecules, and formed non-canonical stabilizing interactions with the neighboring residues. This new mechanism for protein stabilization is quite simple and applicable to a wide range of proteins, as demonstrated by the rapid stabilization of the industrially relevant azoreductase.

  1. Stability and solubility of proteins from extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Richard B; Warwicker, Jim

    2009-03-13

    Charges are important for hyperthermophile protein structure and function. However, the number of charges and their predicted contributions to folded state stability are not correlated, implying that more charge does not imply greater stability. The charge properties that distinguish hyperthermophile proteins also differentiate psychrophile proteins from mesophile proteins, but in the opposite direction and to a smaller extent. We conclude that charge number relates to solubility, whereas protein stability is determined by charge location. Most other structural properties are poorly separated over the ambient temperature range, apart from the burial of certain amino acids. Of particular interest are large non-polar sidechains that tend to increased exposure in proteins evolved to function at higher temperatures. Looking at tryptophan in more detail, this increase is often located close to the termini of secondary structure elements, and is discussed in terms of a novel potential role in protein thermostabilisation.

  2. Stabilized polyacrylic saccharide protein conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1996-02-20

    This invention is directed to water soluble protein polymer conjugates which are stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises a protein which is linked to an acrylic polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 16 figs.

  3. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Phillip D; Wander, Marc J

    2014-11-04

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  4. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Philip D.; Wander, Marc J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  5. A prevalent intraresidue hydrogen bond stabilizes proteins

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Robert W.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    Current limitations in de novo protein structure prediction and design suggest an incomplete understanding of the interactions that govern protein folding. Here we demonstrate that previously unappreciated hydrogen bonds occur within proteins between the amide proton and carbonyl oxygen of the same residue. Quantum calculations, infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy show that these interactions share hallmark features of canonical hydrogen bonds. Biophysical analyses demonstrate that selective attenuation or enhancement of these C5 hydrogen bonds affects the stability of synthetic β-sheets. These interactions are common, affecting approximately 5% of all residues and 94% of proteins, and their cumulative impact provides several kcal/mol of conformational stability to a typical protein. C5 hydrogen bonds stabilize, especially, the flat β-sheets of the amyloid state, which is linked with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Inclusion of these interactions in computational force fields would improve models of protein folding, function, and dysfunction. PMID:27748749

  6. Protein-stabilized magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenen, S. J. H.; Hodenius, M.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; De Cuyper, M.

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and egg yolk phosvitin on magnetic fluid particles was investigated. Incubation mixtures were prepared by mixing an alkaline suspension of tetramethylammonium-coated magnetite cores with protein solutions at various protein/Fe 3O 4 ratios, followed by dialysis against a 5 mM TES buffer (pH 7.0), after which separation of bound and non-bound protein by high-gradient magnetophoresis was executed. Both the kinetic profiles as well as the isotherms of adsorption strongly differed for both proteins. In case of the spherical BSA, initially, abundant adsorption occurred, then it decreased and—at high protein concentrations—it slowly raised again. In contrast, with the highly phosphorylated phosvitin, binding slowly started and the extent of protein adsorption remained unchanged both as a function of time and phosvitin concentration. Competition binding studies, using binary protein mixtures composed of equal weight amounts of BSA and phosvitin, showed that binding of the latter protein is 'unrealistically' high. Based on the geometry of the two proteins, putative pictures on their orientation on the particle's surface in the various experimental conditions were deduced.

  7. Improvement of interfacial protein stability by CHAPS.

    PubMed

    Sah, Hongkee; Kim, Kil-Soo

    2006-04-01

    Emulsification of aqueous protein solutions in methylene chloride triggered the formation of water-insoluble aggregates at a water/methylene chloride interface. As a result, the amounts of beta-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin recovered in water were 36 and 44%, respectively. Addition of 5 mM: CHAPS in the aqueous phase raised the degree of beta-lactoglobulin recovery to 96%. Sodium taurocholate, however, failed to improve protein recovery. The stabilizing effect of CHAPS was also protein-specific and concentration-dependent: at >or=5 mM: , the surfactant caused unfolding of ovalbumin to make a water-soluble oligomer. CHAPS thus stabilizes proteins at an interface.

  8. Molecular modeling of cytochrome P450 3A4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szklarz, Grazyna D.; Halpert, James R.

    1997-05-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human cytochrome P450 3A4 was modeled based on crystallographic coordinates of four bacterial P450s: P450 BM-3, P450cam, P450terp, and P450eryF. The P450 3A4 sequence was aligned to those of the known proteins using a structure-based alignment of P450 BM-3, P450cam, P450terp, and P450eryF. The coordinates of the model were then calculated using a consensus strategy, and the final structure was optimized in the presence of water. The P450 3A4 model resembles P450 BM-3 the most, but the B' helix is similar to that of P450eryF, which leads to an enlarged active site when compared with P450 BM-3, P450cam, and P450terp. The 3A4 residues equivalent to known substrate contact residues of the bacterial proteins and key residues of rat P450 2B1 are located in the active site or the substrate access channel. Docking of progesterone into the P450 3A4 model demonstrated that the substrate bound in a 6β-orientation can interact with a number of active site residues, such as 114, 119, 301, 304, 305, 309, 370, 373, and 479, through hydrophobic interactions. The active site of the enzyme can also accommodate erythromycin, which, in addition to the residues listed for progesterone, also contacts residues 101, 104, 105, 214, 215, 217, 218, 374, and 478. The majority of 3A4 residues which interact with progesterone and/or erythromycin possess their equivalents in key residues of P450 2B enzymes, except for residues 297, 480 and 482, which do not contact either substrate in P450 3A4. The results from docking of progesterone and erythromycin into the enzyme model make it possible to pinpoint residues which may be important for 3A4 function and to target them for site-directed mutagenesis.

  9. Enhancing recombinant protein quality and yield by protein stability profiling.

    PubMed

    Mezzasalma, Tara M; Kranz, James K; Chan, Winnie; Struble, Geoffrey T; Schalk-Hihi, Céline; Deckman, Ingrid C; Springer, Barry A; Todd, Matthew J

    2007-04-01

    The reliable production of large amounts of stable, high-quality proteins is a major challenge facing pharmaceutical protein biochemists, necessary for fulfilling demands from structural biology, for high-throughput screening, and for assay purposes throughout early discovery. One strategy for bypassing purification challenges in problematic systems is to engineer multiple forms of a particular protein to optimize expression, purification, and stability, often resulting in a nonphysiological sub-domain. An alternative strategy is to alter process conditions to maximize wild-type construct stability, based on a specific protein stability profile (PSP). ThermoFluor, a miniaturized 384-well thermal stability assay, has been implemented as a means of monitoring solution-dependent changes in protein stability, complementing the protein engineering and purification processes. A systematic analysis of pH, buffer or salt identity and concentration, biological metals, surfactants, and common excipients in terms of an effect on protein stability rapidly identifies conditions that might be used (or avoided) during protein production. Two PSPs are presented for the kinase catalytic domains of Akt-3 and cFMS, in which information derived from a ThermoFluor PSP led to an altered purification strategy, improving the yield and quality of the protein using the primary sequences of the catalytic domains.

  10. Stability of proteins inside a hydrophobic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that enclosing a protein in an athermal cavity stabilizes the protein against reversible unfolding by virtue of eliminating many open chain conformations. Examples of such confined spaces include pores in chromatographic columns, Anfinsen's cage in Chaperonins, interiors of Ribosomes or regions of steric occlusion inside cells. However, the situation is more complex inside a hydrophobic cavity. The protein has a tendency to adsorb on the surface of the hydrophobic cavity, but at the same time it loses conformational entropy because of confinement. We study this system using a simple Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice protein model. Canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at different temperatures and surface hydrophobicity show that proteins are stabilized at low and moderate hydrophobicity upon adsorption. The range of surface hydrophobicity over which a protein is stable increases with a decrease in radius of the cavity.

  11. Stabilizing effect of knots on proteins.

    PubMed

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Sulkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, P; Cieplak, Marek

    2008-12-16

    Molecular dynamics studies within a coarse-grained, structure-based model were used on two similar proteins belonging to the transcarbamylase family to probe the effects of the knot in the native structure of a protein. The first protein, N-acetylornithine transcarbamylase, contains no knot, whereas human ormithine transcarbamylase contains a trefoil knot located deep within the sequence. In addition, we also analyzed a modified transferase with the knot removed by the appropriate change of a knot-making crossing of the protein chain. The studies of thermally and mechanically induced unfolding processes suggest a larger intrinsic stability of the protein with the knot.

  12. Stabilizing effect of knots on proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, P.; Cieplak, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics studies within a coarse-grained, structure-based model were used on two similar proteins belonging to the transcarbamylase family to probe the effects of the knot in the native structure of a protein. The first protein, N-acetylornithine transcarbamylase, contains no knot, whereas human ormithine transcarbamylase contains a trefoil knot located deep within the sequence. In addition, we also analyzed a modified transferase with the knot removed by the appropriate change of a knot-making crossing of the protein chain. The studies of thermally and mechanically induced unfolding processes suggest a larger intrinsic stability of the protein with the knot. PMID:19064918

  13. The role of CYP3A4 mRNA transcript with shortened 3'-untranslated region in hepatocyte differentiation, liver development, and response to drug induction.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Gaedigk, Roger; Hart, Steven N; Leeder, J Steven; Zhong, Xiao-bo

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) metabolizes more than 50% of prescribed drugs. The expression of CYP3A4 changes during liver development and may be affected by the administration of some drugs. Alternative mRNA transcripts occur in more than 90% of human genes and are frequently observed in cells responding to developmental and environmental signals. Different mRNA transcripts may encode functionally distinct proteins or contribute to variability of mRNA stability or protein translation efficiency. The purpose of this study was to examine expression of alternative CYP3A4 mRNA transcripts in hepatocytes in response to developmental signals and drugs. cDNA cloning and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) were used to identify CYP3A4 mRNA transcripts. Three transcripts were found in HepaRG cells and liver tissues: one represented a canonical mRNA with full-length 3'-untranslated region (UTR), one had a shorter 3'-UTR, and one contained partial intron-6 retention. The alternative mRNA transcripts were validated by either rapid amplification of cDNA 3'-end or endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Quantification of the transcripts by RNA-Seq and real time quantitative PCR revealed that the CYP3A4 transcript with shorter 3'-UTR was preferentially expressed in developed livers, differentiated hepatocytes, and in rifampicin- and phenobarbital-induced hepatocytes. The CYP3A4 transcript with shorter 3'-UTR was more stable and produced more protein compared with the CYP3A4 transcript with canonical 3'-UTR. We conclude that the 3'-end processing of CYP3A4 contributes to the quantitative regulation of CYP3A4 gene expression through alternative polyadenylation, which may serve as a regulatory mechanism explaining changes of CYP3A4 expression and activity during hepatocyte differentiation and liver development and in response to drug induction.

  14. Pressure Stabilization of Proteins from Extreme Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Derek J.; Clark, Douglas S.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the stabilization by pressure of enzymes, including a hydrogenase from Methanococcus jannaschii, an extremely thermophilic deep-sea methanogen. This is the first published report of proteins from thermophiles being stabilized by pressure. Inactivation studies of partially purified hydrogenases from an extreme thermophile (Methanococcus igneus), a moderate thermophile (Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus), and a mesophile (Methanococcus maripaludis), all from shallow marine sites, show that pressure stabilization is not unique to enzymes isolated from high-pressure environments. These studies suggest that pressure stabilization of an enzyme may be related to its thermophilicity. Further experiments comparing the effects of increased pressure on the stability of α-glucosidases from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae support this possibility. We have also examined pressure effects on several highly homologous glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases from mesophilic and thermophilic sources and a rubredoxin from P. furiosus. The results suggest that hydrophobic interactions, which have been implicated in the stabilization of many thermophilic proteins, contribute to the pressure stabilization of enzymes from thermophiles. PMID:16349220

  15. Stabilizer-Guided Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Bartel, Maria; Henen, Morkos A; Leysen, Seppe; Adriaans, Joris M C; Brunsveld, Luc; Landrieu, Isabelle; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-12-21

    The discovery of novel protein-protein interaction (PPI) modulators represents one of the great molecular challenges of the modern era. PPIs can be modulated by either inhibitor or stabilizer compounds, which target different though proximal regions of the protein interface. In principle, protein-stabilizer complexes can guide the design of PPI inhibitors (and vice versa). In the present work, we combine X-ray crystallographic data from both stabilizer and inhibitor co-crystal complexes of the adapter protein 14-3-3 to characterize, down to the atomic scale, inhibitors of the 14-3-3/Tau PPI, a potential drug target to treat Alzheimer's disease. The most potent compound notably inhibited the binding of phosphorylated full-length Tau to 14-3-3 according to NMR spectroscopy studies. Our work sets a precedent for the rational design of PPI inhibitors guided by PPI stabilizer-protein complexes while potentially enabling access to new synthetically tractable stabilizers of 14-3-3 and other PPIs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Dipeptide Prodrug Approach to Evade Efflux Pumps and CYP3A4 Metabolism of Lopinavir

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Sheng, Ye; Mandava, Nanda K.; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Oral absorption of lopinavir (LPV) is limited due to P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein2 (MRP2) mediated efflux by intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, LPV is extensively metabolized by CYP3A4 enzymes. In the present study, dipeptide prodrug approach was employed to circumvent efflux pumps (P-gp and MRP2) and CYP3A4 mediated metabolism of LPV. Valine-isoleucine-LPV (Val-Ile-LPV) was synthesized and identified by LCMS and NMR techniques. The extent of LPV and Val-Ile-LPV interactions with P-gp and MRP2 was studied by uptake and transport studies across MDCK-MDR1 and MDCK-MRP2 cells. To determine the metabolic stability, time and concentration dependent degradation study was performed in liver microsomes. Val-Ile-LPV exhibited significantly higher aqueous solubility relative to LPV. This prodrug generated higher stability under acidic pH. Val-Ile-LPV demonstrated significantly lower affinity towards P-gp and MRP2 relative to LPV. Transepithelial transport of Val-Ile-LPV was significantly higher in the absorptive direction (apical to basolateral) relative to LPV. Importantly, Val-Ile-LPV was recognized as an excellent substrate by peptide transporter. Moreover, Val-Ile-LPV displayed significantly higher metabolic stability relative to LPV. Results obtained from this study suggested that dipeptide prodrug approach is a viable option to elevate systemic levels of LPV following oral administration PMID:25261710

  17. Stabilization of protein-protein interactions by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Schäfer, Anja; Ottmann, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are implicated in every disease and mastering the ability to influence PPIs with small molecules would considerably enlarge the druggable genome. Whereas inhibition of PPIs has repeatedly been shown to work successfully, targeted stabilization of PPIs is underrepresented in the literature. This is all the more surprising because natural products like FK506, rapamycin, brefeldin, forskolin and fusicoccin confer their physiological activity by stabilizing specific PPIs. However, recently a number of very interesting synthetic molecules have been reported from drug discovery projects that indeed achieve their desired activities by stabilizing either homo- or hetero-oligomeric complexes of their target proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of confinement on protein folding and protein stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, G.; Yuan, J. M.; Vallieres, M.; Dong, H.; Sun, Z.; Wei, Y.; Li, F. Y.; Lin, S. H.

    2003-05-01

    In a cell, proteins exist in crowded environments; these environments influence their stability and dynamics. Similarly, for an enzyme molecule encapsulated in an inorganic cavity as in biosensors or biocatalysts, confinement and even surface effects play important roles in its stability and dynamics. Using a minimalist model (two-dimensional HP lattice model), we have carried out Monte Carlo simulations to study confinement effects on protein stability. We have calculated heat capacity as a function of temperature using the histogram method and results obtained show that confinement tends to stabilize the folded conformations, consistent with experimental results (some reported here) and previous theoretical analyses. Furthermore, for a protein molecule tethered to a solid surface the stabilization effect can be even greater. We have also investigated the effects of confinement on the kinetics of the refolding and unfolding processes as functions of temperature and box size. As expected, unfolding time increases as box size decreases, however, confinement affects folding times in a more complicated way. Our theoretical results agree with our experimentally observed trends that thermal stability of horseradish peroxidase and acid phosphatase, encapsulated in mesoporous silica, increases as the pore size of the silica matrix decreases.

  19. Enhancing protein stability with extended disulfide bonds

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaozhou; ...

    2016-05-09

    Disulfide bonds play an important role in protein folding and stability. However, the cross-linking of sites within proteins by cysteine disulfides has significant distance and dihedral angle constraints. In this paper, we report the genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids containing long side-chain thiols that are readily incorporated into both bacterial and mammalian proteins in good yields and with excellent fidelity. These amino acids can pair with cysteines to afford extended disulfide bonds and allow cross-linking of more distant sites and distinct domains of proteins. To demonstrate this notion, we preformed growth-based selection experiments at nonpermissive temperatures using a librarymore » of random β-lactamase mutants containing these noncanonical amino acids. A mutant enzyme that is cross-linked by one such extended disulfide bond and is stabilized by ~9 °C was identified. Finally, this result indicates that an expanded set of building blocks beyond the canonical 20 amino acids can lead to proteins with improved properties by unique mechanisms, distinct from those possible through conventional mutagenesis schemes.« less

  20. Protein stabilization by urea and guanidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Abani K

    2002-11-12

    stability of ferrocytochrome c up to the limit of the subdenaturing concentrations of the additives. NaCl and Na(2)SO(4), which stabilize proteins through their salting-in effect, also decrease the rate with a corresponding increase in activation entropy of CO dissociation from CO-bound native ferrocytochrome c, lending support to the view that low concentrations of GdnHCl and urea stabilize proteins. These results have direct relevance to the understanding and interpretation of the free energy-denaturant relationship and protein folding chevrons.

  1. 22 CFR 3a.4 - Procedure for requesting approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedure for requesting approval. 3a.4 Section 3a.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL ACCEPTANCE OF EMPLOYMENT FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS BY MEMBERS OF THE UNIFORMED SERVICES § 3a.4 Procedure for requesting approval. (a) An applicant must...

  2. Stability analysis of an autocatalytic protein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julian

    2016-05-01

    A self-regulatory genetic circuit, where a protein acts as a positive regulator of its own production, is known to be the simplest biological network with a positive feedback loop. Although at least three components—DNA, RNA, and the protein—are required to form such a circuit, stability analysis of the fixed points of this self-regulatory circuit has been performed only after reducing the system to a two-component system, either by assuming a fast equilibration of the DNA component or by removing the RNA component. Here, stability of the fixed points of the three-component positive feedback loop is analyzed by obtaining eigenvalues of the full three-dimensional Hessian matrix. In addition to rigorously identifying the stable fixed points and saddle points, detailed information about the system can be obtained, such as the existence of complex eigenvalues near a fixed point.

  3. Evolutionary Capacitance and Control of Protein Stability in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Purushottam D.; Maslov, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    In addition to their biological function, protein complexes reduce the exposure of the constituent proteins to the risk of undesired oligomerization by reducing the concentration of the free monomeric state. We interpret this reduced risk as a stabilization of the functional state of the protein. We estimate that protein-protein interactions can account for of additional stabilization; a substantial contribution to intrinsic stability. We hypothesize that proteins in the interaction network act as evolutionary capacitors which allows their binding partners to explore regions of the sequence space which correspond to less stable proteins. In the interaction network of baker's yeast, we find that statistically proteins that receive higher energetic benefits from the interaction network are more likely to misfold. A simplified fitness landscape wherein the fitness of an organism is inversely proportional to the total concentration of unfolded proteins provides an evolutionary justification for the proposed trends. We conclude by outlining clear biophysical experiments to test our predictions. PMID:23592969

  4. Clinical outcomes and management of mechanism-based inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shufeng; Chan, Eli; Li, Xiaotian; Huang, Min

    2005-01-01

    Mechanism-based inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 is characterized by NADPH-, time-, and concentration-dependent enzyme inactivation, occurring when some drugs are converted by CYPs to reactive metabolites. Such inhibition of CYP3A4 can be due to the chemical modification of the heme, the protein, or both as a result of covalent binding of modified heme to the protein. The inactivation of CYP3A4 by drugs has important clinical significance as it metabolizes approximately 60% of therapeutic drugs, and its inhibition frequently causes unfavorable drug–drug interactions and toxicity. The clinical outcomes due to CYP3A4 inactivation depend on many factors associated with the enzyme, drugs, and patients. Clinical professionals should adopt proper approaches when using drugs that are mechanism-based CYP3A4 inhibitors. These include early identification of drugs behaving as CYP3A4 inactivators, rational use of such drugs (eg, safe drug combination regimen, dose adjustment, or discontinuation of therapy when toxic drug interactions occur), therapeutic drug monitoring, and predicting the risks for potential drug–drug interactions. A good understanding of CYP3A4 inactivation and proper clinical management are needed by clinical professionals when these drugs are used. PMID:18360537

  5. High frequency and founder effect of the CYP3A4*20 loss-of-function allele in the Spanish population classifies CYP3A4 as a polymorphic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Apellániz-Ruiz, M; Inglada-Pérez, L; Naranjo, M E G; Sánchez, L; Mancikova, V; Currás-Freixes, M; de Cubas, A A; Comino-Méndez, I; Triki, S; Rebai, A; Rasool, M; Moya, G; Grazina, M; Opocher, G; Cascón, A; Taboada-Echalar, P; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Carracedo, A; Robledo, M; Llerena, A; Rodríguez-Antona, C

    2015-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is a key drug-metabolizing enzyme. Loss-of-function variants have been reported as rare events, and the first demonstration of a CYP3A4 protein lacking functional activity is caused by CYP3A4*20 allele. Here we characterized the world distribution and origin of CYP3A4*20 mutation. CYP3A4*20 was determined in more than 4000 individuals representing different populations, and haplotype analysis was performed using CYP3A polymorphisms and microsatellite markers. CYP3A4*20 allele was present in 1.2% of the Spanish population (up to 3.8% in specific regions), and all CYP3A4*20 carriers had a common haplotype. This is compatible with a Spanish founder effect and classifies CYP3A4 as a polymorphic enzyme. This constitutes the first description of a CYP3A4 loss-of-function variant with high frequency in a population. CYP3A4*20 results together with the key role of CYP3A4 in drug metabolism support screening for rare CYP3A4 functional alleles among subjects with adverse drug events in certain populations.

  6. Ankyrin protein networks in membrane formation and stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Shane R; Mohler, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, ankyrins serve as adaptor proteins that link membrane proteins to the underlying cytoskeleton. These adaptor proteins form protein complexes consisting of integral membrane proteins, signalling molecules and cytoskeletal components. With their modular architecture and ability to interact with many proteins, ankyrins organize and stabilize these protein networks, thereby establishing the infrastructure of membrane domains with specialized functions. To this end, ankyrin collaborates with a number of proteins including cytoskeletal proteins, cell adhesion molecules and large structural proteins. This review addresses the targeting and stabilization of protein networks related to ankyrin interactions with the cytoskeletal protein β-spectrin, L1-cell adhesion molecules and the large myofibrillar protein obscurin. The significance of these interactions for differential targeting of cardiac proteins and neuronal membrane formation is also presented. Finally, this review concludes with a discussion about ankyrin dysfunction in human diseases such as haemolytic anaemia, cardiac arrhythmia and neurological disorders. PMID:19840192

  7. Forster Distances of Ligand-Heme Pairs in Cytochrome P450 3A4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fern, Joel; Guengerich, F. Peter; Marsch, Glenn A.

    2003-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 is a protein in the human intestine and liver which oxidizes over half of drugs in use today. Cytochrome P450 3A4 has proven resistant to structure determination by NMR or x-ray crystallography. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) studies of P450 3A4 can be used to compute distances between fluorophores in the protein, providing information on the structure of the protein. For a ligand to be suitably used as a probe its fluorescence must not be completely quenched by the heme cofactor in P450 3A4. By using quantum yields, fluorescence, and the absorption spectra of six P450 ligands, the following Forster distances between each ligand and the P450 heme moiety were obtained: pyrene 4.6 nm, aflatoxin B2 5.7 nm, alpha-naphthoflavone 3.7 nm, indinavir 2.6 nm, quinidine 3.5 nm, and terfenadine 2.8 nm. Having these distances should yield a better low-resolution cytochrome P450 3A4 structure. Using the Forster distances, FRET experiments on inter-ligand placement in P450 3A4 will be undertaken soon.

  8. Potentiation of Methoxymorpholinyl Doxorubicin Anti-Tumor Activity by P450 3A4 Gene Transfer#

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Chen, Chong-Sheng; Waxman, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Preclinical and clinical studies of CYP gene-directed enzyme-prodrug therapy have focused on anticancer prodrugs activated by CYP2B enzymes, which have low endogenous expression in human liver; however, the gene therapeutic potential of CYP3A enzymes, which are highly expressed in human liver, remains unknown. This study investigated methoxymorpholinyl-doxorubicin (MMDX), a novel CYP3A-activated anticancer prodrug. Retroviral transfer of CYP3A4 increased 9L gliosarcoma cell chemosensitivity to MMDX 120-fold (IC50=0.2nM). In CHO cells, overexpression of P450 reductase in combination with CYP3A4 enhanced chemosensitivity to MMDX, and to ifosfamide, another CYP3A4 prodrug, 11–23-fold compared to CYP3A4 expression alone. CYP3A4 expression and MMDX chemosensitivity were increased in human lung (A549) and brain (U251) tumor cells infected with replication-defective adenovirus encoding CYP3A4. Co-infection with Onyx-017, a replication-conditional adenovirus that co-amplifies and co-replicates the Adeno-3A4 virus, led to large increases in CYP3A4 RNA but only modest increases in CYP3A4 protein and activity. MMDX induced remarkable growth delay of 9L/3A4 tumors, but not 9L tumors, in immunodeficient mice administered low-dose MMDX either i.v. or by direct intratumoral injection (60µg/kg, every 7-days ×3), with the intratumoral route being substantially less toxic to the mouse host. No antitumor activity was observed with i.p. MMDX treatment, suggesting a substantial hepatic first pass effect, and with activated MMDX metabolites formed in the liver having poor access to the tumor site. These studies demonstrate that human CYP3A4 has strong potential for MMDX prodrug activation therapy, and suggest that endogenous tumor cell expression of CYP3A4, and not hepatic CYP3A4 activity, is a key determinant of responsiveness to MMDX therapy in cancer patients in vivo. PMID:19011599

  9. Development of a highly sensitive cytotoxicity assay system for CYP3A4-mediated metabolic activation.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Hiroko; Fukami, Tatsuki; Iwamura, Atsushi; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2011-08-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity, which is a rare but serious adverse reaction to a large number of pharmaceutical drugs, is sometimes associated with reactive metabolites produced by drug-metabolizing enzymes. In the present study, we constructed a cell-based system to evaluate the cytotoxicity of reactive metabolites produced by CYP3A4 using human hepatoma cells infected with an adenovirus vector expressing human CYP3A4 (AdCYP3A4). When seven hepatoma cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, HLE, HLF, Huh6, Huh7, and Fa2N4 cells) were infected with AdCYP3A4, HepG2 cells showed the highest CYP3A4 protein expression and testosterone 6β-hydroxylase activity (670 pmol · min(-1) · mg(-1)). With the use of AdCYP3A4-infected HepG2 cells, the cytotoxicities of 23 drugs were evaluated by the 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium monosodium salt assay, and the cell viability when treated with 11 drugs (amiodarone, desipramine, felbamate, isoniazid, labetalol, leflunomide, nefazodone, nitrofurantoin, tacrine, terbinafine, and tolcapone) was significantly decreased. Moreover, the transfection of siRNA for nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to decrease the cellular expression level of Nrf2 exacerbated the cytotoxicity of some drugs (troglitazone, flutamide, acetaminophen, clozapine, terbinafine, and desipramine), suggesting that the genes regulated by Nrf2 are associated with the detoxification of the cytotoxicities mediated by CYP3A4. We constructed a highly sensitive cell-based system to detect the drug-induced cytotoxicity mediated by CYP3A4. This system would be beneficial in preclinical screening in drug development and increase our understanding of the drug-induced cytotoxicity associated with CYP3A4.

  10. SPLINTS: small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Eric S; Park, Eunyoung; Eck, Michael J; Thomä, Nicolas H

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory protein-protein interactions are ubiquitous in biology, and small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors are an important focus in drug discovery. Remarkably little attention has been given to the opposite strategy-stabilization of protein-protein interactions, despite the fact that several well-known therapeutics act through this mechanism. From a structural perspective, we consider representative examples of small molecules that induce or stabilize the association of protein domains to inhibit, or alter, signaling for nuclear hormone, GTPase, kinase, phosphatase, and ubiquitin ligase pathways. These SPLINTS (small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers) drive interactions that are in some cases physiologically relevant, and in others entirely adventitious. The diverse structural mechanisms employed suggest approaches for a broader and systematic search for such compounds in drug discovery.

  11. Interactions between CYP3A4 and Dietary Polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Kerem, Zohar

    2015-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) catalyze oxidative reactions of a broad spectrum of substrates and play a critical role in the metabolism of xenobiotics, such as drugs and dietary compounds. CYP3A4 is known to be the main enzyme involved in the metabolism of drugs and most other xenobiotics. Dietary compounds, of which polyphenolics are the most studied, have been shown to interact with CYP3A4 and alter its expression and activity. Traditionally, the liver was considered the prime site of CYP3A-mediated first-pass metabolic extraction, but in vitro and in vivo studies now suggest that the small intestine can be of equal or even greater importance for the metabolism of polyphenolics and drugs. Recent studies have pointed to the role of gut microbiota in the metabolic fate of polyphenolics in human, suggesting their involvement in the complex interactions between dietary polyphenols and CYP3A4. Last but not least, all the above suggests that coadministration of drugs and foods that are rich in polyphenols is expected to stimulate undesirable clinical consequences. This review focuses on interactions between dietary polyphenols and CYP3A4 as they relate to structural considerations, food-drug interactions, and potential negative consequences of interactions between CYP3A4 and polyphenols. PMID:26180597

  12. Protein thermal stabilization in aqueous solutions of osmolytes.

    PubMed

    Bruździak, Piotr; Panuszko, Aneta; Jourdan, Muriel; Stangret, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Proteins' thermal stabilization is a significant problem in various biomedical, biotechnological, and technological applications. We investigated thermal stability of hen egg white lysozyme in aqueous solutions of the following stabilizing osmolytes: Glycine (GLY), N-methylglycine (NMG), N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG), N,N,N-trimethylglycine (TMG), and trimethyl-N-oxide (TMAO). Results of CD-UV spectroscopic investigation were compared with FTIR hydration studies' results. Selected osmolytes increased lysozyme's thermal stability in the following order: Gly>NMG>TMAO≈DMG>TMG. Theoretical calculations (DFT) showed clearly that osmolytes' amino group protons and water molecules interacting with them played a distinctive role in protein thermal stabilization. The results brought us a step closer to the exact mechanism of protein stabilization by osmolytes.

  13. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  14. MicroRNAs regulate CYP3A4 expression via direct and indirect targeting.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu-Zhuo; Gao, Wenqing; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2009-10-01

    CYP3A4 metabolizes many drugs on the market. Although transcriptional regulation of CYP3A4 is known to be tightly controlled by some nuclear receptors (NR) including vitamin D receptor (VDR/NR1I1), posttranscriptional regulation of CYP3A4 remains elusive. In this study, we show that noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) may control posttranscriptional and transcriptional regulation of CYP3A4 by directly targeting the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of CYP3A4 and indirectly targeting the 3'UTR of VDR, respectively. Luciferase reporter assays showed that CYP3A4 3'UTR-luciferase activity was significantly decreased in human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with plasmid that expressed microRNA-27b (miR-27b) or mouse microRNA-298 (mmu-miR-298), whereas the activity was unchanged in cells transfected with plasmid that expressed microRNA-122a or microRNA-328. Disruption of the corresponding miRNA response element (MRE) within CYP3A4 3'UTR led to a 2- to 3-fold increase in luciferase activity. Immunoblot analyses indicated that CYP3A4 protein was down-regulated over 30% by miR-27b and mmu-miR-298 in LS-180 and PANC1 cells. The decrease in CYP3A4 protein expression was associated with significantly decreased CYP3A4 mRNA levels, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analyses. Likewise, interactions of miR-27b or mmu-miR-298 with VDR 3'UTR were supported by luciferase reporter assays. The mmu-miR-298 MRE site is well conserved within the 3'UTR of mouse, rat, and human VDR. Down-regulation of VDR by the two miRNAs was supported by immunoblot and qPCR analyses. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-27b or mmu-miR-298 in PANC1 cells led to a lower sensitivity to cyclophosphamide. Together, these findings suggest that CYP3A4 gene expression may be regulated by miRNAs at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional level.

  15. Designing Whey Protein-Polysaccharide Particles for Colloidal Stability.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh; Foegeding, E Allen

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between whey proteins and polysaccharides, in particular the formation of food-grade soluble complexes, are of interest because of potential functional and health benefits. A specific application that has not received much attention is the use of complexes for enhanced colloidal stability of protein sols, such as protein-containing beverages. In beverages, the primary goal is the formation of complexes that remain dispersed after thermal processing and extended storage. This review highlights recent progress in the area of forming whey protein-polysaccharide soluble complexes that would be appropriate for beverage applications. Research in this area indicates that soluble complexes can be formed and stabilized that are reasonably small in size and possess a large surface charge that would predict colloidal stability. Selection of specific proteins and polysaccharides can be tailored to desired conditions. The principal challenges involve overcoming restrictions on protein concentration and ensuring that protein remains bioavailable.

  16. INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY BY IMPROVING BETA-TURNS

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald R.; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of how protein stability can be increased by improving β-turns. We studied 22 β-turns in nine proteins with 66 to 370 residues by replacing other residues with proline and glycine and measuring the stability. These two residues are statistically preferred in some β-turn positions. We studied: Cold shock protein B (CspB), Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), Ubiquitin, Ribonucleases Sa2, Sa3, T1, and HI, Tryptophan synthetase α-subunit (TSα), and Maltose binding protein (MBP). Of the fifteen single proline mutations, 11increased stability (Average = 0.8 ± 0.3; Range = 0.3 – 1.5 kcal/mol), and the stabilizing effect of double proline mutants was additive. Based on this and our previous work, we conclude that proteins can generally be stabilized by replacing non-proline residues with proline residues at the i + 1 position of Type I and II β-turns and at the i position in Type II β-turns. Other turn positions can sometimes be used if the φ angle is near −60° for the residue replaced. It is important that the side chain of the residue replaced is less than 50% buried. Identical substitutions in β-turns in related proteins give similar results. Proline substitutions increase stability mainly by decreasing the entropy of the denatured state. In contrast, the large, diverse group of proteins considered here had almost no residues in β-turns that could be replaced by Gly to increase protein stability. Improving β-turns by substituting Pro residues is a generally useful way of increasing protein stability. PMID:19626709

  17. Automated extraction of information from the literature on chemical-CYP3A4 interactions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunlai; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2007-01-01

    A text mining system is presented for automatically extracting information from the literature on chemical-CYP3A4 interactions (i.e., substrate, induction, inhibition). The system identifies chemicals and CYP3A4 forms according to a combination of name dictionaries and context features. In addition, it transforms sentences into multiple simple clauses each containing a single event and extracts information on chemical-CYP3A4 interactions using a simple but effective pattern matching method based on the order of three keywords (chemicals, CYP3A4, key verbs). Using this system, 2990 relations including 2700 identified interactions with CYP3A4 for 600 chemicals were extracted from a corpus of 2900 PubMed abstracts. In an evaluation test using 100 randomly selected abstracts, it achieved 87.4% recall and 92.3% precision for identification of the chemical name and 85.2% recall and 92.0% precision for the extraction of chemical-CYP3A4 interactions, respectively. This system will be applicable to interactions of chemicals with any functional proteins, such as enzymes and transporters, simply by changing the list of key verbs.

  18. Stability of domain structures in multi-domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M.; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2011-01-01

    Multi-domain proteins have many advantages with respect to stability and folding inside cells. Here we attempt to understand the intricate relationship between the domain-domain interactions and the stability of domains in isolation. We provide quantitative treatment and proof for prevailing intuitive ideas on the strategies employed by nature to stabilize otherwise unstable domains. We find that domains incapable of independent stability are stabilized by favourable interactions with tethered domains in the multi-domain context. Stability of such folds to exist independently is optimized by evolution. Specific residue mutations in the sites equivalent to inter-domain interface enhance the overall solvation, thereby stabilizing these domain folds independently. A few naturally occurring variants at these sites alter communication between domains and affect stability leading to disease manifestation. Our analysis provides safe guidelines for mutagenesis which have attractive applications in obtaining stable fragments and domain constructs essential for structural studies by crystallography and NMR. PMID:22355559

  19. SS-Stabilizing Proteins Rationally: Intrinsic Disorder-Based Design of Stabilizing Disulphide Bridges in GFP.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bogdan S; Povarnitsyna, Tatiana V; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Melnik, Tatyana N; Uversky, Vladimir N; Sarma, Ramaswamy H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The most attractive and methodologically convenient way to enhance protein stability is via the introduction of disulphide bond(s). However, the effect of the artificially introduced SS-bond on protein stability is often quite unpredictable. This raises the question of how to choose the protein sites in an intelligent manner, so that the 'fastening' of these sites by the SS-bond(s) would provide maximal protein stability. We hypothesize that the successful design of a stabilizing SS-bond requires finding highly mobile protein regions. Using GFP as an illustrative example, we demonstrate that the knowledge of the peculiarities of the intramolecular hydrophobic interactions, combined with the understanding of the local intrinsic disorder propensities (that can be evaluated by various disorder predictors, e.g., PONDRFIT), is sufficient to find the candidate sites for the introduction of stabilizing SS-bridge(s). In fact, our analysis revealed that the insertion of the engineered SS-bridge between two highly flexible regions of GFP noticeably increased the conformational stability of this protein toward the thermal and chemical unfolding. Therefore, our study represents a novel approach for the rational design of stabilizing disulphide bridges in proteins.

  20. Dispersion interactions govern the strong thermal stability of a protein.

    PubMed

    Vondrásek, Jirí; Kubar, Tomás; Jenney, Francis E; Adams, Michael W W; Kozísek, Milan; Cerný, Jirí; Sklenár, Vladimír; Hobza, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Rubredoxin from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf Rd) is an extremely thermostable protein, which makes it an attractive subject of protein folding and stability studies. A fundamental question arises as to what the reason for such extreme stability is and how it can be elucidated from a complex set of interatomic interactions. We addressed this issue first theoretically through a computational analysis of the hydrophobic core of the protein and its mutants, including the interactions taking place inside the core. Here we show that a single mutation of one of phenylalanine's residues inside the protein's hydrophobic core results in a dramatic decrease in its thermal stability. The calculated unfolding Gibbs energy as well as the stabilization energy differences between a few core residues follows the same trend as the melting temperature of protein variants determined experimentally by microcalorimetry measurements. NMR spectroscopy experiments have shown that the only part of the protein affected by mutation is the reasonably rearranged hydrophobic core. It is hence concluded that stabilization energies, which are dominated by London dispersion, represent the main source of stability of this protein.

  1. Mutation analysis of barley malt protein Z4 and protein Z7 on beer foam stability.

    PubMed

    Iimure, Takashi; Kimura, Tatsuji; Araki, Shigeki; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Masahide; Yamada, Shinji; Shigyou, Tatsuro; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2012-02-15

    Beer foam stability is an important characteristic. It has been suggested that isoforms of protein Z, that is, protein Z4 and protein Z7, contribute to beer foam stability. We investigated the relationship between beer foam stability and protein Z4 and protein Z7 using their deficient mutants. As a protein Z4-deficient mutant, cv. Pirkka was used. Protein Z7 deficiency was screened in 1564 barley accessions in the world collection of Okayama University, Japan. The barley samples from normal, protein Z4-deficient, protein Z7-deficient, and double-deficient were genotyped in F(2) populations and then pooled based on the DNA marker genotypes of protein Z4 and protein Z7. For a brewing trial, F(5) pooled subpopulations were used. After malting and brewing, the foam stability was determined, and the results showed that the levels of foam stability in the four samples were comparable. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the proteome in these beer samples. The results showed that low molecular weight proteins, including lipid transfer protein (LTP2), in the deficient mutants were higher than those in the normal sample. Our results suggest that the contribution of protein Z4 and protein Z7 to beer foam stability was not greater than that of other beer proteins.

  2. Protein stability: computation, sequence statistics, and new experimental methods

    PubMed Central

    Magliery, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Calculating protein stability and predicting stabilizing mutations remain exceedingly difficult tasks, largely due to the inadequacy of potential functions, the difficulty of modeling entropy and the unfolded state, and challenges of sampling, particularly of backbone conformations. Yet, computational design has produced some remarkably stable proteins in recent years, apparently owing to near ideality in structure and sequence features. With caveats, computational prediction of stability can be used to guide mutation, and mutations derived from consensus sequence analysis, especially improved by recent co-variation filters, are very likely to stabilize without sacrificing function. The combination of computational and statistical approaches with library approaches, including new technologies such as deep sequencing and high throughput stability measurements, point to a very exciting near term future for stability engineering, even with difficult computational issues remaining. PMID:26497286

  3. Post-production protein stability: trouble beyond the cell factory

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Being protein function a conformation-dependent issue, avoiding aggregation during production is a major challenge in biotechnological processes, what is often successfully addressed by convenient upstream, midstream or downstream approaches. Even when obtained in soluble forms, proteins tend to aggregate, especially if stored and manipulated at high concentrations, as is the case of protein drugs for human therapy. Post-production protein aggregation is then a major concern in the pharmaceutical industry, as protein stability, pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, immunogenicity and side effects are largely dependent on the extent of aggregates formation. Apart from acting at the formulation level, the recombinant nature of protein drugs allows intervening at upstream stages through protein engineering, to produce analogue protein versions with higher stability and enhanced therapeutic values. PMID:21806813

  4. Mechanism of Stabilization of Labile Compounds by Silk Fibroin Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-05

    to stability of labile molecules. In addition , we plan to complete efforts initiated to refine our understanding of electrogelation mechanisms of...paper approaches. Additional processing can remediate interactions with conformational structures of the silk protein to further enhance blood... additional benefits such as preventing exposure to enzymatic and UV stresses. Long-term temperature stability of dried silk formats such as films or

  5. Stabilization of supercooled fluids by thermal hysteresis proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P W; Leader, J P

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported that thermal hysteresis proteins found in many cold-hardy, freeze-avoiding arthropods stabilize their supercooled body fluids. We give evidence that fish antifreeze proteins, which also produce thermal hysteresis, bind to and reduce the efficiency of heterogenous nucleation sites, rather than binding to embryonic ice nuclei. We discuss both possible mechanisms for stabilization of supercooled body fluids and also describe a new method for measuring and defining the supercooling point of small volumes of liquid. PMID:7612853

  6. Regulation of TET Protein Stability by Calpains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methylation at the fifth position of cytosine (5mC) is an important epigenetic modification that affects chromatin structure and gene expression. Recent studies have established a critical function of the Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) family of proteins in regulating DNA methylation dynamics. Three Tet genes have been identified in mammals, and they all encode for proteins capable of oxidizing 5mC as part of the DNA demethylation process. While regulation of Tet expression at the transcriptional level is well documented, how TET proteins are regulated at post-translational level is poorly understood. In this study, we report that all three TET proteins are direct substrates of calpains, a family of calcium-dependent proteases. Specifically, calpain1 mediates TET1 and TET2 turnover in mouse ES cells, and calpain2 regulates TET3 level during differentiation. This study provides the first evidence that TET proteins are subject to calpain-mediated degradation. PMID:24412366

  7. Applications of Protein Thermodynamic Database for Understanding Protein Mutant Stability and Designing Stable Mutants.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Anoosha, P; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is the free energy difference between unfolded and folded states of a protein, which lies in the range of 5-25 kcal/mol. Experimentally, protein stability is measured with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy using thermal and denaturant denaturation methods. These experimental data have been accumulated in the form of a database, ProTherm, thermodynamic database for proteins and mutants. It also contains sequence and structure information of a protein, experimental methods and conditions, and literature information. Different features such as search, display, and sorting options and visualization tools have been incorporated in the database. ProTherm is a valuable resource for understanding/predicting the stability of proteins and it can be accessed at http://www.abren.net/protherm/ . ProTherm has been effectively used to examine the relationship among thermodynamics, structure, and function of proteins. We describe the recent progress on the development of methods for understanding/predicting protein stability, such as (1) general trends on mutational effects on stability, (2) relationship between the stability of protein mutants and amino acid properties, (3) applications of protein three-dimensional structures for predicting their stability upon point mutations, (4) prediction of protein stability upon single mutations from amino acid sequence, and (5) prediction methods for addressing double mutants. A list of online resources for predicting has also been provided.

  8. Effects of Glycosylation on the Stability of Protein Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    SOLÁ, RICARDO J.; GRIEBENOW, KAI

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, protein-based therapeutics have substantially expanded the field of molecular pharmacology due to their outstanding potential for the treatment of disease. Unfortunately, protein pharmaceuticals display a series of intrinsic physical and chemical instability problems during their production, purification, storage, and delivery that can adversely impact their final therapeutic efficacies. This has prompted an intense search for generalized strategies to engineer the long-term stability of proteins during their pharmaceutical employment. Due to the well known effect that glycans have in increasing the overall stability of glycoproteins, rational manipulation of the glycosylation parameters through glycoengineering could become a promising approach to improve both the in vitro and in vivo stability of protein pharmaceuticals. The intent of this review is therefore to further the field of protein glycoengineering by increasing the general understanding of the mechanisms by which glycosylation improves the molecular stability of protein pharmaceuticals. This is achieved by presenting a survey of the different instabilities displayed by protein pharmaceuticals, by addressing which of these instabilities can be improved by glycosylation, and by discussing the possible mechanisms by which glycans induce these stabilization effects. PMID:18661536

  9. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  10. A fundamental protein property, thermodynamic stability, revealed solely from large-scale measurements of protein function

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Carlos L.; Fowler, Douglas M.; Chen, Wentao; Muniez, Ike; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Fields, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    The ability of a protein to carry out a given function results from fundamental physicochemical properties that include the protein’s structure, mechanism of action, and thermodynamic stability. Traditional approaches to study these properties have typically required the direct measurement of the property of interest, oftentimes a laborious undertaking. Although protein properties can be probed by mutagenesis, this approach has been limited by its low throughput. Recent technological developments have enabled the rapid quantification of a protein’s function, such as binding to a ligand, for numerous variants of that protein. Here, we measure the ability of 47,000 variants of a WW domain to bind to a peptide ligand and use these functional measurements to identify stabilizing mutations without directly assaying stability. Our approach is rooted in the well-established concept that protein function is closely related to stability. Protein function is generally reduced by destabilizing mutations, but this decrease can be rescued by stabilizing mutations. Based on this observation, we introduce partner potentiation, a metric that uses this rescue ability to identify stabilizing mutations, and identify 15 candidate stabilizing mutations in the WW domain. We tested six candidates by thermal denaturation and found two highly stabilizing mutations, one more stabilizing than any previously known mutation. Thus, physicochemical properties such as stability are latent within these large-scale protein functional data and can be revealed by systematic analysis. This approach should allow other protein properties to be discovered. PMID:23035249

  11. Role of cardiolipin in stability of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Musatov, Andrej; Sedlák, Erik

    2017-08-23

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a unique phospholipid with a dimeric structure having four acyl chains and two phosphate groups found almost exclusively in certain membranes of bacteria and of mitochondria of eukaryotes. CL interacts with numerous proteins and has been implicated in function and stabilization of several integral membrane proteins (IMPs). While both functional and stabilization roles of CL in IMPs has been generally acknowledged, there are, in fact, only limited number of quantitative analysis that support this function of CL. This is likely caused by relatively complex determination of parameters characterizing stability of IMPs and particularly intricate assessment of role of specific PLs such as CL in IMPs stability. This review aims to summarize quantitative findings regarding stabilization role of CL in IMPs reported up to now. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Societe Francaise de Biochimie et Biologie Moleculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. Energetics-Based Methods for Protein Folding and Stability Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, M. Ariel; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-06-01

    Over the past 15 years, a series of energetics-based techniques have been developed for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding and stability. These techniques include Stability of Unpurified Proteins from Rates of amide H/D Exchange (SUPREX), pulse proteolysis, Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX), slow histidine H/D exchange, lysine amidination, and quantitative cysteine reactivity (QCR). The above techniques, which are the subject of this review, all utilize chemical or enzymatic modification reactions to probe the chemical denaturant- or temperature-induced equilibrium unfolding properties of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. They employ various mass spectrometry-, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE)-, and optical spectroscopy-based readouts that are particularly advantageous for high-throughput and in some cases multiplexed analyses. This has created the opportunity to use protein folding and stability measurements in new applications such as in high-throughput screening projects to identify novel protein ligands and in mode-of-action studies to identify protein targets of a particular ligand.

  13. Heat stability of reconstituted, protein-standardized skim milk powders.

    PubMed

    Sikand, V; Tong, P S; Walker, J

    2010-12-01

    We determined the effects of standardization material, protein content, and pH on the heat stability of reconstituted milk made from low-heat (LH) and medium-heat (MH) nonfat dry milk (NDM). Low-heat and MH NDM were standardized downward from 35.5% to 34, 32, and 30% protein by adding either edible lactose powder (ELP) or permeate powder (PP) from skim milk ultrafiltration. These powders were called standardized skim milk powders (SSMP). The LH and MH NDM and SSMP were reconstituted to 9% total solids. Furthermore, subsamples of reconstituted NDM and SSMP samples were set aside to measure heat stability at native (unadjusted) pH, and the rest were adjusted to pH 6.3 to 7.0. Heat stability is defined as heat coagulation time at 140°C of the reconstituted LH or MH NDM and SSMP samples. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times at unadjusted pH values and 2 times at adjusted pH values. At an unadjusted pH, powder type, standardization material, and protein content influenced the heat stability of the samples. Heat stability for reconstituted LH NDM and SSMP was higher than reconstituted MH NDM and SSMP. Generally, decreased heat stability was observed in reconstituted LH or MH SSMP as protein content was decreased by standardization. However, adding ELP to MH SSMP did not significantly change its heat stability. When pH was adjusted to values between 6.3 and 7.0, powder type, standardization material, and pH had a significant effect on heat stability, whereas protein content did not. Maximum heat stability was noted at pH 6.7 for both reconstituted LH NDM and SSMP samples, and at pH 6.6 for both reconstituted MH NDM and SSMP samples. Furthermore, for samples with adjusted pH, higher heat stability was observed for reconstituted LH SSMP containing PP compared with reconstituted milk from LH SSMP containing ELP. However, no statistical difference was observed in the heat stability of reconstituted milk from MH NDM and MH SSMP samples. We conclude that powder type

  14. Electrostatic Stabilization Of Growing Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed technique produces large crystals in compact, economical apparatus. Report presents concept for supporting protein crystals during growth in microgravity. Yields crystals larger and more-nearly perfect than those grown on Earth. Combines best features of sandwich-drop and electrostatic-levitation methods of support. Drop of protein solution inserted between pair of glass or plastic plates, as in sandwich-drop-support method. Electrostatically charged ring confines drop laterally and shapes it, as in electrostatic technique. Apparatus also made to accommodate several drops simultaneously between same pair of supporting plates. Drops can be inserted and crystals removed through ducts in plates.

  15. Stabilized helical peptides: a strategy to target protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Mark A

    2014-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for cell proliferation, differentiation, and function. Peptides hold great promise for clinical applications focused on targeting protein-protein interactions. Advantages of peptides include a large chemical space and potential diversity of sequences and structures. However, peptides do present well-known challenges for drug development. Progress has been made in the development of stabilizing alpha helices for potential therapeutic applications. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of helical peptide stabilization are discussed.

  16. SPR and electrochemical analyses of interactions between CYP3A4 or 3A5 and cytochrome b5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedenko, O. V.; Yablokov, E. O.; Usanov, S. A.; Mukha, D. V.; Sergeev, G. V.; Bulko, T. V.; Kuzikov, A. V.; Moskaleva, N. E.; Shumyantseva, V. V.; Ivanov, A. S.; Archakov, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    The combination of SPR biosensor with electrochemical analysis was used for the study of protein-protein interaction between cytochromes CYP3A4 or 3А5 and cytochromes b5: the microsomal, mitochondrial forms of this protein, and 2 ≪chimeric≫ proteins. Kinetic constants of CYP3A4 and CYP3А5 complex formation with cytochromes b5 were determined by the SPR biosensor. Essential distinction between CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 was observed upon their interactions with mitochondrial cytochrome b5. The electrochemical analysis of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and cytochromes b5 immobilized on screen printed graphite electrodes modified with membranous matrix revealed that these proteins have very close reduction potentials -0.435 to -0.350 V (vs. Ag/AgCl).

  17. Ligand binding and thermodynamic stability of a multidomain protein, calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Masino, L.; Martin, S. R.; Bayley, P. M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation of calmodulin has been monitored spectroscopically to determine the stability for the intact protein and its two isolated domains as a function of binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+. The reversible urea unfolding of either isolated apo-domain follows a two-state mechanism with relatively low deltaG(o)20 values of approximately 2.7 (N-domain) and approximately 1.9 kcal/mol (C-domain). The apo-C-domain is significantly unfolded at normal temperatures (20-25 degrees C). The greater affinity of the C-domain for Ca2+ causes it to be more stable than the N-domain at [Ca2+] > or = 0.3 mM. By contrast, Mg2+ causes a greater stabilization of the N- rather than the C-domain, consistent with measured Mg2+ affinities. For the intact protein (+/-Ca2+), the bimodal denaturation profiles can be analyzed to give two deltaG(o)20 values, which differ significantly from those of the isolated domains, with one domain being less stable and one domain more stable. The observed stability of the domains is strongly dependent on solution conditions such as ionic strength, as well as specific effects due to metal ion binding. In the intact protein, different folding intermediates are observed, depending on the ionic composition. The results illustrate that a protein of low intrinsic stability is liable to major perturbation of its unfolding properties by environmental conditions and liganding processes and, by extension, mutation. Hence, the observed stability of an isolated domain may differ significantly from the stability of the same structure in a multidomain protein. These results address questions involved in manipulating the stability of a protein or its domains by site directed mutagenesis and protein engineering. PMID:10975573

  18. Local hydrophobicity stabilizes secondary structures in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehisa, M.I.; Tsong, T.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The probability of occurrence of helix and ..beta..-sheet residues in 47 globular proteins was determined as a function of local hydrophobicity, which was defined by the sum of the Nozaki-Tanford transfer free energies at two nearest-neighbors on both sides of the amino acid sequence. In general, hydrophilic amino acids favor neither helix nor ..beta..-sheet formations when neighbor residues are also hydrophilic but favor helix formation at higher local hydrophobicity. On the other hand, some hydrophobic amino acids such as Met, Leu, and Ile favor helix formation when neighbor residues are hydrophilic. None of the hydrophobic amino acids favor ..beta..-sheet formation with hydrophilic neighbors, but most of them strongly favor ..beta..-sheet formation at high local hydrophobicity. When the average of 20 amino acids is taken, both helix and ..beta..-sheet residue probabilities are higher at higher local hydrophobicity, although the increase is steeper for ..beta..-sheets. Therefore, ..beta..-sheet formation is more influenced by local hydrophobicity than helix formation. Generally, helices are nearer the surface and tend to have hydrophilic and hydrophobic faces at opposite sides. The tendency of alternating regions of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues in a helical sequence was revealed by calculating the correlation of the Nozaki-Tanford values. Such amphipathic helices may be important in protein-protein-lipid interactions and in forming hydrophilic channels in the membrane. The choice of 30 nonhomologous proteins as the data set did not alter the above results.

  19. Stabilization of protein-protein interactions in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Sebastian A; Sijbesma, Eline; Hann, Michael; Davis, Jeremy; O'Mahony, Gavin; Perry, Matthew W D; Karawajczyk, Anna; Eickhoff, Jan; Brunsveld, Luc; Doveston, Richard G; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Ottmann, Christian

    2017-09-01

    PPIs are involved in every disease and specific modulation of these PPIs with small molecules would significantly improve our prospects of developing therapeutic agents. Both industry and academia have engaged in the identification and use of PPI inhibitors. However in comparison, the opposite strategy of employing small-molecule stabilizers of PPIs is underrepresented in drug discovery. Areas covered: PPI stabilization has not been exploited in a systematic manner. Rather, this concept validated by a number of therapeutically used natural products like rapamycin and paclitaxel has been shown retrospectively to be the basis of the activity of synthetic molecules originating from drug discovery projects among them lenalidomide and tafamidis. Here, the authors cover the growing number of synthetic small-molecule PPI stabilizers to advocate for a stronger consideration of this as a drug discovery approach. Expert opinion: Both the natural products and the growing number of synthetic molecules show that PPI stabilization is a viable strategy for drug discovery. There is certainly a significant challenge to adapt compound libraries, screening techniques and downstream methodologies to identify, characterize and optimize PPI stabilizers, but the examples of molecules reviewed here in our opinion justify these efforts.

  20. Interplay between Protein Thermal Flexibility and Kinetic Stability.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Andrea G; Díaz-Salazar, A Jessica; Cabrera, Nallely; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Piñeiro, Ángel; Costas, Miguel

    2017-01-03

    Kinetic stability is a key parameter to comprehend protein behavior and it plays a central role to understand how evolution has reached the balance between function and stability in cell-relevant timescales. Using an approach that includes simulations, protein engineering, and calorimetry, we show that there is a clear correlation between kinetic stability determined by differential scanning calorimetry and protein thermal flexibility obtained from a novel method based on temperature-induced unfolding molecular dynamics simulations. Thermal flexibility quantitatively measures the increment of the conformational space available to the protein when energy in provided. The (β/α)8 barrel fold of two closely related by evolution triosephosphate isomerases from two trypanosomes are used as model systems. The kinetic stability-thermal flexibility correlation has predictive power for the studied proteins, suggesting that the strategy and methodology discussed here might be applied to other proteins in biotechnological developments, evolutionary studies, and the design of protein based therapeutics.

  1. A method for direct measurement of protein stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2009-01-01

    The stability of proteins is tuned by evolution to enable them to perform their cellular functions for the success of an organism. Yet, most of the arsenal of biophysical techniques at our disposal to characterize the thermodynamic stability of proteins is limited to in vitro samples. We describe an approach that we have developed to observe a protein directly in a cell and to monitor a fluorescence signal that reports the unfolding transition of the protein, yielding quantitatively interpretable stability data in vivo. The method is based on incorporation of structurally nonperturbing, specific binding motifs for a bis-arsenical fluorescein derivative in sites that result in dye fluorescence differences between the folded and unfolded states of the protein under study. This fluorescence labeling approach makes possible the determination of thermodynamic stability by direct urea titration in Escherichia coli cells. The specific case study we describe was carried out on the predominantly beta-sheet intracellular lipid-binding protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP), expressed in E. coli.

  2. Robust enzyme design: bioinformatic tools for improved protein stability.

    PubMed

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Voevodin, Vladimir; Švedas, Vytas

    2015-03-01

    The ability of proteins and enzymes to maintain a functionally active conformation under adverse environmental conditions is an important feature of biocatalysts, vaccines, and biopharmaceutical proteins. From an evolutionary perspective, robust stability of proteins improves their biological fitness and allows for further optimization. Viewed from an industrial perspective, enzyme stability is crucial for the practical application of enzymes under the required reaction conditions. In this review, we analyze bioinformatic-driven strategies that are used to predict structural changes that can be applied to wild type proteins in order to produce more stable variants. The most commonly employed techniques can be classified into stochastic approaches, empirical or systematic rational design strategies, and design of chimeric proteins. We conclude that bioinformatic analysis can be efficiently used to study large protein superfamilies systematically as well as to predict particular structural changes which increase enzyme stability. Evolution has created a diversity of protein properties that are encoded in genomic sequences and structural data. Bioinformatics has the power to uncover this evolutionary code and provide a reproducible selection of hotspots - key residues to be mutated in order to produce more stable and functionally diverse proteins and enzymes. Further development of systematic bioinformatic procedures is needed to organize and analyze sequences and structures of proteins within large superfamilies and to link them to function, as well as to provide knowledge-based predictions for experimental evaluation.

  3. White wine continuous protein stabilization by packed column.

    PubMed

    Pashova, Vesselina; Güell, Carme; López, Francisco

    2004-03-24

    Protein stabilization is an important stage in the production of white wine. This paper studies white wine protein stabilization using a continuous process with zirconium oxide (powder and pellets) packed in a column. The results show that the total proteins decrease by 50 and 70% for the pellet and powdered zirconium oxides, respectively. Treatment with all zirconium oxides improves wine stability. The effect of the heat regeneration process on both zirconium oxide forms is to increase the adsorption capacity. The wine treated with powdered zirconium oxide after the regeneration is the most effective for preventing protein haze. The protein profile of wine after treatment shows that the 20-50 kDa and 50-70 kDa fractions are the ones removed preferentially, while the 15 kDa fraction and the ones higher than 70 kDa are removed the least. The results show that the protein fraction with a molecular weight of 15 kDa does not affect the protein instability of the wines studied. The protein fraction with a molecular weight higher than 70 kDa seems to influence protein instability. The physicochemical properties of wine after treatment were not affected, and the values obtained were like those of the standardized range.

  4. Cytochrome P450 3A4 activity after surgical stress.

    PubMed

    Haas, Curtis E; Kaufman, David C; Jones, Carolyn E; Burstein, Aaron H; Reiss, William

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the acute inflammatory response after surgical trauma and changes in hepatic cytochrome P450 3A4 activity, compare changes in cytochrome P450 3A4 activity after procedures with varying degrees of surgical stress, and to explore the time course of any potential drug-cytokine interaction after surgery. Prospective, open-label study with each patient serving as his or her own control. University-affiliated, acute care, general hospital. A total of 16 patients scheduled for elective repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (n = 5), complete or partial colectomy (n = 6), or peripheral vascular surgery with graft (n = 5). Cytochrome P450 3A4 activity was estimated using the carbon-14 [14C]erythromycin breath test (ERMBT) before surgery and 24, 48, and 72 hrs after surgery. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and colectomy patients also had an ERMBT performed at discharge. Blood samples were obtained before surgery, immediately after surgery, and 6, 24, 32, 48, and 72 hrs after surgery for determination of plasma concentrations of interleukin-6, interleukin-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Clinical markers of surgical stress that were collected included duration of surgery, estimated blood loss, and volume of fluids administered in the operating room. ERMBT results significantly declined in all three surgical groups, with the lowest value at the time of the 72-hr study in all three groups. There was a trend toward differences in ERMBT results among groups that did not reach statistical significance (p =.06). The nadir ERMBT result was significantly and negatively correlated with both peak interleukin-6 concentration (r(s) = -.541, p =.03) and log interleukin-6 area under the curve from 0 to 72 hrs (r(s) = -.597, p =.014). Subjects with a peak interleukin-6 of >100 pg/mL had a significantly lower nadir ERMBT compared with subjects with a peak interleukin-6 of <100 pg/mL (35.5% +/- 5.2% vs. 74.7% +/- 5.1%, p <.001). Acute inflammation after

  5. Development of a simple assay system for protein-stabilizing efficiency based on hemoglobin protection against denaturation and measurement of the cooperative effect of mixing protein stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyu; Manabe, Yoshiyuki; Minamoto, Naoya; Saiki, Naoka; Fukase, Koichi

    2016-10-01

    We have elucidated the cooperative stabilization of proteins by sugars, amino acids, and other protein-stabilizing agents using a new and simple assay system. Our system determines the protein-stabilizing ability of various compounds by measuring their ability to protect hemoglobin from denaturation. Hemoglobin denaturation was readily measured by quantitative changes in its ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum. The efficiency of our assay was confirmed using various sugars such as trehalose and sucrose that are known to be good protein stabilizers. We have also found that mixtures of two different types of protein stabilizers resulted in a cooperative stabilizing effect on protein.

  6. Fluorinated proteins: from design and synthesis to structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Marsh, E Neil G

    2014-10-21

    Fluorine is all but absent from biology; however, it has proved to be a remarkably useful element with which to modulate the activity of biological molecules and to study their mechanism of action. Our laboratory's interest in incorporating fluorine into proteins was stimulated by the unusual physicochemical properties exhibited by perfluorinated small molecules. These include extreme chemical inertness and thermal stability, properties that have made them valuable as nonstick coatings and fire retardants. Fluorocarbons also exhibit an unusual propensity to phase segregation. This phenomenon, which has been termed the "fluorous effect", has been effectively exploited in organic synthesis to purify compounds from reaction mixtures by extracting fluorocarbon-tagged molecules into fluorocarbon solvents. As biochemists, we were curious to explore whether the unusual physicochemical properties of perfluorocarbons could be engineered into proteins. To do this, we developed a synthesis of a highly fluorinated amino acid, hexafluoroleucine, and designed a model 4-helix bundle protein, α4H, in which the hydrophobic core was packed exclusively with leucine. We then investigated the effects of repacking the hydrophobic core of α4H with various combinations of leucine and hexafluoroleucine. These initial studies demonstrated that fluorination is a general and effective strategy for enhancing the stability of proteins against chemical and thermal denaturation and proteolytic degradation. We had originally envisaged that the "fluorous interactions", postulated from the self-segregating properties of fluorous solvents, might be used to mediate specific protein-protein interactions orthogonal to those of natural proteins. However, various lines of evidence indicate that no special, favorable fluorine-fluorine interactions occur in the core of the fluorinated α4 protein. This makes it unlikely that fluorinated amino acids can be used to direct protein-protein interactions. More

  7. Protein stability and molecular adaptation to extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Jaenicke, R

    1991-12-18

    Proteins, due to the delicate balance of stabilizing and destabilizing interactions, are only marginally stable. Adaptation to extreme environments tends to shift the 'mesophilic' characteristics of proteins to the respective extremes of temperature, hydrostatic pressure, pH and salinity, such that, under the mutual physiological conditions, the molecular properties are similar regarding overall topology, flexibility and solvation. Enhanced intrinsic stability requires only minute local structural changes so that general strategies of stabilization cannot be established. Apart from mutative changes of amino-acid sequences, extrinsic factors (or cellular components) may be involved in 'extremophilic adaptation'. The molecular basis of acidophilic, alkalophilic and barophilic adaptation is still obscure. Mechanisms of enhanced thermal stability involve improved packing density, as well as specific local interactions. In halophiles, water and salt binding of the intrinsically stable protein inventory is accomplished by favoring acidic over basic amino acid residues and decreased hydrophobicity. General limits of viability are: (a) the susceptibility of the covalent structure of the polypeptide chain toward hydrolysis or hydrothermal degradation; (b) the competition of extreme solvent parameters with the weak electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions involved in protein stabilization; (c) perturbations of the folding and assembly of proteins; and (d) 'dislocation' of biochemical pathways due to effects of extreme conditions on the intricate network of metabolic reactions.

  8. Defining the role of salt bridges in protein stability.

    PubMed

    Jelesarov, Ilian; Karshikoff, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    Although the energetic balance of forces stabilizing proteins has been established qualitatively over the last decades, quantification of the energetic contribution of particular interactions still poses serious problems. The reasons are the strong cooperativity and the interdependence ofnoncovalent interactions. Salt bridges are a typical example. One expects that ionizable side chains frequently form ion pairs in innumerable crystal structures. Since electrostatic attraction between opposite charges is strong per se, salt bridges can intuitively be regarded as an important factor stabilizing the native structure. Is that really so? In this chapter we critically reassess the available methods to delineate the role ofelectrostatic interactions and salt bridges to protein stability, and discuss the progress and the obstacles in this endeavor. The basic problem is that formation of salt bridges depends on the ionization properties of the participating groups, which is significantly influenced by the protein environment. Furthermore, salt bridges experience thermal fluctuations, continuously break and re-form, and their lifespan in solution is governed by the flexibility of the protein. Finally, electrostatic interactions are long-range and might be significant in the unfolded state, thus seriously influencing the energetic profile. Elimination of salt bridges by protonation/deprotonation at extreme pH or by mutation provides only rough energetic estimates, since there is no way to account for the nonadditive response of the protein moiety. From what we know so far, the strength of electrostatic interactions is strongly context-dependent, yet it is unlikely that salt bridges are dominant factors governing protein stability. Nevertheless, proteins from thermophiles and hyperthermophiles exhibit more, and frequently networked, salt bridges than proteins from the mesophilic counterparts. Increasing the thermal (not the thermodynamic) stability of proteins by optimization

  9. An Entropic Perspective of Protein Stability on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Knotts, Thomas A.; Rathore, Nitin; Pablo, Juan J. de

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces regulates numerous processes in nature, science, and technology. In many applications, it is desirable to place proteins on surfaces in an active state, and tethering represents one manner in which to accomplish this. However, a clear understanding of how tether placement and design affects protein activity is lacking. Available theoretical models predict that proteins will be stabilized when tethered to substrates. Such models suggest that the surface reduces the number of states accessible to the unfolded state of the protein, thereby reducing the entropic cost of folding on the surface compared to the bulk case. Recent studies, however, have shown that this stabilization is not always seen. The purpose of this article is to determine the validity of the theory with a thorough thermodynamic analysis of the folding of peptides attached to surfaces. Configuration-temperature-density-of-states Monte Carlo simulations are used to examine the behavior of four different peptides of different secondary and tertiary structure. It is found that the surface does reduce the entropic cost of folding for tethered peptides, as the theory suggests. This effect, however, does not always translate into improved stability because the surface may also have a destabilizing enthalpic effect. The theory neglects this effect and assumes that the enthalpy of folding is the same on and off the surface. Both the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the stability are found to be topology- and tether-placement-specific; we show that stability cannot be predicted a priori. A detailed analysis of the folding of protein A shows how the same protein can be both stabilized and destabilized on a surface depending upon how the tethering enhances or hinders the ability of the peptide to form correct tertiary structures. PMID:18326646

  10. An entropic perspective of protein stability on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Thomas A; Rathore, Nitin; de Pablo, Juan J

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces regulates numerous processes in nature, science, and technology. In many applications, it is desirable to place proteins on surfaces in an active state, and tethering represents one manner in which to accomplish this. However, a clear understanding of how tether placement and design affects protein activity is lacking. Available theoretical models predict that proteins will be stabilized when tethered to substrates. Such models suggest that the surface reduces the number of states accessible to the unfolded state of the protein, thereby reducing the entropic cost of folding on the surface compared to the bulk case. Recent studies, however, have shown that this stabilization is not always seen. The purpose of this article is to determine the validity of the theory with a thorough thermodynamic analysis of the folding of peptides attached to surfaces. Configuration-temperature-density-of-states Monte Carlo simulations are used to examine the behavior of four different peptides of different secondary and tertiary structure. It is found that the surface does reduce the entropic cost of folding for tethered peptides, as the theory suggests. This effect, however, does not always translate into improved stability because the surface may also have a destabilizing enthalpic effect. The theory neglects this effect and assumes that the enthalpy of folding is the same on and off the surface. Both the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the stability are found to be topology- and tether-placement-specific; we show that stability cannot be predicted a priori. A detailed analysis of the folding of protein A shows how the same protein can be both stabilized and destabilized on a surface depending upon how the tethering enhances or hinders the ability of the peptide to form correct tertiary structures.

  11. Mechanisms of protein stabilization and prevention of protein aggregation by glycerol.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Yap, Miranda G S; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2009-11-24

    The stability of proteins in aqueous solution is routinely enhanced by cosolvents such as glycerol. Glycerol is known to shift the native protein ensemble to more compact states. Glycerol also inhibits protein aggregation during the refolding of many proteins. However, mechanistic insight into protein stabilization and prevention of protein aggregation by glycerol is still lacking. In this study, we derive mechanisms of glycerol-induced protein stabilization by combining the thermodynamic framework of preferential interactions with molecular-level insight into solvent-protein interactions gained from molecular simulations. Contrary to the common conception that preferential hydration of proteins in polyol/water mixtures is determined by the molecular size of the polyol and the surface area of the protein, we present evidence that preferential hydration of proteins in glycerol/water mixtures mainly originates from electrostatic interactions that induce orientations of glycerol molecules at the protein surface such that glycerol is further excluded. These interactions shift the native protein toward more compact conformations. Moreover, glycerol preferentially interacts with large patches of contiguous hydrophobicity where glycerol acts as an amphiphilic interface between the hydrophobic surface and the polar solvent. Accordingly, we propose that glycerol prevents protein aggregation by inhibiting protein unfolding and by stabilizing aggregation-prone intermediates through preferential interactions with hydrophobic surface regions that favor amphiphilic interface orientations of glycerol. These mechanisms agree well with experimental data available in the literature, and we discuss the extent to which these mechanisms apply to other cosolvents, including polyols, arginine, and urea.

  12. Role of arginine in the stabilization of proteins against aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Brian M; Wang, Daniel I C; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2005-03-29

    The amino acid arginine is frequently used as a solution additive to stabilize proteins against aggregation, especially in the process of protein refolding. Despite arginine's prevalence, the mechanism by which it stabilizes proteins is not presently understood. We propose that arginine deters aggregation by slowing protein-protein association reactions, with only a small concomitant effect on protein folding. The associated rate effect was observed experimentally in association of globular proteins (insulin and a monoclonal anti-insulin) and in refolding of carbonic anhydrase. We suggest that this effect arises because arginine is preferentially excluded from protein-protein encounter complexes but not from dissociated protein molecules. Such an effect is predicted by our gap effect theory [Baynes and Trout (2004) Biophys. J. 87, 1631] for "neutral crowder" additives such as arginine which are significantly larger than water but have only a small effect on the free energies of isolated protein molecules. The effect of arginine on refolding of carbonic anhydrase was also shown to be consistent with this hypothesis.

  13. Effects of metronidazole on hepatic CYP3A4 activity.

    PubMed

    Haas, C E; Kaufman, D C; DiCenzo, R C

    2001-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of a short course of oral metronidazole, commonly used for bowel-preparation regimens, on hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 activity, as measured by the [14C N-methyl]-erythromycin breath test (ERMBT) in healthy volunteers. Prospective, nonrandomized, interventional study University-affiliated, community, teaching hospital. Five healthy male volunteers. Subjects underwent a baseline ERMBT in the morning before receiving three oral doses of metronidazole 500 mg administered at 3 P.M., 7 P.M., and 11 P.M. Repeat ERMBTs were performed at 24, 72, and 96 hours after the initial ERMBT. Changes in ERMBT values were compared with baseline results using Freidman's repeated-measures analysis of variance on ranks. The ERMBT values did not change significantly compared with baseline (p=0.82). Median (range) ERMBT values expressed as a percentage of baseline at 24, 72, and 96 hours were 110.3 (96.2-136.9), 101.3 (99.3-115.0), and 101.8 (95.5-116.3), respectively A short course of oral metronidazole does not result in a significant change in hepatic CYP3A4 activity as measured by the ERMBT.

  14. Protein stability and enzyme activity at extreme biological temperatures.

    PubMed

    Feller, Georges

    2010-08-18

    Psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in permanently cold environments, even at subzero temperatures. To maintain metabolic rates compatible with sustained life, they have improved the dynamics of their protein structures, thereby enabling appropriate molecular motions required for biological activity at low temperatures. As a consequence of this structural flexibility, psychrophilic proteins are unstable and heat-labile. In the upper range of biological temperatures, thermophiles and hyperthermophiles grow at temperatures > 100 °C and synthesize ultra-stable proteins. However, thermophilic enzymes are nearly inactive at room temperature as a result of their compactness and rigidity. At the molecular level, both types of extremophilic proteins have adapted the same structural factors, but in opposite directions, to address either activity at low temperatures or stability in hot environments. A model based on folding funnels is proposed accounting for the stability-activity relationships in extremophilic proteins.

  15. Effects of sugars on the thermal stability of a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2013-06-01

    It is experimentally known that the heat-denaturation temperature of a protein is raised (i.e., its thermal stability is enhanced) by sugar addition. In earlier works, we proposed a physical picture of thermal denaturation of proteins in which the measure of the thermal stability is defined as the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding at 298 K normalized by the number of residues. A multipolar-model water was adopted as the solvent. The polyatomic structures of the folded and unfolded states of a protein were taken into account in the atomic detail. A larger value of the measure implies higher thermal stability. First, we show that the measure remains effective even when the model water is replaced by the hard-sphere solvent whose number density and molecular diameter are set at those of real water. The physical picture is then adapted to the elucidation of the effects of sugar addition on the thermal stability of a protein. The water-sugar solution is modeled as a binary mixture of hard spheres. The thermal stability is determined by a complex interplay of the diameter of sugar molecules dC and the total packing fraction of the solution η: dC is estimated from the volume per molecule in the sugar crystal and η is calculated using the experimental data of the solution density. We find that the protein is more stabilized as the sucrose or glucose concentration becomes higher and the stabilization effect is stronger for sucrose than for glucose. These results are in accord with the experimental observations. Using a radial-symmetric integral equation theory and the morphometric approach, we decompose the change in the measure upon sugar addition into two components originating from the protein-solvent pair and protein-solvent many-body correlations, respectively. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume and solvent-accessible-surface terms. These decompositions give physical insights into the microscopic origin of the thermal-stability

  16. Stability of ALS-related Superoxide Dismutase Protein variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusebrink, Daniel; Plotkin, Steven

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a metal binding, homodimeric protein, whose misfolding is implicated in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Monomerization is believed to be a key step in the propagation of the disease. The dimer stability is often difficult to measure experimentally however, because it is entangled with protein unfolding and metal loss. We thus computationally investigate the dimer stability of mutants of SOD1 known to be associated with ALS. We report on systematic trends in dimer stability, as well as intriguing allosteric communication between mutations and the dimer interface. We study the dimer stabilities in molecular dynamics simulations and obtain the binding free energies of the dimers from pulling essays. Mutations are applied in silicoand we compare the differences of binding free energies compared to the wild type.

  17. Rational stabilization of complex proteins: a divide and combine approach

    PubMed Central

    Lamazares, Emilio; Clemente, Isabel; Bueno, Marta; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the thermostability of proteins is often crucial for their successful use as analytic, synthetic or therapeutic tools. Most rational thermostabilization strategies were developed on small two-state proteins and, unsurprisingly, they tend to fail when applied to the much more abundant, larger, non-fully cooperative proteins. We show that the key to stabilize the latter is to know the regions of lower stability. To prove it, we have engineered apoflavodoxin, a non-fully cooperative protein on which previous thermostabilizing attempts had failed. We use a step-wise combination of structure-based, rationally-designed, stabilizing mutations confined to the less stable structural region, and obtain variants that, according to their van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratios, exhibit fully-cooperative thermal unfolding with a melting temperature of 75°C, 32 degrees above the lower melting temperature of the non-cooperative wild type protein. The ideas introduced here may also be useful for the thermostabilization of complex proteins through formulation or using specific stabilizing ligands (e.g. pharmacological chaperones). PMID:25774740

  18. Conformational stability of adrenodoxin mutant proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Burova, T. V.; Beckert, V.; Uhlmann, H.; Ristau, O.; Bernhardt, R.; Pfeil, W.

    1996-01-01

    Adrenodoxin and the mutants at the positions T54, H56, D76, Y82, and C95, as well as the deletion mutants 4-114 and 4-108, were studied by high-sensitivity scanning microcalorimetry, limited proteolysis, and absorption spectroscopy. The mutants show thermal transition temperatures ranging from 46 to 56 degrees C, enthalpy changes from 250 to 370 kJ/mol, and heat capacity change delta Cp = 7.28 +/- 0.67 kJ/mol/K, except H56R. The amino acid replacement H56R produces substantial local changes in the region around positions 56 and Y82, as indicated by reduced heat capacity change (delta Cp = 4.29 +/- 0.37 kJ/mol/K) and enhanced fluorescence. Deletion mutant 4-108 is apparently more stable than the wild type, as judged by higher specific denaturation enthalpy and resistance toward proteolytic degradation. No simple correlation between conformational stability and functional properties could be found. PMID:8880913

  19. Interactions of phospholipase D and cytochrome P450 protein stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Fan, Yang-Yi; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2004-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested a relationship between cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A (CYP3A) conformation and the phospholipid composition of the associated membrane. In this study, we utilized a novel microsomal incubation system that mimics many of the characteristics of CYP3A degradation pathway that have been observed in vivo and in cultured cells to study the effects of phospholipid composition on protein stability. We found that addition of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) stabilized CYP3A in this system, but that phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) was without effect. Addition of phosphatidic acid also stabilized CYP3A protein in the microsomes. The use of 1,10-phenanthroline (phenanthroline), an inhibitor of PLD activity, decreased CYP3A stability in incubated microsomes. Similarly, 6-h treatment of primary cultures of rat hepatocytes with phenanthroline resulted in nearly complete loss of CYP3A protein. Treatment of rats with nicardipine or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which have been shown to affect CYP3A stability, altered the phospholipid composition of hepatic microsomes. It did not appear, though, that the changes in phospholipid composition that resulted from these in vivo treatments accounted for the change in CYP3A stability observed in hepatic microsomes from these animals.

  20. The role of interfacial lipids in stabilizing membrane protein oligomers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kallol; Donlan, Joseph A C; Hopper, Jonathan T S; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Landreh, Michael; Struwe, Weston B; Drew, David; Baldwin, Andrew J; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Robinson, Carol V

    2017-01-19

    Oligomerization of membrane proteins in response to lipid binding has a critical role in many cell-signalling pathways but is often difficult to define or predict. Here we report the development of a mass spectrometry platform to determine simultaneously the presence of interfacial lipids and oligomeric stability and to uncover how lipids act as key regulators of membrane-protein association. Evaluation of oligomeric strength for a dataset of 125 α-helical oligomeric membrane proteins reveals an absence of interfacial lipids in the mass spectra of 12 membrane proteins with high oligomeric stability. For the bacterial homologue of the eukaryotic biogenic transporters (LeuT, one of the proteins with the lowest oligomeric stability), we found a precise cohort of lipids within the dimer interface. Delipidation, mutation of lipid-binding sites or expression in cardiolipin-deficient Escherichia coli abrogated dimer formation. Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that cardiolipin acts as a bidentate ligand, bridging across subunits. Subsequently, we show that for the Vibrio splendidus sugar transporter SemiSWEET, another protein with low oligomeric stability, cardiolipin shifts the equilibrium from monomer to functional dimer. We hypothesized that lipids are essential for dimerization of the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter NhaA from E. coli, which has the lowest oligomeric strength, but not for the substantially more stable homologous Thermus thermophilus protein NapA. We found that lipid binding is obligatory for dimerization of NhaA, whereas NapA has adapted to form an interface that is stable without lipids. Overall, by correlating interfacial strength with the presence of interfacial lipids, we provide a rationale for understanding the role of lipids in both transient and stable interactions within a range of α-helical membrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors.

  1. Conformational stability as a design target to control protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Joseph A; O'Brien, Christopher J; Tiller, Kathryn; Tamargo, Erin; Robinson, Anne Skaja; Roberts, Christopher J; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-05-01

    Non-native protein aggregation is a prevalent problem occurring in many biotechnological manufacturing processes and can compromise the biological activity of the target molecule or induce an undesired immune response. Additionally, some non-native aggregation mechanisms lead to amyloid fibril formation, which can be associated with debilitating diseases. For natively folded proteins, partial or complete unfolding is often required to populate aggregation-prone conformational states, and therefore one proposed strategy to mitigate aggregation is to increase the free energy for unfolding (ΔGunf) prior to aggregation. A computational design approach was tested using human γD crystallin (γD-crys) as a model multi-domain protein. Two mutational strategies were tested for their ability to reduce/increase aggregation rates by increasing/decreasing ΔGunf: stabilizing the less stable domain and stabilizing the domain-domain interface. The computational protein design algorithm, RosettaDesign, was implemented to identify point variants. The results showed that although the predicted free energies were only weakly correlated with the experimental ΔGunf values, increased/decreased aggregation rates for γD-crys correlated reasonably well with decreases/increases in experimental ΔGunf, illustrating improved conformational stability as a possible design target to mitigate aggregation. However, the results also illustrate that conformational stability is not the sole design factor controlling aggregation rates of natively folded proteins.

  2. Temperature compensation via cooperative stability in protein degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuanyuan; Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Noman, Nasimul; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Temperature compensation is a notable property of circadian oscillators that indicates the insensitivity of the oscillator system's period to temperature changes; the underlying mechanism, however, is still unclear. We investigated the influence of protein dimerization and cooperative stability in protein degradation on the temperature compensation ability of two oscillators. Here, cooperative stability means that high-order oligomers are more stable than their monomeric counterparts. The period of an oscillator is affected by the parameters of the dynamic system, which in turn are influenced by temperature. We adopted the Repressilator and the Atkinson oscillator to analyze the temperature sensitivity of their periods. Phase sensitivity analysis was employed to evaluate the period variations of different models induced by perturbations to the parameters. Furthermore, we used experimental data provided by other studies to determine the reasonable range of parameter temperature sensitivity. We then applied the linear programming method to the oscillatory systems to analyze the effects of protein dimerization and cooperative stability on the temperature sensitivity of their periods, which reflects the ability of temperature compensation in circadian rhythms. Our study explains the temperature compensation mechanism for circadian clocks. Compared with the no-dimer mathematical model and linear model for protein degradation, our theoretical results show that the nonlinear protein degradation caused by cooperative stability is more beneficial for realizing temperature compensation of the circadian clock.

  3. Electrostatic stabilization of a thermophilic cold shock protein.

    PubMed

    Perl, D; Schmid, F X

    2001-10-19

    The cold shock protein Bc-Csp from the thermophile Bacillus caldolyticus differs from its mesophilic homolog Bs-CspB from Bacillus subtilis by 15.8 kJ mol(-1) in the Gibbs free energy of denaturation (DeltaG(D)). The two proteins vary in sequence at 12 positions but only two of them, Arg3 and Leu66 of Bc-Csp, which replace Glu3 and Glu66 of Bs-CspB, are responsible for the additional stability of Bc-Csp. These two positions are near the ends of the protein chain, but close to each other in the three-dimensional structure. The Glu3Arg exchange alone changed the stability by more than 11 kJ mol(-1). Here, we elucidated the molecular origins of the stability difference between the two proteins by a mutational analysis. Electrostatic contributions to stability were characterized by measuring the thermodynamic stabilities of many variants as a function of salt concentration. Double and triple mutant analyses indicate that the stabilization by the Glu3Arg exchange originates from three sources. Improved hydrophobic interactions of the aliphatic moiety of Arg3 contribute about 4 kJ mol(-1). Another 4 kJ mol(-1) is gained from the relief of a pairwise electrostatic repulsion between Glu3 and Glu66, as in the mesophilic protein, and 3 kJ mol(-1) originate from a general electrostatic stabilization by the positive charge of Arg3, which is not caused by a pairwise interaction. Mutations of all potential partners for an ion pair within a radius of 10 A around Arg3 had only marginal effects on stability. The Glu3-->Arg3 charge reversal thus optimizes ionic interactions at the protein surface by both local and global effects. However, it cannot convert the coulombic repulsion with another Glu residue into a corresponding attraction. Avoidance of unfavorable coulombic repulsions is probably a much simpler route to thermostability than the creation of stabilizing surface ion pairs, which can form only at the expense of conformational entropy. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Storage Stability of Food Protein Hydrolysates-A Review.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qinchun; Klaassen Kamdar, Andre; Labuza, Theodore P

    2016-05-18

    In recent years, mainly due to the specific health benefits associated with (1) the discovery of bioactive peptides in protein hydrolysates, (2) the reduction of protein allergenicity by protein hydrolysis, and (3) the improved protein digestibility and absorption of protein hydrolysates, the utilization of protein hydrolysates in functional foods and beverages has significantly increased. Although the specific health benefits from different hydrolysates are somewhat proven, the delivery and/or stability of these benefits is debatable during distribution, storage, and consumption. In this review, we discuss (1) the quality changes in different food protein hydrolysates during storage; (2) the resulting changes in the structure and texture of three food matrices, i.e., low moisture foods (LMF, aw < 0.6), intermediate moisture foods (IMF, 0.6 ≤ aw < 0.85), and high moisture foods (HMF, aw ≥ 0.85); and (3) the potential solutions to improve storage stability of food protein hydrolysates. In addition, we note there is a great need for evaluation of biofunction availability of bioactive peptides in food protein hydrolysates during storage.

  5. Thermodynamic stability and folding of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms.

    PubMed

    Luke, Kathryn A; Higgins, Catherine L; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2007-08-01

    Life grows almost everywhere on earth, including in extreme environments and under harsh conditions. Organisms adapted to high temperatures are called thermophiles (growth temperature 45-75 degrees C) and hyperthermophiles (growth temperature >or= 80 degrees C). Proteins from such organisms usually show extreme thermal stability, despite having folded structures very similar to their mesostable counterparts. Here, we summarize the current data on thermodynamic and kinetic folding/unfolding behaviors of proteins from hyperthermophilic microorganisms. In contrast to thermostable proteins, rather few (i.e. less than 20) hyperthermostable proteins have been thoroughly characterized in terms of their in vitro folding processes and their thermodynamic stability profiles. Examples that will be discussed include co-chaperonin proteins, iron-sulfur-cluster proteins, and DNA-binding proteins from hyperthermophilic bacteria (i.e. Aquifex and Theromotoga) and archea (e.g. Pyrococcus, Thermococcus, Methanothermus and Sulfolobus). Despite the small set of studied systems, it is clear that super-slow protein unfolding is a dominant strategy to allow these proteins to function at extreme temperatures.

  6. Flocculation of protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Eric

    2010-11-01

    The flocculation properties of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by proteins are reviewed from the colloid science perspective. Emphasis is placed on insight from systematic studies of the stability of emulsions prepared with a milk protein ingredient as the sole emulsifying agent. The main factors considered are pH, ionic strength, calcium ion concentration, thermal processing, and the presence of cosolutes (alcohol, sugars). Contrasting dependences of the flocculation behaviour on these factors are observed for the pH-sensitive disordered caseins (alpha(s1)-casein or beta-casein) and the heat-sensitive globular proteins (especially beta-lactoglobulin). In comparing characteristic emulsion properties obtained with different proteins, we consider the relative importance of the different kinds of molecular and colloidal interactions-electrostatic, steric, hydrophobic and covalent.

  7. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and bayesian tests to describe the evolution of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations, we observe accelerated evolution in cetaceans and identify seven positively selected sites in Mb. Overall, these sites contribute to Mb stabilization with a conditional probability of 0.8. We observe a correlation between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected sites that occur later act against other destabilizing mutations to maintain stability across the clade, except for the shallow divers, where late stability relaxation occurs, probably due to the shorter aerobic dive limits of these species. The three main positively selected sites 66, 5, and 35 undergo changes that favor hydrophobic folding, structural integrity, and intra-helical hydrogen bonds.

  8. Development of dextran nanoparticles for stabilizing delicate proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fei; Zhou, Zhihua; Su, Jing; Wei, Liangming; Yuan, Weien; Jin, Tuo

    2013-04-01

    One of the most challenging problems in the development of protein pharmaceuticals is to deal with stabilities of proteins due to its complicated structures. This study aims to develop a novel approach to stabilize and encapsulate proteins into dextran nanoparticles without contacting the interface between the aqueous phase and the organic phase. The bovine serum albumin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), β-galactosidase, and myoglobin were selected as model proteins. The proteins were added into an aqueous solution containing the dextran and polyethylene glycol, and then encapsulated into dextran nanoparticles by aqueous-aqueous freezing-induced phase separation. The encapsulation efficiency and recovery of dextran nanoparticles were determined. The dextran nanoparticles loaded with proteins were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and particle size analysis. The protein aggregation was determined by size-exclusion chromatography-high-performance chromatography, and the bioactivity of proteins recovered during formulation steps was determined. The bioactivity of GM-CSF, G-CSF, and β-galactosidase were examined by the proliferation of TF-1 cell, NSF-60 cell, and ortho-nitrophenyl- β-galactoside assay, respectively. The results of bioactivity recovered show that this novel dextran nanoparticle can preserve the protein's bioactivity during the preparation process. LysoSensor™ Yellow/Blue dextran, a pH-sensitive indicator with fluorescence excited at two channels, was encapsulated into dextran nanoparticles to investigate the ability of dextran nanoparticles to resist the acidic microenvironment (pH < 2.5). The result shows that the dextran nanoparticles attenuate the acidic microenvironment in the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microsphere by means of the dilution effect. These novel dextran nanoparticles provided an appealing approach to stabilize the delicate proteins for

  9. Rheological properties of highly concentrated protein-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Tatiana D; Leal-Calderon, Fernando

    2004-05-20

    We prepared concentrated quasi monodisperse hexadecane-in-water emulsions stabilized by various proteins and investigated their rheological properties. Some protein-stabilized emulsions possess remarkably high elasticity and at the same time they are considerably fragile--they exhibit coalescence at yield strain and practically do not flow. The elastic storage modulus G' and the loss modulus G" of the emulsions were determined for different oil volume fractions above the random close packing. Surprisingly, the dimensionless elastic moduli G'/(sigma/a), sigma being the interfacial tension, and a being the mean drop radius, obtained for emulsions stabilized by different proteins do not collapse on a single master curve. They are almost always substantially higher than the corresponding values obtained for equivalent Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-stabilized emulsions. The unusually high elasticity cannot be attributed to a specificity of the continuous phase, because the osmotic equation of state of our emulsions is found identical to the one obtained for samples stabilized by classical surfactants. In parallel, we mimicked the thin films that separate the droplets in the concentrated emulsion and found that the protein adsorption layers contain a substantial number of sticky surface aggregates. These severely obstruct local rearrangements of individual drops in respect to their neighbors which leads to coalescence at yield strain. Furthermore, we found that G'/(sigma/a) is correlated (for a given oil volume fraction) to the dilatational elastic modulus, of the protein layer adsorbed on the droplets. The intrinsic elasticity of the protein layers, together with the blocked local rearrangements are considered as the main factors determining the unusual bulk elasticity of the studied emulsions.

  10. Polyethylene glycol on stability of chitosan microparticulate carrier for protein.

    PubMed

    Luangtana-Anan, Manee; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Chalongsuk, Rapeepun; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2010-09-01

    Stability enhancement of protein-loaded chitosan microparticles under storage was investigated. Chitosan glutamate at 35 kDa and bovine serum albumin as model protein drug were used in this study. The chitosan microparticles were prepared by ionotropic gelation, and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG 200) was applied after the formation of the particles. All chitosan microparticles were kept at 25°C for 28 days. A comparison was made between those preparations with PEG 200 and without PEG 200. The changes in the physicochemical properties of the microparticles such as size, zeta potential, pH, and percent loading capacity were investigated after 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days of storage. It was found that the stability decreased upon storage and the aggregation of microparticles could be observed for both preparations. The reduction in the zeta potential and the increase in the pH, size, and loading capacity were observed when they were kept at a longer period. The significant change of those preparations without PEG 200 was evident after 7 days of storage whereas those with PEG 200 underwent smaller changes with enhanced stability after 28 days of storage. Therefore, this investigation gave valuable information on the stability enhancement of the microparticles. Hence, enhanced stability of chitosan glutamate microparticles for the delivery of protein could be achieved by the application of PEG 200.

  11. Communication: Using multiple tethers to stabilize proteins on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loong, Brandon K.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2014-08-01

    Protein surface interactions are important in many applications in biotechnology including protein arrays, but these technologies have not lived up to their transformative potential because it is difficult to attach proteins to surfaces in a manner that preserves function and theoretical understanding of the relevant phenomena remains limited. Here is reported the effect of using multiple tethers to attach a protein (lysozyme) to a surface and the effects on the structure and stability of the molecule. The simulations show how using two tethers can drastically change the folding mechanism such that a protein that is initially unstable and inactive when attached using a single tether can become more stable and functional when two tethers are used. The results offer hope that the rational design of protein arrays is possible.

  12. Communication: Using multiple tethers to stabilize proteins on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Loong, Brandon K; Knotts, Thomas A

    2014-08-07

    Protein surface interactions are important in many applications in biotechnology including protein arrays, but these technologies have not lived up to their transformative potential because it is difficult to attach proteins to surfaces in a manner that preserves function and theoretical understanding of the relevant phenomena remains limited. Here is reported the effect of using multiple tethers to attach a protein (lysozyme) to a surface and the effects on the structure and stability of the molecule. The simulations show how using two tethers can drastically change the folding mechanism such that a protein that is initially unstable and inactive when attached using a single tether can become more stable and functional when two tethers are used. The results offer hope that the rational design of protein arrays is possible.

  13. Sample preservation through heat stabilization of proteins: principles and examples.

    PubMed

    Borén, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Due to post-sampling changes, caused by residual enzyme activity in the sample, levels of analytes can change from their in vivo levels so that they no longer accurately reflect conditions in the living system. The Stabilizor(™) system accomplishes elimination of enzyme activity through heat-induced denaturation of enzymes by permanently altering the 3D protein structure of the enzymes. Heat stabilization can be introduced in the workflow either directly after sampling, with the instrument just next to where the sample is taken, or prior to sample homogenization and extraction, when samples are heat denatured directly from a frozen state. Initially, heat stabilization was developed to enable mass spectrometric analysis of neuropeptides. Heat stabilization has since been further developed and applied to a range of samples and downstream protein analysis techniques such as western blot, 2D gels and phosphorylation analysis with LC-MS.

  14. Some implications of colloid stability theory for protein crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. C.; De Mattei, R. C.; Feigelson, R. S.; Tiller, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    Colloid stability theory has been applied to protein crystallization and predicts a narrow range of conditions under which crystals can be grown without the agglomeration of protein molecules (colloids) in the bulk solution. It also predicts a critical electrolyte concentration above which agglomeration will always occur. Using this theory, the rapid protein agglomeration occurring during Schlieren experiments as well as a terminal crystal size effect in a fixed container were explained. Following this concept, the supposed 'terminal' crystal size has been at least doubled.

  15. Some implications of colloid stability theory for protein crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. C.; De Mattei, R. C.; Feigelson, R. S.; Tiller, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    Colloid stability theory has been applied to protein crystallization and predicts a narrow range of conditions under which crystals can be grown without the agglomeration of protein molecules (colloids) in the bulk solution. It also predicts a critical electrolyte concentration above which agglomeration will always occur. Using this theory, the rapid protein agglomeration occurring during Schlieren experiments as well as a terminal crystal size effect in a fixed container were explained. Following this concept, the supposed 'terminal' crystal size has been at least doubled.

  16. Large scale analysis of protein stability in OMIM disease related human protein variants.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fariselli, Piero; Savojardo, Castrense; Babbi, Giulia; Aggazio, Francesco; Casadio, Rita

    2016-06-23

    Modern genomic techniques allow to associate several Mendelian human diseases to single residue variations in different proteins. Molecular mechanisms explaining the relationship among genotype and phenotype are still under debate. Change of protein stability upon variation appears to assume a particular relevance in annotating whether a single residue substitution can or cannot be associated to a given disease. Thermodynamic properties of human proteins and of their disease related variants are lacking. In the present work, we take advantage of the available three dimensional structure of human proteins for predicting the role of disease related variations on the perturbation of protein stability. We develop INPS3D, a new predictor based on protein structure for computing the effect of single residue variations on protein stability (ΔΔG), scoring at the state-of-the-art (Pearson's correlation value of the regression is equal to 0.72 with mean standard error of 1.15 kcal/mol on a blind test set comprising 351 variations in 60 proteins). We then filter 368 OMIM disease related proteins known with atomic resolution (where the three dimensional structure covers at least 70 % of the sequence) with 4717 disease related single residue variations and 685 polymorphisms without clinical consequence. We find that the effect on protein stability of disease related variations is larger than the effect of polymorphisms: in particular, by setting to |1 kcal/mol| the threshold between perturbing and not perturbing variations of the protein stability, about 44 % of disease related variations and 20 % of polymorphisms are predicted with |ΔΔG| > 1 kcal/mol, respectively. A consistent fraction of OMIM disease related variations is however predicted to promote |ΔΔG| ≤ 1 kcal/mol and we focus here on detecting features that can be associated to the thermodynamic property of the protein variant. Our analysis reveals that some 47 % of disease related variations

  17. Metabolism of Meloxicam in human liver involves cytochromes P4502C9 and 3A4.

    PubMed

    Chesné, C; Guyomard, C; Guillouzo, A; Schmid, J; Ludwig, E; Sauter, T

    1998-01-01

    1. The metabolism of Meloxicam (ME) and the cytochrome(s) P450 (CYPs) involved were analysed by using primary human hepatocytes, human liver microsomes and microsomes from recombinant human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. 2. While human hepatocytes were capable of converting ME to a 5-hydroxymethyl metabolite (M7) and then to a 5-carboxyderivative (M5), human liver microsomes formed mostly only the 5-hydroxymethylderivative. The kinetics of the formation of M7 by human liver microsomes were biphasic with Km = 13.6 +/- 9.5 and 381 +/- 55.2 microM respectively. The corresponding Vmax were 33.7 +/- 24.2 and 143 +/- 83.9 pmol/min/mg protein respectively. 3. CYP2C9 and, to a much lesser extent, CYP3A4 were found to convert ME to M7. The involvement of 2C9 was demonstrated by inhibition of tolbutamide hydroxylase activity in the presence of ME, inhibition of ME metabolism by sulphaphenazole, correlation between ME metabolism and tolbutamide hydroxylase activity and active metabolism of ME by recombinant 2C9. The involvement of 3A4 was shown by inhibition of ME metabolism by ketoconazole, correlation between ME metabolism and nifedipine oxidase activity and metabolism of ME by recombinant 3A4. Kinetics of the formation of M7 by the individual enzymes resulted in a Km = 9.6 microM and Vmax = 8.4 pmol/min/mg protein for 2C9 and a Km = 475 microM and Vmax = 23 pmol/min/mg protein for 3A4.

  18. Designed protein reveals structural determinants of extreme kinetic stability

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Aron; Ma, S. Martha; Xia, Ke; Rafalia, Hitesh; Trainor, Kyle; Colón, Wilfredo; Gosavi, Shachi; Meiering, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    The design of stable, functional proteins is difficult. Improved design requires a deeper knowledge of the molecular basis for design outcomes and properties. We previously used a bioinformatics and energy function method to design a symmetric superfold protein composed of repeating structural elements with multivalent carbohydrate-binding function, called ThreeFoil. This and similar methods have produced a notably high yield of stable proteins. Using a battery of experimental and computational analyses we show that despite its small size and lack of disulfide bonds, ThreeFoil has remarkably high kinetic stability and its folding is specifically chaperoned by carbohydrate binding. It is also extremely stable against thermal and chemical denaturation and proteolytic degradation. We demonstrate that the kinetic stability can be predicted and modeled using absolute contact order (ACO) and long-range order (LRO), as well as coarse-grained simulations; the stability arises from a topology that includes many long-range contacts which create a large and highly cooperative energy barrier for unfolding and folding. Extensive data from proteomic screens and other experiments reveal that a high ACO/LRO is a general feature of proteins with strong resistances to denaturation and degradation. These results provide tractable approaches for predicting resistance and designing proteins with sufficient topological complexity and long-range interactions to accommodate destabilizing functional features as well as withstand chemical and proteolytic challenge. PMID:26554002

  19. Capture-stabilize approach for membrane protein SPR assays.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ruiyin; Reczek, David; Brondyk, William

    2014-12-08

    Measuring the binding kinetics of antibodies to intact membrane proteins by surface plasmon resonance has been challenging largely because of the inherent difficulties in capturing membrane proteins on chip surfaces while retaining their native conformation. Here we describe a method in which His-tagged CXCR5, a GPCR, was purified and captured on a Biacore chip surface via the affinity tag. The captured receptor protein was then stabilized on the chip surface by limited cross-linking. The resulting chip surface retained ligand binding activity and was used for monoclonal antibody kinetics assays by a standard Biacore kinetics assay method with a simple low pH regeneration step. We demonstrate the advantages of this whole receptor assay when compared to available peptide-based binding assays. We further extended the application of the capture-stabilize approach to virus-like particles and demonstrated its utility analyzing antibodies against CD52, a GPI-anchored protein, in its native membrane environment. The results are the first demonstration of chemically stabilized chip surfaces for membrane protein SPR assays.

  20. Designed protein reveals structural determinants of extreme kinetic stability.

    PubMed

    Broom, Aron; Ma, S Martha; Xia, Ke; Rafalia, Hitesh; Trainor, Kyle; Colón, Wilfredo; Gosavi, Shachi; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2015-11-24

    The design of stable, functional proteins is difficult. Improved design requires a deeper knowledge of the molecular basis for design outcomes and properties. We previously used a bioinformatics and energy function method to design a symmetric superfold protein composed of repeating structural elements with multivalent carbohydrate-binding function, called ThreeFoil. This and similar methods have produced a notably high yield of stable proteins. Using a battery of experimental and computational analyses we show that despite its small size and lack of disulfide bonds, ThreeFoil has remarkably high kinetic stability and its folding is specifically chaperoned by carbohydrate binding. It is also extremely stable against thermal and chemical denaturation and proteolytic degradation. We demonstrate that the kinetic stability can be predicted and modeled using absolute contact order (ACO) and long-range order (LRO), as well as coarse-grained simulations; the stability arises from a topology that includes many long-range contacts which create a large and highly cooperative energy barrier for unfolding and folding. Extensive data from proteomic screens and other experiments reveal that a high ACO/LRO is a general feature of proteins with strong resistances to denaturation and degradation. These results provide tractable approaches for predicting resistance and designing proteins with sufficient topological complexity and long-range interactions to accommodate destabilizing functional features as well as withstand chemical and proteolytic challenge.

  1. Designing an extracellular matrix protein with enhanced mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sean P.; Billings, Kate S.; Ohashi, Tomoo; Allen, Mark D.; Best, Robert B.; Randles, Lucy G.; Erickson, Harold P.; Clarke, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix proteins tenascin and fibronectin experience significant mechanical forces in vivo. Both contain a number of tandem repeating homologous fibronectin type III (fnIII) domains, and atomic force microscopy experiments have demonstrated that the mechanical strength of these domains can vary significantly. Previous work has shown that mutations in the core of an fnIII domain from human tenascin (TNfn3) reduce the unfolding force of that domain significantly: The composition of the core is apparently crucial to the mechanical stability of these proteins. Based on these results, we have used rational redesign to increase the mechanical stability of the 10th fnIII domain of human fibronectin, FNfn10, which is directly involved in integrin binding. The hydrophobic core of FNfn10 was replaced with that of the homologous, mechanically stronger TNfn3 domain. Despite the extensive substitution, FNoTNc retains both the three-dimensional structure and the cell adhesion activity of FNfn10. Atomic force microscopy experiments reveal that the unfolding forces of the engineered protein FNoTNc increase by ≈20% to match those of TNfn3. Thus, we have specifically designed a protein with increased mechanical stability. Our results demonstrate that core engineering can be used to change the mechanical strength of proteins while retaining functional surface interactions. PMID:17535921

  2. Protein stabilization by introduction of cross-strand disulfides.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kausik; Thakurela, Sudhir; Prajapati, Ravindra Singh; Indu, S; Ali, P Shaik Syed; Ramakrishnan, C; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2005-11-08

    Disulfides cross-link residues in a protein that are separated in primary sequence and stabilize the protein through entropic destabilization of the unfolded state. While the removal of naturally occurring disulfides leads to protein destabilization, introduction of engineered disulfides does not always lead to significant stabilization of a protein. We have analyzed naturally occurring disulfides that span adjacent antiparallel strands of beta sheets (cross-strand disulfides). Cross-strand disulfides have recently been implicated as redox-based conformational switches in proteins such as gp120 and CD4. The propensity of these disulfides to act as conformational switches was postulated on the basis of the hypothesis that this class of disulfide is conformationally strained. In the present analysis, there was no evidence to suggest that cross-strand disulfides are more strained compared to other disulfides as assessed by their torsional energy. It was also observed that these disulfides occur solely at non-hydrogen-bonded (NHB) registered pairs of adjacent antiparallel strands and not at hydrogen-bonded (HB) positions as suggested previously. One of the half-cystines involved in cross-strand disulfide formation often occurs at an edge strand. Experimental confirmation of the stabilizing effects of such disulfides was carried out in Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Four pairs of cross-strand cysteines were introduced, two at HB and two at NHB pairs. Disulfides were formed in all four cases. However, as predicted from our analysis, disulfides at NHB positions resulted in an increase in melting temperature of 7-10 degrees C, while at HB positions there was a corresponding decrease of -7 degrees C. The reduced state of all proteins had similar stability.

  3. Detergent Stabilized Nanopore Formation Kinetics of an Anthrax Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Kelby

    2015-03-01

    This summer research project funded through the Society of Physics Students Internship Program and The National Institute of Standards and Technology focused on optimization of pore formation of Protective Antigen protein secreted by Bacillus Anthraces. This experiment analyzes the use of N-tetradecylphosphocholine (FOS-14 Detergent) to stabilize the water soluble protein, protective antigen protein (PA63) to regulate the kinetics of pore formation in a model bilayer lipid membrane. The FOS-14 Detergent was tested under various conditions to understand its impact on the protein pore formation. The optimization of this channel insertion is critical in preparing samples of oriented for neutron reflectometry that provide new data to increase the understanding of the protein's structure.

  4. RNA stabilizing proteins as molecular targets in cardiovascular pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Sahana Suresh; Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Jeyabal, Prince; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan Amirthalingam; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    The stability of mRNA has emerged as a key step in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and function. RNA stabilizing proteins (RSPs) contain several RNA recognition motifs, and selectively bind to Adenylate- and uridylate- Rich Elements in the 3′ untranslated region of several mRNAs leading to altered processing, stability and translation. These post-transcriptional gene regulations play a critical role in cellular homeostasis; therefore act as molecular switch between ‘normal cell’ and ‘disease state’. Many mRNA binding proteins have been discovered to date, which either stabilize (HuR/HuA, HuB, HuC, HuD) or destabilize (AUF1, Tristetraprolin, KSRP) the target transcripts. Although the function of RSPs has been widely studied in cancer biology, its role in cardiovascular pathologies is only beginning to evolve. The current review provides an overall understanding of the potential role of RSP, specifically HuR-mediated mRNA stability in myocardial infarction, hypertension and hypertrophy. Also, the effect of RSPs on various cellular processes including inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, cell-death and proliferation and its relevance to cardiovascular pathophysiological processes is presented. We also discuss the potential clinical implications of RSPs as therapeutic targets in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25801788

  5. Protein stabilization by macromolecular crowding through enthalpy rather than entropy.

    PubMed

    Senske, Michael; Törk, Lisa; Born, Benjamin; Havenith, Martina; Herrmann, Christian; Ebbinghaus, Simon

    2014-06-25

    The interior of the cell is a densely crowded environment in which protein stability is affected differently than in dilute solution. Macromolecular crowding is commonly understood in terms of an entropic volume exclusion effect based on hardcore repulsions among the macromolecules. We studied the thermal unfolding of ubiquitin in the presence of different cosolutes (glucose, dextran, poly(ethylene glycol), KCl, urea). Our results show that for a correct dissection of the cosolute-induced changes of the free energy into its enthalpic and entropic contributions, the temperature dependence of the heat capacity change needs to be explicitly taken into account. In contrast to the prediction by the excluded volume theory, we observed an enthalpic stabilization and an entropic destabilization for glucose, dextran, and poly(ethylene glycol). The enthalpic stabilization mechanism induced by the macromolecular crowder dextran was similar to the enthalpic stabilization mechanism of its monomeric building block glucose. In the case of poly(ethylene glycol), entropy is dominating over enthalpy leading to an overall destabilization. We propose a new model to classify cosolute effects in terms of their enthalpic contributions to protein stability.

  6. Beer consumption and changes in stability of human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Gorinstein, S; Caspi, A; Goshev, I; Moncheva, S; Zemser, M; Weisz, M; Libman, I; Lerner, H T; Trakhtenberg, S; Martín-Belloso, O

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of beer consumption (BC) on the functional and structural properties of human serum proteins (HSP). Thirty-eight volunteers (after coronary bypass) were divided into two groups: experimental (EG) and control (CG). Nineteen volunteers of the EG consumed 330 mL per day of beer (about 20 g of alcohol) for 30 consecutive days. The CG volunteers consumed mineral water instead of beer. Blood samples were collected from EG and CG patients before and after the experiment. Albumin (Alb), globulin (Glo), and methanol-precipitable proteins (MPP) from human serum were denatured with 8 M urea. Fluorescence and electrophoresis were employed in order to elucidate urea-induced conformational changes and structural behavior of proteins. The measured fluorescence emission spectra were used to estimate the stability of native and denatured protein fractions before and after BC. It was found that before BC the fractions most stable to urea denaturation were Glo, Alb, and MPP fractions. After BC in most of the beer-consuming patients (EG) some changes in native and denatured protein fractions were detected: a tendency to lower stability and minor structural deviations. These qualitative changes were more profound in MPP than in Alb and Glo. Thus, Glo is more resistible to alcohol influence than Alb, which in turn is more resistible than MPP. No serum protein changes were detected in patients of CG.

  7. SUMO modification regulates the protein stability of NDRG1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Jung Hwa

    2015-03-27

    N-myc Downstream Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1) is a metastasis suppressor protein which suppresses metastasis without affecting primary tumorigenesis. There have been many reports about the anti-metastatic function of NDRG1 in various cancers. However, the regulatory mechanism of NDRG1 at the protein level has not been studied widely. Here, we found that NDRG1 is posttranslationally modified by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO), preferentially by SUMO-2, and the major SUMO acceptor site of NDRG1 is Lys 14. Using various SUMO-2 modification status mimicking NDRG1 mutants, we characterized the role of SUMO-2 modification on NDRG1. SUMO-2 modification does not affect the subcellular distribution of NDRG1. However, the protein stability of NDRG1 is influenced by SUMO-2 modification. We found that both the wildtype and the SUMO modification site mutant form of the NDRG1 protein were very stable but the protein stability of SUMO-2 fused NDRG1 K14R had dramatically decreased. In addition, the expression of p21 is downregulated by overexpression of SUMO-2 fused NDRG1 K14R mutants. These results indicate that SUMO-2 modification is implicated in the modulation of NDRG1 protein level and function. This novel link between SUMO modification and regulation of NDRG1 could be a therapeutic target for treatment of various metastatic cancers.

  8. Plk phosphorylation regulates the microtubule-stabilizing protein TCTP.

    PubMed

    Yarm, Frederic R

    2002-09-01

    The mitotic polo-like kinases have been implicated in the formation and function of bipolar spindles on the basis of their respective localizations and mutant phenotypes. To date, this putative regulation has been limited to a kinesin-like motor protein, a centrosomal structural protein, and two microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). In this study, another spindle-regulating protein, the mammalian non-MAP microtubule-binding and -stabilizing protein, the translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), was identified as a putative Plk-interacting clone by a two-hybrid screen. Plk phosphorylates TCTP on two serine residues in vitro and cofractionates with the majority of kinase activity toward TCTP in mitotic cell lysates. In addition, these sites were demonstrated to be phosphorylated in vivo. Overexpression of a Plk phosphorylation site-deficient mutant of TCTP induced a dramatic increase in the number of multinucleate cells, rounded cells with condensed ball-like nuclei, and cells undergoing cell death, similar to both the reported anti-Plk antibody microinjection and the low-concentration taxol treatment phenotypes. These results suggest that phosphorylation decreases the microtubule-stabilizing activity of TCTP and promotes the increase in microtubule dynamics that occurs after metaphase.

  9. Arsenite and its metabolites, MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}, modify CYP3A4, PXR and RXR alpha expression in the small intestine of CYP3A4 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Medina-Diaz, I.M.; Estrada-Muniz, E.; Reyes-Hernandez, O.D.; Ramirez, P.; Vega, L.; Elizondo, G.

    2009-09-01

    Arsenic is an environmental pollutant that has been associated with an increased risk for the development of cancer and several other diseases through alterations of cellular homeostasis and hepatic function. Cytochrome P450 (P450) modification may be one of the factors contributing to these disorders. Several reports have established that exposure to arsenite modifies P450 expression by decreasing or increasing mRNA and protein levels. Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the predominant P450 expressed in the human liver and intestines, which is regulated mainly by the Pregnane X Receptor-Retinoid X Receptor alpha (PXR-RXR alpha) heterodimer, contributes to the metabolism of approximately half the drugs in clinical use today. The present study investigates the effect of sodium arsenite and its metabolites monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) on CYP3A4, PXR, and RXR alpha expression in the small intestine of CYP3A4 transgenic mice. Sodium arsenite treatment increases mRNA, protein and CYP3A4 activity in a dose-dependent manner. However, the increase in protein expression was not as marked as compared to the increase in mRNA levels. Arsenite treatment induces the accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates, indicating that the activation of this mechanism may explain the differences observed between the mRNA and protein expression of CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with 0.05 mg/kg of DMA{sup III} induces CYP3A4 in a similar way, while treatment with 0.05 mg/kg of MMA{sup III} increases mostly mRNA, and to a lesser degree, CYP3A4 activity. Sodium arsenite and both its metabolites increase PXR mRNA, while only DMA{sup III} induces RXR alpha expression. Overall, these results suggest that sodium arsenite and its metabolites induce CYP3A4 expression by increasing PXR expression in the small intestine of CYP3A4 transgenic mice.

  10. Probing protein mechanical stability with controlled shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusting, Jonathan; Ashton, Lorna; Leontini, Justin; Blanch, Ewan; Balabani, Stavroula

    2009-11-01

    Understanding and controlling protein aggregation or misfolding is of both fundamental and medical interest. The structural changes experienced by proteins in response to forces such as those generated within flows have not been well characterised, despite the importance of mechanics in many biological processes. By monitoring the structural conformation of proteins in different concentric cylinder flows using Raman Spectroscopy we have quantified the relative stability of β-sheet dominated proteins compared with those containing a greater proportion of α-helix. To ensure that the fluid stresses are quantified accurately, a combined DNS and PIV approach has been undertaken for flow cell characterisation across the full range of operating Re. This is important for practical concentric cylinder geometries where the shear components are non-zero and spatially dependent, with the peak stresses located near the endwalls. Furthermore, recirculation regions appear well below the crtical Reynolds number for Taylor vortex formation.

  11. Nanobody stabilization of G protein coupled receptor conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Steyaert, Jan; K Kobilka, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology during the past four years. Several obstacles to generating diffraction quality crystals of GPCRs have been overcome by combining innovative methods ranging from protein engineering to lipid-based screens and microdiffraction technology. The initial GPCR structures represent energetically stable inactive-state conformations. However, GPCRs signal through different G protein isoforms or G protein-independent effectors upon ligand binding suggesting the existence of multiple ligand-specific active states. These active-state conformations are unstable in the absence of specific cytosolic signaling partners representing new challenges for structural biology. Camelid single chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) show promise for stabilizing active GPCR conformations and as chaperones for crystallogenesis. PMID:21782416

  12. Physical and oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with fish protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Pedro J; Guadix, Antonio; Guadix, Emilia M; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-07-15

    The emulsifying and antioxidant properties of fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) for the physical and oxidative stabilization of 5% (by weight) fish oil-in-water emulsions were investigated. Muscle proteins from sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) were hydrolyzed to degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 3-4-5-6% with subtilisin. Sardine hydrolysates with low DH, 3% and 4%, presented the most effective peptides to physically stabilize emulsions with smaller droplet size. This implied more protein adsorbed at the interface to act as physical barrier against prooxidants. This fact might also be responsible for the higher oxidative stability of these emulsions, as shown by their lowest peroxide value and concentration of volatiles such as 1-penten-3-one and 1-penten-3-ol. Among the hydrolysates prepared from small-spotted catshark only the hydrolysate with DH 3% yielded a physically stable emulsion with low concentration of unsaturated aldehydes. These results show the potential of FPH as alternative protein emulsifiers for the production of oxidatively stable fish oil-in-water emulsions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Protein Folding, Stability, and Solvation Structure in Osmolyte Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Rösgen, Jörg; Pettitt, B. Montgomery; Bolen, David Wayne

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the impact of the crowded conditions in the cytoplasm on its biomolecules is of clear importance to biochemical, medical, and pharmaceutical science. Our previous work on the use of small biochemical compounds to crowd protein solutions indicates that a quantitative description of their nonideal behavior is possible and straightforward. Here, we show the structural origin of the nonideal solution behavior. We discuss the consequences of these findings regarding protein folding stability and solvation in crowded solutions through a structural analysis of the m-value or the change in free-energy difference of a macromolecule in solution with respect to the concentration of a third component. PMID:16113118

  14. Cellular Proteomes Have Broad Distributions of Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kingshuk; Dill, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Biological cells are extremely sensitive to temperature. What is the mechanism? We compute the thermal stabilities of the whole proteomes of Escherichia coli, yeast, and Caenorhabditis elegans using an analytical model and an extensive database of stabilities of individual proteins. Our results support the hypothesis that a cell's thermal sensitivities arise from the collective instability of its proteins. This model shows a denaturation catastrophe at temperatures of 49–55°C, roughly the thermal death point of mesophiles. Cells live on the edge of a proteostasis catastrophe. According to the model, it is not that the average protein is problematic; it is the tail of the distribution. About 650 of E. coli's 4300 proteins are less than 4 kcal mol−1 stable to denaturation. And upshifting by only 4° from 37° to 41°C is estimated to destabilize an average protein by nearly 20%. This model also treats effects of denaturants, osmolytes, and other physical stressors. In addition, it predicts the dependence of cellular growth rates on temperature. This approach may be useful for studying physical forces in biological evolution and the role of climate change on biology. PMID:21156142

  15. Protein stability in Artemia embryos during prolonged anoxia.

    PubMed

    Clegg, James S

    2007-02-01

    Encysted embryos (cysts) of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, are arguably the most stress-resistant of all animal life-history stages. One of their many adaptations is the ability to tolerate anoxia for periods of years, while fully hydrated and at physiological temperatures. Previous work indicated that the overall metabolism of anoxic embryos is brought to a reversible standstill, including the transduction of free energy and the turnover of macromolecules. But the issue of protein stability at the level of tertiary and quaternary structure was not examined. Here I provide evidence that the great majority of proteins do not irreversibly lose their native conformation during years of anoxia, despite the absence of detectable protein turnover. Although a modest degree of protein denaturation and aggregation occurs, that is quickly reversed by a brief post-anoxic aerobic incubation. I consider how such extraordinary stability is achieved and suggest that at least part of the answer involves massive amounts of a small heat shock protein (p26) that acts as a molecular chaperone, the function of which does not appear to require ribonucleoside di- or tri-phosphates.

  16. Determination of CYP3A4 Inducing Properties of Compounds Using a Laboratory-Developed Cell-Based Assay.

    PubMed

    Seah, Tiong Chai; Tay, Yea Lu; Tan, Heng Kean; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Wahab, Habibah Abdul; Tan, Mei Lan

    2015-01-01

    A cell-based assay to measure cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) induction was developed to screen for potential CYP3A4 inducers. This 96-well format assay utilizes HepG2 cells transfected with a gene construct of CYP3A4 proximal promoter linked to green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, and the expression of the GFP is then measured quantitatively. Bergamottin at 5 to 25 µmol/L produced low induction relative to the positive control. Both curcumin and lycopene were not found to affect the expression of GFP, suggesting no induction properties toward CYP3A4. Interestingly, resveratrol produced significant induction from 25 µmol/L onward, which was similar to omeprazole and may warrant further studies. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that this cell-based assay can be used as a tool to evaluate the potential CYP3A4 induction properties of compounds. However, molecular docking data have not provided satisfactory pointers to differentiate between CYP3A4 inducers from noninducers or from inhibitors, more comprehensive molecular screening may be indicated. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Ligand Diversity of Human and Chimpanzee CYP3A4: Activation of Human CYP3A4 by Lithocholic Acid Results from Positive SelectionS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Qiu, Huan; Oezguen, Numan; Herlyn, Holger; Halpert, James R.; Wojnowski, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    For currently unknown reasons, the evolution of CYP3A4 underwent acceleration in the human lineage after the split from chimpanzee. We investigated the significance of this event by comparing Escherichia coli-expressed CYP3A4 from humans, chimpanzee, and their most recent common ancestor. The expression level of chimpanzee CYP3A4 was ∼50% of the human CYP3A4, whereas ancestral CYP3A4 did not express in E. coli. Steady-state kinetic analysis with 7-benzyloxyquinoline, 7-benzyloxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-BFC), and testosterone showed no significant differences between human and chimpanzee CYP3A4. Upon addition of α-naphthoflavone (25 μM), human CYP3A4 showed a slightly decreased substrate concentration at which 50% of the maximal rate Vmax is reached for 7-BFC, whereas chimpanzee CYP3A4 showed a >2-fold increase. No significant differences in inhibition/activation were found for a panel of 43 drugs and endogenous compounds, suggesting that the wide substrate spectrum of human CYP3A4 precedes the human-chimpanzee split. A striking exception was the hepatotoxic secondary bile acid lithocholic acid, which at saturation caused a 5-fold increase in 7-BFC debenzylation by human CYP3A4 but not by chimpanzee CYP3A4. Mutagenesis of human CYP3A4 revealed that at least four of the six amino acids positively selected in the human lineage contribute to the activating effect of lithocholic acid. In summary, the wide functional conservation between chimpanzee and human CYP3A4 raises the prospect that phylogenetically more distant primate species such as rhesus and squirrel monkey represent suitable models of the human counterpart. Positive selection on the human CYP3A4 may have been triggered by an increased load of dietary steroids, which led to a novel defense mechanism against cholestasis. PMID:19299527

  18. The emulsion flocculation stability of protein-carbohydrate diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Wooster, Tim J; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2007-09-15

    The effect of the steric layer thickness on the flocculation stability of beta-lactoglobulin-carbohydrate diblock copolymers was assessed. The diblock copolymers were created by conjugating beta-lactoglobulin to maltose or a series of different M(n) maltodextrins using the Maillard reaction. The thickness and spatial arrangement of the interfacial layers were assessed via latex adsorption and selective enzymatic digestion studies. An increase in the molecular weight of the maltodextrin (900, 1900 and 3800 Da) increased the interfacial thickness (1.1, 2.5 and 7.3 nm, respectively). No detectable change to interfacial thickness was observed upon the attachment of maltose. The increase in the interfacial layer thickness scaled with the hydrodynamic size of the carbohydrate. The beta-lactoglobulin-maltodextrin conjugates were found to have a diblock architecture, with the protein anchored at the surface and the carbohydrate protruding into the aqueous continuous phase. The stability of oil-in-water emulsions formed using the conjugates was assessed by exposing them to salt (150 mM NaCl or 0-20 mM CaCl(2)), heat alone or heat in the presence of 150 mM NaCl. Conjugation of a 900 Da maltodextrin provided sufficient steric stabilization to prevent flocculation in high salt environments. The effect of the (number) density of the steric layer was also assessed by controlling the average number of maltodextrins attached per beta-lactoglobulin molecule. The steric layer density at which emulsions became unstable was a function of carbohydrate M(n). Emulsions made from the 900 Da maltodextrin conjugate became unstable below a steric layer density of one tail per 7.5 nm(2), whilst emulsions made from the 1900 Da maltodextrin were unstable below a steric layer density of one tail per 9.5 nm(2). This trend was expected and can be explained by the stronger van der Waals attraction that arises from the closer interdroplet separations that are permissible with the shorter

  19. Stabilization and inhibition of protein-protein interactions: the 14-3-3 case study.

    PubMed

    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-01-18

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most exciting but also difficult fields in chemical biology and drug development. As one of the most important "hub" proteins with at least 200-300 interaction partners, the 14-3-3 proteins are an especially fruitful case for PPI intervention. Here, we summarize recent success stories in small-molecule modulation, both inhibition and stabilization, of 14-3-3 PPIs. The chemical breath of modulators includes natural products such as fusicoccin A and derivatives but also compounds identified via high-throughput and in silico screening, which has yielded a toolbox of useful inhibitors and stabilizers for this interesting class of adapter proteins. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in almost all biological processes, with any given protein typically engaged in complexes with other proteins for the majority of its lifetime. Hence, proteins function not simply as single, isolated entities but display their roles by interacting with other cellular components. These different interaction patterns are presumably as important as the intrinsic biochemical activity status of the protein itself. The biological role of a protein is therefore decisively dependent on the underlying PPI network that furthermore can show great spatial and temporal variations. A thorough appreciation and understanding of this concept and its regulation mechanisms could help to develop new therapeutic agents and concepts.

  20. Nucleic acid aptamers as stabilizers of proteins: the stability of tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nishant Kumar; Jetani, Hardik C; Roy, Ipsita

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of tetanus toxoid to moisture leads to its aggregation and reduction of potency. The aim of this work was to use SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) protocol and select aptamers which recognize tetanus toxoid (Mr ~150 kDa) with high affinity. Colyophilized preparations of tetanus toxoid and specific aptamers were encapsulated in PLGA microspheres and sustained release of the antigen was observed up to 55 days using different techniques. The total protein released was between 40-55% (24-45% residual antigenicity) in the presence of the aptamers as compared to 25% (11% residual antigenicity) for the antigen alone. We show that instead of inhibiting absorption of moisture, the aptamers blocked the protein unfolding upon absorption of moisture, inhibiting the initiation of aggregation. When exposed to accelerated storage conditions, some of the RNA sequences were able to inhibit moisture-induced aggregation in vitro and retain antigenicity of tetanus toxoid. Nucleic acid aptamers represent a novel class of protein stabilizers which stabilize the protein by interacting directly with it. This mechanism is unlike that of small molecules which alter the medium properties and hence depend on the stress condition a protein is exposed to.

  1. Properties and stability of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by coconut skim milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Onsaard, Ekasit; Vittayanont, Manee; Srigam, Sukoncheun; McClements, D Julian

    2005-07-13

    Protein fractions were isolated from coconut: coconut skim milk protein isolate (CSPI) and coconut skim milk protein concentrate (CSPC). The ability of these proteins to form and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions was compared with that of whey protein isolate (WPI). The solubility of the proteins in CSPI, CSPC, and WPI was determined in aqueous solutions containing 0, 100, and 200 mM NaCl from pH 3 to 8. In the absence of salt, the minimum protein solubility occurred between pH 4 and 5 for CSPI and CSPC and around pH 5 for WPI. In the presence of salt (100 and 200 mM NaCl), all proteins had a higher solubility than in distilled water. Corn oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt %) with relatively small droplet diameters (d32 approximately 0.46, 1.0, and 0.5 mum for CSPI, CSPC, and WPI, respectively) could be produced using 0.2 wt % protein fraction. Emulsions were prepared with different pH values (3-8), salt concentrations (0-500 mM NaCl), and thermal treatments (30-90 degrees C for 30 min), and the mean particle diameter, particle size distribution, zeta-potential, and creaming stability were measured. Considerable droplet flocculation occurred in the emulsions near the isoelectric point of the proteins: CSPI, pH approximately 4.0; CSPC, pH approximately 4.5; WPI, pH approximately 4.8. Emulsions with monomodal particle size distributions, small mean droplet diameters, and good creaming stability could be produced at pH 7 for CSPI and WPI, whereas CSPC produced bimodal distributions. The CSPI and WPI emulsions remained relatively stable to droplet aggregation and creaming at NaCl concentrations of < or =50 and < or =100 mM, respectively. In the absence salt, the CSPI and WPI emulsions were also stable to thermal treatments at < or =80 and < or =90 degrees C for 30 min, respectively. These results suggest that CSPI may be suitable for use as an emulsifier in the food industry.

  2. The effect of interferon-{alpha} on the expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 in human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Flaman, Anathea S.; Gravel, Caroline; Hashem, Anwar M.; Tocchi, Monika; Li Xuguang

    2011-06-01

    Interferon {alpha} (IFN{alpha}) is used to treat malignancies and chronic viral infections. It has been found to decrease the rate of drug metabolism by acting on cytochrome P450 enzymes, but no studies have investigated the consequences of IFN{alpha} treatment on the CYP3A4 isoform, responsible for the metabolism of a majority of drugs. In this study, we have examined the effect of IFN{alpha} on CYP3A4 catalytic activity and expression in human hepatoma cells. We found that IFN{alpha} inhibits CYP3A4 activity and rapidly down-regulates the expression of CYP3A4, independent of de novo protein synthesis. Pharmacologic inhibitors and a dominant-negative mutant expression plasmid were used to dissect the molecular pathway required for CYP3A4 suppression, revealing roles for Jak1 and Stat1 and eliminating the involvement of the p38 mitogen-activated and extracellular regulated kinases. Treatment of hepatoma cells with IFN{alpha} did not affect the nuclear localization or relative abundance of Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors, suggesting that the suppression of CYP3A4 by IFN{alpha} does not result from inhibitory Sp3 out-competing Sp1. To our knowledge, this is the first report that IFN{alpha} down-regulates CYP3A4 expression largely through the JAK-STAT pathway. Since IFN{alpha} suppresses CYP3A4 expression, caution is warranted when IFN{alpha} is administered in combination with CYP3A4 substrates to avoid the occurrence of adverse drug interactions.

  3. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  4. Structuring detergents for extracting and stabilizing functional membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Matar-Merheb, Rima; Rhimi, Moez; Leydier, Antoine; Huché, Frédéric; Galián, Carmen; Desuzinges-Mandon, Elodie; Ficheux, Damien; Flot, David; Aghajari, Nushin; Kahn, Richard; Di Pietro, Attilio; Jault, Jean-Michel; Coleman, Anthony W; Falson, Pierre

    2011-03-31

    Membrane proteins are privileged pharmaceutical targets for which the development of structure-based drug design is challenging. One underlying reason is the fact that detergents do not stabilize membrane domains as efficiently as natural lipids in membranes, often leading to a partial to complete loss of activity/stability during protein extraction and purification and preventing crystallization in an active conformation. Anionic calix[4]arene based detergents (C4Cn, n=1-12) were designed to structure the membrane domains through hydrophobic interactions and a network of salt bridges with the basic residues found at the cytosol-membrane interface of membrane proteins. These compounds behave as surfactants, forming micelles of 5-24 nm, with the critical micellar concentration (CMC) being as expected sensitive to pH ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mM. Both by 1H NMR titration and Surface Tension titration experiments, the interaction of these molecules with the basic amino acids was confirmed. They extract membrane proteins from different origins behaving as mild detergents, leading to partial extraction in some cases. They also retain protein functionality, as shown for BmrA (Bacillus multidrug resistance ATP protein), a membrane multidrug-transporting ATPase, which is particularly sensitive to detergent extraction. These new detergents allow BmrA to bind daunorubicin with a Kd of 12 µM, a value similar to that observed after purification using dodecyl maltoside (DDM). They preserve the ATPase activity of BmrA (which resets the protein to its initial state after drug efflux) much more efficiently than SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate), FC12 (Foscholine 12) or DDM. They also maintain in a functional state the C4Cn-extracted protein upon detergent exchange with FC12. Finally, they promote 3D-crystallization of the membrane protein. These compounds seem promising to extract in a functional state membrane proteins obeying the positive inside rule. In that context, they may

  5. Structuring Detergents for Extracting and Stabilizing Functional Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Matar-Merheb, Rima; Galián, Carmen; Desuzinges-Mandon, Elodie; Ficheux, Damien; Flot, David; Aghajari, Nushin; Kahn, Richard; Di Pietro, Attilio; Jault, Jean-Michel; Coleman, Anthony W.; Falson, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins are privileged pharmaceutical targets for which the development of structure-based drug design is challenging. One underlying reason is the fact that detergents do not stabilize membrane domains as efficiently as natural lipids in membranes, often leading to a partial to complete loss of activity/stability during protein extraction and purification and preventing crystallization in an active conformation. Methodology/Principal Findings Anionic calix[4]arene based detergents (C4Cn, n = 1–12) were designed to structure the membrane domains through hydrophobic interactions and a network of salt bridges with the basic residues found at the cytosol-membrane interface of membrane proteins. These compounds behave as surfactants, forming micelles of 5–24 nm, with the critical micellar concentration (CMC) being as expected sensitive to pH ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mM. Both by 1H NMR titration and Surface Tension titration experiments, the interaction of these molecules with the basic amino acids was confirmed. They extract membrane proteins from different origins behaving as mild detergents, leading to partial extraction in some cases. They also retain protein functionality, as shown for BmrA (Bacillus multidrug resistance ATP protein), a membrane multidrug-transporting ATPase, which is particularly sensitive to detergent extraction. These new detergents allow BmrA to bind daunorubicin with a Kd of 12 µM, a value similar to that observed after purification using dodecyl maltoside (DDM). They preserve the ATPase activity of BmrA (which resets the protein to its initial state after drug efflux) much more efficiently than SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate), FC12 (Foscholine 12) or DDM. They also maintain in a functional state the C4Cn-extracted protein upon detergent exchange with FC12. Finally, they promote 3D-crystallization of the membrane protein. Conclusion/Significance These compounds seem promising to extract in a functional state

  6. Modulation of the interaction between human P450 3A4 and B. megaterium reductase via engineered loops.

    PubMed

    Castrignanò, Silvia; D'Avino, Serena; Di Nardo, Giovanna; Catucci, Gianluca; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2017-07-19

    Chimerogenesis involving cytochromes P450 is a successful approach to generate catalytically self-sufficient enzymes. However, the connection between the different functional modules should allow a certain degree of flexibility in order to obtain functional and catalytically efficient proteins. We previously applied the molecular Lego approach to develop a chimeric P450 3A4 enzyme linked to the reductase domain of P450 BM3 (BMR). Three constructs were designed with the connecting loop containing no glycine, 3 glycine or 5 glycine residues and showed a different catalytic activity and coupling efficiency. Here we investigate how the linker affects the ability of P450 3A4 to bind substrates and inhibitors. We measure the electron transfer rates and the catalytic properties of the enzyme also in the presence of ketoconazole as inhibitor. The data show that the construct 3A4-5GLY-BMR with the longest loop better retains the binding ability and cooperativity for testosterone, compared to P450 3A4. In both 3A4-3GLY-BMR and 3A4-5GLY-BMR, the substrate induces an increase in the first electron transfer rate and a shorter lag phase related to a domain rearrangements, when compared to the construct without Gly. These data are consistent with docking results and secondary structure predictions showing a propensity to form helical structures in the loop of the 3A4-BMR and 3A4-3GLY-BMR. All three chimeras retain the ability to bind the inhibitor ketoconazole and show an IC50 comparable with those reported for the wild type protein. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cytochrome P450 biodiversity and biotechnology, edited by Erika Plettner, Gianfranco Gilardi, Luet Wong, Vlada Urlacher, Jared Goldstone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein folding, stability, and solvation structure in osmolyte solutions hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery Pettitt, B.

    2008-03-01

    The hydrophobic effect between solutes in aqueous solutions plays a central role in our understanding of recognition and folding of proteins and self assembly of lipids. Hydrophobicity induces nonideal solution behavior which plays a role in many aspects of biophysics. Work on the use of small biochemical compounds to crowd protein solutions indicates that a quantitative description of their non-ideal behavior is possible and straightforward. Here, we will show what the structural origin of this non-ideal solution behavior is from expression derived from a semi grand ensemble approach. We discuss the consequences of these findings regarding protein folding stability and solvation in crowded solutions through a structural analysis of the m-value or the change in free energy difference of a macromolecule in solution with respect to the concentration of a third component. This effect has recently been restudied and new mechanisms proposed for its origins in terms of transfer free energies and hydrophobicity.

  8. Liquid drop stability for protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Robert B.; Broom, Beth H.; Snyder, Robert S.; Daniel, Ron

    1987-01-01

    It is possible to grow protein crystals for biomedical research in microgravity by deploying a protein-rich solution from a syringe, forming a drop in which crystallization can occur with the proper degree of supersaturation. Drop stability is critical to the success of this research, due to the large drop sizes which can be achieved in space. In order to determine the type of syringe tips most suitable to support these large drops, tests were performed during brief periods of weightlessness onboard the NASA KC-135 low-gravity simulation aircraft. The drops were analyzed using three simple models in which the samples were approximated by modified pendulum and spring systems. It was concluded that the higher frequency systems were the most stable, indicating that of the syringes utilized, a disk-shaped configuration provided the most stable environment of low-gravity protein crystal growth.

  9. Protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA): protein degradation meets the CRISPR-Cas9 library.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-06-29

    The regulation of protein stability is a fundamental issue for biophysical processes, but there has not previously been a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability. However, as reported in the article entitled "A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A," recently published in Cell Discovery, our team developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Based on our findings, we are confident that this efficient and unbiased screening method at the genome scale will be used by researchers worldwide to identify regulators of protein stability.

  10. Effects of phosphatidylethanolamine glycation on lipid-protein interactions and membrane protein thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Levi, Valeria; Villamil Giraldo, Ana M; Castello, Pablo R; Rossi, Juan P F C; González Flecha, F Luis

    2008-11-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of biomolecules has been implicated in the pathophysiology of aging and diabetes. Among the potential targets for glycation are biological membranes, characterized by a complex organization of lipids and proteins interacting and forming domains of different size and stability. In the present study, we analyse the effects of glycation on the interactions between membrane proteins and lipids. The phospholipid affinity for the transmembrane surface of the PMCA (plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase) was determined after incubating the protein or the phospholipids with glucose. Results show that the affinity between PMCA and the surrounding phospholipids decreases significantly after phosphospholipid glycation, but remains unmodified after glycation of the protein. Furthermore, phosphatidylethanolamine glycation decreases by approximately 30% the stability of PMCA against thermal denaturation, suggesting that glycated aminophospholipids induce a structural rearrangement in the protein that makes it more sensitive to thermal unfolding. We also verified that lipid glycation decreases the affinity of lipids for two other membrane proteins, suggesting that this effect might be common to membrane proteins. Extending these results to the in vivo situation, we can hypothesize that, under hyperglycaemic conditions, glycation of membrane lipids may cause a significant change in the structure and stability of membrane proteins, which may affect the normal functioning of membranes and therefore of cells.

  11. USP7 controls Chk1 protein stability by direct deubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Alonso-de Vega, Ignacio; Martín, Yusé; Smits, Veronique A J

    2014-01-01

    Chk1, an essential checkpoint kinase in the DNA damage response pathway (DDR), is tightly regulated by both ATR-dependent phosphorylation and proteasome-mediated degradation. Here we identify ubiquitin hydrolase USP7 as a novel regulator of Chk1 protein stability. USP7 was shown before to regulate other DDR proteins such as p53, Hdm2 and Claspin, an adaptor protein in the ATR-Chk1 pathway required for Chk1 activation. Depletion or inhibition of USP7 leads to lower Chk1 levels. The decreased Chk1 protein after USP7 knock down cannot be rescued by simultaneously elevating Claspin levels, demonstrating that the effect of USP7 on Chk1 is independent of its known effect on Claspin. Conversely, overexpression of USP7 wild type, but not a catalytic mutant version, elevates Chk1 levels and increases the half-life of Chk1 protein. Importantly, wild type, but not catalytic mutant USP7 can deubiquitinate Chk1 in vivo and in vitro, confirming that USP7 directly regulates Chk1 protein levels. Finally we show that USP7 catalytic mutant is (mono-)ubiquitinated, which suggests auto-deubiquitination by this ubiquitin hydrolase, possibly important for its regulation.

  12. Small-molecule stabilization of the p53 - 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Doveston, Richard G; Kuusk, Ave; Andrei, Sebastian A; Leysen, Seppe; Cao, Qing; Castaldi, Maria P; Hendricks, Adam; Brunsveld, Luc; Chen, Hongming; Boyd, Helen; Ottmann, Christian

    2017-08-01

    14-3-3 proteins are positive regulators of the tumor suppressor p53, the mutation of which is implicated in many human cancers. Current strategies for targeting of p53 involve restoration of wild-type function or inhibition of the interaction with MDM2, its key negative regulator. Despite the efficacy of these strategies, the alternate approach of stabilizing the interaction of p53 with positive regulators and, thus, enhancing tumor suppressor activity, has not been explored. Here, we report the first example of small-molecule stabilization of the 14-3-3 - p53 protein-protein interaction (PPI) and demonstrate the potential of this approach as a therapeutic modality. We also observed a disconnect between biophysical and crystallographic data in the presence of a stabilizing molecule, which is unusual in 14-3-3 PPIs. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Monoclonal antibody probe for assessing beer foam stabilizing proteins.

    PubMed

    Onishi, A; Proudlove, M O; Dickie, K; Mills, E N; Kauffman, J A; Morgan, M R

    1999-08-01

    A monoclonal antibody (Mab; IFRN 1625) has been produced, which is specific for the most hydrophobic polypeptides responsible for foam stabilization. The binding characteristics of the Mab suggest that it is the conformation of certain hydrophobic polypeptides which is important for foam stabilization. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for assessing the foam-positive form of the foam-stabilizing polypeptides in beer was developed using IFRN 1625. A good correlation was obtained between ELISA determination of foam-stabilizing polypeptides and an empirical means of determining foaming, that is, the Rudin head retention values, for a collection of beers of various foam qualities. Application of the ELISA to different stages of the brewing process showed that the amounts of foam-positive polypeptides increased during barley germination. During the brewing process the proportion of foam-positive polypeptides present after fermentation increased slightly, although a large amount was lost along with other beer proteins during subsequent steps, such as filtering. The present study demonstrates that the amounts of beer polypeptide present in a foam-positive form have a direct relationship with the foaming potential of beer, that their levels are altered by processing, and that there is potential for greater quality control.

  14. Effective stabilization of CLA by microencapsulation in pea protein.

    PubMed

    Costa, A M M; Nunes, J C; Lima, B N B; Pedrosa, C; Calado, V; Torres, A G; Pierucci, A P T R

    2015-02-01

    CLA was microencapsulated by spray drying in ten varied wall systems (WS) consisting of pea protein isolate or pea protein concentrate (PPC) alone at varied core:WS ratios (1:2; 1:3 and 1:4), or blended with maltodextrin (M) and carboxymethylcellulose at a pea protein:carbohydrate ratio of 3:1. The physical-chemical properties of the CLA microparticles were characterised by core retention, microencapsulation efficiency (ME), particle size and moisture. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) showed the most promising results, thus we evaluated the effect of M addition in the WS on other physical-chemical characteristics and oxidative stability (CLA isomer profile, quantification of CLA and volatile compounds by SPME coupled with CG-MS) during two months of storage at room temperature, CLA:PPC (1:4) was selected for comparisons. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) microparticles demonstrated better morphology, solubility, dispersibility and higher glass-transition temperature values. M addition did not influence the oxidative stability of CLA, however its presence improved physical-chemical characteristics necessary for food applications.

  15. Hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain contributes to pre-fusion protein stability.

    PubMed

    Webb, Stacy; Nagy, Tamas; Moseley, Hunter; Fried, Michael; Dutch, Rebecca

    2017-04-07

    Enveloped viruses utilize fusion (F) proteins studding the surface of the virus to facilitate membrane fusion with a target cell membrane. Fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is required for release of viral genomic material, so the virus can ultimately reproduce and spread. To drive fusion, the F protein undergoes an irreversible conformational change, transitioning from a metastable pre-fusion conformation to a more thermodynamically stable post-fusion structure. Understanding the elements that control stability of the pre-fusion state and triggering to the post-fusion conformation is important for understanding F protein function. Mutations in F protein transmembrane (TM) domains implicated the TM domain in the fusion process, but the structural and molecular details in fusion remain unclear. Previously, analytical ultracentrifugation was utilized to demonstrate that isolated TM domains of Hendra virus F protein associate in a monomer-trimer equilibrium (Smith, E. C., Smith, S. E., Carter, J. R., Webb, S. R., Gibson, K. M., Hellman, L. M., Fried, M. G., and Dutch, R. E. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 35726-35735). To determine factors driving this association, 140 paramyxovirus F protein TM domain sequences were analyzed. A heptad repeat of β-branched residues was found, and analysis of the Hendra virus F TM domain revealed a heptad repeat leucine-isoleucine zipper motif (LIZ). Replacement of the LIZ with alanine resulted in dramatically reduced TM-TM association. Mutation of the LIZ in the whole protein resulted in decreased protein stability, including pre-fusion conformation stability. Together, our data suggest that the heptad repeat LIZ contributed to TM-TM association and is important for F protein function and pre-fusion stability. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Stabilization of Protein-Protein Interactions in chemical biology and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bier, David; Thiel, Philipp; Briels, Jeroen; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    More than 300,000 Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) can be found in human cells. This number is significantly larger than the number of single proteins, which are the classical targets for pharmacological intervention. Hence, specific and potent modulation of PPIs by small, drug-like molecules would tremendously enlarge the "druggable genome" enabling novel ways of drug discovery for essentially every human disease. This strategy is especially promising in diseases with difficult targets like intrinsically disordered proteins or transcription factors, for example neurodegeneration or metabolic diseases. Whereas the potential of PPI modulation has been recognized in terms of the development of inhibitors that disrupt or prevent a binary protein complex, the opposite (or complementary) strategy to stabilize PPIs has not yet been realized in a systematic manner. This fact is rather surprising given the number of impressive natural product examples that confer their activity by stabilizing specific PPIs. In addition, in recent years more and more examples of synthetic molecules are being published that work as PPI stabilizers, despite the fact that in the majority they initially have not been designed as such. Here, we describe examples from both the natural products as well as the synthetic molecules advocating for a stronger consideration of the PPI stabilization approach in chemical biology and drug discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein-stabilized nanoemulsions and emulsions: comparison of physicochemical stability, lipid oxidation, and lipase digestibility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Je; Choi, Seung Jun; Li, Yan; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2011-01-12

    The properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) stabilized oil-in-water (O/W) nanoemulsions (d(43) ≈ 66 nm; 0.5% oil, 0.9% WPI) and emulsions (d(43) ≈ 325 nm; 0.5% oil, 0.045% WPI) were compared. Emulsions were prepared by high-pressure homogenization, while nanoemulsions were prepared by high-pressure homogenization and solvent (ethyl acetate) evaporation. The effects of pH, ionic strength (0-500 mM NaCl), thermal treatment (30-90 °C), and freezing/thawing on the stability and properties of the nanoemulsions and emulsions were compared. In general, nanoemulsions had better stability to droplet aggregation and creaming than emulsions. The nanoemulsions were unstable to droplet flocculation near the isoelectric point of WPI but remained stable at higher or lower pH values. In addition, the nanoemulsions were stable to salt addition, thermal treatment, and freezing/thawing (pH 7). Lipid oxidation was faster in nanoemulsions than emulsions, which was attributed to the increased surface area. Lipase digestibility of lipids was slower in nanoemulsions than emulsions, which was attributed to changes in interfacial structure and protein content. These results have important consequences for the design and utilization of food-grade nanoemulsions.

  18. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions. PMID:28266541

  19. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-03-07

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions.

  20. What makes a protein a protein? Hydrophobic core designs that specify stability and structural properties.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; Balasubramanian, S.; Fleming, K. G.; Nagi, A. D.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Here we describe how the systematic redesign of a protein's hydrophobic core alters its structure and stability. We have repacked the hydrophobic core of the four-helix-bundle protein, Rop, with altered packing patterns and various side chain shapes and sizes. Several designs reproduce the structure and native-like properties of the wild-type, while increasing the thermal stability. Other designs, either with similar sizes but different shapes, or with decreased sizes of the packing residues, destabilize the protein. Finally, overpacking the core with the larger side chains causes a loss of native-like structure. These results allow us to further define the roles of tight residue packing and the burial of hydrophobic surface area in the construction of native-like proteins. PMID:8844848

  1. Inulin glasses for the stabilization of therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, W L; Prinsen, M G; Frijlink, H W

    2001-03-14

    Sugar glasses are widely used to stabilize proteins during drying and subsequent storage. To act successfully as a protectant, the sugars should have a high glass transition temperature (Tg), a poor hygroscopicity, a low crystallization rate, and contain no reducing groups. When freeze drying is envisaged as method of drying, a relatively high Tg of the freeze concentrated fraction (Tg') is preferrable. In this study, whether inulins meet these requirements was investigated. Inulins of various degrees of polymerisation (DP) were evaluated. Trehalose glass was used as a positive control. It was found that the Tg and the Tg' of inulins with a number/weight average DP (DP(n)/DP(w)) higher than 5.5/6.0 were higher than those of trehalose glass. Furthermore, inulin glasses showed a similar hygroscopicity to that of trehalose glass but crystallized less rapidly. Less than 6% of the sugar units of inulins with a DP(n)/DP(w) higher than 5.5/6.0 contained reducing groups. Trehalose contained no reducing groups. Freeze drying of an alkaline phosphatase solution without protectant induced an almost complete loss of the activity of the protein. In contrast, when inulins with a DP(n)/DP(w) higher than 5.5/6.0 or trehalose were used as stabilizer, the activity was fully maintained, also after subsequent storage for 4 weeks at 20 degrees C and 0, 45, or 60% RH, respectively. The stabilizing capacities of inulin with a lower DP and glucose were substantially less pronounced. After storage at 60 degrees C for 6 days, the activity of freeze dried samples containing inulins with a DP(n)/DP(w) higher than 5.5/6.0 was still about 50% whereas the activity of samples containing inulin with a lower DP, glucose, or trehalose was completely lost. It is concluded that inulins with a DP(n)/DP(w) higher than 5.5/6.0 meet the physico-chemical characteristics to successfully act as protectants for proteins. The stabilizing potential of these inulins was clearly shown using alkaline phosphatase

  2. On the Stability of Parainfluenza Virus 5 F Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Poor, Taylor A.; Song, Albert S.; Welch, Brett D.; Kors, Christopher A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the F protein (prefusion form) of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) WR isolate was determined. We investigated the basis by which point mutations affect fusion in PIV5 isolates W3A and WR, which differ by two residues in the F ectodomain. The P22 stabilizing site acts through a local conformational change and a hydrophobic pocket interaction, whereas the S443 destabilizing site appears sensitive to both conformational effects and amino acid charge/polarity changes. PMID:25589638

  3. Is cytochrome P450 3A4 regulated by menstrual cycle hormones in control endometrium and endometriosis?

    PubMed

    Piccinato, Carla A; Neme, Rosa M; Torres, Natália; Silvério, Renata; Pazzini, Vanessa Bitencourt; Rosa E Silva, Júlio C; Ferriani, Rui A

    2017-03-01

    The estrogen-metabolizing activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have been implicated in endometriosis. However, their regulation in various sources of endometrial tissue under different hormonal conditions has not been clarified. Our objective was to study the hormone regulation of a specific CYP enzyme, namely CYP3A4, in control (n = 15) and endometriosis patients (n = 42). To this end, we evaluated mRNA expression (using real-time PCR) of CYP3A4 in tissue samples classified according to the phase of menstrual cycle at which they were obtained as confirmed by the related circulating hormone levels. Protein expression was also evaluated by Western Blot. In order to further investigate the hormonal regulation of CYP3A4, stromal cells from ovarian endometriotic lesions were cultured with the prevailing hormones of the distinct phases of the menstrual cycle. We observed that all control and endometriosis tissues express CYP3A4. Nevertheless, changes in CYP3A4 gene expression related to cycle phase were only seen in the control eutopic endometrium and not in samples from endometriosis patients, with an increase in the luteal phase. Stromal cells isolated from ovarian endometriotic lesions expressed CYP3A4 and their exposure to luteal phase-mimicking hormones (estradiol + progesterone) reduced CYP3A4 mRNA in parallel with a diminished expression of the corresponding receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and progesterone receptor. Our findings suggest that steroid hormones are able to regulate CYP3A4 mRNA expression, although the circulating levels of these hormones can only regulate control endometrium and not endometriosis tissues, probably because of dysregulated local steroid concentration in these latter samples.

  4. Contribution of surface salt bridges to protein stability: guidelines for protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Makhatadze, George I; Loladze, Vakhtang V; Ermolenko, Dmitri N; Chen, XiaoFen; Thomas, Susan T

    2003-04-11

    The small globular protein, ubiquitin, contains a pair of oppositely charged residues, K11 and E34, that according to the three-dimensional structure are located on the surface of this protein with a spatial orientation characteristic of a salt bridge. We investigated the strength of this salt bridge and its contribution to the global stability of the ubiquitin molecule. Using the "double mutant cycle" analysis, the strength of the pairwise interactions between K11 and E34 was estimated to be favorable by 3.6kJ/mol. Further, the salt bridge of the reverse orientation, i.e. E11/K34, can be formed and is found to have a strength (3.8kJ/mol) similar to that of the K11/E34 pair. However, the global stability of the K11/E34 variant of ubiquitin is 2.2kJ/mol higher than that of the E11/K34 variant. The difference in the contribution of the opposing salt bridge orientations to the overall stability of the ubiquitin molecule is attributed to the difference in the charge-charge interactions between residues forming the salt bridge and the rest of the ionizable groups in this protein. On the basis of these results, we concluded that surface salt bridges are stabilizing, but their contribution to the overall protein stability is strongly context-dependent, with charge-charge interactions being the largest determinant. Analysis of 16 salt bridges from six different proteins, for which detailed experimental data on energetics have been reported, support the conclusions made from the analysis of the salt bridge in ubiquitin. Implications of these findings for engineering proteins with enhanced thermostability are discussed.

  5. Stabilization of collagen through bioconversion: An insight in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Usharani, Nagarajan; Jayakumar, Gladstone Christopher; Kanth, Swarna Vinodh; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava

    2014-08-01

    Collagen is a natural protein, which is used as a vital biomaterial in tissue engineering. The major concern about native collagen is lack of its thermal stability and weak resistance to proteolytic degradation. In this scenario, the crosslinking compounds used for stabilization of collagen are mostly of chemical nature and exhibit toxicity. The enzyme mediated crosslinking of collagen provides a novel alternative, nontoxic method for stabilization. In this study, aldehyde forming enzyme (AFE) is used in the bioconversion of hydroxylmethyl groups of collagen to formyl groups that results in the formation of peptidyl aldehyde. The resulted peptidyl aldehyde interacts with bipolar ions of basic amino acid residues of collagen. Further interaction leads to the formation of conjugated double bonds (aldol condensation involving the aldehyde group of peptidyl aldehyde) within the collagen. The enzyme modified collagen matrices have shown an increase in the denaturation temperature, when compared with native collagen. Enzyme modified collagen membranes exhibit resistance toward collagenolytic activity. Moreover, they exhibited a nontoxic nature. The catalytic activity of AFE on collagen as a substrate establishes an efficient modification, which enhances the structural stability of collagen. This finds new avenues in the context of protein-protein stabilization and discovers paramount application in tissue engineering.

  6. Quantifying why urea is a protein denaturant, whereas glycine betaine is a protein stabilizer

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Emily J.; Pegram, Laurel M.; Capp, Michael W.; Pollock, Michelle N.; Record, M. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    To explain the large, opposite effects of urea and glycine betaine (GB) on stability of folded proteins and protein complexes, we quantify and interpret preferential interactions of urea with 45 model compounds displaying protein functional groups and compare with a previous analysis of GB. This information is needed to use urea as a probe of coupled folding in protein processes and to tune molecular dynamics force fields. Preferential interactions between urea and model compounds relative to their interactions with water are determined by osmometry or solubility and dissected using a unique coarse-grained analysis to obtain interaction potentials quantifying the interaction of urea with each significant type of protein surface (aliphatic, aromatic hydrocarbon (C); polar and charged N and O). Microscopic local-bulk partition coefficients Kp for the accumulation or exclusion of urea in the water of hydration of these surfaces relative to bulk water are obtained. Kp values reveal that urea accumulates moderately at amide O and weakly at aliphatic C, whereas GB is excluded from both. These results provide both thermodynamic and molecular explanations for the opposite effects of urea and glycine betaine on protein stability, as well as deductions about strengths of amide NH—amide O and amide NH—amide N hydrogen bonds relative to hydrogen bonds to water. Interestingly, urea, like GB, is moderately accumulated at aromatic C surface. Urea m-values for protein folding and other protein processes are quantitatively interpreted and predicted using these urea interaction potentials or Kp values. PMID:21930943

  7. Discovery of Manassantin A Protein Targets Using Large-Scale Protein Folding and Stability Measurements.

    PubMed

    Geer Wallace, M Ariel; Kwon, Do-Yeon; Weitzel, Douglas H; Lee, Chen-Ting; Stephenson, Tesia N; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Mook, Robert A; Dewhirst, Mark W; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2016-08-05

    Manassantin A is a natural product that has been shown to have anticancer activity in cell-based assays, but has a largely unknown mode-of-action. Described here is the use of two different energetics-based approaches to identify protein targets of manassantin A. Using the stability of proteins from rates of oxidation technique with an isobaric mass tagging strategy (iTRAQ-SPROX) and the pulse proteolysis technique with a stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture strategy (SILAC-PP), over 1000 proteins in a MDA-MB-231 cell lysate grown under hypoxic conditions were assayed for manassantin A interactions (both direct and indirect). A total of 28 protein hits were identified with manassantin A-induced thermodynamic stability changes. Two of the protein hits (filamin A and elongation factor 1α) were identified using both experimental approaches. The remaining 26 hit proteins were only assayed in either the iTRAQ-SPROX or the SILAC-PP experiment. The 28 potential protein targets of manassantin A identified here provide new experimental avenues along which to explore the molecular basis of manassantin A's mode of action. The current work also represents the first application iTRAQ-SPROX and SILAC-PP to the large-scale analysis of protein-ligand binding interactions involving a potential anticancer drug with an unknown mode-of-action.

  8. Small-molecule stabilization of protein-protein interactions: an underestimated concept in drug discovery?

    PubMed

    Thiel, Philipp; Kaiser, Markus; Ottmann, Christian

    2012-02-27

    The modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has been recognized as one of the most challenging tasks in drug discovery. While their systematic development has long been considered as intractable, this view has changed over the last years, with the first drug candidates undergoing clinical studies. To date, the vast majority of PPI modulators are interaction inhibitors. However, in many biological contexts a prolonged lifespan of a PPI might be desirable, calling for the complementary approach of PPI stabilization. In fact, nature offers impressive examples of this concept and some PPI-stabilizing natural products have already found application as important drugs. Moreover, directed small-molecule stabilization has recently been demonstrated. Therefore, it is time to take a closer look at the constructive side of modulating PPIs. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Cementing proteins provide extra mechanical stabilization to viral cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando-Pérez, M.; Lambert, S.; Nakatani-Webster, E.; Catalano, C. E.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    The study of virus shell stability is key not only for gaining insights into viral biological cycles but also for using viral capsids in materials science. The strength of viral particles depends profoundly on their structural changes occurring during maturation, whose final step often requires the specific binding of ‘decoration’ proteins (such as gpD in bacteriophage lambda) to the viral shell. Here we characterize the mechanical stability of gpD-free and gpD-decorated bacteriophage lambda capsids. The incorporation of gpD into the lambda shell imparts a major mechanical reinforcement that resists punctual deformations. We further interrogate lambda particle stability with molecular fatigue experiments that resemble the sub-lethal Brownian collisions of virus shells with macromolecules in crowded environments. Decorated particles are especially robust against collisions of a few kBT (where kB is the Boltzmann’s constant and T is the temperature ~300 K), which approximate those anticipated from molecular insults in the environment.

  10. FAD Regulates CRYPTOCHROME Protein Stability and Circadian Clock in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Arisa; Braas, Daniel; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J

    2017-04-11

    The circadian clock generates biological rhythms of metabolic and physiological processes, including the sleep-wake cycle. We previously identified a missense mutation in the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding pocket of CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2), a clock protein that causes human advanced sleep phase. This prompted us to examine the role of FAD as a mediator of the clock and metabolism. FAD stabilized CRY proteins, leading to increased protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of Riboflavin kinase (Rfk), an FAD biosynthetic enzyme, enhanced CRY degradation. RFK protein levels and FAD concentrations oscillate in the nucleus, suggesting that they are subject to circadian control. Knockdown of Rfk combined with a riboflavin-deficient diet altered the CRY levels in mouse liver and the expression profiles of clock and clock-controlled genes (especially those related to metabolism including glucose homeostasis). We conclude that light-independent mechanisms of FAD regulate CRY and contribute to proper circadian oscillation of metabolic genes in mammals. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In Silico Docking of Ligands to Drug Oxidation Enzymes Cytochrome P450 3A4 and Cytochrome P450 1A2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Guglielmon, Jonathan; Glenn, Marsch; Peter, Guengerich F.

    2009-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) oxidize most drugs in humans. Protein modeling toolkits from OpenEye Scientific Software were used to examine the interaction of drug substrates with CYP3A4 and CYP1A2. Conformers and partial atomic charges were generated for each drug molecule. User-defined volumes were defined around CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 active sites. Ligands were docked assuming protein and substrates as rigid bodies. To assess rigid docking accuracy, x-ray diffraction coordinates of CYP3A4-erythromycin and CYP3A4-metyrapone complexes were obtained. Rigid re-docking of erythromycin and metyrapone into CYP3A4 yielded poses similar to the crystal structures. Rigid docking revealed two other energetically-favorable CYP3A4-metyrapone poses. The best poses were obtained by using all the Open Eye scoring functions. Optimization of protein-ligand interactions within 5-10 Angstroms of the docked ligand was then performed using the Merck Molecular Force Field in which the protein was assumed to be flexible and the ligand to be rigid. Nearby protein residues pulled slightly closer to the substrate, reducing the volume of the active site.

  12. Stability and structure of protein-polysaccharide coacervates in the presence of protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Christian; Renard, Denis

    2002-08-21

    We have studied at pH 4.2 and three protein (Pr):polysaccharide (Pol) weight ratios (8:1, 2:1 and 1:1) the structure and stability of beta-lactoglobulin/acacia gum/water dispersions containing protein aggregates (BLG/AG/W) or free from aggregates (AF-BLG/AG/W). Phase diagrams were characteristic of complex coacervation. BLG/AG/W dispersions displayed a larger biphasic area than AF-BLG/AG/W dispersions, that moved towards the protein axis. It was concluded that protein aggregates affected complex coacervation both by entropic (size and molecular masses of aggregates) and enthalpic (surface properties of aggregates) effects. Laser light scattering measurements revealed that the particles diameter (d(43)) induced by demixing was controlled by protein aggregates in AF-BLG/AG/W dispersions. At 1 wt.% biopolymer concentration, particles were 15-20 times larger in AF-BLG/AG/W dispersions than in BLG/AG/W dispersions at (Pr:Pol) ratios of 2:1 or 1:1. Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that AF-BLG/AG/W dispersions only contained spherical coacervates. BLG/AG/W dispersions contained both coacervates and aggregates coated with AG or/and BLG/AG coacervates. At a (Pr:Pol) ratio of 2:1 and 1:1, coacervates were vesicular or multivesicular. Coacervates were smaller in BLG/AG/W dispersions than in AF-BLG/AG/W dispersions. It was concluded that protein aggregates have the intrinsic ability to stabilize complex coacervates and could be used to design multifunctional delivery systems. This study showed that composite dispersions containing both protein aggregates embedded in protein-polysaccharide coacervates and free coacervates may be performed. In this respect, the design of protein aggregates with controlled size distribution and surface properties could open new possibilities both in the non-chemical control of coacervates stability and in the development of multifunctional delivery systems.

  13. Protein attributes contribute to halo-stability, bioinformatics approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Halophile proteins can tolerate high salt concentrations. Understanding halophilicity features is the first step toward engineering halostable crops. To this end, we examined protein features contributing to the halo-toleration of halophilic organisms. We compared more than 850 features for halophilic and non-halophilic proteins with various screening, clustering, decision tree, and generalized rule induction models to search for patterns that code for halo-toleration. Up to 251 protein attributes selected by various attribute weighting algorithms as important features contribute to halo-stability; from them 14 attributes selected by 90% of models and the count of hydrogen gained the highest value (1.0) in 70% of attribute weighting models, showing the importance of this attribute in feature selection modeling. The other attributes mostly were the frequencies of di-peptides. No changes were found in the numbers of groups when K-Means and TwoStep clustering modeling were performed on datasets with or without feature selection filtering. Although the depths of induced trees were not high, the accuracies of trees were higher than 94% and the frequency of hydrophobic residues pointed as the most important feature to build trees. The performance evaluation of decision tree models had the same values and the best correctness percentage recorded with the Exhaustive CHAID and CHAID models. We did not find any significant difference in the percent of correctness, performance evaluation, and mean correctness of various decision tree models with or without feature selection. For the first time, we analyzed the performance of different screening, clustering, and decision tree algorithms for discriminating halophilic and non-halophilic proteins and the results showed that amino acid composition can be used to discriminate between halo-tolerant and halo-sensitive proteins. PMID:21592393

  14. Conformational Mobility in Cytochrome P450 3A4 Explored by Pressure-Perturbation EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davydov, Dmitri R; Yang, Zhongyu; Davydova, Nadezhda; Halpert, James R; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2016-04-12

    We used high hydrostatic pressure as a tool for exploring the conformational landscape of human cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) by electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. Site-directed incorporation of a luminescence resonance energy transfer donor-acceptor pair allowed us to identify a pressure-dependent equilibrium between two states of the enzyme, where an increase in pressure increased the spatial separation between the two distantly located fluorophores. This transition is characterized by volume change (ΔV°) and P1/2 values of -36.8 ± 5.0 mL/mol and 1.45 ± 0.33 kbar, respectively, which corresponds to a Keq° of 0.13 ± 0.06, so that only 15% of the enzyme adopts the pressure-promoted conformation at ambient pressure. This pressure-promoted displacement of the equilibrium is eliminated by the addition of testosterone, an allosteric activator. Using site-directed spin labeling, we demonstrated that the pressure- and testosterone-sensitive transition is also revealed by pressure-induced changes in the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of a nitroxide side chain placed at position 85 or 409 of the enzyme. Furthermore, we observed a pressure-induced displacement of the emission maxima of a solvatochromic fluorophore (7-diethylamino-3-((((2-maleimidyl)ethyl)amino)carbonyl) coumarin) placed at the same positions, which suggests a relocation to a more polar environment. Taken together, the results reveal an effector-dependent conformational equilibrium between open and closed states of CYP3A4 that involves a pronounced change at the interface between the region of α-helices A/A' and the meander loop of the enzyme, where residues 85 and 409 are located. Our study demonstrates the high potential of pressure-perturbation strategies for studying protein conformational landscapes.

  15. Conformational Mobility in Cytochrome P450 3A4 Explored by Pressure-Perturbation EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Davydov, Dmitri R.; Yang, Zhongyu; Davydova, Nadezhda; Halpert, James R.; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2016-01-01

    We used high hydrostatic pressure as a tool for exploring the conformational landscape of human cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) by electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. Site-directed incorporation of a luminescence resonance energy transfer donor-acceptor pair allowed us to identify a pressure-dependent equilibrium between two states of the enzyme, where an increase in pressure increased the spatial separation between the two distantly located fluorophores. This transition is characterized by volume change (ΔV°) and P1/2 values of −36.8 ± 5.0 mL/mol and 1.45 ± 0.33 kbar, respectively, which corresponds to a Keq° of 0.13 ± 0.06, so that only 15% of the enzyme adopts the pressure-promoted conformation at ambient pressure. This pressure-promoted displacement of the equilibrium is eliminated by the addition of testosterone, an allosteric activator. Using site-directed spin labeling, we demonstrated that the pressure- and testosterone-sensitive transition is also revealed by pressure-induced changes in the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of a nitroxide side chain placed at position 85 or 409 of the enzyme. Furthermore, we observed a pressure-induced displacement of the emission maxima of a solvatochromic fluorophore (7-diethylamino-3-((((2-maleimidyl)ethyl)amino)carbonyl) coumarin) placed at the same positions, which suggests a relocation to a more polar environment. Taken together, the results reveal an effector-dependent conformational equilibrium between open and closed states of CYP3A4 that involves a pronounced change at the interface between the region of α-helices A/A′ and the meander loop of the enzyme, where residues 85 and 409 are located. Our study demonstrates the high potential of pressure-perturbation strategies for studying protein conformational landscapes. PMID:27074675

  16. Soy protein polymers: Enhancing the water stability property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gowrishankar

    Soy protein based plastics have been processed in the past by researchers for various short-term applications; however a common issue is the high water sensitivity of these plastics. This work concentrates on resolving this water sensitivity issue of soy protein polymers by employing chemical and mechanical interaction at the molecular level during extrusion. The primary chemical interactions employed were anhydride chemistries such as maleic anhydride (MA), phthalic anhydride (PTA), and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). These were respectively used in conjunction with glycerol as a plasticizer to produce relatively water stable soy protein based plastics. Formulations with varying additive levels of the chemistries were extruded and injection molded to form the samples for characterization. The additive levels of anhydrides were varied between 3-10% tw/tw (total mass). Results indicated that phthalic anhydride formulations resulted in highest water stability. Plastic formulations with concentration up to 10% phthalic anhydride were observed to have water absorption as low as 21.5% after 24 hrs of exposure to water with respect to 250% for the control formulation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was utilized to characterize and confirm the fundamental mechanisms of water stability achieved by phthalic and maleic anhydride chemistries. In addition, the anhydride formulations were modified by inclusion of cotton fibers and pretreated cotton powder in order to improve mechanical properties. The incorporation of cotton fibers improved the dry strength by 18%, but did not significantly improve the wet state strength of the plastics. It was also observed that the butylated-hydroxy anisole (BHA) formulation exhibited high extension values in the dry state and had inferior water absorption properties in comparison with anhydride formulations.

  17. Expression of the sucrose binding protein from soybean: renaturation and stability of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Carolina S; Luz, Dirce F; Oliveira, Marli L; Baracat-Pereira, Maria C; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2007-03-01

    The sucrose binding protein (SBP) belongs to the cupin family of proteins and is structurally related to vicilin-like storage proteins. In this investigation, a SBP isoform (GmSBP2/S64) was expressed in E. coli and large amounts of the protein accumulated in the insoluble fraction as inclusion bodies. The renatured protein was studied by circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic fluorescence, and binding of the hydrophobic probes ANS and Bis-ANS. The estimated content of secondary structure of the renatured protein was consistent with that obtained by theoretical modeling with a large predominance of beta-strand structure (42%) over the alpha-helix (9.9%). The fluorescence emission maximum of 303 nm for SBP2 indicated that the fluorescent tryptophan was completely buried within a highly hydrophobic environment. We also measured the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of sucrose binding by fluorescence titration using the refolded protein. The low sucrose binding affinity (K(d)=2.79+/-0.22 mM) of the renatured protein was similar to that of the native protein purified from soybean seeds. Collectively, these results indicate that the folded structure of the renatured protein was similar to the native SBP protein. As a member of the bicupin family of proteins, which includes highly stable seed storage proteins, SBP2 was fairly stable at high temperatures. Likewise, it remained folded to a similar extent in the presence or absence of 7.6M urea or 6.7 M GdmHCl. The high stability of the renatured protein may be a reminiscent property of SBP from its evolutionary relatedness to the seed storage proteins.

  18. Protein's native state stability in a chemically induced denaturation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Quiroz, L; Garcia-Colin, L S

    2007-05-21

    In this work, we present a generalization of Zwanzig's protein unfolding analysis [Zwanzig, R., 1997. Two-state models of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94, 148-150; Zwanzig, R., 1995. Simple model of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9801], in order to calculate the free energy change Delta(N)(D)F between the protein's native state N and its unfolded state D in a chemically induced denaturation. This Extended Zwanzig Model (EZM) is both based on an equilibrium statistical mechanics approach and the inclusion of experimental denaturation curves. It enables us to construct a suitable partition function Z and to derive an analytical formula for Delta(N)(D)F in terms of the number K of residues of the macromolecule, the average number nu of accessible states for each single amino acid and the concentration C(1/2) where the midpoint of the N<==>D transition occurs. The results of the EZM for proteins where chemical denaturation follows a sigmoidal-type profile, as it occurs for the case of the T70N human variant of lysozyme (PDB code: T70N) [Esposito, G., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 25910-25918], can be splitted into two lines. First, EZM shows that for sigmoidal denaturation profiles, the internal degrees of freedom of the chain play an outstanding role in the stability of the native state. On the other hand, that under certain conditions DeltaF can be written as a quadratic polynomial on concentration C(1/2), i.e., DeltaF approximately aC(1/2)(2)+bC(1/2)+c, where a,b,c are constant coefficients directly linked to protein's size K and the averaged number of non-native conformations nu. Such functional form for DeltaF has been widely known to fit experimental measures in chemically induced protein denaturation [Yagi, M., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 47009-47015; Asgeirsson, B., Guojonsdottir, K., 2006. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1764, 190-198; Sharma, S., et al., 2006. Protein Pept. Lett. 13(4), 323-329; Salem, M., et

  19. Significantly reduced cytochrome P450 3A4 expression and activity in liver from humans with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Court, Michael H; Yan, Bingfang; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Patients with diabetes mellitus require pharmacotherapy with numerous medications. However, the effect of diabetes on drug biotransformation is not well understood. Our goal was to investigate the effect of diabetes on liver cytochrome P450 3As, the most abundant phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes in humans. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Human liver microsomal fractions (HLMs) were prepared from diabetic (n = 12) and demographically matched nondiabetic (n = 12) donors, genotyped for CYP3A4*1B and CYP3A5*3 polymorphisms. Cytochrome P450 3A4, 3A5 and 2E1 mRNA expression, protein level and enzymatic activity were compared between the two groups. KEY RESULTS Midazolam 1′- or 4-hydroxylation and testosterone 6β-hydroxylation, catalyzed by P450 3A, were markedly reduced in diabetic HLMs, irrespective of genotype. Significantly lower P450 3A4 protein and comparable mRNA levels were observed in diabetic HLMs. In contrast, neither P450 3A5 protein level nor mRNA expression differed significantly between the two groups. Concurrently, we have observed increased P450 2E1 protein level and higher chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation activity in diabetic HLMs. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These studies indicate that diabetes is associated with a significant decrease in hepatic P450 3A4 enzymatic activity and protein level. This finding could be clinically relevant for diabetic patients who have additional comorbidities and are receiving multiple medications. To further characterize the effect of diabetes on P450 3A4 activity, a well-controlled clinical study in diabetic patients is warranted. PMID:21323901

  20. Regulation of the p73 protein stability and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberst, Andrew; Salomoni, Paolo; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Oren, Moshe; Melino, Gerry; Bernassola, Francesca . E-mail: bernasso@uniroma2.it

    2005-06-10

    p73, a homologue to the tumor suppressor gene p53, is involved in tumorigenesis, though its specific role remains unclear. The gene has two distinct promoters which allow the formation of two protein isoforms with opposite effects: full-length transactivating (TA) p73 shows pro-apoptotic effects, while the shorter {delta}Np73, which lacks the N-terminal transactivating domain, has an evident anti-apoptotic function. Unlike p53, the p73 gene is rarely mutated in human cancers. However, alterations in the relative levels of TA and {delta}Np73 have been shown to correlate with prognosis in several human cancers, suggesting that the fine regulation of these two isoforms is of pivotal importance in controlling proliferation and cell death. Much effort is currently focused on the elucidation of the mechanisms that differentially control TA and {delta}Np73 activity and protein stability, a process complicated by the finding that both proteins are regulated by a similar suite of complex post-translational modifications that include ubiquitination, sequential phosphorylation, prolyl-isomerization, recruitment into the PML-nuclear body (PML-NB), and acetylation. Here we shall consider the main regulatory partners of p73, with particular attention to the recently discovered Itch- and Nedd8-mediated degradation pathways, along with the emerging roles of PML, p38 MAP kinase, Pin1, and p300 in p73 transcriptional activation, and possible mechanisms for the differential regulation of the TAp73 and {delta}Np73 isoforms.

  1. Solubilizing and Stabilizing Proteins in Anhydrous Ionic Liquids through Formation of Protein-Polymer Surfactant Nanoconstructs.

    PubMed

    Brogan, Alex P S; Hallett, Jason P

    2016-04-06

    Nonaqueous biocatalysis is rapidly becoming a desirable tool for chemical and fuel synthesis in both the laboratory and industry. Similarly, ionic liquids are increasingly popular anhydrous reaction media for a number of industrial processes. Consequently, the use of enzymes in ionic liquids as efficient, environment-friendly, commercial biocatalysts is highly attractive. However, issues surrounding the poor solubility and low stability of enzymes in truly anhydrous media remain a significant challenge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that engineering the surface of a protein to yield protein-polymer surfactant nanoconstructs allows for dissolution of dry protein into dry ionic liquids. Using myoglobin as a model protein, we show that this method can deliver protein molecules with near native structure into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic anhydrous ionic liquids. Remarkably, using temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to measure half-denaturation temperatures, our results show that protein stability increases by 55 °C in the ionic liquid as compared to aqueous solution, pushing the solution thermal denaturation beyond the boiling point of water. Therefore, the work presented herein could provide a platform for the realization of biocatalysis at high temperatures or in anhydrous solvent systems.

  2. Distribution, Transition and Thermodynamic Stability of Protein Conformations in the Denaturant-Induced Unfolding of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liujiao; Ji, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Background Extensive and intensive studies on the unfolding of proteins require appropriate theoretical model and parameter to clearly illustrate the feature and characteristic of the unfolding system. Over the past several decades, four approaches have been proposed to describe the interaction between proteins and denaturants, but some ambiguity and deviations usually occur in the explanation of the experimental data. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, a theoretical model was presented to show the dependency of the residual activity ratio of the proteins on the molar denaturant concentration. Through the characteristic unfolding parameters ki and Δmi in this model, the distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations during the unfolding process can be quantitatively described. This model was tested with the two-state unfolding of bovine heart cytochrome c and the three-state unfolding of hen egg white lysozyme induced by both guanidine hydrochloride and urea, the four-state unfolding of bovine carbonic anhydrase b induced by guanidine hydrochloride and the unfolding of some other proteins induced by denaturants. The results illustrated that this model could be used accurately to reveal the distribution and transition of protein conformations in the presence of different concentrations of denaturants and to evaluate the unfolding tendency and thermodynamic stability of different conformations. In most denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins, the unfolding became increasingly hard in next transition step and the proteins became more unstable as they attained next successive stable conformation. Conclusions/Significance This work presents a useful method for people to study the unfolding of proteins and may be used to describe the unfolding and refolding of other biopolymers induced by denaturants, inducers, etc. PMID:24603868

  3. Dual effects of Tween 80 on protein stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Y John; Wang, D Q

    2008-01-22

    In this paper, we used IL-2 mutein as a model protein and evaluated the effect of Tween 80, a non-ionic surfactant. In summary, we found that the dual effects of Tween 80 on the stability of IL-2SA, such as that shaking-induced aggregation of IL-2 mutein was significantly inhibited in the presence of Tween 80. However, this surfactant adversely affected the stability of IL-2 mutein in solution during storage in terms of both oxidation and aggregation. These adverse effects are strongly temperature and formulation-dependent. Data particularly showed that IL-2 mutein in solution forms soluble aggregates to a different degree in different formulations during storage at 40 degrees C for 2 months. Aggregation was barely detectable during storage at 5 degrees C for 22 months. Addition of 0.1% Tween 80 significantly increased the rate of IL-2 mutein aggregation during storage. The IL-2 mutein aggregates are linked by both disulfide and non-disulfide bonds and their relative contribution is temperature-dependent. IL-2 mutein can be oxidized also to a different degree in different formulations during storage and the oxidation rate is strongly temperature-dependent with an activation energy between 21 and 25 kcal/mol. Addition of 0.1% Tween 80 not only increased the rate of oxidation in general but also altered the temperature-dependency of IL-2 mutein oxidation.

  4. Characterisation of protein stability in rod-insert vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Pattani, Aditya; Lowry, Deborah; Curran, Rhonda M; McGrath, Stephanie; Kett, Vicky L; Andrews, Gavin P; Malcolm, R Karl

    2012-07-01

    A major goal in vaccine development is elimination of the 'cold chain', the transport and storage system for maintenance and distribution of the vaccine product. This is particularly pertinent to liquid formulation of vaccines. We have previously described the rod-insert vaginal ring (RiR) device, comprising an elastomeric body into which are inserted lyophilised, rod-shaped, solid drug dosage forms, and having potential for sustained mucosal delivery of biomacromolecules, such as HIV envelope protein-based vaccine candidates. Given the solid, lyophilised nature of these insert dosage forms, we hypothesised that antigen stability may be significantly increased compared with more conventional solubilised vaginal gel format. In this study, we prepared and tested vaginal ring devices fitted with lyophilised rod inserts containing the model antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA). Both the RiRs and the gels that were freeze-dried to prepare the inserts were evaluated for BSA stability using PAGE, turbidimetry, microbial load, MALDI-TOF and qualitative precipitate solubility measurements. When stored at 4 °C, but not when stored at 40 °C/75% RH, the RiR formulation offered protection against structural and conformational changes to BSA. The insert also retained matrix integrity and release characteristics. The results demonstrate that lypophilised gels can provide relative protection against degradation at lower temperatures compared to semi-solid gels. The major mechanism of degradation at 40 °C/75% RH was shown to be protein aggregation. Finally, in a preliminary study, we found that addition of trehalose to the formulation significantly reduces the rate of BSA degradation compared to the original formulation when stored at 40 °C/75% RH. Establishing the mechanism of degradation, and finding that degradation is decelerated in the presence of trehalose, will help inform further development of RiRs specifically and polymer based freeze-dried systems in general.

  5. Byakangelicin induces cytochrome P450 3A4 expression via transactivation of pregnane X receptors in human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Luan, Xiaofei; Gui, Haiyan; Yan, Peng; Yang, Dongfang; Song, Xiulong; Liu, Wei; Hu, Gang; Yan, Bingfang

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Byakangelicin is found in extracts of the root of Angelica dahurica, used in Korea and China as a traditional medicine to treat colds, headache and toothache. As byakangelicin can inhibit the effects of sex hormones, it may increase the catabolism of endogenous hormones. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of byakangelicin on the cytochrome P450 isoform cytochrome (CY) P3A4 in human hepatocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cultures of human hepatocytes and a hepatoma cell line (Huh7 cells) were used. mRNA and protein levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Plasmid constructs and mutants were prepared by cloning and site-directed mutagenesis. Reporter (luciferase) activity was determined by transient co-transfection experiments. KEY RESULTS In human primary hepatocytes, byakangelicin markedly induced the expression of CYP3A4 both at the mRNA level (approximately fivefold) and the protein level (approximately threefold) but did not affect expression of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR). In reporter assays, byakangelicin activated CYP3A4 promoter in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50= 5 µM), and this activation was enhanced by co-transfection with hPXR. Further reporter assays demonstrated that the eNR4 binding element in the CYP3A4 promoter was required for the transcriptional activation of CYP3A4 by byakangelicin. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Byakangelicin induced expression and activity of CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes. This induction was achieved by the transactivation of PXR and not by increased expression of PXR. Therefore, byakangelicin is likely to increase the expression of all PXR target genes (such as MDR1) and induce a wide range of drug–drug interactions. PMID:20942813

  6. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A.

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  7. Mathematics, Thermodynamics, and Modeling to Address Ten Common Misconceptions about Protein Structure, Folding, and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robic, Srebrenka

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative…

  8. Mathematics, Thermodynamics, and Modeling to Address Ten Common Misconceptions about Protein Structure, Folding, and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robic, Srebrenka

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative…

  9. Osmolytes stabilize ribonuclease S by stabilizing its fragments S protein and S peptide to compact folding-competent states.

    PubMed

    Ratnaparkhi, G S; Varadarajan, R

    2001-08-03

    Osmolytes stabilize proteins to thermal and chemical denaturation. We have studied the effects of the osmolytes sarcosine, betaine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and taurine on the structure and stability of the protein.peptide complex RNase S using x-ray crystallography and titration calorimetry, respectively. The largest degree of stabilization is achieved with 6 m sarcosine, which increases the denaturation temperatures of RNase S and S pro by 24.6 and 17.4 degrees C, respectively, at pH 5 and protects both proteins against tryptic cleavage. Four crystal structures of RNase S in the presence of different osmolytes do not offer any evidence for osmolyte binding to the folded state of the protein or any perturbation in the water structure surrounding the protein. The degree of stabilization in 6 m sarcosine increases with temperature, ranging from -0.52 kcal mol(-1) at 20 degrees C to -5.4 kcal mol(-1) at 60 degrees C. The data support the thesis that osmolytes that stabilize proteins, do so by perturbing unfolded states, which change conformation to a compact, folding competent state in the presence of osmolyte. The increased stabilization thus results from a decrease in conformational entropy of the unfolded state.

  10. Stabilization of methionine-rich protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: targeting of BZN protein into the peroxisome.

    PubMed

    Nicaud, J M; Raynal, A; Beyou, A; Merkamm, M; Ito, H; Labat, N

    1994-01-01

    We have constructed a gene coding for the 12-kDa intermediate form of the 2s methionine-rich protein from Bertholletia excelsa seeds. This protein, expressed intracellularly in yeast, is characterised by a 20-min half-life. By adding 11 amino acids corresponding to the peroxisome-targeting sequence (PTSc) of luciferase, we have significantly increased its half-life. This stabilization allowed accumulation of the BZN protein into the peroxisome as judged by cell fractionation. Accumulation of the 12-kDa protein results in a significant increase of the total methionine content in yeast cells (30%) indicating that such a microorganism could represent a practicable protected shuttle for an animal-feed additive.

  11. Alpha-haemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) stabilizes apo-α-haemoglobin in a partially folded state

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Dickson, Claire F.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Mackay, Joel P.; Gell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS To produce functional haemoglobin, nascent α-globin (αo) and β-globin (βo) chains must each bind a single haem molecule (to form αh and βh) and interact together to form heterodimers. The precise sequence of binding events is unknown, and it has been suggested that additional factors might enhance the efficiency of Hb folding. The α-haemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) has previously been shown to bind αh and regulate redox activity of the haem iron. Here, we use a combination of classical and dynamic light scattering and NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that AHSP forms a heterodimeric complex with αo that inhibits αo aggregation and promotes αo folding in the absence of haem. These findings indicate that AHSP may function as an αo-specific chaperone, and suggest an important role for αo in guiding Hb assembly by stabilizing βo and inhibiting off-pathway self-association of βh. PMID:20860551

  12. α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein: a modulating factor in thalassemias?

    PubMed

    Wajcman, Henri; Vasseur, Corinne; Pissard, Serge; Baudin-Creuza, Veronique

    2011-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a small protein of 102 residues induced by GATA-1, Oct-1- and EKLF. It is synthesized at a high level in the red blood cell precursors and acts as a chaperone protecting the α-hemoglobin (α-Hb) chains against precipitation. α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein forms a heterodimer complex with α-Hb, then displaying modified oxygen binding kinetics. In the absence of AHSP, α-Hb oxidizes and precipitates within the erythrocyte precursors of bone marrow leading to apoptosis and defective erythropoiesis. Several α-Hb variants with a structural abnormality, frequently located in the contact area between α-Hb and AHSP, exhibit instability and a thalassemia-like syndrome when they are associated with another α-thalassemia (α-thal) determinant. We suggest that this disorder could result from a disturbed interaction between the abnormal α-Hb chains and AHSP. Hb Groene Hart (Pro119>Ser) was one of the first examples in which we observed this abnormality. We later verified this mechanism in a list of several variants, now considered as being nondeletional α-thalassemias. Conversely, it was hypothesized from studies on knock-out mice, that a defect affecting AHSP could cause a thalassemia-like syndrome. This was supported in man by studies showing that a decreased expression of AHSP linked to specific genetic clades could act as a modulating factor in some thalassemia phenotypes. It was also supported by our observation of a family from Southeast Asia, in which a child homozygous for an AHSP mutant (Val56>Gly) displayed, in his first year of life, a moderate thalassemia syndrome. This mutant AHSP was expressed in vitro and demonstrated by biochemical and biophysical studies to display a clear defective interaction with α-Hb, which could support the hypothesis that the reb blood cell (RBC) disorders of the child resulted from this abnormality. It therefore appears that AHSP is a factor with a key role in the formation of Hb

  13. Food proteins as novel nanosuspension stabilizers for poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Chen, Lingyun; Hu, Fuqiang; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-30

    Nanonization of the poorly water-soluble drugs is a promising strategy to improve dissolution and oral bioavailability. To stabilize the drug nanosuspensions, stabilizers are usually used; however, the use of common stabilizers is limited by weak stabilization effect and toxicological concerns for long-term treatment. The present work was to investigate the potential of food proteins as novel safe stabilizers for nanosuspensions using indomethacin as a model drug. The nanosuspensions stabilized by food proteins (soybean protein isolate, whey protein isolate and β-lactoglobulin) were prepared by the nanoprecipitation-ultrasonication method. The particle size could be easily reduced to 100-400 nm with bimodal particle-size distribution through monitoring the preparative variables. The exposure of buried hydrophobic moieties due to heat-denaturation and subsequent adsorption onto the surface of drug particles was assumed to contribute to their efficient stabilization effect. In comparison with conventional stabilizers, food proteins are superior in stabilization efficiency. The dissolution was enhanced significantly owing to particle size reduction. The protein-stabilized nanosuspensions could be easily freeze-fried and reconstituted into nanosuspensions, keeping the original mean particle size and particle-size distribution. It is concluded that the three denatured proteins perform as efficient stabilizers for indomethacin nanosuspensions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Stability constraints and protein evolution: the role of chain length, composition and disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Bastolla, U; Demetrius, Lloyd

    2005-09-01

    Stability of the native state is an essential requirement in protein evolution and design. Here we investigated the interplay between chain length and stability constraints using a simple model of protein folding and a statistical study of the Protein Data Bank. We distinguish two types of stability of the native state: with respect to the unfolded state (unfolding stability) and with respect to misfolded configurations (misfolding stability). Several contributions to stability are evaluated and their correlations are disentangled through principal components analysis, with the following main results. (1) We show that longer proteins can fulfil more easily the requirements of unfolding and misfolding stability, because they have a higher number of native interactions per residue. Consistently, in longer proteins native interactions are weaker and they are less optimized with respect to non-native interactions. (2) Stability against misfolding is negatively correlated with the strength of native interactions, which is related to hydrophobicity. Hence there is a trade-off between unfolding and misfolding stability. This trade-off is influenced by protein length: less hydrophobic sequences are observed in very long proteins. (3) The number of disulfide bonds is positively correlated with the deficit of free energy stabilizing the native state. Chain length and the number of disulfide bonds per residue are negatively correlated in proteins with short chains and uncorrelated in proteins with long chains. (4) The number of salt bridges per residue and per native contact increases with chain length. We interpret these observations as an indication that the constraints imposed by unfolding stability are less demanding in long proteins and they are further reduced by the competing requirement for stability against misfolding. In particular, disulfide bonds appear to be positively selected in short proteins, whereas they evolve in an effectively neutral way in long proteins.

  15. Effect of cosolvent on protein stability: A theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Chalikian, Tigran V.

    2014-12-14

    We developed a statistical thermodynamic algorithm for analyzing solvent-induced folding/unfolding transitions of proteins. The energetics of protein transitions is governed by the interplay between the cavity formation contribution and the term reflecting direct solute-cosolvent interactions. The latter is viewed as an exchange reaction in which the binding of a cosolvent to a solute is accompanied by release of waters of hydration to the bulk. Our model clearly differentiates between the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric interactions of solvent or co-solvent molecules with a solute. We analyzed the urea- and glycine betaine (GB)-induced conformational transitions of model proteins of varying size which are geometrically approximated by a sphere in their native state and a spherocylinder in their unfolded state. The free energy of cavity formation and its changes accompanying protein transitions were computed based on the concepts of scaled particle theory. The free energy of direct solute-cosolvent interactions were analyzed using empirical parameters previously determined for urea and GB interactions with low molecular weight model compounds. Our computations correctly capture the mode of action of urea and GB and yield realistic numbers for (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} which are related to the m-values of protein denaturation. Urea is characterized by negative values of (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} within the entire range of urea concentrations analyzed. At concentrations below ∼1 M, GB exhibits positive values of (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} which turn positive at higher GB concentrations. The balance between the thermodynamic contributions of cavity formation and direct solute-cosolvent interactions that, ultimately, defines the mode of cosolvent action is extremely subtle. A 20% increase or decrease in the equilibrium constant for solute-cosolvent binding may change the sign of (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} thereby altering the mode of

  16. Effect of cosolvent on protein stability: A theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalikian, Tigran V.

    2014-12-01

    We developed a statistical thermodynamic algorithm for analyzing solvent-induced folding/unfolding transitions of proteins. The energetics of protein transitions is governed by the interplay between the cavity formation contribution and the term reflecting direct solute-cosolvent interactions. The latter is viewed as an exchange reaction in which the binding of a cosolvent to a solute is accompanied by release of waters of hydration to the bulk. Our model clearly differentiates between the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric interactions of solvent or co-solvent molecules with a solute. We analyzed the urea- and glycine betaine (GB)-induced conformational transitions of model proteins of varying size which are geometrically approximated by a sphere in their native state and a spherocylinder in their unfolded state. The free energy of cavity formation and its changes accompanying protein transitions were computed based on the concepts of scaled particle theory. The free energy of direct solute-cosolvent interactions were analyzed using empirical parameters previously determined for urea and GB interactions with low molecular weight model compounds. Our computations correctly capture the mode of action of urea and GB and yield realistic numbers for (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P which are related to the m-values of protein denaturation. Urea is characterized by negative values of (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P within the entire range of urea concentrations analyzed. At concentrations below ˜1 M, GB exhibits positive values of (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P which turn positive at higher GB concentrations. The balance between the thermodynamic contributions of cavity formation and direct solute-cosolvent interactions that, ultimately, defines the mode of cosolvent action is extremely subtle. A 20% increase or decrease in the equilibrium constant for solute-cosolvent binding may change the sign of (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P thereby altering the mode of cosolvent action (stabilizing to destabilizing or vice

  17. Dissecting the role of protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions in MS2 bacteriophage stability.

    PubMed

    Lima, Sheila M B; Vaz, Ana Carolina Q; Souza, Theo L F; Peabody, David S; Silva, Jerson L; Oliveira, Andréa C

    2006-04-01

    To investigate the role of protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions in virus assembly, we compared the stabilities of native bacteriophage MS2, virus-like particles (VLPs) containing nonviral RNAs, and an assembly-defective coat protein mutant (dlFG) and its single-chain variant (sc-dlFG). Physical (high pressure) and chemical (urea and guanidine hydrochloride) agents were used to promote virus disassembly and protein denaturation, and the changes in virus and protein structure were monitored by measuring tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence, bis-ANS probe fluorescence, and light scattering. We found that VLPs dissociate into capsid proteins that remain folded and more stable than the proteins dissociated from authentic particles. The proposed model is that the capsid disassembles but the protein remains bound to the heterologous RNA encased by VLPs. The dlFG dimerizes correctly, but fails to assemble into capsids, because it lacks the 15-amino acid FG loop involved in inter-dimer interactions at the viral fivefold and quasi-sixfold axes. This protein was very unstable and, when compared with the dissociation/denaturation of the VLPs and the wild-type virus, it was much more susceptible to chemical and physical perturbation. Genetic fusion of the two subunits of the dimer in the single-chain dimer sc-dlFG stabilized the protein, as did the presence of 34-bp poly(GC) DNA. These studies reveal mechanisms by which interactions in the capsid lattice can be sufficiently stable and specific to ensure assembly, and they shed light on the processes that lead to the formation of infectious viral particles.

  18. StaRProtein, A Web Server for Prediction of the Stability of Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongtao; Zhou, Xu; Huang, Meilan

    2015-01-01

    Repeat proteins have become increasingly important due to their capability to bind to almost any proteins and the potential as alternative therapy to monoclonal antibodies. In the past decade repeat proteins have been designed to mediate specific protein-protein interactions. The tetratricopeptide and ankyrin repeat proteins are two classes of helical repeat proteins that form different binding pockets to accommodate various partners. It is important to understand the factors that define folding and stability of repeat proteins in order to prioritize the most stable designed repeat proteins to further explore their potential binding affinities. Here we developed distance-dependant statistical potentials using two classes of alpha-helical repeat proteins, tetratricopeptide and ankyrin repeat proteins respectively, and evaluated their efficiency in predicting the stability of repeat proteins. We demonstrated that the repeat-specific statistical potentials based on these two classes of repeat proteins showed paramount accuracy compared with non-specific statistical potentials in: 1) discriminate correct vs. incorrect models 2) rank the stability of designed repeat proteins. In particular, the statistical scores correlate closely with the equilibrium unfolding free energies of repeat proteins and therefore would serve as a novel tool in quickly prioritizing the designed repeat proteins with high stability. StaRProtein web server was developed for predicting the stability of repeat proteins. PMID:25807112

  19. Effects of Commonly Used Excipients on the Expression of CYP3A4 in Colon and Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Leslie; Lynch, Caitlin; Haidar, Sam; Polli, James; Wang, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this investigation was to assess whether common pharmaceutical excipients regulate the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human colon and liver cells. Methods Nineteen commonly used excipients were evaluated using a panel of experiments including cell-based human PXR activation assays, real-time RT-PCR assays for CYP3A4 mRNA expression, and immunoblot analysis of CYP3A4 protein expression in immortalized human liver cells (HepG2 and Fa2N4), human primary hepatocytes, and the intestinal LS174T cell models. Results No excipient activated human PXR or practically induced CYP3A4. However, three excipients (polysorbate 80, pregelatinized starch, and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose) tended to decrease mRNA and protein expression across experimental models. Conclusion This study represents the first investigation of the potential role of excipients in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Findings imply that some excipients may hold potential for excipient-drug interactions by repression of CYP3A4 expression. PMID:20503067

  20. CYP3A4-based drug-drug interaction: CYP3A4 substrates' pharmacokinetic properties and ketoconazole dose regimen effect.

    PubMed

    Boulenc, Xavier; Nicolas, Olivier; Hermabessière, Stéphanie; Zobouyan, Isabelle; Martin, Valérie; Donazzolo, Yves; Ollier, Céline

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the magnitude of the CYP3A4 inhibitory effect of 2 dosing regimens of ketoconazole and the influence of the pharmacokinetic properties of the CYP3A4 substrate on the extent of the substrate exposure increase. For this purpose, a clinical study was conducted and PBPK modeling simulations were performed. A crossover study was conducted in healthy subjects. The study was designed to compare the effects of different regimens of reversible CYP3A4 inhibitors, i.e., ketoconazole 400 mg OD, ketoconazole 200 mg BID, on two CYP3A4 substrates, alprazolam and midazolam, reflecting different pharmacokinetic properties in terms of first-pass effect and elimination. In parallel, time-based simulations were performed using the Simcyp population-based Simulator to address the usefulness of modeling to assess interaction clinical study design with CYP3A4 substrates. Comparison of the OD versus BID regimens for ketoconazole showed an opposite trend for the 2 substrates: BID (200 mg) dosing regimen provided the maximal clearance inhibition for alprazolam, while it was OD (400 mg) dosing regimen for midazolam. However, these effects are moderate despite the well-known pharmacokinetic differences between these substrates, suggesting that these differences are not enough. In the other way round, these investigations show how two CYP3A4 substrates can be different without leading to a major impact of the ketoconazole dosing regimen. The clinical findings are consistent with the Simcyp predictions, in particular the opposite trend observed with midazolam and alprazolam and the ketoconazole dosing regimen. These clinical investigations showed the influence of the CYP3A4 substrates' pharmacokinetic properties and the relevance of ketoconazole dose regimen on the magnitude of the interaction ratios. In addition, PBPK Simcyp simulations demonstrated how they can be used to help clinical study design assessment to capture the maximum effect.

  1. Reduced native state stability in crowded cellular environment due to protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuhei; Tochio, Naoya; Kigawa, Takanori; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The effect of cellular crowding environments on protein structure and stability is a key issue in molecular and cellular biology. The classical view of crowding emphasizes the volume exclusion effect that generally favors compact, native states. Here, results from molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments show that protein crowders may destabilize native states via protein-protein interactions. In the model system considered here, mixtures of villin head piece and protein G at high concentrations, villin structures become increasingly destabilized upon increasing crowder concentrations. The denatured states observed in the simulation involve partial unfolding as well as more subtle conformational shifts. The unfolded states remain overall compact and only partially overlap with unfolded ensembles at high temperature and in the presence of urea. NMR measurements on the same systems confirm structural changes upon crowding based on changes of chemical shifts relative to dilute conditions. An analysis of protein-protein interactions and energetic aspects suggests the importance of enthalpic and solvation contributions to the crowding free energies that challenge an entropic-centered view of crowding effects. PMID:23402619

  2. Cellular localization and functional significance of CYP3A4 in the human epileptic brain

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Chaitali; Marchi, Nicola; Desai, Nirav K.; Puvenna, Vikram; Hossain, Mohammed; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.; Janigro, Damir

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose Compelling evidence supports the presence of P450 enzymes (CYPs) in the central nervous system (CNS). However, little information is available on the localization and function of CYPs in the drug-resistant epileptic brain. We have evaluated the pattern of expression of the specific enzyme CYP3A4 and studied its co-localization with MDR1. We also determined whether an association exists between CYP3A4 expression and cell survival. Methods Brain specimens were obtained from eight patients undergoing resection to relieve drug-resistant seizures or to remove a cavernous angioma. Each specimen was partitioned for either immunostaining or primary culture of human endothelial cells and astrocytes. Immunostaining was performed using anti-CYP3A4, MDR1, GFAP, or NeuN antibodies. High performance liquid chromatography–ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) analysis was used to quantify carbamazepine (CBZ) metabolism by these cells. CYP3A4 expression was correlated to DAPI condensation, a marker of cell viability. Human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells were transfected with CYP3A4 to further evaluate the link between CYP3A4 levels, CBZ metabolism, and cell viability. Key Findings CYP3A4 was expressed by blood–brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells and by the majority of neurons (75 ± 10%). Fluorescent immunostaining showed coexpression of CYP3A4 and MDR1 in endothelial cells and neurons. CYP3A4 expression inversely correlated with DAPI nuclear condensation. CYP3A4 overexpression in HEK cells conferred resistance to cytotoxic levels of carbamazepine. CYP3A4 levels positively correlated with the amount of CBZ metabolized. Significance CYP3A4 brain expression is not only associated with drug metabolism but may also represent a cytoprotective mechanism. Coexpression of CYP3A4 and MDR1 may be involved in cell survival in the diseased brain. PMID:21294720

  3. Phenotype-genotype variability in the human CYP3A locus as assessed by the probe drug quinine and analyses of variant CYP3A4 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina . E-mail: cristina.rodriguez-antona@cnio.es; Sayi, Jane G.; Gustafsson, Lars L.; Bertilsson, Leif; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2005-12-09

    The human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) enzymes, which metabolize 50% of currently used therapeutic drugs, exhibit great interindividual differences in activity that have a major impact on drug treatment outcome, but hitherto no genetic background importantly contributing to this variation has been identified. In this study we show that CYP3A4 mRNA and hnRNA contents with a few exceptions vary in parallel in human liver, suggesting that mechanisms affecting CYP3A4 transcription, such as promoter polymorphisms, are relevant for interindividual differences in CYP3A4 expression. Tanzanian (n = 143) healthy volunteers were phenotyped using quinine as a CYP3A probe and the results were used for association studies with CYP3A4 genotypes. Carriers of CYP3A4*1B had a significantly lower activity than those with CYP3A4*1 whereas no differences were seen for five other SNPs investigated. Nuclear proteins from the B16A2 hepatoma cells were found to bind with less affinity to the CYP3A4*1B element around -392 bp as compared to CYP3A4*1. The data indicate the existence of a genetic CYP3A4 polymorphism with functional importance for interindividual differences in enzyme expression.

  4. Regulation of myocardin factor protein stability by the LIM-only protein FHL2

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, Jeremiah S.; Medlin, Matt D.; Taylor, Joan M.; Mack, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that serum response factor (SRF) regulates muscle-specific gene expression and that myocardin family SRF cofactors are critical for smooth muscle cell differentiation. In a yeast two hybrid screen for novel SRF binding partners expressed in aortic SMC, we identified four and a half LIM domain protein 2 (FHL2) and confirmed this interaction by GST pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation assays. FHL2 also interacted with all three myocardin factors and enhanced myocardin and myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-A-dependent transactivation of smooth muscle α-actin, SM22, and cardiac atrial natriuretic factor promoters in 10T1/2 cells. The expression of FHL2 increased myocardin and MRTF-A protein levels, and, importantly, this effect was due to an increase in protein stability not due to an increase in myocardin factor mRNA expression. Treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors MG-132 and lactacystin strongly upregulated endogenous MRTF-A protein levels and resulted in a substantial increase in ubiquitin immunoreactivity in MRTF-A immunoprecipitants. Interestingly, the expression of FHL2 attenuated the effects of RhoA and MRTF-B on promoter activity, perhaps through decreased MRTF-B nuclear localization or decreased SRF-CArG binding. Taken together, these data indicate that myocardin factors are regulated by proteasome-mediated degradation and that FHL2 regulates SRF-dependent transcription by multiple mechanisms, including stabilization of myocardin and MRTF-A. PMID:18586895

  5. Small-Molecule Stabilization of 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions Stimulates Axon Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Andrew; Morquette, Barbara; Kroner, Antje; Leong, SooYuen; Madwar, Carolin; Sanz, Ricardo; Banerjee, Sara L; Antel, Jack; Bisson, Nicolas; David, Samuel; Fournier, Alyson E

    2017-03-08

    Damaged central nervous system (CNS) neurons have a poor ability to spontaneously regenerate, causing persistent functional deficits after injury. Therapies that stimulate axon growth are needed to repair CNS damage. 14-3-3 adaptors are hub proteins that are attractive targets to manipulate cell signaling. We identify a positive role for 14-3-3s in axon growth and uncover a developmental regulation of the phosphorylation and function of 14-3-3s. We show that fusicoccin-A (FC-A), a small-molecule stabilizer of 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions, stimulates axon growth in vitro and regeneration in vivo. We show that FC-A stabilizes a complex between 14-3-3 and the stress response regulator GCN1, inducing GCN1 turnover and neurite outgrowth. These findings show that 14-3-3 adaptor protein complexes are druggable targets and identify a new class of small molecules that may be further optimized for the repair of CNS damage.

  6. Purification and characterization of ensconsin, a novel microtubule stabilizing protein.

    PubMed

    Bulinski, J C; Bossler, A

    1994-10-01

    In previous studies (Bulinski and Borisy (1979). Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 76, 293-297; Weatherbee et al. (1980). Biochemistry 19, 4116-4123) a microtubule-associated protein (MAP) of M(r) approximately 125,000 was identified as a prominent MAP in HeLa cells. We set out to perform a biochemical characterization of this protein, and to determine its in vitro functions and in vivo distribution. We determined that, like the assembly-promoting MAPs, tau, MAP2 and MAP4, the 125 kDa MAP was both proteolytically sensitive and thermostable. An additional property of this MAP; namely, its unusually tight association with a calcium-insensitive population of MTs in the presence of taxol, was exploited in devising an efficient purification strategy. Because of the MAP's tenacious association with a stable population of MTs, and because it appeared to contribute to the stability of this population of MTs in vitro, we have named this protein ensconsin. We examined the binding of purified ensconsin to MTs; ensconsin exhibited binding that saturated its MT binding sites at an approximate molar ratio of 1:6 (ensconsin:tubulin). Unlike other MAPs characterized to date, ensconsin's binding to MTs was insensitive to moderate salt concentrations (< or = 0.6 M). We further characterized ensconsin in immunoblotting experiments using mouse polyclonal anti-ensconsin antibodies and antibodies reactive with previously described MAPs, such as high molecular mass tau isoforms, dynamin, STOP, CLIP-170 and kinesin. These experiments demonstrated that ensconsin is distinct from other proteins of similar M(r) that may be present in association with MTs. Immunofluorescence with anti-ensconsin antibodies demonstrated that ensconsin was detectable in association with most or all of the MTs of several lines of human epithelial, fibroblastic and muscle cells; its in vivo properties and distribution, especially in response to drug or other treatments of cells, were found to be different from those of MAP4

  7. In vitro inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 by Aronia melanocarpa constituents.

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, Marie; Christensen, Hege; Johannesen, Siri; Slimestad, Rune; Wangensteen, Helle; Malterud, Karl E; Barsett, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    Extracts, subfractions, isolated anthocyanins and procyanidins, and two phenolic acids from aronia [Aronia melanocarpa] were investigated for their CYP3A4 inhibitory effects, using midazolam as the probe substrate and recombinant insect cell microsomes expressing CYP3A4 as the enzyme source. Procyanidin B5 was a considerably stronger CYP3A4 inhibitor in vitro than the isomeric procyanidin B2 and comparable to bergamottin, a known CYP3A4 inhibitor from grapefruit juice. The inhibitory activity of proanthocyanidin-containing fractions was correlated to the degree of polymerization. Among the anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-arabinoside showed stronger CYP3A4 inhibition than cyanidin 3-galactoside and cyanidin 3-glucoside. Thus, the ability to inhibit CYP3A4 in vitro seems to be influenced by the sugar unit linked to the anthocyanidin. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Stability and Immunogenicity of Hypoallergenic Peanut Protein-Polyphenol Complexes During In Vitro Pepsin Digestion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Allergenic peanut proteins are relatively resistant to digestion, and if digested, metabolized peptides tend to remain large and immunoreactive, triggering allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. In this study, the stability of hypoallergenic peanut protein-polyphenol complexes was evaluated d...

  9. Genetic selection designed to stabilize proteins uncovers a chaperone called Spy.

    PubMed

    Quan, Shu; Koldewey, Philipp; Tapley, Tim; Kirsch, Nadine; Ruane, Karen M; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Shi, Rong; Hofmann, Stephan; Foit, Linda; Ren, Guoping; Jakob, Ursula; Xu, Zhaohui; Cygler, Miroslaw; Bardwell, James C A

    2011-03-01

    To optimize the in vivo folding of proteins, we linked protein stability to antibiotic resistance, thereby forcing bacteria to effectively fold and stabilize proteins. When we challenged Escherichia coli to stabilize a very unstable periplasmic protein, it massively overproduced a periplasmic protein called Spy, which increases the steady-state levels of a set of unstable protein mutants up to 700-fold. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Spy protein is an effective ATP-independent chaperone that suppresses protein aggregation and aids protein refolding. Our strategy opens up new routes for chaperone discovery and the custom tailoring of the in vivo folding environment. Spy forms thin, apparently flexible cradle-shaped dimers. The structure of Spy is unlike that of any previously solved chaperone, making it the prototypical member of a new class of small chaperones that facilitate protein refolding in the absence of energy cofactors.

  10. Genetic selection designed to stabilize proteins uncovers a chaperone called Spy

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Shu; Koldewey, Philipp; Tapley, Tim; Kirsch, Nadine; Ruane, Karen M.; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Shi, Rong; Hofmann, Stephan; Foit, Linda; Ren, Guoping; Jakob, Ursula; Xu, Zhaohui; Cygler, Miroslaw; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the in vivo folding of proteins, we linked protein stability to antibiotic resistance, thereby forcing bacteria to effectively fold and stabilize proteins. When we challenged Escherichia coli to stabilize a very unstable periplasmic protein, it massively overproduced a periplasmic protein called Spy, which increases the steady-state levels of a set of unstable protein mutants up to 700-fold. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Spy protein is an effective ATP-independent chaperone that suppresses protein aggregation and aids protein refolding. Our strategy opens up new routes for chaperone discovery and the custom tailoring of the in vivo folding environment. Spy forms thin, apparently flexible cradle-shaped dimers. Spy is unlike the structure of any previously solved chaperone, making it the prototypical member of a new class of small chaperones that facilitate protein refolding in the absence of energy cofactors. PMID:21317898

  11. MDR- and CYP3A4-mediated drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2006-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multiple drug resistance associated proteins (MRPs), and cytochrome P450 3A4 together constitute a highly efficient barrier for many orally absorbed drugs. Multidrug regimens and corresponding drug-drug interactions are known to cause many adverse drug reactions and treatment failures. Available literature, clinical reports, and in vitro studies from our laboratory indicate that many drugs are substrates for both P-gp and CYP3A4. Our primary hypothesis is that transport and metabolism of protease inhibitors (PIs) and NNRTIs will be altered when administered in combination with azole antifungals, macrolide, fluroquinolone antibiotics, statins, cardiovascular agents, immune modulators, and recreational drugs [benzodiazepines, cocaine, lysergic acid dithylamide (LSD), marijuana, amphetamine (Meth), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and opiates] due to efflux, and/or metabolism at cellular targets. Therefore, such drug combinations could be a reason for the unexpected and unexplainable therapeutic outcomes. A number of clinical reports on drug interaction between PIs and other classes (macrolide antibiotics, azole antifungals, cholesterol lowering statins, cardiovascular medicines, and immunomodulators) are discussed in this article. MDCKII-MDR1 was employed as an in vitro model to evaluate the effects of antiretrovirals, azole antifungals, macrolide, and fluroquinolone antibiotics on efflux transporters. Ketoconazole (50 muM) enhanced the intracellular concentration of (3)H ritonavir. The inhibitory effects of ketoconazole and MK 571 on the efflux of (3)H ritonavir were comparable. An additive effect was observed with simultaneous incorporation of ketoconazole and MK 571. Results of (3)H ritonavir uptake studies were confirmed with transcellular transport studies. Several fluroquinolones were also evaluated on P-gp-mediated efflux of (3)H cyclosporin and 14C erythromycin. These in vitro studies indicate that grepafloxacin, levofloxacin

  12. Isolation of CYP3A4 Inhibitors from the Black Cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Recent investigation on drug interaction has shown that some foods and herbal medicines increase the oral availability of a variety of CYP3A4 substrates, which is caused by the reduction of CYP3A4 in intestinal epithelium. During the course of our investigation on CYP3A4 interaction, we found that the commercially available dietary supplement made from black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) showed CYP3A4 inhibition. Black cohosh has been used for the treatment of menopausal and post-menopausal symptoms as a dietary supplement. Bioassay-guided isolation from the supplement afforded six active principles, which were identified as cycloartanoid triterpene glycosides. PMID:15937564

  13. In vitro inhibition of CYP3A4 by herbal remedies frequently used by cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Engdal, Silje; Nilsen, Odd Georg

    2009-07-01

    The herbal remedies Natto K2, Agaricus, mistletoe, noni juice, green tea and garlic, frequently used by cancer patients, were investigated for their in vitro inhibition potential of cytochrome P-450 3A4 (CYP3A4) metabolism. To our knowledge, only garlic and green tea had available data on the possible inhibition of CYP3A4 metabolism. Metabolic studies were performed with human c-DNA baculovirus expressed CYP3A4. Testosterone was used as a substrate and ketoconazole as a positive quantitative inhibition control. The formation of 6-beta-OH-testosterone was quantified by a validated HPLC methodology. Green tea was the most potent inhibitor of CYP3A4 metabolism (IC(50): 73 microg/mL), followed by Agaricus, mistletoe and noni juice (1324, 3594, >10 000 microg/mL, respectively). All IC(50) values were high compared with those determined for crude extracts of other herbal remedies. The IC(50)/IC(25) ratios for the inhibiting herbal remedies ranged from 2.15 to 2.67, indicating similar inhibition profiles of the herbal inhibitors of CYP3A4. Garlic and Natto K2 were classified as non-inhibitors. Although Agaricus, noni juice, mistletoe and green tea inhibited CYP3A4 metabolism in vitro, clinically relevant systemic or intestinal interactions with CYP3A4 were considered unlikely, except for a probable inhibition of intestinal CYP3A4 by the green tea product. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Computational tools help improve protein stability but with a solubility tradeoff.

    PubMed

    Broom, Aron; Jacobi, Zachary; Trainor, Kyle; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2017-09-01

    Accurately predicting changes in protein stability upon amino acid substitution is a much sought after goal. Destabilizing mutations are often implicated in disease, whereas stabilizing mutations are of great value for industrial and therapeutic biotechnology. Increasing protein stability is an especially challenging task, with random substitution yielding stabilizing mutations in only ∼2% of cases. To overcome this bottleneck, computational tools that aim to predict the effect of mutations have been developed; however, achieving accuracy and consistency remains challenging. Here, we combined 11 freely available tools into a meta-predictor (meieringlab.uwaterloo.ca/stabilitypredict/). Validation against ∼600 experimental mutations indicated that our meta-predictor has improved performance over any of the individual tools. The meta-predictor was then used to recommend 10 mutations in a previously designed protein of moderate thermodynamic stability, ThreeFoil. Experimental characterization showed that four mutations increased protein stability and could be amplified through ThreeFoil's structural symmetry to yield several multiple mutants with >2-kcal/mol stabilization. By avoiding residues within functional ties, we could maintain ThreeFoil's glycan-binding capacity. Despite successfully achieving substantial stabilization, however, almost all mutations decreased protein solubility, the most common cause of protein design failure. Examination of the 600-mutation data set revealed that stabilizing mutations on the protein surface tend to increase hydrophobicity and that the individual tools favor this approach to gain stability. Thus, whereas currently available tools can increase protein stability and combining them into a meta-predictor yields enhanced reliability, improvements to the potentials/force fields underlying these tools are needed to avoid gaining protein stability at the cost of solubility. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and

  15. Effect of Chinese herbs on CYP3A4 activity and expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lau, C; Mooiman, K D; Maas-Bakker, R F; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M; Meijerman, I

    2013-09-16

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has become more popular among cancer patients in the Western world, who often use Chinese herbs as adjuvant therapy to reduce the adverse effects of conventional chemotherapy. However, pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between Chinese herbs and anticancer drugs can occur and have dramatic consequences for these patients. Currently, only a few possible PK interactions between Chinese herbs and conventional Western drugs have been documented. Since the drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) contributes to most of the PK interactions with (anticancer) drugs, the effect of four Chinese herbs (Oldenlandia diffusa, Codonopsis tangshen, Rehmannia glutinosa and Astragalus propinquus) on the activity and expression of CYP3A4 was investigated in vitro. Ethanol and water-ethanol extracts of the four Chinese herbs were prepared from raw material. CYP3A4 inhibition was assessed by the use of Supersomes™ in a fluorescence assay. Furthermore, CYP3A4 induction was evaluated in a human pregnane X receptor (hPXR)-mediated CYP3A4 reporter gene assay and a quantitative real time PCR assay, both in human colon adenocarcinoma-derived LS180 cells (LS180). Extracts of Oldenlandia diffusa, Codonopsis tangshen, Rehmannia glutinosa and Astragalus propinquus inhibited CYP3A4 in human CYP3A4 Supersomes™ (IC50 values: 17-83 µg/mL). Oldenlandia diffusa and Rehmannia glutinosa significantly induced PXR-mediated CYP3A4 (p<0.001). Oldenlandia diffusa also significantly induced CYP3A4 mRNA levels (p<0.001 at 250 µg/mL). Concomitant use of Oldenlandia diffusa and Rehmannia glutinosa could result in induction of CYP3A4, leading to a reduced efficacy of drugs that are CYP3A4 substrates and have a narrow therapeutic window. Because of the possible enhanced toxicity caused by CYP3A4 inhibition, clinical effects of CYP3A4 inhibition by Astragalus propinquus and Codonopsis tangshen must also be taken into account. In conclusion, herb-drug interactions

  16. Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization improves oxidative stability and interfacial properties of soy protein isolate-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Avila, C; Trujillo, A J

    2016-10-15

    Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization (100-300MPa) has great potential for technological, microbiological and nutritional aspects of fluid processing. Its effect on the oxidative stability and interfacial properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 4% (w/v) of soy protein isolate and soybean oil (10 and 20%, v/v) were studied and compared to emulsions treated by conventional homogenization (15MPa). Emulsions were characterized by particle size, emulsifying activity index, surface protein concentration at the interface and by transmission electron microscopy. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were evaluated in emulsions upon storage. Emulsions with 20% oil treated at 100 and 200MPa exhibited the most oxidative stability due to higher amount of oil and protein surface load at the interface. This manuscript addresses the improvement in oxidative stability in emulsions treated by UHPH when compared to conventional emulsions.

  17. Concurrent Cooperativity and Substrate Inhibition in the Epoxidation of Carbamazepine by Cytochrome P450 3A4 Active Site Mutants Inspired by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the major human P450 responsible for the metabolism of carbamazepine (CBZ). To explore the mechanisms of interactions of CYP3A4 with this anticonvulsive drug, we carried out multiple molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, starting with the complex of CYP3A4 manually docked with CBZ. On the basis of these simulations, we engineered CYP3A4 mutants I369F, I369L, A370V, and A370L, in which the productive binding orientation was expected to be stabilized, thus leading to increased turnover of CBZ to the 10,11-epoxide product. In addition, we generated CYP3A4 mutant S119A as a control construct with putative destabilization of the productive binding pose. Evaluation of the kinetics profiles of CBZ epoxidation demonstrate that CYP3A4-containing bacterial membranes (bactosomes) as well as purified CYP3A4 (wild-type and mutants I369L/F) exhibit substrate inhibition in reconstituted systems. In contrast, mutants S119A and A370V/L exhibit S-shaped profiles that are indicative of homotropic cooperativity. MD simulations with two to four CBZ molecules provide evidence that the substrate-binding pocket of CYP3A4 can accommodate more than one molecule of CBZ. Analysis of the kinetics profiles of CBZ metabolism with a model that combines the formalism of the Hill equation with an allowance for substrate inhibition demonstrates that the mechanism of interactions of CBZ with CYP3A4 involves multiple substrate-binding events (most likely three). Despite the retention of the multisite binding mechanism in the mutants, functional manifestations reveal an exquisite sensitivity to even minor structural changes in the binding pocket that are introduced by conservative substitutions such as I369F, I369L, and A370V. PMID:25545162

  18. Concurrent cooperativity and substrate inhibition in the epoxidation of carbamazepine by cytochrome P450 3A4 active site mutants inspired by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian S; Knehans, Tim; Davydov, Dmitri R; Bounds, Patricia L; von Mandach, Ursula; Halpert, James R; Caflisch, Amedeo; Koppenol, Willem H

    2015-01-27

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the major human P450 responsible for the metabolism of carbamazepine (CBZ). To explore the mechanisms of interactions of CYP3A4 with this anticonvulsive drug, we carried out multiple molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, starting with the complex of CYP3A4 manually docked with CBZ. On the basis of these simulations, we engineered CYP3A4 mutants I369F, I369L, A370V, and A370L, in which the productive binding orientation was expected to be stabilized, thus leading to increased turnover of CBZ to the 10,11-epoxide product. In addition, we generated CYP3A4 mutant S119A as a control construct with putative destabilization of the productive binding pose. Evaluation of the kinetics profiles of CBZ epoxidation demonstrate that CYP3A4-containing bacterial membranes (bactosomes) as well as purified CYP3A4 (wild-type and mutants I369L/F) exhibit substrate inhibition in reconstituted systems. In contrast, mutants S119A and A370V/L exhibit S-shaped profiles that are indicative of homotropic cooperativity. MD simulations with two to four CBZ molecules provide evidence that the substrate-binding pocket of CYP3A4 can accommodate more than one molecule of CBZ. Analysis of the kinetics profiles of CBZ metabolism with a model that combines the formalism of the Hill equation with an allowance for substrate inhibition demonstrates that the mechanism of interactions of CBZ with CYP3A4 involves multiple substrate-binding events (most likely three). Despite the retention of the multisite binding mechanism in the mutants, functional manifestations reveal an exquisite sensitivity to even minor structural changes in the binding pocket that are introduced by conservative substitutions such as I369F, I369L, and A370V.

  19. Combined application of plasma mutagenesis and gene engineering leads to 5-oxomilbemycins A3/A4 as main components from Streptomyces bingchenggensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Yue-Jing; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Chong-Xi; He, Hai-Rong; Wang, Xiang-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Milbemycin oxime has been commercialized as effective anthelmintics in the fields of animal health, agriculture, and human infections. Currently, milbemycin oxime is synthesized by a two-step chemical reaction, which involves the ketonization of milbemycins A3/A4 to yield the intermediates 5-oxomilbemycins A3/A4 using CrO3 as catalyst. Due to the low efficiency and environmental unfriendliness of the ketonization of milbemycins A3/A4, it is imperative to develop alternative strategies to produce 5-oxomilbemycins A3/A4. In this study, the atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) mutation system was first employed to treat milbemycin-producing strain Streptomyces bingchenggensis, and a mutant strain BC-120-4 producing milbemycins A3, A4, B2, and B3 as main components was obtained, which favors the construction of genetically engineered strains producing 5-oxomilbemycins. Importantly, the milbemycins A3/A4 yield of BC-120-4 reached 3,890 ± 52 g/l, which was approximately two times higher than that of the initial strain BC-109-6 (1,326 ± 37 g/l). The subsequent interruption of the gene milF encoding a C5-ketoreductase responsible for the ketonization of milbemycins led to strain BCJ60 (∆milF) with the production of 5-oxomilbemycins A3/A4 and the elimination of milbemycins A3, A4, B2, and B3. The high 5-oxomilbemycins A3/A4 yield (3,470 ± 147 g/l) and genetic stability of BCJ60 implied the potential use in industry to prepare 5-oxomilbemycins A3/A4 for the semisynthesis of milbemycins oxime.

  20. Cree antidiabetic plant extracts display mechanism-based inactivation of CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Tam, Teresa W; Liu, Rui; Arnason, John T; Krantis, Anthony; Staines, William A; Haddad, Pierre S; Foster, Brian C

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen Cree antidiabetic medicinal plants were studied to determine their potential to inhibit cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) through mechanism-based inactivation (MBI). The ethanolic extracts of the medicinal plants were studied for their inhibition of CYP3A4 using the substrates testosterone and dibenzylfluorescein (DBF) in high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and microtiter fluorometric assays, respectively. Using testosterone as a substrate, extracts of Alnus incana, Sarracenia purpurea, and Lycopodium clavatum were identified as potent CYP3A4 MBIs, while those from Abies balsamea, Picea mariana, Pinus banksiana, Rhododendron tomentosum, Kalmia angustifolia, and Picea glauca were identified as less potent inactivators. Not unexpectedly, the other substrate, DBF, showed a different profile of inhibition. Only A. balsamea was identified as a CYP3A4 MBI using DBF. Abies balsamea displayed both NADPH- and time-dependence of CYP3A4 inhibition using both substrates. Overall, several of the medicinal plants may markedly deplete CYP3A4 through MBI and, consequently, decrease the metabolism of CYP3A4 substrates including numerous medications used by diabetics.

  1. Using state diagrams for predicting colloidal stability of whey protein beverages.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty B; Ward, Loren; Foegeding, E Allen

    2015-05-06

    A method for evaluating aspects of colloidal stability of whey protein beverages after thermal treatment was established. Three state diagrams for beverages (pH 3-7) were developed representing protein solubility, turbidity, and macroscopic state after two ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) treatments. Key transitions of stability in the state diagrams were explored using electrophoresis and chromatography to determine aggregation propensities of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin, and glycomacropeptide. The state diagrams present an overlapping view of high colloidal stability at pH 3 accompanied by high solubility of individual whey proteins. At pH 5, beverages were characterized by poor solubility, high turbidity, and aggregation/gelation of whey proteins with the exception of glycomacropeptide. Stability increased at pH 6, due to increased solubility of α-lactalbumin. The results indicate that combinations of state diagrams can be used to identify key regions of stability for whey protein containing beverages.

  2. Importance of mutant position in Ramachandran plot for predicting protein stability of surface mutations.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Oobatake, Motohisa; Kono, Hidetoshi; Uedaira, Hatsuho; Sarai, Akinori

    2002-08-05

    Understanding the mechanisms by which mutations affect protein stability is one of the most important problems in molecular biology. In this work, we analyzed the relationship between changes in protein stability caused by surface mutations and changes in 49 physicochemical, energetic, and conformational properties of amino acid residues. We found that the hydration entropy was the major contributor to the stability of surface mutations in helical segments; other properties responsible for size and volume of molecule also correlated significantly with stability. Classification of coil mutations based on their locations in the (phi-psi) map improved the correlation significantly, demonstrating the existence of a relationship between stability and strain energy, which indicates that the role of strain energy is very important for the stability of surface mutations. We observed that the inclusion of sequence and structural information raised the correlation, indicating the influence of surrounding residues on the stability of surface mutations. Further, we examined the previously reported "inverse relationship" between stability and hydrophobicity, and observed that the inverse hydrophobic effect was generally applicable only to coil mutations. The present study leads to a simple method for predicting protein stability changes caused by amino acid substitutions, which will be useful for protein engineering in designing novel proteins with increased stability and altered function.

  3. Comparison of the colloidal stability, bioaccessibility and antioxidant activity of corn protein hydrolysate and sodium caseinate stabilized curcumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Hui; Yuan, Yang; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Wang, Jin-Mei; Guo, Jian; Lin, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this work were to construct corn protein hydrolysate (CPH)-based curcumin nanoparticles (Cur NPs) and to compare the colloidal stability, bioaccessibility and antioxidant activity of the Cur NPs stabilized CPH and sodium caseinate (NaCas) respectively. The results indicated that Cur solubility could be considerably improved after the Cur NPs fabrication. The spectroscopy results demonstrated that the solubilization of Cur should be attributed to its complexation with CPH or NaCas. The Cur NPs exhibited good colloidal stability after 1 week's storage but showed smaller (40 nm) size in CPH than in NaCas (100 nm). After lyophilization, the Cur NPs powders showed good rehydration properties and chemical stability, and compared with NaCas, the size of Cur NPs stabilized by CPH was still smaller. Additionally, the Cur NPs exhibited higher chemical stability against the temperature compared with free Cur, and the CPH could protect Cur from degradation more efficiently. Comparing with NaCas, the Cur NPs stabilized by CPH exhibited better bioaccessibility and antioxidant activity. This study demonstrated that CPH may be better than NaCas in Cur NPs fabrication and it opens up the possibility of using hydrophobic protein hydrolysate to construct the NPs delivery system.

  4. Increasing protein stability: Importance of ΔCp and the denatured state

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2010-01-01

    Increasing the conformational stability of proteins is an important goal for both basic research and industrial applications. In vitro selection has been used successfully to increase protein stability, but more often site-directed mutagenesis is used to optimize the various forces that contribute to protein stability. In previous studies, we showed that improving electrostatic interactions on the protein surface and improving the β-turn sequences were good general strategies for increasing protein stability, and used them to increase the stability of RNase Sa. By incorporating seven of these mutations in RNase Sa, we increased the stability by 5.3 kcal/mol. Adding one more mutation, D79F, gave a total increase in stability of 7.7 kcal/mol, and a melting temperature 28°C higher than the wild-type enzyme. Surprisingly, the D79F mutation lowers the change in heat capacity for folding, ΔCp, by 0.6 kcal/mol/K. This suggests that this mutation stabilizes structure in the denatured state ensemble. We made other mutants that give some insight into the structure present in the denatured state. Finally, the thermodynamics of folding of these stabilized variants of RNase Sa are compared with those observed for proteins from thermophiles. PMID:20340133

  5. Increasing protein stability: importance of DeltaC(p) and the denatured state.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the conformational stability of proteins is an important goal for both basic research and industrial applications. In vitro selection has been used successfully to increase protein stability, but more often site-directed mutagenesis is used to optimize the various forces that contribute to protein stability. In previous studies, we showed that improving electrostatic interactions on the protein surface and improving the beta-turn sequences were good general strategies for increasing protein stability, and used them to increase the stability of RNase Sa. By incorporating seven of these mutations in RNase Sa, we increased the stability by 5.3 kcal/mol. Adding one more mutation, D79F, gave a total increase in stability of 7.7 kcal/mol, and a melting temperature 28 degrees C higher than the wild-type enzyme. Surprisingly, the D79F mutation lowers the change in heat capacity for folding, DeltaC(p), by 0.6 kcal/mol/K. This suggests that this mutation stabilizes structure in the denatured state ensemble. We made other mutants that give some insight into the structure present in the denatured state. Finally, the thermodynamics of folding of these stabilized variants of RNase Sa are compared with those observed for proteins from thermophiles.

  6. Protein stability in stored decellularized heart valve scaffolds and diffusion kinetics of protective molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shangping; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Dai, Xiaolei; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres; Harder, Michael; Wolkers, Willem F

    2014-02-01

    Decellularized tissues can be used as matrix implants. The aims of this study were to investigate protein stability and solvent accessibility in decellularized pulmonary heart valve tissues. Protein denaturation profiles of tissues were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Protein solvent accessibility of tissue exposed to D2O, and diffusion kinetics of various protective molecules were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Little changes were observed in the protein denaturation temperature during storage, at either 5 or 40°C. Glycerol was found to stabilize proteins; it increased the protein denaturation temperature. The stabilizing effect of glycerol disappeared after washing the sample with saline solution. Hydrogen-to-deuterium exchange rates of protein amide groups were fastest in leaflet tissue, followed by artery and muscle tissue. Diffusion of glycerol was found to be fastest in muscle tissue, followed by artery and leaflet tissue. Diffusion coefficients were derived and used to estimate the time needed to reach saturation. Fixation of tissue with glutaraldehyde had little effects on exchange and diffusion rates. Diffusion rates decreased with increasing molecular size. Proteins in decellularized heart valve tissue are stable during storage. Glycerol increases protein stability in a reversible manner. Solvent accessibility studies of protein amide groups provide an additional tool to study proteins in tissues. Diffusion coefficients can be derived to simulate diffusion kinetics of protective molecules in tissues. This study provides novel tools to evaluate protein stability and solvent accessibility in tissues, which can be used to develop biopreservation strategies.

  7. Protein engineering to stabilize soluble amyloid β-protein aggregates for structural and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Härd, Torleif

    2011-10-01

    The molecular biology underlying protein aggregation and neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease is not yet completely understood, but small soluble nonamyloid aggregates of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) have been shown to play a fundamental neurotoxic role. The composition and biological action of such aggregates, known as oligomers and protofibrils, are therefore areas of intense study. However, research is complicated by the multitude of different interconverting aggregates that Aβ can form in vitro and in vivo, and by the inhomogeneity and instability of in vitro preparations. Here we review recent studies in which protein engineering, and in particular disulfide engineering, has been applied to stabilize different Aβ aggregates. For example, several techniques now exist to obtain stable and neurotoxic protofibrillar forms of Aβ, and engineered Aβ dimers, or larger aggregates formed by these, have been shown to specifically induce neuronal damage in a way that mimics Alzheimer's disease pathology. Disulfide engineering has also revealed structural properties of neurotoxic aggregates, for instance that Aβ in protofibrils and globular oligomers adopts a β-hairpin conformation that is similar to, but topologically distinct from, the conformation of Aβ in mature amyloid fibrils. Protein engineering is therefore a workable strategy to address many of the outstanding questions relating to the structure, interconversion and biological effects of oligomers and protofibrils of Aβ.

  8. Conjugation Strategy Strongly Impacts the Conformational Stability of a PEG-Protein Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Paul B; Billings, Wendy M; Miller, McKenzie B; Pandey, Brijesh K; Stephens, Andrew R; Langlois, Minnie I; Price, Joshua L

    2016-07-15

    Site-specific PEGylation is an important strategy for enhancing the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, and has been enabled by the recent development of many chemoselective reactions for protein side-chain modification. However, the impact of these different conjugation strategies on the properties of PEG-protein conjugates is poorly understood. Here we show that the ability of PEG to enhance protein conformational stability depends strongly on the identity of the PEG-protein linker, with the most stabilizing linkers involving conjugation of PEG to planar polar groups near the peptide backbone. We also find that branched PEGs provide superior stabilization relative to their linear counterparts, suggesting additional applications for branched PEGs in protein stabilization.

  9. Structural and functional stabilization of protein entities: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Balcão, Victor M; Vila, Marta M D C

    2015-10-01

    Within the context of biomedicine and pharmaceutical sciences, the issue of (therapeutic) protein stabilization assumes particular relevance. Stabilization of protein and protein-like molecules translates into preservation of both structure and functionality during storage and/or targeting, and such stabilization is mostly attained through establishment of a thermodynamic equilibrium with the (micro)environment. The basic thermodynamic principles that govern protein structural transitions and the interactions of the protein molecule with its (micro)environment are, therefore, tackled in a systematic fashion. Highlights are given to the major classes of (bio)therapeutic molecules, viz. enzymes, recombinant proteins, (macro)peptides, (monoclonal) antibodies and bacteriophages. Modification of the microenvironment of the biomolecule via multipoint covalent attachment onto a solid surface followed by hydrophilic polymer co-immobilization, or physical containment within nanocarriers, are some of the (latest) strategies discussed aiming at full structural and functional stabilization of said biomolecules.

  10. Denatured state aggregation parameters derived from concentration dependence of protein stability.

    PubMed

    Schön, Arne; Clarkson, Benjamin R; Siles, Rogelio; Ross, Patrick; Brown, Richard K; Freire, Ernesto

    2015-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major issue affecting the long-term stability of protein preparations. Proteins exist in equilibrium between the native and denatured or partially denatured conformations. Often denatured or partially denatured conformations are prone to aggregate because they expose to solvent the hydrophobic core of the protein. The aggregation of denatured protein gradually shifts the protein equilibrium toward increasing amounts of denatured and ultimately aggregated protein. Recognizing and quantitating the presence of denatured protein and its aggregation at the earliest possible time will bring enormous benefits to the identification and selection of optimal solvent conditions or the engineering of proteins with the best stability/aggregation profile. In this article, a new approach that allows simultaneous determination of structural stability and the amount of denatured and aggregated protein is presented. This approach is based on the analysis of the concentration dependence of the Gibbs energy (ΔG) of protein stability. It is shown that three important quantities can be evaluated simultaneously: (i) the population of denatured protein, (ii) the population of aggregated protein, and (iii) the fraction of denatured protein that is aggregated.

  11. Evolutionary stabilization of the gene-3-protein of phage fd reveals the principles that govern the thermodynamic stability of two-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andreas; Schmid, Franz X

    2003-05-09

    The gene-3-protein (G3P) of filamentous phage is essential for their propagation. It consists of three domains. The CT domain anchors G3P in the phage coat, the N2 domain binds to the F pilus of Escherichia coli and thus initiates infection, and the N1 domain continues by interacting with the TolA receptor. Phage are thus only infective when the three domains of G3P are tightly linked, and this requirement is exploited by Proside, an in vitro selection method for proteins with increased stability. In Proside, a repertoire of variants of the protein to be stabilized is inserted between the N2 and the CT domains of G3P. Stabilized variants can be selected because they resist cleavage by a protease and thus maintain the essential linkage between the domains. The method is limited by the proteolytic stability of G3P itself. We improved the stability of G3P by subjecting the phage without a guest protein to rounds of random in vivo mutagenesis and proteolytic Proside selections. Variants of G3P with one to four mutations were selected, and the temperature at which the corresponding phage became accessible for a protease increased in a stepwise manner from 40 degrees C to almost 60 degrees C. The N1-N2 fragments of wild-type gene-3-protein and of the four selected variants were purified and their stabilities towards thermal and denaturant-induced unfolding were determined. In the biphasic transitions of these proteins domain dissociation and unfolding of N2 occur in a concerted reaction in the first step, followed by the independent unfolding of domain N1 in the second step. N2 is thus less stable than N1, and it unfolds when the interactions with N1 are broken. The strongest stabilizations were caused by mutations in domain N2, in particular in its hinge subdomain, which provides many stabilizing interactions between the N1 and N2 domains. These results reveal how the individual domains and their assembly contribute to the overall stability of two-domain proteins and

  12. CYP3A4 expression in breast cancer and its association with risk factors in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Floriano-Sanchez, Esau; Rodriguez, Noemi Cardenas; Bandala, Cindy; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Lopez-Cruz, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, breast cancer (BCa) is the leading type of cancer in women. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) is a superfamily of major oxidative enzymes that metabolize carcinogens and many antineoplastic drugs. In addition, these enzymes have influence on tumor development and tumor response to therapy. In this report, we analyzed the protein expression in patients with BCa and in healthy women. Links with some clinic-pathological characteristic were also assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses were conducted on 48 sets of human breast tumors and normal breast tissues enrolled in Hospital Militar de Especialidades de la Mujer y Neonatologia and Hospital Central Militar, respectively, during the time period from 2010 to 2011. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 or Fisher exact tests to estimate associations and the Mann Whitney U test for comparison of group means. We found a significant CYP3A4 overexpression in BCa stroma and gland regions in comparison with healthy tissue. A significant association between protein expression with smoking, alcoholism and hormonal contraceptives use was also observed. Additionally, we observed estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) positive association in BCa. We suggest that CYP3A4 expression promotes BCa development and can be used in the prediction of tumor response to different treatments. One therapeutic approach may thus be to block CYP3A4 function.

  13. Current Approaches for Investigating and Predicting Cytochrome P450 3A4-Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Poulos, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the major and most important drug-metabolizing enzyme in humans that oxidizes and clears over a half of all administered pharmaceuticals. This is possible because CYP3A4 is promiscuous with respect to substrate binding and has the ability to catalyze diverse oxidative chemistries in addition to traditional hydroxylation reactions. Furthermore, CYP3A4 binds and oxidizes a number of substrates in a cooperative manner and can be both induced and inactivated by drugs. In vivo, CYP3A4 inhibition could lead to undesired drug-drug interactions and drug toxicity, a major reason for late-stage clinical failures and withdrawal of marketed pharmaceuticals. Owing to its central role in drug metabolism, many aspects of CYP3A4 catalysis have been extensively studied by various techniques. Here, we give an overview of experimental and theoretical methods currently used for investigation and prediction of CYP3A4-ligand interactions, a defining factor in drug metabolism, with an emphasis on the problems addressed and conclusions derived from the studies. PMID:26002732

  14. Effects of Protein Stabilizing Agents on Thermal Backbone Motions: A Disulfide Trapping Study†

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Scott L.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stabilizers are widely used to enhance protein stability, both in nature and in the laboratory. Here, the molecular mechanism of chemical stabilizers is studied using a disulfide trapping assay to measure the effects of stabilizers on thermal backbone dynamics in the Escherichia coli galactose/glucose binding protein. Two types of backbone fluctuations are examined: (a) relative movements of adjacent surface α-helices within the same domain and (b) interdomain twisting motions. Both types of fluctuations are significantly reduced by all six stabilizers tested (glycerol, sucrose, trehalose, l-glucose, d-glucose, and d-galactose), and in each case larger amplitude motions are inhibited more than smaller ones. Motional inhibition does not require a high-affinity stabilizer binding site, indicating that the effects of stabilizers are nonspecific. Overall, the results support the theory that effective stabilizing agents act by favoring the most compact structure of a protein, thereby reducing local backbone fluctuations away from the fully folded state. Such inhibition of protein backbone dynamics may be a general mechanism of protein stabilization in extreme thermal or chemical environments. PMID:8718847

  15. Mitotane induces CYP3A4 expression via activation of the steroid and xenobiotic receptor.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Akira; Igarashi-Migitaka, Junko; Koibuchi, Noriyuki; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2013-03-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare disease with an extremely poor prognosis. Mitotane alone or in combination with other cytotoxic drugs is a common therapeutic option for ACC. In addition to its adrenolytic function, mitotane has been known for decades to increase the metabolic clearance of glucocorticoids. It was recently shown that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is also rapidly metabolized in patients treated with mitotane, indicating that mitotane engages in clinically relevant drug interactions. Although the precise mechanism of these interactions is not well understood, cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase 3A4 (CYP3A4) is a key enzyme to inactivate both glucocorticoids and sunitinib. The nuclear receptor steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR (NR1I2)) is one of the key transcriptional regulators of CYP3A4 gene expression in the liver and intestine. A variety of xenobiotics bind to SXR and stimulate transcription of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) located in the CYP3A4 gene promoter. In this study, we evaluated the effects of mitotane on SXR-mediated transcription in vitro by luciferase reporter analysis, SXR-steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1) interactions, quantitative real-time PCR analysis of CYP3A4 expression, SXR knockdown, and CYP3A4 enzyme activity assays using human hepatocyte-derived cells. We found that mitotane activated SXR-mediated transcription of the XREs. Mitotane recruited SRC1 to the ligand-binding domain of SXR. Mitotane increased CYP3A4 mRNA levels, which was attenuated by SXR knockdown. Finally, we showed that mitotane increased CYP3A4 enzyme activity. We conclude that mitotane can induce CYP3A4 gene expression and suggest that mitotane is used cautiously due to its drug-drug interactions.

  16. Influence of lipophilicity on the interactions of hydroxy stilbenes with cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    Regev-Shoshani, Gilly; Shoseyov, Oded; Kerem, Zohar

    2004-10-15

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, was recently suggested to act as an irreversible, mechanism-based inactivator of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). We found a significant inhibition of human CYP3A4-dependent transformation of cyclosporine by resveratrol, with IC50 = 4.5 microM. We studied the kinetics parameters of CYP3A4 transformation of resveratrol and structurally related, naturally occurring stilbenes. Resveratrol, piceid, resveratroloside, 5,4'-dihydroxy-3-O-methoxystilbene, and 5,3-dihydroxy-4'-O-methoxystilbene were all shown to inhibit hydroxylation of testosterone by CYP3A4. Both methoxy-stilbenes had lower IC50 values, ranging from 0.43 to 0.47 microM, suggesting that lipophilicity rather than number or positions of free hydroxyls (3,5 or 5,4') determines the CYP3A4 inhibition capacity of polyphenols. In line with these findings, both glucosyl-stilbenes were found to be weak inhibitors of CYP3A4. The affinity of the enzyme towards methoxy-stilbenes, expressed as apparent Km, was indeed higher than those for the parent resveratrol and its glucosides, in CYP3A4 reaction mixtures. Vmax values were similar, except for piceid. These results support the role of lipophilicity in the interaction of polyphenols with CYP3A4. It is suggested that selective structural modifications of substrates add significantly to knowledge acquired through molecular modifications of the enzyme. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  17. The Cytochrome P450 3A4 Has Three Major Conformations: New Clues to Drug Recognition by this Promiscuous Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Benkaidali, Lydia; André, François; Moroy, Gautier; Tangour, Bahoueddine; Maurel, François; Petitjean, Michel

    2017-07-07

    We computed the channels of the 3A4 isoform of the cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP) on the basis of 24 crystal structures extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We identified three major conformations (denoted C, O1 and O2) using an enhanced version of the CCCPP software that we developed for the present work, while only two conformations (C and O(2) ) are considered in the literature. We established the flowchart of definition of these three conformations in function of the structural and physicochemical parameters of the ligand. The channels are characterized with qualitative and quantitative parameters, and not only with their surrounding secondary structures as it is usually done in the literature. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Protein thermal stability and phospholipid-protein interaction investigated by capillary isoelectric focusing with whole column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Bo, Tao; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2006-05-01

    CIEF with whole column imaging detection (WCID) is an attractive technique for studying protein reaction and protein-ligand interaction due to its fast separation, simple operation, and high efficiency. In this study, two interesting applications by the CIEF-WCID were developed, involving the study of protein thermal stability and phospholipid-protein interaction. Four proteins (beta-lactoglobulin B, trypsin inhibitor, phosphorylase b, and trypsinogen) with different pI, and two types of phospholipids, including phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylserine (PS), were used for this purpose. First, the altered CIEF profiles of four proteins were exhibited due to conformational changes resulting from protein denaturation induced by a high incubation temperature at 60 degrees C. It was demonstrated that the addition of a zwitterionic phospholipid (PC) played a crucial role in the thermal stability of targeted proteins, especially for trypsin inhibitor whose thermal stability was promoted with the addition of the PC vesicles at 60 degrees C. Second, the zwitterionic (PC) and acidic (PS) phospholipids displayed completely different interactions with the proteins. The addition of PS vesicles modified the zwitterionic phospholipids to carry negative charges, which correspondingly changed the interaction between the phospholipid and the protein. Our study demonstrates that the CIEF-WCID is a powerful approach to study protein reaction and protein-ligand interaction with high efficiency, high selectivity, and fast separation.

  19. A rapid, ensemble and free energy based method for engineering protein stabilities.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Athi N

    2013-05-02

    Engineering the conformational stabilities of proteins through mutations has immense potential in biotechnological applications. It is, however, an inherently challenging problem given the weak noncovalent nature of the stabilizing interactions. In this regard, we present here a robust and fast strategy to engineer protein stabilities through mutations involving charged residues using a structure-based statistical mechanical model that accounts for the ensemble nature of folding. We validate the method by predicting the absolute changes in stability for 138 experimental mutations from 16 different proteins and enzymes with a correlation of 0.65 and importantly with a success rate of 81%. Multiple point mutants are predicted with a higher success rate (90%) that is validated further by comparing meosphile-thermophile protein pairs. In parallel, we devise a methodology to rapidly engineer mutations in silico which we benchmark against experimental mutations of ubiquitin (correlation of 0.95) and check for its feasibility on a larger therapeutic protein DNase I. We expect the method to be of importance as a first and rapid step to screen for protein mutants with specific stability in the biotechnology industry, in the construction of stability maps at the residue level (i.e., hot spots), and as a robust tool to probe for mutations that enhance the stability of protein-based drugs.

  20. Predicting stability of alpha-helical, orthogonal-bundle proteins on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is a key phenomenon in many applications, but current understanding of the biophysics involved is lacking. At present, rational design of such emerging technologies is difficult as no methods or theories exist that correctly predict how surfaces influence protein behavior. Using molecular simulation and a coarse-grain model, this study illustrates for the first time that stability of proteins on surfaces can be correlated with tertiary structural elements for alpha-helical, orthogonal-bundle proteins. Results show that several factors contribute to stability on surfaces including the nature of the loop region where the tether is placed and the ability of the protein to freely rotate on the surface. A thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that surfaces stabilize proteins entropically and that any destabilization is an enthalpic effect. Moreover, the entropic effects are concentrated on the unfolded state of the protein while the ethalpic effects are focused on the folded state.

  1. Predicting stability of alpha-helical, orthogonal-bundle proteins on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A

    2010-09-21

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is a key phenomenon in many applications, but current understanding of the biophysics involved is lacking. At present, rational design of such emerging technologies is difficult as no methods or theories exist that correctly predict how surfaces influence protein behavior. Using molecular simulation and a coarse-grain model, this study illustrates for the first time that stability of proteins on surfaces can be correlated with tertiary structural elements for alpha-helical, orthogonal-bundle proteins. Results show that several factors contribute to stability on surfaces including the nature of the loop region where the tether is placed and the ability of the protein to freely rotate on the surface. A thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that surfaces stabilize proteins entropically and that any destabilization is an enthalpic effect. Moreover, the entropic effects are concentrated on the unfolded state of the protein while the ethalpic effects are focused on the folded state.

  2. A functional protein retention and release multilayer with high stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Kun; An, Qi; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-01

    Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by varying the number of capping layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein-loaded interfacial layers could not only be used to construct catalytic-active interfaces, but also be integrated as the power-generating unit to propel a macroscopic floating device.Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by

  3. Measuring the interaction of urea and protein-stabilizing osmolytes with the nonpolar surface of hydroxypropylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christopher; Rau, Donald C

    2008-06-24

    The interaction of urea and several naturally occurring protein-stabilizing osmolytes, glycerol, sorbitol, glycine betaine, trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), and proline, with condensed arrays of a hydrophobically modified polysaccharide, hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC), has been inferred from the effect of these solutes on the forces acting between HPC polymers. Urea interacts only very weakly. The protein-stabilizing osmolytes are strongly excluded. The observed energies indicate that the exclusion of the protein-stabilizing osmolytes from protein hydrophobic side chains would add significantly to protein stability. The temperature dependence of exclusion indicates a significant contribution of enthalpy to the interaction energy in contrast to expectations from "molecular crowding" theories based on steric repulsion. The dependence of exclusion on the distance between HPC polymers rather indicates that perturbations of water structuring or hydration forces underlie exclusion.

  4. Fungal Hydrophobin Proteins Produce Self-Assembling Protein Films with Diverse Structure and Chemical Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Victor C.; Ren, Qin; Pham, Chi L. L.; Morris, Vanessa K.; Kwan, Ann H.; Sunde, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobins are small proteins secreted by fungi and which spontaneously assemble into amphipathic layers at hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces. We have examined the self-assembly of the Class I hydrophobins EAS∆15 and DewA, the Class II hydrophobin NC2 and an engineered chimeric hydrophobin. These Class I hydrophobins form layers composed of laterally associated fibrils with an underlying amyloid structure. These two Class I hydrophobins, despite showing significant conformational differences in solution, self-assemble to form fibrillar layers with very similar structures and require a hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface to trigger self-assembly. Addition of additives that influence surface tension can be used to manipulate the fine structure of the protein films. The Class II hydrophobin NC2 forms a mesh-like protein network and the engineered chimeric hydrophobin displays two multimeric forms, depending on assembly conditions. When formed on a graphite surface, the fibrillar EAS∆15 layers are resistant to alcohol, acid and basic washes. In contrast, the NC2 Class II monolayers are dissociated by alcohol treatment but are relatively stable towards acid and base washes. The engineered chimeric Class I/II hydrophobin shows increased stability towards alcohol and acid and base washes. Self-assembled hydrophobin films may have extensive applications in biotechnology where biocompatible; amphipathic coatings facilitate the functionalization of nanomaterials.

  5. Modulation of protein stability and aggregation properties by surface charge engineering.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Govindan; Sokalingam, Sriram; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Madan, Bharat; Munussami, Ganapathiraman; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2013-09-01

    An attempt to alter protein surface charges through traditional protein engineering approaches often affects the native protein structure significantly and induces misfolding. This limitation is a major hindrance in modulating protein properties through surface charge variations. In this study, as a strategy to overcome such a limitation, we attempted to co-introduce stabilizing mutations that can neutralize the destabilizing effect of protein surface charge variation. Two sets of rational mutations were designed; one to increase the number of surface charged amino acids and the other to decrease the number of surface charged amino acids by mutating surface polar uncharged amino acids and charged amino acids, respectively. These two sets of mutations were introduced into Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) together with or without stabilizing mutations. The co-introduction of stabilizing mutations along with mutations for surface charge modification allowed us to obtain functionally active protein variants (s-GFP(+15-17) and s-GFP(+5-6)). When the protein properties such as fluorescent activity, folding rate and kinetic stability were assessed, we found the possibility that the protein stability can be modulated independently of activity and folding by engineering protein surface charges. The aggregation properties of GFP could also be altered through the surface charge engineering.

  6. Adhesive–cohesive model for protein compressibility: An alternative perspective on stability

    PubMed Central

    Dadarlat, Voichita M.; Post, Carol Beth

    2003-01-01

    As a dynamic property of folded proteins, protein compressibility provides important information about the forces that govern structural stability. We relate intrinsic compressibility to stability by using molecular dynamics to identify a molecular basis for the variation in compressibility among globular proteins. We find that excess surface charge accounts for this variation not only for the proteins simulated by molecular dynamics but also for a larger set of globular proteins. This dependence on charge distribution forms the basis for an adhesive–cohesive model of protein compressibility in which attractive forces from solvent compete with tertiary interactions that favor folding. Further, a newly recognized correlation between compressibility and the heat capacity of unfolding infers a link between compressibility and the enthalpy of unfolding. This linkage, together with the adhesive–cohesive model for compressibility, leads to the conclusion that folded proteins can gain enthalpic stability from a uniform distribution of charged atoms, as opposed to partitioning charge to the protein surface. Whether buried charged groups can be energetically stabilizing is a fundamental, yet controversial, question regarding protein structure. The analysis reported here implies that one mechanism to gain enthalpic stability involves positioning charge inside the protein in an optimal structural arrangement. PMID:14638940

  7. Metabolomic profiling of liquid Echinacea medicinal products with in vitro inhibitory effects on cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4).

    PubMed

    Modarai, Maryam; Yang, Min; Suter, Andy; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Heinrich, Michael

    2010-03-01

    ECHINACEA is a popular and widely used herbal medicinal product and consequently, studies of its interactions with conventional drugs are of particular importance. We have shown that ECHINACEA preparations and some common alkylamides weakly inhibit several cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms, with considerable variation in potency. We now report a detailed analysis of six commercial ECHINACEA liquid preparations, with emphasis on the metabolomic characterisation of the ECHINACEA compounds responsible for inhibiting CYP3A4. We separated each preparation into its ethanol- and water-soluble components, and then used (1)H-NMR together with multivariate data analysis and partial least square regression analysis to investigate the nature of the compounds responsible for CYP3A4 inhibition. The results implicated alkylamides in the CYP3A4 inhibitory activity of ECHINACEA. One of the commercial preparations (Echinaforce(R)) was further fractionated using solid phase extraction. Analysis by (1)H-NMR and mass spectroscopy (LC/MS, tandem MS, accurate mass) identified dodeca-2 E,4 E,8 Z,10 E/Z-tetraenoic acid (alkylamide 1) and a new compound (putative molecular formula C (18)H (36) NO (+)) as major components of the inhibitory fractions. In addition, the alkylamide content of all six preparations was determined by reverse phase HPLC. Levels of alkylamides 1 and 3 (undeca-2 E,4 E/ Z-diene-8,10-diynoic acid isobutylamide), correlated well with CYP3A4 inhibition. The acetylene tetradeca-8 Z-ene-11,13-diyn-2-one was shown to be present in the E. PURPUREA as well as the E. PALLIDA extracts. E. PURPUREA unlike E. PALLIDA was thought to not contain significant amounts of acetylenes. Our results directly confirm the role of alkylamides in the inhibition of CYP3A4 by ECHINACEA and uncovered a new compound which may also be involved. Extensive differences in the composition of the commercially available preparations were found. This will inevitably impact on the product efficacy, safety and

  8. Mapping the stabilome: a novel computational method for classifying metabolic protein stability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The half-life of a protein is regulated by a range of system properties, including the abundance of components of the degradative machinery and protein modifiers. It is also influenced by protein-specific properties, such as a protein’s structural make-up and interaction partners. New experimental techniques coupled with powerful data integration methods now enable us to not only investigate what features govern protein stability in general, but also to build models that identify what properties determine each protein’s metabolic stability. Results In this work we present five groups of features useful for predicting protein stability: (1) post-translational modifications, (2) domain types, (3) structural disorder, (4) the identity of a protein’s N-terminal residue and (5) amino acid sequence. We incorporate these features into a predictive model with promising accuracy. At a 20% false positive rate, the model exhibits an 80% true positive rate, outperforming the only previously proposed stability predictor. We also investigate the impact of N-terminal protein tagging as used to generate the data set, in particular the impact it may have on the measurements for secreted and transmembrane proteins; we train and test our model on a subset of the data with those proteins removed, and show that the model sustains high accuracy. Finally, we estimate system-wide metabolic stability by surveying the whole human proteome. Conclusions We describe a variety of protein features that are significantly over- or under-represented in stable and unstable proteins, including phosphorylation, acetylation and destabilizing N-terminal residues. Bayesian networks are ideal for combining these features into a predictive model with superior accuracy and transparency compared to the only other proposed stability predictor. Furthermore, our stability predictions of the human proteome will find application in the analysis of functionally related proteins, shedding new light

  9. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  10. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-25

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  11. Pharmacogenomics of Cytochrome P450 3A4: Recent Progress Toward the "Missing Heritability" Problem.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kathrin; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2013-01-01

    CYP3A4 is the most important drug metabolizing enzyme in adult humans because of its prominent expression in liver and gut and because of its broad substrate specificity, which includes drugs from most therapeutic categories and many endogenous substances. Expression and function of CYP3A4 vary extensively both intra- and interindividually thus contributing to unpredictable drug response and toxicity. A multitude of environmental, genetic, and physiological factors are known to influence CYP3A4 expression and activity. Among the best predictable sources of variation are drug-drug interactions, which are either caused by pregnane X-receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) mediated gene induction, or by inhibition through coadministered drugs or other chemicals, including also plant and food ingredients. Among physiological and pathophysiological factors are hormonal status, age, and gender, the latter of which was shown to result in higher levels in females compared to males, as well as inflammatory processes that downregulate CYP3A4 transcription. Despite the influence of these non-genetic factors, the genetic influence on CYP3A4 activity was estimated in previous twin studies and using information on repeated drug administration to account for 66% up to 88% of the interindividual variation. Although many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the CYP3A locus have been identified, genetic association studies have so far failed to explain a major part of the phenotypic variability. The term "missing heritability" has been used to denominate the gap between expected and known genetic contribution, e.g., for complex diseases, and is also used here in analogy. In this review we summarize CYP3A4 pharmacogenetics/genomics from the early inheritance estimations up to the most recent genetic and clinical studies, including new findings about SNPs in CYP3A4 (*22) and other genes (P450 oxidoreductase (POR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor

  12. [Effects of isorhamnetin on CYP3A4 and herb-drug interaction].

    PubMed

    Ding, Li-li; Zhang, Jing-jing; Dou, Wei

    2012-08-01

    The study is to report the investigation of the effects of isorhamnetin on CYP3A4 and herb-drug interaction. A reporter gene assay is used to test pregnane X receptor transactivation action, qRT-PCR and a luminescence-based assay were applied to determine mRNA induction and enzyme activity of CYP3A4 after isorhamnetin treatment. The interaction of irinotecan and isorhamnetin was assessed by inhibition assay of cell proliferation. Isorhamnetin at 1, 10 and 25 micromol x L(-1) transactivated the CYP3A4 reporter construct and upregulated CYP3A4 mRNA as well in a dose-dependent manner. However, isorhamnetin had no effect on enzyme activity of CYP3A4 and irinotecan HepG2 cytotoxicity. In conclusion, activation of PXR by isorhamnetin played a role in the upregulation of CYP3A4 mRNA. Moreover, joint action of isorhamnetin with other drugs may not be associated with the herb-drug interaction.

  13. CYP3A4*18 polymorphisms and anti-hepatitis A virus seroprevalence.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fazlina; Che Hamzah, Nor Aizal; Mustaffa, Nazri; Hua, Gan Siew

    2011-01-01

    CYP3A4 is the major cytochrome in humans which shows reduced activity in chronic liver disease as well as in hepatic cirrhosis. The detection of this polymorphism may give an indication on the prognosis of patients having chronic viral hepatitis with superimposed hepatitis A infection. The aim of this study is to correlate the seroprevalence of anti-HAV antibodies in chronic liver disease patients having CYP3A4*18 polymorphisms. This is a prospective study where patients (n=119) blood was tested for anti-HAVIgG and CYP3A4*18 polymorphism. The overall anti-HAV seroprevalence was 88.2%. The etiology of CLD was hepatitis B in 96 patients (80.7%) and hepatitis C in 23 patients (19.3%). There was a significant increase in the age of the prevalence of this disease after 30 years of age (p=0.008). CYP3A4*18 polymorphism was detected in 3 (2.5%) of the patients with chronic liver disease. However, there was no significant association between CP3A4*18 mutation and anti-HAV serology. Age was the most important factor in determining anti-HAV positivity. It is concluded that CYP3A4*18 genetic polymorphism does not play a main role in influencing the seroprevalence of anti-hepatitis A among chronic viral hepatitis B and C liver disease patients.

  14. Stability Curve Prediction of Homologous Proteins Using Temperature-Dependent Statistical Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The unraveling and control of protein stability at different temperatures is a fundamental problem in biophysics that is substantially far from being quantitatively and accurately solved, as it requires a precise knowledge of the temperature dependence of amino acid interactions. In this paper we attempt to gain insight into the thermal stability of proteins by designing a tool to predict the full stability curve as a function of the temperature for a set of 45 proteins belonging to 11 homologous families, given their sequence and structure, as well as the melting temperature () and the change in heat capacity () of proteins belonging to the same family. Stability curves constitute a fundamental instrument to analyze in detail the thermal stability and its relation to the thermodynamic stability, and to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the folding free energy. In summary, our approach for predicting the protein stability curves relies on temperature-dependent statistical potentials derived from three datasets of protein structures with targeted thermal stability properties. Using these potentials, the folding free energies () at three different temperatures were computed for each protein. The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation was then used to predict the protein's stability curve as the curve that best fits these three points. The results are quite encouraging: the standard deviations between the experimental and predicted 's, 's and folding free energies at room temperature () are equal to 13 , 1.3 ) and 4.1 , respectively, in cross-validation. The main sources of error and some further improvements and perspectives are briefly discussed. PMID:25032839

  15. Stability curve prediction of homologous proteins using temperature-dependent statistical potentials.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-07-01

    The unraveling and control of protein stability at different temperatures is a fundamental problem in biophysics that is substantially far from being quantitatively and accurately solved, as it requires a precise knowledge of the temperature dependence of amino acid interactions. In this paper we attempt to gain insight into the thermal stability of proteins by designing a tool to predict the full stability curve as a function of the temperature for a set of 45 proteins belonging to 11 homologous families, given their sequence and structure, as well as the melting temperature (Tm) and the change in heat capacity (ΔCP) of proteins belonging to the same family. Stability curves constitute a fundamental instrument to analyze in detail the thermal stability and its relation to the thermodynamic stability, and to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the folding free energy. In summary, our approach for predicting the protein stability curves relies on temperature-dependent statistical potentials derived from three datasets of protein structures with targeted thermal stability properties. Using these potentials, the folding free energies (ΔG) at three different temperatures were computed for each protein. The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation was then used to predict the protein's stability curve as the curve that best fits these three points. The results are quite encouraging: the standard deviations between the experimental and predicted Tm's, ΔCP's and folding free energies at room temperature (ΔG25) are equal to 13° C, 1.3 kcal/(mol° C) and 4.1 kcal/mol, respectively, in cross-validation. The main sources of error and some further improvements and perspectives are briefly discussed.

  16. CAR-mediated up-regulation of CYP3A4 expression in LS174T cells by Chinese herbal compounds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Bi, Hui-Chang; Liu, Ya-He; Wang, Yi-Tao; Xue, Xin-Ping; Huang, Min

    2011-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is an orphan nuclear receptor which has been shown to participate in the activation of human CYP3A4, which metabolizes more than 50% of clinically used drugs. We investigated the effects of an array of compounds isolated from herbal medicines such as Rheum palmatum (Da Huang), Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn (Qian Hu), Cortex Mori Radicis (Sang Bai Pi), Radix Asteris (Zi Wan), Salvia miltiorrhiza (Dan Shen), Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc (Hu Zhang), and Ginkgo biloba (Yin Xing) on the CAR-mediated transactivation of CYP3A4. The effect of herbal compounds on CYP3A4 expression was measured using a CYP3A4 luciferase reporter gene assay in transiently transfected human intestinal LS174T cells. The gene expression, protein expression, and catalytic activity of CYP3A4 in LS174T cells transfected with CAR were determined by using real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and LC-MS/MS-based substrate assay. The study found that in CAR-transfected cells, praeruptorin A, C, and D significantly induced CYP3A4 luciferase activity, mRNA expression, and functional activity through the CAR-mediated pathway; conversely, induction was not found in untransfected cells. Our findings suggest that these herbal compounds can significantly up-regulate the CYP3A4 gene via the CAR-mediated pathway, which has important implications in herb-drug interactions.

  17. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols. PMID:27113844

  18. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-04-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols.

  19. Endosulfan induces CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 by activating the pregnane X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Casabar, Richard C.T.; Das, Parikshit C.; DeKrey, Gregory K.; Gardiner, Catherine S.; Cao Yan; Rose, Randy L.; Wallace, Andrew D.

    2010-06-15

    Endosulfan is an organochlorine pesticide commonly used in agriculture. Endosulfan has affects on vertebrate xenobiotic metabolism pathways that may be mediated, in part, by its ability to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) which can elevate expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. This study examined the dose-dependency and receptor specificity of CYP induction in vitro and in vivo. The HepG2 cell line was transiently transfected with CYP2B6- and CYP3A4-luciferase promoter reporter plasmids along with human PXR (hPXR) or hCAR expression vectors. In the presence of hPXR, endosulfan-alpha exposure caused significant induction of CYP2B6 (16-fold) and CYP3A4 (11-fold) promoter activities over control at 10 {mu}M. The metabolite endosulfan sulfate also induced CYP2B6 (12-fold) and CYP3A4 (6-fold) promoter activities over control at 10 {mu}M. In the presence of hCAR-3, endosulfan-alpha induced CYP2B6 (2-fold) promoter activity at 10 {mu}M, but not at lower concentrations. These data indicate that endosulfan-alpha significantly activates hPXR strongly and hCAR weakly. Using western blot analysis of human hepatocytes, the lowest concentrations at which CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 protein levels were found to be significantly elevated by endosulfan-alpha were 1.0 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M, respectively. In mPXR-null/hPXR-transgenic mice, endosulfan-alpha exposure (2.5 mg/kg/day) caused a significant reduction of tribromoethanol-induced sleep times by approximately 50%, whereas no significant change in sleep times was observed in PXR-null mice. These data support the role of endosulfan-alpha as a strong activator of PXR and inducer of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4, which may impact metabolism of CYP2B6 or CYP3A4 substrates.

  20. Effect of protein load on stability of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lopez, Laura; Pedrero, Sara G; Lopez-Carrobles, Nerea; Gorines, Beatriz C; Virgen-Ortíz, Jose J; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    Different lipases have been immobilized on octyl agarose beads at 1mg/g and at maximum loading, via physical interfacial activation versus the octyl layer on the support. The stability of the preparations was analyzed. Most biocatalysts had the expected result: the apparent stability increased using the highly loaded preparations, due to the diffusional limitations that reduced the initial observed activity. However, lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB) was significantly more stable using the lowly loaded preparation than the maximum loaded one. This negative effect of the enzyme crowding on enzyme stability was found in inactivations at pH 5, 7 or 9, but not in inactivations in the presence of organic solvents. The immobilization using ethanol to reduce the immobilization rate had no effect on the stability of the lowly loaded preparation, while the highly loaded enzyme biocatalysts increased their stabilities, becoming very similar to that of the lowly loaded preparation. Results suggested that CALB molecules immobilized on octyl agarose may be closely packed together due to the high immobilization rate and this produced some negative interactions between immobilized enzyme molecules during enzyme thermal inactivation. Slowing-down the immobilization rate may be a solution for this unexpected problem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Salts Enhance Both Protein Stability and Amyloid Formation of an Immunoglobulin Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Sikkink, Laura A.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix. The presence of sulfated glycosaminoglycans is known to promote amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, with the sulfate groups playing a role in this process. In order to understand the role that sulfate plays in amyloid formation, we have studied the effect of salts from the Hofmeister series on the protein structure, stability and amyloid formation of an amyloidogenic light chain protein, AL-12. We have been able to show for the first time a direct correlation between protein stability and amyloid formation enhancement by salts from the Hofmeister series, where SO42−conferred the most protein stability and enhancement of amyloid formation. Our study emphasizes the importance of the effect of ions in the protein bound water properties and downplays the role of specific interactions between the protein and ions. PMID:18395318

  2. The Stability and Formation of Native Proteins from Unfolded Monomers Is Increased through Interactions with Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Torner, Francisco J.; Costas, Miguel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Puyou, Armando Gómez

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of protein may be as high as 400 mg per ml; thus it seems inevitable that within the cell, numerous protein-protein contacts are constantly occurring. A basic biochemical principle states that the equilibrium of an association reaction can be shifted by ligand binding. This indicates that if within the cell many protein-protein interactions are indeed taking place, some fundamental characteristics of proteins would necessarily differ from those observed in traditional biochemical systems. Accordingly, we measured the effect of eight different proteins on the formation of homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei (TbTIM) from guanidinium chloride unfolded monomers. The eight proteins at concentrations of micrograms per ml induced an important increase on active dimer formation. Studies on the mechanism of this phenomenon showed that the proteins stabilize the dimeric structure of TbTIM, and that this is the driving force that promotes the formation of active dimers. Similar data were obtained with TIM from three other species. The heat changes that occur when TbTIM is mixed with lysozyme were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry; the results provided direct evidence of the weak interaction between apparently unrelated proteins. The data, therefore, are strongly suggestive that the numerous protein-protein interactions that occur in the intracellular space are an additional control factor in the formation and stability of proteins. PMID:17551578

  3. Knotted and topologically complex proteins as models for studying folding and stability

    PubMed Central

    Yeates, Todd O.; Norcross, Todd S.; King, Neil P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Among proteins of known three dimensional structure, only a few possess complex topological features such as knotted or interlinked (catenated) protein backbones. Such unusual proteins offer potentially unique insights into folding pathways and stabilization mechanisms. They also present special challenges for both theorists and computational scientists interested in understanding and predicting protein folding behavior. Here we review complex topological features in proteins with a focus on recent progress on the identification and characterization of knotted and interlinked protein systems. Also, an approach is described for designing an expanded set of knotted proteins. PMID:17967433

  4. Stereospecific Metabolism of Itraconazole by CYP3A4: Dioxolane Ring Scission of Azole Antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chi-Chi; Shi, Wei; Lutz, Justin D.; Kunze, Kent L.; Liu, Jun O.; Nelson, Wendel L.

    2012-01-01

    Itraconazole (ITZ) is a mixture of four cis-stereoisomers that inhibit CYP3A4 potently and coordinate CYP3A4 heme via the triazole nitrogen. However, (2R,4S,2′R)-ITZ and (2R,4S,2′S)-ITZ also undergo stereoselective sequential metabolism by CYP3A4 at a site distant from the triazole ring to 3′-OH-ITZ, keto-ITZ, and N-desalkyl-ITZ. This stereoselective metabolism demonstrates specific interactions of ITZ within the CYP3A4 active site. To further investigate this process, the binding and metabolism of the four trans-ITZ stereoisomers by CYP3A4 were characterized. All four trans-ITZ stereoisomers were tight binding inhibitors of CYP3A4-mediated midazolam hydroxylation (IC50 16–26 nM), and each gave a type II spectrum upon binding to CYP3A4. However, instead of formation of 3′-OH-ITZ, they were oxidized at the dioxolane ring, leading to ring scission and formation of two new metabolites of ITZ. These two metabolites were also formed from the four cis-ITZ stereoisomers, although not as efficiently. The catalytic rates of dioxolane ring scission were similar to the dissociation rates of ITZ stereoisomers from CYP3A4, suggesting that the heme iron is reduced while the triazole moiety coordinates to it and no dissociation of ITZ is necessary before catalysis. The triazole containing metabolite [1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)ethanone] also inhibited CYP3A4 (IC50 >15 μM) and showed type II binding with CYP3A4. The dioxolane ring scission appears to be clinically relevant because this metabolite was detected in urine samples from subjects that had been administered the mixture of cis-ITZ isomers. These data suggest that the dioxolane ring scission is a metabolic pathway for drugs that contain this moiety. PMID:22106171

  5. Identification of VPS13C as a Galectin-12-Binding Protein That Regulates Galectin-12 Protein Stability and Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ri-Yao; Xue, Huiting; Yu, Lan; Velayos-Baeza, Antonio; Monaco, Anthony P.; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-12, a member of the galectin family of β-galactoside-binding animal lectins, is preferentially expressed in adipocytes and required for adipocyte differentiation in vitro. This protein was recently found to regulate lipolysis, whole body adiposity, and glucose homeostasis in vivo. Here we identify VPS13C, a member of the VPS13 family of vacuolar protein sorting-associated proteins highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution, as a major galectin-12-binding protein. VPS13C is upregulated during adipocyte differentiation, and is required for galectin-12 protein stability. Knockdown of Vps13c markedly reduces the steady-state levels of galectin-12 by promoting its degradation through primarily the lysosomal pathway, and impairs adipocyte differentiation. Our studies also suggest that VPS13C may have a broader role in protein quality control. The regulation of galectin-12 stability by VPS13C could potentially be exploited for therapeutic intervention of obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:27073999

  6. Identification of VPS13C as a Galectin-12-Binding Protein That Regulates Galectin-12 Protein Stability and Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ri-Yao; Xue, Huiting; Yu, Lan; Velayos-Baeza, Antonio; Monaco, Anthony P; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-12, a member of the galectin family of β-galactoside-binding animal lectins, is preferentially expressed in adipocytes and required for adipocyte differentiation in vitro. This protein was recently found to regulate lipolysis, whole body adiposity, and glucose homeostasis in vivo. Here we identify VPS13C, a member of the VPS13 family of vacuolar protein sorting-associated proteins highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution, as a major galectin-12-binding protein. VPS13C is upregulated during adipocyte differentiation, and is required for galectin-12 protein stability. Knockdown of Vps13c markedly reduces the steady-state levels of galectin-12 by promoting its degradation through primarily the lysosomal pathway, and impairs adipocyte differentiation. Our studies also suggest that VPS13C may have a broader role in protein quality control. The regulation of galectin-12 stability by VPS13C could potentially be exploited for therapeutic intervention of obesity and related metabolic diseases.

  7. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute.

  8. Solution stability and variability in a simple model of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2004-01-08

    It is well known among molecular biologists that proteins with a common ancestor and that perform the same function in similar organisms, can have rather different amino-acid sequences. Mutations have altered the amino-acid sequences without affecting the function. A simple model of a protein in which the interactions are encoded by sequences of bits is introduced, and used to study how mutations can change these bits, and hence the interactions, while maintaining the stability of the protein solution. This stability is a simple minimal requirement on our model proteins which mimics part of the requirement on a real protein to be functional. The properties of our model protein, such as its second virial coefficient, are found to vary significantly from one model protein to another. It is suggested that this may also be the case for real proteins in vivo. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  9. An optimized strategy to measure protein stability highlights differences between cold and hot unfolded states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Caterina; Sanfelice, Domenico; Martin, Stephen R.; Pastore, Annalisa; Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2017-05-01

    Macromolecular crowding ought to stabilize folded forms of proteins, through an excluded volume effect. This explanation has been questioned and observed effects attributed to weak interactions with other cell components. Here we show conclusively that protein stability is affected by volume exclusion and that the effect is more pronounced when the crowder's size is closer to that of the protein under study. Accurate evaluation of the volume exclusion effect is made possible by the choice of yeast frataxin, a protein that undergoes cold denaturation above zero degrees, because the unfolded form at low temperature is more expanded than the corresponding one at high temperature. To achieve optimum sensitivity to changes in stability we introduce an empirical parameter derived from the stability curve. The large effect of PEG 20 on cold denaturation can be explained by a change in water activity, according to Privalov's interpretation of cold denaturation.

  10. An Anion-π Interaction Strongly Stabilizes the β-Sheet Protein WW.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mason S; Lawrence, Eliza E K; Billings, Wendy M; Larsen, Kimberlee S; Bécar, Natalie A; Price, Joshua L

    2017-09-14

    Anions have long been known to engage in stabilizing interactions with electron-deficient arenes. However, the precise nature and energetic contribution of anion-π interactions to protein stability remains a subject of debate. Here, we show that placing a negatively charged Asp in close proximity to electron-rich Phe in a reverse turn within the WW domain results in a favorable interaction that increases WW conformational stability by -1.3 kcal/mol.

  11. Applying Stable Isotope Labeled Amino Acids in Micropatterned Hepatocyte Co-Culture to Directly Determine the Degradation Rate Constant for CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryan H; Shahidi-Latham, Sheerin; Wong, Susan; Chang, Jae H

    2017-03-13

    The rate of enzyme degradation (kdeg) is an important input parameter for the prediction of clinical drug-drug-interactions (DDI) that result from mechanism-based inactivation or induction of cytochrome P450s. Currently, a large range of reported estimates for CYP3A4 enzyme degradation exists, and consequently, large uncertainty exists in steady-state predictions for DDI. In the current investigations, stable isotope labeled amino acids in culture (SILAC) was applied to a long-lived primary human hepatocyte culture, HepatoPac, to directly monitor the degradation of CYP3A4. This approach allowed selective isotope labeling of a population of de novo synthesized CYP3A4, and specific quantification of proteins with mass spectrometry to determine the CYP3A4 degradation within the hepatocytes. The kdeg estimate was 0.026 ± 0.005 h- 1. This value was reproduced by cultures derived across four individual donors. For these cultures, data indicated that CYP3A4 mRNA and total protein expression (i.e. labeled and not labeled P450s), and activity were stable over the period where degradation had been determined. This kdeg value for CYP3A4 was in good agreement with recently reported values that used alternate analytical approaches, but also employed micropatterned primary human hepatocytes as the in vitro model.

  12. Membrane Protein Stability Analyses by Means of Protein Energy Profiles in Case of Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Heinke, Florian; Labudde, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare endocrine, inheritable disorder with low incidences in an estimated one per 25,000–30,000 live births. This disease is characterized by polyuria and compensatory polydypsia. The diverse underlying causes of DI can be central defects, in which no functional arginine vasopressin (AVP) is released from the pituitary or can be a result of defects in the kidney (nephrogenic DI, NDI). NDI is a disorder in which patients are unable to concentrate their urine despite the presence of AVP. This antidiuretic hormone regulates the process of water reabsorption from the prourine that is formed in the kidney. It binds to its type-2 receptor (V2R) in the kidney induces a cAMP-driven cascade, which leads to the insertion of aquaporin-2 water channels into the apical membrane. Mutations in the genes of V2R and aquaporin-2 often lead to NDI. We investigated a structure model of V2R in its bound and unbound state regarding protein stability using a novel protein energy profile approach. Furthermore, these techniques were applied to the wild-type and selected mutations of aquaporin-2. We show that our results correspond well to experimental water ux analysis, which confirms the applicability of our theoretical approach to equivalent problems. PMID:22474537

  13. Analytical model for studying how environmental factors influence protein conformational stability in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Jason K.; Raverkar, Prajakta S.; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2006-12-01

    We introduce an analytical modeling strategy for probing the conformational stability of globular proteins in aqueous solution. In this approach, the intrinsic (i.e., infinite dilution) thermodynamic stability and coarse structural properties of the proteins, as well as the effective protein-protein interactions, derive from a heteropolymer collapse theory that incorporates predicted temperature- and pressure-dependent hydrophobic interactions. Protein concentration effects are estimated by integrating this information into a molecular thermodynamic model, which is an ad hoc generalization of the exact equilibrium theory of a one-dimensional binary mixture of square-well particles that interconvert through an isomerization (i.e., folding) reaction. The end result is an analytical multiscale modeling approach which, although still schematic, can predict that folded proteins exhibit a closed-loop region of stability in the pressure-temperature plane and that protein concentration has a nonmonotonic effect on protein stability, results consistent with qualitative trends observed in both experiments of protein solutions and simulations of coarse-grained protein models.

  14. Stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions by cod protein extracts.

    PubMed

    Petursson, Sigthor; Decker, Eric A; McClements, D Julian

    2004-06-16

    The ability of two protein fractions extracted from cod to form and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions was examined: a high salt extracted fraction (HSE protein) and a pH 3 acid extracted fraction (AE protein). Both fractions consisted of a complex mixture of different proteins, with the predominant one being myosin (200 kDa). The two protein fractions were used to prepare 5 wt % corn oil-in-water emulsions at ambient temperature (pH 3.0, 10 mM citrate-imidazole buffer). Emulsions with relatively small mean droplet diameters (d(3,2) < 1 microm) and good creaming stability (> 9 days) could be produced at protein concentrations > or =0.2 wt % for both fractions. The isoelectric point of droplets stabilized by both protein fractions was pH approximately 5. The emulsions were stable to droplet flocculation and creaming at relatively low pH (< or =4) and NaCl concentrations (< or =150 mM) when stored at room temperature. In the absence of salt, the emulsions were also stable to thermal treatment (30-90 degrees C for 30 min), but in the presence of 100 mM NaCl droplet flocculation and creaming were observed in some of the emulsions, particularly those stabilized by the AE fraction. The results suggest that protein fractions extracted from cod can be used as emulsifiers to form and stabilize food emulsions.

  15. QSAR modeling of in vitro inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    Mao, Boryeu; Gozalbes, Rafael; Barbosa, Frédérique; Migeon, Jacques; Merrick, Sandra; Kamm, Kelly; Wong, Eric; Costales, Chester; Shi, Wei; Wu, Cheryl; Froloff, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    We report the QSAR modeling of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) enzyme inhibition using four large data sets of in vitro data. These data sets consist of marketed drugs and drug-like compounds all tested in four assays measuring the inhibition of the metabolism of four different substrates by the CYP3A4 enzyme. The four probe substrates are benzyloxycoumarin, testosterone, benzyloxyresorufin, and midazolam. We first show that using state-of-the-art QSAR modeling approaches applied to only one of these four data sets does not lead to predictive models that would be useful for in silico filtering of chemical libraries. We then present the development and the testing of a multiple pharmacophore hypothesis (MPH) that is formulated as a conceptual extension of the traditional QSAR approach to modeling the promiscuous binding of a large variety of drugs to CYP3A4. In the simplest form, the MPH approach takes advantage of the multiple substrate data sets and identifies the binding of test compounds as either proximal or distal relative to that of a given substrate. Application of the approach to the in silico filtering of test compounds for potential inhibitors of CYP3A4 is also presented. In addition to an improvement in the QSAR modeling for the inhibition of CYP3A4, the results from this modeling approach provide structural insights into the drug-enzyme interactions. The existence of multiple inhibition data sets in the BioPrint database motivates the original development of the concept of a multiple pharmacophore hypothesis and provides a unique opportunity for formulating alternative strategies of QSAR modeling of the inhibition of the in vitro metabolism of CYP3A4.

  16. Metabolic Intermediate Complex Formation of Human Cytochrome P450 3A4 by Lapatinib

    PubMed Central

    Takakusa, Hideo; Wahlin, Michelle D.; Zhao, Chunsheng; Hanson, Kelsey L.; New, Lee Sun; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2011-01-01

    Lapatinib, an oral breast cancer drug, has recently been reported to be a mechanism-based inactivator of cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 and also an idiosyncratic hepatotoxicant. It was suggested that formation of a reactive quinoneimine metabolite was involved in mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) and/or hepatotoxicity. We investigated the mechanism of MBI of P450 3A4 by lapatinib. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of P450 3A4 after incubation with lapatinib did not show any peak corresponding to irreversible modifications. The enzymatic activity inactivated by lapatinib was completely restored by the addition of potassium ferricyanide. These results indicate that the mechanism of MBI by lapatinib is quasi-irreversible and mediated via metabolic intermediate complex (MI complex) formation. This finding was verified by the increase in a signature Soret absorbance at approximately 455 nm. Two amine oxidation products of the metabolism of lapatinib by P450 3A4 were characterized: N-hydroxy lapatinib (M3) and the oxime form of N-dealkylated lapatinib (M2), suggesting that a nitroso or another related intermediate generated from M3 is involved in MI complex formation. In contrast, P450 3A5 was much less susceptible to MBI by lapatinib via MI complex formation than P450 3A4. In addition, P450 3A5 had a significantly lower ability than 3A4 to generate M3, consistent with N-hydroxylation as the initial step in the pathway to MI complex formation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the primary mechanism for MBI of P450 3A4 by lapatinib is not irreversible modification by the quinoneimine metabolite, but quasi-irreversible MI complex formation mediated via oxidation of the secondary amine group of lapatinib. PMID:21363997

  17. Dual effects of ketoconazole cis-enantiomers on CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes and HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Novotná, Aneta; Krasulová, Kristýna; Bartoňková, Iveta; Korhoňová, Martina; Bachleda, Petr; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal drug ketoconazole causes severe drug-drug interactions by influencing gene expression and catalytic activity of major drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 CYP3A4. Ketoconazole is administered in the form of racemic mixture of two cis-enantiomers, i.e. (+)-ketoconazole and (-)-ketoconazole. Many enantiopure drugs were introduced to human pharmacotherapy in last two decades. In the current paper, we have examined the effects of ketoconazole cis-enantiomers on the expression of CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells and on catalytic activity of CYP3A4 in human liver microsomes. We show that both ketoconazole enantiomers induce CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Gene reporter assays revealed partial agonist activity of ketoconazole enantiomers towards pregnane X receptor PXR. Catalytic activity of CYP3A4/5 towards two prototypic substrates of CYP3A enzymes, testosterone and midazolam, was determined in presence of both (+)-ketoconazole and (-)-ketoconazole in human liver microsomes. Overall, both ketoconazole cis-enantiomers induced CYP3A4 in human cells and inhibited CYP3A4 in human liver microsomes. While interaction of ketoconazole with PXR and induction of CYP3A4 did not display enantiospecific pattern, inhibition of CYP3A4 catalytic activity by ketoconazole differed for ketoconazole cis-enantiomers ((+)-ketoconazole IC₅₀ 1.69 µM, Ki 0.92 µM for testosterone, IC₅₀ 1.46 µM, Ki 2.52 µM for midazolam; (-)-ketoconazole IC₅₀ 0.90 µM, Ki 0.17 µM for testosterone, IC₅₀ 1.04 µM, Ki 1.51 µM for midazolam).

  18. Hydrophobic environment is a key factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Pathak, Manish C; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ortlund, Eric A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-04-01

    The stability of thermophilic proteins has been viewed from different perspectives and there is yet no unified principle to understand this stability. It would be valuable to reveal the most important interactions for designing thermostable proteins for such applications as industrial protein engineering. In this work, we have systematically analyzed the importance of various interactions by computing different parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, inter-residue interactions, ion-pairs and hydrogen bonds. The importance of each interaction has been determined by its predicted relative contribution in thermophiles versus the same contribution in mesophilic homologues based on a dataset of 373 protein families. We predict that hydrophobic environment is the major factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins and found that 80% of thermophilic proteins analyzed showed higher hydrophobicity than their mesophilic counterparts. Ion pairs, hydrogen bonds, and interaction energy are also important and favored in 68%, 50%, and 62% of thermophilic proteins, respectively. Interestingly, thermophilic proteins with decreased hydrophobic environments display a greater number of hydrogen bonds and/or ion pairs. The systematic elimination of mesophilic proteins based on surrounding hydrophobicity, interaction energy, and ion pairs/hydrogen bonds, led to correctly identifying 95% of the thermophilic proteins in our analyses. Our analysis was also applied to another, more refined set of 102 thermophilic-mesophilic pairs, which again identified hydrophobicity as a dominant property in 71% of the thermophilic proteins. Further, the notion of surrounding hydrophobicity, which characterizes the hydrophobic behavior of residues in a protein environment, has been applied to the three-dimensional structures of elongation factor-Tu proteins and we found that the thermophilic proteins are enriched with a hydrophobic environment. The results obtained in this work highlight the

  19. Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-13

    ARL-TR-7572 ● JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold ...JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stabilizing Protein Effects on the Pressure Sensitivity of Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters by Abby...Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Abby L West, Mark H Griep

  20. TRAF Family Proteins Regulate Autophagy Dynamics by Modulating AUTOPHAGY PROTEIN6 Stability in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Hua; Xia, Fan-Nv; Xie, Li-Juan; Yu, Lu-Jun; Chen, Qin-Fang; Jiang, Liwen

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use autophagy to recycle cellular components. During autophagy, autophagosomes deliver cytoplasmic contents to the vacuole or lysosome for breakdown. Mammalian cells regulate the dynamics of autophagy via ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of autophagy proteins. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana Tumor necrosis factor Receptor-Associated Factor (TRAF) family proteins TRAF1a and TRAF1b (previously named MUSE14 and MUSE13, respectively) help regulate autophagy via ubiquitination. Upon starvation, cytoplasmic TRAF1a and TRAF1b translocated to autophagosomes. Knockout traf1a/b lines showed reduced tolerance to nutrient deficiency, increased salicylic acid and reactive oxygen species levels, and constitutive cell death in rosettes, resembling the phenotypes of autophagy-defective mutants. Starvation-activated autophagosome accumulation decreased in traf1a/b root cells, indicating that TRAF1a and TRAF1b function redundantly in regulating autophagosome formation. TRAF1a and TRAF1b interacted in planta with ATG6 and the RING finger E3 ligases SINAT1, SINAT2, and SINAT6 (with a truncated RING-finger domain). SINAT1 and SINAT2 require the presence of TRAF1a and TRAF1b to ubiquitinate and destabilize AUTOPHAGY PROTEIN6 (ATG6) in vivo. Conversely, starvation-induced SINAT6 reduced SINAT1- and SINAT2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of ATG6. Consistently, SINAT1/SINAT2 and SINAT6 knockout mutants exhibited increased tolerance and sensitivity, respectively, to nutrient starvation. Therefore, TRAF1a and TRAF1b function as molecular adaptors that help regulate autophagy by modulating ATG6 stability in Arabidopsis. PMID:28351989

  1. Identification of rare slipknots in proteins and their implications for stability and folding.

    PubMed

    King, Neil P; Yeates, Eric O; Yeates, Todd O

    2007-10-12

    Among the thousands of known three-dimensional protein folds, only a few have been found whose backbones are in knotted configurations. The rarity of knotted proteins has important implications for how natural proteins reach their natively folded states. Proteins with such unusual features offer unique opportunities for studying the relationships between structure, folding, and stability. Here we report the identification of a unique slipknot feature in the fold of a well-known thermostable protein, alkaline phosphatase. A slipknot is created when a knot is formed by part of a protein chain, after which the backbone doubles back so that the entire structure becomes unknotted in a mathematical sense. Slipknots are therefore not detected by computational tests that look for knots in complete protein structures. A computational survey looking specifically for slipknots in the Protein Data Bank reveals a few other instances in addition to alkaline phosphatase. Unexpected similarities are noted among some of the proteins identified. In addition, two transmembrane proteins are found to contain slipknots. Finally, mutagenesis experiments on alkaline phosphatase are used to probe the contribution the slipknot feature makes to thermal stability. The trends and conserved features observed in these proteins provide new insights into mechanisms of protein folding and stability.

  2. Effects of CYP3A4 inducers with and without CYP3A4 inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Samantha; Jenkins, Timothy M; Whitlock, Lyndsey A; Ridgway, Caroline E; Muirhead, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Aims To assess the potential of known CYP3A4 inducers, with and without CYP3A4 inhibitors, to alter the pharmacokinetic profile of maraviroc. Methods Two separate, open, randomized, placebo-controlled studies were conducted in healthy subjects. Study 1 was a 28-day parallel-group study with three treatment groups of 12 subjects each. On days 1–7, all subjects received maraviroc 100 mg b.i.d.; on days 8–21, subjects received maraviroc 100 mg b.i.d. plus either rifampicin 600 mg q.d., efavirenz (EFV) 600 mg q.d., or placebo q.d. as assigned; on days 22–28, the maraviroc dose was increased to 200 mg b.i.d. for patients receiving either rifampicin or EFV. Study 2 was a 21-day, two-way crossover study with three cohorts (12 subjects per cohort). On days 1–21, subjects received maraviroc 300 mg b.i.d. and boosted lopinavir (LPV/r, lopinavir 400 mg + ritonavir 100 mg) or placebo b.i.d. in cohort 1, maraviroc 100 mg b.i.d. and boosted saquinavir (SQV/r, saquinavir 1000 mg + ritonavir 100 mg) or placebo b.i.d. in cohort 2, and maraviroc 100 mg b.i.d. and 1000 mg saquinavir + LPV/r (400 mg/100 mg) or placebo b.i.d. in cohort 3. On days 8–21, subjects in all three cohorts also received EFV 600 mg or placebo q.d. Results Maraviroc (100 mg b.i.d.) exposure (AUC12 and Cmax) was reduced in the presence of rifampicin and EFV by approximately 70% and 50%, respectively. Maraviroc AUC12 and Cmax approached preinduction values when the maraviroc dose was increased to 200 mg b.i.d. for both the rifampicin-treated and EFV-treated groups. Co-administration of LPV/r with maraviroc (300 mg b.i.d.) resulted in geometric mean ratios (GMRs) of 395% and 197% for maraviroc AUC12 and Cmax, respectively, compared with placebo; addition of EFV resulted in GMRs of 253% and 125% for AUC12 and Cmax, respectively. Co-administration of SQV/r with maraviroc (100 mg b.i.d.) resulted in GMRs of 977% and 478% for maraviroc AUC12 and Cmax, respectively, compared with placebo; addition of EFV

  3. Molecular origins of surfactant-mediated stabilization of protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jin; McAuley, Arnold; Schilke, Karl F; McGuire, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    Loss of activity through aggregation and surface-induced denaturation is a significant problem in the production, formulation and administration of therapeutic proteins. Surfactants are commonly used in upstream and downstream processing and drug formulation. However, the effectiveness of a surfactant strongly depends on its mechanism(s) of action and properties of the protein and interfaces. Surfactants can modulate adsorption loss and aggregation by coating interfaces and/or participating in protein-surfactant associations. Minimizing protein loss from colloidal and interfacial interaction requires a fundamental understanding of the molecular factors underlying surfactant effectiveness and mechanism. These concepts provide direction for improvements in the manufacture and finishing of therapeutic proteins. We summarize the roles of surfactants, proteins, and surfactant-protein complexes in modulating interfacial behavior and aggregation. These events depend on surfactant properties that may be quantified using a thermodynamic model, to provide physical/chemical direction for surfactant selection or design, and to effectively reduce aggregation and adsorption loss. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pi-pi Stacking Mediated Cooperative Mechanism for Human Cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    Fa, Botao; Cong, Shan; Wang, Jingfang

    2015-04-24

    Human Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is an important member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily with responsibility for metabolizing ~50% of clinical drugs. Experimental evidence showed that CYP3A4 can adopt multiple substrates in its active site to form a cooperative binding model, accelerating substrate metabolism efficiency. In the current study, we constructed both normal and cooperative binding models of human CYP3A4 with antifungal drug ketoconazoles (KLN). Molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculation were then carried out to study the cooperative binding mechanism. Our simulation showed that the second KLN in the cooperative binding model had a positive impact on the first one binding in the active site by two significant pi-pi stacking interactions. The first one was formed by Phe215, functioning to position the first KLN in a favorable orientation in the active site for further metabolism reactions. The second one was contributed by Phe304. This pi-pi stacking was enhanced in the cooperative binding model by the parallel conformation between the aromatic rings in Phe304 and the dioxolan moiety of the first KLN. These findings can provide an atomic insight into the cooperative binding in CYP3A4, revealing a novel pi-pi stacking mechanism for drug-drug interactions.

  5. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Inhibit the Cytochrome P450 Enzyme, CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Ramy; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Weber, Jeffrey K; Li, Hu; Leifer, Klaus; Zhao, Yichen; Toprak, Muhammet S; Zhou, Ruhong; Fadeel, Bengt

    2016-02-22

    We report a detailed computational and experimental study of the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP3A4. Dose-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4-mediated conversion of the model compound, testosterone, to its major metabolite, 6β-hydroxy testosterone was noted. Evidence for a direct interaction between SWCNTs and CYP3A4 was also provided. The inhibition of enzyme activity was alleviated when SWCNTs were pre-coated with bovine serum albumin. Furthermore, covalent functionalization of SWCNTs with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains mitigated the inhibition of CYP3A4 enzymatic activity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that inhibition of the catalytic activity of CYP3A4 is mainly due to blocking of the exit channel for substrates/products through a complex binding mechanism. This work suggests that SWCNTs could interfere with metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics and provides a molecular mechanism for this toxicity. Our study also suggests means to reduce this toxicity, eg., by surface modification.

  6. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Inhibit the Cytochrome P450 Enzyme, CYP3A4

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ramy; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Li, Hu; Leifer, Klaus; Zhao, Yichen; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Zhou, Ruhong; Fadeel, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed computational and experimental study of the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP3A4. Dose-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4-mediated conversion of the model compound, testosterone, to its major metabolite, 6β-hydroxy testosterone was noted. Evidence for a direct interaction between SWCNTs and CYP3A4 was also provided. The inhibition of enzyme activity was alleviated when SWCNTs were pre-coated with bovine serum albumin. Furthermore, covalent functionalization of SWCNTs with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains mitigated the inhibition of CYP3A4 enzymatic activity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that inhibition of the catalytic activity of CYP3A4 is mainly due to blocking of the exit channel for substrates/products through a complex binding mechanism. This work suggests that SWCNTs could interfere with metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics and provides a molecular mechanism for this toxicity. Our study also suggests means to reduce this toxicity, eg., by surface modification. PMID:26899743

  7. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Inhibit the Cytochrome P450 Enzyme, CYP3A4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Ramy; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Li, Hu; Leifer, Klaus; Zhao, Yichen; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Zhou, Ruhong; Fadeel, Bengt

    2016-02-01

    We report a detailed computational and experimental study of the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP3A4. Dose-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4-mediated conversion of the model compound, testosterone, to its major metabolite, 6β-hydroxy testosterone was noted. Evidence for a direct interaction between SWCNTs and CYP3A4 was also provided. The inhibition of enzyme activity was alleviated when SWCNTs were pre-coated with bovine serum albumin. Furthermore, covalent functionalization of SWCNTs with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains mitigated the inhibition of CYP3A4 enzymatic activity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that inhibition of the catalytic activity of CYP3A4 is mainly due to blocking of the exit channel for substrates/products through a complex binding mechanism. This work suggests that SWCNTs could interfere with metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics and provides a molecular mechanism for this toxicity. Our study also suggests means to reduce this toxicity, eg., by surface modification.

  8. Effect of pasteurization on the protein composition and oxidative stability of beer during storage.

    PubMed

    Lund, Marianne N; Hoff, Signe; Berner, Torben S; Lametsch, René; Andersen, Mogens L

    2012-12-19

    The impacts of pasteurization of a lager beer on protein composition and the oxidative stability were studied during storage at 22 °C for 426 days in the dark. Pasteurization clearly improved the oxidative stability of beer determined by ESR spectroscopy, whereas it had a minor negative effect on the volatile profile by increasing volatile compounds that is generally associated with heat treatment and a loss of fruity ester aroma. A faster rate of radical formation in unpasteurized beer was consistent with a faster consumption of sulfite. Beer proteins in the unpasteurized beer were more degraded, most likely due to proteolytic enzyme activity of yeast remnants and more precipitation of proteins was also observed. The differences in soluble protein content and composition are suggested to result in differences in the contents of prooxidative metals as a consequence of the proteins ability to bind metals. This also contributes to the differences in oxidative stabilities of the beers.

  9. Stabilization of structure in near-infrared fluorescent proteins by binding of biliverdin chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Bublikov, G. S.; Kuznetsova, I. M.; Verkhusha, V. V.; Turoverov, K. K.

    2017-07-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes and their mutants with different location of Cys residues, which able to bind a biliverdin chromophore, or without these Cys residues were studied using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, NIR fluorescence and circular dichroism. It was shown that a covalent binding of the biliverdin chromophore to a Cys residue via thioether group substantially stabilizes the spatial structure of NIR FPs. The stability of the protein structure and the chromophore association strength strongly depends on the location of Cys residues and decreases in the following order: a protein with Cys residues in both domains, a protein with Cys in PAS domains, and a protein with Cys in GAF domains. NIR FPs without Cys residues capable to covalently attach biliverdin have the lowest stability, comparable to NIR FP apoforms.

  10. Stability of whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions during chilled storage and temperature cycling.

    PubMed

    Kiokias, Sotirios; Reiffers-Magnani, Christel K; Bot, Arjen

    2004-06-16

    The stability of heat-treated and/or acidified, partly-crystalline-fat-based, whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions against partial coalescence was investigated during chilled storage (at 5 degrees C) and repeated temperature cycling (three times between 5 and 25 degrees C). Experiments focused on the evolution of firmness and droplet size (using pulsed field gradient NMR and scanning electron microscopy). Besides the effects of denaturation and/or acidification, the influence of the droplet size of the dispersed phase on emulsion stability was investigated also. It was found that heat treatment or acidification before emulsification led to unstable emulsions during temperature cycling, whereas heat treatment after acidification resulted in stable emulsions.

  11. Water-in-Oil Microemulsions for Protein Delivery: Loading Optimization and Stability.

    PubMed

    Perinelli, Diego R; Cespi, Marco; Pucciarelli, Stefania; Vincenzetti, Silvia; Casettari, Luca; Lam, Jenny K W; Logrippo, Serena; Canala, Elisa; Soliman, Mahmoud E; Bonacucina, Giulia; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2017-01-01

    Microemulsions are attractive delivery systems for therapeutic proteins and peptides due to their ability to enhance bioavailability. Although different proteins and peptides have been successfully delivered through such ternary systems, no information can be found about protein loading and the formulation stability when such microemulsions are prepared with pharmaceuticallyapproved oils and surfactants. The aim of this work was to optimise a ternary system consisting of water/ ethyl oleate/Span® 80-Tween® 80 and to determine its protein loading capacity and stability, using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model of biomolecule. The optimization was carried out using a Central Composite Design and all the prepared formulations were characterised through dynamic light scattering, rheology, optical and polarized microscopy. Subsequently, the maximum loading capacity was determined and the stability of the final microemulsion with the highest content of protein was followed over six months. To investigate the structural features of the protein, BSA was recovered from the microemulsion and analysed through fluorescence spectroscopy. After incorporation of the protein in the microemulsion, a decrease of its aqueous solubility was observed. However, the formulation remained stable over six months and the native-like state of the recovered protein was demonstrated by fluorescence spectroscopy Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of preparing microemulsions with the highest content of protein and their long-term stability. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Principles and equations for measuring and interpreting protein stability: From monomer to tetramer.

    PubMed

    Bedouelle, Hugues

    2016-02-01

    The ability to measure the thermodynamic stability of proteins with precision is important for both academic and applied research. Such measurements rely on mathematical models of the protein denaturation profile, i.e. the relation between a global protein signal, corresponding to the folding states in equilibrium, and the variable value of a denaturing agent, either heat or a chemical molecule, e.g. urea or guanidinium hydrochloride. In turn, such models rely on a handful of physical laws: the laws of mass action and conservation, the law that relates the protein signal and concentration, and the one that relates stability and denaturant value. So far, equations have been derived mainly for the denaturation profiles of homomeric proteins. Here, we review the underlying basic physical laws and show in detail how to derive model equations for the unfolding equilibria of homomeric or heteromeric proteins up to trimers and potentially tetramers, with or without folding intermediates, and give full demonstrations. We show that such equations cannot be derived for pentamers or higher oligomers except in special degenerate cases. We expand the method to signals that do not correspond to extensive protein properties. We review and expand methods for uncovering hidden intermediates of unfolding. Finally, we review methods for comparing and interpreting the thermodynamic parameters that derive from stability measurements for cognate wild-type and mutant proteins. This work should provide a robust theoretical basis for measuring the stability of complex proteins.

  13. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 A), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 A. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  14. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 Å), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 Å. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  15. Accelerated Disease Onset with Stabilized Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)-linked Mutant TDP-43 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shoji; Kaneko, Kumi; Yamanaka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal protein accumulation is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, including accumulation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Dominant mutations in the TDP-43 gene are causative for familial ALS; however, the relationship between mutant protein biochemical phenotypes and disease course and their significance to disease pathomechanism are not known. Here, we found that longer half-lives of mutant proteins correlated with accelerated disease onset. Based on our findings, we established a cell model in which chronic stabilization of wild-type TDP-43 protein provoked cytotoxicity and recapitulated pathogenic protein cleavage and insolubility to the detergent Sarkosyl, TDP-43 properties that have been observed in sporadic ALS lesions. Furthermore, these cells showed proteasomal impairment and dysregulation of their own mRNA levels. These results suggest that chronically increased stability of mutant or wild-type TDP-43 proteins results in a gain of toxicity through abnormal proteostasis. PMID:23235148

  16. Modification of proteins with cyclodextrins prevents aggregation and surface adsorption and increases thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Prashar, Deepali; Cui, DaWei; Bandyopadhyay, Debjyoti; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2011-11-01

    This work describes a general approach for preventing protein aggregation and surface adsorption by modifying proteins with β-cyclodextrins (βCD) via an efficient water-driven ligation. As compared to native unmodified proteins, the cyclodextrin-modified proteins (lysozyme and RNase A) exhibit significant reduction in aggregation, surface adsorption and increase in thermal stability. These results reveal a new chemistry for preventing protein aggregation and surface adsorption that is likely of different mechanisms than that by modifying proteins with poly(ethylene glycol).

  17. Novel regulation of Ski protein stability and endosomal sorting by actin cytoskeleton dynamics in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-02-13

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration.

  18. Novel Regulation of Ski Protein Stability and Endosomal Sorting by Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics in Hepatocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R.; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A.; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-01-01

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration. PMID:25561741

  19. Rigidity versus flexibility: the dilemma of understanding protein thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Karshikoff, Andrey; Nilsson, Lennart; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2015-10-01

    The role of fluctuations in protein thermostability has recently received considerable attention. In the current literature a dualistic picture can be found: thermostability seems to be associated with enhanced rigidity of the protein scaffold in parallel with the reduction of flexible parts of the structure. In contradiction to such arguments it has been shown by experimental studies and computer simulation that thermal tolerance of a protein is not necessarily correlated with the suppression of internal fluctuations and mobility. Both concepts, rigidity and flexibility, are derived from mechanical engineering and represent temporally insensitive features describing static properties, neglecting that relative motion at certain time scales is possible in structurally stable regions of a protein. This suggests that a strict separation of rigid and flexible parts of a protein molecule does not describe the reality correctly. In this work the concepts of mobility/flexibility versus rigidity will be critically reconsidered by taking into account molecular dynamics calculations of heat capacity and conformational entropy, salt bridge networks, electrostatic interactions in folded and unfolded states, and the emerging picture of protein thermostability in view of recently developed network theories. Last, but not least, the influence of high temperature on the active site and activity of enzymes will be considered. © 2015 FEBS.

  20. Effect of Oxygen-containing Functional Groups on Protein Stability in Ionic Liquid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Megan B.; Holbrey, John D.; Spear, Scott K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Rogers, Robin D.

    2004-01-01

    The ability of functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) to provide an environment of increased stability for biomolecules has been studied. Serum albumin is an inexpensive, widely available protein that contributes to the overall colloid osmotic blood pressure within the vascular system. Albumin is used in the present study as a marker of biomolecular stability in the presence of various ILs in a range of concentrations. The incorporation of hydroxyl functionality into the methylimidazolium-based cation leads to increased protein stability detected by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroic (CD) spectrometry.

  1. Effect of Oxygen-containing Functional Groups on Protein Stability in Ionic Liquid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Megan B.; Holbrey, John D.; Spear, Scott K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Rogers, Robin D.

    2004-01-01

    The ability of functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) to provide an environment of increased stability for biomolecules has been studied. Serum albumin is an inexpensive, widely available protein that contributes to the overall colloid osmotic blood pressure within the vascular system. Albumin is used in the present study as a marker of biomolecular stability in the presence of various ILs in a range of concentrations. The incorporation of hydroxyl functionality into the methylimidazolium-based cation leads to increased protein stability detected by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroic (CD) spectrometry.

  2. Hemopericardium with tamponade following rivaroxaban administration and its attenuation by CYP3A4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Denisse

    2016-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants including the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban are important alternatives to warfarin for the prevention of thromboembolic stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. The pharmacology and metabolism of these agents differ from those of the vitamin K antagonists used over the decades preceding their introduction. We present a case of spontaneous hemopericardium and cardiac tamponade following administration of rivaroxaban. A review of the patient's medications revealed a total of seven agents known to be metabolized through cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the major pathway for rivaroxaban metabolism. While most physicians are familiar with recommendations to monitor renal function in patients prescribed rivaroxaban, we suspect that many fail to evaluate possible interactions with other agents having CYP3A4 inhibitory or inducer activity. PMID:27695181

  3. A QM/MM study of the active species of the human cytochrome P450 3A4, and the influence thereof of the multiple substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Fishelovitch, Dan; Hazan, Carina; Hirao, Hajime; Wolfson, Haim J.; Nussinov, Ruth; Shaik, Sason

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 is involved in the metabolism of 50% of all swallowed drugs. The enzyme functions by means of a high-valent iron-oxo species, called Compound I (Cpd I), which is formed after entrance of the substrate to the active site. We explored the features of Cpd I using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations on various models that are either substrate-free or containing one and two molecules of diazepam as a substrate. Mössbauer parameters of Cpd I were computed. Our major finding shows that without the substrate, Cpd I tends to elongate its Fe-S bond, localize the radical on the sulfur, and form hydrogen bonds with A305 and T309, which may hypothetically lead to Cpd I consumption by H-abstraction. However, the positioning of diazepam close to Cpd I, as enforced by the effector molecule, was found to strengthen the NH---S interactions of the conserved I443 and G444 residues with the proximal cysteinate ligand. These interactions are known to stabilize the Fe-S bond, and as such, the presence of the substrate leads to a shorter Fe-S bond and it prevents the localization of the radical on the sulfur. This diazepam-Cpd I stabilization was manifested in the 1W0E conformer. The effector substrate did not influence Cpd I directly but rather by positioning the active substrate close to Cpd I, thus displacing the hydrogen bonds with A305 and T309, and thereby giving preference to substrate oxidation. It is hypothesized that these effects on Cpd I, promoted by the restrained substrate, may be behind the special metabolic behavior observed in cases of multiple substrate binding (called also cooperative binding). This restraint constitutes a mechanism whereby substrates stabilize Cpd I sufficiently long to affect monooxygenation by P450s at the expense of Cpd I destruction by the protein residues. PMID:18020326

  4. A study on the effect of surface lysine to arginine mutagenesis on protein stability and structure using green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering.

  5. A Study on the Effect of Surface Lysine to Arginine Mutagenesis on Protein Stability and Structure Using Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering. PMID:22792305

  6. Electronic polarization is important in stabilizing the native structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chang G; Zhang, John Z H

    2009-12-10

    Quantum mechanical computations of proteins based on the molecular fragment approach have been carried out, and polarized protein-specific charges have been derived to provide accurate electrostatic interactions for a benchmark set of proteins. Our study shows that, under the polarized protein-specific force field, the native structure indeed corresponds to the lowest-energy conformation for these proteins. In contrast, when a standard mean-field force field such as AMBER is used, the energies of many decoy structures of proteins could be lower than those of the native structures. Furthermore, MD simulations were carried out and verified that the native structures of these proteins not only are statically more stable but are also dynamically more stable under the polarized protein-specific force field. The present results, together with several recent studies, provide strong evidence that protein polarization is critical to stabilizing the native structures of proteins.

  7. CYP3A4*22 genotype and systemic exposure affect paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    de Graan, Anne-Joy M.; Elens, Laure; Sprowl, Jason A.; Sparreboom, Alex; Friberg, Lena E.; van der Holt, Bronno; de Raaf, Pleun J.; de Bruijn, Peter; Engels, Frederike K.; Eskens, Ferry A.L.M.; Wiemer, Erik A.C.; Verweij, Jaap; Mathijssen, Ron H.J.; van Schaik, Ron H.N.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Paclitaxel is used for the treatment of several solid tumors and displays a high inter-individual variation in exposure and toxicity. Neurotoxicity is one of the most prominent side-effects of paclitaxel. This study explores potential predictive pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic determinants for the onset and severity of neurotoxicity. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN In an exploratory cohort of patients (n=261) treated with paclitaxel, neurotoxicity incidence and severity, pharmacokinetic parameters and pharmacogenetic variants were determined. Paclitaxel plasma concentrations were measured by HPLC or LC-MS/MS, and individual pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated from previously developed population pharmacokinetic models by non-linear mixed effects modeling (NONMEM). Genetic variants of paclitaxel pharmacokinetics tested were CYP3A4*22, CYP2C8*3, CYP2C8*4, and ABCB1 3435 C>T. The association between CYP3A4*22 and neurotoxicity observed in the exploratory cohort was validated in an independent patient cohort (n=239). RESULTS Exposure to paclitaxel (logAUC) was correlated with severity of neurotoxicity (P <0.00001). Female CYP3A4*22 carriers were at increased risk of developing neurotoxicity (P = 0.043) in the exploratory cohort. CYP3A4*22 carrier status itself was not associated with pharmacokinetic parameters (CL, AUC, Cmax, or T>0.05) of paclitaxel in males or females. Other genetic variants displayed no association with neurotoxicity. In the subsequent independent validation cohort, CYP3A4*22 carriers were at risk of developing grade 3 neurotoxicity (odds ratio = 19.1; P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Paclitaxel exposure showed a relationship with the severity of paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity. In this study, female CYP3A4*22 carriers had increased risk of developing severe neurotoxicity during paclitaxel therapy. These observations may guide future individualization of paclitaxel treatment. PMID:23640974

  8. CYP3A4*22 genotype and systemic exposure affect paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    de Graan, Anne-Joy M; Elens, Laure; Sprowl, Jason A; Sparreboom, Alex; Friberg, Lena E; van der Holt, Bronno; de Raaf, Pleun J; de Bruijn, Peter; Engels, Frederike K; Eskens, Ferry A L M; Wiemer, Erik A C; Verweij, Jaap; Mathijssen, Ron H J; van Schaik, Ron H N

    2013-06-15

    Paclitaxel is used for the treatment of several solid tumors and displays a high interindividual variation in exposure and toxicity. Neurotoxicity is one of the most prominent side effects of paclitaxel. This study explores potential predictive pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic determinants for the onset and severity of neurotoxicity. In an exploratory cohort of patients (n = 261) treated with paclitaxel, neurotoxicity incidence, and severity, pharmacokinetic parameters and pharmacogenetic variants were determined. Paclitaxel plasma concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography or liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and individual pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated from previously developed population pharmacokinetic models by nonlinear mixed effects modeling. Genetic variants of paclitaxel pharmacokinetics tested were CYP3A4*22, CYP2C8*3, CYP2C8*4, and ABCB1 3435 C>T. The association between CYP3A4*22 and neurotoxicity observed in the exploratory cohort was validated in an independent patient cohort (n = 239). Exposure to paclitaxel (logAUC) was correlated with severity of neurotoxicity (P < 0.00001). Female CYP3A4*22 carriers were at increased risk of developing neurotoxicity (P = 0.043) in the exploratory cohort. CYP3A4*22 carrier status itself was not associated with pharmacokinetic parameters (CL, AUC, Cmax, or T>0.05) of paclitaxel in males or females. Other genetic variants displayed no association with neurotoxicity. In the subsequent independent validation cohort, CYP3A4*22 carriers were at risk of developing grade 3 neurotoxicity (OR = 19.1; P = 0.001). Paclitaxel exposure showed a relationship with the severity of paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity. In this study, female CYP3A4*22 carriers had increased risk of developing severe neurotoxicity during paclitaxel therapy. These observations may guide future individualization of paclitaxel treatment.

  9. Flavonoids and polymer derivatives as CYP3A4 inhibitors for improved oral drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Fasinu, Pius; Choonara, Yahya E; Khan, Riaz A; Du Toit, Lisa C; Kumar, Pradeep; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Pillay, Viness

    2013-02-01

    Molecular modeling computations were utilized to generate pharmaceutical grade CYP3A4-enzyme inhibitors. In vitro metabolism of felodipine in human intestinal and liver microsomes (HLM and HIM) was optimized yielding a Michaelis-Menten plot from where the K(m) and V(max) values were estimated by nonlinear regression. The flavonoids, naringin, naringenin, and quercetin, were subsequently incubated with felodipine at the determined K(m) value in HLM. Comparing results obtained from a known CYP3A4 inhibitor, verapamil, the flavonoids inhibited felodipine metabolism. In-depth computational analysis of these flavonoids in terms of CYP3A4 binding, sequencing, and affinity, computational biomimetism was employed to validate the potential CYP3A4 inhibitors. The modeled compounds were comparatively evaluated by incubation with felodipine in both HLM and HIM. Results showed that the polymers 8-arm-PEG, o-(2-aminoethyl)-o-methyl-PEG, 4-arm-PEG (molecular weight = 10,000 g/mol and 20,000 g/mol, respectively), and poly(l-lysine) were able to inhibit the felodipine metabolism with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values ranging from 7.22 to 30.0 μM (HLM) and 5.78 to 41.03 μM (HIM). Molecular docking confirmed drug-enzyme interactions by computing the free energies of binding (ΔE) and inhibition constants (K(i)) of the docked compounds utilizing a Lamarckian Genetic Algorithm. Comparative correlations between the computed and experimental K(i) values were obtained. Computational modeling of CYP3A4 inhibitors provided a suitable strategy to screen pharmaceutical grade compounds that may potentially inhibit presystemic CYP3A4-dependent drug metabolism with the prospect of improving oral drug bioavailability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. An Inducible Cytochrome P450 3A4-Dependent Vitamin D Catabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhican; Lin, Yvonne S.; Zheng, Xi Emily; Senn, Tauri; Hashizume, Takanori; Scian, Michele; Dickmann, Leslie J.; Nelson, Sidney D.; Baillie, Thomas A.; Hebert, Mary F.; Blough, David; Davis, Connie L.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D3 is critical for the regulation of calcium and phosphate homeostasis. In some individuals, mineral homeostasis can be disrupted by long-term therapy with certain antiepileptic drugs and the antimicrobial agent rifampin, resulting in drug-induced osteomalacia, which is attributed to vitamin D deficiency. We now report a novel CYP3A4-dependent pathway, the 4-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3), the induction of which may contribute to drug-induced vitamin D deficiency. The metabolism of 25OHD3 was fully characterized in vitro. CYP3A4 was the predominant source of 25OHD3 hydroxylation by human liver microsomes, with the formation of 4β,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [4β,25(OH)2D3] dominating (Vmax/Km = 0.85 ml · min−1 · nmol enzyme−1). 4β,25(OH)2D3 was found in human plasma at concentrations comparable to that of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and its formation rate in a panel of human liver microsomes was strongly correlated with CYP3A4 content and midazolam hydroxylation activity. Formation of 4β,25(OH)2D3 in primary human hepatocytes was induced by rifampin and inhibited by CYP3A4-specific inhibitors. Short-term treatment of healthy volunteers (n = 6) with rifampin selectively induced CYP3A4-dependent 4β,25(OH)2D3, but not CYP24A1-dependent 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 formation, and altered systemic mineral homeostasis. Our results suggest that CYP3A4-dependent 25OHD3 metabolism may play an important role in the regulation of vitamin D3 in vivo and in the etiology of drug-induced osteomalacia. PMID:22205755

  11. Metabolic-induced cytotoxicity of diosbulbin B in CYP3A4-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ji-Zong; Yang, Bao-Hua; Ji, Li-Li; Yang, Li; Mao, Yu-Chang; Hu, Zhuo-Han; Wang, Zheng-Tao; Wang, Chang-Hong

    2017-02-01

    As a candidate antitumor agent, diosbulbin B (DB) can induce serious liver toxicity and other adverse reactions. DB is mainly metabolized by CYP3A4 in vitro and in vivo, but the cytotoxicity and anti-tumor mechanisms of DB have yet to be clarified. This study aimed to determine whether the cytotoxicity and anti-tumor effects of DB are related to the metabolism-induced activation of CYP3A4 in various cell models, including CYP-free NIH3T3 cells, primary rat hepatocytes, HepG2 and L02 cells of high CYP3A4 expression and wild-type. Results showed that DB did not markedly decrease the viability of NIH3T3 cells. DB metabolites, obtained from the metabolism by mouse liver microsomes, did not elicit cytotoxicity on NIH3T3 cells either. By contrast, DB could induce significant cytotoxicity on primary rat hepatocytes. The DB induced cytotoxicity on HepG2 or L02 cells with high CYP3A4 expression were stronger than those on wild-type cells. As a metabolic biomarker, the metabolite conjugate (M31) of DB with GSH was detected in the incubation system. A higher amount of M31 was generated in the transfected HepG2 and L02 cells than in the wild-type cells at different time points. Ketoconazole, however, could restrain DB induced cytotoxicity on primary rat hepatocytes and in CYP3A4 transfected HepG2 and L02 cells. Therefore, the cytotoxicity of DB was closely related to CYP3A4-metabolized reactive DB metabolites.

  12. Combined effect of tissue stabilization and protein extraction methods on phosphoprotein analysis.

    PubMed

    Kofanova, Olga A; Fack, Fred; Niclou, Simone P; Betsou, Fay

    2013-06-01

    Preanalytical conditions applied during sample collection and processing can affect the detection or quantification of unstable phosphoprotein biomarkers. We evaluated the consequences of tissue stabilization and protein extraction methods on phosphoprotein analysis. The effects of stabilization techniques (heat stabilization, snap-freezing) and time on the levels of phosphoproteins, including phospho-Akt, p-ERK 1/2, p-IkBα, p-JNK, and p38 MAPK, were evaluated using a BioPlex phosphoprotein assay. Additionally, two different protein extraction protocols, using different extraction buffers (8 M urea buffer, or Bio-Rad buffer without urea) were tested. For snap-frozen samples, protein extraction yields were comparable with the two buffer systems. For heat-stabilized samples, total protein yields were significantly lower following extraction in non-urea buffer. However, the concentrations of specific phosphoproteins were significantly higher in heat-stabilized samples than in the corresponding snap-frozen samples, indicating that this tissue processing method better preserved phosphoproteins. Significant differences were found between the measured phosphoprotein levels in heat-stabilized and snap-frozen tissue, suggesting that alterations occur very rapidly after tissue excision. Our results suggest that heat stabilization can be used as a tissue processing method for subsequent phosphoprotein analyses, but also suggest that the BioPlex phosphoprotein assay could be used as a possible quality control method to assess tissue sample integrity.

  13. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to identify in vitro and in vivo. In this study, model peptides with cysteine, lysine, and histidine residues were used to examine the reactivity of acrolein. Results from these experiments show that acrolein reacts rapidly with cysteine residues through Michael addition to form M+56 Da adducts. These M+56 adducts are, however, not stable, even though spontaneous dissociation of the adduct is slow. Further studies demonstrated that when acrolein and model peptides are incubated at physiological pH and temperature, the M+56 adducts decreased gradually accompanied by the increase of M+38 adducts, which are formed from intra-molecular Schiff base formation. Adduct formation with the side chains of other amino acid residues (lysine and histidine) was much slower than cysteine and required higher acrolein concentration. When cysteine residues were blocked by reaction with iodoacetamide and higher concentrations of acrolein were used, adducts of the N-terminal amino group or histidyl residues were formed but lysine adducts were not detected. Collectively, these data demonstrate that acrolein reacts avidly with protein cysteine residues and that the apparent loss of protein-acrolein Michael adducts over time may be related to the appearance of a novel (M+38) adduct. These findings may be important in identification of in vivo adducts of acrolein with protein cysteine residues. PMID:19231900

  14. Curdione Plays an Important Role in the Inhibitory Effect of Curcuma aromatica on CYP3A4 in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiao-Long; Hayashi-Nakamura, Emi; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Tanaka, Ken; Takahashi, Kyoko; Komatsu, Katsuko; Takahashi, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma aromatica is a plant belonging to genus Curcuma of family Zingiberaceae and is widely used as supplements in Japan. Rhizomes of C. aromatica have curcumin as a major yellow pigment and curdione as a main ingredient of essential oils. In this study, we investigated the affect of C. aromatica on CYP3A4 using 1α,25-(OH)2-D3-treated Caco-2 clone cells. Caco-2 cells were treated with methanol extract (0.1 mg ml−1), its hexane soluble fraction (0.1 mg ml−1), curcumin (4 μM) and curdione (20 μM) for 72 hours. Nifedipine was used as a substrate of CYP3A4. Methanol extract, hexane fraction and curdione inhibited the formation of oxidized nifedipine by 50–70%, and curcumin showed no effect. The IC50s of methanol extract, hexane fraction and curdione to oxidized nifedipine formation were 21, 14 and 3.9 μg ml−1 (16.9 μM), respectively. The content of curdione in methanol extract was 11.4%. Moreover, all of methanol extract, hexane fraction and curdione decreased CYP3A4 protein expression but had no affect on CYP3A4 mRNA expression. Our results showed that these drugs further decreased the CYP3A4 protein expression level after the protein synthesis was inhibited by cychroheximide. These findings suggest that curdione plays an important role in the CYP3A4 inhibitory activity of C. aromatica and curdione might inhibit the activity by accelerating the degradation of CYP3A4. PMID:21785639

  15. Case report: delirium due to a diltiazem-fentanyl CYP3A4 drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Levin, Tomer T; Bakr, Mohamed Hussien; Nikolova, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    Fentanyl and diltiazem are frequently used medications. Diltiazem inhibits cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzymes. This can suppress fentanyl metabolism. We present a case of delirium after coadministration of fentanyl and diltiazem. Cautious use is warranted while concomitantly administering fentanyl and diltiazem as this can potentiate fentanyl toxicity. Other 3A4 inhibitors include ketoconazole, erythromycin, nefazodone, ritonavir, delavirdine, aprepitant and imatinib. Psychosomatic medicine psychiatrists, pain and palliative care physicians and cardiologists in particular should be aware of this interaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of protein fold stability on immunogenicity and its implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Laimer, Josef; Machado, Yoan; Weiss, Richard; Thalhamer, Josef

    2017-05-01

    In modern vaccinology and immunotherapy, recombinant proteins more and more replace whole organisms to induce protective or curative immune responses. Structural stability of proteins is of crucial importance for efficient presentation of antigenic peptides on MHC, which plays a decisive role for triggering strong immune reactions. Areas covered: In this review, we discuss structural stability as a key factor for modulating the potency of recombinant vaccines and its importance for antigen proteolysis, presentation, and stimulation of B and T cells. Moreover, the impact of fold stability on downstream events determining the differentiation of T cells into effector cells is reviewed. We summarize studies investigating the impact of protein fold stability on the outcome of the immune response and provide an overview on computational methods to estimate the effects of point mutations on protein stability. Expert commentary: Based on this information, the rational design of up-to-date vaccines is discussed. A model for predicting immunogenicity of proteins based on their conformational stability at different pH values is proposed.

  17. Stay Wet, Stay Stable? How Internal Water Helps the Stability of Thermophilic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debashree; Taly, Antoine; Sterpone, Fabio

    2015-10-08

    We present a systematic computational investigation of the internal hydration of a set of homologous proteins of different stability content and molecular complexities. The goal of the study is to verify whether structural water can be part of the molecular mechanisms ensuring enhanced stability in thermophilic enzymes. Our free-energy calculations show that internal hydration in the thermophilic variants is generally more favorable, and that the cumulated effect of wetting multiple sites results in a meaningful contribution to stability. Moreover, thanks to a more effective capability to retain internal water, some thermophilic proteins benefit by a systematic gain from internal wetting up to their optimal working temperature. Our work supports the idea that internal wetting can be viewed as an alternative molecular variable to be tuned for increasing protein stability.

  18. [Intermolecular hydrogen bond between protein and flavonoid and its contribution to the stability of the flavonoids].

    PubMed

    Fang, Ru; Leng, Xiao-jing; Wu, Xia; Li, Qi; Hao, Rui-fang; Ren, Fa-zheng; Jing, Hao

    2012-01-01

    The interactions between three proteins (BSA, lysozyme and myoglobin) and three flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol and rutin) were analyzed, using three-dimensional fluorescence spectrometry in combination with UV-Vis spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The stabilities of unbound flavonoids and protein-bound flavonoids were compared. The correlation between the interaction and stability was analyzed. The results showed that the hydrophobic interaction was the main binding code in all proteins and flavonoids systems. However, the hydrogen bond has been involved merely in the BSA system. The stability of all three flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol and rutin) was improved by BSA. There was a great correlation between the hydrogen bonding and the stability of the flavonoids in the presence of BSA. It suggested that the protection of BSA on the flavonoids was due to the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between BSA and flavonoid, and the stronger hydrogen bonding resulted in more protection.

  19. Functional properties of protein isolates extracted from stabilized rice bran by microwave, dry heat, and parboiling.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saima Hafeez; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Sharif, Mian Kamran; Sameen, Ayesha; Mumtaz, Semee; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef

    2011-03-23

    Protein isolates extracted from differently stabilized rice bran were analyzed to work out the food use potential. Bulk density remained higher for isolates obtained from heat stabilized bran, the treatments were found to have positive impact on the oil absorption properties, while the water absorption was slightly impaired owing to some possible configurational changes. Surface hydrophobicity and emulsion properties were improved with bran stabilization. Isolates exhibited better foaming properties owing to the flexible nature of protein molecules, with less intensive disulfide bonding, that were slightly affected by the stabilization treatment. Nitrogen solubility index followed a curved pattern with the least value near isoelectric point that showed an increasing trend toward basic pH, and parboiled protein isolates exhibited better gelling properties among the isolates.

  20. Stay Wet, Stay Stable? How Internal Water Helps Stability of Thermophilic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Debashree; Taly, Antoine; Sterpone, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic computational investigation of the internal hydration of a set of homologous proteins of different stability content and molecular complexities. The goal of the study is to verify whether structural water can be part of the molecular mechanisms ensuring enhanced stability in thermophilic enzymes. Our free energy calculations show that internal hydration in the thermophilic variants is generally more favourable and that the cumulated effect of wetting multiple sites results in a meaningful contribution to stability. Moreover, thanks to a more effective capability to retain internal water some thermophilic proteins benefit of a systematic gain from internal wetting up to their optimal working temperature. Our work supports the idea that internal wetting can be viewed as an alternative molecular variable to be tuned for increasing protein stability. PMID:26335353

  1. Identification of the heme-modified peptides from cumene hydroperoxide-inactivated cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    He, K; Bornheim, L M; Falick, A M; Maltby, D; Yin, H; Correia, M A

    1998-12-15

    Cumene hydroperoxide-mediated (CuOOH-mediated) inactivation of cytochromes P450 (CYPs) results in destruction of their prosthetic heme to reactive fragments that irreversibly bind to the protein. We have attempted to characterize this process structurally, using purified, 14C-heme labeled, recombinant human liver P450 3A4 as the target of CuOOH-mediated inactivation, and a battery of protein characterization approaches [chemical (CNBr) and proteolytic (lysylendopeptidase-C) digestion, HPLC-peptide mapping, microEdman sequencing, and mass spectrometric analyses]. The heme-peptide adducts isolated after CNBr/lysylendopeptidase-C digestion of the CuOOH-inactivated P450 3A4 pertain to two distinct P450 3A4 active site domains. One of the peptides isolated corresponds to the proximal helix L/Cys-region peptide 429-450 domain and the others to the K-region (peptide 359-386 domain). Although the precise residue(s) targeted remain to be identified, we have narrowed down the region of attack to within a 17 amino acid peptide (429-445) stretch of the 55-amino acid proximal helix L/Cys domain. Furthermore, although the exact structures of the heme-modifying fragments and the nature of the adduction remain to be established conclusively, the incremental masses of approximately 302 and 314 Da detected by electrospray mass spectrometric analyses of the heme-modified peptides are consistent with a dipyrrolic heme fragment comprised of either pyrrole ring A-D or B-C, a known soluble product of peroxidative heme degradation, as a modifying species.

  2. Substrate-induced protein stabilization reveals a predominant contribution from mature protein to peptides presented on MHC class I

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Jeff D.; Farfán-Arribas, Diego J.; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the MHC class I-presented peptides are thought to be primarily from newly synthesized but defective proteins, termed DRiPs. Most of the data supporting this concept come from studies where inhibitors of protein synthesis were found to rapidly block antigen presentation even when cells contained a pool of mature protein. However, these data only indirectly address the origin of presented peptides and in most studies the contribution of mature functional protein to the class I peptide pool has not been directly quantified. In this report we address the efficiency and contribution of mature protein by using a tetracycline-inducible system to express antigen that is conditionally stabilized upon ligand binding. This system circumvents the use of general inhibitors of protein synthesis to control antigen expression. Moreover, by controlling antigen stabilization, we could investigate whether the degradation of mature antigen contributed to antigen presentation at early and/or late time points. We show that mature protein is the major contributor of peptides presented on class I for two distinct antigenic constructs. Furthermore our data show that the protein synthesis inhibitors used previously to test the contribution of defective proteins actually block antigen presentation in ways that are independent from blocking antigen synthesis. These data suggest that for the constructs we have analyzed, mature functional protein rather than DRiPs are the predominant source of MHC class I presented-peptides PMID:24174619

  3. Novel microscale approaches for easy, rapid determination of protein stability in academic and commercial settings.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Crispin G; Wanner, Randy; Johnson, Christopher M; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Winter, Gerhard; Duhr, Stefan; Baaske, Philipp; Ferguson, Neil

    2014-12-01

    Chemical denaturant titrations can be used to accurately determine protein stability. However, data acquisition is typically labour intensive, has low throughput and is difficult to automate. These factors, combined with high protein consumption, have limited the adoption of chemical denaturant titrations in commercial settings. Thermal denaturation assays can be automated, sometimes with very high throughput. However, thermal denaturation assays are incompatible with proteins that aggregate at high temperatures and large extrapolation of stability parameters to physiological temperatures can introduce significant uncertainties. We used capillary-based instruments to measure chemical denaturant titrations by intrinsic fluorescence and microscale thermophoresis. This allowed higher throughput, consumed several hundred-fold less protein than conventional, cuvette-based methods yet maintained the high quality of the conventional approaches. We also established efficient strategies for automated, direct determination of protein stability at a range of temperatures via chemical denaturation, which has utility for characterising stability for proteins that are difficult to purify in high yield. This approach may also have merit for proteins that irreversibly denature or aggregate in classical thermal denaturation assays. We also developed procedures for affinity ranking of protein-ligand interactions from ligand-induced changes in chemical denaturation data, and proved the principle for this by correctly ranking the affinity of previously unreported peptide-PDZ domain interactions. The increased throughput, automation and low protein consumption of protein stability determinations afforded by using capillary-based methods to measure denaturant titrations, can help to revolutionise protein research. We believe that the strategies reported are likely to find wide applications in academia, biotherapeutic formulation and drug discovery programmes.

  4. Small-Molecule Stabilization of the 14-3-3/Gab2 Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Interface.

    PubMed

    Bier, David; Bartel, Maria; Sies, Katharina; Halbach, Sebastian; Higuchi, Yusuke; Haranosono, Yu; Brummer, Tilman; Kato, Nobuo; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-04-19

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most promising new areas in drug discovery. In the vast majority of cases only inhibition or disruption of PPIs is realized, whereas the complementary strategy of targeted stabilization of PPIs is clearly under-represented. Here, we report the example of a semi-synthetic natural product derivative--ISIR-005--that stabilizes the cancer-relevant interaction of the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and Gab2. The crystal structure of ISIR-005 in complex with 14-3-3 and the binding motif of Gab2 comprising two phosphorylation sites (Gab2pS210pT391) showed how the stabilizing molecule binds to the rim-of-the-interface of the protein complex. Only in the direct vicinity of 14-3-3/Gab2pT391 site is a pre-formed pocket occupied by ISIR-005; binding of the Gab2pS210 motif to 14-3-3 does not create an interface pocket suitable for the molecule. Accordingly, ISIR-005 only stabilizes the binding of the Gab2pT391 but not the Gab2pS210 site. This study represents structural and biochemical proof of the druggability of the 14-3-3/Gab2 PPI interface with important implications for the development of PPI stabilizers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The contribution of polar group burial to protein stability is strongly context-dependent.

    PubMed

    Takano, Kazufumi; Scholtz, J Martin; Sacchettini, James C; Pace, C Nick

    2003-08-22

    We previously suggested that proteins gain more stability from the burial and hydrogen bonding of polar groups than from the burial of nonpolar groups (Pace, C. N. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 310-313). To study this further, we prepared eight Thr-to-Val mutants of RNase Sa, four in which the Thr side chain is hydrogen-bonded and four in which it is not. We measured the stability of these mutants by analyzing their thermal denaturation curves. The four hydrogen-bonded Thr side chains contribute 1.3 +/- 0.9 kcal/mol to the stability; those that are not still contribute 0.4 +/- 0.9 kcal/mol to the stability. For 40 Thr-to-Val mutants of 11 proteins, the average decrease in stability is 1.0 +/- 1.0 kcal/mol when the Thr side chain is hydrogen-bonded and 0.0 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol when it is not. This is clear evidence that hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. In addition, we prepared four Val-to-Thr mutants of RNase Sa, measured their stability, and determined their crystal structures. In all cases, the mutants are less stable than the wild-type protein, with the decreases in stability ranging from 0.5 to 4.4 kcal/mol. For 41 Val-to-Thr mutants of 11 proteins, the average decrease in stability is 1.8 +/- 1.3 kcal/mol and is unfavorable for 40 of 41 mutants. This shows that placing an [bond]OH group at a site designed for a [bond]CH3 group is very unfavorable. So, [bond]OH groups can contribute favorably to protein stability, even if they are not hydrogen-bonded, if the site was selected for an [bond]OH group, but they will make an unfavorable contribution to stability, even if they are hydrogen-bonded, when they are placed at a site selected for a [bond]CH3 group. The contribution that polar groups make to protein stability depends strongly on their environment.

  6. Identifying Protein Stabilizing Ligands Using GroEL

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Subhashchandra; Haque, Inamul; Degner, Nick; Kornilayev, Boris; Bomhoff, Gregory; Hodges, Jacob; Khorassani, Ara-Azad; Katayama, Hiroo; Morris, Jill; Kelly, Jeffery; Seed, John; Fisher, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past five years, it has become increasingly apparent to researchers that the initial promise and excitement of using gene replacement therapies to ameliorate folding diseases are still far from being broadly or easily applicable. Because a large number of human diseases are protein folding diseases (~30 to 50%), many researchers now realize that more directed approaches to target and reverse the fundamental misfolding reactions preceding disease are highly feasible and offer the potential of developing more targeted drug therapies. This is also true with a large number of so called “orphan protein folding diseases”. The development of a broad-based general screening array method using the chaperonin as a detection platform will enable us to screen large chemical combinatorial libraries for specific ligands against the elusive transient, primary reactions that often lead to protein misfolding. This development will provide a highly desirable tool for the pharmaceutical, academic and medical professions. PMID:19802819

  7. Mathematics, thermodynamics, and modeling to address ten common misconceptions about protein structure, folding, and stability.

    PubMed

    Robic, Srebrenka

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative phenomena in undergraduate classes. In the process of learning about these topics, students often form incorrect ideas. For example, by learning about protein folding in the context of protein synthesis, students may come to an incorrect conclusion that once synthesized on the ribosome, a protein spends its entire cellular life time in its fully folded native confirmation. This is clearly not true; proteins are dynamic structures that undergo both local fluctuations and global unfolding events. To prevent and address such misconceptions, basic concepts of protein science can be introduced in the context of simple mathematical models and hands-on explorations of publicly available data sets. Ten common misconceptions about proteins are presented, along with suggestions for using equations, models, sequence, structure, and thermodynamic data to help students gain a deeper understanding of basic concepts relating to protein structure, folding, and stability.

  8. Mathematics, Thermodynamics, and Modeling to Address Ten Common Misconceptions about Protein Structure, Folding, and Stability

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative phenomena in undergraduate classes. In the process of learning about these topics, students often form incorrect ideas. For example, by learning about protein folding in the context of protein synthesis, students may come to an incorrect conclusion that once synthesized on the ribosome, a protein spends its entire cellular life time in its fully folded native confirmation. This is clearly not true; proteins are dynamic structures that undergo both local fluctuations and global unfolding events. To prevent and address such misconceptions, basic concepts of protein science can be introduced in the context of simple mathematical models and hands-on explorations of publicly available data sets. Ten common misconceptions about proteins are presented, along with suggestions for using equations, models, sequence, structure, and thermodynamic data to help students gain a deeper understanding of basic concepts relating to protein structure, folding, and stability. PMID:20810950

  9. Characterization of the Stability and Bio-functionality of Tethered Proteins on Bioengineered Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting-Yi; Bruggeman, Kiara A. F.; Sheean, Rebecca K.; Turner, Bradley J.; Nisbet, David R.; Parish, Clare L.

    2014-01-01

    Various engineering applications have been utilized to deliver molecules and compounds in both innate and biological settings. In the context of biological applications, the timely delivery of molecules can be critical for cellular and organ function. As such, previous studies have demonstrated the superiority of long-term protein delivery, by way of protein tethering onto bioengineered scaffolds, compared with conventional delivery of soluble protein in vitro and in vivo. Despite such benefits little knowledge exists regarding the stability, release kinetics, longevity, activation of intracellular pathway, and functionality of these proteins over time. By way of example, here we examined the stability, degradation and functionality of a protein, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which is known to influence neuronal survival, differentiation, and neurite morphogenesis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) revealed that GDNF, covalently tethered onto polycaprolactone (PCL) electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds, remained present on the scaffold surface for 120 days, with no evidence of protein leaching or degradation. The tethered GDNF protein remained functional and capable of activating downstream signaling cascades, as revealed by its capacity to phosphorylate intracellular Erk in a neural cell line. Furthermore, immobilization of GDNF protein promoted cell survival and differentiation in culture at both 3 and 7 days, further validating prolonged functionality of the protein, well beyond the minutes to hours timeframe observed for soluble proteins under the same culture conditions. This study provides important evidence of the stability and functionality kinetics of tethered molecules. PMID:24700461

  10. Characterization of milk proteins-lutein complexes and the impact on lutein chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiang; Fan, Yuting; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Liqing

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the interaction of WPI (whey protein isolate) and SC (sodium caseinate) with hydrophobic lutein was investigated through UV-vis spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) as well as fluorescence. The effects on lutein's chemical stability were also examined. The decrease of turbidity of lutein suggested that lutein's aqueous solubility was improved after binding with milk proteins. CD analysis indicated lutein had little impact on the secondary structures of both proteins. Different preparation methods have significant impacts on the binding constant. Fluorescence results indicated that WPI and SC interact with lutein by hydrophobic contacts. Milk proteins have protective effects on lutein against oxidation and decomposition, and SC showed better capability in protecting lutein from oxidation than WPI during 16 days storage. The lutein's chemical stability was increased with increasing of proteins concentration. The results indicated that milk proteins may act as effective carriers for lipophilic nutraceuticals.

  11. Coexistence of flexibility and stability of proteins: an equation of state.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Marina; Reuveni, Shlomi; Klafter, Joseph; Granek, Rony

    2009-10-09

    We consider a recently suggested "equation of state" for natively folded proteins, and verify its validity for a set of about 5800 proteins. The equation is based on a fractal viewpoint of proteins, on a generalization of the Landau-Peierls instability, and on a marginal stability criterion. The latter allows for coexistence of stability and flexibility of proteins, which is required for their proper function. The equation of state relates the protein fractal dimension d(f), its spectral dimension d(s), and the number of amino acids N. Using structural data from the protein data bank (PDB) and the Gaussian network model (GNM), we compute d(f) and d(s) for the entire set and demonstrate that the equation of state is well obeyed. Addressing the fractal properties and making use of the equation of state may help to engineer biologically inspired catalysts.

  12. A miniature protein stabilized by a cation-π interaction network core

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Timothy W.; Cho, Min-Kyu; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Bonneau, Richard; Kirshenbaum, Kent

    2016-01-01

    The design of folded miniature proteins is predicated on establishing non-covalent interactions that direct the self-assembly of discrete thermo-stable tertiary structures. In this work, we describe how a network of cation-π interactions present in proteins containing “WSXWS motifs” can be emulated to stabilize the core of a miniature protein. This 19-residue protein sequence recapitulates a set of interdigitated arginine and tryptophan residues that stabilize a distinctive β-strand:loop:PPII-helix topology. Validation of the compact fold determined by NMR was carried out by mutagenesis of the cation-π network and by comparison to the corresponding disulfide-bridged structure. These results support the involvement of a coordinated set of cation-π interactions that stabilize the tertiary structure. PMID:26812069

  13. Lentil and chickpea protein-stabilized emulsions: optimization of emulsion formulation.

    PubMed

    Can Karaca, Asli; Nickerson, Michael T; Low, Nicholas H

    2011-12-28

    Chickpea and lentil protein-stabilized emulsions were optimized with regard to pH (3.0-8.0), protein concentration (1.1-4.1% w/w), and oil content (20-40%) for their ability to form and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions using response surface methodology. Specifically, creaming stability, droplet size, and droplet charge were assessed. Optimum conditions for minimal creaming (no serum separation after 24 h), small droplet size (<2 μm), and high net droplet charge (absolute value of ZP > 40 mV) were identified as 4.1% protein, 40% oil, and pH 3.0 or 8.0, regardless of the plant protein used for emulsion preparation.

  14. New insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Prions are the etiological agent of fatal neurodegenerative diseases called prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious disorders. Prions are due to post-translational modifications of the cellular prion protein leading to the formation of a β-sheet enriched conformer with altered biochemical properties. The molecular events causing prion formation in sporadic prion diseases are still elusive. Recently, we published a research elucidating the contribution of major structural determinants and environmental factors in prion protein folding and stability. Our study highlighted the crucial role of octarepeats in stabilizing prion protein; the presence of a highly enthalpically stable intermediate state in prion-susceptible species; and the role of disulfide bridge in preserving native fold thus avoiding the misfolding to a β-sheet enriched isoform. Taking advantage from these findings, in this work we present new insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

  15. Modeling of drug-mediated CYP3A4 induction by using human iPS cell-derived enterocyte-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Negoro, Ryosuke; Takayama, Kazuo; Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-15

    Many drugs have potential to induce the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes, particularly cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), in small intestinal enterocytes. Therefore, a model that can accurately evaluate drug-mediated CYP3A4 induction is urgently needed. In this study, we overlaid Matrigel on the human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived enterocyte-like cells (hiPS-ELCs) to generate the mature hiPS-ELCs that could be applied to drug-mediated CYP3A4 induction test. By overlaying Matrigel in the maturation process of enterocyte-like cells, the gene expression levels of intestinal markers (VILLIN, sucrase-isomaltase, intestine-specific homeobox, caudal type homeobox 2, and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein) were enhanced suggesting that the enterocyte-like cells were maturated by Matrigel overlay. The percentage of VILLIN-positive cells in the hiPS-ELCs found to be approximately 55.6%. To examine the CYP3A4 induction potential, the hiPS-ELCs were treated with various drugs. Treatment with dexamethasone, phenobarbital, rifampicin, or 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 resulted in 5.8-fold, 13.4-fold, 9.8-fold, or 95.0-fold induction of CYP3A4 expression relative to that in the untreated controls, respectively. These results suggest that our hiPS-ELCs would be a useful model for CYP3A4 induction test. - Highlights: • The hiPS-ELCs were matured by Matrigel overlay. • The hiPS-ELCs expressed intestinal nuclear receptors, such as PXR, GR and VDR. • The hiPS-ELC is a useful model for the drug-mediated CYP3A4 induction test.

  16. Increased inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 with the tablet formulation of posaconazole.

    PubMed

    Petitcollin, A; Crochette, R; Tron, C; Verdier, M-C; Boglione-Kerrien, C; Vigneau, C; Bellissant, E; Lemaitre, F

    2016-10-01

    Being a substrate of the cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) isoenzyme, sirolimus metabolism is decreased when posaconazole is administered concomitantly. However, because of the poor bioavailability of the oral suspension of posaconazole with which low plasma concentrations are obtained, CYP3A4 inhibition is weak and a 50-75% dose reduction of sirolimus is sufficient to avoid sirolimus overdosage. The new tablet formulation allows reaching posaconazole concentrations 3-4 fold higher than those obtained with the oral suspension. Based on a case of sirolimus overdosage following posaconazole tablets administration, we modelled the inhibition of sirolimus clearance by posaconazole, and then simulated several dosage regimens of sirolimus taken together with posaconazole tablets. We were able to describe well the interaction, and found a value of IC50 of posaconazole towards sirolimus clearance of 0.68 μg/mL. The simulations showed that even a 80% decrease of the daily dose of sirolimus is unsuitable in many cases with trough concentrations of posaconazole of 2 μg/mL. A decrease of 40% of the dose with spacing administrations of 3 days may be considered. The clinicians and pharmacologists must be warned that the use of posaconazole tablets may result in an inhibition of CYP3A4 of greater magnitude than with the oral suspension.

  17. Fatal Methadone Toxicity: Potential Role of CYP3A4 Genetic Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Richards-Waugh, Lauren L.; Primerano, Donald A.; Dementieva, Yulia; Kraner, James C.; Rankin, Gary O.

    2014-01-01

    Methadone is difficult to administer as a therapeutic agent because of a wide range of interindividual pharmacokinetics, likely due to genetic variability of the CYP450 enzymes responsible for metabolism to its principal metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP). CYP3A4 is one of the primary CYP450 isoforms responsible for the metabolism of methadone to EDDP in humans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of CYP3A4 genetic polymorphisms in accidental methadone fatalities. A study cohort consisting of 136 methadone-only and 92 combined methadone/benzodiazepine fatalities was selected from cases investigated at the West Virginia and Kentucky Offices of the Chief Medical Examiner. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped within the CYP3A4 gene. Observed allelic and genotypic frequencies were compared with expected frequencies obtained from The National Center for Biotechnology Information dbSNP database. SNPs rs2242480 and rs2740574 demonstrated an apparent enrichment within the methadone-only overdose fatalities compared with the control group and the general population. This enrichment was not apparent in the methadone/benzodiazepine cases for these two SNPs. Our findings indicate that there may be two or more SNPs on the CYP3A4 gene that cause or contribute to the methadone poor metabolizer phenotype. PMID:25217544

  18. Fatal methadone toxicity: potential role of CYP3A4 genetic polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Richards-Waugh, Lauren L; Primerano, Donald A; Dementieva, Yulia; Kraner, James C; Rankin, Gary O

    2014-10-01

    Methadone is difficult to administer as a therapeutic agent because of a wide range of interindividual pharmacokinetics, likely due to genetic variability of the CYP450 enzymes responsible for metabolism to its principal metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP). CYP3A4 is one of the primary CYP450 isoforms responsible for the metabolism of methadone to EDDP in humans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of CYP3A4 genetic polymorphisms in accidental methadone fatalities. A study cohort consisting of 136 methadone-only and 92 combined methadone/benzodiazepine fatalities was selected from cases investigated at the West Virginia and Kentucky Offices of the Chief Medical Examiner. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped within the CYP3A4 gene. Observed allelic and genotypic frequencies were compared with expected frequencies obtained from The National Center for Biotechnology Information dbSNP database. SNPs rs2242480 and rs2740574 demonstrated an apparent enrichment within the methadone-only overdose fatalities compared with the control group and the general population. This enrichment was not apparent in the methadone/benzodiazepine cases for these two SNPs. Our findings indicate that there may be two or more SNPs on the CYP3A4 gene that cause or contribute to the methadone poor metabolizer phenotype.

  19. Evolutionary Dynamics on Protein Bi-stability Landscapes can Potentially Resolve Adaptive Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Sikosek, Tobias; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Chan, Hue Sun

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that some proteins exist in two alternative native-state conformations. It has been proposed that such bi-stable proteins can potentially function as evolutionary bridges at the interface between two neutral networks of protein sequences that fold uniquely into the two different native conformations. Under adaptive conflict scenarios, bi-stable proteins may be of particular advantage if they simultaneously provide two beneficial biological functions. However, computational models that simulate protein structure evolution do not yet recognize the importance of bi-stability. Here we use a biophysical model to analyze sequence space to identify bi-stable or multi-stable proteins with two or more equally stable native-state structures. The inclusion of such proteins enhances phenotype connectivity between neutral networks in sequence space. Consideration of the sequence space neighborhood of bridge proteins revealed that bi-stability decreases gradually with each mutation that takes the sequence further away from an exactly bi-stable protein. With relaxed selection pressures, we found that bi-stable proteins in our model are highly successful under simulated adaptive conflict. Inspired by these model predictions, we developed a method to identify real proteins in the PDB with bridge-like properties, and have verified a clear bi-stability gradient for a series of mutants studied by Alexander et al. (Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 2009, 106:21149–21154) that connect two sequences that fold uniquely into two different native structures via a bridge-like intermediate mutant sequence. Based on these findings, new testable predictions for future studies on protein bi-stability and evolution are discussed. PMID:23028272

  20. Documentation of an Imperative To Improve Methods for Predicting Membrane Protein Stability.

    PubMed

    Kroncke, Brett M; Duran, Amanda M; Mendenhall, Jeffrey L; Meiler, Jens; Blume, Jeffrey D; Sanders, Charles R

    2016-09-13

    There is a compelling and growing need to accurately predict the impact of amino acid mutations on protein stability for problems in personalized medicine and other applications. Here the ability of 10 computational tools to accurately predict mutation-induced perturbation of folding stability (ΔΔG) for membrane proteins of known structure was assessed. All methods for predicting ΔΔG values performed significantly worse when applied to membrane proteins than when applied to soluble proteins, yielding estimated concordance, Pearson, and Spearman correlation coefficients of <0.4 for membrane proteins. Rosetta and PROVEAN showed a modest ability to classify mutations as destabilizing (ΔΔG < -0.5 kcal/mol), with a 7 in 10 chance of correctly discriminating a randomly chosen destabilizing variant from a randomly chosen stabilizing variant. However, even this performance is significantly worse than for soluble proteins. This study highlights the need for further development of reliable and reproducible methods for predicting thermodynamic folding stability in membrane proteins.

  1. Prediction of salt effects on protein phase behavior by HIC retention and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Kai; Großhans, Steffen; Schütz, Juliane; Suhm, Susanna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-05

    In the biopharmaceutical industry it is mandatory to know and ensure the correct protein phase state as a critical quality attribute in every process step. Unwanted protein precipitation or crystallization can lead to column, pipe or filter blocking. In formulation, the formation of aggregates can even be lethal when injected into the patient. The typical methodology to illustrate protein phase states is the generation of protein phase diagrams. Commonly, protein phase behavior is shown in dependence of protein and precipitant concentration. Despite using high-throughput methods for the generation of phase diagrams, the time necessary to reach equilibrium is the bottleneck. Faster methods to predict protein phase behavior are desirable. In this study, hydrophobic interaction chromatography retention times were correlated to crystal size and form. High-throughput thermal stability measurements (melting and aggregation temperatures), using an Optim(®)2 system, were successfully correlated to glucose isomerase stability. By using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and thermal stability determinations, glucose isomerase conformational and colloidal stability were successfully predicted for different salts in a specific pH range.

  2. Molecular insights into the stabilization of protein-protein interactions with small molecule: The FKBP12-rapamycin-FRB case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, Shilpi; Pieraccini, Stefano; De Gonda, Riccardo; Conti, Simone; Sironi, Maurizio

    2013-11-01

    Targetting protein-protein interactions is a challenging task in drug discovery process. Despite the challenges, several studies provided evidences for the development of small molecules modulating protein-protein interactions. Here we consider a typical case of protein-protein interaction stabilization: the complex between FKBP12 and FRB with rapamycin. We have analyzed the stability of the complex and characterized its interactions at the atomic level by performing free energy calculations and computational alanine scanning. It is shown that rapamycin stabilizes the complex by acting as a bridge between the two proteins; and the complex is stable only in the presence of rapamycin.

  3. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Capture by Cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Gareth K; Ritchie, Caroline M; Shock, Lisa S; Lyons, Charles E; Hackett, John C

    2016-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the dominant P450 enzyme involved in human drug metabolism, and its inhibition may result in adverse interactions or, conversely, favorably reduce the systemic elimination rates of poorly bioavailable drugs. Herein we describe a spectroscopic investigation of the interaction of CYP3A4 with N-methylritonavir, an analog of ritonavir, widely used as a pharmacoenhancer. In contrast to ritonavir, the binding affinity of N-methylritonavir for CYP3A4 is pH-dependent. At pH <7.4, the spectra are definitively type I, whereas at pH ≥7.4 the spectra have split Soret bands, including a red-shifted component characteristic of a P450-carbene complex. Variable-pH UV-visible spectroscopy binding studies with molecular fragments narrows the source of this pH dependence to its N-methylthiazolium fragment. The C2 proton of this group is acidic, and variable-pH resonance Raman spectroscopy tentatively assigns it a pKa of 7.4. Hence, this fragment of N-methylritonavir is expected to be readily deprotonated under physiologic conditions to yield a thiazol-2-ylidene, which is an N-heterocyclic carbene that has high-affinity for and is presumed to be subsequently captured by the heme iron. This mechanism is supported by time-dependent density functional theory with an active site model that accurately reproduces distinguishing features of the experimental UV-visible spectra of N-methylritonavir bound to CYP3A4. Finally, density functional theory calculations support that this novel interaction is as strong as the tightest-binding azaheterocycles found in P450 inhibitors and could offer new avenues for inhibitor development. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) induction of CYP3A4 enzyme activity in healthy Faroese adults

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Maria Skaalum Halling, Jonrit; Damkier, Per; Nielsen, Flemming; Grandjean, Philippe; Weihe, Pal; Brosen, Kim

    2007-10-15

    The CYP3A4 enzyme is, along with other cytochrome P450 enzymes, involved in the metabolism of environmental pollutants and is highly inducible by these substances. A commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture, 1,1,1,-trichloro-2-(o-chlorophenyl), 2-(p'-chlorophenyl)ethane (o,p'-DDT) and 1,1,-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)ethene (p,p'-DDE) are known to induce CYP3A4 activity through activation of nuclear receptors, such as the pregnane X receptor. However, this induction of CYP3A4 has not yet been investigated in humans. Thus, the aim of the study was to determine the variability of the CYP3A4 phenotype in regard to increased concentrations of PCBs and other persistent organohalogen pollutants (POPs) in healthy Faroese adults. In 310 randomly selected Faroese residents aged 18-60 years, the CYP3A4 activity was determined based on the urinary 6{beta}-hydroxycortisol/cortisol (6{beta}-OHC/FC) ratio. POP exposures were assessed by measuring their concentrations in serum lipid. The results showed a unimodal distribution of the 6{beta}-OHC/FC ratio with values ranging from 0.58 to 27.38. Women had a slightly higher 6{beta}-OHC/FC ratio than men (p = 0.07). Confounder-adjusted multiple regression analysis showed significant associations between 6{beta}-OHC/FC ratios and {sigma}PCB, PCB-TEQ and p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDT and HCB, respectively, but the associations were statistically significant for men only.

  5. Evidences for CYP3A4 autoactivation in the desulfuration of dimethoate by the human liver.

    PubMed

    Buratti, Franca M; Testai, Emanuela

    2007-11-20

    Dimethoate (DIM) is an organophosphorothionate (OPT) pesticide used worldwide as a systemic insecticide and acaricide. It is characterized by low-to-moderate acute mammalian toxicity; similarly to the other OPT pesticides, its mode of action is mediated by the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), exerted by its toxic metabolite dimethoate-oxon or omethoate (OME), which is also used as a direct acting pesticide. Human hepatic DIM bioactivation to the toxic metabolite OME has been characterized by using c-DNA expressed human CYPs and human liver microsomes (HLM) also in the presence of CYP-specific chemical inhibitors, with a method based on AChE inhibition. The obtained kinetic parameters and AChE IC(50) have been compared with those previously obtained with other OPTs, indicating a lower efficiency in DIM desulfuration reaction and a lower potency in inhibiting AChE. Results showed that, similarly to the other OPTs tested so far, at low DIM concentration OME formation is mainly catalysed by CYP1A2, while the role of 3A4 is relevant at high DIM levels. Differently from the other OPTs, DIM desulfuration reaction showed an atypical kinetic profile, likely due to CYP3A4 autoactivation. The sigmoidicity degree of the activity curve increased with the level of CYP3A4 in HLM or disappeared in the presence of a CYP3A4 chemical inhibitor. This atypical kinetic behaviour can be considered one of the possible explanations for the recent findings that among patients hospitalized following OPT intoxication, DIM ingestion gave different symptoms and more severe poisoning (23.1% of fatal cases versus total) than chlorpyrifos (8% of deaths), which has a lower LD(50) value. Since DIM-poisoned patients poorly responded to pralidoxime, the possibility to use CYP3A4 inhibitors could be considered as a complementary treatment.

  6. Addition of Monovalent Electrolytes to Improve Storage Stability of Freeze-Dried Protein Formulations.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Hiroshika; Forney-Stevens, Kelly M; Liu, Ming; Qian, Ken K; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Cicerone, Marcus T; Pikal, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of low levels of electrolytes on storage stability in freeze-dried sucrose-based protein formulations. Both bovine serum albumin and recombinant human serum albumin were freeze dried with sucrose and alkali halides (LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl) at selected low levels. All formulations were stored at 50 °C and 65 °C up to 2 months and then assayed for protein aggregation. The data demonstrate that low levels of LiCl and NaCl enhance stability. No obvious correlations with either protein secondary structure or global dynamics (structural relaxation time) were found. However, good correlations were found between stability and both free-volume hole size via positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and fast dynamics by neutron scattering. Volume changes on mixing and the partial molal volume of salt were also studied in an effort to detect decreases in free volume. These data did not support the hypothesis that reduction in free volume was the primary mechanism for salt-induced stabilization. Finally, a positive effect of postlyophilization annealing on stability was demonstrated. In summary, we find that small amounts of LiCl and NaCl significantly stabilize these proteins, which is a result at variance with conventional formulation wisdom. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of actin-binding proteins on the thermal stability of monomeric actin.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Kremneva, Elena V; Lappalainen, Pekka; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2013-01-08

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was applied to investigate the thermal unfolding of rabbit skeletal muscle G-actin in its complexes with actin-binding proteins, cofilin, twinfilin, and profilin. The results show that the effects of these proteins on the thermal stability of G-actin depend on the nucleotide, ATP or ADP, bound in the nucleotide-binding cleft between actin subdomains 2 and 4. Interestingly, cofilin binding stabilizes both ATP-G-actin and ADP-G-actin, whereas twinfilin increases the thermal stability of the ADP-G-actin but not that of the ATP-G-actin. By contrast, profilin strongly decreases the thermal stability of the ATP-G-actin but has no appreciable effect on the ADP-G-actin. Comparison of these DSC results with literature data reveals a relationship between the effects of actin-binding proteins on the thermal unfolding of G-actin, stabilization or destabilization, and their effects on the rate of nucleotide exchange in the nucleotide-binding cleft, decrease or increase. These results suggest that the thermal stability of G-actin depends, at least partially, on the conformation of the nucleotide-binding cleft: the actin molecule is more stable when the cleft is closed, while an opening of the cleft leads to significant destabilization of G-actin. Thus, DSC studies of the thermal unfolding of G-actin can provide new valuable information about the conformational changes induced by actin-binding proteins in the actin molecule.

  8. Glycosylation May Reduce Protein Thermodynamic Stability by Inducing a Conformational Distortion.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Yulian; Shental-Bechor, Dalit; Greenblatt, Harry M; Levy, Yaakov

    2015-09-17

    Glycosylation plays not only a functional role but can also modify the biophysical properties of the modified protein. Usually, natural glycosylation results in protein stabilization; however, in vitro and in silico studies showed that sometimes glycosylation results in thermodynamic destabilization. Here, we applied coarse-grained and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to understand the mechanism underlying the loss of stability of the MM1 protein by glycosylation. We show that the origin of the destabilization is a conformational distortion of the protein caused by the interaction of the monosaccharide with the protein surface. Though glycosylation creates new short-range glycan-protein interactions that stabilize the conjugated protein, it breaks long-range protein-protein interactions. This has a destabilizing effect because the probability of long- and short-range interactions forming differs between the folded and unfolded states. The destabilization originates not from simple loss of interactions but due to a trade-off between the short- and long-range interactions.

  9. Detecting Selection on Protein Stability through Statistical Mechanical Models of Folding and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bastolla, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    The properties of biomolecules depend both on physics and on the evolutionary process that formed them. These two points of view produce a powerful synergism. Physics sets the stage and the constraints that molecular evolution has to obey, and evolutionary theory helps in rationalizing the physical properties of biomolecules, including protein folding thermodynamics. To complete the parallelism, protein thermodynamics is founded on the statistical mechanics in the space of protein structures, and molecular evolution can be viewed as statistical mechanics in the space of protein sequences. In this review, we will integrate both points of view, applying them to detecting selection on the stability of the folded state of proteins. We will start discussing positive design, which strengthens the stability of the folded against the unfolded state of proteins. Positive design justifies why statistical potentials for protein folding can be obtained from the frequencies of structural motifs. Stability against unfolding is easier to achieve for longer proteins. On the contrary, negative design, which consists in destabilizing frequently formed misfolded conformations, is more difficult to achieve for longer proteins. The folding rate can be enhanced by strengthening short-range native interactions, but this requirement contrasts with negative design, and evolution has to trade-off between them. Finally, selection can accelerate functional movements by favoring low frequency normal modes of the dynamics of the native state that strongly correlate with the functional conformation change. PMID:24970217

  10. Co-translational stabilization of insoluble proteins in cell-free expression systems.

    PubMed

    Kai, Lei; Orbán, Erika; Henrich, Erik; Proverbio, Davide; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation, aggregation, and inclusion body (IB) formation are frequently observed problems upon overexpression of recombinant proteins. The open accessibility of cell-free reactions allows addressing such critical steps by the addition of protein stabilizers such as chemical chaperones or detergents directly into the expression reactions. This approach could therefore reduce or even prevent initial protein precipitation already in the translation environment. The strategy might be considered to generally improve protein sample quality and to rescue proteins that are difficult to refold from IBs or from aggregated precipitates. We describe a protocol for the co-translational stabilization of difficult proteins by their expression in the presence of supplements such as alcohols, poly-ions, or detergents. We compile potentially useful compounds together with their recommended stock and working concentrations. Examples of screening experiments in order to systematically identify compounds or compound mixtures that stabilize particular proteins of interest are given. The method can primarily be considered for the production of unstable soluble proteins or of membrane proteins containing larger soluble domains.

  11. Effect of gold nanoparticle conjugation on the activity and stability of functional proteins.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Julian; Gazi, Sara; Ivanova, Rositsa; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    Immobilization of functional proteins such as enzymes on solid surfaces produces a variety of effects ranging from the reversal and strong inhibition to the enhancement of protein stability and function. Such effects are protein-dependent and are affected by the physical and chemical properties of the surfaces. Functional consequences of protein immobilization on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are protein-dependent and require thorough investigation using suitable functional tests. However, traditional approaches to making control samples, i.e., immobilized protein vs. protein in solution in absence of any nanoparticles do not provide sufficiently identical reaction conditions and complicate interpretation of the results. This report provides advice and methods for preparing AuNP-conjugated preparations generally suitable for studying the effects of immobilization on the activity and stability of different functional proteins. We use bovine catalase to illustrate our approach, but the methods are easily adaptable to any other enzyme or protein. The AuNP-immobilized enzyme showed increased stability at elevated temperatures compared to the same enzyme in solution.

  12. p73 expression is regulated by ribosomal protein RPL26 through mRNA translation and protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wensheng; Chen, Xinbin

    2016-01-01

    p73, a p53 family tumor suppressor, is regulated by multiple mechanisms, including transcription and mRNA and protein stability. However, whether p73 expression is regulated via mRNA translation has not been explored. To test this, we examined whether ribosomal protein 26 (RPL26) plays a role in p73 expression. Here, we showed that p73 expression is controlled by RPL26 via protein stability and mRNA translation. To examine whether MDM2 mediates RPL26 to regulate p73 protein stability, we generated multiple MDM2-knockout cell lines by CRISPR-cas9. We found that in the absence of MDM2, the half-life of p73 protein is markedly increased. Interestingly, we also found that RPL26 is still capable of regulating p73 expression, albeit to a lesser extent, in MDM2-KO cells compared to that in isogenic control cells, suggesting that RPL26 regulates p73 expression via multiple mechanisms. Indeed, we found that RPL26 is necessary for efficient assembly of polysomes on p73 mRNA and de novo synthesis of p73 protein. Consistently, we found that RPL26 directly binds to p73 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) and that RPL26 is necessary for efficient expression of an eGFP reporter that carries p73 3′UTR. We also found that RPL26 interacts with cap-binding protein eIF4E and enhances the association of eIF4E with p73 mRNA, leading to increased p73 mRNA translation. Finally, we showed that knockdown of RPL26 promotes, whereas ectopic expression of RPL26 inhibits, cell growth in a TAp73-dependent manner. Together, our data indicate that RPL26 regulates p73 expression via two distinct mechanisms: protein stability and mRNA translation. PMID:27825141

  13. Improving Protein Stability and Controlling Protein Release by Adding Poly (Cyclohexane-1, 4-Diyl Acetone Dimethylene Ketal) to PLGA Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Yu, Changhui; Yu, Kongtong; Teng, Lesheng; Liu, Jiaxin; Wang, Xuesong; Sun, Fengying; Li, Youxin

    2015-01-01

    The use of biodegradable polymers such as PLGA to encapsulate therapeutic proteins for their controlled release has received tremendous interest. However, an acidic environment caused by PLGA degradation productions leads to protein incomplete release and chemical degradation. The aim of this study was to develop novel PCADK/PLGA microspheres to improve protein stability and release behavior. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) incubated in PCADK and PLGA degradation products was investigated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), size exclusion chromatography (SEC-HPLC), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Blended microspheres of PCADK/PLGA were prepared in different ratios and the release behaviors of the microspheres and the protein stability were then measured. The degradation properties of the microspheres and the pH inside the microspheres were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to examine the mechanism of autocatalytic degradation and protein stability. BSA was more stable in the presence of PCADK monomers than it was in the presence of PLGA monomers, revealing that PCADK is highly compatible with this protein. PCADK/PLGA microspheres were successfully prepared, and 2/8 was determined to be the optimal ratio. Further, 43% of the BSA formed water-insoluble aggregates in the presence of PCADK/PLGA microspheres, compared with 57% for the PLGA microspheres, demonstrating that the BSA encapsulated in PCADK/PLGA blended microspheres was more stable than in PLGA microspheres. The PCADK/PLGA blended microspheres improved protein stability and release behavior, providing a promising protein drug delivery system.

  14. Protein Stability and Dynamics Modulation: The Case of Human Frataxin

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Mariana; Salvay, Andres G.; Ferreiro, Diego U.; Santos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Frataxin (FXN) is an α/β protein that plays an essential role in iron homeostasis. Apparently, the function of human FXN (hFXN) depends on the cooperative formation of crucial interactions between helix α1, helix α2, and the C-terminal region (CTR) of the protein. In this work we quantitatively explore these relationships using a purified recombinant fragment hFXN90–195. This variant shows the hydrodynamic behavior expected for a monomeric globular domain. Circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies show that hFXN90–195 presents native-like secondary and tertiary structure. However, chemical and temperature induced denaturation show that CTR truncation significantly destabilizes the overall hFXN fold. Accordingly, limited proteolysis experiments suggest that the native-state dynamics of hFXN90–195 and hFXN90–210 are indeed different, being the former form much more sensitive to the protease at specific sites. The overall folding dynamics of hFXN fold was further explored with structure-based protein folding simulations. These suggest that the native ensemble of hFXN can be decomposed in at least two substates, one with consolidation of the CTR and the other without consolidation of the CTR. Explicit-solvent all atom simulations identify some of the proteolytic target sites as flexible regions of the protein. We propose that the local unfolding of CTR may be a critical step for the global unfolding of hFXN, and that modulation of the CTR interactions may strongly affect hFXN physiological function. PMID:23049850

  15. Cross-linking Mass Spectrometry and Mutagenesis Confirm the Functional Importance of Surface Interactions between CYP3A4 and Holo/Apo Cytochrome b5

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunsheng; Gao, Qiuxia; Roberts, Arthur G.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Doneanu, Catalin E.; Xue, Song; Goodlett, David R.; Nelson, Sidney D.; Atkins, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome b5 (cyt b5) is one of the key components in the microsomal cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system. Consensus has not been reached on the underlying mechanism of cyt b5 modulation of CYP catalysis. Both cyt b5 and apo b5, are reported to stimulate the activity of several P450 isoforms. In the present study, the surface interactions of both holo and apo b5 with CYP3A4 were investigated and compared for the first time. Chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometric analysis was used to identify the potential electrostatic interactions between the protein surfaces. Subsequently, the interaction models of holo/apo b5 with CYP3A4 were built using the identified interacting sites as constraints. Both cyt b5 and apo b5 were predicted to bind to the same groove on CYP3A4 with close contacts to the B-B’ loop of CYP3A4, a substrate recognition site (SRS). Mutagenesis studies further confirmed that the interacting sites on CYP3A4 (Lys96, Lys127 and Lys421) are of functional importance. Mutation of these residues reduced or abolished cyt b5 binding affinity. The critical role of Arg446 on CYP3A4 in binding to cyt b5 and/or cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) was also discovered. The results indicated that electrostatic interactions on the interface of the two proteins are functionally important. The results indicate that the apo cyt b5 can dock with CYP3A4 in a manner analogous to holo cyt b5 so electron transfer from cyt b5 is not required for its effects. PMID:23150942

  16. Cross-linking mass spectrometry and mutagenesis confirm the functional importance of surface interactions between CYP3A4 and holo/apo cytochrome b(5).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunsheng; Gao, Qiuxia; Roberts, Arthur G; Shaffer, Scott A; Doneanu, Catalin E; Xue, Song; Goodlett, David R; Nelson, Sidney D; Atkins, William M

    2012-11-27

    Cytochrome b(5) (cyt b(5)) is one of the key components in the microsomal cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system. Consensus has not been reached about the underlying mechanism of cyt b(5) modulation of CYP catalysis. Both cyt b(5) and apo b(5) are reported to stimulate the activity of several P450 isoforms. In this study, the surface interactions of both holo and apo b(5) with CYP3A4 were investigated and compared for the first time. Chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometric analysis was used to identify the potential electrostatic interactions between the protein surfaces. Subsequently, the models of interaction of holo/apo b(5) with CYP3A4 were built using the identified interacting sites as constraints. Both cyt b(5) and apo b(5) were predicted to bind to the same groove on CYP3A4 with close contacts to the B-B' loop of CYP3A4, a substrate recognition site. Mutagenesis studies further confirmed that the interacting sites on CYP3A4 (Lys96, Lys127, and Lys421) are functionally important. Mutation of these residues reduced or abolished cyt b(5) binding affinity. The critical role of Arg446 on CYP3A4 in binding to cyt b(5) and/or cytochrome P450 reductase was also discovered. The results indicated that electrostatic interactions on the interface of the two proteins are functionally important. The results indicate that apo b(5) can dock with CYP3A4 in a manner analogous to that of holo b(5), so electron transfer from cyt b(5) is not required for its effects.

  17. Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Protein Epitopes: The Basis of Antigenic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Maino; Bürckert, Jean-Philippe; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Muller, Claude P.; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Globally eliminating measles using available vaccines is biologically feasible because the measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) protein is antigenically stable. The H protein is responsible for receptor binding, and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. The immunodominant epitope, known as the hemagglutinating and noose epitope, is located near the receptor-binding site (RBS). The RBS also contains an immunodominant epitope. Loss of receptor binding correlates with an escape from the neutralization by antibodies that target the epitope at RBS. Another neutralizing epitope is located near RBS and is shielded by an N-linked sugar in certain genotype strains. However, human sera from vaccinees and measles patients neutralized all MV strains with similar efficiencies, regardless of the N-linked sugar modification or mutations at these epitopes. Two other major epitopes exist at a distance from RBS. One has an unstructured flexible domain with a linear neutralizing epitope. When MV-H forms a tetramer (dimer of dimers), these epitopes may form the dimer-dimer interface, and one of the two epitopes may also interact with the F protein. The neutralization mechanisms of antibodies that recognize these epitopes may involve inhibiting the H-F interaction or blocking the fusion cascade after MV-H binds to its receptors. PMID:27490564

  18. Regulation of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation: the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein Stabilizes the Fusion Protein in a Pretriggered State

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zuhair W.; Gui, Long; DeVito, Ilaria; Jurgens, Eric M.; Lu, Hong; Yokoyama, Christine C.; Palermo, Laura M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2012-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA)-neuraminidase protein (HN) of paramyxoviruses carries out three discrete activities, each of which affects the ability of HN to promote viral fusion and entry: receptor binding, receptor cleaving (neuraminidase), and triggering of the fusion protein. Binding of HN to its sialic acid receptor on a target cell triggers its activation of the fusion protein (F), which then inserts into the target cell and mediates the membrane fusion that initiates infection. We provide new evidence for a fourth function of HN: stabilization of the F protein in its pretriggered state before activation. Influenza virus hemagglutinin protein (uncleaved HA) was used as a nonspecific binding protein to tether F-expressing cells to target cells, and heat was used to activate F, indicating that the prefusion state of F can be triggered to initiate structural rearrangement and fusion by temperature. HN expression along with uncleaved HA and F enhances the F activation if HN is permitted to engage the receptor. However, if HN is prevented from engaging the receptor by the use of a small compound, temperature-induced F activation is curtailed. The results indicate that HN helps stabilize the prefusion state of F, and analysis of a stalk domain mutant HN reveals that the stalk domain of HN mediates the F-stabilization effect. PMID:22993149

  19. Biophysical stability of hyFc fusion protein with regards to buffers and various excipients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Yeul; Kim, Nam Ah; Lim, Dae Gon; Eun, Chang-yong; Choi, Donghoon; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A novel non-cytolytic hybrid Fc (hyFc) with an intact Ig structure without any mutation in the hyFc region, was developed to construct a long-acting agonistic protein. The stability of interleukin-7 (IL-7) fused with the hyFc (GXN-04) was evaluated to develop early formulations. Various biophysical methods were utilized and three different buffer systems with various pH ranges were investigated including histidine-acetate, sodium citrate, and tris buffers. Various excipients were incorporated into the systems to obtain optimum protein stability. Two evident thermal transitions were observed with the unfolding of IL-7 and hyFc. The Tm and ΔH increased with pH, suggesting increased conformational stability. Increased Z-average size with PDI and decreased zeta potential with pH increase, with the exception of tris buffer, showed aggregation issues. Moreover, tris buffer at higher pH showed aggregation peaks from DLS. Non-ionic surfactants were effective against agitation by outcompeting protein molecules for hydrophobic surfaces. Sucrose and sorbitol accelerated protein aggregation during agitation, but exhibited a protective effect against oxidation, with preferential exclusion favoring the compact states of GXN-04. The stability of GXN-04 was varied by basal buffers and excipients, hence the buffers and excipients need to be evaluated carefully to achieve the maximum stability of proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved insights into protein thermal stability: from the molecular to the structurome scale.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2016-11-13

    Despite the intense efforts of the last decades to understand the thermal stability of proteins, the mechanisms responsible for its modulation still remain debated. In this investigation, we tackle this issue by showing how a multiscale perspective can yield new insights. With the help of temperature-dependent statistical potentials, we analysed some amino acid interactions at the molecular level, which are suggested to be relevant for the enhancement of thermal resistance. We then investigated the thermal stability at the protein level by quantifying its modification upon amino acid substitutions. Finally, a large scale analysis of protein stability-at the structurome level-contributed to the clarification of the relation between stability and natural evolution, thereby showing that the mutational profile of proteins differs according to their thermal properties. Some considerations on how the multiscale approach could help in unravelling the protein stability mechanisms are briefly discussed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Influence of Miscibility of Protein-Sugar Lyophilizates on Their Storage Stability.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Maarten A; Nethercott, Matthew J; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees; Frijlink, Henderik W; Munson, Eric J; Pikal, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    For sugars to act as successful stabilizers of proteins during lyophilization and subsequent storage, they need to have several characteristics. One of them is that they need to be able to form interactions with the protein and for that miscibility is essential. To evaluate the influence of protein-sugar miscibility on protein storage stability, model protein IgG was lyophilized in the presence of various sugars of different molecular weight. By comparing solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy relaxation times of both protein and sugar on two different timescales, i.e., (1)H T1 and (1)H T1ρ, miscibility of the two components was established on a 2-5- and a 20-50-nm length scale, respectively, and related to protein storage stability. Smaller sugars showed better miscibility with IgG, and the tendency of IgG to aggregate during storage was lower for smaller sugars. The largest sugar performed worst and was phase separated on both length scales. Additionally, shorter protein (1)H T1 relaxation times correlated with higher aggregation rates during storage. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay showed overlapping effects of aggregation and chemical degradation and did not correspond as well with the miscibility. Because of the small scale at which miscibility was determined (2-5 nm) and the size of the protein domains (∼2.5 × 2.5 × 5 nm), the miscibility data give an indirect measure of interaction between protein and sugar. This reduced interaction could be the result of steric hindrance, providing a possible explanation as to why smaller sugars show better miscibility and storage stability with the protein.

  2. Studying the role of cooperative hydration in stabilizing folded protein states.

    PubMed

    Huggins, David J

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and modelling protein folding remains a key scientific and engineering challenge. Two key questions in protein folding are (1) why many proteins adopt a folded state and (2) how these proteins transition from the random coil ensemble to a folded state. In this paper we employ molecular dynamics simulations to address the first of these questions. Computational methods are well-placed to address this issue due to their ability to analyze systems at atomic-level resolution. Traditionally, the stability of folded proteins has been ascribed to the balance of two types of intermolecular interactions: hydrogen-bonding interactions and hydrophobic contacts. In this study, we explore a third type of intermolecular interaction: cooperative hydration of protein surface residues. To achieve this, we consider multiple independent simulations of the villin headpiece domain to quantify the contributions of different interactions to the energy of the native and fully extended states. In addition, we consider whether these findings are robust with respect to the protein forcefield, the water model, and the presence of salt. In all cases, we identify many cooperatively hydrated interactions that are transient but energetically favor the native state. Whilst further work on additional protein structures, forcefields, and water models is necessary, these results suggest a role for cooperative hydration in protein folding that should be explored further. Rational design of cooperative hydration on the protein surface could be a viable strategy for increasing protein stability. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Formation and stability of secondary structures in globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bascle, J.; Garel, T.; Orland, H.

    1993-02-01

    We study two models for the formation and packing of helices and sheets in globular (compact) proteins. These models, based on weighted Hamiltonian paths on a regular lattice both exhibit a first order transition between a compact high temperature phase, with no extended secondary structures, and a quasi-frozen compact phase, with secondary structures invading the whole lattice. The quasi-frozen phase with very weak temperature dependence, is identified as the native phase of proteins, whereas the high-temperature phase may be relevant to the so-called molten globule state of proteins. Nous étudions deux modèles pour la formation et l'empilement d'hélices ou de feuillets dans la phase globulaire (compacte) des protéines. ces modèles, fondés sur des chemins hamiltoniens pondérés sur réseau, possèdent une transition de phase du premier ordre, entre (i) une phase haute température compacte, avec structures secondaires non étendues, et (ii) une phase compacte quasi-gelée, où les structures secondaires envahissent tout le réseau. La phase quasi-gelée, qui a une dépendance en température très faible, est identifiée à la phase native des protéines; la phase haute température est peut-être reliée à la phase native “globule fondu” (molten globule) des protéines.

  4. Differential scanning calorimetry to quantify the stability of protein cages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ardejani, Maziar S

    2015-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is an experimental technique through which the differences in amount of heat required to maintain equal temperature between a sample and a reference cell are measured at various temperatures. The quantified heat relates to the differences in apparent heat capacity of the analytes. The data from DSC studies will thereby provide direct information about the energetics of thermally induced processes in the sample. Here we present a detailed protocol to quantify the thermostability of protein cage, bacterioferritin (BFR), using differential scanning calorimetry.

  5. Glycans as biofunctional ligands for gold nanorods: stability and targeting in protein-rich media.

    PubMed

    García, Isabel; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Henriksen-Lacey, Malou; Grzelczak, Marek; Penadés, Soledad; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2015-03-18

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) has become the gold standard for stabilization of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) in biofluids, because it prevents aggregation while minimizing unspecific interactions with proteins. Application of Au NPs in biological environments requires the use of ligands that can target selected receptors, even in the presence of protein-rich media. We demonstrate here the stabilizing effect of low-molecular-weight glycans on both spherical and rod-like plasmonic NPs under physiological conditions, as bench-marked against the well-established PEG ligands. Glycan-coated NPs are resistant to adsorption of proteins from serum-containing media and avoid phagocytosis by macrophage-like cells, but retain selectivity toward carbohydrate-binding proteins in protein-rich biological media. These results open the way toward the design of efficient therapeutic/diagnostic glycan-decorated plasmonic nanotools for specific biological applications.

  6. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-03-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a `fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures.

  7. Use of whey protein soluble aggregates for thermal stability-a hypothesis paper.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kelsey N; Zhong, Qixin; Foegeding, Edward A

    2013-08-01

    Forming whey proteins into soluble aggregates is a modification shown to improve or expand the applications in foaming, emulsification, gelation, film-formation, and encapsulation. Whey protein soluble aggregates are defined as aggregates that are intermediates between monomer proteins and an insoluble gel network or precipitate. The conditions under which whey proteins denature and aggregate have been extensively studied and can be used as guiding principles of producing soluble aggregates. These conditions are reviewed for pH, ion type and concentration, cosolutes, and protein concentration, along with heating temperature and duration. Combinations of these conditions can be used to design soluble aggregates with desired physicochemical properties including surface charge, surface hydrophobicity, size, and shape. These properties in turn can be used to obtain target macroscopic properties, such as viscosity, clarity, and stability, of the final product. A proposed approach to designing soluble aggregates with improved thermal stability for beverage applications is presented.

  8. Preparation of iron bound succinylated milk protein concentrate and evaluation of its stability.

    PubMed

    Shilpashree, B G; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek; Bajaj, Rajesh Kumar; Tomar, S K

    2016-04-01

    Major problems associated with the fortification of soluble iron salts include chemical reactivity and incompatibility with other components. Milk protein concentrate (MPC) are able to bind significant amount of iron due to the presence of both casein and whey protein. MPC in its native state possess very poor solubility, therefore, succinylated derivatives of MPC (succ. MPC) were also used for the preparation of protein-iron complex. Preparation of the complex involved centrifugation (to remove insoluble iron), ultrafiltration (to remove unbound iron) and lyophilisation (to attain in dry form). Iron binding ability of MPC enhanced significantly (P<0.05) upon succinylation. Stability of bound iron from both varieties of complexes was monitored under different conditions encountered during processing. Higher stability (P<0.05) of bound iron was observed in succ. MPC-iron complex than native protein complex. This method could be adopted for the production of stable iron enriched protein, an organic iron source.

  9. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a ‘fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures. PMID:26980593

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Protein stability and enzyme activity at extreme biological temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, Georges

    2010-08-01

    Psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in permanently cold environments, even at subzero temperatures. To maintain metabolic rates compatible with sustained life, they have improved the dynamics of their protein structures, thereby enabling appropriate molecular motions required for biological activity at low temperatures. As a consequence of this structural flexibility, psychrophilic proteins are unstable and heat-labile. In the upper range of biological temperatures, thermophiles and hyperthermophiles grow at temperatures > 100 °C and synthesize ultra-stable proteins. However, thermophilic enzymes are nearly inactive at room temperature as a result of their compactness and rigidity. At the molecular level, both types of extremophilic proteins have adapted the same structural factors, but in opposite directions, to address either activity at low temperatures or stability in hot environments. A model based on folding funnels is proposed accounting for the stability-activity relationships in extremophilic proteins.

  11. Influence of ι-carrageenan, pectin, and gelatin on the physicochemical properties and stability of milk protein-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Tippetts, M; Martini, S

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated the stability of bilayer emulsions as a function of secondary layer composition and pH. Primary emulsions were formulated with 5% soybean oil, 1% protein from nonfat dry milk (NDM) powder as emulsifier and ι-carrageenan (ι-carr), low-methoxyl pectin (LMp), high-methoxyl pectin (HMp), or gelatin as secondary layers. ζ-Potential values increased for each emulsion as the pH decreased, with ι-carr emulsions being consistently more negatively charged than primary emulsions and significantly more stable. ζ-Potential values were not always correlated to emulsion stability. Gelatin secondary emulsions at pH 3 and HMp secondary emulsions at pH 7 were unstable due to the presence of depletion flocculation. In addition, LMp secondary emulsions stability at pH 7 might be due to calcium bridging, which increased the emulsion's viscosity. Overall, the stability of NDM emulsions was improved when ι-carr and LMp were used as secondary layers at pH 7 and 5, and when ι-carr and HMp were used as secondary layers at pH 3. Increased stability of these systems can be attributed to a second homogenization step used to formulate the secondary emulsions and to the presence of Ca(+2) in the NDM. Results from this research show that the stability of bilayer emulsions is driven by the presence of depletion flocculation, droplet charge, droplet size and distribution and viscosity. The use of everyday ingredients (nonfat dry milk powder, gelatin, pectin, and carrageenan), which are understood and accepted by the average consumer, creates label-friendly products that are the wave of the future. Stable emulsions can be formed using these ingredients at various pH. Understanding the stability and how the pH impacts the physicochemical characteristics and stability of these emulsions will enable manufactures to use ordinary ingredients to create healthier products (for example, low-fat dressings, sauces, dips, and beverages). © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Role of Internal Water on Protein Thermal Stability: The Case of Homologous G Domains.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Kalimeri, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Hénin, Jérôme; Sterpone, Fabio

    2015-07-23

    In this work, we address the question of whether the enhanced stability of thermophilic proteins has a direct connection with internal hydration. Our model systems are two homologous G domains of different stability: the mesophilic G domain of the elongation factor thermal unstable protein from E. coli and the hyperthermophilic G domain of the EF-1α protein from S. solfataricus. Using molecular dynamics simulation at the microsecond time scale, we show that both proteins host water molecules in internal cavities and that these molecules exchange with the external solution in the nanosecond time scale. The hydration free energy of these sites evaluated via extensive calculations is found to be favorable for both systems, with the hyperthermophilic protein offering a slightly more favorable environment to host water molecules. We estimate that, under ambient conditions, the free energy gain due to internal hydration is about 1.3 kcal/mol in favor of the hyperthermophilic variant. However, we also find that, at the high working temperature of the hyperthermophile, the cavities are rather dehydrated, meaning that under extreme conditions other molecular factors secure the stability of the protein. Interestingly, we detect a clear correlation between the hydration of internal cavities and the protein conformational landscape. The emerging picture is that internal hydration is an effective observable to probe the conformational landscape of proteins. In the specific context of our investigation, the analysis confirms that the hyperthermophilic G domain is characterized by multiple states and it has a more flexible structure than its mesophilic homologue.

  13. Stabilization of a binary protein complex by intein-mediated cyclization.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Cy M; Graham, Stephen C; Stokes, Philippa H; Collyer, Charles A; Guss, J Mitchell; Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2006-11-01

    The study of protein-protein interactions can be hampered by the instability of one or more of the protein complex components. In this study, we showed that intein-mediated cyclization can be used to engineer an artificial intramolecular cyclic protein complex between two interacting proteins: the largely unstable LIM-only protein 4 (LMO4) and an unstructured domain of LIM domain binding protein 1 (ldb1). The X-ray structure of the cyclic complex is identical to noncyclized versions of the complex. Chemical and thermal denaturation assays using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and dynamic light scattering were used to compare the relative stabilities of the cyclized complex, the intermolecular (or free) complex, and two linear versions of the intramolecular complex (in which the interacting domains of LMO4 and ldb1 were fused, via a flexible linker, in either orientation). In terms of resistance to denaturation, the cyclic complex is the most stable variant and the intermolecular complex is the least stable; however, the two linear intramolecular variants show significant differences in stability. These differences appear to be related to the relative contact order (the average distance in sequence between residues that make contacts within a structure) of key binding residues at the interface of the two proteins. Thus, the restriction of the more stable component of a complex may enhance stability to a greater extent than restraining less stable components.

  14. Effects of polyols on the stability of whey proteins in intermediate-moisture food model systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Peng; Tran, Amy; Labuza, Ted P

    2009-03-25

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of polyols on the stability of whey proteins in an intermediate-moisture food model system and to elucidate the effect of polyols on the hardening of whey protein-based bars during storage. Four major polyols, glycerol, propylene glycol, maltitol, and sorbitol, were evaluated in model systems, which contained whey protein isolate, polyols, and water. The results showed that glycerol was the most effective polyol in lowering water activity and provided the soft texture of intermediate-moisture foods, followed by sorbitol and maltitol. These three polyols stabilized the native structure of whey proteins, provided a desired texture, and slowed the hardening of the model systems. Propylene glycol should not be used in whey protein-based high-protein intermediate-moisture foods because it caused changes in protein conformation and stability as observed by differential scanning calorimeter and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and resulted in aggregation of whey proteins and hardening of the bar texture during storage, causing loss in product quality.

  15. Probing Bio-Nano Interactions between Blood Proteins and Monolayer-Stabilized Graphene Sheets.

    PubMed

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Han, Dongxue; Niu, Li; Chi, Qijin

    2015-11-18

    Meeting proteins is regarded as the starting event for nanostructures to enter biological systems. Understanding their interactions is thus essential for a newly emerging field, nanomedicine. Chemically converted graphene (CCG) is a wonderful two-dimensional (2D) material for nanomedicine, but its stability in biological environments is limited. Systematic probing on the binding of proteins to CCG is currently lacking. Herein, we report a comprehensive study on the interactions between blood proteins and stabilized CCG (sCCG). CCG nanosheets are functionalized by monolayers of perylene leading to significant improvement in their resistance to electrolyte salts and long-term stability, but retain their core structural characteristics. Five types of model human blood proteins including human fibrinogen, γ-globulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), insulin, and histone are tested. The main driving forces for blood protein binding involve the π-π interacations between the π-plane of sCCG and surface aromatic amonic acid (sAA) residues of proteins. Several key binding parameters including the binding amount, Hill coefficient, and binding constant are determined. Through a detailed analysis of key controlling factors, we conclude that the protein binding to sCCG is determined mainly by the protein size, the number, and the density of the sAA.

  16. Applications of differential scanning calorimetry for thermal stability analysis of proteins: qualification of DSC.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jie; Arthur, Kelly; Chemmalil, Letha; Muzammil, Salman; Gabrielson, John; Jiang, Yijia

    2012-03-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to characterize protein thermal stability, overall conformation, and domain folding integrity by the biopharmaceutical industry. Recently, there have been increased requests from regulatory agencies for the qualification of characterization methods including DSC. Understanding the method precision can help determine what differences between samples are significant and also establish the acceptance criteria for comparability and other characterization studies. In this study, we identify the parameters for the qualification of DSC for thermal stability analysis of proteins. We use these parameters to assess the precision and sensitivity of DSC and demonstrate that DSC is suitable for protein thermal stability analysis for these purposes. Several molecules from different structural families were studied. The experiments and data analyses were performed by different analysts using different instruments at different sites. The results show that the (apparent) thermal transition midpoint (T(m)) values obtained for the same protein by same and different instruments and/or analysts are quite reproducible, and the profile similarity values obtained for the same protein from the same instrument are also high. DSC is an appropriate method for assessing protein thermal stability and conformational changes.

  17. The impact of agglomeration and storage on flavor and flavor stability of whey protein concentrate 80% and whey protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Wright, B J; Zevchak, S E; Wright, J M; Drake, M A

    2009-01-01

    The impact of agglomeration on flavor and flavor stability of whey protein concentrates 80% (WPC80) and whey protein isolates (WPI) has not been widely addressed. This study examined the impact of agglomeration on the flavor and flavor stability of commercial WPC80 and WPI across 18 mo of storage. Duplicate agglomerated and nonagglomerated WPC80 and WPI were collected from 4 facilities and stored at 21 degrees C, 50% relative humidity. Volatile analysis using solid phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and descriptive sensory analysis were conducted every 2 mo. Solubility index, bulk volume, dispersibility, moisture, and color (L, a, b) were tested every 3 or 6 mo. Consumer acceptance testing with protein beverages was conducted with fresh and stored whey proteins. Higher intensities and more rapid development of lipid oxidation flavors (cardboard, raisin/brothy, cucumber, and fatty) were noted in agglomerated powders compared to nonagglomerated powders (P < 0.05). Volatile analysis results confirmed sensory results, which indicated increased formation of aldehydes and ketones in agglomerated products compared to nonagglomerated powders (P < 0.05). Consumer acceptance scores for protein beverages were lower for beverages made with agglomerated WPC80 stored for 12 mo and agglomerated or nonagglomerated WPI stored for 18 mo compared to fresh products while trained panelists detected differences among beverages and rehydrated proteins earlier. Agglomeration with or without lecithin decreased the storage stability of whey proteins. These results indicate that the optimum shelf life at 21 degrees C for nonagglomerated whey proteins is 12 to 15 mo and 8 to 12 mo for agglomerated whey proteins.

  18. Protein knotting through concatenation significantly reduces folding stability

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2016-01-01

    Concatenation by covalent linkage of two protomers of an intertwined all-helical HP0242 homodimer from Helicobacter pylori results in the first example of an engineered knotted protein. While concatenation does not affect the native structure according to X-ray crystallography, the folding kinetics is substantially slower compared to the parent homodimer. Using NMR hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis, we showed here that concatenation destabilises significantly the knotted structure in solution, with some regions close to the covalent linkage being destabilised by as much as 5 kcal mol−1. Structural mapping of chemical shift perturbations induced by concatenation revealed a pattern that is similar to the effect induced by concentrated chaotrophic agent. Our results suggested that the design strategy of protein knotting by concatenation may be thermodynamically unfavourable due to covalent constrains imposed on the flexible fraying ends of the template structure, leading to rugged free energy landscape with increased propensity to form off-pathway folding intermediates. PMID:27982106

  19. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    PubMed

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties.

  20. Contribution of polar groups in the interior of a protein to the conformational stability.

    PubMed

    Takano, K; Yamagata, Y; Yutani, K

    2001-04-17

    It has been generally believed that polar residues are usually located on the surface of protein structures. However, there are many polar groups in the interior of the structures in reality. To evaluate the contribution of such buried polar groups to the conformational stability of a protein, nonpolar to polar mutations (L8T, A9S, A32S, I56T, I59T, I59S, A92S, V93T, A96S, V99T, and V100T) in the interior of a human lysozyme were examined. The thermodynamic parameters for denaturation were determined using a differential scanning calorimeter, and the crystal structures were analyzed by X-ray crystallography. If a polar group had a heavy energy cost to be buried, a mutant protein would be remarkably destabilized. However, the stability (Delta G) of the Ala to Ser and Val to Thr mutant human lysozymes was comparable to that of the wild-type protein, suggesting a low-energy penalty of buried polar groups. The structural analysis showed that all polar side chains introduced in the mutant proteins were able to find their hydrogen bond partners, which are ubiquitous in protein structures. The empirical structure-based calculation of stability change (Delta Delta G) [Takano et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 12698--12708] revealed that the mutant proteins decreased the hydrophobic effect contributing to the stability (Delta G(HP)), but this destabilization was recovered by the hydrogen bonds newly introduced. The present study shows the favorable contribution of polar groups with hydrogen bonds in the interior of protein molecules to the conformational stability.

  1. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  2. The influence of disulfide bonds on the mechanical stability of proteins is context dependent.

    PubMed

    Manteca, Aitor; Alonso-Caballero, Álvaro; Fertin, Marie; Poly, Simon; De Sancho, David; Perez-Jimenez, Raul

    2017-08-11

    Disulfide bonds play a crucial role in proteins, modulating their stability and constraining their conformational dynamics. A particularly important case is that of proteins that need to withstand forces arising from their normal biological function and that are often disulfide bonded. However, the influence of disulfides on the overall mechanical stability of proteins is poorly understood. Here, we used single-molecule force spectroscopy (smFS) to study the role of disulfide bonds in different mechanical proteins in terms of their unfolding forces. For this purpose, we chose the pilus protein FimG from Gram-negative bacteria and a disulfide-bonded variant of the I91 human cardiac titin polyprotein. Our results show that disulfide bonds can alter the mechanical stability of proteins in different ways depending on the properties of the system. Specifically, disulfide-bonded FimG undergoes a 30% increase in its mechanical stability compared with its reduced counterpart, whereas the unfolding force of I91 domains experiences a decrease of 15% relative to the WT form. Using a coarse-grained simulation model, we rationalized that the increase in mechanical stability of FimG is due to a shift in the mechanical unfolding pathway. The simple topology-based explanation suggests a neutral effect in the case of titin. In summary, our results indicate that disulfide bonds in proteins act in a context-dependent manner rather than simply as mechanical lockers, underscoring the importance of considering disulfide bonds both computationally and experimentally when studying the mechanical properties of proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Quantitation of protein–protein interactions by thermal stability shift analysis

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Curtis J; Hellinga, Homme W

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stability shift analysis is a powerful method for examining binding interactions in proteins. We demonstrate that under certain circumstances, protein–protein interactions can be quantitated by monitoring shifts in thermal stability using thermodynamic models and data analysis methods presented in this work. This method relies on the determination of protein stabilities from thermal unfolding experiments using fluorescent dyes such as SYPRO Orange that report on protein denaturation. Data collection is rapid and straightforward using readily available real-time polymerase chain reaction instrumentation. We present an approach for the analysis of the unfolding transitions corresponding to each partner to extract the affinity of the interaction between the proteins. This method does not require the construction of a titration series that brackets the dissociation constant. In thermal shift experiments, protein stability data are obtained at different temperatures according to the affinity- and concentration-dependent shifts in unfolding transition midpoints. Treatment of the temperature dependence of affinity is, therefore, intrinsic to this method and is developed in this study. We used the interaction between maltose-binding protein (MBP) and a thermostable synthetic ankyrin repeat protein (Off7) as an experimental test case because their unfolding transitions overlap minimally. We found that MBP is significantly stabilized by Off7. High experimental throughput is enabled by sample parallelization, and the ability to extract quantitative binding information at a single partner concentration. In a single experiment, we were able to quantify the affinities of a series of alanine mutants, covering a wide range of affinities (∼ 100 nM to ∼ 100 μM). PMID:21674662

  4. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  5. Poly(zwitterionic)protein conjugates offer increased stability without sacrificing binding affinity or bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with therapeutic proteins is an attractive approach to targeting a number of challenging diseases. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions, reducing bioavailability and therefore increasing the dose that is required. Conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used to increase stability, but this has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here, we introduce conjugation with zwitterionic polymers such as poly(carboxybetaine). We show that poly(carboxybetaine) conjugation improves stability in a manner similar to PEGylation, but that the new conjugates retain or even improve the binding affinity as a result of enhanced protein–substrate hydrophobic interactions. This chemistry opens a new avenue for the development of protein therapeutics by avoiding the need to compromise between stability and affinity. PMID:22169873

  6. Spectroscopic studies and molecular docking on the interaction of organotin antitumor compound bis[2,4-difluoro-N-(hydroxy-⟨κ⟩O)benzamidato-⟨κ⟩O]diphenyltin(IV) with human cytochrome P450 3A4 protease.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ying; Niu, Lin; Liu, Xinxin; Zhou, Hongyan; Dong, Hongzhou; Kong, Depeng; Li, Yunlan; Li, Qingshan

    2016-06-15

    A novel organotin DFDPT was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1)H, (13)C, (119)Sn, NMR techniques,etc. In order to investigate profoundly the relationship between DFDPT with human CYP3A4 proteaset and anticancer molecular mechanism of DFDPT, the intercalative mode of binding of DFDPT with CYP3A4 under physiological conditions were comprehensively evaluated using steady state, synchronous, three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy,circular dichroism and molecular docking. Fluorescence emission data showed that CYP3A4 fluorescence affected by DFDPT was a static quenching procedure, which implied that DFDPT-CYP3A4 complex had been formed. Apparent binding constants Kb of CYP3A4 with compound at 298 and 310K were 2.51×10(7) and 3.09×10(5), respectively. The binding sites number n was 1.64 and 1.22, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters ΔH and ΔS of the DFDPT-CYP3A4 complex were negative, which indicated that their interaction was driven mainly by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals force. The binding of DFDPT-CYP3A4 was spontaneous process in which ΔG was negative. The synchronous results showed DFDPT induced conformational changes of CYP3A4 protein. Three-dimensional fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra results also revealed conformation of CYP3A4 protein had been possible changed in the presence of DFDPT. Molecular docking was used to study the interaction orientation between DFDPT and CYP3A4 protease. The results indicated that DFDPT interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP3A4 protein mainly through formation of hydrogen bond. Furthermore, the predicted binding mode of DFDPT into CYP3A4 appeared to adopt an orientation with interactions among Arg105, Ser119 and Thr309.

  7. Spectroscopic studies and molecular docking on the interaction of organotin antitumor compound bis[2,4-difluoro-N-(hydroxy-⟨κ⟩O)benzamidato-⟨κ⟩O]diphenyltin(IV) with human cytochrome P450 3A4 protease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ying; Niu, Lin; Liu, Xinxin; Zhou, Hongyan; Dong, Hongzhou; Kong, Depeng; Li, Yunlan; Li, Qingshan

    2016-06-01

    A novel organotin DFDPT was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H, 13C, 119Sn, NMR techniques,etc. In order to investigate profoundly the relationship between DFDPT with human CYP3A4 proteaset and anticancer molecular mechanism of DFDPT, the intercalative mode of binding of DFDPT with CYP3A4 under physiological conditions were comprehensively evaluated using steady state, synchronous, three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy,circular dichroism and molecular docking. Fluorescence emission data showed that CYP3A4 fluorescence affected by DFDPT was a static quenching procedure, which implied that DFDPT-CYP3A4 complex had been formed. Apparent binding constants Kb of CYP3A4 with compound at 298 and 310 K were 2.51 × 107 and 3.09 × 105, respectively. The binding sites number n was 1.64 and 1.22, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters ΔH and ΔS of the DFDPT-CYP3A4 complex were negative, which indicated that their interaction was driven mainly by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals force. The binding of DFDPT-CYP3A4 was spontaneous process in which ΔG was negative. The synchronous results showed DFDPT induced conformational changes of CYP3A4 protein. Three-dimensional fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra results also revealed conformation of CYP3A4 protein had been possible changed in the presence of DFDPT. Molecular docking was used to study the interaction orientation between DFDPT and CYP3A4 protease. The results indicated that DFDPT interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP3A4 protein mainly through formation of hydrogen bond. Furthermore, the predicted binding mode of DFDPT into CYP3A4 appeared to adopt an orientation with interactions among Arg105, Ser119 and Thr309.

  8. Stability of silk and collagen protein materials in space.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Raja, Waseem K; An, Bo; Tokareva, Olena; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L

    2013-12-05

    Collagen and silk materials, in neat forms and as silica composites, were flown for 18 months on the International Space Station [Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)-6] to assess the impact of space radiation on structure and function. As natural biomaterials, the impact of the space environment on films of these proteins was investigated to understand fundamental changes in structure and function related to the future utility in materials and medicine in space environments. About 15% of the film surfaces were etched by heavy ionizing particles such as atomic oxygen, the major component of the low-Earth orbit space environment. Unexpectedly, more than 80% of the silk and collagen materials were chemically crosslinked by space radiation. These findings are critical for designing next-generation biocompatible materials for contact with living systems in space environments, where the effects of heavy ionizing particles and other cosmic radiation need to be considered.

  9. Stability of Silk and Collagen Protein Materials in Space

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Raja, Waseem K.; An, Bo; Tokareva, Olena; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and silk materials, in neat forms and as silica composites, were flown for 18 months on the International Space Station [Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)-6] to assess the impact of space radiation on structure and function. As natural biomaterials, the impact of the space environment on films of these proteins was investigated to understand fundamental changes in structure and function related to the future utility in materials and medicine in space environments. About 15% of the film surfaces were etched by heavy ionizing particles such as atomic oxygen, the major component of the low-Earth orbit space environment. Unexpectedly, more than 80% of the silk and collagen materials were chemically crosslinked by space radiation. These findings are critical for designing next-generation biocompatible materials for contact with living systems in space environments, where the effects of heavy ionizing particles and other cosmic radiation need to be considered. PMID:24305951

  10. Site-specific contributions to the pH dependence of protein stability.

    PubMed

    Tollinger, Martin; Crowhurst, Karin A; Kay, Lewis E; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2003-04-15

    Understanding protein stability is a significant challenge requiring characterization of interactions within both folded and unfolded states. Of these, electrostatic interactions influence ionization equilibria of acidic and basic groups and diversify their pK(a) values. The pH dependence of the thermodynamic stability (Delta G(FU)) of a protein arises as a consequence of differential pK(a) values between folded and unfolded states. Previous attempts to calculate pH-dependent contributions to stability have been limited by the lack of experimental unfolded state pK(a) values. Using recently developed NMR spectroscopic methods, we have determined residue-specific pK(a) values for a thermodynamically unstable Src homology 3 domain in both states, enabling the calculation of the pH dependence of stability based on simple analytical expressions. The calculated pH stability profile obtained agrees very well with experiment, unlike profiles derived from two current models of electrostatic interactions within unfolded states. Most importantly, per-residue contributions to the pH dependence of Delta G(FU) derived from the data provide insights into specific electrostatic interactions in both the folded and unfolded states and their roles in protein stability. These interactions include a hydrogen bond between the Asp-8 side-chain and the Lys-21 backbone amide group in the folded state, which represents a highly conserved interaction in Src homology 3 domains.

  11. In vitro metabolism of piperaquine is primarily mediated by CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tina Ming-Na; Huang, Liusheng; Johnson, Marla K; Lizak, Patricia; Kroetz, Deanna; Aweeka, Francesca; Parikh, Sunil

    2012-11-01

    Piperaquine (PQ) is part of a first-line treatment regimen for Plasmodium falciparum malaria recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). We aimed to determine the major metabolic pathway(s) of PQ in vitro. A reliable, validated tandem mass spectrometry method was developed. Concentrations of PQ were measured after incubation with both human liver microsomes (HLMs) and expressed cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s). In pooled HLMs, incubations with an initial PQ concentration of 0.3 µM resulted in a 34.8 ± 4.9% loss of substrate over 60 min, corresponding to a turnover rate of 0.009 min(-1) (r(2) = 0.9223). Miconazole, at nonspecific P450 inhibitory concentrations, resulted in almost complete inhibition of PQ metabolism. The greatest inhibition was demonstrated with selective CYP3A4 (100%) and CYP2C8 (66%) inhibitors. Using a mixture of recombinant P450 enzymes, turnover for PQ metabolism was estimated as 0.0099 min(-1); recombinant CYP3A4 had a higher metabolic rate (0.017 min(-1)) than recombinant CYP2C8 (p < .0001). Inhibition of CYP3A4-mediated PQ loss was greatest using the selective inhibitor ketoconazole (9.1 ± 3.5% loss with ketoconazole vs 60.7 ± 5.9% with no inhibitor, p < .0001). In summary, the extent of inhibition of in vitro metabolism with ketoconazole (83%) denotes that PQ appears to be primarily catalyzed by CYP3A4. Further studies to support these findings through the identification and characterization of PQ metabolites are planned.

  12. In vitro metabolism of piperaquine is primarily mediated by CYP3A4

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tina Ming-Na; Huang, Liusheng; Johnson, Marla K.; Lizak, Patricia; Kroetz, Deanna; Aweeka, Francesca; Parikh, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Piperaquine (PQ) is part of a first-line treatment regimen for Plasmodium falciparum malaria recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). We aimed to determine the major metabolic pathway(s) of PQ in vitro. A reliable, validated tandem mass spectrometry method was developed. Concentrations of PQ were measured after incubation with both human liver microsomes (HLMs) and expressed cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s). In pooled HLMs, incubations with an initial PQ concentration of 0.3 µM resulted in a 34.8 ± 4.9% loss of substrate over 60 min, corresponding to a turnover rate of 0.009 min−1 (r2 = 0.9223). Miconazole, at nonspecific P450 inhibitory concentrations, resulted in almost complete inhibition of PQ metabolism. The greatest inhibition was demonstrated with selective CYP3A4 (100%) and CYP2C8 (66%) inhibitors. Using a mixture of recombinant P450 enzymes, turnover for PQ metabolism was estimated as 0.0099 min−1; recombinant CYP3A4 had a higher metabolic rate (0.017 min−1) than recombinant CYP2C8 (p < .0001). Inhibition of CYP3A4-mediated PQ loss was greatest using the selective inhibitor ketoconazole (9.1 ± 3.5% loss with ketoconazole vs 60.7 ± 5.9% with no inhibitor, p < .0001). In summary, the extent of inhibition of in vitro metabolism with ketoconazole (83%) denotes that PQ appears to be primarily catalyzed by CYP3A4. Further studies to support these findings through the identification and characterization of PQ metabolites are planned. PMID:22671777

  13. Comparative CYP3A4 inhibitory effects of venlafaxine, fluoxetine, sertraline, and nefazodone in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    DeVane, C Lindsay; Donovan, Jennifer L; Liston, Heidi L; Markowitz, John S; Cheng, Kenneth T; Risch, S Craig; Willard, Lauren

    2004-02-01

    An antidepressant for use in the patient receiving concomitant drug treatment, over-the-counter medications, or herbal products should lack cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 3A4 inductive or inhibitory activity to provide the least likelihood of a drug-drug interaction. This study addresses the potential of 4 diverse antidepressants (venlafaxine, nefazodone, sertraline, and fluoxetine) to inhibit or induce CYP3A4. In a 4-way crossover design, 16 subjects received clinically relevant doses of venlafaxine, nefazodone, or sertraline for 8 days or fluoxetine for 11 days. Treatments were separated by a 7- to 14-day washout period and fluoxetine was always the last antidepressant taken. CYP3A4 activity was evaluated for each subject at baseline and following each antidepressant using the erythromycin breath test (EBT) and by the pharmacokinetics of alprazolam (ALPZ) after 2-mg dose of oral ALPZ. Compared to baseline, venlafaxine, sertraline, and fluoxetine caused no apparent inhibition or induction of erythromycin metabolism (P > 0.05). For nefazodone, a statistically significant inhibition was observed (P < 0.0005). Nefazodone was also the only antidepressant that caused a significant change in ALPZ disposition, decreasing its area under the concentration-versus-time curve (AUC; P < 0.01), and increasing its elimination half-life (16.4 vs. 12.3 hours; P < 0.05) compared with values at baseline. No significant differences were found in the pharmacokinetics of ALPZ with any of the other antidepressants tested. These results demonstrate in vivo that, unlike nefazodone, venlafaxine, sertraline, and fluoxetine do not possess significant metabolic inductive or inhibitory effects on CYP3A4.

  14. Enhanced stability of anthocyanin-based color in model beverage systems through whey protein isolate complexation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2015-10-01

    Anthocyanins are often used in functional foods and beverages as colorants and nutraceuticals. However, these natural compounds may undergo chemical degradation during storage leading to color fading and loss of bioactivity. In particular, vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid) is known to accelerate anthocyanin degradation. In this study, the influence of various food-grade biopolymers on the physical and chemical stability of model beverages containing anthocyanin (0.025%), ascorbic acid (0 or 0.05%), and calcium salt (0 or 0.01%) was examined under accelerated conditions (40°C for 7days). Four biopolymers (1%) were examined for their potential to inhibit anthocyanin degradation: native whey protein; denatured whey protein; citrus pectin; and beet pectin. The physical stability was determined by measuring changes in absorbance, color, and visual appearance. Solutions containing anthocyanin and calcium salt (0 or 0.01%) were stable throughout storage, while those with added ascorbic acid were the least stable. The addition of biopolymers, particularly heat denatured whey protein, significantly enhanced the stability of the anthocyanin during storage. Fluorescence quenching studies showed that the anthocyanin may have formed complexes with the whey protein through hydrogen bonding that resulted in their enhanced stability in the presence of ascorbic acid. This study provides information that may improve the stability of anthocyanins in food and beverage systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Formulation, stability and immunogenicity of a trivalent pneumococcal protein vaccine formulated with aluminum salt adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Ljutic, Belma; Ochs, Martina; Messham, Benjamin; Ming, Marin; Dookie, Annie; Harper, Kevin; Ausar, Salvador F

    2012-04-19

    We investigated the immunogenicity, stability and adsorption properties of an experimental pneumococcal vaccine composed of three protein vaccine antigens; Pneumococcal histidine triad protein D, (PhtD), Pneumococcal choline-binding protein A (PcpA) and genetically detoxified pneumolysin D1 (PlyD1) formulated with aluminum salt adjuvants. Immunogenicity studies conducted in BALB/c mice showed that antibody responses to each antigen adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide (AH) were significantly higher than when adjuvanted with aluminum phosphate (AP) or formulated without adjuvant. Lower microenvironment pH and decreased strength of antigen adsorption significantly improved the stability of antigens. The stability of PcpA and PlyD1 assessed by RP-HPLC correlated well with the immunogenicity of these antigens in mice and showed that pretreatment of the aluminum hydroxide adjuvant with phosphate ions improved their stability. Adjuvant dose-ranging studies showed that 28 μg Al/dose to be the concentration of adjuvant resulting in optimal immunogenicity of the trivalent vaccine formulation. Taken together, the results of theses studies suggest that the type of aluminum salt, strength of adsorption and microenvironment pH have a significant impact on the immunogenicity and chemical stability of an experimental vaccine composed of the three pneumococcal protein antigens, PhtD, PcpA, and PlyD1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High-quality Thermodynamic Data on the Stability Changes of Proteins Upon Single-site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, Fabrizio Bourgeas, Raphaël Rooman, Marianne

    2016-06-15

    We have set up and manually curated a dataset containing experimental information on the impact of amino acid substitutions in a protein on its thermal stability. It consists of a repository of experimentally measured melting temperatures (T{sub m}) and their changes upon point mutations (ΔT{sub m}) for proteins having a well-resolved x-ray structure. This high-quality dataset is designed for being used for the training or benchmarking of in silico thermal stability prediction methods. It also reports other experimentally measured thermodynamic quantities when available, i.e., the folding enthalpy (ΔH) and heat capacity (ΔC{sub P}) of the wild type proteins and their changes upon mutations (ΔΔH and ΔΔC{sub P}), as well as the change in folding free energy (ΔΔG) at a reference temperature. These data are analyzed in view of improving our insights into the correlation between thermal and thermodynamic stabilities, the asymmetry between the number of stabilizing and destabilizing mutations, and the difference in stabilization potential of thermostable versus mesostable proteins.

  17. Differential Scanning Calorimetry - A Method for Assessing the Thermal Stability and Conformation of Protein Antigen.

    PubMed

    Durowoju, Ibrahim B; Bhandal, Kamaljit S; Hu, Jian; Carpick, Bruce; Kirkitadze, Marina

    2017-03-04

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is an analytical technique that measures the molar heat capacity of samples as a function of temperature. In the case of protein samples, DSC profiles provide information about thermal stability, and to some extent serves as a structural "fingerprint" that can be used to assess structural conformation. It is performed using a differential scanning calorimeter that measures the thermal transition temperature (melting temperature; Tm) and the energy required to disrupt the interactions stabilizing the tertiary structure (enthalpy; ∆H) of proteins. Comparisons are made between formulations as well as production lots, and differences in derived values indicate differences in thermal stability and structural conformation. Data illustrating the use of DSC in an industrial setting for stability studies as well as monitoring key manufacturing steps are provided as proof of the effectiveness of this protocol. In comparison to other methods for assessing the thermal stability of protein conformations, DSC is cost-effective, requires few sample preparation steps, and also provides a complete thermodynamic profile of the protein unfolding process.

  18. Differential Scanning Calorimetry — A Method for Assessing the Thermal Stability and Conformation of Protein Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Durowoju, Ibrahim B.; Bhandal, Kamaljit S.; Hu, Jian; Carpick, Bruce; Kirkitadze, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is an analytical technique that measures the molar heat capacity of samples as a function of temperature. In the case of protein samples, DSC profiles provide information about thermal stability, and to some extent serves as a structural “fingerprint” that can be used to assess structural conformation. It is performed using a differential scanning calorimeter that measures the thermal transition temperature (melting temperature; Tm) and the energy required to disrupt the interactions stabilizing the tertiary structure (enthalpy; ∆H) of proteins. Comparisons are made between formulations as well as production lots, and differences in derived values indicate differences in thermal stability and structural conformation. Data illustrating the use of DSC in an industrial setting for stability studies as well as monitoring key manufacturing steps are provided as proof of the effectiveness of this protocol. In comparison to other methods for assessing the thermal stability of protein conformations, DSC is cost-effective, requires few sample preparation steps, and also provides a complete thermodynamic profile of the protein unfolding process. PMID:28287565

  19. Time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 by sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Yuki

    2013-11-01

    Drug-drug interactions associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely known. A major interaction by SSRIs is the inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated hepatic drug metabolism. The SSRI, sertraline, is also reported to increase the blood concentration of co-administered drugs. The potency of sertraline directly to inhibit hepatic drug metabolism is relatively weak compared with the other SSRIs, implying that additional mechanisms are involved in the interactions. The study examined whether sertraline produces time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 and/or other P450 enzymes. Incubation of human liver microsomes with sertraline in the presence of NADPH resulted in marked decreases in testosterone 6β-hydroxylation activities, indicating that sertraline metabolism leads to CYP3A4 inactivation. This inactivation required NADPH and was not protected by glutathione. No significant inactivation was observed for other P450 enzymes. Spectroscopic evaluation revealed that microsomes with and without sertraline in the presence of NADPH gave a Soret peak at 455 nm, suggesting the formation of metabolic intermediate (MI) complexes of sertraline metabolite(s) with the reduced form of P450. This is the first report indicating that sertraline produced time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4, which may be associated with MI complex formation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The computational model to predict accurately inhibitory activity for inhibitors towards CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2010-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) is a superfamily of enzymes with oxidative function responsible for the metabolism of xenobiotics especially drug metabolism. CYP3A4, an extensive studied CYP isoform, plays crucial role in the metabolism of structurally diverse drugs. Furthermore, the drug-drug interaction resulted from the inhibition of CYP3A4 activity is of extreme importance for the treatment of disease and the development of new drug. In this study, using the method of the support vector machine (SVM) and three descriptors selected from the 153 descriptors we construct the models that can predict accurately the inhibitory effect of a compound on the activity of CYP3A4. By optimizing the parameters related to SVM, the cross validation correlation efficient of the model can achieve 0.71, which is higher than those of other models obtained using Artifical Neutral Network (ANN) and Partial least square (PLS) methods to our knowledge, and thus our model can present the important application in assessment of the potential toxicity of a drug as well as prediction of drug-drug interactions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a highly reproducible system to evaluate inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 activity by natural medicines.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yu; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Takahashi, Shogo; Kumagai, Takeshi; Nagata, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of natural medicines have been reported to have inductive or inhibitive effects on the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes, upon co-administration with prescribed medicines. However, information regarding natural medicine-drug interactions that influence drug metabolism is limited owing to the lack of efficient screening method for such interactions. Therefore, to understand whether P450 activity is affected by natural medicine in small intestines, we have established frozen recombinant P450-expressing cells infected with human CYP3A4 expressing adenovirus (Ad-CYP3A4) to evaluate the effect of natural medicines on CYP3A4 activity. Ad-CYP3A4 cells were created by infecting HepG2 cells with Ad-CYP3A4 at 10 multiplicity of infection (MOI) and these cells were stored using cryopreservation medium (fAd-CYP3A4 cells) to obtain long-term consistent data and stable supplies of cells expressing a constant level of CYP3A4 activity. The CYP3A4 activity in fAd-CYP3A4 cells remained unaffected at the end of each frozen period (0, 1, 2, and 6 months). Inhibitory effect on CYP3A4 activity by typical inhibitors (ketoconazole, hyperforin) and natural medicines (Cat's Claw, Devil's Claw, Feverfew, Peppermint Oil, Red Clover, and Siberian Eleuthero) were evaluated. The inhibitors had nearly equal IC50 values in fAd-CYP3A4 cells, Ad-CYP3A4 cells and recombinant CYP3A4 microsomes. Cat's Claw, Peppermint Oil and Siberian Eleuthero inhibited CYP3A4 activity more potently than 0.1 μM ketoconazole in fAd-CYP3A4 cells. In the present study, we have successfully developed a highly reproducible system to evaluate CYP3A4 inhibition in small intestines by natural medicines.

  2. Nonlinear Model of the Specificity of DNA-Protein Interactions and Its Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwiputra, D.; Hidayat, W.; Khairani, R.; Zen, F. P.

    2016-08-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are fundamental processes of living cells. We propose a new model of DNA-protein interactions to explain the site specificity of the interactions. The hydrogen bonds between DNA base pairs and between DNA-protein peptide groups play a significant role in determination of the specific binding site. We adopt the Morse potential with coupling terms to construct the Hamiltonian of coupled oscillators representing the hydrogen bonds in which the depth of the potentials vary in the DNA chain. In this paper we investigate the stability of the model to determine the conditions satisfying the biological circumstances of the DNA-protein interactions.

  3. Surface forces in model oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Tatiana D; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Gurkov, Theodor D; Campbell, Bruce

    2004-05-20

    We have employed two complementary techniques, namely, the magnetic chaining technique (MCT) and a variant of the Mysels cell to obtain data concerning the repulsive intera