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Sample records for 3c cellulose binding

  1. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  4. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  5. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  6. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  7. Cellulose-binding domains: biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilan; Shoseyov, Oded

    2002-11-01

    Many researchers have acknowledged the fact that there exists an immense potential for the application of the cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) in the field of biotechnology. This becomes apparent when the phrase "cellulose-binding domain" is used as the key word for a computerized patent search; more then 150 hits are retrieved. Cellulose is an ideal matrix for large-scale affinity purification procedures. This chemically inert matrix has excellent physical properties as well as low affinity for nonspecific protein binding. It is available in a diverse range of forms and sizes, is pharmaceutically safe, and relatively inexpensive. Present studies into the application of CBDs in industry have established that they can be applied in the modification of physical and chemical properties of composite materials and the development of modified materials with improved properties. In agro-biotechnology, CBDs can be used to modify polysaccharide materials both in vivo and in vitro. The CBDs exert nonhydrolytic fiber disruption on cellulose-containing materials. The potential applications of "CBD technology" range from modulating the architecture of individual cells to the modification of an entire organism. Expressing these genes under specific promoters and using appropriate trafficking signals, can be used to alter the nutritional value and texture of agricultural crops and their final products. PMID:14550028

  8. Biglycan is a novel binding partner of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3c (FGFR3c) in the human testis.

    PubMed

    Winge, S B; Nielsen, J; Jørgensen, A; Owczarek, S; Ewen, K A; Nielsen, J E; Juul, A; Berezin, V; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of spermatogonial maintenance in the human testis is currently not well understood. One pathway suggested to be involved is activated by fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), which is expressed in a subset of spermatogonia. FGFR3-activating mutations have been identified in spermatocytic seminoma, thought to originate from clonal expansion of spermatogonia. In this study we aimed to characterize potential binding partners of FGFR3, and specifically its mesenchymal "c" splice isoform, in human spermatogonia. Based on expression patterns and homology to the binding site, we identified FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 as the best candidates for natural ligands of FGFR3c in the testis. In addition, we screened non-FGF proteins and found that a proteoglycan biglycan (BGN) contains a sequence homologous to the FGFR3c binding site on FGF1, and is expressed in peritubular cells adjacent to FGFR3-expressing spermatogonia. Experiments in a cell-free system confirmed that BGN binds to FGFR3c and FGF1. In conclusion, our findings further clarify the complex regulation of FGFR3c in the human testis. We postulate that BGN is a factor secreted by peritubular cells to modulate FGFR3c signaling and thus contributes to the regulation of spermatogonial maintenance. PMID:25260943

  9. Modeling of Carbohydrate Binding Modules Complexed to Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Bomble, Y. J.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for the interaction of two carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with cellulose. The family 1 CBM from Trichoderma reesei's Cel7A cellulase was modeled using molecular dynamics to confirm that this protein selectively binds to the hydrophobic (100) surface of cellulose fibrils and to determine the energetics and mechanisms for locating this surface. Modeling was also conducted of binding of the family 4 CBM from the CbhA complex from Clostridium thermocellum. There is a cleft in this protein, which may accommodate a cellulose chain that is detached from crystalline cellulose. This possibility is explored using molecular dynamics.

  10. Processivity, substrate binding, and mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis by Thermobifida fusca Cel9A.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongchao; Irwin, Diana C; Wilson, David B

    2007-05-01

    Thermobifida fusca Cel9A-90 is a processive endoglucanase consisting of a family 9 catalytic domain (CD), a family 3c cellulose binding module (CBM3c), a fibronectin III-like domain, and a family 2 CBM. This enzyme has the highest activity of any individual T. fusca enzyme on crystalline substrates, particularly bacterial cellulose (BC). Mutations were introduced into the CD or the CBM3c of Cel9A-68 using site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli; purified; and tested for activity on four substrates, ligand binding, and processivity. The results show that H125 and Y206 play an important role in activity by forming a hydrogen bonding network with the catalytic base, D58; another important supporting residue, D55; and Glc(-1) O1. R378, a residue interacting with Glc(+1), plays an important role in processivity. Several enzymes with mutations in the subsites Glc(-2) to Glc(-4) had less than 15% activity on BC and markedly reduced processivity. Mutant enzymes with severalfold-higher activity on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were found in the subsites from Glc(-2) to Glc(-4). The CBM3c mutant enzymes, Y520A, R557A/E559A, and R563A, had decreased activity on BC but had wild-type or improved processivity. Mutation of D513, a conserved residue at the end of the CBM, increased activity on crystalline cellulose. Previous work showed that deletion of the CBM3c abolished crystalline activity and processivity. This study shows that it is residues in the catalytic cleft that control processivity while the CBM3c is important for loose binding of the enzyme to the crystalline cellulose substrate. PMID:17369336

  11. Mutation analysis of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Doi, R H

    1994-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA) has been previously shown to mediate the interaction between crystalline cellulose substrates and the cellulase enzyme complex of Clostridium cellulovorans. CbpA contains a family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD) which, when expressed independently, binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. A series of N- and C-terminal deletions and a series of small internal deletions of the CBD were created to determine whether the entire region previously described as a CBD is required for the cellulose-binding function. The N- and C-terminal deletions reduced binding affinity by 10- to 100-fold. Small internal deletions of the CBD resulted in substantial reduction of CBD function. Some, but not all, point mutations throughout the sequence had significant disruptive effects on the binding ability of the CBD. Thus, mutations in any region of the CBD had effects on the binding of the fragment to cellulose. The results indicate that the entire 163-amino-acid region of the CBD is required for maximal binding to crystalline cellulose. Images PMID:7961505

  12. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-Like Protein, Functions in Cellulose Assembly through Binding Cellulose Microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baocai; Liu, Xiangling; Yan, Meixian; Zhang, Lanjun; Shi, Yanyun; Zhang, Mu; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Zhou, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1), a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD) assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs) function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity. PMID:23990797

  13. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  14. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  15. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  17. Cellulose chain binding free energy drives the processive move of cellulases on the cellulose surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yefei; Zhang, Shujun; Song, Xiangfei; Yao, Lishan

    2016-09-01

    Processivity is essential for cellulases in their catalysis of cellulose hydrolysis. But what drives the processive move is not well understood. In this work, we use Trichoderma reesei Cel7B as a model system and show that its processivity is directly correlated to the binding free energy difference of a cellulose chain occupying the binding sites -7 to +2 and that occupying sites -7 to -1. Several mutants that have stronger interactions with glycosyl units in sites +1 and +2 than the wild type enzyme show higher processivity. The results suggest that after the release of the product cellobiose located in sites +1 and +2, the enzyme pulls the cellulose chain to fill the vacant sites, which propels its processive move on the cellulose surface. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1873-1880. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928155

  18. Design of Compact Biomimetic Cellulose Binding Peptides as Carriers for Cellulose Catalytic Degradation.

    PubMed

    Khazanov, Netaly; Iline-Vul, Taly; Noy, Efrat; Goobes, Gil; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2016-01-21

    The conversion of biomass into biofuels can reduce the strategic vulnerability of petroleum-based systems and at the same time have a positive effect on global climate issues. Lignocellulose is the cheapest and most abundant source of biomass and consequently has been widely considered as a source for liquid fuel. However, despite ongoing efforts, cellulosic biofuels are still far from commercial realization, one of the major bottlenecks being the hydrolysis of cellulose into simpler sugars. Inspired by the structural and functional modularity of cellulases used by many organisms for the breakdown of cellulose, we propose to mimic the cellulose binding domain (CBD) and the catalytic domain of these proteins by small molecular entities. Multiple copies of these mimics could subsequently be tethered together to enhance hydrolytic activity. In this work, we take the first step toward achieving this goal by applying computational approaches to the design of efficient, cost-effective mimetics of the CBD. The design is based on low molecular weight peptides that are amenable to large-scale production. We provide an optimized design of four short (i.e., ∼18 residues) peptide mimetics based on the three-dimensional structure of a known CBD and demonstrate that some of these peptides bind cellulose as well as or better than the full CBD. The structures of these peptides were studied by circular dichroism and their interactions with cellulose by solid phase NMR. Finally, we present a computational strategy for predicting CBD/peptide-cellulose binding free energies and demonstrate its ability to provide values in good agreement with experimental data. Using this computational model, we have also studied the dissociation pathway of the CBDs/peptides from the surface of cellulose. PMID:26691055

  19. Does the Cellulose-Binding Module Move on the Cellulose Surface?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. S.; Zeng, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S. J.; Ding, S. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Exoglucanases are key enzymes required for the efficient hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. It has been proposed that exoglucanases hydrolyze cellulose chains in a processive manner to produce primarily cellobiose. Usually, two functional modules are involved in the processive mechanism: a catalytic module and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). In this report, single molecule tracking techniques were used to analyze the molecular motion of CBMs labeled with quantum dots (QDs) and bound to cellulose crystals. By tracking the single QD, we observed that the family 2 CBM from Acidothermus cellulolyticus (AcCBM2) exhibited linear motion along the long axis of the cellulose fiber. This apparent movement was observed consistently when different concentrations (25 {micro}M to 25 nM) of AcCBM2 were used. Although the mechanism of AcCBM2 motion remains unknown, single-molecule spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a promising tool for acquiring new fundamental understanding of cellulase action.

  20. Use of cellulases and recombinant cellulose binding domains for refining TCF kraft pulp.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Edith M; Chriac, A Iulia; Pastor, F I Javier; Diaz, Pilar; Vidal, Teresa; Torres, Antonio L

    2010-01-01

    The modular endoglucanase Cel9B from Paenibacillus barcinonensis is a highly efficient biocatalyst, which expedites pulp refining and reduces the associated energy costs as a result. In this work, we set out to identify the specific structural domain or domains responsible for the action of this enzyme on cellulose fibre surfaces with a view to facilitating the development of new cellulases for optimum biorefining. Using the recombinant enzymes GH9-CBD3c, Fn3-CBD3b, and CBD3b, which are truncated forms of Cel9B, allowed us to assess the individual effects of the catalytic, cellulose binding, and fibronectin-like domains of the enzyme on the refining of TCF kraft pulp from Eucalyptus globulus. Based on the physico-mechanical properties obtained, the truncated form containing the catalytic domain (GH9-CBD3c) has a strong effect on fibre morphology. Comparing its effect with that of the whole cellulase (Cel9B) revealed that the truncated enzyme contributes to increasing paper strength through improved tensile strength and burst strength and also that the truncated form is more effective than the whole enzyme in improving tear resistance. Therefore, the catalytic domain of Cel9B has biorefining action on pulp. Although cellulose binding domains (CBDs) are less efficient toward pulp refining, evidence obtained in this work suggests that CBD3b alters fibre surfaces and influences paper properties as a result. PMID:20730755

  1. Studies of cellulose binding by cellobiose dehydrogenase and a comparison with cellobiohydrolase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, G; Salumets, A; Divne, C; Pettersson, G

    1997-01-01

    The binding isotherm to cellulose of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been compared with that of cellobiohydrolase 1 (CBH 1) from Trichoderma reesei. CDH binds more strongly but more sparsely to cellulose than does CBH 1. In a classical Scatchard analysis, a better fit to a one-site binding model was obtained for CDH than for CBH 1. The binding of both enzymes decreased in the presence of ethylene glycol, increased in the presence of ammonium sulphate and was unaffected by sodium chloride. Attempts to localize the cellulose-binding site on CDH have also been made by exposing enzymically digested CDH to cellulose and isolating the cellulose-bound peptides. The results suggest that the cellulose-binding site is located internally in the amino acid sequence of CDH. PMID:9210407

  2. Enhancement of acetyl xylan esterase activity on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 cellulose binding module.

    PubMed

    Mai-Gisondi, Galina; Turunen, Ossi; Pastinen, Ossi; Pahimanolis, Nikolaos; Master, Emma R

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the potential to increase the activity of a family 1 carbohydrate esterase on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 carbohydrate binding module (CBM). Specifically, CtCBM3 from Clostridium thermocellum was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the acetyl xylan esterase (AnAXE) from Aspergillus nidulans, and active forms of both AnAXE and AnAXE-CtCBM3 were produced in Pichia pastoris. CtCBM3 fusion had negligible impact on the thermostability or regioselectivity of AnAXE; activities towards acetylated corncob xylan, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and cellobiose octaacetate were also unchanged. By contrast, the activity of AnAXE-CtCBM3 on cellulose acetate increased by two to four times over 24 h, with greater differences observed at earlier time points. Binding studies using microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) and a commercial source of cellulose acetate confirmed functional production of the CtCBM3 domain; affinity gel electrophoresis using acetylated xylan also verified the selectivity of CtCBM3 binding to cellulose. Notably, gains in enzyme activity on cellulose acetate appeared to exceed gains in substrate binding, suggesting that fusion to CtCBM3 increases functional associations between the enzyme and insoluble, high molecular weight cellulosic substrates. PMID:26320711

  3. Crystal structure of a bacterial family-III cellulose-binding domain: a general mechanism for attachment to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Tormo, J; Lamed, R; Chirino, A J; Morag, E; Bayer, E A; Shoham, Y; Steitz, T A

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structure of a family-III cellulose-binding domain (CBD) from the cellulosomal scaffoldin subunit of Clostridium thermocellum has been determined at 1.75 A resolution. The protein forms a nine-stranded beta sandwich with a jelly roll topology and binds a calcium ion. conserved, surface-exposed residues map into two defined surfaces located on opposite sides of the molecule. One of these faces is dominated by a planar linear strip of aromatic and polar residues which are proposed to interact with crystalline cellulose. The other conserved residues are contained in a shallow groove, the function of which is currently unknown, and which has not been observed previously in other families of CBDs. On the basis of modeling studies combined with comparisons of recently determined NMR structures for other CBDs, a general model for the binding of CBDs to cellulose is presented. Although the proposed binding of the CBD to cellulose is essentially a surface interaction, specific types and combinations of amino acids appear to interact selectively with glucose moieties positioned on three adjacent chains of the cellulose surface. The major interaction is characterized by the planar strip of aromatic residues, which align along one of the chains. In addition, polar amino acid residues are proposed to anchor the CBD molecule to two other adjacent chains of crystalline cellulose. Images PMID:8918451

  4. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  5. Utilization of a mammalian cell-based RNA binding assay to characterize the RNA binding properties of picornavirus 3C proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, W S; Parsley, T B; Bogerd, H P; Towner, J S; Semler, B L; Cullen, B R

    1998-01-01

    Using an assay capable of detecting sequence-specific RNA/protein interactions in mammalian cells, we demonstrate that the poliovirus and rhinovirus 3C proteinases are able to bind structured target RNA sequences derived from their respective 5' noncoding regions in vivo. Specific RNA binding by poliovirus 3C was found to be dependent on the integrity of stem-loop d of the RNA cloverleaf structure located at the 5' end of poliovirus genomic RNA. In contrast, mutation of stem-loop b did not prevent this in vivo interaction. However, mutation of stem-loop b, which serves as the RNA binding site for a cellular co-factor important for efficient poliovirus replication, did significantly attenuate the efficiency of 3C RNA binding in vivo and 3CD RNA binding in vitro. This in vivo protein:RNA binding assay was also used to identify several residues in 3C that are critical for RNA binding, but dispensable for 3C proteinase activity. The mammalian cell-based RNA binding assay described in this study may have considerable potential utility in the future detection or analysis of in vivo RNA/protein interactions unrelated to the 3C/RNA interaction described here. PMID:9570321

  6. Binding of arabinan or galactan during cellulose synthesis is extensive and reversible.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dehui; Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia; Gidley, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Arabinans and galactans are major components of the side-chains of pectin in plant cell walls. In order to understand how pectin side-chains interact with cellulose, in this work we studied the interaction of de-branched arabinan (from sugar beet) and linear galactan (from potato) during the synthesis of cellulose by Gluconacetobacter xylinus (ATCC 53524) to mimic in muro assembly. The binding studies reveal that arabinan and galactan are able to bind extensively (>200mg/g of cellulose) during cellulose deposition, and more than pectin (from apple) in the absence of calcium. (13)C NMR revealed that associated arabinan, galactan or apple pectin molecules were neither rigid nor affected cellulose crystallinity, and there was no apparent change in cellulose architecture as reflected in scanning electron micrographs. De-binding of arabinan, galactan or apple pectin occurred as a result of washing, indicating a reversible binding to cellulose, which was modelled in terms of a surface-controlled process. Implications for structural models of primary plant cell walls and possible roles for cellulose binding of arabinan- and galactan-rich pectins in biological processes are discussed. PMID:25933529

  7. Increases thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase by fusion of cellulose binding domain derived from Trichoderma reesei

    SciTech Connect

    Thongekkaew, Jantaporn; Ikeda, Hiroko; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CSLP and fusion enzyme were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 Degree-Sign C for 120-min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme was responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme has an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization. -- Abstract: To improve the thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase (CSLP), the cellulose-binding domain originates from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I was engineered into C-terminal region of the CSLP (CSLP-CBD). The CSLP and CSLP-CBD were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris using the strong methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter and the secretion signal sequence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae ({alpha} factor). The recombinant CSLP and CSLP-CBD were secreted into culture medium and estimated by SDS-PAGE to be 22 and 27 kDa, respectively. The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 Degree-Sign C and retained more than 80% of its activity after 120-min incubation at this temperature. Our results also found that the fusion of fungal exoglucanase cellulose-binding domain to CSLP is responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. This attribute should make it an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization.

  8. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  9. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Gene Cloning and Characterization of a Novel Cellulose-Binding β-Glucosidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Renganathan, V.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of a 2.4-kb cDNA of the cellulose-binding extracellular β-glucosidase (CBGL) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium suggested that CBGL is organized into two domains, an N-terminal cellulose-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. Genomic sequence analysis suggested that cbgl is encoded by 30 exons. Southern analysis of DNA from homokaryotic cultures indicated that CBGL is encoded by two alleles, cbgl-1 and cbgl-2, of a single gene. PMID:9647863

  11. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-binding Module on Cellulose*

    PubMed Central

    Nimlos, Mark R.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Matthews, James F.; Bu, Lintao; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 μs of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose. PMID:22496371

  12. Cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose properties and structure are reviewed, with a primary focus on crystal structure and polymorphy. This focus highlights the conversion from cellulose I to cellulose II, which converts the molecules to being all parallel to each other in the crystal to being antiparallel. This has been co...

  13. Oxidized cellulose binding to allergens with a carbohydrate-binding module attenuates allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shani, Nir; Shani, Ziv; Shoseyov, Oded; Mruwat, Rufayda; Shoseyov, David

    2011-01-15

    Grass and mite allergens are of the main causes of allergy and asthma. A carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) represents a common motif to groups I (β-expansin) and II/III (expansin-like) grass allergens and is suggested to mediate allergen-IgE binding. House dust mite group II allergen (Der p 2 and Der f 2) structures bear strong similarity to expansin's CBM, suggesting their ability to bind carbohydrates. Thus, this study proposes the design of a carbohydrate-based treatment in which allergen binding to carbohydrate particles will promote allergen airway clearance and prevent allergic reactions. The aim of the study was to identify a polysaccharide with high allergen-binding capacities and to explore its ability to prevent allergy. Oxidized cellulose (OC) demonstrated allergen-binding capacities toward grass and mite allergens that surpassed those of any other polysaccharide examined in this study. Furthermore, inhalant preparations of OC microparticles attenuated allergic lung inflammation in rye grass-sensitized Brown Norway rats and OVA-sensitized BALB/c mice. Fluorescently labeled OC efficiently cleared from the mouse airways and body organs. Moreover, long-term administration of OC inhalant to Wistar rats did not result in toxicity. In conclusion, many allergens, such as grass and dust mite, contain a common CBM motif. OC demonstrates a strong and relatively specific allergen-binding capacity to CBM-containing allergens. OC's ability to attenuate allergic inflammation, together with its documented safety record, forms a firm basis for its application as an alternative treatment for prevention and relief of allergy and asthma. PMID:21169552

  14. The cellulose-binding domain of the major cellobiohydrolase of Trichoderma reesei exhibits true reversibility and a high exchange rate on crystalline cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Linder, M; Teeri, T T

    1996-01-01

    Cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) bind specifically to cellulose, and form distinct domains of most cellulose degrading enzymes. The CBD-mediated binding of the enzyme has a fundamental role in the hydrolysis of the solid cellulose substrate. In this work we have investigated the reversibility and kinetics of the binding of the CBD from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I on microcrystalline cellulose. The CBD was produced in Escherichia coli, purified, and radioactively labeled by reductive alkylation with 3H. Sensitive detection of the labeled CBD allowed more detailed analysis of its behavior than has been possible before, and important novel features were resolved. Binding of the CBD was found to be temperature sensitive, with an increased affinity at lower temperatures. The interaction of the CBD with cellulose was shown to be fully reversible and the CBD could be eluted from cellulose by simple dilution. The rate of exchange measured for the CBD-cellulose interaction compares well with the hydrolysis rate of cellobiohydrolase I, which is consistent with its proposed mode of action as a processive exoglucanase. PMID:8901566

  15. Recognition of xyloglucan by the crystalline cellulose-binding site of a family 3a carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Gomez, Mercedes C; Rydahl, Maja G; Rogowski, Artur; Morland, Carl; Cartmell, Alan; Crouch, Lucy; Labourel, Aurore; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Willats, William G T; Gilbert, Harry J; Knox, J Paul

    2015-08-19

    Type A non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), exemplified by CtCBM3acipA, are widely believed to specifically target crystalline cellulose through entropic forces. Here we have tested the hypothesis that type A CBMs can also bind to xyloglucan (XG), a soluble β-1,4-glucan containing α-1,6-xylose side chains. CtCBM3acipA bound to xyloglucan in cell walls and arrayed on solid surfaces. Xyloglucan and cellulose were shown to bind to the same planar surface on CBM3acipA. A range of type A CBMs from different families were shown to bind to xyloglucan in solution with ligand binding driven by enthalpic changes. The nature of CBM-polysaccharide interactions is discussed. PMID:26193423

  16. A Structural Study of Norovirus 3C Protease Specificity: Binding of a Designed Active Site-Directed Peptide Inhibitor†

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are the major cause of human epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200 kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.7 Å resolution. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, which is based on the most rapidly cleaved recognition sequence in the 200 kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenyl ethyl ester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups in a noroviral 3C protease and thus provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics. PMID:21128685

  17. Oxidation of 4-bromophenol by the recombinant fused protein cellulose-binding domain-horseradish peroxidase immobilized on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilan; Ward, Gary; Hadar, Yitzhak; Shoseyov, Oded; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2003-04-20

    A fused protein consisting of cellulose-binding domain (CBD) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. Refolded recombinant CBD-HRP (95% recovery yield) was bound to microcrystalline cellulose and applied for the oxidation of a model toxic phenol, 4-bromophenol (BP). Oxidation of BP by CBD-HRP resulted in the formation of dimers to pentamers as evidenced by mass spectrometry analysis. When immobilized, the vast majority of the oxidation products adsorbed to the cellulose matrix. CBD-HRP (0.75 pyrogallol units) bound to 0.1 g cellulose was packed in a column, connected to an HPLC pump and monitoring system, and column performance and capacity were studied under various operating conditions. When performance was studied as a function of BP loading rate at a constant H(2)O(2) loading rate of 1500 nmol/min, V(app) (max) and K(m) (app) were calculated to be 5.29 +/- 0.46 micromol mL min and 644.9 +/- 114.3 microM, respectively. Immobilized CBD-HRP exhibited enhanced stability to H(2)O(2) and oxidized considerably more BP than free CBD-HRP. Inclusion of gelatin, which suppresses product-dependent inactivation, further increased the amount of BP oxidation. These findings may have potential impact in terms of enzyme supply in high-rate treatment of wastewater contaminated with toxic phenols, since the susceptibility of peroxidases to both H(2)O(2) - and product-dependent inactivation demands continuous supply of fresh enzyme. PMID:12584764

  18. Visualization of Nanofibrillar Cellulose in Biological Tissues Using a Biotinylated Carbohydrate Binding Module of β-1,4-Glycanase.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Kofoed, Christian; Espersen, Roall; Højgaard, Casper; Winther, Jakob Rahr; Willemoës, Martin; Wedin, Irene; Nuopponen, Markus; Vilske, Sara; Aimonen, Kukka; Weydahl, Ingrid Elise Konow; Alenius, Harri; Norppa, Hannu; Wolff, Henrik; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-08-17

    Nanofibrillar cellulose is a very promising innovation with diverse potential applications including high quality paper, coatings, and drug delivery carriers. The production of nanofibrillar cellulose on an industrial scale may lead to increased exposure to nanofibrillar cellulose both in the working environment and the general environment. Assessment of the potential health effects following exposure to nanofibrillar cellulose is therefore required. However, as nanofibrillar cellulose primarily consists of glucose moieties, detection of nanofibrillar cellulose in biological tissues is difficult. We have developed a simple and robust method for specific and sensitive detection of cellulose fibers, including nanofibrillar cellulose, in biological tissue, using a biotinylated carbohydrate binding module (CBM) of β-1,4-glycanase (EXG:CBM) from the bacterium Cellulomonas fimi. EXG:CBM was expressed in Eschericia coli, purified, and biotinylated. EXG:CBM was shown to bind quantitatively to five different cellulose fibers including four different nanofibrillar celluloses. Biotinylated EXG:CBM was used to visualize cellulose fibers by either fluorescence- or horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-tagged avidin labeling. The HRP-EXG:CBM complex was used to visualize cellulose fibers in both cryopreserved and paraffin embedded lung tissue from mice dosed by pharyngeal aspiration with 10-200 μg/mouse. Detection was shown to be highly specific, and the assay appeared very robust. The present method represents a novel concept for the design of simple, robust, and highly specific detection methods for the detection of nanomaterials, which are otherwise difficult to visualize. PMID:26208679

  19. A small cellulose binding domain protein in Phytophtora is cell wall localized

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose binding domains (CBD) are structurally conserved regions linked to catalytic regions of cellulolytic enzymes. While widespread amongst saprophytic fungi that subsist on plant cell wall polysaccharides, they are not generally present in plant pathogenic fungi. A genome wide survey of CBDs w...

  20. Bacterial Cellulose-Binding Domain Modulates in Vitro Elongation of Different Plant Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Shpigel, Etai; Roiz, Levava; Goren, Raphael; Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant cellulose-binding domain (CBD) derived from the cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium cellulovorans was found to modulate the elongation of different plant cells in vitro. In peach (Prunus persica L.) pollen tubes, maximum elongation was observed at 50 μg mL−1 CBD. Pollen tube staining with calcofluor showed a loss of crystallinity in the tip zone of CBD-treated pollen tubes. At low concentrations CBD enhanced elongation of Arabidopsis roots. At high concentrations CBD dramatically inhibited root elongation in a dose-responsive manner. Maximum effect on root hair elongation was at 100 μg mL−1, whereas root elongation was inhibited at that concentration. CBD was found to compete with xyloglucan for binding to cellulose when CBD was added first to the cellulose, before the addition of xyloglucan. When Acetobacter xylinum L. was used as a model system, CBD was found to increase the rate of cellulose synthase in a dose-responsive manner, up to 5-fold compared with the control. Electron microscopy examination of the cellulose ribbons produced by A. xylinum showed that CBD treatment resulted in a splayed ribbon composed of separate fibrillar subunits, compared with a thin, uniform ribbon in the control. PMID:9701575

  1. Structural basis for cellulose binding by the type A carbohydrate-binding module 64 of Spirochaeta thermophila.

    PubMed

    Schiefner, André; Angelov, Angel; Liebl, Wolfgang; Skerra, Arne

    2016-06-01

    Spirochaeta thermophila secretes seven glycoside hydrolases for plant biomass degradation that carry a carbohydrate-binding module 64 (CBM64) appended at the C-terminus. CBM64 adsorbs to various β1-4-linked pyranose substrates and shows high affinity for cellulose. We present the first crystal structure of a CBM64 at 1.2 Å resolution, which reveals a jelly-roll-like fold corresponding to a surface-binding type A CBM. Modeling of its interaction with cellulose indicates that CBM64 achieves association with the hydrophobic face of β-linked pyranose chains via a unique coplanar arrangement of four exposed tryptophan side chains. Proteins 2016; 84:855-858. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868291

  2. Effects of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase oxidation on cellulose structure and binding of oxidized cellulose oligomers to cellulases.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, Josh V; Crowley, Michael F; Beckham, Gregg T; Payne, Christina M

    2015-05-21

    In nature, polysaccharide glycosidic bonds are cleaved by hydrolytic enzymes for a vast array of biological functions. Recently, a new class of enzymes that utilize an oxidative mechanism to cleave glycosidic linkages was discovered; these enzymes are called lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO). These oxidative enzymes are synergistic with cocktails of hydrolytic enzymes and are thought to act primarily on crystalline regions, in turn providing new sites of productive attachment and detachment for processive hydrolytic enzymes. In the case of cellulose, the homopolymer of β-1,4-d-glucose, enzymatic oxidation occurs at either the reducing end or the nonreducing end of glucose, depending on enzymatic specificity, and results in the generation of oxidized chemical substituents at polymer chain ends. LPMO oxidation of cellulose is thought to produce either a lactone at the reducing end of glucose that can spontaneously or enzymatically convert to aldonic acid or 4-keto-aldose at the nonreducing end that may further oxidize to a geminal diol. Here, we use molecular simulation to examine the effect of oxidation on the structure of crystalline cellulose. The simulations highlight variations in behaviors depending on the chemical identity of the oxidized species and its location within the cellulose fibril, as different oxidized species introduce steric effects that disrupt local crystallinity and in some cases reduce the work needed for polymer decrystallization. Reducing-end oxidations are easiest to decrystallize when located at the end of the fibril, whereas nonreducing end oxidations readily decrystallize from internal cleavage sites despite their lower solvent accessibility. The differential in decrystallization free energy suggests a molecular mechanism consistent with experimentally observed LPMO/cellobiohydrolase synergy. Additionally, the soluble oxidized cellobiose products released by hydrolytic cellulases may bind to the active sites of cellulases with

  3. Increased enzyme binding to substrate is not necessary for more efficient cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dahai; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Sethi, Anurag; Balan, Venkatesh; Gnanakaran, S; Dale, Bruce E

    2013-07-01

    Substrate binding is typically one of the rate-limiting steps preceding enzyme catalytic action during homogeneous reactions. However, interfacial-based enzyme catalysis on insoluble crystalline substrates, like cellulose, has additional bottlenecks of individual biopolymer chain decrystallization from the substrate interface followed by its processive depolymerization to soluble sugars. This additional decrystallization step has ramifications on the role of enzyme-substrate binding and its relationship to overall catalytic efficiency. We found that altering the crystalline structure of cellulose from its native allomorph I(β) to III(I) results in 40-50% lower binding partition coefficient for fungal cellulases, but surprisingly, it enhanced hydrolytic activity on the latter allomorph. We developed a comprehensive kinetic model for processive cellulases acting on insoluble substrates to explain this anomalous finding. Our model predicts that a reduction in the effective binding affinity to the substrate coupled with an increase in the decrystallization procession rate of individual cellulose chains from the substrate surface into the enzyme active site can reproduce our anomalous experimental findings. PMID:23784776

  4. Expression, immobilization and enzymatic properties of glutamate decarboxylase fused to a cellulose-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyemin; Ahn, Jungoh; Lee, Juwhan; Lee, Hyeokwon; Kim, Chunsuk; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamic acid to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), was fused to the cellulose-binding domain (CBD) and a linker of Trichoderma harzianum endoglucanase II. To prevent proteolysis of the fusion protein, the native linker was replaced with a S(3)N(10) peptide known to be completely resistant to E. coli endopeptidase. The CBD-GAD expressed in E. coli was successfully immobilized on Avicel, a crystalline cellulose, with binding capacity of 33 ± 2 nmol(CBD-GAD)/g(Avicel) and the immobilized enzymes retained 60% of their initial activities after 10 uses. The results of this report provide a feasible alternative to produce GABA using immobilized GAD through fusion to CBD. PMID:22312257

  5. Labeling the Planar Face of Crystalline Cellulose Using Quantum Dots Directed by Type-I Carbohydrate-Binding Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Tucker, M. P.; Arenkiel, P.; Ai, X.; Rumbles, G.; Sugiyama, J.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    We report a new method for the direct labeling and visualization of crystalline cellulose using quantum dots (QDs) directed by carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Two type-I (surface binding) CBMs belonging to families 2 and 3a were cloned and expressed with dual histidine tags at the N- and C-termini. Semiconductor (CdSe)ZnS QDs were used to label these CBMs following their binding to Valonia cellulose crystals. Using this approach, we demonstrated that QDs are linearly arrayed on cellulose, which implies that these CBMs specifically bind to a planar face of cellulose. Direct imaging has further shown that different sizes (colors) of QDs can be used to label CBMs bound to cellulose. Furthermore, the binding density of QDs arrayed on cellulose was modified predictably by selecting from various combinations of CBMs and QDs of known dimensions. This approach should be useful for labeling and imaging cellulose-containing materials precisely at the molecular scale, thereby supporting studies of the molecular mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion for biofuels production.

  6. EndB, a Multidomain Family 44 Cellulase from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17, Binds to Cellulose via a Novel Cellulose-Binding Module and to Another R. flavefaciens Protein via a Dockerin Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rincón, Marco T.; McCrae, Sheila I.; Kirby, James; Scott, Karen P.; Flint, Harry J.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes in Ruminococcus spp. bind to cellulose are not fully understood. The product of the newly isolated cellulase gene endB from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17 was purified as a His-tagged product after expression in Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind directly to crystalline cellulose. The ability to bind cellulose is shown to be associated with a novel cellulose-binding module (CBM) located within a region of 200 amino acids that is unrelated to known protein sequences. EndB (808 amino acids) also contains a catalytic domain belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 44 and a C-terminal dockerin-like domain. Purified EndB is also shown to bind specifically via its dockerin domain to a polypeptide of ca. 130 kDa present among supernatant proteins from Avicel-grown R. flavefaciens that attach to cellulose. The protein to which EndB attaches is a strong candidate for the scaffolding component of a cellulosome-like multienzyme complex recently identified in this species (S.-Y. Ding et al., J. Bacteriol. 183:1945–1953, 2001). It is concluded that binding of EndB to cellulose may occur both through its own CBM and potentially also through its involvement in a cellulosome complex. PMID:11571138

  7. Glycosylated linkers in multimodular lignocellulose-degrading enzymes dynamically bind to cellulose.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christina M; Resch, Michael G; Chen, Liqun; Crowley, Michael F; Himmel, Michael E; Taylor, Larry E; Sandgren, Mats; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Stals, Ingeborg; Tan, Zhongping; Beckham, Gregg T

    2013-09-01

    Plant cell-wall polysaccharides represent a vast source of food in nature. To depolymerize polysaccharides to soluble sugars, many organisms use multifunctional enzyme mixtures consisting of glycoside hydrolases, lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases, polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases, as well as accessory, redox-active enzymes for lignin depolymerization. Many of these enzymes that degrade lignocellulose are multimodular with carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and catalytic domains connected by flexible, glycosylated linkers. These linkers have long been thought to simply serve as a tether between structured domains or to act in an inchworm-like fashion during catalytic action. To examine linker function, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 and Family 7 cellobiohydrolases (TrCel6A and TrCel7A, respectively) bound to cellulose. During these simulations, the glycosylated linkers bind directly to cellulose, suggesting a previously unknown role in enzyme action. The prediction from the MD simulations was examined experimentally by measuring the binding affinity of the Cel7A CBM and the natively glycosylated Cel7A CBM-linker. On crystalline cellulose, the glycosylated linker enhances the binding affinity over the CBM alone by an order of magnitude. The MD simulations before and after binding of the linker also suggest that the bound linker may affect enzyme action due to significant damping in the enzyme fluctuations. Together, these results suggest that glycosylated linkers in carbohydrate-active enzymes, which are intrinsically disordered proteins in solution, aid in dynamic binding during the enzymatic deconstruction of plant cell walls. PMID:23959893

  8. Cellulose binding domain assisted immobilization of lipase (GSlip-CBD) onto cellulosic nanogel: characterization and application in organic medium.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Zhang, Shaowei; Wu, Gaobing; Wu, Cheng Chao; Chen, JunPeng; Baskaran, R; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-12-01

    A cbd gene was cloned into the C-terminal region of a lip gene from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. The native lipase (43.5 kDa) and CBD-Lip fusion protein (60.2 kDa) were purified to homogeneity by SDS-PAGE. A highly stable cellulosic nanogel was prepared by controlled hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose onto which the CBD-lip fusion protein was immobilized through bio-affinity based binding. The nanogel-bound lipase showed optimum activity at 55 °C, and it remains stable and active at pH 10-10.5. Furthermore, the immobilized lipase showed an over two-fold increase of relative activity in the presence of DMSO, isopropanol, isoamyl alcohol and n-butanol, but a mild activity decrease at a low concentration of methanol and ethanol. The immobilized biocatalyst retained ~50% activity after eight repetitive hydrolytic cycles. Enzyme kinetic studies of the immobilized lipase showed a 1.24 fold increase in Vmax and 5.25 fold increase in kcat towards p-NPP hydrolysis. Additionally, the nanogel bound lipase was tested to synthesize a biodiesel ester, ethyl oleate in DMSO. Kinetic analysis showed the km 100.5 ± 4.3 mmol and Vmax 0.19 ± 0.015 mmolmin(-1) at varied oleic acid concentration. Also, the values of km and Vmax at varying concentration of ethanol were observed to be 95.9 ± 13.9 mmol and 0.22 ± 0.013 mmolmin(-1) respectively. The maximum yield of ethyl oleate 111.2 ± 1.24 mM was obtained under optimized reaction conditions in organic medium. These results suggest that this immobilized biocatalyst can be used as an efficient tool for the biotransformation reactions on an industrial scale. PMID:26590897

  9. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Resch, Michael G.; Greene, Eric R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  10. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  11. Modular Architecture of Protein Binding Units for Designing Properties of Cellulose Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Malho, Jani-Markus; Arola, Suvi; Laaksonen, Päivi; Szilvay, Géza R; Ikkala, Olli; Linder, Markus B

    2015-01-01

    Molecular biomimetic models suggest that proteins in the soft matrix of nanocomposites have a multimodular architecture. Engineered proteins were used together with nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) to show how this type of architecture leads to function. The proteins consist of two cellulose-binding modules (CBM) separated by 12-, 24-, or 48-mer linkers. Engineering the linkers has a considerable effects on the interaction between protein and NFC in both wet colloidal state and a dry film. The protein optionally incorporates a multimerizing hydrophobin (HFB) domain connected by another linker. The modular structure explains effects in the hydrated gel state, as well as the deformation of composite materials through stress distribution and crosslinking. Based on this work, strategies can be suggested for tuning the mechanical properties of materials through the coupling of protein modules and their interlinking architectures. PMID:26305491

  12. Expression, purification, and characterization of the cellulose-binding domain of the scaffoldin subunit from the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed Central

    Morag, E; Lapidot, A; Govorko, D; Lamed, R; Wilchek, M; Bayer, E A; Shoham, Y

    1995-01-01

    The major cellulose-binding domain (CBD) from the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum YS was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified efficiently by a modification of a novel procedure termed affinity digestion. The properties of the purified polypeptide were compared with those of a related CBD derived from a cellulosome-like complex of a similar (but mesophilic) clostridial species, Clostridium cellulovorans. The binding properties of the two proteins with their common substrate were found to be very similar. Despite the similarity in the amino acid sequences of the two CBDs, polyclonal antibodies raised against the CBD from C. thermocellum failed to interact with the protein from C. cellulovorans. Chemical modification of the single cysteine of the CBD had little effect on the binding to cellulose. Biotinylation of this cysteine allowed the efficient binding of avidin to cellulose, and the resultant matrix is appropriate for use as a universal affinity system. PMID:7646033

  13. Sorption of poly(hexamethylenebiguanide) on cellulose: mechanism of binding and molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Richard S; Harvey, Anna; Kettle, Lorna L; Payne, John D; Russell, Stephen J

    2006-06-20

    Antimicrobial agents such as poly(hexamethylene biguanide) (PHMB) find application in medical, apparel, and household textile sectors; although it is understood that certain concentrations need to be applied to achieve suitable performance, there has been very little work published concerning the interactions of the polymer and its adsorption mechanism on cellulose. In this paper, such physical chemistry parameters are examined and related to computational chemistry studies. Adsorption isotherms were constructed: at low concentrations, these were typical Langmuir isotherms; at higher concentrations, they were more indicative of Freundlich isotherms, attributed to a combination of electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding forces, which endorsed computational chemistry proposals. At lower concentrations, electrostatic interactions between PHMB and carboxylic acid groups in the cellulose dominate with a contribution to binding through hydrogen bonding; as the concentration of PHMB increases, hydrogen bonding with cellulose becomes increasingly dominant. At high PHMB concentrations, observations of increasing PHMB adsorption are attributed to monolayer aggregation and multilayer stacking of PHMB through electrostatic interactions with counterions and hydrogen bonding of biguanide groups. PMID:16768488

  14. Addition of a carbohydrate-binding module enhances cellulase penetration into cellulose substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cellulases are of great interest for application in biomass degradation, yet the molecular details of the mode of action of glycoside hydrolases during degradation of insoluble cellulose remain elusive. To further improve these enzymes for application at industrial conditions, it is critical to gain a better understanding of not only the details of the degradation process, but also the function of accessory modules. Method We fused a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) from family 2a to two thermophilic endoglucanases. We then applied neutron reflectometry to determine the mechanism of the resulting enhancements. Results Catalytic activity of the chimeric enzymes was enhanced up to three fold on insoluble cellulose substrates as compared to wild type. Importantly, we demonstrate that the wild type enzymes affect primarily the surface properties of an amorphous cellulose film, while the chimeras containing a CBM alter the bulk properties of the amorphous film. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the CBM improves the efficiency of these cellulases by enabling digestion within the bulk of the film. PMID:23819686

  15. Enzymatic properties of Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum β-glucosidase fused to Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose binding domain and its application in hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The complete degradation of the cellulose requires the synergistic action of endo-β-glucanase, exo-β-glucanase, and β-glucosidase. But endo-β-glucanase and exo-β-glucanase can be recovered by solid–liquid separation in cellulose hydrolysis by their cellulose binding domain (CBD), however, the β-glucosidases cannot be recovered because of most β-glucosidases without the CBD, so additional β-glucosidases are necessary for the next cellulose degradation. This will increase the cost of cellulose degradation. Results The glucose-tolerant β-glucosidase (BGL) from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571 was fused with cellulose binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium cellulovorans cellulosome anchoring protein by a peptide linker. The fusion enzyme (BGL-CBD) gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli with the maximum β-glucosidase activity of 17 U/mL. Recombinant BGL-CBD was purified by heat treatment and following by Ni-NTA affinity. The enzymatic characteristics of the BGL-CBD showed optimal activities at pH 6.0 and 65°C. The fusion of CBD structure enhanced the hydrolytic efficiency of the BGL-CBD against cellobiose, which displayed a 6-fold increase in V max /K m in comparison with the BGL. A gram of cellulose was found to absorb 643 U of the fusion enzyme (BGL-CBD) in pH 6.0 at 50°C for 25 min with a high immobilization efficiency of 90%. Using the BGL-CBD as the catalyst, the yield of glucose reached a maximum of 90% from 100 g/L cellobiose and the BGL-CBD could retain over 85% activity after five batches with the yield of glucose all above 70%. The performance of the BGL-CBD on microcrystalline cellulose was also studied. The yield of the glucose was increased from 47% to 58% by adding the BGL-CBD to the cellulase, instead of adding the Novozyme 188. Conclusions The hydrolytic activity of BGL-CBD is greater than that of the Novozyme 188 in cellulose degradation. The article provides a prospect to decrease significantly the

  16. The influence of supramolecular structure of cellulose allomorphs on the interactions with cellulose-binding domain, CBD3b from Paenibacillus barcinonensis.

    PubMed

    Ciolacu, Diana; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Pastor, F I Javier; Kokol, Vanja

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of recombinant cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) of endoglucanase Cel9B from Paenibacillus barcinonensis with different cotton cellulose allomorphs (I, II and III) has been investigated, in order to bring new insights regarding the CBD adsorption and desorption processes. The highest CBD adsorption capacity was recorded for cellulose I, confirming the affinity of proteins to the most crystalline substrate. The weakening and splitting of the hydrogen bonds within cellulose structure after CBD adsorption, as well as a decrease of the crystallinity degree were identified by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and XRD. The CBD's adsorption kinetic was shown to be rendered by properties as, specific surface area and porosity, being confirmed by dynamic vapor sorption measurements. An important influence of temperature (25, 37 and 50°C) and/or pH medium (4, 5.5, 7 and 10) on the CBD desorption capacity was confirmed, being related to the hydrophobic interactions formed between the CBD and the cellulose allomorphs. PMID:24525243

  17. Site-specific cleavage of the host poly(A) binding protein by the encephalomyocarditis virus 3C proteinase stimulates viral replication.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Arias, Carolina; Garabedian, Alexandra; Palmenberg, Ann C; Mohr, Ian

    2012-10-01

    Although picornavirus RNA genomes contain a 3'-terminal poly(A) tract that is critical for their replication, the impact of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection on the host poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) remains unknown. Here, we establish that EMCV infection stimulates site-specific PABP proteolysis, resulting in accumulation of a 45-kDa N-terminal PABP fragment in virus-infected cells. Expression of a functional EMCV 3C proteinase was necessary and sufficient to stimulate PABP cleavage in uninfected cells, and bacterially expressed 3C cleaved recombinant PABP in vitro in the absence of any virus-encoded or eukaryotic cellular cofactors. N-terminal sequencing of the resulting C-terminal PABP fragment identified a 3C(pro) cleavage site on PABP between amino acids Q437 and G438, severing the C-terminal protein-interacting domain from the N-terminal RNA binding fragment. Single amino acid substitution mutants with changes at Q437 were resistant to 3C(pro) cleavage in vitro and in vivo, validating that this is the sole detectable PABP cleavage site. Finally, while ongoing protein synthesis was not detectably altered in EMCV-infected cells expressing a cleavage-resistant PABP variant, viral RNA synthesis and infectious virus production were both reduced. Together, these results establish that the EMCV 3C proteinase mediates site-specific PABP cleavage and demonstrate that PABP cleavage by 3C regulates EMCV replication. PMID:22837200

  18. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding.

    PubMed

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2014-10-21

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications. PMID:25171730

  19. Energy Landscape for the Interaction of the Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module and the Cellulose Surface is Altered by Hydrolyzed Glycosidic Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Beckham, G. T.; Crowley, M. F.; Chang, C. H.; Matthews, J. F.; Bomble, Y. J.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    A multiscale simulation model is used to construct potential and free energy surfaces for the carbohydrate-binding module [CBM] from an industrially important cellulase, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I, on the hydrophobic face of a coarse-grained cellulose I{beta} polymorph. We predict from computation that the CBM alone exhibits regions of stability on the hydrophobic face of cellulose every 5 and 10 {angstrom}, corresponding to a glucose unit and a cellobiose unit, respectively. In addition, we predict a new role for the CBM: specifically, that in the presence of hydrolyzed cellulose chain ends, the CBM exerts a thermodynamic driving force to translate away from the free cellulose chain ends. This suggests that the CBM is not only required for binding to cellulose, as has been known for two decades, but also that it has evolved to both assist the enzyme in recognizing a cellulose chain end and exert a driving force on the enzyme during processive hydrolysis of cellulose.

  20. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R.; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2014-09-01

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications.Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface

  1. Binding and Movement of Individual Cel7A Cellobiohydrolases on Crystalline Cellulose Surfaces Revealed by Single-molecule Fluorescence Imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J.; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate. PMID:23818525

  2. Binding and movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases on crystalline cellulose surfaces revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M

    2013-08-16

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate. PMID:23818525

  3. A new family of rhamnogalacturonan lyases contains an enzyme that binds to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    McKie, V A; Vincken, J P; Voragen, A G; van den Broek, L A; Stimson, E; Gilbert, H J

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas cellulosa is an aerobic bacterium that synthesizes an extensive array of modular cellulases and hemicellulases, which have a modular architecture consisting of catalytic domains and distinct non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). To investigate whether the main-chain-cleaving pectinases from this bacterium also have a modular structure, a library of P. cellulosa genomic DNA, constructed in lambdaZAPII, was screened for pectinase-encoding sequences. A recombinant phage that attacked arabinan, galactan and rhamnogalacturonan was isolated. The encoded enzyme, designated Rgl11A, had a modular structure comprising an N-terminal domain that exhibited homology to Bacillus and Streptomyces proteins of unknown function, a middle domain that exhibited sequence identity to fibronectin-3 domains, and a C-terminal domain that was homologous to family 2a CBMs. Expression of the three modules of the Pseudomonas protein in Escherichia coli showed that its C-terminal module was a functional cellulose-binding domain, and the N-terminal module consisted of a catalytic domain that hydrolysed rhamnogalacturonan-containing substrates. The activity of Rgl11A against apple- and potato-derived rhamnogalacturonan substrates indicated that the enzyme had a strong preference for rhamnogalacturonans that contained galactose side chains, and which were not esterified. The enzyme had an absolute requirement for calcium, a high optimum pH, and catalysis was associated with an increase in absorbance at 235 nm, indicating that glycosidic bond cleavage was mediated via a beta-elimination mechanism. These data indicate that Rgl11A is a rhamnogalacturonan lyase and, together with the homologous Bacillus and Streptomyces proteins, comprise a new family of polysaccharide lyases. The presence of a family 2a CBM in Rgl11A, and in a P. cellulosa pectate lyase described in the accompanying paper [Brown, Mallen, Charnock, Davies and Black (2001) Biochem. J. 355, 155-165] suggests that

  4. Three-dimensional structures of three engineered cellulose-binding domains of cellobiohydrolase I from Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Mattinen, M L; Kontteli, M; Kerovuo, J; Linder, M; Annila, A; Lindeberg, G; Reinikainen, T; Drakenberg, T

    1997-02-01

    Three-dimensional solution structures for three engineered, synthetic CBDs (Y5A, Y31A, and Y32A) of cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) from Trichoderma reesei were studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. According to CD measurements the antiparallel beta-sheet structure of the CBD fold was preserved in all engineered peptides. The three-dimensional NMR-based structures of Y31A and Y32A revealed only small local changes due to mutations in the flat face of CBD, which is expected to bind to crystalline cellulose. Therefore, the structural roles of Y31 and Y32 are minor, but their functional importance is obvious because these mutants do not bind strongly to cellulose. In the case of Y5A, the disruption of the structural framework at the N-terminus and the complete loss of binding affinity implies that Y5 has both structural and functional significance. The number of aromatic residues and their precise spatial arrangement in the flat face of the type I CBD fold appears to be critical for specific binding. A model for the CBD binding in which the three aligned aromatic rings stack onto every other glucose ring of the cellulose polymer is discussed. PMID:9041630

  5. Three-dimensional structures of three engineered cellulose-binding domains of cellobiohydrolase I from Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed Central

    Mattinen, M. L.; Kontteli, M.; Kerovuo, J.; Linder, M.; Annila, A.; Lindeberg, G.; Reinikainen, T.; Drakenberg, T.

    1997-01-01

    Three-dimensional solution structures for three engineered, synthetic CBDs (Y5A, Y31A, and Y32A) of cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) from Trichoderma reesei were studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. According to CD measurements the antiparallel beta-sheet structure of the CBD fold was preserved in all engineered peptides. The three-dimensional NMR-based structures of Y31A and Y32A revealed only small local changes due to mutations in the flat face of CBD, which is expected to bind to crystalline cellulose. Therefore, the structural roles of Y31 and Y32 are minor, but their functional importance is obvious because these mutants do not bind strongly to cellulose. In the case of Y5A, the disruption of the structural framework at the N-terminus and the complete loss of binding affinity implies that Y5 has both structural and functional significance. The number of aromatic residues and their precise spatial arrangement in the flat face of the type I CBD fold appears to be critical for specific binding. A model for the CBD binding in which the three aligned aromatic rings stack onto every other glucose ring of the cellulose polymer is discussed. PMID:9041630

  6. A non-proteolytic role for ubiquitin in deadenylation of MHC-I mRNA by the RNA-binding E3-ligase MEX-3C

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Florencia; Rapiteanu, Radu; Sebastiaan Winkler, G.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of protein and mRNA turnover is essential for many cellular processes. We recently showed that ubiquitin—traditionally linked to protein degradation—directly regulates the degradation of mRNAs through the action of a newly identified family of RNA-binding E3 ubiquitin ligases. How ubiquitin regulates mRNA decay remains unclear. Here, we identify a new role for ubiquitin in regulating deadenylation, the initial and often rate-limiting step in mRNA degradation. MEX-3C, a canonical member of this family of RNA-binding ubiquitin ligases, associates with the cytoplasmic deadenylation complexes and ubiquitinates CNOT7(Caf1), the main catalytic subunit of the CCR4-NOT deadenylation machinery. We establish a new role for ubiquitin in regulating MHC-I mRNA deadenylation as ubiquitination of CNOT7 by MEX-3C regulates its deadenylation activity and is required for MHC-I mRNA degradation. Since neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitors rescued MEX-3C-mediated MHC-I mRNA degradation, our findings suggest a new non-proteolytic function for ubiquitin in the regulation of mRNA decay. PMID:26471122

  7. A non-proteolytic role for ubiquitin in deadenylation of MHC-I mRNA by the RNA-binding E3-ligase MEX-3C.

    PubMed

    Cano, Florencia; Rapiteanu, Radu; Sebastiaan Winkler, G; Lehner, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of protein and mRNA turnover is essential for many cellular processes. We recently showed that ubiquitin--traditionally linked to protein degradation--directly regulates the degradation of mRNAs through the action of a newly identified family of RNA-binding E3 ubiquitin ligases. How ubiquitin regulates mRNA decay remains unclear. Here, we identify a new role for ubiquitin in regulating deadenylation, the initial and often rate-limiting step in mRNA degradation. MEX-3C, a canonical member of this family of RNA-binding ubiquitin ligases, associates with the cytoplasmic deadenylation complexes and ubiquitinates CNOT7(Caf1), the main catalytic subunit of the CCR4-NOT deadenylation machinery. We establish a new role for ubiquitin in regulating MHC-I mRNA deadenylation as ubiquitination of CNOT7 by MEX-3C regulates its deadenylation activity and is required for MHC-I mRNA degradation. Since neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitors rescued MEX-3C-mediated MHC-I mRNA degradation, our findings suggest a new non-proteolytic function for ubiquitin in the regulation of mRNA decay. PMID:26471122

  8. Chimeric proteins combining phosphatase and cellulose-binding activities: proof-of-concept and application in the hydrolysis of paraoxon.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Larissa M; Chaimovich, Hernan; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Marana, Sandro R

    2014-05-01

    Phosphatases for organophosphate degradation and carbohydrate-binding domains (CBMs) have potential biotechnological applications. As a proof-of-concept, a soluble chimeric protein that combines acid phosphatase (AppA) from Escherichia coli and a CBM from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (AppA-CBM) was produced in E.coli. AppACBM adsorbed in microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH101 catalyzed the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP). The binding to microcrystalline cellulose displayed saturation behavior with an apparent binding constant (Kb) of 22 ± 5 mg and a maximum binding (Bmax) of 1.500 ± 0.001 enzyme units. Binding was highest at pH 2.5 and decreased above pH 6.5, as previously observed for family 2 CBMs. The Km values for PNPP of AppA-CBM and native AppA were identical (2.7 mM). To demonstrate that this strategy for protein engineering has practical applications and is largely functional, even for phosphatases exhibiting diverse folds, a chimeric protein combining human paraoxonase 1 (hPON1) and the CBM was produced. Both PON1-CBM and hPON1 had identical Km values for paraoxon (1.3 mM). Additionally, hPON1 bound to microcrystalline cellulose with a Kb of 27 ± 3 mg, the same as that observed for AppA-CBM. These data show that the phosphatase domains are as functional in both of the chimeric proteins as they are in the native enzymes and that the CBM domain maintains the same cellulose affinity. Therefore, the engineering of chimeric proteins combining domains of phosphatases and CBMs is fully feasible, resulting in chimeric enzymes that exhibit potential for OP detoxification. PMID:24555432

  9. Poliovirus protease 3C (P3-7c) does not cleave P220 of the eucaryotic mRNA cap-binding protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K A; Edery, I; Hanecak, R; Wimmer, E; Sonenberg, N

    1985-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells by poliovirus results in proteolysis of the large subunit (P220) of the cap-binding protein complex. This is believed to cause the rapid shut-off of host protein synthesis during poliovirus infection. In this communication we examined the possible involvement of poliovirus proteins 3C (a proteinase) and 2C in cleavage of P220. Using antisera against these two viral polypeptides, we were unable to inhibit proteolysis of P220 in an in vitro assay. These results indicate that viral proteins 3C and 2C are not directly involved in cleaving P220 and hence do not cause shut-off of cellular protein synthesis. Images PMID:2991572

  10. Stringent Regulation of Complement Lectin Pathway C3/C5 Convertase By C4b-Binding Protein (C4bp)

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Nenoo; Rajagopalan, Rema; Salvi, Veena P.

    2009-01-01

    The complement lectin pathway, an essential component of the innate immune system, is geared for rapid recognition of infections as each C4b deposited via this pathway is capable of forming a C3/C5 convertase. In the present study, role of C4b-binding protein (C4BP) in regulating the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase assembled on zymosan and sheep erythrocytes coated with mannan (EMan) was examined. While the C4BP concentration for inhibiting 50% (IC50) formation of surface-bound C3 convertase on the two surfaces was similar to that obtained for the soluble C3 convertase (1.05 nM), ∼3- and 41-fold more was required to inhibit assembly of the C5 convertase on zymosan (2.81 nM) and EMan (42.66 nM). No difference in binding interactions between C4BP and surface-bound C4b alone or in complex with C3b was observed. Increasing the C4b density on zymosan (14,000-431,000 C4b/Zym) increased the number of C4b bound per C4BP from 2.87 to 8.23 indicating that at high C4b density all seven α-chains of C4BP are engaged in C4b-binding. In contrast, the number of C4b bound per C4BP remained constant (3.79 ± 0.60) when the C4b density on EMan was increased. The data also show that C4BP regulates assembly and decay of the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase more stringently than the classical pathway C3/C5 convertase because of a ∼7 to 13-fold greater affinity for C4b deposited via the lectin pathway than the classical pathway. C4BP thus regulates efficiently the four times greater potential of the lectin pathway than the classical pathway in generating the C3/C5 convertase and hence production of pro-inflammatory products, which are required to fight infections but occasionally cause pathological inflammatory reactions. PMID:19660812

  11. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-[beta] receptor promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-10-08

    Ets proteins are transcription factors that activate or repress the expression of genes that are involved in various biological processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, development, transformation and apoptosis. Like other Ets-family members, Elf3 functions as a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcriptional factor. A mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment (amino-acid residues 269-371) containing the DNA-binding domain has been crystallized in complex with mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter (TR-II) DNA. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.66, b = 52, c = 99.78 {angstrom}, and diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom}.

  12. Effect of T68A/N126Y mutations on the conformational and ligand binding landscape of Coxsackievirus B3 3C protease.

    PubMed

    Bhakat, Soumendranath

    2015-08-01

    3C protease of Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) plays an essential role in the viral replication cycle, and therefore, emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human diseases caused by CVB3 infection. In this study, we report the first account of the molecular impact of the T68A/N126Y double mutant (Mutant(Bound)) using an integrated computational approach. Molecular dynamics simulation and post-dynamics binding free energy, principal component analysis (PCA), hydrogen bond occupancy, SASA, R(g) and RMSF confirm that T68A/N126Y instigated an increased conformational flexibility due to the loss of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bond interactions and other prominent binding forces, which led to a decreased protease grip on the ligand (3CPI). The double mutations triggered a distortion orientation of 3CPI in the active site and decreases the binding energy, ΔG(bind) (∼3 kcal mol(-1)), compared to the wild type (Wild(Bound)). The van der Waals and electrostatic energy contributions coming from residues 68 and 126 are lower for Mutant(Bound) when compared with Wild(Bound). In addition, variation in the overall enzyme motion as evident from the PCA, distorted hydrogen bonding network and loss of protein-ligand interactions resulted in a loss of inhibitor efficiency. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study should be of great importance in understanding the drug resistance against CVB3 3C protease; also, it will assist in the designing of novel Coxsackievirus B3 inhibitors with high ligand efficacy on resistant strains. PMID:26077945

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3C Activates the Latent Membrane Protein 1 Promoter in the Presence of Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2 through Sequences Encompassing an Spi-1/Spi-B Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Sample, Clare E.

    2000-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA-3C) protein is a transcriptional regulator of viral and cellular genes that is essential for EBV-mediated immortalization of B lymphocytes in vitro. EBNA-3C can inhibit transcription through an association with the cellular DNA-binding protein Jκ, a function shared by EBNA-3A and EBNA-3B. Here, we report a mechanism by which EBNA-3C can activate transcription from the EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) promoter in conjunction with EBNA-2. Jκ DNA-binding sites were not required for this activation, and a mutant EBNA-3C protein unable to bind Jκ activated transcription as efficiently as wild-type EBNA-3C, indicating that EBNA-3C can regulate transcription through a mechanism that is independent of Jκ. Furthermore, activation of the LMP-1 promoter is a unique function of EBNA-3C, not shared by EBNA-3A and EBNA-3B. The DNA element through which EBNA-3C activates the LMP-1 promoter includes a Spi-1/Spi-B binding site, previously characterized as an important EBNA-2 response element. Although this element has considerable homology to mouse immunoglobulin light chain promoter sequences to which the mouse homologue of Spi-1 binds with its dimerization partner IRF4, we demonstrate that the IRF4-like binding sites in the LMP-1 promoter do not play a role in EBNA-3C-mediated activation. Both EBNA-2 and EBNA-3C were required for transcription mediated through a 41-bp region of the LMP-1 promoter encompassing the Spi binding site. However, EBNA-3C had no effect on transcription mediated in conjunction with the EBNA-2 activation domain fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain, suggesting that it does not function as an adapter between EBNA-2 and the cellular transcriptional machinery. Like EBNA-2, EBNA-3C bound directly to both Spi-1 and Spi-B in vitro. This interaction was mediated by a region of EBNA-3C encompassing a likely basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain and the ets domain of Spi-1 or Spi-B, reminiscent of

  14. Cellulose-binding polypeptides from Cellulomonas fimi: endoglucanase D (CenD), a family A beta-1,4-glucanase.

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, A; Gilkes, N R; Kilburn, D G; Miller, R C; Warren, R A

    1993-01-01

    Five cellulose-binding polypeptides were detected in Cellulomonas fimi culture supernatants. Two of them are CenA and CenB, endo-beta-1,4-glucanases which have been characterized previously; the other three were previously uncharacterized polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 120, 95, and 75 kDa. The 75-kDa cellulose-binding protein was designated endoglucanase D (CenD). The cenD gene was cloned and sequenced. It encodes a polypeptide of 747 amino acids. Mature CenD is 708 amino acids long and has a predicted molecular mass of 74,982 Da. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of CenD shows that the enzyme comprises four domains which are separated by short linker polypeptides: an N-terminal catalytic domain of 405 amino acids, two repeated sequences of 95 amino acids each, and a C-terminal domain of 105 amino acids which is > 50% identical to the sequences of cellulose-binding domains in Cex, CenA, and CenB from C. fimi. Amino acid sequence comparison placed the catalytic domain of CenD in family A, subtype 1, of beta-1,4-glycanases. The repeated sequences are more than 40% identical to the sequences of three repeats in CenB and are related to the repeats of fibronectin type III. CenD hydrolyzed the beta-1,4-glucosidic bond with retention of anomeric configuration. The activities of CenD towards various cellulosic substrates were quite different from those of CenA and CenB. Images PMID:8458833

  15. The biosynthesis and wall-binding of hemicelluloses in cellulose-deficient maize cells: an example of metabolic plasticity.

    PubMed

    de Castro, María; Miller, Janice G; Acebes, José Luis; Encina, Antonio; García-Angulo, Penélope; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-04-01

    Cell-suspension cultures (Zea mays L., Black Mexican sweet corn) habituated to 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) survive with reduced cellulose owing to hemicellulose network modification. We aimed to define the hemicellulose metabolism modifications in DCB-habituated maize cells showing a mild reduction in cellulose at different stages in the culture cycle. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, we fed habituated and non-habituated cultures with [(3)H]arabinose, and traced the distribution of (3)H-pentose residues between xylans, xyloglucans and other polymers in several cellular compartments for 5 h. Habituated cells were slower taking up exogenous [(3)H]arabinose. Tritium was incorporated into polysaccharide-bound arabinose and xylose residues, but habituated cells diverted a higher proportion of their new [(3)H]xylose residues into (hetero) xylans at the expense of xyloglucan synthesis. During logarithmic growth, habituated cells showed slower vesicular trafficking of polymers, especially xylans. Moreover, habituated cells showed a decrease in the strong wall-binding of all pentose-containing polysaccharides studied; correspondingly, especially in log-phase cultures, habituation increased the proportion of (3)H-hemicelluloses ([(3)H]xylans and [(3)H]xyloglucan) sloughed into the medium. These findings could be related to the cell walls' cellulose-deficiency, and consequent reduction in binding sites for hemicelluloses; the data could also reflect the habituated cells' reduced capacity to integrate arabinoxylans by extra-protoplasmic phenolic cross-linking, as well as xyloglucans, during wall assembly. PMID:25611087

  16. Crystal Structure of Mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding Domain in Complex with Type II TGF-[beta] Receptor Promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-08-18

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-{beta} receptor gene (T{beta}R-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, the A-site and the B-site. Here, we report the 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter DNA (mT{beta}R-II{sub DNA}). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from a major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity.

  17. Crystal structure of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-01-01

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-β receptor gene (TβR-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, A-site and B-site. Here we report the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA (mTβR-IIDNA). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity. PMID:20079749

  18. Identification of the uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose (UDP-Glc) binding subunit of cellulose synthase in Acetobacter xylinum using the photoaffinity probe 5-azido-UDP-Glc

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.C.; Brown, R.M. Jr.; Drake, R.R. Jr.; Haley, B.E. )

    1990-03-25

    Photoaffinity labeling of purified cellulose synthase with (beta-32P)5-azidouridine 5'-diphosphoglucose (UDP-Glc) has been used to identify the UDP-Glc binding subunit of the cellulose synthase from Acetobacter xylinum strain ATCC 53582. The results showed exclusive labeling of an 83-kDa polypeptide. Photoinsertion of (beta-32P)5-azido-UDP-Glc is stimulated by the cellulose synthase activator, bis-(3'----5') cyclic diguanylic acid. Addition of increasing amounts of UDP-Glc prevents photolabeling of the 83-kDa polypeptide. The reversible and photocatalyzed binding of this photoprobe also showed saturation kinetics. These studies demonstrate that the 83-kDa polypeptide is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase in A. xylinum strain ATCC 53582.

  19. Use of substructure-specific carbohydrate binding modules to track changes in cellulose accessibility and surface morphology during the amorphogenesis step of enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellulose amorphogenesis, described as the non-hydrolytic “opening up” or disruption of a cellulosic substrate, is becoming increasingly recognized as one of the key steps in the enzymatic deconstruction of cellulosic biomass when used as a feedstock for fuels and chemicals production. Although this process is thought to play a major role in facilitating hydrolysis, the lack of quantitative techniques capable of accurately describing the molecular-level changes occurring in the substrate during amorphogenesis has hindered our understanding of this process. Results In this work, techniques for measuring changes in cellulose accessibility are reviewed and a new quantitative assay method is described. Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with specific affinities for crystalline (CBM2a) or amorphous (CBM44) cellulose were used to track specific changes in the surface morphology of cotton fibres during amorphogenesis. The extents of phosphoric acid-induced and Swollenin-induced changes to cellulose accessibility were successfully quantified using this technique. Conclusions The adsorption of substructure-specific CBMs can be used to accurately quantify the extent of changes to cellulose accessibility induced by non-hydrolytic disruptive proteins. The technique provided a quick, accurate and quantitative measure of the accessibility of cellulosic substrates. Expanding the range of CBMs used for adsorption studies to include those specific for such compounds as xylan or mannan should also allow for the accurate quantitative tracking of the accessibility of these and other polymers within the lignocellulosic biomass matrix. PMID:22828270

  20. Rate of Threading a Cellulose Chain into the Binding Tunnel of a Cellulase.

    PubMed

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Alasepp, Kadri; Andersen, Morten; Ottesen, Johnny; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2016-06-30

    Industrially important cellulase Cel7A hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose by a complex processive mechanism in which the enzyme slides along the cellulose surface with one strand of the polymeric substrate channeled through its catalytic tunnel. Each processive run must start with threading the tunnel with a cellulose strand and end with the opposite, that is, the dethreading process. Evidence has suggested that threading or dethreading may be rate-limiting for the overall enzyme reaction. To directly elucidate the rates of threading and dethreading, we analyzed experimental data with respect to a two-step model that distinguishes enzymes in free, associated nonthreaded, and threaded states. This approach enabled the estimation of rate constants for both steps in both directions. The results showed that Cel7A utilizes a "tapping" mode of attack, in which it associates unproductively with the cellulose surface many times before it eventually finds a location at which it gets threaded. Moreover, it was concluded that at the quasi steady state dethreading was the main determinant of the overall hydrolytic rate under most conditions. An exception to this was at very low enzyme/substrate ratios, at which other steps also influenced the overall dynamics. These results will be helpful in identifying rate-limiting steps for cellulases and, in turn, targets for rational design of faster enzymes. PMID:27248184

  1. Cellulose hydrolysis and binding with Trichoderma reesei Cel5A and Cel7A and their core domains in ionic liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Wahlström, Ronny; Rahikainen, Jenni; Kruus, Kristiina; Suurnäkki, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) dissolve lignocellulosic biomass and have a high potential as pretreatment prior to total enzymatic hydrolysis. ILs are, however, known to inactivate cellulases. In this article, enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and enzyme binding onto the cellulosic substrate were studied in the presence of cellulose-dissolving ILs. Two different ILs, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([DMIM]DMP) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]AcO), and two monocomponent cellulases, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase Cel7A and endoglucanase Cel5A, were used in the study. The role and IL sensitivity of the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) were studied by performing hydrolysis and binding experiments with both the intact cellulases, and their respective core domains (CDs). Based on hydrolysis yields and substrate binding experiments for the intact enzymes and their CDs in the presence of ILs, the function of the CBM appeared to be very IL sensitive. Binding data suggested that the CBM was more important for the substrate binding of endoglucanase Cel5A than for the binding of cellobiohydrolase Cel7A. The CD of Cel7A was able to bind well to cellulose even without a CBM, whereas Cel5A CD had very low binding affinity. Hydrolysis also occurred with Cel5A CD even if this protein had very low binding affinity in all the studied matrices. Binding and hydrolysis were less affected by the studied ILs for Cel7A than for Cel5A. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic study of IL effects on cellulase substrate binding. PMID:24258388

  2. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 3C binds to the N-terminal (NTD) and beta trefoil domains (BTD) of RBP/CSL; Only the NTD interaction is essential for lymphoblastoid cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Calderwood, Michael A.; Lee, Sungwook; Holthaus, Amy M.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Kieff, Elliott; Johannsen, Eric

    2011-05-25

    Association of EBV nuclear proteins EBNA2, EBNA3A and EBNA3C with RBP/CSL, is essential for lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) proliferation. Conserved residues in the EBNA3 homology domain, required for RBP/CSL interaction, lack the W{Phi}P motif that mediates EBNA2 and Notch binding to the RBP/CSL beta-trefoil domain (BTD). We map RBP/CSL interacting residues within EBNA3A(aa128-204) and EBNA3C(aa211-233). The EBNA3A results are consistent with an earlier report (aa125-222), but the EBNA3C domain is unexpectedly small and includes a 'WTP' sequence. This EBNA3C WTP motif confers RBP/CSL binding in vitro, in yeast, and in mammalian cells. Further, an EBNA3C WTP {yields} STP(W227S) mutation impaired BTD binding whereas EBNA3 homology domain mutations disrupted RBP/CSL N-terminal domain (NTD) binding. WTP was not essential for EBNA3C repression of EBNA2 in reporter assays or for maintenance of LCL growth. Our results indicate that EBNA3 proteins interact with multiple RBP/CSL domains, but only NTD interactions are required for LCL growth.

  3. The Use of Carbohydrate Binding Modules (CBMs) to Monitor Changes in Fragmentation and Cellulose Fiber Surface Morphology during Cellulase- and Swollenin-induced Deconstruction of Lignocellulosic Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Gourlay, Keith; Hu, Jinguang; Arantes, Valdeir; Penttilä, Merja; Saddler, Jack N.

    2015-01-01

    Although the actions of many of the hydrolytic enzymes involved in cellulose hydrolysis are relatively well understood, the contributions that amorphogenesis-inducing proteins might contribute to cellulose deconstruction are still relatively undefined. Earlier work has shown that disruptive proteins, such as the non-hydrolytic non-oxidative protein Swollenin, can open up and disaggregate the less-ordered regions of lignocellulosic substrates. Within the cellulosic fraction, relatively disordered, amorphous regions known as dislocations are known to occur along the length of the fibers. It was postulated that Swollenin might act synergistically with hydrolytic enzymes to initiate biomass deconstruction within these dislocation regions. Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that preferentially bind to cellulosic substructures were fluorescently labeled. They were imaged, using confocal microscopy, to assess the distribution of crystalline and amorphous cellulose at the fiber surface, as well as to track changes in surface morphology over the course of enzymatic hydrolysis and fiber fragmentation. Swollenin was shown to promote targeted disruption of the cellulosic structure at fiber dislocations. PMID:25527502

  4. Two genes encoding an endoglucanase and a cellulose-binding protein are clustered and co-regulated by a TTA codon in Streptomyces halstedii JM8.

    PubMed Central

    Garda, A L; Fernández-Abalos, J M; Sánchez, P; Ruiz-Arribas, A; Santamaría, R I

    1997-01-01

    Streptomyces halstedii JM8 Cel2 is an endoglucanase of 28 kDa that is first produced as a protein of 42 kDa (p42) and is later processed at its C-terminus. Cel2 displays optimal activity towards CM-cellulose at pH6 and 50 degrees C and shows no activity against crystalline cellulose or xylan. The N-terminus of p42 shares similarity with cellulases included in family 12 of the beta-glycanases and the C-terminus shares similarity with bacterial cellulose-binding domains included in family II. This latter domain enables the precursor to bind so tightly to Avicel that it can only be eluted by boiling in 10% (w/v) SDS. Another open reading frame (ORF) situated 216 bp downstream from the p42 ORF encodes a protein of 40 kDa (p40) that does not have any clear hydrolytic activity against cellulosic or xylanosic compounds, but shows high affinity for Avicel (crystalline cellulose). The p40 protein is processed in old cultures to give a protein of 35 kDa that does not bind to Avicel. Translation of both ORFs is impaired in Streptomyces coelicolor bldA mutants, suggesting that a TTA codon situated at the fourth position of the first ORF is responsible for this regulation. S1 nuclease protection experiments demonstrate that both ORFs are co-transcribed. PMID:9182697

  5. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C binds to BATF/IRF4 or SPI1/IRF4 composite sites and recruits Sin3A to repress CDKN2A.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sizun; Willox, Bradford; Zhou, Hufeng; Holthaus, Amy M; Wang, Anqi; Shi, Tommy T; Maruo, Seiji; Kharchenko, Peter V; Johannsen, Eric C; Kieff, Elliott; Zhao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) repression of CDKN2A p14(ARF) and p16(INK4A) is essential for immortal human B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) growth. EBNA3C ChIP-sequencing identified >13,000 EBNA3C sites in LCL DNA. Most EBNA3C sites were associated with active transcription; 64% were strong H3K4me1- and H3K27ac-marked enhancers and 16% were active promoters marked by H3K4me3 and H3K9ac. Using ENCODE LCL transcription factor ChIP-sequencing data, EBNA3C sites coincided (±250 bp) with RUNX3 (64%), BATF (55%), ATF2 (51%), IRF4 (41%), MEF2A (35%), PAX5 (34%), SPI1 (29%), BCL11a (28%), SP1 (26%), TCF12 (23%), NF-κB (23%), POU2F2 (23%), and RBPJ (16%). EBNA3C sites separated into five distinct clusters: (i) Sin3A, (ii) EBNA2/RBPJ, (iii) SPI1, and (iv) strong or (v) weak BATF/IRF4. EBNA3C signals were positively affected by RUNX3, BATF/IRF4 (AICE) and SPI1/IRF4 (EICE) cooccupancy. Gene set enrichment analyses correlated EBNA3C/Sin3A promoter sites with transcription down-regulation (P < 1.6 × 10(-4)). EBNA3C signals were strongest at BATF/IRF4 and SPI1/IRF4 composite sites. EBNA3C bound strongly to the p14(ARF) promoter through SPI1/IRF4/BATF/RUNX3, establishing RBPJ-, Sin3A-, and REST-mediated repression. EBNA3C immune precipitated with Sin3A and conditional EBNA3C inactivation significantly decreased Sin3A binding at the p14(ARF) promoter (P < 0.05). These data support a model in which EBNA3C binds strongly to BATF/IRF4/SPI1/RUNX3 sites to enhance transcription and recruits RBPJ/Sin3A- and REST/NRSF-repressive complexes to repress p14(ARF) and p16(INK4A) expression. PMID:24344258

  6. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P₃ with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-01-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site. PMID:26857031

  7. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-02-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site.

  8. A cellulose-binding module of the Trichoderma reesei beta-mannanase Man5A increases the mannan-hydrolysis of complex substrates.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Per; Eriksson, Torny; Collén, Anna; Nerinckx, Wim; Claeyssens, Marc; Stålbrand, Henrik

    2003-02-27

    Endo-beta-1,4-D-mannanases (beta-mannanase; EC 3.2.1.78) are endohydrolases that participate in the degradation of hemicellulose, which is closely associated with cellulose in plant cell walls. The beta-mannanase from Trichoderma reesei (Man5A) is composed of an N-terminal catalytic module and a C-terminal carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). In order to study the properties of the CBM, a construct encoding a mutant of Man5A lacking the part encoding the CBM (Man5ADeltaCBM), was expressed in T. reesei under the regulation of the Aspergillus nidulans gpdA promoter. The wild-type enzyme was expressed in the same way and both proteins were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. Both enzymes hydrolysed mannopentaose, soluble locust bean gum galactomannan and insoluble ivory nut mannan with similar rates. With a mannan/cellulose complex, however, the deletion mutant lacking the CBM showed a significant decrease in hydrolysis. Binding experiments using activity detection of Man5A and Man5ADeltaCBM suggests that the CBM binds to cellulose but not to mannan. Moreover, the binding of Man5A to cellulose was compared with that of an endoglucanase (Cel7B) from T. reesei. PMID:12523968

  9. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-01-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site. PMID:26857031

  10. Specific Adhesion to Cellulose and Hydrolysis of Organophosphate Nerve Agents by a Genetically Engineered Escherichia coli Strain with a Surface-Expressed Cellulose-Binding Domain and Organophosphorus Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aijun A.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2002-01-01

    A genetically engineered Escherichia coli cell expressing both organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and a cellulose-binding domain (CBD) on the cell surface was constructed, enabling the simultaneous hydrolysis of organophosphate nerve agents and immobilization via specific adsorption to cellulose. OPH was displayed on the cell surface by use of the truncated ice nucleation protein (INPNC) fusion system, while the CBD was surface anchored by the Lpp-OmpA fusion system. Production of both INPNC-OPH and Lpp-OmpA-CBD fusion proteins was verified by immunoblotting, and the surface localization of OPH and the CBD was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Whole-cell immobilization with the surface-anchored CBD was very specific, forming essentially a monolayer of cells on different supports, as shown by electron micrographs. Optimal levels of OPH activity and binding affinity to cellulose supports were achieved by investigating expression under different induction levels. Immobilized cells degraded paraoxon rapidly at an initial rate of 0.65 mM/min/g of cells (dry weight) and retained almost 100% efficiency over a period of 45 days. Owing to its superior degradation capacity and affinity to cellulose, this immobilized-cell system should be an attractive alternative for large-scale detoxification of organophosphate nerve agents. PMID:11916685

  11. The binding, synergistic and structural characteristics of BsEXLX1 for loosening the main components of lignocellulose: Lignin, xylan, and cellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Chen, Liang; Lin, Hui; Yu, Daobing; Shen, Qi; Wan, Li; Zhao, Yuhua

    2016-10-01

    The bacterial expansin, BsEXLX1, has been studied as a model to understand the synergistic effect of expansins on lignocellulose degradation and the structure-function relationships of expansins. However, the specific mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, the binding, synergistic and structural characteristics of BsEXLX1 for loosening the main components of lignocellulose: lignin, xylan, and cellulose, were further characterized. Results showed that BsEXLX1 preferentially binds to xylan over lignin or cellulose under various conditions. The binding of BsEXLX1 to all substrates increased linearly with the initial concentration of BsEXLX1. But the changing rate of binding (i.e., slope of the line; k value) varied with the incubation temperature. Interestingly, the binding of BsEXLX1 to substrates did not saturate. Mutating residue-125, 126 or 171 indicated their importance for binding, but they were less important for binding to xylan. Through binding assays and homologous modeling, it was concluded that residue-125 and 171 play more important roles in the structural maintenance of BsEXLX1. By comparing the synergistic activity of BsEXLX1 or its mutants, it was found that synergistic activity is not correlated with specific binding. All these results can lead deeper understand about the mechanism of wall loosening by expansins, and further promote the application of expansins in lignocellulose degradation. PMID:27542746

  12. Cloning and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a Trichoderma reesei beta-mannanase gene containing a cellulose binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Stålbrand, H; Saloheimo, A; Vehmaanperä, J; Henrissat, B; Penttilä, M

    1995-01-01

    beta-Mannanase (endo-1,4-beta-mannanase; mannan endo-1,4-beta-mannosidase; EC 3.2.1.78) catalyzes endo-wise hydrolysis of the backbone of mannan and heteromannans, including hemicellulose polysaccharides, which are among the major components of plant cell walls. The gene man1, which encodes beta-mannanase, of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei was isolated from an expression library by using antiserum raised towards the earlier-purified beta-mannanase protein. The deduced beta-mannanase consists of 410 amino acids. On the basis of hydrophobic cluster analysis, the beta-mannanase was assigned to family 5 of glycosyl hydrolases (cellulase family A). The C terminus of the beta-mannanase has strong amino acid sequence similarity to the cellulose binding domains of fungal cellulases and is preceded by a serine-, threonine-, and proline-rich region. Consequently, the beta-mannanase is probably organized similarly to the T. reesei cellulases, having a catalytic core domain separated from the substrate-binding domain by an O-glycosylated linker. Active beta-mannanase was expressed and secreted by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the host. The results indicate that the man1 gene encodes the two beta-mannanases with different isoelectric points (pIs 4.6 and 5.4) purified earlier from T. reesei. PMID:7793911

  13. Production, purification, and characterization of a fusion protein of carbonic anhydrase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and cellulose binding domain from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Bartlow, Patrick; Dilmore, Robert M; Soong, Yee; Pan, Zhiwei; Koepsel, Richard; Ataai, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture technologies have the potential to become an important climate change mitigation option through sequestration of gaseous CO2. A new concept for CO2 capture involves use of immobilized carbonic anhydrase (CA) that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-) and H+. Cost-efficient production of the enzyme and an inexpensive immobilization system are critical for development of economically feasible CA-based CO2 capture processes. An artificial, bifunctional enzyme containing CA from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and a cellulose binding domain (CBD) from Clostridium thermocellum was constructed with a His6 tag. The chimeric enzyme exhibited both CA activity and CBD binding affinity. This fusion enzyme is of particular interest due to its binding affinity for cellulose and retained CA activity, which could serve as the basis for improved technology to capture CO2 from flue gasses. PMID:19224556

  14. Fusing a Carbohydrate-Binding Module into the Aspergillus usamii β-Mannanase to Improve Its Thermostability and Cellulose-Binding Capacity by In Silico Design

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xi-Huan; Min, Rou; Gao, Shu-Juan; Wang, Jun-Qing; Yin, Xin; Wu, Min-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The AuMan5A, an acidophilic glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 β-mannanase derived from Aspergillus usamii YL-01-78, consists of an only catalytic domain (CD). To perfect enzymatic properties of the AuMan5A, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) of the Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (TrCBH I), having the lowest binding free energy with cellobiose, was selected by in silico design, and fused into its C-terminus forming a fusion β-mannanase, designated as AuMan5A-CBM. Then, its encoding gene, Auman5A-cbm, was constructed as it was designed theoretically, and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. SDS-PAGE analysis displayed that both recombinant AuMan5A-CBM (reAuMan5A-CBM) and AuMan5A (reAuMan5A) were secreted into the cultured media with apparent molecular masses of 57.3 and 49.8 kDa, respectively. The temperature optimum of the reAuMan5A-CBM was 75°C, being 5°C higher than that of the reAuMan5A. They were stable at temperatures of 68 and 60°C, respectively. Compared with reAuMan5A, the reAuMan5A-CBM showed an obvious decrease in Km and a slight alteration in Vmax. In addition, the fusion of a CBM of the TrCBH I into the AuMan5A contributed to its cellulose-binding capacity. PMID:23741390

  15. A new method for measuring scouring efficiency of natural fibers based on the cellulose-binding domain-beta-glucuronidase fused protein.

    PubMed

    Degani, Ofir; Gepstein, Shimon; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2004-02-01

    Cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) are characterized by their ability to strongly bind to different forms of cellulose. This study examined the use of a recombinant CBD fused to the reporter enzyme beta-glucuronidase (CBD-GUS) to determine the extent of removal of the water-repellent waxy component of cotton fiber cuticles following hydrolytic treatment, i.e., scouring. The CBD-GUS test displayed higher sensitivity and repeatability than conventional water absorb techniques applied in the textile industry. Increases in the levels of CBD-GUS bound to the exposed cellulose correlated to increases in the fabric's hydrophilicity as a function of the severity of the scouring treatment applied, clearly indicating that the amount of bound enzyme increases proportionally with the amount of available binding sites. The binding of CBD-GUS also gave measurable and repeatable results when used on untreated or raw fabrics in comparison with conventional water drop techniques. The quantitative response of the reaction as bound enzyme activity was optimized for fully wettable fabrics. A minimal free enzyme concentration-to-swatch weight ratio of 75:1 was found to be necessary to ensure enzyme saturation (i.e., a linear response), corresponding to a free enzyme-to-bound enzyme ratio of at least 3:5. PMID:14736462

  16. Cellobiose dehydrogenase in cellulose degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    1996-10-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase is produced by a variety of fungi. Although it was already discovered during the 70`s, it`s role in cellulose and lignin degradation is yet ambiguous. The enzyme contains both heme and FAD as prosthetic groups, and seems to have a domain specifically designed to bind the enzyme to cellulose. It`s affinity to amorphous cellulose is higher than to crystalline cellulose. We will report on the binding behavior of the enzyme, its usefulness in elucidation of cellulose structures and also, possibilities for applications such as its use in measuring individual and synergistic mechanisms for cellulose degradation by endo- and exo-glucanases.

  17. The type II and X cellulose-binding domains of Pseudomonas xylanase A potentiate catalytic activity against complex substrates by a common mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, J; Rixon, J E; Bolam, D N; McQueen-Mason, S; Simpson, P J; Williamson, M P; Hazlewood, G P; Gilbert, H J

    1999-01-01

    Xylanase A (Pf Xyn10A), in common with several other Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa polysaccharidases, consists of a Type II cellulose-binding domain (CBD), a catalytic domain (Pf Xyn10A(CD)) and an internal domain that exhibits homology to Type X CBDs. The Type X CBD of Pf Xyn10A, expressed as a discrete entity (CBD(X)) or fused to the catalytic domain (Pf Xyn10A'), bound to amorphous and bacterial microcrystalline cellulose with a K(a) of 2.5 x 10(5) M(-1). CBD(X) exhibited no affinity for soluble forms of cellulose or cello-oligosaccharides, suggesting that the domain interacts with multiple cellulose chains in the insoluble forms of the polysaccharide. Pf Xyn10A' was 2-3 times more active against cellulose-hemicellulose complexes than Pf Xyn10A(CD); however, Pf Xyn10A' and Pf Xyn10A(CD) exhibited the same activity against soluble substrates. CBD(X) did not disrupt the structure of plant-cell-wall material or bacterial microcrystalline cellulose, and did not potentiate Pf Xyn10A(CD) when not covalently linked to the enzyme. There was no substantial difference in the affinity of full-length Pf Xyn10A and the enzyme's Type II CBD for cellulose. The activity of Pf Xyn10A against cellulose-hemicellulose complexes was similar to that of Pf Xyn10A', and a derivative of Pf Xyn10A in which the Type II CBD is linked to the Pf Xyn10A(CD) via a serine-rich linker sequence [Bolam, Cireula, McQueen-Mason, Simpson, Williamson, Rixon, Boraston, Hazlewood and Gilbert (1998) Biochem J. 331, 775-781]. These data indicate that CBD(X) is functional in Pf Xyn10A and that no synergy, either in ligand binding or in the potentiation of catalysis, is evident between the Type II and X CBDs of the xylanase. PMID:10455036

  18. Nanocrystalline Cellulose Improves the Biocompatibility and Reduces the Wear Debris of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene via Weak Binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwen; Feng, Qiang; Sun, Jiashu; Gao, Feng; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Xiaohong; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-26

    The doping of biocompatible nanomaterials into ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) to improve the biocompatibility and reduce the wear debris is of great significance to prolonging implantation time of UHMWPE as the bearing material for artificial joints. This study shows that UHMWPE can form a composite with nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC, a hydrophilic nanosized material with a high aspect ratio) by ball-milling and hot-pressing. Compared to pure UHMWPE, the NCC/UHMWPE composite exhibits improved tribological characteristics with reduced generation of wear debris. The underlying mechanism is related to the weak binding between hydrophilic NCC and hydrophobic UHMWPE. The hydrophilic, rigid NCC particles tend to detach from the UHMWPE surface during friction, which could move with the rubbing surface, serve as a thin lubricant layer, and protect the UHMWPE substrate from abrasion. The biological safety of the NCC/UHMWPE composite, as tested by MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and macrophage RAW264.7 cells, is high, with significantly lower inflammatory responses/cytotoxicity than pure UHMWPE. The NCC/UHMWPE composite therefore could be a promising alternative to the current UHMWPE for bearing applications. PMID:26687771

  19. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  20. Production, purification, and characterization of a fusion protein of carbonic anhydrase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and cellulose binding domain from Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhu; Bartlow, Patrick; Dilmore, Robert M.; Soong, Yee; Pan, Zhiwei; Koepsel, Richard; Ataai, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture technologies have the potential to become an important climate change mitigation option through sequestration of gaseous CO2, A new concept for CO2 capture involves use of immobilized carbonic anhydrase (CA) that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Cost-efficient production of the enzyme and an inexpensive immobilization system are critical for development of economically feasible CA-based CO2 capture processes. An artificial, bifunctional enzyme containing CA from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and a cellulose binding domain (CBD) from Clostridium thermocellum was constructed with a His6 tag. The chimeric enzyme exhibited both CA activity and CBD binding affinity. This fusion enzyme is of particular interest due to its binding affinity for cellulose and retained CA activity, which could serve as the basis for improved technology to capture CO2 from flue gasses.

  1. A high pressure mass spectrometric study of the binding of (CH3)3Si+ and (CH3)3C+ to toluene and benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Jennifer M.; Stone, John A.

    1991-11-01

    The equilibria (CH3)3X+ + aromatic [right harpoon over left] (CH3)3X · aromatic+ (X = Si, C; AROMATIC = toluene, toluene-d8) have been studied by high pressure mass spectrometry. Van't Hoff plots yield the following [Delta]H° values (kcal mol-1): X = Si, toluene -28.4 ± 0.4, toluene-d8 - 31.3 ± 0.3; X = C, toluene - 29.1 ± 0.3, toluene-d8 -28.6 ± 0.8 and [Delta]S° values (cal K-1 mol-1): X --- Si, toluene -33.6 ± 1.9, toluene-d8 -39.3 ± 1.9; X = C, toluene -54.6 ± 0.8, toluene-d8 - 54.5 ± 2.4. Deuteron transfer from (CH3)3CC7D+8 to the strong base (C2H5)3N provides definite proof that the complex is an arenium ion. Less convincing experimental evidence is provided for (CH3)3SiC7D+8 being an arenium ion although thermodynamic data derived from the binding enthalpy are consistent with such a structure.

  2. HC[triple bond]P and H3C-C[triple bond]P as proton acceptors in protonated complexes containing two phosphorus bases: structures, binding energies, and spin-spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Bene, Janet E Del

    2007-10-01

    Ab initio calculations at the MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ level have been carried out to investigate the structures and binding energies of cationic complexes involving protonated sp, sp2, and sp3 phosphorus bases as proton donor ions and the sp-hybridized phosphorus bases H-C[triple bond]P and H3C-C[triple bond]P as proton acceptors. These proton-bound complexes exhibit a variety of structural motifs, but all are stabilized by interactions that occur through the pi cloud of the acceptor base. The binding energies of these complexes range from 6 to 15 kcal/mol. Corresponding complexes with H3C-C[triple bond]P as the proton acceptor are more stable than those with H-C[triple bond]P as the acceptor, a reflection of the greater basicity of H3C-C[triple bond]P. In most complexes with sp2- or sp3-hybridized P-H donor ions, the P-H bond lengthens and the P-H stretching frequency is red-shifted relative to the corresponding monomers. Complex formation also leads to a lengthening of the C[triple bond]P bond and a red shift of the C[triple bond]P stretching vibration. The two-bond coupling constants 2pihJ(P-P) and 2pihJ(P-C) are significantly smaller than 2hJ(P-P) and 2hJ(P-C) for complexes in which hydrogen bonding occurs through lone pairs of electrons on P or C. This reflects the absence of significant s electron density in the hydrogen-bonding regions of these pi complexes. PMID:17760429

  3. X-ray Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Endoglucanase 3 from Trichoderma harzianum: Structural Organization and Substrate Recognition by Endoglucanases That Lack Cellulose Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Prates, Érica T.; Stankovic, Ivana; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Liberato, Marcelo V.; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Pereira, Nei; Polikarpov, Igor; Skaf, Munir S.

    2013-01-01

    Plant biomass holds a promise for the production of second-generation ethanol via enzymatic hydrolysis, but its utilization as a biofuel resource is currently limited to a large extent by the cost and low efficiency of the cellulolytic enzymes. Considerable efforts have been dedicated to elucidate the mechanisms of the enzymatic process. It is well known that most cellulases possess a catalytic core domain and a carbohydrate binding module (CBM), without which the enzymatic activity can be drastically reduced. However, Cel12A members of the glycosyl hydrolases family 12 (GHF12) do not bear a CBM and yet are able to hydrolyze amorphous cellulose quite efficiently. Here, we use X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the molecular basis underlying the catalytic capability of endoglucanase 3 from Trichoderma harzianum (ThEG3), a member of the GHF12 enzymes that lacks a CBM. A comparative analysis with the Cellulomonas fimi CBM identifies important residues mediating interactions of EG3s with amorphous regions of the cellulose. For instance, three aromatic residues constitute a harboring wall of hydrophobic contacts with the substrate in both ThEG3 and CfCBM structures. Moreover, residues at the entrance of the active site cleft of ThEG3 are identified, which might hydrogen bond to the substrate. We advocate that the ThEG3 residues Asn152 and Glu201 interact with the substrate similarly to the corresponding CfCBM residues Asn81 and Arg75. Altogether, these results show that CBM motifs are incorporated within the ThEG3 catalytic domain and suggest that the enzymatic efficiency is associated with the length and position of the substrate chain, being higher when the substrate interact with the aromatic residues at the entrance of the cleft and the catalytic triad. Our results provide guidelines for rational protein engineering aiming to improve interactions of GHF12 enzymes with cellulosic substrates. PMID:23516599

  4. Carboxymethyl cellulose binding to mineral substrates: characterization by atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy and quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pensini, Erica; Yip, Christopher M; O'Carroll, Denis; Sleep, Brent E

    2013-07-15

    The attachment of the sodium salt of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) onto iron oxide and various silicate substrates in aqueous solution as a function of salt concentration and pH was studied by atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy (AFM) and quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Both ionic strength and cation valency were found to influence substrate binding. Notably, QCM-D experiments strongly suggested that the solubility of CMC is directly impacted by the presence of CaCl2. Such data are critical for the design of new molecules for stabilizing mineral floc dispersions and for assessing the mobility of CMC-coated particles in the subsurface. Modeling of AFM data with an extended Ohshima theory showed that van der Waals and steric forces played a major role in the interactions between CMC and mineral substrates, and that hydration forces were also important. PMID:23643251

  5. Properties of lignin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses isolated from olive cake and olive stones: binding of water, oil, bile acids, and glucose.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rubio-Senent, Fátima; Lama-Muñoz, Antonio; García, Aránzazu; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan

    2014-09-10

    A process based on a steam explosion pretreatment and alkali solution post-treatment was applied to fractionate olive stones (whole and fragmented, without seeds) and olive cake into their main constitutive polymers of cellulose (C), hemicelluloses (H), and lignin (L) under optimal conditions for each fraction according to earlier works. The chemical characterization (chromatographic method and UV and IR spectroscopy) and the functional properties (water- and oil-holding capacities, bile acid binding, and glucose retardation index) of each fraction were analyzed. The in vitro studies showed a substantial bile acid binding activity in the fraction containing lignin from olive stones (L) and the alkaline extractable fraction from olive cake (Lp). Lignin bound significantly more bile acid than any other fraction and an amount similar to that bound by cholestyramine (a cholesterol-lowering, bile acid-binding drug), especially when cholic acid (CA) was tested. These results highlight the health-promoting potential of lignin from olive stones and olive cake extracted from olive byproducts. PMID:25140731

  6. INTEGRATED POLARIZATION PROPERTIES OF 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, AND 3C286

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the integrated polarization properties of the four compact radio sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, and 3C286, from 1 to 50 GHz, over a 30 yr time frame spanning 1982-2012. Using the polarized emission of Mars, we have determined that the position angle of the linearly polarized emission of 3C286 rises from 33 Degree-Sign at 8 GHz to 36 Degree-Sign at 45 GHz. There is no evidence for a change in the position angle over time. Using these values, the position angles of the integrated polarized emission from the other three sources are determined as a function of frequency and time. The fractional polarization of 3C286 is found to be slowly rising, at all frequencies, at a rate of {approx}0.015% yr{sup -1}. The fractional polarizations of 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 are all slowly variable, with the variations correlated with changes in the total flux densities of these sources.

  7. Compensation Point and Isotopic Characteristics of C3/C4 Intermediates and Hybrids in Panicum1

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel Da S. L.; Deniro, Michael J.; Sloan, Margaret E.; Black, Clanton C.

    1986-01-01

    Leaf CO2 compensation points and stable hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were determined for Panicum species including C3/C4 intermediate photosynthesis plants, hybrids between C3/C4 intermediates and C3 plants, C3 and C4 plants in the Panicum genus as well as several other C3 and C4 plants. C3 plants had the highest compensation points, followed by hybrids, C3/C4 intermediates, and C4 plants. δ13C values of cellulose nitrate and saponifiable lipids from C4 plants were about 10‰ higher than those observed for cellulose nitrate and saponifiable lipids of C3/C4 intermediates, hybrids, and C3 plants. Oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose as well as those of leaf water were similar for all plants. There was substantial variability in the δD values of cellulose nitrate among the plants studied. In contrast, such variability was not observed in δD values of water distilled from the leaves, nor in the δD values of the saponifiable lipids. Variability in δD values of cellulose nitrate from C3/C4 intermediates, hybrids, C3, and C4 plants is due to fractionations occurring during biochemical reactions specific to leaf carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:16664590

  8. Kinetics of Cellulose Digestion by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, G.; Russell, J. B.; Wilson, D. B.

    1997-01-01

    Growing cultures of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 digested cellulose at a rapid rate, but nongrowing cells and cell extracts did not have detectable crystalline cellulase activity. Cells that had been growing exponentially on cellobiose initiated cellulose digestion and succinate production immediately, and cellulose-dependent succinate production could be used as an index of enzyme activity against crystalline cellulose. Cells incubated with cellulose never produced detectable cellobiose, and cells that were preincubated for a short time with thiocellobiose lost their ability to digest cellulose (competitive inhibition [K(infi)] of only 0.2 mg/ml or 0.56 mM). Based on these results, the crystalline cellulases of F. succinogenes were very sensitive to feedback inhibition. Different cellulose sources bound different amounts of Congo red, and the binding capacity was HCl-regenerated cellulose > ball-milled cellulose > Sigmacel > Avicel > filter paper. Congo red binding capacity was highly correlated with the maximum rates of metabolism of cellulose digestion and inversely related to K(infm). Congo red (250 (mu)g/ml) did not inhibit the growth of F. succinogenes S85 on cellobiose, but this concentration of Congo red inhibited the rate of ball-milled cellulose digestion. A Lineweaver-Burk plot of ball-milled cellulose digestion rate versus the amount of cellulose indicated that Congo red was a competitive inhibitor of cellulose digestion (K(infi) was 250 (mu)g/ml). PMID:16535519

  9. Human Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4G (eIF4G) Protein Binds to eIF3c, -d, and -e to Promote mRNA Recruitment to the Ribosome*

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy; Do, Angelie; Hershey, John W. B.; Fraser, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of mRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit requires the coordinated interaction of a large number of translation initiation factors. In mammals, the direct interaction between eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and eIF3 is thought to act as the molecular bridge between the mRNA cap-binding complex and the 40S subunit. A discrete ∼90 amino acid domain in eIF4G is responsible for binding to eIF3, but the identity of the eIF3 subunit(s) involved is less clear. The eIF3e subunit has been shown to directly bind eIF4G, but the potential role of other eIF3 subunits in stabilizing this interaction has not been investigated. It is also not clear if the eIF4A helicase plays a role in stabilizing the interaction between eIF4G and eIF3. Here, we have used a fluorescence anisotropy assay to demonstrate that eIF4G binds to eIF3 independently of eIF4A binding to the middle region of eIF4G. By using a site-specific cross-linking approach, we unexpectedly show that the eIF4G-binding surface in eIF3 is comprised of the -c, -d and -e subunits. Screening multiple cross-linker positions reveals that eIF4G contains two distinct eIF3-binding subdomains within the previously identified eIF3-binding domain. Finally, by employing an eIF4G-dependent translation assay, we establish that both of these subdomains are required for efficient mRNA recruitment to the ribosome and stimulate translation. Our study reveals unexpected complexity to the eIF3-eIF4G interaction that provides new insight into the regulation of mRNA recruitment to the human ribosome. PMID:24092755

  10. Cellulose biosynthesis in Acetobacter xylinum

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    Time-lapse video microscopy has shown periodic reversals during the synthesis of cellulose. In the presence of Congo Red, Acetobacter produces a band of fine fibrils. The direction of cell movement is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of cell, and the rate of movement was decreased. A linear row of particles, presumably the cellulose synthesizing complexes, was found on the outer membrane by freeze-fracture technique. During the cell cycle, the increase of particles in linear row, the differentiation to four linear rows and the separation of the linear rows have been observed. A digitonin-solubilized cellulose synthase was prepared from A. xylinum, and incubated under conditions known to lead to active in vitro synthesis of 1,4-{beta}-D-glucan polymer. Electron microscopy revealed that clusters of fibrils were assembled within minutes. Individual fibrils are 17 {plus minus} 2 angstroms in diameter. Evidence for the cellulosic composition of newly synthesized fibrils was based on incorporation of tritium from UDP-({sup 3}H) glucose binding of gold-labeled cellobiohydrolase, and an electron diffraction pattern identified as cellulose II polymorph instead of cellulose I.

  11. Cellulose synthase interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities. PMID:21150290

  12. Cellulose degradation by polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Beeson, William T; Vu, Van V; Span, Elise A; Phillips, Christopher M; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs), also known as lytic PMOs (LPMOs), enhance the depolymerization of recalcitrant polysaccharides by hydrolytic enzymes and are found in the majority of cellulolytic fungi and actinomycete bacteria. For more than a decade, PMOs were incorrectly annotated as family 61 glycoside hydrolases (GH61s) or family 33 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM33s). PMOs have an unusual surface-exposed active site with a tightly bound Cu(II) ion that catalyzes the regioselective hydroxylation of crystalline cellulose, leading to glycosidic bond cleavage. The genomes of some cellulolytic fungi contain more than 20 genes encoding cellulose-active PMOs, suggesting a diversity of biological activities. PMOs show great promise in reducing the cost of conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars; however, many questions remain about their reaction mechanism and biological function. This review addresses, in depth, the structural and mechanistic aspects of oxidative depolymerization of cellulose by PMOs and considers their biological function and phylogenetic diversity. PMID:25784051

  13. Evaluation of drug interactions with nanofibrillar cellulose.

    PubMed

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Peltonen, Leena; Laukkanen, Antti; Hellman, Maarit; Laaksonen, Päivi; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Laaksonen, Timo

    2013-11-01

    Nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) (also referred to as cellulose nanofibers, nanocellulose, microfibrillated, or nanofibrillated cellulose) has recently gotten wide attention in various research areas and it has also been studied as excipient in formulation of the pharmaceutical dosage forms. Here, we have evaluated the interactions between NFC and the model drugs of different structural characteristics (size, charge, etc.). The series of permeation studies were utilized to evaluate the ability of the drugs in solution to diffuse through the thin, porous, dry NFC films. An incubation method was used to determine capacity of binding of chosen model drugs to NFC as well as isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to study thermodynamics of the binding process. A genetically engineered fusion protein carrying double cellulose binding domain was used as a positive control since its affinity and capacity of binding for NFC have already been reported. The permeation studies revealed the size dependent diffusion rate of the model drugs through the NFC films. The results of both binding and ITC studies showed that the studied drugs bind to the NFC material and indicated the pH dependence of the binding and electrostatic forces as the main mechanism. PMID:23774185

  14. Molecular and Biochemical Analyses of CbCel9A/Cel48A, a Highly Secreted Multi-Modular Cellulase by Caldicellulosiruptor bescii during Growth on Crystalline Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhuolin; Su, Xiaoyun; Revindran, Vanessa; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    During growth on crystalline cellulose, the thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii secretes several cellulose-degrading enzymes. Among these enzymes is CelA (CbCel9A/Cel48A), which is reported as the most highly secreted cellulolytic enzyme in this bacterium. CbCel9A/Cel48A is a large multi-modular polypeptide, composed of an N-terminal catalytic glycoside hydrolase family 9 (GH9) module and a C-terminal GH48 catalytic module that are separated by a family 3c carbohydrate-binding module (CBM3c) and two identical CBM3bs. The wild-type CbCel9A/Cel48A and its truncational mutants were expressed in Bacillus megaterium and Escherichia coli, respectively. The wild-type polypeptide released twice the amount of glucose equivalents from Avicel than its truncational mutant that lacks the GH48 catalytic module. The truncational mutant harboring the GH9 module and the CBM3c was more thermostable than the wild-type protein, likely due to its compact structure. The main hydrolytic activity was present in the GH9 catalytic module, while the truncational mutant containing the GH48 module and the three CBMs was ineffective in degradation of either crystalline or amorphous cellulose. Interestingly, the GH9 and/or GH48 catalytic modules containing the CBM3bs form low-density particles during hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. Moreover, TM3 (GH9/CBM3c) and TM2 (GH48 with three CBM3 modules) synergistically hydrolyze crystalline cellulose. Deletion of the CBM3bs or mutations that compromised their binding activity suggested that these CBMs are important during hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. In agreement with this observation, seven of nine genes in a C. bescii gene cluster predicted to encode cellulose-degrading enzymes harbor CBM3bs. Based on our results, we hypothesize that C. bescii uses the GH48 module and the CBM3bs in CbCel9A/Cel48A to destabilize certain regions of crystalline cellulose for attack by the highly active GH9 module and other endoglucanases

  15. Long-Range Communication between Different Functional Sites in the Picornaviral 3C Protein.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yan M; Moustafa, Ibrahim M; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Boehr, David D

    2016-04-01

    The 3C protein is a master regulator of the picornaviral infection cycle, responsible for both cleaving viral and host proteins, and interacting with genomic RNA replication elements. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to show that 3C is conformationally dynamic across multiple timescales. Binding of peptide and RNA lead to structural dynamics changes at both the protease active site and the RNA-binding site, consistent with these sites being dynamically coupled. Indeed, binding of RNA influences protease activity, and likewise, interactions at the active site affect RNA binding. We propose that RNA and peptide binding re-shapes the conformational energy landscape of 3C to regulate subsequent functions, including formation of complexes with other viral proteins. The observed channeling of the 3C energy landscape may be important for regulation of the viral infection cycle. PMID:27050688

  16. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dimarogona, Maria; Topakas, Evangelos; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs), cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs) and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33). PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future. PMID:24688656

  17. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dimarogona, Maria; Topakas, Evangelos; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs), cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs) and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33). PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future. PMID:24688656

  18. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  19. Bacterial cellulose-kaolin nanocomposites for application as biomedical wound healing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanna, Dwi; Alam, Catharina; Toivola, Diana M.; Alam, Parvez

    2013-12-01

    This short communication provides preliminary experimental details on the structure-property relationships of novel biomedical kaolin-bacterial cellulose nanocomposites. Bacterial cellulose is an effective binding agent for kaolin particles forming reticulated structures at kaolin-cellulose interfaces and entanglements when the cellulose fraction is sufficiently high. The mechanical performance of these materials hence improves with an increased fraction of bacterial cellulose, though this also causes the rate of blood clotting to decrease. These composites have combined potential as both short-term (kaolin) and long-term (bacterial cellulose) wound healing materials.

  20. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  1. Adherence of Clostridium thermocellum to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, E A; Kenig, R; Lamed, R

    1983-01-01

    The adherence of Clostridium thermocellum, a cellulolytic, thermophilic anaerobe, to its insoluble substrate (cellulose) was studied. The adherence phenomenon was determined to be selective for cellulose. The observed adherence was not significantly affected by various parameters, including salts, pH, temperature, detergents, or soluble sugars. A spontaneous adherence-defective mutant strain (AD2) was isolated from the wild-type strain YS. Antibodies were prepared against the bacterial cell surface and rendered specific to the cellulose-binding factor (CBF) by adsorption to mutant AD2 cells. By using these CBF-specific antibodies, crossed immunoelectrophoresis of cell extracts revealed a single discrete precipitation peak in the parent strain which was absent in the mutant. This difference was accompanied by an alteration in the polypeptide profile whereby sonicates of strain YS contained a 210,000-molecular-weight band which was missing in strain AD2. The CBF antigen could be removed from cell extracts by adsorption to cellulose. A combined gel-overlay--immunoelectrophoretic technique demonstrated that the cellulose-binding properties of the CBF were accompanied by carboxymethylcellulase activity. During the exponential phase of growth, a large part of the CBF antigen and related carboxymethylcellulase activity was associated with the cells of wild-type strain YS. However, the amounts decreased in stationary-phase cells. Cellobiose-grown mutant AD2 cells lacked the cell-associated CBF, but the latter was detected in the extracellular fluid. Increased levels of CBF were observed when cells were grown on cellulose. In addition, mutant AD2 regained cell-associated CBF together with the property of cellulose adherence. The presence of the CBF antigen and related adherence characteristics appeared to be a phenomenon common to other naturally occurring strains of this species. Images PMID:6630152

  2. Cellulose-silica aerogels.

    PubMed

    Demilecamps, Arnaud; Beauger, Christian; Hildenbrand, Claudia; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana

    2015-05-20

    Aerogels based on interpenetrated cellulose-silica networks were prepared and characterised. Wet coagulated cellulose was impregnated with silica phase, polyethoxydisiloxane, using two methods: (i) molecular diffusion and (ii) forced flow induced by pressure difference. The latter allowed an enormous decrease in the impregnation times, by almost three orders of magnitude, for a sample with the same geometry. In both cases, nanostructured silica gel was in situ formed inside cellulose matrix. Nitrogen adsorption analysis revealed an almost threefold increase in pores specific surface area, from cellulose aerogel alone to organic-inorganic composite. Morphology, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties under uniaxial compression were investigated. Thermal conductivity of composite aerogels was lower than that of cellulose aerogel due to the formation of superinsulating mesoporous silica inside cellulose pores. Furthermore, composite aerogels were stiffer than each of reference aerogels. PMID:25817671

  3. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatogrpahic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressin...

  4. Wrinkle resistant cellulosic textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchens, J.D.; Patton, R.T.; Nadar, R.S.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes a process for treating a cellulosic textile material so as to impart wrinkle resistance and smooth drying properties. It comprises treating the cellulosic textile material with an aqueous solution comprising trans-1,2,3,4-cyclobutane tetracarboxylic acid, and a curing catalyst, and heating the treated material so as to produce esterification and crosslinking of the material with the acid.

  5. NATO-3C/Delta launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NATO-3C, the third in a series of NATO defense-related communication satellites, is scheduled to be launched on a delta vehicle from the Eastern Test Range no earlier than November 15, 1978. NATO-3A and -3B were successfully launched by Delta vehicles in April 1976 and January 1977, respectively. The NATO-3C spacecraft will be capable of transmitting voice, data, facsimile, and telex messages among military ground stations. The launch vehicle for the NATO-3C mission will be the Delta 2914 configuration. The launch vehicle is to place the spacecraft in a synchronous transfer orbit. The spacecraft Apogee Kick motor is to be fired at fifth transfer orbit apogee to circularize its orbit at geosynchronous altitude of 35,900 km(22,260 miles) above the equator over the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between 45 and 50 degrees W longitude.

  6. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-01-01

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3C(pro)s) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3C(pro) plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3C(pro) are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3C(pro) can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3C(pro) and these essential factors, 3C(pro) is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3C(pro) are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3C(pro) may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3C(pro) is summarized. PMID:26999188

  7. Periodicity Analysis of the Spectral Index in 3c 273 and 3c 446

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yu-Hai; Fan, Jun-Hui

    In this work, we used the preliminary data of University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) for the spectral index calculation for two blazars, 3C 273 (1226+023) and 3C 446 (2223-052), and found that the spectral indices are variable. Therefore, we used three methods (Jurkevich method (J), the discrete correlation analysis (D), and the Periodogram method (P)) to investigate the period in the spectral index variation curves. The results show that 3C 273 has a quasi-period of 8.8 ± 1.3 yr, and 3C 446 has a period of 5.8 ± 1.2 yr.

  8. Cellulose promotes extracellular assembly of Clostridium cellulovorans cellulosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Matano, Y; Park, J S; Goldstein, M A; Doi, R H

    1994-01-01

    Cellulosome synthesis by Clostridium cellulovorans was investigated by growing the cells in media containing different carbon sources. Supernatant from cells grown with cellobiose contained no cellulosomes and only the free forms of cellulosomal major subunits CbpA, P100, and P70 and the minor subunits with enzymatic activity. Supernatant from cells grown on pebble-milled cellulose and Avicel contained cellulosomes capable of degrading crystalline cellulose. Supernatants from cells grown with cellobiose, pebble-milled cellulose, and Avicel contained about the same amount of carboxymethyl cellulase activity. Although the supernatant from the medium containing cellobiose did not initially contain active cellulosomes, the addition of crystalline cellulose to the cell-free supernatant fraction converted the free major forms to cellulosomes with the ability to degrade crystalline cellulose. The binding of P100 and P70 to crystalline cellulose was dependent on their attachment to the endoglucanase-binding domains of CbpA. These data strongly indicate that crystalline cellulose promotes cellulosome assembly. Images PMID:7961457

  9. Evaluating Models of Cellulose Degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

    PubMed Central

    Burnet, Meagan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Neumann, Anthony P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Suen, Garret; Callister, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-sequencing, proteomics, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to further clarify the cellulolytic mechanism of F. succinogenes. Our RNA-sequence analysis shows that genes encoding type II and III secretion systems, fibro-slime proteins, and pili are differentially expressed on cellulose, relative to glucose. A subcellular fractionation of cells grown on cellulose revealed that carbohydrate active enzymes associated with cellulose deconstruction and fibro-slime proteins were greater in the extracellular medium, as compared to the periplasm and outer membrane fractions. TEMs of samples harvested at mid-exponential and stationary phases of growth on cellulose and glucose showed the presence of grooves in the cellulose between the bacterial cells and substrate, suggesting enzymes work extracellularly for cellulose degradation. Membrane vesicles were only observed in stationary phase cultures grown on cellulose. These results provide evidence that F. succinogenes attaches to cellulose fibers using fibro-slime and pili, produces cellulases, such as endoglucanases, that are secreted extracellularly using type II and III secretion systems, and degrades the cellulose into cellodextrins that are then imported back into the periplasm for further digestion by β-glucanases and other cellulases. PMID:26629814

  10. Evaluating models of cellulose degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burnet, Meagan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Neumann, Anthony P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Suen, Garret; Callister, Stephen J.

    2015-12-02

    Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve a combination of cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-sequencing, proteomics, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to further elucidate the cellulolytic mechanism of F. succinogenes. Our RNA-sequence analysis shows that genes encoding Type II and III secretion systems, fibro-slime proteins,more » and pili are differentially expressed on cellulose, relative to glucose. A subcellular fractionation of cells grown on cellulose revealed that carbohydrate active enzymes associated with cellulose deconstruction and fibro-slime proteins were greater in the extracellular media, as compared to the periplasm and outer membrane fractions. TEMs of samples harvested at mid-exponential and stationary phases of growth on cellulose and glucose showed the presence of grooves in the cellulose between the bacterial cells and substrate, suggesting enzymes work extracellularly for cellulose degradation. Membrane vesicles were only observed in stationary phase cultures grown on cellulose. Furthermore, these results provide evidence that F. succinogenes attaches to cellulose fibers using fibro-slime and pili, produces cellulases, such as endoglucanases, that are secreted extracellularly using type II and III secretion systems, and degrades the cellulose into cellodextrins that are then imported back into the periplasm for further digestion by β-glucanases and other cellulases.« less

  11. Fulton Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect

    Sumait, Necy; Cuzens, John; Klann, Richard

    2015-07-24

    Final report on work performed by BlueFire on the deployment of acid hydrolysis technology to convert cellulosic waste materials into renewable fuels, power and chemicals in a production facility to be located in Fulton, Mississippi.

  12. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Eric A.; Demain, Arnold L.; Madia, Ashwin

    1985-09-10

    A method of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of a reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  13. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

    1983-05-13

    A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  14. Structural Basis for Molecular Discrimination by a 3',3'-cGAMP Sensing Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Aiming; Wang, Xin  C.; Kellenberger, Colleen  A.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta  R.; Jones, Roger  A.; Hammond, Ming  C.; Patel, Dinshaw  J.

    2015-04-07

    Cyclic dinucleotides are second messengers that target the adaptor STING and stimulate the innate immune response in mammals. Besides protein receptors, there are bacterial riboswitches that selectively recognize cyclic dinucleotides. We recently discovered a natural riboswitch that targets 3',3'-cGAMP, which is distinguished from the endogenous mammalian signal 2',3'-cGAMP by its backbone connectivity. Here, we report on structures of the aptamer domain of the 3',3'-cGAMP riboswitch from Geobacter in the 3',3'-cGAMP and c-di-GMP bound states. The riboswitch adopts a tuning forklike architecture with a junctional ligand-binding pocket and different orientations of the arms are correlated with the identity of the bound cyclic dinucleotide. Subsequent biochemical experiments revealed that specificity of ligand recognition can be affected by point mutations outside of the binding pocket, which has implications for both the assignment and reengineering of riboswitches in this structural class.

  15. The optical variability of 3C 345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, M. R.

    1989-12-01

    The behavior of the light curve of 3C 345 is analyzed using all B magnitudes available in the literature, thus extending the number of points in the compiled light curve of this object by a factor of more than 50 percent and the coverage by about 7 yrs, in comparison with the light curve compiled by Kidger and Beckman (1986). In addition, a new and better m(B) - m(pg) correction is applied to all the data. Results of the analysis demonstrate that the light curve of 3C 345 is effectively aperiodic and that the power spectrum is not continuous, in the sense that even overlapping sections of light curve have very distinct power spectra. This behavior indicates that the curve variations are random. This conclusion is supported by the use of the Jurkevich (1971) V(m)-sq statistic.

  16. The Optical Variability of 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Rui-Guang

    2001-06-01

    B-band measurements of 3C273 over some 110 years are compiled and used in a search for periodicities using the Jurkevich method. Periods of 2.0, 13.65±0.20 and 22.5±0.2 yr are found. If the long-term periodicity is from the instability of a slim disk, then the periodicity (~ 13-yr or ~ 22-yr) suggests masses of 107 Msun for the central black holes.

  17. Mex3c mutation reduces adiposity partially through increasing physical activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Changjie; Jiao, Yan; Zhao, Qingguo; Lu, Baisong

    2014-06-01

    MEX3C is an RNA-binding protein with unknown physiological function. We have recently reported that a Mex3c mutation in mice causes growth retardation and reduced adiposity, but how adiposity is reduced remains unclear. Herein, we show that homozygous Mex3c gene trap mice have increased physical activity. The Mex3c mutation consistently conferred full protection from diet-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. In ob/ob mice with leptin deficiency, the Mex3c mutation also increased physical activity and improved glucose and lipid profiles. Expressing cre in the neurons of Mex3c gene trap mice, an attempt to partially restoring neuronal Mex3c expression, significantly increased white adipose tissue deposition, but had no effects on body length. Our data suggest that one way in which Mex3c regulates adiposity is through controlling physical activity, and that neuronal Mex3c expression could play an important role in this process. PMID:24741071

  18. Re-constructing our models of cellulose and primary cell wall assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The cellulose microfibril has more subtlety than is commonly recognized. Details of its structure may influence how matrix polysaccharides interact with its distinctive hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces to form a strong yet extensible structure. Recent advances in this field include the first structures of bacterial and plant cellulose synthases and revised estimates of microfibril structure, reduced from 36 to 18 chains. New results also indicate that cellulose interactions with xyloglucan are more limited than commonly believed, whereas pectin-cellulose interactions are more prevalent. Computational results indicate that xyloglucan binds tightest to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose microfibrils. Wall extensibility may be controlled at limited regions (“biomechanical hotspots”) where cellulose-cellulose contacts are made, potentially mediated by trace amounts of xyloglucan. PMID:25460077

  19. Observing cellulose biosynthesis and membrane translocation in crystallo.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jacob L W; McNamara, Joshua T; Fischer, Michael; Rich, Jamie; Chen, Hong-Ming; Withers, Stephen G; Zimmer, Jochen

    2016-03-17

    Many biopolymers, including polysaccharides, must be translocated across at least one membrane to reach their site of biological function. Cellulose is a linear glucose polymer synthesized and secreted by a membrane-integrated cellulose synthase. Here, in crystallo enzymology with the catalytically active bacterial cellulose synthase BcsA-BcsB complex reveals structural snapshots of a complete cellulose biosynthesis cycle, from substrate binding to polymer translocation. Substrate- and product-bound structures of BcsA provide the basis for substrate recognition and demonstrate the stepwise elongation of cellulose. Furthermore, the structural snapshots show that BcsA translocates cellulose via a ratcheting mechanism involving a 'finger helix' that contacts the polymer's terminal glucose. Cooperating with BcsA's gating loop, the finger helix moves 'up' and 'down' in response to substrate binding and polymer elongation, respectively, thereby pushing the elongated polymer into BcsA's transmembrane channel. This mechanism is validated experimentally by tethering BcsA's finger helix, which inhibits polymer translocation but not elongation. PMID:26958837

  20. The peculiar radio galaxy 3C 433

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Breugel, W.; Helfand, D.; Balick, B.; Heckman, T.; Miley, G.

    1983-01-01

    Radio, optical and X-ray observations are presented of the peculiar radio galaxy 3C 433, a Seyfert 2 object with luminosity an order of magnitude greater than that expected from its complex, shell-type morphology. Observations conducted at 6 and 12 cm with the VLA and at 21 cm with the Westerbork telescope show a striking asymmetry between the northern and southern radio emissions, and an overall X-shaped morphology. Optical observations using the Video Camera and High Gain Video Spectrometer on the 4-m telescope and the Intensified Image Dissector Scanner on the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak confirm the identification of the source with a pair of bright galaxies. Observations in the X-ray from the Einstein Observatory IPC reveal an unresolved source at the position of 3C 433, as well as two serendipitous X-ray sources. The observations may be used to explain the overall structure of the source either in terms of tidal torquing or precessing models of double galaxies; however, it is argued that the tidal torquing model requires fewer assumptions to account for the brightness asymmetry.

  1. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  2. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  3. Cellulose biosynthesis by the beta-proteobacterium, Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Recouvreux, Derce O S; Carminatti, Claudimir A; Pitlovanciv, Ana K; Rambo, Carlos R; Porto, Luismar M; Antônio, Regina V

    2008-11-01

    The Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 genome was sequenced by The Brazilian National Genome Project Consortium. Previous annotation reported the presence of cellulose biosynthesis genes in that genome. Analysis of these genes showed that, as observed in other bacteria, they are organized in two operons. In the present work, experimental evidences of the presence of cellulose in the extracellular matrix of the biofilm produced by C. violaceum in static cultures are shown. Biofilm samples were enzymatically digested by cellulase, releasing glucose units, suggesting the presence of cellulose as an extracellular matrix component. Fluorescence microscopy observations showed that C. violaceum produces a cellulase-sensitive extracellular matrix composed of fibers able to bind calcofluor. C. violaceum grows on medium containing Congo red, forming brown-red colonies. Together, these results suggest that cellulase-susceptible matrix material is cellulose. Scanning electronic microscopy analysis showed that the extracellular matrix exhibited a network of microfibrils, typical of bacterial cellulose. Although cellulose production is widely distributed between several bacterial species, including at least the groups of Gram-negative proteobacteria alpha and gamma, we give for the first time experimental evidence for cellulose production in beta-proteobacteria. PMID:18820969

  4. Compositions and methods comprising cellulase variants with reduced affinity to non-cellulosic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cascao-Pereira, Luis G; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R; Liu, Amy D

    2015-04-07

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having reduced binding to non-cellulosic materials. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase, compositions comprising said cellulase, methods of identifying cellulose variants and methods of using the compositions.

  5. An Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Mechanism of Cellulose Biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, Amanda; Chen, Maohui; Cockburn, Darrell; Regli, Sarah; Clarke, Anthony; Dutcher, John; Lipkowski, Jacek; Roscoe, Sharon

    2009-03-01

    Cellulose, a biopolymer consisting of long chain β-(1->4) linked glucose sugars, is used as structural material by plants and bacteria. Degradation of cellulose to glucose, a sugar easily fermented to ethanol, occurs by the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase enzymes. The enzymes have a complex structure including carbohydrate binding modules and catalytic domains responsible for the binding and degradation of cellulose, respectively. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study native cellulose films prepared from Acetobacter xylinum using a novel application of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. These films allowed AFM images of single fibers and their microfibril structure to be obtained. Further in situ AFM studies of single fibers were performed in solution using cellulolytic enzymes. The in situ degradation of cellulose fibers was monitored over 20-hours using AFM. These studies provided insight into the degradation timeline of a single fiber. Complementary studies of proteins adsorbed on cellulose fibers revealed information about the binding of the enzymes to the substrate. Studying the modular enzyme action separately will provide insight into the mechanism of cellulose binding and contribute to our understanding of the degradation process.

  6. Dissolving process of a cellulose bunch in ionic liquids: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Suojiang; Yao, Yingying; Yao, Xiaoqian; Xu, Junli; Lu, Xingmei

    2015-07-21

    In recent years, a variety of ionic liquids (ILs) were found to be capable of dissolving cellulose and mechanistic studies were also reported. However, there is still a lack of detailed information at the molecular level. Here, long time molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose bunch in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EmimCl), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BmimCl) and water were performed to analyze the inherent interaction and dissolving mechanism. Complete dissolution of the cellulose bunch was observed in EmimAc, while little change took place in EmimCl and BmimCl, and nothing significant happened in water. The deconstruction of the hydrogen bond (H-bond) network in cellulose was found and analyzed quantitatively. The synergistic effect of cations and anions was revealed by analyzing the whole dissolving process. Initially, cations bind to the side face of the cellulose bunch and anions insert into the cellulose strands to form H-bonds with hydroxyl groups. Then cations start to intercalate into cellulose chains due to their strong electrostatic interaction with the entered anions. The H-bonds formed by Cl(-) cannot effectively separate the cellulose chain and that is the reason why EmimCl and BmimCl dissolve cellulose more slowly. These findings deepen people's understanding on how ILs dissolve cellulose and would be helpful for designing new efficient ILs to dissolve cellulose. PMID:26095890

  7. Two Active Nuclei in 3C 294

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Alan; Canalizo, Gabriela; Nelan, E. P.; Ridgway, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    The z=1.786 radio galaxy 3C 294 lies < 10" from a 12 mag star and has been the target of at least three previous investigations using adaptive optics (AO) imaging. A major problem in interpreting these results is the uncertainty in the precise alignment of the radio structure with the H- or K-band AO imaging. Here we report observations of the position of the AO guide star with the Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor, which, together with positions from the second United States Naval Observatory's CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC2), allow us to register the infrared and radio frames to an accuracy of better than 0.1". The result is that the nuclear compact radio source is not coincident with the brightest discrete object in the AO image, an essentially unresolved source on the eastern side of the light distribution, as Quirrenbach and coworkers had suggested. Instead, the radio source is centered about 0.9" to the west of this object, on one of the two apparently real peaks in a region of diffuse emission. Nevertheless, the conclusion of Quirrenbach and coworkers that 3C 294 involves an ongoing merger appears to be correct: analysis of a recent deep Chandra image of 3C 294 obtained from the archive shows that the nucleus comprises two X-ray sources, which are coincident with the radio nucleus and the eastern stellar object. The X-ray/optical flux ratio of the latter makes it extremely unlikely that it is a foreground Galactic star. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with proposal 08315. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a

  8. Double Faraday rotation toward 3C 27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, S. J., Jr.; Reed, J. A.

    1984-08-01

    From observations of the integrated flux of 3C 27 with the NRAO 140 foot (43 m) telescope at 40 frequencies between 1250 and 1445 MHz, the authors deduce rotation measures of 165±15 and -104±4 rad m-2. Since the source (assumed to be a radio galaxy) has components 45arcsec apart, it is concluded that the net magnetic field reverses between these directions. One explanation is that a large magnetic field surrounding the central galaxy of the distant source covers one component but not the other. Another explanation is that our Galaxy contains a dipole field with a scale of order 1 pc. One component of the distant source is seen inside the current loop associated with the dipole field, while the other is seen outside the loop.

  9. Cellulose Microfibril Formation by Surface-Tethered Cellulose Synthase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Basu, Snehasish; Omadjela, Okako; Gaddes, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zimmer, Jochen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-23

    Cellulose microfibrils are pseudocrystalline arrays of cellulose chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases. The enzymes are organized into large membrane-embedded complexes in which each enzyme likely synthesizes and secretes a β-(1→4) glucan. The relationship between the organization of the enzymes in these complexes and cellulose crystallization has not been explored. To better understand this relationship, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize cellulose microfibril formation from nickel-film-immobilized bacterial cellulose synthase enzymes (BcsA-Bs), which in standard solution only form amorphous cellulose from monomeric BcsA-B complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques show that surface-tethered BcsA-Bs synthesize highly crystalline cellulose II in the presence of UDP-Glc, the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, as well as magnesium. The cellulose II cross section/diameter and the crystal size and crystallinity depend on the surface density of tethered enzymes as well as the overall concentration of substrates. Our results provide the correlation between cellulose microfibril formation and the spatial organization of cellulose synthases. PMID:26799780

  10. Modeling of cellulose crystals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers are single cells, and the substance of the fiber is the secondary cell wall that is nearly pure, microcrystalline cellulose. Normally there is about 5% moisture in cotton fiber, but variations of a few percent make differences as large as 40% in the strength, with more water resulting ...

  11. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  12. Multiwavelength observations of giant radio galaxy 3C 35 and 3C 284

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We report multi wavelength observations of large radio galaxy 3C35 and 3C284. The low frequency observations were done with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) starting from 150 MHz. The high frequency observations were done with Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). Our main motivation for these observations is to estimate the spectral ages of these galaxies and to examine any proof of extended emission at low radio frequencies due to an earlier cycle of activity. The spectral age is measured by fitting the spectra with different spectral ageing models e.g. Kardashev-Pacholczyk (KP), Jaffe-Perola (JP) and Continuous Injection (CI).

  13. Cellulose Synthesis and Its Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shundai; Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Gu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer synthesized on land, is made of linear chains of ß (1–4) linked D-glucose. As a major structural component of the cell wall, cellulose is important not only for industrial use but also for plant growth and development. Cellulose microfibrils are tethered by other cell wall polysaccharides such as hemicellulose, pectin, and lignin. In higher plants, cellulose is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized rosette cellulose synthase complexes. Despite the recent advances using a combination of molecular genetics, live cell imaging, and spectroscopic tools, many aspects of the cellulose synthesis remain a mystery. In this chapter, we highlight recent research progress towards understanding the mechanism of cellulose synthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:24465174

  14. THE SUZAKU VIEW OF 3C 382

    SciTech Connect

    Sambruna, R. M.; Gliozzi, M.; Tombesi, F.; Braito, V.; Ballo, L.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2011-06-20

    We present a long (116 ks) Suzaku observation of the broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG) 3C 382 acquired in 2007 April. A Swift BAT spectrum in 15-200 keV from the 58 month survey is also analyzed, together with an archival XMM-Newton EPIC exposure of 20 ks obtained one year after Suzaku. Our main result is the finding with Suzaku of a broad Fe K line with a relativistic profile consistent with emission from an accretion disk at tens of gravitational radii from the central black hole. The XIS data indicate emission from highly ionized iron and allow us to set tight, albeit model-dependent, constraints on the inner and outer radii of the disk reflecting region, r{sub in} {approx_equal} 10 r{sub g} and r{sub out} {approx_equal} 20 r{sub g} , respectively, and on the disk inclination, i {approx_equal} 30{sup 0}. Two ionized reflection components are possibly observed, with similar contributions of {approx}10% to the total continuum-a highly ionized one, with log{xi} {approx_equal} 3 erg s{sup -1} cm, which successfully models the relativistic line, and a mildly ionized one, with log{xi} {approx_equal} 1.5 erg s{sup -1} cm, which models the narrow Fe K{alpha} and high energy hump. When both these components are included, there is no further requirement for an additional blackbody soft excess below 2 keV. The Suzaku data confirm the presence of a warm absorber previously known from grating studies. After accounting for all the spectral features, the intrinsic photon index of the X-ray continuum is {Gamma}{sub x} {approx_equal} 1.8 with a cutoff energy at {approx}200 keV, consistent with Comptonization models and excluding jet-related emission up to these energies. Comparison of the X-ray properties of 3C 382 and other BLRGs to Seyferts recently observed with Suzaku and BAT confirms the idea that the distinction between radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nucleus at X-rays is blurred. The two classes form a continuum distribution in terms of X-ray photon index

  15. The Arabidopsis COBRA Protein Facilitates Cellulose Crystallization at the Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Sorek, Nadav; Sorek, Hagit; Kijac, Aleksandra; Szemenyei, Heidi J.; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Wemmer, David E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Arabidopsis COBRA gene lead to defects in cellulose synthesis but the function of COBRA is unknown. Here we present evidence that COBRA localizes to discrete particles in the plasma membrane and is sensitive to inhibitors of cellulose synthesis, suggesting that COBRA and the cellulose synthase complex reside in close proximity on the plasma membrane. Live-cell imaging of cellulose synthesis indicated that, once initiated, cellulose synthesis appeared to proceed normally in the cobra mutant. Using isothermal calorimetry, COBRA was found to bind individual β1–4-linked glucan chains with a KD of 3.2 μm. Competition assays suggests that COBRA binds individual β1–4-linked glucan chains with higher affinity than crystalline cellulose. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the cell wall of the cobra mutant also indicated that, in addition to decreases in cellulose amount, the properties of the cellulose fibrils and other cell wall polymers differed from wild type by being less crystalline and having an increased number of reducing ends. We interpret the available evidence as suggesting that COBRA facilitates cellulose crystallization from the emerging β1–4-glucan chains by acting as a “polysaccharide chaperone.” PMID:25331944

  16. The Arabidopsis COBRA protein facilitates cellulose crystallization at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sorek, Nadav; Sorek, Hagit; Kijac, Aleksandra; Szemenyei, Heidi J; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Wemmer, David E; Somerville, Chris R

    2014-12-12

    Mutations in the Arabidopsis COBRA gene lead to defects in cellulose synthesis but the function of COBRA is unknown. Here we present evidence that COBRA localizes to discrete particles in the plasma membrane and is sensitive to inhibitors of cellulose synthesis, suggesting that COBRA and the cellulose synthase complex reside in close proximity on the plasma membrane. Live-cell imaging of cellulose synthesis indicated that, once initiated, cellulose synthesis appeared to proceed normally in the cobra mutant. Using isothermal calorimetry, COBRA was found to bind individual β1-4-linked glucan chains with a KD of 3.2 μm. Competition assays suggests that COBRA binds individual β1-4-linked glucan chains with higher affinity than crystalline cellulose. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the cell wall of the cobra mutant also indicated that, in addition to decreases in cellulose amount, the properties of the cellulose fibrils and other cell wall polymers differed from wild type by being less crystalline and having an increased number of reducing ends. We interpret the available evidence as suggesting that COBRA facilitates cellulose crystallization from the emerging β1-4-glucan chains by acting as a "polysaccharide chaperone." PMID:25331944

  17. Multifrequency Monitoring of 3C 120, 3C 279, and PKS 1510--089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Aller, M. F.; Balonek, T. J.; Gomez, J.-L.; McHardy, I. M.; Terasranta, H.; Raiteri, C.; Tosti, G.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze contemporaneous X-ray, optical, and radio light curves of 3C 120, ABC 279, and PKS 1510-089 on timescales from a few to hundreds of days over a 3-5 year period. The results show the diverse connections between variability properties at different frequencies for different blazers.

  18. Cellulose in Cyanobacteria. Origin of Vascular Plant Cellulose Synthase?

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, David R.; Romanovicz, Dwight K.; Brown, R. Malcolm

    2001-01-01

    Although cellulose biosynthesis among the cyanobacteria has been suggested previously, we present the first conclusive evidence, to our knowledge, of the presence of cellulose in these organisms. Based on the results of x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy of microfibrils, and cellobiohydrolase I-gold labeling, we report the occurrence of cellulose biosynthesis in nine species representing three of the five sections of cyanobacteria. Sequence analysis of the genomes of four cyanobacteria revealed the presence of multiple amino acid sequences bearing the DDD35QXXRW motif conserved in all cellulose synthases. Pairwise alignments demonstrated that CesAs from plants were more similar to putative cellulose synthases from Anabaena sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and Nostoc punctiforme American Type Culture Collection 29133 than any other cellulose synthases in the database. Multiple alignments of putative cellulose synthases from Anabaena sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and N. punctiforme American Type Culture Collection 29133 with the cellulose synthases of other prokaryotes, Arabidopsis, Gossypium hirsutum, Populus alba × Populus tremula, corn (Zea mays), and Dictyostelium discoideum showed that cyanobacteria share an insertion between conserved regions U1 and U2 found previously only in eukaryotic sequences. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis indicates that the cyanobacterial cellulose synthases share a common branch with CesAs of vascular plants in a manner similar to the relationship observed with cyanobacterial and chloroplast 16s rRNAs, implying endosymbiotic transfer of CesA from cyanobacteria to plants and an ancient origin for cellulose synthase in eukaryotes. PMID:11598227

  19. Effect of substituent pattern and molecular weight of cellulose ethers on interactions with different bile salts.

    PubMed

    Torcello-Gómez, Amelia; Fernández Fraguas, Cristina; Ridout, Mike J; Woodward, Nicola C; Wilde, Peter J; Foster, Timothy J

    2015-03-01

    Some known mechanisms proposed for the reduction of blood cholesterol by dietary fibre are: binding with bile salts in the duodenum and prevention of lipid absorption, which can be partially related with the bile salt binding. In order to gain new insights into the mechanisms of the binding of dietary fibre to bile salts, the goal of this work is to study the main interactions between cellulose derivatives and two types of bile salts. Commercial cellulose ethers: methyl (MC), hydroxypropyl (HPC) and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), have been chosen as dietary fibre due to their highly functional properties important in manufactured food products. Two types of bile salts: sodium taurocholate (NaTC) and sodium taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC), have been chosen to understand the effect of the bile salt type. Interactions in the bulk have been investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and linear mechanical spectroscopy. Results show that both bile salts have inhibitory effects on the thermal structuring of cellulose ethers and this depends on the number and type of substitution in the derivatised celluloses, and is not dependent upon molecular weight. Concerning the bile salt type, the more hydrophobic bile salt (NaTDC) has greater effect on these interactions, suggesting more efficient adsorption onto cellulose ethers. These findings may have implications in the digestion of cellulose-stabilised food matrices, providing a springboard to develop new healthy cellulose-based food products with improved functional properties. PMID:25679293

  20. The resolved outflow from 3C 48

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, the mass is ∼6 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow.

  1. Synthesis of Multifunctional Cellulose Nanocrystals for Lectin Recognition and Bacterial Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juan; Butchosa, Núria; Jayawardena, H. Surangi N.; Park, JaeHyeung; Zhou, Qi; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional cellulose nanocrystals have been synthesized and applied as a new type of glyconanomaterial in lectin binding and bacterial imaging. The cellulose nanocrystals were prepared by TEMPO-mediated oxidation and acidic hydrolysis, followed by functionalization with a quinolone fluorophore and carbohydrate ligands. The cellulose nanocrystals were subsequently applied in interaction studies with carbohydrate-binding proteins and in bacterial imaging. The results show that the functional cellulose nanocrystals could selectively recognize the corresponding cognate lectins. In addition, mannosylated nanocrystals were shown to selectively interact with FimH-presenting E. coli, as detected by TEM and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These glyconanomaterials provide a new application of cellulose nanocrystals in biorecognition and imaging. PMID:25738860

  2. Interactions of arabinoxylan and (1,3)(1,4)-β-glucan with cellulose networks.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Wilson, Sarah M; Bacic, Antony; Gidley, Michael J

    2015-04-13

    To identify interactions of relevance to the structure and properties of the primary cell walls of cereals and grasses, we used arabinoxylan and (1,3)(1,4)-β-glucan, major polymers in cereal/grass primary cell walls, to construct composites with cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Both polymers associated prolifically with cellulose without becoming rigid or altering the nature or extent of cellulose crystallinity. Mechanical properties were modestly affected compared with xyloglucan or pectin (characteristic components of nongrass primary cell walls) composites with cellulose. In situ depletion of arabinoxylan arabinose side chains within preformed cellulose composites resulted in phase separation, with only limited enhancement of xylan-cellulose interactions. These results suggest that arabinoxylan and (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-d-glucan are not functional homologues for either xyloglucan or pectin in the way they interact with cellulose networks. Association of cell-wall polymers with cellulose driven by entropic amelioration of high energy cellulose/water interfaces should be considered as a third type of interaction within cellulose-based cell walls, in addition to molecular binding (enthalpic driving force) exhibited by, for example, xyloglucans or mannans, and interpenetrating networks based on, for example, pectins. PMID:25756836

  3. Photosynthesis of C3, C3-C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E; Tissue, David T; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-07-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3-C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l(-1)) and glacial (180 μl l(-1)) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3-C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3-C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3-C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3-C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3-C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24723409

  4. A single molecule study of cellulase hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-San; Luo, Yonghua; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Smith, Steve; Ding, Shi-You

    2010-02-01

    Cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I), a processive exoglucanase secreted by Trichoderma reesei, is one of the key enzyme components in a commercial cellulase mixture currently used for processing biomass to biofuels. CBH I contains a family 7 glycoside hydrolase catalytic module, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), and a highlyglycosylated linker peptide. It has been proposed that the CBH I cellulase initiates the hydrolysis from the reducing end of one cellulose chain and successively cleaves alternate β-1,4-glycosidic bonds to release cellobiose as its principal end product. The role each module of CBH I plays in the processive hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose has yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, we use a single-molecule approach that combines optical (Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscopy, or TIRF-M) and non-optical (Atomic Force Microscopy, or AFM) imaging techniques to analyze the molecular motion of CBM tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP), and to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBM and CBH I. The preliminary results have revealed a confined nanometer-scale movement of the TrCBM1-GFP bound to cellulose, and decreases in cellulose crystal size as well as increases in surface roughness during CBH I hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

  5. Oocyte-Specific Expression of Mouse MEX3C652AA in the Ovary and Its Potential Role in Regulating Maternal Fos mRNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Li, Yan; Liu, Chunlian; Jin, Mulan; Lu, Baisong

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the human MEX3C gene is known to encode an RNA-binding protein of 659 amino acid residues. Here we show that the MEX3C gene has alternative splicing forms giving rise to multiple MEX3C variants, and some cells express MEX3C transcripts coding for short MEX3C isoforms but not transcripts for MEX3C(659AA) MEX3C(659AA) functions as an adaptor protein for Exportin 1 (XPO1)-mediated nuclear export since it increases the cytoplasmic distribution of poly(A)(+) RNA and since addition of the nuclear export signal (NES) sequence to a short MEX3C isoform MEX3C(464AA) confers similar cytoplasmic poly(A)(+) RNA accumulation activity as MEX3C(659AA) FOS mRNA is a potential MEX3C target mRNA. One mechanism by which MEX3C(659AA) could regulate FOS mRNA is by promoting its nuclear export. Overexpressing MEX3C(659AA) significantly increased FOS mRNA expression, whereas mutating the NES of MEX3C(659AA) and treating cells with leptomycin B to inhibit XPO1-mediated nuclear export attenuated FOS upregulation. FOS mRNA is unstable in somatic cells but less so in oocytes; how it is stabilized in the oocytes is unknown. Transcripts for the mouse counterpart of human MEX3C(659AA) (MEX3C(652AA)) are specifically expressed in developing oocytes in the ovary, although total Mex3c transcripts are expressed in both granulosa cells and oocytes. The specific expression of this long MEX3C isoform in oocytes and its ability to enhance FOS mRNA nuclear export and stability all suggest that MEX3C(659AA) is an RNA-binding protein that preserves maternal FOS mRNA in oocytes. PMID:27053362

  6. The Resolved Outflow from 3C 48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 103-104 cm-3, the mass is ~6 × 106 M ⊙, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11574. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Some of the

  7. THE ACCELERATING JET OF 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, S. D.; Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the proper motions of the subparsec scale jet of the quasar 3C 279 at 15 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array shows significant accelerations in four of nine superluminal features. Analysis of these motions is combined with the analysis of flux density light curves to constrain values of Lorentz factor and viewing angle (and their derivatives) for each component. The data for each of these components are consistent with significant changes to the Lorentz factor, viewing angle, and azimuthal angle, suggesting jet bending with changes in speed. We see that for these observed components Lorentz factors are in the range {Gamma} = 10-41, viewing angles are in the range thetav = 0. Degree-Sign 1-5. Degree-Sign 0, and intrinsic (source frame) flux density is in the range, F{sub {nu},int} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Jy. Considering individual components, the Lorentz factors vary from {Gamma} = 11-16 for C1, {Gamma} = 31-41 for C5, {Gamma} = 29-41 for C6, and {Gamma} = 9-12 for C8, indicating that there is no single underlying flow speed to the jet and likely we are seeing pattern speeds from shocks in the jet. The viewing angles vary in time from 0. Degree-Sign 6 to 1. Degree-Sign 5 in the case of C1 (the least extreme example), from 0. Degree-Sign 5 to 5. Degree-Sign 0 in the case of C8, and from 0. Degree-Sign 1 to 0. Degree-Sign 9 for C5 (the last two being the most extreme examples). The intrinsic flux density varies by factors from 1.4 for C8 and 430 for C5. Theoretical analysis of the accelerations also indicates potential jet bending. In addition, for one component, C5, polarization measurements also set limits to the trajectory of the jet.

  8. Processes for treating cellulosic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladisch, Michael R. (Inventor); Kohlman, Karen L. (Inventor); Westgate, Paul L. (Inventor); Weil, Joseph R. (Inventor); Yang, Yiqi (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed are processes for pretreating cellulosic materials in liquid water by heating the materials in liquid water at a temperature at or above their glass transition temperature but not substantially exceeding 220.degree. C., while maintaining the pH of the reaction medium in a range that avoids substantial autohydrolysis of the cellulosic materials. Such pretreatments minimize chemical changes to the cellulose while leading to physical changes which substantially increase susceptibility to hydrolysis in the presence of cellulase.

  9. Ice formation in amorphous cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czihak, C.; Müller, M.; Schober, H.; Vogl, G.

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the formation of ice in wet amorphous cellulose in the temperature range of 190 K⩽T⩽280 K. Due to voids and pores in the cellulose film, water molecules are able to form crystalline aggregates. Beyond that, water is able to penetrate between cellulose chains where it can adsorb to hydroxyl side groups. From diffraction data we suggest an aggregation of low-density amorphous (lda) ice at cellulose surfaces. The formation of lda ice shows a clear temperature dependence which will be discussed together with recent inelastic neutron scattering results.

  10. Cellulose biogenesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Organisms that synthesize cellulose can be found amongst the bacteria, protistans, fungi, and animals, but it is in plants that the importance of cellulose in function (as the major structural constituent of plant cell walls) and economic use (as wood and fiber) can be best appreciated. The structure of cellulose and its biosynthesis have been the subjects of intense investigation. One of the most important insights gained from these studies is that the synthesis of cellulose by living organisms involves much more than simply the polymerization of glucose into a (1{r_arrow}4)-{beta}-linked polymer. The number of glucoses in a polymer (the degree of polymerization), the crystalline form assumed by the glucan chains when they crystallize to form a microfibril, and the dimensions and orientation of the microfibrils are all subject to cellular control. Instead of cellulose biosynthesis, a more appropriate term might be cellulose biogenesis, to emphasize the involvement of cellular structures and mechanisms in controlling polymerization and directing crystallization and deposition. Dictyostelium discoideum is uniquely suitable for the study of cellulose biogenesis because of its amenability to experimental study and manipulation and the extent of our knowledge of its basic cellular mechanisms (as will be evident from the rest of this volume). In this chapter, I will summarize what is known about cellulose biogenesis in D. discoideum, emphasizing its potential to illuminate our understanding both of D. discoideum development and plant cellulose biogenesis.

  11. KIF3C and KIF3A Form a Novel Neuronal Heteromeric Kinesin That Associates with Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Muresan, Virgil; Abramson, Tatiana; Lyass, Asya; Winter, Dirk; Porro, Elena; Hong, Filbert; Chamberlin, Nancy L.; Schnapp, Bruce J.

    1998-01-01

    We have cloned from rat brain the cDNA encoding an 89,828-Da kinesin-related polypeptide KIF3C that is enriched in brain, retina, and lung. Immunocytochemistry of hippocampal neurons in culture shows that KIF3C is localized to cell bodies, dendrites, and, in lesser amounts, to axons. In subcellular fractionation experiments, KIF3C cofractionates with a distinct population of membrane vesicles. Native KIF3C binds to microtubules in a kinesin-like, nucleotide-dependent manner. KIF3C is most similar to mouse KIF3B and KIF3A, two closely related kinesins that are normally present as a heteromer. In sucrose density gradients, KIF3C sediments at two distinct densities, suggesting that it may be part of two different multimolecular complexes. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that KIF3C is in part associated with KIF3A, but not with KIF3B. Unlike KIF3B, a significant portion of KIF3C is not associated with KIF3A. Consistent with these biochemical properties, the distribution of KIF3C in the CNS has both similarities and differences compared with KIF3A and KIF3B. These results suggest that KIF3C is a vesicle-associated motor that functions both independently and in association with KIF3A. PMID:9487132

  12. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose to yield glucose

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, George T.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Bose, Arindam

    1979-01-01

    A process to yield glucose from cellulose through acid hydrolysis. Cellulose is recovered from cellulosic materials, preferably by pretreating the cellulosic materials by dissolving the cellulosic materials in Cadoxen or a chelating metal caustic swelling solvent and then precipitating the cellulose therefrom. Hydrolysis is accomplished using an acid, preferably dilute sulfuric acid, and the glucose is yielded substantially without side products. Lignin may be removed either before or after hydrolysis.

  13. Noncovalent Dispersion and Functionalization of Cellulose Nanocrystals with Proteins and Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenwen; Arola, Suvi; Malho, Jani-Markus; Kontturi, Eero; Linder, Markus B; Laaksonen, Päivi

    2016-04-11

    Native cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are valuable high quality materials with potential for many applications including the manufacture of high performance materials. In this work, a relatively effortless procedure was introduced for the production of CNCs, which gives a nearly 100% yield of crystalline cellulose. However, the processing of the native CNCs is hindered by the difficulty in dispersing them in water due to the absence of surface charges. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed a one-step procedure for dispersion and functionalization of CNCs with tailored cellulose binding proteins. The process is also applicable for polysaccharides. The tailored cellulose binding proteins are very efficient for the dispersion of CNCs due to the selective interaction with cellulose, and only small fraction of proteins (5-10 wt %, corresponds to about 3 μmol g(-1)) could stabilize the CNC suspension. Xyloglucan (XG) enhanced the CNC dispersion above a fraction of 10 wt %. For CNC suspension dispersed with carboxylmethyl cellulose (CMC) we observed the most long-lasting stability, up to 1 month. The cellulose binding proteins could not only enhance the dispersion of the CNCs, but also functionalize the surface. This we demonstrated by attaching gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to the proteins, thus, forming a monolayer of GNPs on the CNC surface. Cryo transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) imaging confirmed the attachment of the GNPs to CNC solution conditions. PMID:26907991

  14. AmrZ regulates cellulose production in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    Prada-Ramírez, Harold A; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Felipe, Antonia; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Rivilla, Rafael; Sanjuán, Juan; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2016-03-01

    In Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, the second messenger c-di-GMP has been previously shown to stimulate pellicle formation and cellulose biosynthesis. A screen for genes involved in cellulose production under high c-di-GMP intracellular levels led to the identification of insertions in two genes, wssB and wssE, belonging to the Pto DC3000 cellulose biosynthesis operon wssABCDEFGHI. Interestingly, beside cellulose-deficient mutants, colonies with a rougher appearance than the wild type also arouse among the transposants. Those mutants carry insertions in amrZ, a gene encoding a transcriptional regulator in different Pseudomonas. Here, we provide evidence that AmrZ is involved in the regulation of bacterial cellulose production at transcriptional level by binding to the promoter region of the wssABCDEFGHI operon and repressing cellulose biosynthesis genes. Mutation of amrZ promotes wrinkly colony morphology, increased cellulose production and loss of motility in Pto DC3000. AmrZ regulon includes putative c-di-GMP metabolising proteins, like AdcA and MorA, which may also impact those phenotypes. Furthermore, an amrZ but not a cellulose-deficient mutant turned out to be impaired in pathogenesis, indicating that AmrZ is a key regulator of Pto DC3000 virulence probably by controlling bacterial processes other than cellulose production. PMID:26564578

  15. A kinetic study of Trichoderma reesei Cel7B catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiangfei; Zhang, Shujun; Wang, Yefei; Li, Jingwen; He, Chunyan; Yao, Lishan

    2016-06-01

    One prominent feature of Trichoderma reesei (Tr) endoglucanases catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis is that the reaction slows down quickly after it starts (within minutes). But the mechanism of the slowdown is not well understood. A structural model of Tr- Cel7B catalytic domain bound to cellulose was built computationally and the potentially important binding residues were identified and tested experimentally. The 13 tested mutants show different binding properties in the adsorption to phosphoric acid swollen cellulose and filter paper. Though the partitioning parameter to filter paper is about 10 times smaller than that to phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, a positive correlation is shown for two substrates. The kinetic studies show that the reactions slow down quickly for both substrates. This slowdown is not correlated to the binding constant but anticorrelated to the enzyme initial activity. The amount of reducing sugars released after 24h by Cel7B in phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, Avicel and filter paper cellulose hydrolysis is correlated with the enzyme activity against a soluble substrate p-nitrophenyl lactoside. Six of the 13 tested mutants, including N47A, N52D, S99A, N323D, S324A, and S346A, yield ∼15-35% more reducing sugars than the wild type (WT) Cel7B in phosphoric acid swollen cellulose and filter paper hydrolysis. This study reveals that the slowdown of the reaction is not due to the binding of the enzyme to cellulose. The activity of Tr- Cel7B against the insoluble substrate cellulose is determined by the enzyme's capability in hydrolyzing the soluble substrate. PMID:27178789

  16. Transcriptional analysis of selected cellulose-acting enzymes encoding genes of the white-rot fungus Dichomitus squalens on spruce wood and microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Rytioja, Johanna; Hildén, Kristiina; Hatakka, Annele; Mäkelä, Miia R

    2014-11-01

    The recent discovery of oxidative cellulose degradation enhancing enzymes has considerably changed the traditional concept of hydrolytic cellulose degradation. The relative expression levels of ten cellulose-acting enzyme encoding genes of the white-rot fungus Dichomitus squalens were studied on solid-state spruce wood and in microcrystalline Avicel cellulose cultures. From the cellobiohydrolase encoding genes, cel7c was detected at the highest level and showed constitutive expression whereas variable transcript levels were detected for cel7a, cel7b and cel6 in the course of four-week spruce cultivation. The cellulolytic enzyme activities detected in the liquid cultures were consistent with the transcript levels. Interestingly, the selected lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) encoding genes were expressed in both cultures, but showed different transcription patterns on wood compared to those in submerged microcrystalline cellulose cultures. On spruce wood, higher transcript levels were detected for the lpmos carrying cellulose binding module (CBM) than for the lpmos without CBMs. In both cultures, the expression levels of the lpmo genes were generally higher than the levels of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) encoding genes. Based on the results of this work, the oxidative cellulose cleaving enzymes of D. squalens have essential role in cellulose degrading machinery of the fungus. PMID:24394946

  17. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isogai, Akira; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Fukuzumi, Hayaka

    2011-01-01

    Native wood celluloses can be converted to individual nanofibers 3-4 nm wide that are at least several microns in length, i.e. with aspect ratios >100, by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and successive mild disintegration in water. Preparation methods and fundamental characteristics of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCN) are reviewed in this paper. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups are selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface by TEMPO-mediated oxidation without any changes to the original crystallinity (~74%) or crystal width of wood celluloses. Electrostatic repulsion and/or osmotic effects working between anionically-charged cellulose microfibrils, the ζ-potentials of which are approximately -75 mV in water, cause the formation of completely individualized TOCN dispersed in water by gentle mechanical disintegration treatment of TEMPO-oxidized wood cellulose fibers. Self-standing TOCN films are transparent and flexible, with high tensile strengths of 200-300 MPa and elastic moduli of 6-7 GPa. Moreover, TOCN-coated poly(lactic acid) films have extremely low oxygen permeability. The new cellulose-based nanofibers formed by size reduction process of native cellulose fibers by TEMPO-mediated oxidation have potential application as environmentally friendly and new bio-based nanomaterials in high-tech fields.

  18. Cellulose Synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Alan R. White; Ann G. Matthysse

    2004-07-31

    We have cloned the celC gene and its homologue from E. coli, yhjM, in an expression vector and expressed the both genes in E. coli; we have determined that the YhjM protein is able to complement in vitro cellulose synthesis by extracts of A. tumefaciens celC mutants, we have purified the YhjM protein product and are currently examining its enzymatic activity; we have examined whole cell extracts of CelC and various other cellulose mutants and wild type bacteria for the presence of cellulose oligomers and cellulose; we have examined the ability of extracts of wild type and cellulose mutants including CelC to incorporate UDP-14C-glucose into cellulose and into water-soluble, ethanol-insoluble oligosaccharides; we have made mutants which synthesize greater amounts of cellulose than the wild type; and we have examined the role of cellulose in the formation of biofilms by A. tumefaciens. In addition we have examined the ability of a putative cellulose synthase gene from the tunicate Ciona savignyi to complement an A. tumefaciens celA mutant. The greatest difference between our knowledge of bacterial cellulose synthesis when we started this project and current knowledge is that in 1999 when we wrote the original grant very few bacteria were known to synthesize cellulose and genes involved in this synthesis were sequenced only from Acetobacter species, A. tumefaciens and Rhizobium leguminosarum. Currently many bacteria are known to synthesize cellulose and genes that may be involved have been sequenced from more than 10 species of bacteria. This additional information has raised the possibility of attempting to use genes from one bacterium to complement mutants in another bacterium. This will enable us to examine the question of which genes are responsible for the three dimensional structure of cellulose (since this differs among bacterial species) and also to examine the interactions between the various proteins required for cellulose synthesis. We have carried out one

  19. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing. PMID:26964959

  20. Cellulose nanocrystals/cellulose core-in-shell nanocomposite assemblies.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Washington Luiz Esteves; Cao, Xiaodong; Lucia, Lucian A

    2009-11-17

    We report herein for the first time how a co-electrospinning technique can be used to overcome the issue of orienting cellulose nanocrystals within a neat cellulose matrix. A home-built co-electrospinning apparatus was fabricated that was comprised of a high-voltage power supply, two concentric capillary needles, and one screw-type pump syringe. Eucalyptus-derived cellulose was dissolved in N-methylmorpholine oxide (NMMO) at 120 degrees C and diluted with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) which was used in the external concentric capillary needle as the shell solution. A cellulose nanocrystal suspension obtained by the sulfuric acid hydrolysis of bleached sisal and cotton fibers was used as the core liquid in the internal concentric capillary needle. Three flow rate ratios between the shell and core, four flow rates for the shell dope solution, and four high voltages were tested. The resultant co-electrospun composite fibers were collected onto a grounded metal screen immersed in cold water. Micrometer and submicrometer cellulose fiber assemblies were obtained which were reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals and characterized by FESEM, FTIR, TGA, and XRD. Surprisingly, it was determined that the physical properties for the cellulose controls are superior to the composites; in addition, the crystallinity of the controls was slightly greater. PMID:19731951

  1. Structural Basis for Molecular Discrimination by a 3',3'-cGAMP Sensing Riboswitch

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ren, Aiming; Wang, Xin  C.; Kellenberger, Colleen  A.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta  R.; Jones, Roger  A.; Hammond, Ming  C.; Patel, Dinshaw  J.

    2015-04-07

    Cyclic dinucleotides are second messengers that target the adaptor STING and stimulate the innate immune response in mammals. Besides protein receptors, there are bacterial riboswitches that selectively recognize cyclic dinucleotides. We recently discovered a natural riboswitch that targets 3',3'-cGAMP, which is distinguished from the endogenous mammalian signal 2',3'-cGAMP by its backbone connectivity. Here, we report on structures of the aptamer domain of the 3',3'-cGAMP riboswitch from Geobacter in the 3',3'-cGAMP and c-di-GMP bound states. The riboswitch adopts a tuning forklike architecture with a junctional ligand-binding pocket and different orientations of the arms are correlated with the identity of the boundmore » cyclic dinucleotide. Subsequent biochemical experiments revealed that specificity of ligand recognition can be affected by point mutations outside of the binding pocket, which has implications for both the assignment and reengineering of riboswitches in this structural class.« less

  2. Structural basis for molecular discrimination by a 3',3'-cGAMP sensing riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Ren, Aiming; Wang, Xin C; Kellenberger, Colleen A; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Jones, Roger A; Hammond, Ming C; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-04-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides are second messengers that target the adaptor STING and stimulate the innate immune response in mammals. Besides protein receptors, there are bacterial riboswitches that selectively recognize cyclic dinucleotides. We recently discovered a natural riboswitch that targets 3',3'-cGAMP, which is distinguished from the endogenous mammalian signal 2',3'-cGAMP by its backbone connectivity. Here, we report on structures of the aptamer domain of the 3',3'-cGAMP riboswitch from Geobacter in the 3',3'-cGAMP and c-di-GMP bound states. The riboswitch adopts a tuning fork-like architecture with a junctional ligand-binding pocket and different orientations of the arms are correlated with the identity of the bound cyclic dinucleotide. Subsequent biochemical experiments revealed that specificity of ligand recognition can be affected by point mutations outside of the binding pocket, which has implications for both the assignment and reengineering of riboswitches in this structural class. PMID:25818298

  3. Glycine decarboxylase in C3, C4 and C3-C4 intermediate species.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Stefanie; Westhoff, Peter; Gowik, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) plays a central role in photorespiration. GDC is localized in the mitochondria and together with serine hydroxymethyltransferase it converts two molecules of glycine to one molecule of serine, CO2 and NH3. Overexpression of GDC subunits in the C3 species Arabidopsis thaliana can increase the metabolic flux through the photorespiratory pathway leading to enhanced photosynthetic efficiency and consequently to an enhanced biomass production of the transgenic plants. Changing the spatial expression patterns of GDC subunits was an important step during the evolution of C3-C4 intermediate and likely also C4 plants. Restriction of the GDC activity to the bundle sheath cells led to the establishment of a photorespiratory CO2 pump. PMID:27038285

  4. Dissecting the contribution of EBNA3C domains important for EBV-induced B-cell growth and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jie; Prasad Aj, Mahadesh; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Robertson, Erle S.

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic gammaherpes virus which is linked to pathogenesis of several human lymphatic malignancies. The EBV essential latent antigen EBNA3C is critical for efficient conversion of primary human B-lymphocytes to lymphoblastic cell lines and for continued LCL growth. EBNA3C, an EBV latent antigen with oncogenic potential can bind and regulate the functions of a wide range of cellular transcription factors. In our current reverse genetics study, we deleted the full length EBNA3C, and independently the RBP-Jκ and Nm23-H1 binding sites within EBNA3C using BACmid recombinant engineering methodology. Our experiments demonstrated that deletion of the EBV EBNA3C open reading frame (ORF) and more specifically the residues 621–675 which binds Nm23H1 and SUMO-1 showed a significant reduction in the ability of the cells to proliferate. Furthermore, they exhibited lower infectivity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also showed that recombinant EBV with deletions of the EBNA3C ORF, as well as a recombinant with residues 621–675 within EBNA3C ORF deleted had diminished abilities to activate CD40. Our study also revealed that the full length (1–992) and 621–675 aa deletions of EBNA3C when compared to wild type EBV infected PBMCs had differential expression patterns for the phosphorylation of MAP kinases specifically p38, JNK and ERK. Regulation of β-catenin also differed among wild type and EBNA3C deleted mutants. These temporal differences in signaling activities of these recombinant viruses in PBMCs is likely important in defining their functional importance in EBV-mediated B-cell transformation. PMID:26336822

  5. Three Novel Heterozygous Point Mutations of NR3C1 Causing Glucocorticoid Resistance.

    PubMed

    Vitellius, Géraldine; Fagart, Jérôme; Delemer, Brigitte; Amazit, Larbi; Ramos, Nelly; Bouligand, Jérôme; Le Billan, Florian; Castinetti, Frédéric; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Trabado, Séverine; Lombès, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Generalized glucocorticoid resistance is associated with glucocorticoid receptor (GR; NR3C1) mutations. Three novel heterozygous missense NR3C1 mutations (R477S, Y478C, and L672P) were identified in patients presenting with adrenal incidentalomas, glucocorticoid excess without Cushing syndrome. Dexamethasone (DXM) binding studies demonstrated that the affinity of GRR477S and GRY478C mutants, located in the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of GR, was similar to wild-type GR (Kd  = 2-3 nM). In contrast, GRL672P mutant, located in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of GR, was unable to bind glucocorticoids and was more sensitive to protein degradation. GR subcellular distribution revealed a marked decrease in DXM-induced nuclear translocation of GRR477S and GRY478C mutants, whereas GRL672P remained exclusively cytoplasmic. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated impaired recruitment of DBD mutants onto the regulatory sequence of FKBP5. Transactivation assays disclosed the lack of transcriptional activity of GRR477S and GRL672P , whereas GRY478C had a reduced transactivation capacity. Three-dimensional modeling indicated that R477S lost two essential hydrogen bonds with DNA, Y478C resulted in altered interaction with surrounding amino-acids, destabilizing DBD, whereas L672P altered the H8 helix folding, leading to unstructured LBD. This study identifies novel NR3C1 mutations with their molecular consequences on altered GR signaling and suggests that genetic screening of NR3C1 should be conducted in patients with subclinical hypercorticism. PMID:27120390

  6. Cellulose membrane as a biomaterial: from hydrolysis to depolymerization with electron beam.

    PubMed

    Eo, Mi Young; Fan, Huan; Cho, Yun Ju; Kim, Soung Min; Lee, Suk Keun

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose membrane (CM) is a major component of plant cell walls and is both a chemically and mechanically stable synthetic polymer with many applications for use in tissue engineering. However, due to its dissolution difficulty, there are no known physiologically relevant or pharmaceutically clinical applications for this polymer. Thus, research is underway on controlled and adjusted forms of cellulose depolymerization. To advance the study of applying CM for tissue engineering, we have suggested new possibilities for electron beam (E-beam) treatment of CM. Treatment of CM with an E-beam can modify physical, chemical, molecular and biological properties, so it can be studied continuously to improve its usefulness and to enhance value. We review clinical applications of CM, cellulose binding domains, cellulose crosslinking proteins, conventional hydrolysis of cellulose, and depolymerization with radiation and focus our experiences with depolymerization of E-beam irradiated CM in this article. PMID:27418974

  7. Origins of sp(3)C peaks in C1s X-ray Photoelectron Spectra of Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ayaka; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Koinuma, Michio; Sato, Satoshi

    2016-06-21

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is among the most powerful techniques to analyze defective structures of carbon materials such as graphene and activated carbon. However, reported assignments of defects, especially sp(3)C and sp(2)C, are questionable. Most reports assign sp(3)C peaks to be higher than sp(2)C peaks, whereas a few reports assign sp(3)C peaks to be lower than sp(2)C peaks. Our group previously reported that calculated binding energies of sp(3)C were basically lower than those of sp(2)C. This work clarified that one of the reasons for the prevailing ambiguous assignments of sp(3)C peaks is charging effects of diamond. PMID:27264720

  8. On the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c classification.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina

    2012-10-01

    As there are ambiguities in classification of the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c, relatively frequent in populations of Northern Asia, we analyzed all three haplogroup-defining markers M48, M77 and M86 in C3-M217-individuals from Siberia, Eastern Asia and Eastern Europe. We have found that haplogroup C3c is characterized by the derived state at M48, whereas mutations at both M77 and M86 define subhaplogroup C3c1. The branch defined by M48 alone would belong to subhaplogroup C3c*, characteristic for some populations of Central and Eastern Siberia, such as Koryaks, Evens, Evenks and Yukaghirs. Subhaplogroup C3c* individuals could be considered as remnants of the Neolithic population of Siberia, based on the age of C3c*-short tandem repeat variation amounting to 4.5 ± 2.4 thousand years. PMID:22810113

  9. EBNA3C regulates p53 through induction of Aurora kinase B.

    PubMed

    Jha, Hem C; Yang, Karren; El-Naccache, Darine W; Sun, Zhiguo; Robertson, Erle S

    2015-03-20

    In multicellular organisms p53 maintains genomic integrity through activation of DNA repair, and apoptosis. EBNA3C can down regulate p53 transcriptional activity. Aurora kinase (AK) B phosphorylates p53, which leads to degradation of p53. Aberrant expression of AK-B is a hallmark of numerous human cancers. Therefore changes in the activities of p53 due to AK-B and EBNA3C expression is important for understanding EBV-mediated cell transformation. Here we show that the activities of p53 and its homolog p73 are dysregulated in EBV infected primary cells which can contribute to increased cell transformation. Further, we showed that the ETS-1 binding site is crucial for EBNA3C-mediated up-regulation of AK-B transcription. Further, we determined the Ser 215 residue of p53 is critical for functional regulation by AK-B and EBNA3C and that the kinase domain of AK-B which includes amino acid residues 106, 111 and 205 was important for p53 regulation. AK-B with a mutation at residue 207 was functionally similar to wild type AK-B in terms of its kinase activities and knockdown of AK-B led to enhanced p73 expression independent of p53. This study explores an additional mechanism by which p53 is regulated by AK-B and EBNA3C contributing to EBV-induced B-cell transformation. PMID:25691063

  10. EBNA3C regulates p53 through induction of Aurora kinase B

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem C.; Yang, Karren; El-Naccache, Darine W.; Sun, Zhiguo; Robertson, Erle S.

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms p53 maintains genomic integrity through activation of DNA repair, and apoptosis. EBNA3C can down regulate p53 transcriptional activity. Aurora kinase (AK) B phosphorylates p53, which leads to degradation of p53. Aberrant expression of AK-B is a hallmark of numerous human cancers. Therefore changes in the activities of p53 due to AK-B and EBNA3C expression is important for understanding EBV-mediated cell transformation. Here we show that the activities of p53 and its homolog p73 are dysregulated in EBV infected primary cells which can contribute to increased cell transformation. Further, we showed that the ETS-1 binding site is crucial for EBNA3C-mediated up-regulation of AK-B transcription. Further, we determined the Ser 215 residue of p53 is critical for functional regulation by AK-B and EBNA3C and that the kinase domain of AK-B which includes amino acid residues 106, 111 and 205 was important for p53 regulation. AK-B with a mutation at residue 207 was functionally similar to wild type AK-B in terms of its kinase activities and knockdown of AK-B led to enhanced p73 expression independent of p53. This study explores an additional mechanism by which p53 is regulated by AK-B and EBNA3C contributing to EBV-induced B-cell transformation. PMID:25691063

  11. Role of scaffolding protein CipC of Clostridium cellulolyticum in cellulose degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, S; Gal, L; Bélaïch, A; Gaudin, C; Tardif, C; Bélaïch, J P

    1997-01-01

    The role of a miniscaffolding protein, miniCipC1, forming part of Clostridium cellulolyticum scaffolding protein CipC in insoluble cellulose degradation was investigated. The parameters of the binding of miniCipC1, which contains a family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD), a hydrophilic domain, and a cohesin domain, to four insoluble celluloses were determined. At saturating concentrations, about 8.2 micromol of protein was bound per g of bacterial microcrystalline cellulose, while Avicel, colloidal Avicel, and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose bound 0.28, 0.38, and 0.55 micromol of miniCipC1 per g, respectively. The dissociation constants measured varied between 1.3 x 10(-7) and 1.5 x 10(-8) M. These results are discussed with regard to the properties of the various substrates. The synergistic action of miniCipC1 and two forms of endoglucanase CelA (with and without the dockerin domain [CelA2 and CelA3, respectively]) in cellulose degradation was also studied. Although only CelA2 interacted with miniCipC1 (K(d), 7 x 10(-9) M), nonhydrolytic miniCipC1 enhanced the activities of endoglucanases CelA2 and CelA3 with all of the insoluble substrates tested. This finding shows that miniCipC1 plays two roles: it increases the enzyme concentration on the cellulose surface and enhances the accessibility of the enzyme to the substrate by modifying the structure of the cellulose, leading to an increased available cellulose surface area. In addition, the data obtained with a hybrid protein, CelA3-CBD(CipC), which was more active towards all of the insoluble substrates tested confirm that the CBD of the scaffolding protein plays an essential role in cellulose degradation. PMID:9139893

  12. Correlation between cellulose thin film supramolecular structures and interactions with water.

    PubMed

    Tammelin, Tekla; Abburi, Ramarao; Gestranius, Marie; Laine, Christiane; Setälä, Harri; Österberg, Monika

    2015-06-01

    Water interactions of ultra-thin films of wood-derived polysaccharides were investigated by using surface sensitive methods, Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These approaches allow systematic molecular level detection and reveal information on the inherent behaviour of biobased materials with nanosensitivity. The influence of structural features of cellulose films i.e. crystallinity, surface roughness and porosity on water interactions was clarified. Cellulose films were prepared using spin-coating and Langmuir-Schaefer deposition to obtain thin films of equal thickness, identical cellulose origin, simultaneously with different supramolecular structures. The uptake/release of water molecules and swelling were characterized using QCM-D, and the structural features of the films were evaluated by AFM. More crystalline cellulose film possessed nanoporosity and as a consequence higher accessible surface area (more binding sites for water) and thus, it was capable of binding more water molecules in humid air and when immersed in water when compared to amorphous cellulose film. Due to the ordered structure, more crystalline cellulose film remained rigid and elastic although the water binding ability was more pronounced compared to amorphous film. The lower amount of bound water induced softening of the amorphous cellulose film and the elastic layer became viscoelastic at high humidity. Finally, cellulose thin films were modified by adsorbing a layer of 1-butyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl xylan, and the effect on moisture uptake was investigated. It was found that the supramolecular structure of the cellulose substrate has an effect not only on the adsorbed amount of xylan derivative but also on the water interactions of the material. PMID:25903294

  13. Cellulose Derivatives for Water Repellent Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this poster presentation, we will discuss the synthesis and structural characterizations of nitro-benzyl cellulose (1), amino-benzyl cellulose (2) and pentafluoro –benzyl cellulose (3). All cellulose derivatives are synthesized by etherification process in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide h...

  14. Cellulose Derivatives for Water Repellent Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthesis and structural characterizations of nitro-benzyl cellulose, amino-benzyl cellulose and pentafluoro –benzyl cellulose were carried out. Cellulose derivatives were synthesized by etherification process in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide homogeneous solution. Nitrobenzylation was effec...

  15. Assemblies of Cellulose Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumacheva, Eugenia

    The entropically driven coassembly of nanorods (cellulose nanocrystals, CNCs) and different types of nanoparticles (NPs), including dye-labeled latex NPs, carbon dots and plasmonic NPs was experimentally studied in aqueous suspensions and in solid films. In mixed CNC-NP suspensions, phase separation into an isotropic NP-rich and a chiral nematic CNC-rich phase took place; the latter contained a significant amount of NPs. Drying the mixed suspension resulted in CNC-NP films with planar disordered layers of NPs, which alternated with chiral nematic CNC-rich regions. In addition, NPs were embedded in the chiral nematic domains. The stratified morphology of the films, together with a random distribution of NPs in the anisotropic phase, led to the films having close-to-uniform fluorescence, birefringence, and circular dichroism properties.

  16. Radiation degradation of cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, J.; Arnold, G.; Baer, M.; Langguth, H.; Gey, M.; Hübert, S.

    The application of straw and other cellulose polymers as feedstuff for ruminants is limited by its low digestibility. During recent decades it was attempted to increase the digestibility of straw by several chemical and physical methods. In this work some results of the degradation of gamma and electron treated wheat straw are reported. Complex methods of treatment (e.g. radiation influence and influence of lyes) are taken into consideration. In vitro-experiments with radiation treated straw show that the digestibility can be increased from 20 % up to about 80 %. A high pressure liquid chromatography method was used to analyze the hydrolysates. The contents of certain species of carbohydrates in the hydrolysates in dependence on the applied dose are given.

  17. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, Myles A.; Morris, Robert S.

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

  18. Thermophilic degradation of cellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1982-12-01

    The conversion of cellulosic biomass to chemical feedstocks and fuel by microbial fermentation is an important objective of developing biotechnology. Direct fermentation of cellulosic derivatives to ethanol by thermophilic bacteria offers a promising approach to this goal. Fermentations at elevated temperatures lowers the energy demand for cooling and also facilitates the recovery of volatile products. In addition, thermophilic microorganisms possess enzymes with greater stability than those from mesophilic microorganisms. Three anaerobic thermophilic cocultures that ferment cellulosic substrate mainly to ethanol have been described: Clostridium thermocellum/Clostriidium thermohydrosulfuricum, C. thermocellum/Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum, and C. thermocellum/Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus sp. nov. The growth characteristics and metabolic features of these cocultures are reviewed.

  19. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, M.A.; Morris, R.S.

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorption agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure. 3 figs.

  20. Two structurally discrete GH7-cellobiohydrolases compete for the same cellulosic substrate fiber

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellulose consisting of arrays of linear beta-1,4 linked glucans, is the most abundant carbon-containing polymer present in biomass. Recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose towards enzymatic degradation is widely reported and is the result of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds within and among the linear glucans. Cellobiohydrolases are enzymes that attack crystalline cellulose. Here we report on two forms of glycosyl hydrolase family 7 cellobiohydrolases common to all Aspergillii that attack Avicel, cotton cellulose and other forms of crystalline cellulose. Results Cellobiohydrolases Cbh1 and CelD have similar catalytic domains but only Cbh1 contains a carbohydrate-binding domain (CBD) that binds to cellulose. Structural superpositioning of Cbh1 and CelD on the Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A 3-dimensional structure, identifies the typical tunnel-like catalytic active site while Cbh1 shows an additional loop that partially obstructs the substrate-fitting channel. CelD does not have a CBD and shows a four amino acid residue deletion on the tunnel-obstructing loop providing a continuous opening in the absence of a CBD. Cbh1 and CelD are catalytically functional and while specific activity against Avicel is 7.7 and 0.5 U.mg prot-1, respectively specific activity on pNPC is virtually identical. Cbh1 is slightly more stable to thermal inactivation compared to CelD and is much less sensitive to glucose inhibition suggesting that an open tunnel configuration, or absence of a CBD, alters the way the catalytic domain interacts with the substrate. Cbh1 and CelD enzyme mixtures on crystalline cellulosic substrates show a strong combinatorial effort response for mixtures where Cbh1 is present in 2:1 or 4:1 molar excess. When CelD was overrepresented the combinatorial effort could only be partially overcome. CelD appears to bind and hydrolyze only loose cellulosic chains while Cbh1 is capable of opening new cellulosic substrate molecules away from the cellulosic

  1. Evaluating models of cellulose degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, Meagan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Neumann, Anthony P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Suen, Garret; Callister, Stephen J.

    2015-12-02

    Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve a combination of cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-sequencing, proteomics, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to further elucidate the cellulolytic mechanism of F. succinogenes. Our RNA-sequence analysis shows that genes encoding Type II and III secretion systems, fibro-slime proteins, and pili are differentially expressed on cellulose, relative to glucose. A subcellular fractionation of cells grown on cellulose revealed that carbohydrate active enzymes associated with cellulose deconstruction and fibro-slime proteins were greater in the extracellular media, as compared to the periplasm and outer membrane fractions. TEMs of samples harvested at mid-exponential and stationary phases of growth on cellulose and glucose showed the presence of grooves in the cellulose between the bacterial cells and substrate, suggesting enzymes work extracellularly for cellulose degradation. Membrane vesicles were only observed in stationary phase cultures grown on cellulose. Furthermore, these results provide evidence that F. succinogenes attaches to cellulose fibers using fibro-slime and pili, produces cellulases, such as endoglucanases, that are secreted extracellularly using type II and III secretion systems, and degrades the cellulose into cellodextrins that are then imported back into the periplasm for further digestion by β-glucanases and other cellulases.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C targets p53 and modulates its transcriptional and apoptotic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Fuming; Saha, Abhik; Murakami, Masanao; Kumar, Pankaj; Knight, Jason S.; Cai Qiliang; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Robertson, Erle S.

    2009-06-05

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancers and the corresponding encoded protein induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest at the G1/S checkpoint in response to DNA damage. To date, previous studies have shown that antigens encoded by human tumor viruses such as SV40 large T antigen, adenovirus E1A and HPV E6 interact with p53 and disrupt its functional activity. In a similar fashion, we now show that EBNA3C, one of the EBV latent antigens essential for the B-cell immortalization in vitro, interacts directly with p53. Additionally, we mapped the interaction of EBNA3C with p53 to the C-terminal DNA-binding and the tetramerization domain of p53, and the region of EBNA3C responsible for binding to p53 was mapped to the N-terminal domain of EBNA3C (residues 130-190), previously shown to interact with a number of important cell-cycle components, specifically SCF{sup Skp2}, cyclin A, and cMyc. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBNA3C substantially represses the transcriptional activity of p53 in luciferase based reporter assays, and rescues apoptosis induced by ectopic p53 expression in SAOS-2 (p53{sup -/-}) cells. Interestingly, we also show that the DNA-binding ability of p53 is diminished in the presence of EBNA3C. Thus, the interaction between the p53 and EBNA3C provides new insights into the mechanism(s) by which the EBNA3C oncoprotein can alter cellular gene expression in EBV associated human cancers.

  3. A functional cellulose synthase from ascidian epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Matthysse, Ann G.; Deschet, Karine; Williams, Melanie; Marry, Mazz; White, Alan R.; Smith, William C.

    2004-01-01

    Among animals, urochordates (e.g., ascidians) are unique in their ability to biosynthesize cellulose. In ascidians cellulose is synthesized in the epidermis and incorporated into a protective coat know as the tunic. A putative cellulose synthase-like gene was first identified in the genome sequences of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. We describe here a cellulose synthase gene from the ascidian Ciona savignyi that is expressed in the epidermis. The predicted C. savignyi cellulose synthase amino acid sequence showed conserved features found in all cellulose synthases, including plants, but was most similar to cellulose synthases from bacteria, fungi, and Dictyostelium discoidium. However, unlike other known cellulose synthases, the predicted C. savignyi polypeptide has a degenerate cellulase-like region near the carboxyl-terminal end. An expression construct carrying the C. savignyi cDNA was found to restore cellulose biosynthesis to a cellulose synthase (CelA) minus mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, showing that the predicted protein has cellulose synthase activity. The lack of cellulose biosynthesis in all other groups of metazoans and the similarity of the C. savignyi cellulose synthase to enzymes from cellulose-producing organisms support the hypothesis that the urochordates acquired the cellulose biosynthetic pathway by horizontal transfer. PMID:14722352

  4. Chromophores in lignin-free cellulosic materials belong to three compound classes. Chromophores in cellulosics, XII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The CRI (chromophore release and identification) method isolates well-defined chromophoric substances from different cellulosic matrices, such as highly bleached pulps, cotton linters, bacterial cellulose, viscose or lyocell fibers, and cellulose acetates. The chromophores are present only in extrem...

  5. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  6. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein EBNA3C directly induces expression of AID and somatic mutations in B cells.

    PubMed

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Paschos, Kostas; Gillman, Adam C T; Styles, Christine T; Kellam, Paul; Allday, Martin J

    2016-05-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme responsible for induction of sequence variation in immunoglobulins (Igs) during the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and also Ig class switching, can have a potent mutator phenotype in the development of lymphoma. Using various Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) recombinants, we provide definitive evidence that the viral nuclear protein EBNA3C is essential in EBV-infected primary B cells for the induction of AID mRNA and protein. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) established with EBV recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, this was confirmed, and it was shown that transactivation of the AID gene (AICDA) is associated with EBNA3C binding to highly conserved regulatory elements located proximal to and upstream of the AICDA transcription start site. EBNA3C binding initiated epigenetic changes to chromatin at specific sites across the AICDA locus. Deep sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the IgH V-D-J region from the conditional LCL was used to formally show that SHM is activated by functional EBNA3C and induction of AID. These data, showing the direct targeting and induction of functional AID by EBNA3C, suggest a novel role for EBV in the etiology of B cell cancers, including endemic Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:27217538

  7. A precessing relativistic jet model for 3C 449

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gower, A. C.; Hutchings, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the radio structure of 3C 449 can be matched with a model in which the jets are precessing and have relativistic (beta greater-than or equal to 0.4) velocities. The best-fit model implies a precession period of about 100,000 yr and a cone angle which increases with time. A similar model may be relevant for the radio structure of 3C 31. A brief discussion of the implications for 3C 449 is given.

  8. Multivalent Anchoring and Oriented Display of Single-Domain Antibodies on Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Hussack, Greg; Luo, Yan; Veldhuis, Linda; Hall, J. Christopher; Tanha, Jamshid; MacKenzie, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Antibody engineering has allowed for the rapid generation of binding agents against virtually any antigen of interest, predominantly for therapeutic applications. Considerably less attention has been given to the development of diagnostic reagents and biosensors using engineered antibodies. Recently, we produced a novel pentavalent bispecific antibody (i.e., decabody) by pentamerizing two single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) through the verotoxin B subunit (VTB) and found both fusion partners to be functional. Using a similar approach, we have engineered a bispecific pentameric fusion protein consisting of five sdAbs and five cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) linked via VTB. To find an optimal design format, we constructed six bispecific pentamers consisting of three different CBMs, fused to the Staphylococcus aureus-specific human sdAb HVHP428, in both orientations. One bispecific pentamer, containing an N-terminal CBM9 and C-terminal HVHP428, was soluble, non-aggregating, and did not degrade upon storage at 4 °C for over six months. This molecule was dually functional as it bound to cellulose-based filters as well as S. aureus cells. When impregnated in cellulose filters, the bispecific pentamer recognized S. aureus cells in a flow-through detection assay. The ability of pentamerized CBMs to bind cellulose may form the basis of an immobilization platform for multivalent display of high-avidity binding reagents on cellulosic filters for sensing of pathogens, biomarkers and environmental pollutants. PMID:22346702

  9. Gravity effects on cellulose assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. M. Jr; Kudlicka, K.; Cousins, S. K.; Nagy, R.; Brown RM, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on cellulose synthesis using the model system of Acetobacter xylinum was the subject of recent investigations using The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Reduced Gravity Laboratory, a modified KC-135 aircraft designed to produce 20 sec of microgravity during the top of a parabolic dive. Approximately 40 parabolas were executed per mission, and a period of 2 x g was integral to the pullout phase of each parabola. Cellulose biosynthesis was initiated on agar surfaces, liquid growth medium, and buffered glucose during parabolic flight and terminated with 2.0% sodium azide or 50.0% ethanol. While careful ground and in-flight controls indicated normal, compact ribbons of microbial cellulose, data from five different flights consistently showed that during progression into the parabola regime, the cellulose ribbons became splayed. This observation suggests that some element of the parabola (the 20 sec microgravity phase, the 20 sec 2 x g phase, or a combination of both) was responsible for this effect. Presumably the cellulose I alpha crystalline polymorph normally is produced under strain, and the microgravity/hypergravity combination may relieve this stress to produce splayed ribbons. An in-flight video microscopy analysis of bacterial motions during a parabolic series demonstrated that the bacteria continue to synthesize cellulose during all phases of the parabolic series. Thus, the splaying may be a reflection of a more subtle alteration such as reduction of intermicrofibrillar hydrogen bonding. Long-term microgravity exposures during spaceflight will be necessary to fully understand the cellulose alterations from the short-term microgravity experiments.

  10. 27 CFR 21.37 - Formula No. 3-C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 3-C. 21.37 Section 21.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.37 Formula No. 3-C....

  11. 27 CFR 21.37 - Formula No. 3-C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Formula No. 3-C. 21.37 Section 21.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.37 Formula No. 3-C....

  12. Microfibrillated cellulose: morphology and accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Herrick, F.W.; Casebier, R.L.; Hamilton, J.K.; Sandberg, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) is prepared by subjecting dilute slurries of cellulose fibers to repeated high-pressure homogenizing action. A highly microfibrillated product will have a gel-like appearance at 2% concentration in water. Such gels have pseudoplastic viscosity properties and are very fluid when stirred at high shear rate. The relative viscosity of 2% MFC dispersions may be used as a measure of the degree of homogenization or microfibrillation of a given wood cellulose pulp. The water retention value of an MFC product can also be used as an indicator for degree of homogenization. Structurally, MFC appears to be a web of interconnected fibrils and microfibrils, the latter having diameters in the range 10-100 nm as observed in scanning and transmission electron micrographs. Chemical studies have revealed that MFC is only moderately degraded, while being greatly expanded in surface area. The accessibility of cellulose in MFC is only moderately degraded, while being greatly expanded in surface area. The accessibility of cellulose in MFC toward chemical reagents is greatly increased. Higher reactivity was demonstrated in dilute cupriethylenediamine solubility, triphenylmethylation, acetylation, periodate oxidation, and mineral acid and cellulase enzyme hydrolysis rates. 16 references, 8 figures, 7 tables.

  13. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  14. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  15. Fine Structure in 3C 120 and 3C 84. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., 24 Aug. 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, L. K.

    1976-01-01

    Seven epochs of very long baseline radio interferometric observations of the Seyfert galaxies 3C 120 and 3C 84, at 3.8-cm wave length using stations at Westford, Massachusetts, Goldstone, California, Green Bank, West Virginia, and Onsala, Sweden, have been analyzed for source structure. An algorithm for reconstructing the brightness distribution of a spatially confined source from fringe amplitude and so called closure phase data has been developed and successfully applied to artificially generated test data and to data on the above mentioned sources. Over the two year time period of observation, 3C 120 was observed to consist of a double source showing apparent super relativistic expansion and separation velocities. The total flux changes comprising one outburst can be attributed to one of these components. 3C 84 showed much slower changes, evidently involving flux density changes in individual stationary components rather than relative motion.

  16. Are Cellulosome Scaffolding Protein CipC and CBM3-Containing Protein HycP, Involved in Adherence of Clostridium cellulolyticum to Cellulose?

    PubMed Central

    Ferdinand, Pierre-Henri; Borne, Romain; Trotter, Valentine; Pagès, Sandrine; Tardif, Chantal; Fierobe, Henri-Pierre; Perret, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium cellulolyticum, a mesophilic anaerobic bacterium, produces highly active enzymatic complexes called cellulosomes. This strain was already shown to bind to cellulose, however the molecular mechanism(s) involved is not known. In this context we focused on the gene named hycP, encoding a 250-kDa protein of unknown function, containing a Family-3 Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM3) along with 23 hyaline repeat modules (HYR modules). In the microbial kingdom the gene hycP is only found in C. cellulolyticum and the very close strain recently sequenced Clostridium sp BNL1100. Its presence in C. cellulolyticum guided us to analyze its function and its putative role in adhesion of the cells to cellulose. The CBM3 of HycP was shown to bind to crystalline cellulose and was assigned to the CBM3b subfamily. No hydrolytic activity on cellulose was found with a mini-protein displaying representative domains of HycP. A C. cellulolyticum inactivated hycP mutant strain was constructed, and we found that HycP is neither involved in binding of the cells to cellulose nor that the protein has an obvious role in cell growth on cellulose. We also characterized the role of the cellulosome scaffolding protein CipC in adhesion of C. cellulolyticum to cellulose, since cellulosome scaffolding protein has been proposed to mediate binding of other cellulolytic bacteria to cellulose. A second mutant was constructed, where cipC was inactivated. We unexpectedly found that CipC is only partly involved in binding of C. cellulolyticum to cellulose. Other mechanisms for cellulose adhesion may therefore exist in C. cellulolyticum. In addition, no cellulosomal protuberances were observed at the cellular surface of C. cellulolyticum, what is in contrast to reports from several other cellulosomes producing strains. These findings may suggest that C. cellulolyticum has no dedicated molecular mechanism to aggregate the cellulosomes at the cellular surface. PMID:23935995

  17. Development of nonflammable cellulosic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttinger, M.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a moldable cellulosic foam for use in Skylab instrument storage cushions is considered. Requirements include density of 10 lb cu ft or less, minimal friability with normal handling, and nonflammability in an atmosphere of 70 percent oxygen and 30 percent nitrogen at 6.2 psia. A study of halogenated foam components was made, including more highly chlorinated binders, halogen-containing additives, and halogenation of the cellulose. The immediate objective was to reduce the density of the foam through reduction in inorganic phosphate without sacrificing flame-retarding properties of the foams. The use of frothing techniques was investigated, with particular emphasis on a urea-formaldehyde foam. Halogen-containing flame retardants were deemphasized in favor of inorganic salts and the preparation of phosphate and sulphate esters of cellulose. Utilization of foam products for civilian applications was also considered.

  18. Microbial Cellulose Assembly in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. Malcolm, Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Based on evidence indicating a possible correlation between hypo-gravity conditions and alteration of cellulose production by the gram negative bacterium, Acetobacter xylinum, a ground-based study for a possible long term Space Shuttle flight has been conducted. The proposed experiment for A. xylinum aboard the Shuttle is the BRIC (Biological Research in a Canister), a metal container containing spaces for nine Petri plates. Using a common experimental design, the cellulose production capability as well as the survivability of the A. xylinum strains NQ5 and AY201 have been described. It should now be possible to use the BRIC for the first long term microgravity experiments involving the biosynthesis of cellulose.

  19. A Molecular Description of Cellulose Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Joshua T.; Morgan, Jacob L.W.; Zimmer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, and certain organisms from bacteria to plants and animals synthesize cellulose as an extracellular polymer for various biological functions. Humans have used cellulose for millennia as a material and an energy source, and the advent of a lignocellulosic fuel industry will elevate it to the primary carbon source for the burgeoning renewable energy sector. Despite the biological and societal importance of cellulose, the molecular mechanism by which it is synthesized is now only beginning to emerge. On the basis of recent advances in structural and molecular biology on bacterial cellulose synthases, we review emerging concepts of how the enzymes polymerize glucose molecules, how the nascent polymer is transported across the plasma membrane, and how bacterial cellulose biosynthesis is regulated during biofilm formation. Additionally, we review evolutionary commonalities and differences between cellulose synthases that modulate the nature of the cellulose product formed. PMID:26034894

  20. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Samaneh Sadat; Mohammadi, Kourosh; Ji, Kong-shu

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4) D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA) proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family. PMID:27314060

  1. Cellulose Modifications and Their Future Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this poster, we will describe the synthesis and structural characterizations of a benzyl-, nitrobenzyl-, and aminobenzyl celluloses. Nitrobenzyl- and aminobenzyl cellulose derivatives are synthesized by etherification process in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide homogeneous solution. Nitrobe...

  2. A molecular description of cellulose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Joshua T; Morgan, Jacob L W; Zimmer, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, and certain organisms from bacteria to plants and animals synthesize cellulose as an extracellular polymer for various biological functions. Humans have used cellulose for millennia as a material and an energy source, and the advent of a lignocellulosic fuel industry will elevate it to the primary carbon source for the burgeoning renewable energy sector. Despite the biological and societal importance of cellulose, the molecular mechanism by which it is synthesized is now only beginning to emerge. On the basis of recent advances in structural and molecular biology on bacterial cellulose synthases, we review emerging concepts of how the enzymes polymerize glucose molecules, how the nascent polymer is transported across the plasma membrane, and how bacterial cellulose biosynthesis is regulated during biofilm formation. Additionally, we review evolutionary commonalities and differences between cellulose synthases that modulate the nature of the cellulose product formed. PMID:26034894

  3. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Samaneh Sadat; Mohammadi, Kourosh; Ji, Kong-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4) D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA) proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family. PMID:27314060

  4. Kvn Source-Frequency Phase-Referencing Observation of 3c 66A and 3c 66B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guang-Yao; Jung, Taehyun; Dodson, Richard; Rioja, Maria; Sohn, Bong Won

    2015-09-01

    In this proceedings, preliminary results of the KVN Source-Frequency Phase-Referencing (SFPR) observation of 3C 66A and 3C 66B are presented. The motivation of this work is to measure the core-shift of these 2 sources and study the temporal evolution of the jet opacity. Two more sources were observed as secondary reference calibrators and each source was observed at 22, 43, and 86 GHz simultaneously. Our preliminary results show that after using the observations at the lower frequency to calibrate those at the higher frequency of the same source, the residual visibility phases for each source at the higher frequencies became more aligned, and the coherence time became much longer; also, the residual phases for different sources, within 10 degrees angular separations, follow similar trends. After reference to the nearby calibrator, the SFPRed maps were obtained as well as the astrometric measurements, i.e. the combined coreshift. The measurements were found to be affected by structural blending effects because of the large beamsize of KVN, but this can be corrected with higher resolution maps (e.g. KAVA maps). *%K Astrometry, radio continuum: galaxies, galaxies: active, galaxy: individual(3C 66A, 3C 66B), techniques: interferometric *%O 3C 66A, 3C 66B

  5. RXTE, VLBA, Optical, and Radio Monitoring of the Quasars 3C 279, PKS 1510--089, and 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Aller, M. F.; McHardy, I. M.; Balonek, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    We are continuing our combined RXTE X-ray, VLBA imaging (at 43 GHz), optical (several observatories), and radio (University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory) monitoring of the quasars 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089, and have started similar monitoring of 3C 273. X-ray flares in 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089 are associated with ejections of superluminal components. In addition, there is a close connection between the optical and X-ray variability of 3C 279. There is a strong correlation between the 14.5 GHz and X-ray variability of PKS 1510-089 in 1997 and 1998 (with the radio leading the X-ray) that becomes weaker in subsequent years. X-ray fluctuations occur on a variety of timescales in 3C 273, with a major prolonged outburst in mid-2001. The lead author will discuss the correlations in terms of inverse Compton models for the X-ray emission coupled with synchrotron models for the lower-frequency radiation. Synchrotron self-Compton models can explain the "reverse" time lag in PKS 1510-089 is well as the variable correlation between the X-ray variations and those at lower frequencies in this object and in 3C 279.

  6. CHITINASE-LIKE1/POM-POM1 and Its Homolog CTL2 Are Glucan-Interacting Proteins Important for Cellulose Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Saxe, Friederike; Ibáñez, Ana Belén; Vodermaier, Vera; Konlechner, Cornelia; Sampathkumar, Arun; Rüggeberg, Markus; Aichinger, Ernst; Neumetzler, Lutz; Burgert, Ingo; Somerville, Chris; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Persson, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    Plant cells are encased by a cellulose-containing wall that is essential for plant morphogenesis. Cellulose consists of β-1,4-linked glucan chains assembled into paracrystalline microfibrils that are synthesized by plasma membrane–located cellulose synthase (CESA) complexes. Associations with hemicelluloses are important for microfibril spacing and for maintaining cell wall tensile strength. Several components associated with cellulose synthesis have been identified; however, the biological functions for many of them remain elusive. We show that the chitinase-like (CTL) proteins, CTL1/POM1 and CTL2, are functionally equivalent, affect cellulose biosynthesis, and are likely to play a key role in establishing interactions between cellulose microfibrils and hemicelluloses. CTL1/POM1 coincided with CESAs in the endomembrane system and was secreted to the apoplast. The movement of CESAs was compromised in ctl1/pom1 mutant seedlings, and the cellulose content and xyloglucan structures were altered. X-ray analysis revealed reduced crystalline cellulose content in ctl1 ctl2 double mutants, suggesting that the CTLs cooperatively affect assembly of the glucan chains, which may affect interactions between hemicelluloses and cellulose. Consistent with this hypothesis, both CTLs bound glucan-based polymers in vitro. We propose that the apoplastic CTLs regulate cellulose assembly and interaction with hemicelluloses via binding to emerging cellulose microfibrils. PMID:22327741

  7. CelG from Clostridium cellulolyticum: a multidomain endoglucanase acting efficiently on crystalline cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, L; Gaudin, C; Belaich, A; Pages, S; Tardif, C; Belaich, J P

    1997-01-01

    The gene coding for CelG, a family 9 cellulase from Clostridium cellulolyticum, was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Four different forms of the protein were genetically engineered, purified, and studied: CelGL (the entire form of CelG), CelGcat1 (the catalytic domain of CelG alone), CelGcat2 (CelGcat1 plus 91 amino acids at the beginning of the cellulose binding domain [CBD]), and GST-CBD(CelG) (the CBD of CelG fused to glutathione S-transferase). The biochemical properties of CelG were compared with those of CelA, an endoglucanase from C. cellulolyticum which was previously studied. CelG, like CelA, was found to have an endo cutting mode of activity on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) but exhibited greater activity on crystalline substrates (bacterial microcrystalline cellulose and Avicel) than CelA. As observed with CelA, the presence of the nonhydrolytic miniscaffolding protein (miniCipC1) enhanced the activity of CelG on phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC), but to a lesser extent. The absence of the CBD led to the complete inactivation of the enzyme. The abilities of CelG and GST-CBD(CelG) to bind various substrates were also studied. Although the entire enzyme is able to bind to crystalline cellulose at a limited number of sites, the chimeric protein GST-CBD(CelG) does not bind to either of the tested substrates (Avicel and PASC). The lack of independence between the two domains and the weak binding to cellulose suggest that this CBD-like domain may play a special role and be either directly or indirectly involved in the catalytic reaction. PMID:9352905

  8. Polarization-maintaining amplifier based on 3C fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enokidani, Jun; Ito, Rumi; Sakurai, Tsutomu; Shin, Sumida; Tei, Kazuyoku

    2015-03-01

    Chirally-Coupled-Core (3C) fiber structure can preserve a single mode quality and even a linear polarization for a large core size. A principal advantage of fiber laser is its compatibility with monolithic integration and robust system. But so far, devices such as a combiner using the 3C fibers have not been reported. Here we report the first demonstration of such monolithic amplifier structure which contains an active fiber and a combiner based on 3C fibers. A single-stage amplifier is seeded by an EO Q-switched micro-laser and pumped by two high power fiber pigtailed 976-nm laser diodes via an in-house fabricated (2 + 1) × 1 pump signal combiner. The active fiber is based on a 3-m-long, 3C Yb-doped fiber (33 μm/250 μm core/cladding diameter with 0.06/0.46 NA). The amplifier demonstrates scaling up to 30W average power and 150 kW peak power in 0.3mJ, 2ns pulses. The beam profiles and beam qualities were characterized as its output power was varied up to 30W. The beam profile was maintained at a high beam quality of around M2=1.2. The spectral properties of the 3C fiber were also characterized as its output peak power was varied.

  9. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  10. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  11. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  12. Iodine catalyzed acetylation of starch and cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch and cellulose, earth's most abundant biopolymers, are of tremendous economic importance. Over 90% of cotton and 50% of wood are made of cellulose. Wood and cotton are the major resources for all cellulose products such as paper, textiles, construction materials, cardboard, as well as such c...

  13. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    DOEpatents

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-12-23

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

  14. Microbial Cellulose Utilization: Fundamentals and Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Lynd, Lee R.; Weimer, Paul J.; van Zyl, Willem H.; Pretorius, Isak S.

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental features of microbial cellulose utilization are examined at successively higher levels of aggregation encompassing the structure and composition of cellulosic biomass, taxonomic diversity, cellulase enzyme systems, molecular biology of cellulase enzymes, physiology of cellulolytic microorganisms, ecological aspects of cellulase-degrading communities, and rate-limiting factors in nature. The methodological basis for studying microbial cellulose utilization is considered relative to quantification of cells and enzymes in the presence of solid substrates as well as apparatus and analysis for cellulose-grown continuous cultures. Quantitative description of cellulose hydrolysis is addressed with respect to adsorption of cellulase enzymes, rates of enzymatic hydrolysis, bioenergetics of microbial cellulose utilization, kinetics of microbial cellulose utilization, and contrasting features compared to soluble substrate kinetics. A biological perspective on processing cellulosic biomass is presented, including features of pretreated substrates and alternative process configurations. Organism development is considered for “consolidated bioprocessing” (CBP), in which the production of cellulolytic enzymes, hydrolysis of biomass, and fermentation of resulting sugars to desired products occur in one step. Two organism development strategies for CBP are examined: (i) improve product yield and tolerance in microorganisms able to utilize cellulose, or (ii) express a heterologous system for cellulose hydrolysis and utilization in microorganisms that exhibit high product yield and tolerance. A concluding discussion identifies unresolved issues pertaining to microbial cellulose utilization, suggests approaches by which such issues might be resolved, and contrasts a microbially oriented cellulose hydrolysis paradigm to the more conventional enzymatically oriented paradigm in both fundamental and applied contexts. PMID:12209002

  15. Ionic Liquids and Cellulose: Dissolution, Chemical Modification and Preparation of New Cellulosic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Mehmet; Sardon, Haritz; Mecerreyes, David

    2014-01-01

    Due to its abundance and a wide range of beneficial physical and chemical properties, cellulose has become very popular in order to produce materials for various applications. This review summarizes the recent advances in the development of new cellulose materials and technologies using ionic liquids. Dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquids has been used to develop new processing technologies, cellulose functionalization methods and new cellulose materials including blends, composites, fibers and ion gels. PMID:25000264

  16. Energetics and structural stability of Cs3C60

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Susumu; Umemoto, Koichiro; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, MarvinL.

    2003-12-15

    Using the ab initio pseudo potential total-energy method and the density-functional theory, we study the energetics of face-centered-cubic Cs3C60 which is a material of great interest as a possible high transition-temperature superconductor. At the optimized lattice constant the volume per C60 is found to be smaller than the most stable hexagon-coordination A15 phase, while the total energy of the fcc phase is about 0.9 eV higher than the A15 phase. These results indicate that a low-temperature and high-pressure synthesis method might be a possible way to produce the fcc Cs3C60 phase. In addition, it is also found that the A15 Cs3C60 should show a phase transformation from a hexagon-coordination phase to a pentagon-coordination phase under hydrostatic pressure.

  17. Graphene/3C-SiC Hybrid Nanolaminate.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Bing; Heuser, Steffen; Huang, Nan; Fu, Haiyuan; Jiang, Xin

    2015-12-30

    In this work, we demonstrate a one-step approach to create graphene/3C-SiC nanolaminate structure using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. Layer-by-layer arrangement of thin 3C-SiC layers and graphene sheets is obtained with the thicknesses of the individual 3C-SiC layers and graphene sheets being 5-10 nm and 2-5 nm, respectively. An intimate contact between 3C-SiC and the graphene sheets is achieved and the nanolaminate film shows a high room temperature conductivity of 96.1 S/cm. A dedicated structural analysis of the nanolaminates by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals that the growth of the nanolaminates follows an iterative process: preferential graphene nucleation around the planar defects at the central region of the SiC layer, leading to the "splitting" of the SiC layer; and the thickening of the SiC layer after being "split". A growth mechanism based on both kinetics and thermodynamics is proposed. Following the proposed mechanism, it is possible to control the layer thickness of the graphene/3C-SiC hybrid nanolaminate by manipulating the carbon concentration in the gas phase, which is further experimentally verified. The high electrical conductivity, large surface area porous structure, feasible integration on different substrates (metal, Mo; semiconductor, Si and 2H-SiC; insulator, diamond) of the graphene/3C-SiC hybrid nanolaminate as well as other unprecedented advantages of the nanolaminate structure make it very promising for applications in mechanical, energy, and sensor-related areas. PMID:26650041

  18. Antibacterial Activity of Ti3C2Tx MXene.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Helal, Mohamed; Ali, Adnan; Ren, Chang E; Gogotsi, Yury; Mahmoud, Khaled A

    2016-03-22

    MXenes are a family of atomically thin, two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and carbonitrides with many attractive properties. Two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx (MXene) has been recently explored for applications in water desalination/purification membranes. A major success indicator for any water treatment membrane is the resistance to biofouling. To validate this and to understand better the health and environmental impacts of the new 2D carbides, we investigated the antibacterial properties of single- and few-layer Ti3C2Tx MXene flakes in colloidal solution. The antibacterial properties of Ti3C2Tx were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) by using bacterial growth curves based on optical densities (OD) and colonies growth on agar nutritive plates. Ti3C2Tx shows a higher antibacterial efficiency toward both Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive B. subtilis compared with graphene oxide (GO), which has been widely reported as an antibacterial agent. Concentration dependent antibacterial activity was observed and more than 98% bacterial cell viability loss was found at 200 μg/mL Ti3C2Tx for both bacterial cells within 4 h of exposure, as confirmed by colony forming unit (CFU) and regrowth curve. Antibacterial mechanism investigation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay indicated the damage to the cell membrane, which resulted in release of cytoplasmic materials from the bacterial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent and independent stress induction by Ti3C2Tx was investigated in two separate abiotic assays. MXenes are expected to be resistant to biofouling and offer bactericidal properties. PMID:26909865

  19. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-07-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization.

  20. G3-C12 Peptide Reverses Galectin-3 from Foe to Friend for Active Targeting Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Lian; Yang, Qingqing; Shan, Wei; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Galectin-3 is overexpressed by numerous carcinomas and is a potential target for active tumor treatments. On the other hand, galectin-3 also plays a key role in cancer progression and prevents cells from undergoing apoptosis, thereby offsetting the benefits of active targeting drugs. However, the relative contribution of the protective antiapoptotic effects of galectin-3 and the proapoptotic effects of galectin-3-targeted therapies has remained yet unrevealed. Here, we show that a galectin-3-binding peptide G3-C12 could reverse galectin-3 from foe to friend for active targeting delivery system. Results showed G3-C12 modified N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer doxorubicin conjugates (G3-C12-HPMA-Dox) could internalize into galectin-3 overexpressed PC-3 cells via a highly specific ligand-receptor pathway (2.2 times higher cellular internalization than HPMA-Dox). The internalized Dox stimulated the translocation of galectin-3 to the mitochondria to prevent from apoptosis. In turn, this caused G3-C12-HPMA-Dox to concentrate into the mitochondria after binding to galectin-3 intracellularly. Initially, mitochondrial galectin-3 weakened Dox-induced mitochondrial damage; however, as time progressed, G3-C12 active-mediation allowed increasing amounts of Dox to be delivered to the mitochondria, which eventually induced higher level of apoptosis than nontargeted copolymers. In addition, G3-C12 downregulates galectin-3 expression, 0.43 times lower than control cells, which could possibly be responsible for the suppressed cell migration. Thus, G3-C12 peptide exerts sequential targeting to both cell membrane and mitochondria via regulating galectin-3, and eventually reverses and overcomes the protective effects of galectin-3; therefore, it could be a promising agent for the treatment of galectin-3-overexpressing cancers. PMID:26393405

  1. Purification of aqueous cellulose ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Bartscherer, K.A.; de Pablo, J.J.; Bonnin, M.C.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1990-07-01

    Manufacture of cellulose ethers usually involves high amounts of salt by-products. For application of the product, salt must be removed. In this work, we have studied the injection of high-pressure CO{sub 2} into an aqueous polymer-salt solution; we find that upon addition of isopropanol in addition to CO{sub 2}, the solution separates into two phases. One phase is rich in polymer and water, and the other phase contains mostly isopropanol, water and CO{sub 2}. The salt distributes between the two phases, thereby offering interesting possibilities for development of a new purification process for water-soluble polymers. This work presents experimental phase-equilibrium data for hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose with sodium acetate and potassium sulfate, respectively, in the region 40{degree}C and 30 to 80 bar. Based on these data, we suggest a process for the manufacture and purification of water-soluble cellulose ethers. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Preliminary modulus calculations for cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Young's modulus is a measure of the inherent stiffness of an elastic material. In the case of cellulose, it quantifies the ability of the material to undergo changes in length as tension or compression forces are applied. The modulus can be calculated by performing tensile tests on cotton fiber...

  3. Production of Bacterial Cellulose from Alternate Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David Neil; Hamilton, Melinda Ann

    2000-05-01

    Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS & HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

  4. Production of bacterial cellulose from alternate feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    D. N. Thompson; M. A. Hamilton

    2000-05-07

    Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS and HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

  5. Crystalline Ni3C as both carbon source and catalyst for graphene nucleation: a QM/MD study

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Menggai; Li, Kai; Guan, Wei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Page, Alister; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nucleation from crystalline Ni3C has been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulations based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. It was observed that the lattice of Ni3C was quickly relaxed upon thermal annealing at high temperature, resulting in an amorphous Ni3C catalyst structure. With the aid of the mobile nickel atoms, inner layer carbon atoms precipitated rapidly out of the surface and then formed polyyne chains and Y-junctions. The frequent sinusoidal-like vibration of the branched carbon configurations led to the formation of nascent graphene precursors. In light of the rapid decomposition of the crystalline Ni3C, it is proposed that the crystalline Ni3C is unlikely to be a reaction intermediate in the CVD-growth of graphene at high temperatures. However, results present here indicate that Ni3C films can be employed as precursors in the synthesis of graphene with exciting possibility. PMID:26169042

  6. Crystalline Ni3C as both carbon source and catalyst for graphene nucleation: a QM/MD study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Menggai; Li, Kai; Guan, Wei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Page, Alister; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-07-01

    Graphene nucleation from crystalline Ni3C has been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulations based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. It was observed that the lattice of Ni3C was quickly relaxed upon thermal annealing at high temperature, resulting in an amorphous Ni3C catalyst structure. With the aid of the mobile nickel atoms, inner layer carbon atoms precipitated rapidly out of the surface and then formed polyyne chains and Y-junctions. The frequent sinusoidal-like vibration of the branched carbon configurations led to the formation of nascent graphene precursors. In light of the rapid decomposition of the crystalline Ni3C, it is proposed that the crystalline Ni3C is unlikely to be a reaction intermediate in the CVD-growth of graphene at high temperatures. However, results present here indicate that Ni3C films can be employed as precursors in the synthesis of graphene with exciting possibility.

  7. Synchrotron-radiation photoemission study of the ultrathin Ba/3C-SiC(111) interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Benemanskaya, G. V.; Dementev, P. A.; Timoshnev, S. N.; Senkovskiy, B.

    2016-03-01

    Electronic structure of the Ba/3C-SiC(111) interface has been detailed studied in situ in an ultrahigh vacuum using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy with photon energies in the range of 100-450 eV. The 3C-SiC(111) samples were grown by a new method of epitaxy of low-defect unstressed nanoscaled silicon carbide films on silicon substrates. Valence band photoemission and both the Si 2p, C 1s core level spectra have been investigated as a function of Ba submonolayer coverage. Under Ba adsorption two induced surface bands are found at binding energies of 2 eV and 6 eV. It is obtained that Ba/3C-SiC(111) interface can be characterized as metallic-like. Modification of both the Si 2p and C 1s surface-related components were ascertained and shown to be provided by redistribution effect of electron density between Ba adatoms and both the Si surface and C interface atoms.

  8. Revisiting correlations between broad-line and jet emission variations for AGNs: 3C 120 and 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. T.; Bai, J. M.; Feng, H. C.; Li, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We restudy the issue of cross-correlations between broad-line and jet emission variations, and aim to locate the position of a radio (and gamma-ray) emitting region in a jet of active galactic nuclei. Considering the radial profiles of the radius and number density of clouds in a spherical broad-line region (BLR), we derive new formulae connecting the jet-emitting position Rjet to the time lag τob between broad-line and jet emission variations, and the BLR radius. Also, formulae are derived for a disc-like BLR and a spherical shell BLR. The model-independent flux randomization/random subset selection method is used to estimate τob. For 3C 120, positive lags of about 0.3 yr are found between the 15 GHz emission and the Hβ, Hγ and He II λ4686 lines, including broad-line data in a newly published paper, indicating that the line variations lead the 15 GHz ones. Each of the broad-line light curves corresponds to a radio outburst. Rjet = 1.1-1.5 parsec (pc) is obtained for 3C 120. For 3C 273, a common feature of negative time lags is found in the cross-correlation functions between light curves of radio emission and the Balmer lines, as well as Lyα λ1216 and C IV λ1549 lines. Rjet = 1.0-2.6 pc is obtained for 3C 273. The estimated Rjet is comparable for 3C 120 and 3C 273, and the gamma-ray-emitting positions will be within ˜1-3 pc from the central engines. Comparisons show that the cloud number density and radius radial distributions and the BLR structures have only negligible effects on Rjet.

  9. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  10. The 3C support: A survivable alternative to wood cribbing

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, J.

    1995-10-01

    Wood cribbing has historically been a somewhat dependable and low cost method of providing mine roof support. In high stress conditions, such as longwall tailgates, the wood crib does not always survive. Failure of tailgate cribs can block travelways, restrict ventilation and force costly time-consuming rehabilitation. At least in the Western United States, wood cribbing is no longer the answer to many roof support problems. Western mines are being forced to find alternatives to wood cribbing. This is due to the escalating cost, questionable availability and dubious quality of available wood supplies. The Corrugated Confined Core mine roof Support (3C Support) was developed to survive the extreme ground control conditions of a longwall tailgate. The 3C Support testing has shown ultimate strengths exceeding 2,000,000 lbs and a yield range over 48-inches. Standard wood cribs, constructed from Western United States softwood, were also tested. The wood cribs had ultimate strengths up to 237,000 lbs and a yield range up to 27-inches. Underground testing of the 3C Support in longwall tailgates at Southern Utah Fuel Company (SUFCO) was also conducted. This testing and installation of over 5000 3C Supports have demonstrated the following advantages: (1) lower installed cost; (2) 55 percent reduction in cribbing manpower requirements; (3) improved yield and ultimate strength characteristics; (4) much improved tailgate roof support survivability; (5) virtually eliminates blocked tailgates; (6) improved safety; (7) reduced flammable material; (8) improved ventilation; and (9) environmentally friendly.

  11. Low Frequency Radio Observations of 3C 129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, W. M.; Harris, D. E.; Ensslin, T. A.; Kassim, N. E.; Perley, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    We present a wide-field map of the radio galaxy 3C 129 and its companion galaxy 3C 129.1 at λ = 90 cm. Both galaxies are part of an X-ray identified cluster at z=0.021, which has been excluded from most optical studies because it lies in the galactic plane. 3C 129 is a narrow-angle-tail (NAT) source with a plume-like double-tail extending nearly 30' at a wavelength of 90cm. We see a distinct steep-spectrum feature near its head, extending in a direction perpendicular to the radio tails. We propose is that this `crosspiece' might consist of fossil radio plasma, which has been re-energized by the compression of the bow shock wave of the supersonically moving galaxy 3C 129. One possible origin of the fossil radio plasma could be the tail of a nearby head-tail radio galaxy, and we discuss the implications of this scenario. WML is a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow. Basic research in astronomy at the Naval Research Laboratory is funded by the Office of Naval Research. DEH acknowledges support from NASA grant GO1-2135A.

  12. The linear polarization of 3C 345 in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Wolinski, Karen G.; Smith, Paul S.; Impey, C. D.; Bless, Robert C.; Nelson, M. J.; Percival, J. W.; Taylor, M. J.; Elliot, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The linear polarization of 3C 345, a superluminal radio source and OVV quasar, was observed in two bandpasses in the ultraviolet (centered at 2160 A and 2770 A) in 1993 April using the High Speed Photometer on the Hubble Space Telescope. The quasar is significantly polarized in the UV (p greater than 5%). Ground-based polarimetry was obtained 11 days later, but a difference in the position angle between the observations in the visible and those in the UV indicate that the magnitude of the polarization of 3C 345 may have changed over that time. If the two observation sets represent the same state of spectral polarization, then the large UV flux implies that either the polarization of the synchrotron continuum must stop decreasing in the UV, or that there is an additional source of polarized flux in the ultraviolet. Only if the UV observations represent a spectral polarization state with the same position angle in the visible seen previously in 3C 345 can the polarized flux be represented by a single power law consistent with the three-component model of Smith et al. This model consists of a polarized synchrotron component, an unpolarized component from the broad-line region, and an unpolarized component attributed to thermal radiation from an optically thick accretion disk. Additional simultaneous polarimetry in the UV and visible will be required to further constrain models of the continuum emission processes in 3C 345 and determine if the UV polarized flux is synchrotron in origin.

  13. A morpholinium ionic liquid for cellulose dissolution.

    PubMed

    Raut, Dilip G; Sundman, Ola; Su, Weiqing; Virtanen, Pasi; Sugano, Yasuhito; Kordas, Krisztian; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2015-10-01

    A series of substituted morpholinium ionic salts and allyl ammonium acetates were prepared. Amongst those, N-allyl-N-methylmorpholinium acetate ([AMMorp][OAc]) was found to dissolve cellulose readily without any pre-processing of native cellulose. At 120°C, [AMMorp][OAc] could dissolve 30 wt%, 28 wt% and 25 wt% of cellulose with degree of polymerization (DPn) - 789, 1644 and 2082 respectively, in 20 min. Importantly, SEC analysis indicated that no discernible changes occurred in terms of the degree of polymerization of the different celluloses after regeneration. Furthermore, when comparing the cellulose dissolution capability of these newly synthesized ionic liquids, it is evident that the combination of all three constituents - the morpholinium cation, the existence of an allyl group and choosing the acetate anion are essential for efficient cellulose dissolution. The structure and morphology of the regenerated cellulosic materials were characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, CP/MAS (13)C NMR and FTIR, respectively. PMID:26076596

  14. Cellulose nanomaterials in water treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-05-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials' potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials' beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization. PMID:25837659

  15. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    George, Johnsy; Sabapathi, S N

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. PMID:26604715

  16. Cellulose Nanomaterials in Water Treatment Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles François; Wiesner, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials’ potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials’ beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization. PMID:25837659

  17. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    PubMed Central

    George, Johnsy; Sabapathi, SN

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. PMID:26604715

  18. Cellulose and hemicellulose decomposition by forest soil bacteria proceeds by the action of structurally variable enzymatic systems

    PubMed Central

    López-Mondéjar, Rubén; Zühlke, Daniela; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that bacteria contribute actively to the decomposition of cellulose and hemicellulose in forest soil; however, their role in this process is still unclear. Here we performed the screening and identification of bacteria showing potential cellulolytic activity from litter and organic soil of a temperate oak forest. The genomes of three cellulolytic isolates previously described as abundant in this ecosystem were sequenced and their proteomes were characterized during the growth on plant biomass and on microcrystalline cellulose. Pedobacter and Mucilaginibacter showed complex enzymatic systems containing highly diverse carbohydrate-active enzymes for the degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, which were functionally redundant for endoglucanases, β-glucosidases, endoxylanases, β-xylosidases, mannosidases and carbohydrate-binding modules. Luteibacter did not express any glycosyl hydrolases traditionally recognized as cellulases. Instead, cellulose decomposition was likely performed by an expressed GH23 family protein containing a cellulose-binding domain. Interestingly, the presence of plant lignocellulose as well as crystalline cellulose both trigger the production of a wide set of hydrolytic proteins including cellulases, hemicellulases and other glycosyl hydrolases. Our findings highlight the extensive and unexplored structural diversity of enzymatic systems in cellulolytic soil bacteria and indicate the roles of multiple abundant bacterial taxa in the decomposition of cellulose and other plant polysaccharides. PMID:27125755

  19. Cellulose and hemicellulose decomposition by forest soil bacteria proceeds by the action of structurally variable enzymatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Mondéjar, Rubén; Zühlke, Daniela; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Evidence shows that bacteria contribute actively to the decomposition of cellulose and hemicellulose in forest soil; however, their role in this process is still unclear. Here we performed the screening and identification of bacteria showing potential cellulolytic activity from litter and organic soil of a temperate oak forest. The genomes of three cellulolytic isolates previously described as abundant in this ecosystem were sequenced and their proteomes were characterized during the growth on plant biomass and on microcrystalline cellulose. Pedobacter and Mucilaginibacter showed complex enzymatic systems containing highly diverse carbohydrate-active enzymes for the degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, which were functionally redundant for endoglucanases, β-glucosidases, endoxylanases, β-xylosidases, mannosidases and carbohydrate-binding modules. Luteibacter did not express any glycosyl hydrolases traditionally recognized as cellulases. Instead, cellulose decomposition was likely performed by an expressed GH23 family protein containing a cellulose-binding domain. Interestingly, the presence of plant lignocellulose as well as crystalline cellulose both trigger the production of a wide set of hydrolytic proteins including cellulases, hemicellulases and other glycosyl hydrolases. Our findings highlight the extensive and unexplored structural diversity of enzymatic systems in cellulolytic soil bacteria and indicate the roles of multiple abundant bacterial taxa in the decomposition of cellulose and other plant polysaccharides.

  20. Cellulose and hemicellulose decomposition by forest soil bacteria proceeds by the action of structurally variable enzymatic systems.

    PubMed

    López-Mondéjar, Rubén; Zühlke, Daniela; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that bacteria contribute actively to the decomposition of cellulose and hemicellulose in forest soil; however, their role in this process is still unclear. Here we performed the screening and identification of bacteria showing potential cellulolytic activity from litter and organic soil of a temperate oak forest. The genomes of three cellulolytic isolates previously described as abundant in this ecosystem were sequenced and their proteomes were characterized during the growth on plant biomass and on microcrystalline cellulose. Pedobacter and Mucilaginibacter showed complex enzymatic systems containing highly diverse carbohydrate-active enzymes for the degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, which were functionally redundant for endoglucanases, β-glucosidases, endoxylanases, β-xylosidases, mannosidases and carbohydrate-binding modules. Luteibacter did not express any glycosyl hydrolases traditionally recognized as cellulases. Instead, cellulose decomposition was likely performed by an expressed GH23 family protein containing a cellulose-binding domain. Interestingly, the presence of plant lignocellulose as well as crystalline cellulose both trigger the production of a wide set of hydrolytic proteins including cellulases, hemicellulases and other glycosyl hydrolases. Our findings highlight the extensive and unexplored structural diversity of enzymatic systems in cellulolytic soil bacteria and indicate the roles of multiple abundant bacterial taxa in the decomposition of cellulose and other plant polysaccharides. PMID:27125755

  1. Chiral Plasmonics Using Twisting along Cellulose Nanocrystals as a Template for Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majoinen, Johanna; Hassinen, Jukka; Haataja, Johannes S; Rekola, Heikki T; Kontturi, Eero; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Ras, Robin H A; Törmä, Päivi; Ikkala, Olli

    2016-07-01

    The right-handed twist along aqueous dispersed cellulose nanocrystals allows right-handed chiral plasmonics upon electrostatic binding of gold nanoparticles in dilute environment, through tuning the particle sizes and concentrations. Simulations using nanoparticle coordinates from cryo-electron tomography confirm the experimental results. The finding suggests generalization for other chiral and helical colloidal templates for nanoscale chiral plasmonics. PMID:27152434

  2. Investigation and characterization of oxidized cellulose and cellulose nanofiber films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han

    Over the last two decades, a large amount of research has focused on natural cellulose fibers, since they are "green" and renewable raw materials. Recently, nanomaterials science has attracted wide attention due to the large surface area and unique properties of nanoparticles. Cellulose certainly is becoming an important material in nanomaterials science, with the increasing demand of environmentally friendly materials. In this work, a novel method of preparing cellulose nanofibers (CNF) is being presented. This method contains up to three oxidation steps: periodate, chlorite and TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl) oxidation. The first two oxidation steps are investigated in the first part of this work. Cellulose pulp was oxidized to various extents by a two step-oxidation with sodium periodate, followed by sodium chlorite. The oxidized products can be separated into three different fractions. The mass ratio and charge content of each fraction were determined. The morphology, size distribution and crystallinity index of each fraction were measured by AFM, DLS and XRD, respectively. In the second part of this work, CNF were prepared and modified under various conditions, including (1) the introduction of various amounts of aldehyde groups onto CNF by periodate oxidation; (2) the carboxyl groups in sodium form on CNF were converted to acid form by treated with an acid type ion-exchange resin; (3) CNF were cross-linked in two different ways by employing adipic dihydrazide (ADH) as cross-linker and water-soluble 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylaminopropyl)] carbodiimide (EDC) as carboxyl-activating agent. Films were fabricated with these modified CNF suspensions by vacuum filtration. The optical, mechanical and thermo-stability properties of these films were investigated by UV-visible spectrometry, tensile test and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) and water contact angle (WCA) of these films were also studied.

  3. Single-molecule imaging analysis of elementary reaction steps of Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) hydrolyzing crystalline cellulose Iα and IIII.

    PubMed

    Shibafuji, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akihiko; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Naohisa; Fukuda, Shingo; Watanabe, Hiroki; Samejima, Masahiro; Ando, Toshio; Noji, Hiroyuki; Koivula, Anu; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Iino, Ryota

    2014-05-16

    Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) is a molecular motor that directly hydrolyzes crystalline celluloses into water-soluble cellobioses. It has recently drawn attention as a tool that could be used to convert cellulosic materials into biofuel. However, detailed mechanisms of action, including elementary reaction steps such as binding, processive hydrolysis, and dissociation, have not been thoroughly explored because of the inherent challenges associated with monitoring reactions occurring at the solid/liquid interface. The crystalline cellulose Iα and IIII were previously reported as substrates with different crystalline forms and different susceptibilities to hydrolysis by TrCel7A. In this study, we observed that different susceptibilities of cellulose Iα and IIII are highly dependent on enzyme concentration, and at nanomolar enzyme concentration, TrCel7A shows similar rates of hydrolysis against cellulose Iα and IIII. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and high speed atomic force microscopy, we also determined kinetic constants of the elementary reaction steps for TrCel7A against cellulose Iα and IIII. These measurements were performed at picomolar enzyme concentration in which density of TrCel7A on crystalline cellulose was very low. Under this condition, TrCel7A displayed similar binding and dissociation rate constants for cellulose Iα and IIII and similar fractions of productive binding on cellulose Iα and IIII. Furthermore, once productively bound, TrCel7A processively hydrolyzes and moves along cellulose Iα and IIII with similar translational rates. With structural models of cellulose Iα and IIII, we propose that different susceptibilities at high TrCel7A concentration arise from surface properties of substrate, including ratio of hydrophobic surface and number of available lanes. PMID:24692563

  4. Cellulose Aggregation under Hydrothermal Pretreatment Conditions.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Kovalenko, Andriy; Skaf, Munir S

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, represents a resource for sustainable production of biofuels. Thermochemical treatments make lignocellulosic biomaterials more amenable to depolymerization by exposing cellulose microfibrils to enzymatic or chemical attacks. In such treatments, the solvent plays fundamental roles in biomass modification, but the molecular events underlying these changes are still poorly understood. Here, the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation has been employed to analyze the role of water in cellulose aggregation under different thermodynamic conditions. The results show that, under ambient conditions, highly structured hydration shells around cellulose create repulsive forces that protect cellulose microfibrils from aggregating. Under hydrothermal pretreatment conditions, however, the hydration shells lose structure, and cellulose aggregation is favored. These effects are largely due to a decrease in cellulose-water interactions relative to those at ambient conditions, so that cellulose-cellulose attractive interactions become prevalent. Our results provide an explanation to the observed increase in the lateral size of cellulose crystallites when biomass is subject to pretreatments and deepen the current understanding of the mechanisms of biomass modification. PMID:27301535

  5. Evidence for a cyclic diguanylic acid-dependent cellulose synthase in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Y; Mayer, R; Benziman, M; Delmer, D

    1991-01-01

    Because numerous attempts to detect an activity for a cellulose synthase in plants have failed, we have taken a different approach toward detecting polypeptides involved in this process. The uniqueness of the structure and function of cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) as an activator of the cellulose synthase of the bacterium Acetobacter xylinum makes it an attractive probe to use in a search for a c-di-GMP receptor that might be involved in the process in plants. Direct photolabeling with 32P-c-di-GMP has been used, therefore, to identify in plants two membrane polypeptides of 83 and 48 kD derived from cotton fibers that possess properties consistent with their being components of a c-di-GMP-dependent cellulose synthase. Based upon several criteria, the 48-kD species is proposed to be derived by proteolytic cleavage of the 83-kD polypeptide. Both polypeptides bind c-di-GMP with high affinity and specificity and show antigenic relatedness to the bacterial cellulose synthase, and the N-terminal sequence of the 48-kD polypeptide also indicates relatedness to the bacterial synthase. Ability to detect both cotton fiber polypeptides by photolabeling increases markedly in extracts derived from fibers entering the active phase of secondary wall cellulose synthesis. These results provide a basis for future work aimed at identifying and characterizing genes involved in cellulose synthesis in plants. PMID:1668373

  6. Magnetic Mesoporous Photonic Cellulose Films.

    PubMed

    Giese, Michael; Blusch, Lina K; Schlesinger, Maik; Meseck, Georg R; Hamad, Wadood Y; Arjmand, Mohammad; Sundararaj, Uttandaraman; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2016-09-13

    Novel hybrid materials of cellulose and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and characterized. The materials combine the chiral nematic structural features of mesoporous photonic cellulose (MPC) with the magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4). The photonic, magnetic, and dielectric properties of the hybrid materials were investigated during the dynamic swelling and deswelling of the MPC films. It was observed that the dielectric properties of the generated MPC films increased tremendously following swelling in water, endorsing efficient swelling ability of the generated mesoporous films. The high magnetic permeability of the developed MPC films in conjunction with their superior dielectric properties, predominantly in the swollen state, makes them interesting for electromagnetic interference shielding applications. PMID:27588561

  7. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  8. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, An; Gomes, Thiago C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  9. From cellulose fibrils to single chains: understanding cellulose dissolution in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xueming; Cheng, Gang

    2015-12-21

    Cellulose is the most abundant and renewable organic compound on Earth, it is however not soluble in common organic solvents and aqueous solutions. Cellulose dissolution is a key aspect to promote its value-added applications. Ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to solubilize cellulose under relatively mild conditions. The easy processability of cellulose with ILs and their environmental-friendly nature prompted research in various fields such as biomass pretreatment and conversion, cellulose fiber and composite production, and chemical conversion of cellulose in ILs. Progress has been made on understanding the mechanism of cellulose dissolution in ILs, including the structural characteristics of ILs that are cellulose solvents, however many details remain unknown. In light of rapid development and importance of cellulose dissolution in the field of IL-based cellulose and biomass processing, it is necessary to provide an overview of current understanding of cellulose dissolution in ILs and outline possible future research trends. Recent literature studies suggest that synergistic effects between the anions and the cations of ILs need to be revealed, which requires refining the structure of cellulose elementary fibrils, simulation of more realistic cellulose fibrils and detailed studies on the solution structure of cellulose in ILs. After analyzing literature studies, three interacting modules are identified, which are crucial to understand the process of cellulose dissolution in ILs: (1) the structure of elementary fibrils; (2) solvation of cellulose in ILs; and (3) solution structure of cellulose solubilized in ILs. A coherent analysis of these modules will aid in better design of more efficient ILs and processes. PMID:26562500

  10. Hydration of microcrystalline cellulose and milled cellulose studied by sorption calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Kocherbitov, Vitaly; Ulvenlund, Stefan; Kober, Maria; Jarring, Kjell; Arnebrant, Thomas

    2008-03-27

    The hydration of two different polymorphs of microcrystalline cellulose (cellulose I and II), as well as the hydration of amorphous cellulose was studied using water sorption calorimetry, gravimetric water vapor sorption, nitrogen sorption, and X-ray powder diffraction. Amorphous cellulose was prepared by means of ball-milling of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). Whereas X-ray data showed the untreated MCC to consist of cellulose I, the amorphous cellulose was found to recrystallize into cellulose II after contact with water or water vapor at relative humidities (RHs) above 90%. Sorption isotherms show an increase of water sorption in the sequence cellulose I<cellulose IIcellulose. The enthalpy of water sorption becomes more exothermic in the same sequence. The specific area of cellulose is dramatically higher when calculated from the water adsorption than when calculated from nitrogen adsorption. A proposed mechanism of water sorption by MCC implies the adsorption of water molecules at solid-solid interfaces, i.e., between neighboring microfibrils, which explains the observed difference between water and nitrogen. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) model is therefore not appropriate for the description of the hydration of cellulose. Rather, the Langmuir model represents a more accurate description of water sorption by MCC at low RH. At higher RH, the water adsorption competes with capillary condensation. The thickness of microfibrils, as calculated using the fitting of the sorption isotherm of MCC with the Langmuir equation, is about 4 nm. This value compares favorably with literature data. PMID:18307340

  11. Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose-Degrading Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-12-19

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated within biofuel development.

  12. A Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose Degrading Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes, in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic microbial cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated with biofuel development. PMID:23176123

  13. The Trails of Superluminal Jet Components in 3C 111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadler, M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Homan, D. C.; Agudo, I.; Kellermann, K. I.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Lister, M. L.; Zensus, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The parsec-scale radio jet of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111 has been monitored since 1995 as part of the 2cm Survey and MOJAVE monitoring observations conducted with the VLBA. Here, we present results from 18 epochs of VLBA observations of 3C 111 and from 18 years of radio flux density monitoring observations conducted at the University of Michigan. A major radio flux-density outburst of 3C 111 occurred in 1996 and was followed by a particularly bright plasma ejection associated with a superluminal jet component. This major event allows us to study a variety of processes associated with outbursts of radio-loud AGN in much greater detail than possible in other cases: the primary perturbation gives rise to the formation of a forward and a backward-shock, which both evolve in characteristically different ways and allow us to draw conclusions about the workflow of jet-production events; the expansion, acceleration and recollimation of the ejected jet plasma in an environment with steep pressure and density gradients are revealed; trailing components are formed in the wake of the primary perturbation as a result of Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities from the interaction of the jet with the external medium. The jet-medium interaction is further scrutinized by the linear-polarization signature of jet components traveling along the jet and passing a region of steep pressure/density gradients.

  14. Optimal High-TC Superconductivity in Cs3C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshman, Dale; Fiory, Anthony

    The highest superconducting transition temperatures in the (A1-xBx)3C60 superconducting family are seen in the A15 and FCC structural phases of Cs3C60 (optimized under hydrostatic pressure), exhibiting measured values for near-stoichiometric samples of TC0 meas . = 37.8 K and 35.7 K, respectively. It is argued these two Cs-intercalated C60 compounds represent the optimal materials of their respective structures, with superconductivity originating from Coulombic e- h interactions between the C60 molecules, which host the n-type superconductivity, and mediating holes associated with the Cs cations. A variation of the interlayer Coulombic pairing model [Harshman and Fiory, J. Supercond. Nov. Magn. 28 ̲, 2967 (2015), and references therein] is introduced in which TC0 calc . ~ 1 / lζ , where l relates to the mean spacing between interacting charges on surfaces of the C60 molecules, and ζ is the average radial distance between the surface of the C60 molecules and the neighboring Cs cations. For stoichiometric Cs3C60, TC0 calc . = 38.08 K and 35.67 K for the A15 and FCC macrostructures, respectively; the dichotomy is attributable to differences in ζ.

  15. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  16. The cellulose synthase companion proteins act non-redundantly with CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1/POM2 and CELLULOSE SYNTHASE 6

    PubMed Central

    Endler, Anne; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellulose is a cell wall constituent that is essential for plant growth and development, and an important raw material for a range of industrial applications. Cellulose is synthesized at the plasma membrane by massive cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes that track along cortical microtubules in elongating cells of Arabidopsis through the activity of the protein CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1 (CSI1). In a recent study we identified another family of proteins that also are associated with the CesA complex and microtubules, and that we named COMPANIONS OF CELLULOSE SYNTHASE (CC). The CC proteins protect the cellulose synthesising capacity of Arabidopsis seedlings during exposure to adverse environmental conditions by enhancing microtubule dynamics. In this paper we provide cell biology and genetic evidence that the CSI1 and the CC proteins fulfil distinct functions during cellulose synthesis. We also show that the CC proteins are necessary to aid cellulose synthesis when components of the CesA complex are impaired. These data indicate that the CC proteins have a broad role in aiding cellulose synthesis during environmental changes and when core complex components are non-functional. PMID:26829351

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3C Facilitates G1-S Transition by Stabilizing and Enhancing the Function of Cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Abhik; Halder, Sabyasachi; Upadhyay, Santosh K.; Lu, Jie; Kumar, Pankaj; Murakami, Masanao; Cai, Qiliang; Robertson, Erle S.

    2011-01-01

    EBNA3C, one of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent antigens, is essential for primary B-cell transformation. Cyclin D1, a key regulator of G1 to S phase progression, is tightly associated and aberrantly expressed in numerous human cancers. Previously, EBNA3C was shown to bind to Cyclin D1 in vitro along with Cyclin A and Cyclin E. In the present study, we provide evidence which demonstrates that EBNA3C forms a complex with Cyclin D1 in human cells. Detailed mapping experiments show that a small N-terminal region which lies between amino acids 130–160 of EBNA3C binds to two different sites of Cyclin D1- the N-terminal pRb binding domain (residues 1–50), and C-terminal domain (residues 171–240), known to regulate Cyclin D1 stability. Cyclin D1 is short-lived and ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation has been targeted as a means of therapeutic intervention. Here, we show that EBNA3C stabilizes Cyclin D1 through inhibition of its poly-ubiquitination, and also increases its nuclear localization by blocking GSK3β activity. We further show that EBNA3C enhances the kinase activity of Cyclin D1/CDK6 which enables subsequent ubiquitination and degradation of pRb. EBNA3C together with Cyclin D1-CDK6 complex also efficiently nullifies the inhibitory effect of pRb on cell growth. Moreover, an sh-RNA based strategy for knock-down of both cyclin D1 and EBNA3C genes in EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) shows a significant reduction in cell-growth. Based on these results, we propose that EBNA3C can stabilize as well as enhance the functional activity of Cyclin D1 thereby facilitating the G1-S transition in EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. PMID:21347341

  18. Effects of reaction conditions on cellulose structures synthesized in vitro by bacterial cellulose synthases.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Paavo A; Sugiyama, Junji; Imai, Tomoya

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was synthesized by cellulose synthases extracted from the Komagataeibacter xylinus (formerly known as Gluconacetobacter xylinus). The effects of temperature and centrifugation of the reaction solution on the synthesis products were investigated. Cellulose with number-average degree of polymerization (DPn) roughly in the range 60-80 and cellulose II crystal structure was produced under all conditions. The amount of cellulose varied with temperature and centrifugation, and the centrifugation at 2000 × g also slightly reduced the DPn. Cellulose production was maximal around the temperature 35 °C and without centrifugation. At higher temperatures and during centrifugation at 2000 × g the proteins started to denature, causing differences also in the morphology of the cellulosic aggregates, as seen with electron microscopy. These observations serve as a basis for discussions about the factors affecting the structure formation and chain length of in vitro synthesized cellulose. PMID:26572398

  19. Engineering of a novel cellulose-adherent cellulolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae for cellulosic biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Sasaki, Kengo; den Haan, Riaan; Inokuma, Kentaro; Ogino, Chiaki; van Zyl, Willem H; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Cellulosic biofuel is the subject of increasing attention. The main obstacle toward its economic feasibility is the recalcitrance of lignocellulose requiring large amount of enzyme to break. Several engineered yeast strains have been developed with cellulolytic activities to reduce the need for enzyme addition, but exhibiting limited effect. Here, we report the successful engineering of a cellulose-adherent Saccharomyces cerevisiae displaying four different synergistic cellulases on the cell surface. The cellulase-displaying yeast strain exhibited clear cell-to-cellulose adhesion and a "tearing" cellulose degradation pattern; the adhesion ability correlated with enhanced surface area and roughness of the target cellulose fibers, resulting in higher hydrolysis efficiency. The engineered yeast directly produced ethanol from rice straw despite a more than 40% decrease in the required enzyme dosage for high-density fermentation. Thus, improved cell-to-cellulose interactions provided a novel strategy for increasing cellulose hydrolysis, suggesting a mechanism for promoting the feasibility of cellulosic biofuel production. PMID:27079382

  20. Micromechanics and poroelasticity of hydrated cellulose networks.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Sanchez, P; Rincon, Mauricio; Wang, D; Brulhart, S; Stokes, J R; Gidley, M J

    2014-06-01

    The micromechanics of cellulose hydrogels have been investigated using a new rheological experimental approach, combined with simulation using a poroelastic constitutive model. A series of mechanical compression steps at different strain rates were performed as a function of cellulose hydrogel thickness, combined with small amplitude oscillatory shear after each step to monitor the viscoelasticity of the sample. During compression, bacterial cellulose hydrogels behaved as anisotropic materials with near zero Poisson's ratio. The micromechanics of the hydrogels altered with each compression as water was squeezed out of the structure, and microstructural changes were strain rate-dependent, with increased densification of the cellulose network and increased cellulose fiber aggregation observed for slower compressive strain rates. A transversely isotropic poroelastic model was used to explain the observed micromechanical behavior, showing that the mechanical properties of cellulose networks in aqueous environments are mainly controlled by the rate of water movement within the structure. PMID:24784575

  1. The case for cellulose production on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rummel, John D.

    1989-01-01

    From examining the consequences of not requiring that all wastes from life support be recycled back to the food plants, it is concluded that cellulose production on Mars could be an important input for many nonmetabolic material requirements on Mars. The fluxes of carbon in cellulose production would probably exceed those in food production, and therefore settlements on Mars could utilize cellulose farms in building a Mars infrastructure.

  2. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  3. Assimilatory Sulfate Reduction in C3, C3-C4, and C4 Species of Flaveria1

    PubMed Central

    Koprivova, Anna; Melzer, Michael; von Ballmoos, Peter; Mandel, Therese; Brunold, Christian; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    The activity of the enzymes catalyzing the first two steps of sulfate assimilation, ATP sulfurylase and adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), are confined to bundle sheath cells in several C4 monocot species. With the aim to analyze the molecular basis of this distribution and to determine whether it was a prerequisite or a consequence of the C4 photosynthetic mechanism, we compared the intercellular distribution of the activity and the mRNA of APR in C3, C3-C4, C4-like, and C4 species of the dicot genus Flaveria. Measurements of APR activity, mRNA level, and protein accumulation in six Flaveria species revealed that APR activity, cysteine, and glutathione levels were significantly higher in C4-like and C4 species than in C3 and C3-C4 species. ATP sulfurylase and APR mRNA were present at comparable levels in both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of C4 species Flaveria trinervia. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of APR protein in chloroplasts of both cell types. These findings, taken together with results from the literature, show that the localization of assimilatory sulfate reduction in the bundle sheath cells is not ubiquitous among C4 plants and therefore is neither a prerequisite nor a consequence of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:11598228

  4. High performance cellulose nanocomposites: comparing the reinforcing ability of bacterial cellulose and nanofibrillated cellulose.

    PubMed

    Lee, Koon-Yang; Tammelin, Tekla; Schulfter, Kerstin; Kiiskinen, Harri; Samela, Juha; Bismarck, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    This work investigates the surface and bulk properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and bacterial cellulose (BC), as well as their reinforcing ability in polymer nanocomposites. BC possesses higher critical surface tension of 57 mN m(-1) compared to NFC (41 mN m(-1)). The thermal degradation temperature in both nitrogen and air atmosphere of BC was also found to be higher than that of NFC. These results are in good agreement with the higher crystallinity of BC as determined by XRD, measured to be 71% for BC as compared to NFC of 41%. Nanocellulose papers were prepared from BC and NFC. Both papers possessed similar tensile moduli and strengths of 12 GPa and 110 MPa, respectively. Nanocomposites were manufactured by impregnating the nanocellulose paper with an epoxy resin using vacuum assisted resin infusion. The cellulose reinforced epoxy nanocomposites had a stiffness and strength of approximately ∼8 GPa and ∼100 MPa at an equivalent fiber volume fraction of 60 vol.-%. In terms of the reinforcing ability of NFC and BC in a polymer matrix, no significant difference between NFC and BC was observed. PMID:22839594

  5. Are eons and spinons really in superconducting M{sub 3}C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, W.E.; Phillips, P.

    1993-12-31

    A recurrent theme among several recently proposed (Eyrophys. Lett. 16, 751(1991)) mechanisms for superconductivity in M{sub 3}C{sub 60} (M=alkali metal) suggests that electron pairs bind together as a result of a subtle intramolecular correlation effect. The authors have calculated the dependence of such a mechanism on the range of the electron-electron correlations within the framework of perturbation theory. Specifically, it is found that long-range interactions defeat pair-binding when the range of interactions exceeds a critical distance ({approximately}.7A). Further, the analysis of a non-phononic isotope effect also finds that long-range interactions are needed to produce the experimentally-observed shifts in T{sub c}. Similarly, from the study of the effective Coulomb pseudo-potential parameter, {mu}{sup *}, it is found that extended-range interactions are needed to explain the magnitude of {Tc}. Because pair-binding fails in this limit, the authors argue that it is unlikely that the correlation-induced mechanism is responsible for superconductivity in doped fullerenes.

  6. Quantitative analysis of cellulose-reducing ends.

    PubMed

    Kongruang, Sasithorn; Han, Myung Joo; Breton, Claudia Isela Gil; Penner, Michael H

    2004-01-01

    Methods for the quantification of total and accessible reducing ends on traditional cellulose substrates have been evaluated because of their relevance to enzyme-catalyzed cellulose saccharificaion. For example, quantification of accessible reducing ends is likely to be the most direct measure of substrate concentration for the exo-acting, reducing end-preferring cellobiohydrolases. Two colorimetric assays (dinitrosalicylic acid [DNS] and bicinchoninic acid [BCA] assay ) and a radioisotope approach (NaB3H4 labeling) were evaluated for this application. Cellulose substrates included microcrystalline celluloses, bacterial celluloses, and filter paper. Estimates of the number of reducing ends per unit mass cellulose were found to be dependent on the assay system (i.e. the DNS and BCA assays gave strikingly different results). DNS-based values were several-fold higher than those obtained using the BCA assay, with fold-differences being substrate specific. Sodium borohydride reduction of celluloses, using cold or radiolabeled reagent under relatively mild conditions, was used to assess the number of surface (solvent-accessible) reducing ends. The results indicate that 30-40% of the reducing ends on traditional cellulose substrates are not solvent accessible; that is, they are buried in the interior of cellulose structures and thus not available to exo-acting enzymes. PMID:15054208

  7. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43N/mm(2) and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference. PMID:27127053

  8. Simultaneous cellulose conversion and hydrogen production assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV-light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guan; Ni, Chengsheng; Huang, Xiubing; Welgamage, Aakash; Lawton, Linda A; Robertson, Peter K J; Irvine, John T S

    2016-01-28

    Photocatalytic conversion of cellulose to sugars and carbon dioxide with simultaneous production of hydrogen assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV or solar light irradiation was achieved upon immobilization of cellulose onto a TiO2 photocatalyst. This approach enables production of hydrogen from water without using valuable sacrificial agents, and provides the possibility for recovering sugars as liquid fuels. PMID:26661296

  9. Synthesis, micellization behavior and alcohol induced amphipathic cellulose film of cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fang; Liu, Ya-nan; Yu, Jian-ling; Li, Hai-peng; Li, Gang

    2015-08-01

    This paper presented a novel preparation method of the cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant, and the surfactant was used to prepare amphipathic cellulose membrane. The native cotton cellulose was tailored to cellulose segments in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. Then, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic modification of cellulose segments were carried out by esterification and graft polymerization of the ɛ-caprolactone (ɛ-CL) monomer onto the hydroxyl group of cellulose as well as sulphonation with sulfamic acid. The amphipathic cellulose membrane was made by cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. The molecular structure of amphipathic cellulose surfactant was confirmed by FT-IR, and its surface active properties were investigated by Wilhelmy plate method and Steady-state fluorescence probe method, respectively. Experimental results showed that cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant caused low interfacial tension of 48.62 mN/m and its critical micelle concentration (cmc) value was 0.65 wt% when the grafting ratio of cellulose-g-PCL (poly-caprolactone) was 25.40%. The contact angle between a droplet of water and the surface of membrane was 90.84o, and the surface free energy of the alcohol induced cellulose membrane was 15.7 mJ/m2. This study may help increase using natural and biodegradable surface-activity materials with improved properties as surfactants.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces reticuli, an efficient degrader of crystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Al-Dilaimi, Arwa; Busche, Tobias; Wedderhoff, Ina; Schrempf, Hildgund; Kalinowski, Jörn; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío

    2016-03-20

    We report the complete, GC-rich genome sequence of the melanin producer Streptomyces reticuli Tü 45 (S. reticuli) that targets and degrades highly crystalline cellulose by the concerted action of a range of biochemically characterized proteins. It consists of a linear 8.3 Mb chromosome, a linear 0.8 Mb megaplasmid, a linear 94 kb plasmid and a circular 76 kb plasmid. Noteworthy, the megaplasmid is the second largest known Streptomyces plasmid. Preliminary analysis reveals, among others, 43 predicted gene clusters for the synthesis of secondary metabolites and 456 predicted genes for binding and degradation of cellulose, other polysaccharides and carbohydrate-containing compounds. PMID:26851387

  11. EBNA3C Directs Recruitment of RBPJ (CBF1) to Chromatin during the Process of Gene Repression in EBV Infected B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S.; Gillman, Adam C. T.; Paschos, Kostas; Bazot, Quentin; Kempkes, Bettina; Allday, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) can act as a potent repressor of gene expression, but little is known about the sequence of events occurring during the repression process. To explore further the role of EBNA3C in gene repression–particularly in relation to histone modifications and cell factors involved–the three host genes previously reported as most robustly repressed by EBNA3C were investigated. COBLL1, a gene of unknown function, is regulated by EBNA3C alone and the two co-regulated disintegrin/metalloproteases, ADAM28 and ADAMDEC1 have been described previously as targets of both EBNA3A and EBNA3C. For the first time, EBNA3C was here shown to be the main regulator of all three genes early after infection of primary B cells. Using various EBV-recombinants, repression over orders of magnitude was seen only when EBNA3C was expressed. Unexpectedly, full repression was not achieved until 30 days after infection. This was accurately reproduced in established LCLs carrying EBV-recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, demonstrating the utility of the conditional system to replicate events early after infection. Using this system, detailed chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that the initial repression was associated with loss of activation-associated histone modifications (H3K9ac, H3K27ac and H3K4me3) and was independent of recruitment of polycomb proteins and deposition of the repressive H3K27me3 modification, which were only observed later in repression. Most remarkable, and in contrast to current models of RBPJ in repression, was the observation that this DNA-binding factor accumulated at the EBNA3C-binding sites only when EBNA3C was functional. Transient reporter assays indicated that repression of these genes was dependent on the interaction between EBNA3C and RBPJ. This was confirmed with a novel EBV-recombinant encoding a mutant of EBNA3C unable to bind RBPJ, by showing this virus was incapable of

  12. EBNA3C Directs Recruitment of RBPJ (CBF1) to Chromatin during the Process of Gene Repression in EBV Infected B Cells.

    PubMed

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S; Gillman, Adam C T; Paschos, Kostas; Bazot, Quentin; Kempkes, Bettina; Allday, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) can act as a potent repressor of gene expression, but little is known about the sequence of events occurring during the repression process. To explore further the role of EBNA3C in gene repression-particularly in relation to histone modifications and cell factors involved-the three host genes previously reported as most robustly repressed by EBNA3C were investigated. COBLL1, a gene of unknown function, is regulated by EBNA3C alone and the two co-regulated disintegrin/metalloproteases, ADAM28 and ADAMDEC1 have been described previously as targets of both EBNA3A and EBNA3C. For the first time, EBNA3C was here shown to be the main regulator of all three genes early after infection of primary B cells. Using various EBV-recombinants, repression over orders of magnitude was seen only when EBNA3C was expressed. Unexpectedly, full repression was not achieved until 30 days after infection. This was accurately reproduced in established LCLs carrying EBV-recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, demonstrating the utility of the conditional system to replicate events early after infection. Using this system, detailed chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that the initial repression was associated with loss of activation-associated histone modifications (H3K9ac, H3K27ac and H3K4me3) and was independent of recruitment of polycomb proteins and deposition of the repressive H3K27me3 modification, which were only observed later in repression. Most remarkable, and in contrast to current models of RBPJ in repression, was the observation that this DNA-binding factor accumulated at the EBNA3C-binding sites only when EBNA3C was functional. Transient reporter assays indicated that repression of these genes was dependent on the interaction between EBNA3C and RBPJ. This was confirmed with a novel EBV-recombinant encoding a mutant of EBNA3C unable to bind RBPJ, by showing this virus was incapable of

  13. Comparative Characterization of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in C3, C4, and C3-C4 Intermediate Panicum Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Holaday, A. Scott; Black, Clanton C.

    1981-01-01

    Various properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases were compared in leaf preparations from C3-C4 intermediate, C3, and C4Panicum species. Values of Vmax in micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour at pH 8.3 were 57 to 75 for the enzyme from Panicum milioides, Panicum schenckii, and Panicum decipiens (all C3-C4). The values for Panicum laxum (C3) and Panicum prionitis (C4) were 20 to 40 and 952 to 1374, respectively. The Vmax values did not change at pH 7.3 except for the C4 value, which increased about 24%. At pH 8.3, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from C3 and C3-C4 species had slightly higher Km HCO3− and lower K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values than did the C4 enzyme. With each species at pH 7.3, all K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values were 2- to 4-fold greater. The enzyme from all species was inhibited 85 to 90% by 1 millimolar malate at rate-limiting phosphoenolpyruvate and Mg2+ levels. With low levels of malate, 0.2 millimolar, the rate curve with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate was distinctly sigmoidal, and the inhibition was not eliminated at 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate. Malate at 10 millimolar protected all phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from inactivation at 55 C at pH 5.5, but not at pH 8.3. Aspartate did not protect well. When incubated at 37 C at pH 8.3 without phosphoenolpyruvate, but with HCO3−, the enzyme from several C4 grasses lost 92 to 98% of the initial activity after 4 minutes, whereas the enzymes from C3 and C3-C4Panicum species retained 60 to 70% of their activities. In contrast, 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate stabilized the enzyme at 37 C in all plant extracts. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from C3-C4 intermediate Panicum species has properties most similar to the enzyme from C3Panicum species. The higher leaf activity of the enzyme from the intermediate plants than from C3 species is not due to any unusual property assayed other than a higher Vmax. PMID:16661669

  14. Salmonella Biofilm Formation on Aspergillus niger Involves Cellulose – Chitin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Maria T.; Carter, Michelle Q.; Parker, Craig T.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Huynh, Steven; Zhou, Yaguang

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella cycles between host and nonhost environments, where it can become an active member of complex microbial communities. The role of fungi in the environmental adaptation of enteric pathogens remains relatively unexplored. We have discovered that S. enterica Typhimurium rapidly attaches to and forms biofilms on the hyphae of the common fungus, Aspergillus niger. Several Salmonella enterica serovars displayed a similar interaction, whereas other bacterial species were unable to bind to the fungus. Bacterial attachment to chitin, a major constituent of fungal cell walls, mirrored this specificity. Pre-incubation of S. Typhimurium with N-acetylglucosamine, the monomeric component of chitin, reduced binding to chitin beads by as much as 727-fold and inhibited attachment to A. niger hyphae considerably. A cellulose-deficient mutant of S. Typhimurium failed to attach to chitin beads and to the fungus. Complementation of this mutant with the cellulose operon restored binding to chitin beads to 79% of that of the parental strain and allowed for attachment and biofilm formation on A. niger, indicating that cellulose is involved in bacterial attachment to the fungus via the chitin component of its cell wall. In contrast to cellulose, S. Typhimurium curli fimbriae were not required for attachment and biofilm development on the hyphae but were critical for its stability. Our results suggest that cellulose–chitin interactions are required for the production of mixed Salmonella-A. niger biofilms, and support the hypothesis that encounters with chitinaceous alternate hosts may contribute to the ecological success of human pathogens. PMID:22003399

  15. X-rays from the SNR 3C 391

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, F. D.; Wang, Z. R.

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray map and spectral information were obtained from a short Einstein observation of 3C 391 (G31.9 + 0.0). Both X-ray and radio emission appear to come from an irregular shell 5 arcmin in diameter. For a distance of 11 kpc the X-ray luminosity is at least 10 to the 35th ergs/sec. The luminosity, the radius, and the temperature are about as expected from a middle-aged SNR expanding into a medium with density a few tenths of an atom per cu cm.

  16. Discovery of an optical synchrotron jet in 3C 264

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, P.; Peletier, R.; Baxter, D.; Sparks, W. B.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Observations with the Faint Object Camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed a new optical jet in the core of the elliptical galaxy NGC 3862 (3C 264). Morphologically, this jet is similar to the synchrotron jets seen in other galaxies, as it shows knots and bifurcations. The optical spectral index is also similar to that found in other jets. Thus, the nucleus of NGC 3862 appears to contain the fifth known example of an optical synchrotron jet. Since NGC 3862 is a typical radio-loud elliptical galaxy, it seems likely that many nonthermal jets found in the radio continuum may also have optical counterparts.

  17. The optical variability periodicity analysis of 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Romero, G. E.; Lin, R. G.

    2001-02-01

    The authors have compiled measurements of ~ 110 years in the B-band of the quasar 3C273 and used this database to search for periodicity signals in the optical light curve. Two different methods were applied: the Jurkevich technique and the discrete correlation function (DCF) method. They revealed the existence of periods of 2.0, (13.65+/-0.20) and (22.50+/-0.20) years in the source variability. The possible origin of such a behavior is also discussed.

  18. Infrared variability properties of the blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.

    1999-10-01

    The long-term (about 27 years) near-infrared K light curve is constructed from the published literature for the blazar 3C 279. The Jurkevich method is adopted to analyse the periodicity, and a strong 7.1+/-0.44yr period is found, suggesting that the next near-infrared outburst will occur in 2002/03. The correlation between colour index (spectral index) and magnitude is discussed, and a significant correlation between (J-H) and K is found with a correlation coefficient r=0.72 (p=2.0x10^-10), which is consistent with Brown et al.'s proposal.

  19. Photopolarimetry of Blazar 3C454.3 from MIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliyan, Ks; Ganesh, S.; Chandra, Sunil; Joshi, Uc

    2009-12-01

    The Blazar 3C 454.3 has been active in Gamma-rays, optical and X- rays since Sept. 2009 ( Atel #2181, #2200, #2201). Very recently, it has been reported to be flaring up in the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray energy regimes(ATel #2322; #2325; #2326; #2328; #2329; #2330; #2332). In Atel #2333, Sasada et al report optical behaviour of this source on Dec 1.9 with brightness (V=14.06+/-0.02 and degree of polarization 6.0+/-0.1% on the same epoch.

  20. The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.; Vio, R.; Cappellaro, E; Turatto, M Padova Osservatorio Astronomico, Padua )

    1990-08-01

    The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446 is investigated using power spectrum and structure function analysis along with a new set of observations that extend the available data till 1989. No contradiction is found between the PS and SF analyses. The presence of the 1540-day periodicity is strengthened by the occurrence of the 1988 luminosity peak, suggesting that the next burst will occur in the northern spring of 1992. The time series of the quasar is nonstationary. The light variations are determined by a sequence of luminosity bursts, mostly regularly spaced in time and lasting up to 2 yr. 25 refs.

  1. Pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb

    Sugars are the feedstocks for many promising advanced cellulosic biofuels. Traditional sugars derived from starch and sugar crops are limited in their availability. In principle, more plentiful supply of sugars can be obtained from depolymerization of cellulose, the most abundant form of biomass in the world. Breaking the glycosidic bonds between the pyranose rings in the cellulose chain to liberate glucose has usually been pursued by enzymatic hydrolysis although a purely thermal depolymerization route to sugars is also possible. Fast pyrolysis of pure cellulose yields primarily levoglucosan, an anhydrosugar that can be hydrolyzed to glucose. However, naturally occurring alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEM) in biomass are strongly catalytic toward ring-breaking reactions that favor formation of light oxygenates over anhydrosugars. Removing the AAEM by washing was shown to be effective in increasing the yield of anhydrosugars; but this process involves removal of large amount of water from biomass that renders it energy intensive and thereby impractical. In this work passivation of the AAEM (making them less active or inactive) using mineral acid infusion was explored that will increase the yield of anhydrosugars from fast pyrolysis of biomass. Mineral acid infusion was tried by previous researchers, but the possibility of chemical reactions between infused acid and AAEM in the biomass appears to have been overlooked, possibly because metal cations might be expected to already be substantially complexed to chlorine or other strong anions that are found in biomass. Likewise, it appears that previous researchers assumed that as long as AAEM cations were in the biomass, they would be catalytically active regardless of the nature of their complexion with anions. On the contrary, we hypothesized that AAEM can be converted to inactive or less active salts using mineral acids. Various biomass feedstocks were infused with mineral (hydrochloric, nitric, sulfuric and

  2. [Terahertz and Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Cellulose].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-hua; Zhang, Le; Shentu, Nan-ying

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the Terahertz's application prospect, corn, wheat husk and reed were used to detect their Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy, and be compared with that of cellulose powder. The experimental results show that all of their absorption peaks exist at 1.75, 1.62, 1.1, and 0.7 THz. Absorption intensity of cellulose powder, corn, wheat husk and reed were compared in some frequencies points. It finds that corn, wheat husk and reed have higher absorption intensity than cellulose powder in early frequency domain. However, absorption intensity of cellulose powder is the strongest at 1.62 THz. Cellulose content in corn, wheat husk and reed were detected by using the method of chemical analysis. The peaks of absorption coefficient are related to their cellulose content at this frequency. It shows that plant cellulose occur lattice vibration in the frequency. Deformation, bending, flexing, and other changes appear to their functional keys. Quantum chemical calculation was carried out by using density functional theory to cellulose and the structure diagram of cellulose molecular formula was obtained. It also finds some absorption peaks exist at 0.7, 1.1, and 1.75 THz. Characterization of cellulose clusters mainly includes CH2, OH, CH, and so on. Glucose hydroxyl radical on the ring is active in the cellulose chain. Where hydroxyl related chemical reaction can occur, Hydroxyl can also be integrated into the intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bond. Terahertz wave can promote hydrogen bond vibration. This kind of vibration is weak in the intermolecular interaction. The vibration and rotating happen in dipole transition. The crystal lattice rotates and is absorptive in low frequency, and large molecular skeleton vibrates. All of them can show different intensity and position of the absorption peak in the terahertz band. Corn and cellulose were analyzed by infrared spectrum. The reverse and vibration mode of cellulose was discussed. The absorption peak is

  3. Photonic Crystal Cavities in Cubic (3C) Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulaski, Marina; Babinec, Thomas; Buckley, Sonia; Rundquist, Armand; Provine, J.; Alassaad, Kassem; Ferro, Gabriel; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2014-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) combines many of the outstanding material properties of other well-known optical and quantum optical materials, including strong optical nonlinearity, high Young's modulus, and a host of optically-active crystalline defects, in a single CMOS-compatible platform. For many applications in classical and quantum information processing, the material properties of the cubic silicon carbide polytype (3C-SiC) in particular are advantageous. We therefore present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities in cubic 3C-SiC thin films (200 nm). We demonstrate cavity resonances across the infrared telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1.25 - 1.6 μm. Finally, we highlight our progress developing higher Q/V nanobeam cavities, as well as extending this optical cavity platform towards integration with SiC color centers. PECASE Grant ECCS-10 25811, NSF Grant ECS-9731293, Stanford Graduate Fellowship, National Science Graduate Fellowship.

  4. Design and structure-activity relationships of novel inhibitors of human rhinovirus 3C protease.

    PubMed

    Kawatkar, S P; Gagnon, M; Hoesch, V; Tiong-Yip, C; Johnson, K; Ek, M; Nilsson, E; Lister, T; Olsson, L; Patel, J; Yu, Q

    2016-07-15

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a primary cause of common cold and is linked to exacerbation of underlying respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD. HRV 3C protease, which is responsible for cleavage of viral polyprotein in to proteins essential for viral life-cycle, represents an important target. We have designed proline- and azetidine-based analogues of Rupintrivir that target the P2 pocket of the binding site. Potency optimization, aided with X-ray crystallography and quantum mechanical calculations, led to compounds with activity against a broad spectrum of HRV serotypes. Altogether, these compounds represent alternative starting points to identify promising leads in our continual efforts to treat HRV infections. PMID:27265257

  5. Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Different Photosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O.; Deniro, Michael J.; Johnson, Hyrum B.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants were determined for plants growing within a small area in Val Verde County, Texas. Plants having CAM had distinctly higher deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios than plants having C3 and C4 metabolism. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, each photosynthetic mode separates into a distinct cluster of points. C4 plants had many D/H ratios similar to those of C3 plants, so that hydrogen isotope ratios cannot be used to distinguish between these two photosynthetic modes. Portulaca mundula, which may have a modified photosynthetic mode between C4 and CAM, had a hydrogen isotope ratio between those of the C4 and CAM plants. When oxygen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, no distinct clustering of the C4 and CAM plants occurs. Thus, oxygen isotope ratios are not useful in distinguishing between these metabolic modes. A plot of hydrogen isotope ratios versus oxygen isotope ratios for this sample set shows considerable overlap between oxygen isotope ratios of the different photosynthetic modes without a concomitant overlap in the hydrogen isotope ratios of CAM and the other two photosynthetic modes. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that higher D/H ratios in CAM plants relative to C3 and C4 plants are due to isotopic fractionations occurring during biochemical reactions. PMID:16663460

  6. [Audiometry in the cellulose industry].

    PubMed

    Corrao, C R; Milano, L; Pedulla, P; Carlesi, G; Bacaloni, A; Monaco, E

    1993-01-01

    A noise level dosimetry and audiometric testing were conducted in a cellulose factory to determine the hazardous noise level and the prevalence of noise induced hearing loss among the exposed workers. The noise level was recorded up to 90 db (A) in several working areas. 18 workers, potentially exposed to noise injury, evidenced a significant hearing loss. While no evidence of noise injury was recorded in a control group of 100 subjects. This finding suggest a strict relationship between audiometric tests, the noise level recorded in the working place and the working seniority of exposed employers. PMID:7720969

  7. Ethanol from municipal cellulosic wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. J., Jr.; Timbario, T. J.; Mulloney, J. A., Jr.

    This paper addresses the use of municipal cellulosic wastes as a feedstock for producing ethanol fuels, and describes the application of enzymatic hydrolysis technology for their production. The concept incorporates recent process technology developments within the framework of an existing industry familiar with large-scale ethanol fermentation (the brewing industry). Preliminary indications are that the cost of producing ethanol via enzymatic hydrolysis in an existing plant with minimal facility modifications (low capital investment) can be significantly less than that of ethanol from grain fermentation.

  8. First-principles study of helium trapping in cementite Fe3C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B. L.; Ping, D. H.; Geng, W. T.

    2014-01-01

    We report a first-principles density functional theory study of helium distribution in cementite Fe3C. The solution energy of interstitial He is similar to that in bcc Fe; by contrast, the substitutional He (replacing Fe) is remarkably (0.74 eV) more stable than in the latter, due to the easiness of Fe vacancy formation in Fe3C. Therefore, He is predicted to be significantly more soluble in cementite than in Fe matrix. We find the binding potencies of both a substitutional-interstitial He pair (0.21 eV) and a substitutional-substitutional He pair (0.22 eV) are noticeably weaker in cementite than in bcc Fe, indicating a less powerful self-trapping. As a consequence, small size cementite in ferritic steels might serve as scattered trapping centers for He, mitigate helium bubble growth, and make the steel more swelling resistant while under neutron irradiation, just as dispersed oxide particles do.

  9. Optical and mechanical properties of nanofibrillated cellulose: Toward a robust platform for next-generation green technologies.

    PubMed

    Simão, Claudia D; Reparaz, Juan S; Wagner, Markus R; Graczykowski, Bartlomiej; Kreuzer, Martin; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; García, Yamila; Malho, Jani-Markus; Goñi, Alejandro R; Ahopelto, Jouni; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M

    2015-08-01

    Nanofibrillated cellulose, a polymer that can be obtained from one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature, is being increasingly explored due to its outstanding properties for packaging and device applications. Still, open challenges in engineering its intrinsic properties remain to address. To elucidate the optical and mechanical stability of nanofibrillated cellulose as a standalone platform, herein we report on three main findings: (i) for the first time an experimental determination of the optical bandgap of nanofibrillated cellulose, important for future modeling purposes, based on the onset of the optical bandgap of the nanofibrillated cellulose film at Eg≈275 nm (4.5 eV), obtained using absorption and cathodoluminescence measurements. In addition, comparing this result with ab-initio calculations of the electronic structure the exciton binding energy is estimated to be Eex≈800 meV; (ii) hydrostatic pressure experiments revealed that nanofibrillated cellulose is structurally stable at least up to 1.2 GPa; and (iii) surface elastic properties with repeatability better than 5% were observed under moisture cycles with changes of the Young modulus as large as 65%. The results obtained show the precise determination of significant properties as elastic properties and interactions that are compared with similar works and, moreover, demonstrate that nanofibrillated cellulose properties can be reversibly controlled, supporting the extended potential of nanofibrillated cellulose as a robust platform for green-technology applications. PMID:25933520

  10. Systems biology defines the biological significance of redox-active proteins during cellulose degradation in an aerobic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jeffrey G; Crouch, Lucy; Labourel, Aurore; Forsberg, Zarah; Bukhman, Yury V; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Gilbert, Harry J; Keating, David H

    2014-10-01

    Microbial depolymerization of plant cell walls contributes to global carbon balance and is a critical component of renewable energy. The genomes of lignocellulose degrading microorganisms encode diverse classes of carbohydrate modifying enzymes, although currently there is a paucity of knowledge on the role of these proteins in vivo. We report the comprehensive analysis of the cellulose degradation system in the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus. Gene expression profiling of C. japonicus demonstrated that three of the 12 predicted β-1,4 endoglucanases (cel5A, cel5B, and cel45A) and the sole predicted cellobiohydrolase (cel6A) showed elevated expression during growth on cellulose. Targeted gene disruptions of all 13 predicted cellulase genes showed that only cel5B and cel6A were required for optimal growth on cellulose. Our analysis also identified three additional genes required for cellulose degradation: lpmo10B encodes a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO), while cbp2D and cbp2E encode proteins containing carbohydrate binding modules and predicted cytochrome domains for electron transfer. CjLPMO10B oxidized cellulose and Cbp2D demonstrated spectral properties consistent with redox function. Collectively, this report provides insight into the biological role of LPMOs and redox proteins in cellulose utilization and suggests that C. japonicus utilizes a combination of hydrolytic and oxidative cleavage mechanisms to degrade cellulose. PMID:25294408

  11. Rheological characterization of microcrystalline cellulose and silicified microcrystalline cellulose wet masses using a mixer torque rheometer.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, P; Schaefer, T; Hellén, L; Juppo, A M; Yliruusi, J

    1999-10-25

    The rheological properties of silicified microcrystalline cellulose (Prosolv 50) were compared with those of standard grades of microcrystalline cellulose (Emcocel 50 and Avicel PH 101). Cellulose samples were analyzed using nitrogen adsorption together with particle size, flowability, density and swelling volume studies. The rheological behaviour of the wet powder masses was studied as a function of mixing time using a mixer torque rheometer (MTR). Silicified microcrystalline cellulose exhibited improved flow characteristics and increased specific surface area compared to standard microcrystalline cellulose grades. Although the silicification process affected the swelling properties and, furthermore, the mixing kinetics of microcrystalline cellulose, the source of the microcrystalline cellulose had a stronger influence than silicification on the liquid requirement at peak torque. PMID:10518674

  12. Conformational studies of cellulosic fragments by DFT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of cellulosic fragments by DFTr is a continuation of our efforts to produce quality structural data that will be valuable to those working in the field of cellulose structure and enzymatic degradation. Using a reduced basis set and density functional DFTr (B3LYP), optimization of cellulosi...

  13. Synthesis of Cellulose Acetate from Cotton Byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton burr and cottonseed hull are relatively inexpensive cotton byproducts. In an effort to derive greater value out of these natural renewable materials, we have succeeded in converting part of them into cellulose acetate without prior chemical breakdown or physical separation of cellulose, ligni...

  14. Idealized powder diffraction patterns for cellulose polymorphs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose samples are routinely analyzed by X-ray diffraction to determine their crystal type (polymorph) and crystallinity. However, the connection is seldom made between those efforts and the crystal structures of cellulose that have been determined with synchrotron X-radiation and neutron diffrac...

  15. Diffraction from nonperiodic models of cellulose crystals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Powder and fiber diffraction patterns were calculated for model cellulose crystallites with chains 20 glucose units long. Model sizes ranged from four chains to 169 chains, based on cellulose I' coordinates, and were subjected to various combinations of energy minimization and molecular dynamics (M...

  16. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daniel I. C.; Avgerinos, George C.

    1983-01-01

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

  17. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydroxypropyl cellulose. 172.870 Section 172.870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food...

  18. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26590309

  19. Salmonella promotes virulence by repressing cellulose production

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Mauricio H.; Lee, Eun-Jin; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. In bacteria, cellulose confers protection against environmental insults and is a constituent of biofilms typically formed on abiotic surfaces. We report that, surprisingly, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium makes cellulose when inside macrophages. We determine that preventing cellulose synthesis increases virulence, whereas stimulation of cellulose synthesis inside macrophages decreases virulence. An attenuated mutant lacking the mgtC gene exhibited increased cellulose levels due to increased expression of the cellulose synthase gene bcsA and of cyclic diguanylate, the allosteric activator of the BcsA protein. Inactivation of bcsA restored wild-type virulence to the Salmonella mgtC mutant, but not to other attenuated mutants displaying a wild-type phenotype regarding cellulose. Our findings indicate that a virulence determinant can promote pathogenicity by repressing a pathogen's antivirulence trait. Moreover, they suggest that controlling antivirulence traits increases long-term pathogen fitness by mediating a trade-off between acute virulence and transmission. PMID:25848006

  20. Salmonella promotes virulence by repressing cellulose production.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Lee, Eun-Jin; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-04-21

    Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. In bacteria, cellulose confers protection against environmental insults and is a constituent of biofilms typically formed on abiotic surfaces. We report that, surprisingly, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium makes cellulose when inside macrophages. We determine that preventing cellulose synthesis increases virulence, whereas stimulation of cellulose synthesis inside macrophages decreases virulence. An attenuated mutant lacking the mgtC gene exhibited increased cellulose levels due to increased expression of the cellulose synthase gene bcsA and of cyclic diguanylate, the allosteric activator of the BcsA protein. Inactivation of bcsA restored wild-type virulence to the Salmonella mgtC mutant, but not to other attenuated mutants displaying a wild-type phenotype regarding cellulose. Our findings indicate that a virulence determinant can promote pathogenicity by repressing a pathogen's antivirulence trait. Moreover, they suggest that controlling antivirulence traits increases long-term pathogen fitness by mediating a trade-off between acute virulence and transmission. PMID:25848006

  1. Enzymatic degradation of (ligno)cellulose.

    PubMed

    Bornscheuer, Uwe; Buchholz, Klaus; Seibel, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Glycoside-degrading enzymes play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass into low-price biofuels and high-value-added chemicals. New insight into protein functions and substrate structures, the kinetics of recognition, and degradation events has resulted in a substantial improvement of our understanding of cellulose degradation. PMID:25136976

  2. Book review: "cellulose science and technology"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose Science and Technology” by Jean-Luc Wertz, Olivier Bédué and Jean P. Mercier is a fairly comprehensive, up-to-date introduction to many areas of cellulose science. Their summary of a vast and often controversial literature is reasonably comprehensive. It requires little background to re...

  3. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOEpatents

    Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

    1983-07-26

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

  4. Update on Models of Cellulose Crystals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes progress in the computational modeling of cellulose crystals since our 2007 report. These crystal models are needed to better understand the interactions of cotton cellulose with water, enzymes and chemical finishing agents. Previous models resulted from molecular dynamics si...

  5. A new procedure for the hydrophobization of cellulose fibre using laccase and a hydrophobic phenolic compound.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ubasart, Jordi; Colom, Josep F; Vila, Carlos; Gómez Hernández, Nuria; Blanca Roncero, M; Vidal, Teresa

    2012-05-01

    A new biotechnological procedure using laccase in combination with a hydrophobic phenolic compound (lauryl gallate) for the hydrophobization of cellulose fibres and internal sizing of paper was developed. Cellulose fibres from hardwood kraft pulp were incubated with laccase (Lac), in combination with lauryl gallate (LG). The Lac-LG treatment resulted in the internal sizing of paper, and also in significantly reduced water penetration in the handsheets and wettability of the paper surface. Paper was found not to be effectively rendered hydrophobic by LG alone. SEM images of the fibre network revealed the presence of the sizing agent: a product of the reaction between laccase and lauryl gallate. Binding of lauryl gallate to cellulose fibres was suggested by the increase in kappa number of the pulp and further confirmed by IR spectroscopy. PMID:22440576

  6. Single-cell protein from waste cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, C. E.; Callihan, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The recycle, reuse, or reclamation of single cell protein from liquid and solid agricultural waste fibers by a fermentation process is reported. It is shown that cellulose comprises the bulk of the fibers at 50% to 55% of the dry weight of the refuse and that its biodegradability is of prime importance in the choice of a substrate. The application of sodium hydroxide followed by heat and pressure serves to de-polymerize and disrupt lignin structure while swelling the cellulose to increase water uptake and pore volume. Some of the lignin, hemi-celluloses, ash, and cellulose of the material is hydrolized and solubilized. Introduction of microorganisms to the substrate fibers mixed with nutrients produces continuous fermentation of cellulose for further protein extraction and purification.

  7. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, T.L.; Lee, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  8. Photophysics of alloxazines on cellulose.

    PubMed

    Sikorski, Marek; Sikorska, Ewa; Khmelinskii, Igor V; Gonzalez-Moreno, Rafael; Bourdelande, José L; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    2002-09-01

    We report the UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence and transient absorption spectra of selected methylalloxazines adsorbed on cellulose from a polar solvent. The ground-state properties of these probe molecules in the cellulose matrix are similar to those in polar protic solvents. Fluorescence decay data allowed identification of three emitting species for every molecule studied, excluding 1-methyllumichrome which lacks the capacity to rearrange into an isoalloxazinic form. The short-lived emission component was attributed to the neutral form of the molecule, and the two longer-lived components were assigned to the two distinct deprotonated monoanionic forms resulting from dissociation at the respective N(3) and N(1) nitrogen atoms. The two monoanions coexist due to their very similar pKa, values. Transient absorption experiments detected two species created by the laser pulse in these systems. The short-lived species was identified as the triplet excited state, and the long-lived species as the semireduced radical, formed by hydrogen atom or proton transfer from the glycosidic unit to the alloxazine carbonyl group. PMID:12665311

  9. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester.

  10. Substitutional Ge in 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, C.; Kolodzey, J.

    1999-02-01

    The incorporation of substitutional Ge into 3C-SiC alloys is studied theoretically with an anharmonic Keating model specifically adapted to the computation of the structural properties and the lattice dynamics of Si1-x-yGexCy alloys. Basic energy calculations show that the substitution of Si by Ge is more probable than the substitution of C by Ge in the zinc-blende silicon carbide crystal. If Ge replaces only Si, then the lattice parameter equals (0.43593±0.00002)+(0.000337±0.000002)y, where y stands for the Ge content. Hence, Vegard's law is not applicable. The alloy is characterized by a distinct phonon spectrum whose maximum peak position in cm-1 is best described by the exponential decay (243±1)+(27±2)exp[-y/(7.5±1.2)] up to the zinc-blende GeC compound.

  11. Behavior of inversion layers in 3C silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, R. E.; Kopanski, J. J.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    A study on the field-induced surface-charge region in 3C silicon carbide (SiC) using 1 MHz capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements at room temperature is here reported. A double column mercury probe was used on oxidized SiC substrates to form metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures. These structures were characterized in terms of the substrate doping profile, effective fixed oxide charge, and interface trap density. A distinctive feature of the MOS C-V curves from accumulation to inversion is that after going into deep depletion the capacitance rises to its equilibrium inversion level during the voltage sweep. Capacitance transient measurements indicate that the minority-carrier generation occurs at the SiO2/SiC interface.

  12. Behavior of inversion layers in 3C silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, R. E.; Kopanski, J. J.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-08-01

    A study on the field-induced surface-charge region in 3C silicon carbide (SiC) using 1 MHz capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements at room temperature is here reported. A double column mercury probe was used on oxidized SiC substrates to form metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures. These structures were characterized in terms of the substrate doping profile, effective fixed oxide charge, and interface trap density. A distinctive feature of the MOS C-V curves from accumulation to inversion is that after going into deep depletion the capacitance rises to its equilibrium inversion level during the voltage sweep. Capacitance transient measurements indicate that the minority-carrier generation occurs at the SiO2/SiC interface.

  13. Structural Variability of 3C 111 on Parsec Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossberger, C.; Kadler, M.; Wilms, J.; Muller, C.; Beuchert, T.; Ros, E.; Ojha, R.; Aller, M.; Aller, H.; Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Nestoras, I.; Schmidt, R.; Zensus, J. A.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.; Riquelme, D.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the parsec-scale structural variability of the extragalactic jet 3C 111 related to a major radio flux density outburst in 2007, The data analyzed were taken within the scope of the MOJAVE, UMRAO, and F-GAMMA programs, which monitor a large sample of the radio brightest compact extragalactic jets with the VLBA, the University of Michigan 26 m, the Effelsberg 100 m, and the IRAM 30 m radio telescopes. The analysis of the VLBA data is performed by fitting Gaussian model components in the visibility domain, We associate the ejection of bright features in the radio jet with a major flux-density outburst in 2007, The evolution of these features suggests the formation of a leading component and multiple trailing components

  14. Trisodium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7)

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tris­odium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7), has been solved and refined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional theory (DFT). There are two independent five-coordinate Na+ and one six-coordinate Na+ cations in the asymmetric unit. The [NaO5] and [NaO6] polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework. There are channels parallel to the a and b axes in which the remainder of the citrate anions reside. The only hydrogen bonds are an intra­molecular one between the hy­droxy group and one of the terminal carboxyl­ate O atoms and an intermolecular one between a methylene group and the hydroxyl O atom. PMID:27308044

  15. Milliarcsecond polarization structure of the superluminal quasar 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David H.; Kollgaard, Ronald I.; Brown, Leslie F.; Gabuzda, Denise C.; Wardle, John F. C.

    1990-09-01

    A 2 x 10 marcsec-resolution determination is presented for the total intensity and linear polarization structures of the superluminal quasar 3C 273 at 5 GHz. Substantial polarized flux was detected from several superluminal components of the jet, whose fractional polarization increased symmetrically with distance from the core; the most distant component is highly polarized and exhibits a highly ordered magnetic field. Within a few marcsec of the core, the inferred magnetic field orientation varies rapidly with position along the jet. The primarily longitudinal magnetic field orientation is concluded to become established within 20 marcsec of the core. A highly disorganized magnetic field is the most plausible explanation for the low degree of polarization in the innermost regions of the jet.

  16. The Parsec-Scale Jet of Quasar 3C345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zensus, J. A.; Rabaca, C. R.

    1993-12-01

    We discuss the parsec-scale structure of the superluminal quasar 3C345. Monitoring of the structure with VLBI at cm and mm wavelengths has shown apparent superluminal motion of at least four distinct emission features, over a distance of more than 40 pc from the stationary core (Zensus, Cohen, and Unwin, submitted to APJ). Near the core, the projected trajectories are curved and different for individual components, indicative of more complicated flow patterns than previously suspected, and consistent with motion along helical paths. The motion accelerates with increasing separation from the core, as the jet curves towards the extended kiloparsec structure. The flux evolution of individual components can be described using a generalized shock model. We apply this to component C4 and discuss the impact of orientation effects and implications for specific shock models.

  17. Extended Ly-alpha emission associated with 3C 294

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.; Spinrad, Hyron; Dickinson, Mark; Van Breugel, Wil; Liebert, James; Djorgovski, S.; Eisenhardt, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Optical, IR, and radio observations of the powerful radio source 3C 294, which is surrounded by a large cloud of ionized gas, are presented. The galaxy is faint in the rest-frame UV, yet has a near-IR luminosity that is typical of radio galaxies at redshifts of order two. In contrast to the large extent of the ionized gas, the K-band image is quite compact. The emission-line cloud is closely aligned with the radio source axis and has an ionization state indicative of ionization by a nonstellar source. The velocity field of the gas has both large ordered motions and large turbulent components. The total mass required to keep the gas bound to the system is comparable to present-day massive galaxies and their halos. The velocity fields of the high-ionization lines are systematically different from Ly-alpha in a manner that is not easily understood.

  18. NIR Flaring of the Quasar 3C454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Carramiñana, A.; Recillas, E.; Escobedo, G.; Porras, A.; Mayya, Y. D.; Valdes, J. R.

    2010-10-01

    We report the ongoing NIR flare of the quasar 3C454.3, also known as [HB89]2251+158. It is likely associated with a gamma ray source CGRaBSJ2253+1608 and the radio source WMAP055. It is an intermediate redshift FRSQSO Z=0.859 (RA=22:53:57.75, Dec=+16:08:53.6(J2000). On October 31th,2010 (JD 2455500.781451), we determined the NIR flux from this object to correspond to H = 11.190 +/- 0.03, 0.63mag brighter than it was two days earlier(JD 2455498.821166) when we determined it to have H = 11.820 +/- 0.03.

  19. Development of potent inhibitors of the coxsackievirus 3C protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eui Seung; Lee, Won Gil; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Rho, Seong Hwan; Im, Isak; Yang, Sung Tae; Sellamuthu, Saravanan; Lee, Yong Jae; Kwon, Sun Jae; Park, Ohkmae K.; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Park, Woo Jin . E-mail: wjpark@gist.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Chul . E-mail: yongchul@gist.ac.kr

    2007-06-22

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3C protease (3CP) plays essential roles in the viral replication cycle, and therefore, provides an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of human diseases caused by CVB3 infection. CVB3 3CP and human rhinovirus (HRV) 3CP have a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity. Comparative modeling of these two 3CPs revealed one prominent distinction; an Asn residue delineating the S2' pocket in HRV 3CP is replaced by a Tyr residue in CVB3 3CP. AG7088, a potent inhibitor of HRV 3CP, was modified by substitution of the ethyl group at the P2' position with various hydrophobic aromatic rings that are predicted to interact preferentially with the Tyr residue in the S2' pocket of CVB3 3CP. The resulting derivatives showed dramatically increased inhibitory activities against CVB3 3CP. In addition, one of the derivatives effectively inhibited the CVB3 proliferation in vitro.

  20. Simulations of cellulose translocation in the bacterial cellulose synthase suggest a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zimmer, Jochen; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-01-29

    The processive cycle of the bacterial cellulose synthase (Bcs) includes the addition of a single glucose moiety to the end of a growing cellulose chain followed by the translocation of the nascent chain across the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation and its precise location within the processive cycle are not well understood. In particular, the molecular details of how a polymer (cellulose) whose basic structural unit is a dimer (cellobiose) can be constructed by adding one monomer (glucose) at a time are yet to be elucidated. Here, we have utilized molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations tomore » the shed light on these questions. We find that translocation forward by one glucose unit is quite favorable energetically, giving a free energy stabilization of greater than 10 kcal mol-1. In addition, there is only a small barrier to translocation, implying that translocation is not rate limiting within the Bcs processive cycle (given experimental rates for cellulose synthesis in vitro). Perhaps most significantly, our results also indicate that steric constraints at the transmembrane tunnel entrance regulate the dimeric structure of cellulose. Namely, when a glucose molecule is added to the cellulose chain in the same orientation as the acceptor glucose, the terminal glucose freely rotates upon forward motion, thus suggesting a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose. We characterize both the conserved and non-conserved enzyme-polysaccharide interactions that drive translocation, and find that 20 of the 25 residues that strongly interact with the translocating cellulose chain in the simulations are well conserved, mostly with polar or aromatic side chains. Our results also allow for a dynamical analysis of the role of the so-called 'finger helix' in cellulose translocation that has been observed structurally. Taken together, these findings aid in the elucidation of the translocation steps of the Bcs processive

  1. Simulations of cellulose translocation in the bacterial cellulose synthase suggest a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zimmer, Jochen; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-01-01

    The processive cycle of the bacterial cellulose synthase (Bcs) includes the addition of a single glucose moiety to the end of a growing cellulose chain followed by the translocation of the nascent chain across the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation and its precise location within the processive cycle are not well understood. In particular, the molecular details of how a polymer (cellulose) whose basic structural unit is a dimer (cellobiose) can be constructed by adding one monomer (glucose) at a time are yet to be elucidated. Here, we have utilized molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to the shed light on these questions. We find that translocation forward by one glucose unit is quite favorable energetically, giving a free energy stabilization of greater than 10 kcal/mol. In addition, there is only a small barrier to translocation, implying that translocation is not rate limiting within the Bcs processive cycle (given experimental rates for cellulose synthesis in vitro). Perhaps most significantly, our results also indicate that steric constraints at the transmembrane tunnel entrance regulate the dimeric structure of cellulose. Namely, when a glucose molecule is added to the cellulose chain in the same orientation as the acceptor glucose, the terminal glucose freely rotates upon forward motion, thus suggesting a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose. We characterize both the conserved and non-conserved enzyme-polysaccharide interactions that drive translocation, and find that 20 of the 25 residues that strongly interact with the translocating cellulose chain in the simulations are well conserved, mostly with polar or aromatic side chains. Our results also allow for a dynamical analysis of the role of the so-called `finger helix' in cellulose translocation that has been observed structurally. Taken together, these findings aid in the elucidation of the translocation steps of the Bcs processive cycle and

  2. 50 CFR Table 3c to Part 680 - Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports 3c Table 3c to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3c Table 3c to Part 680—Crab Product Codes for...

  3. 50 CFR Table 3c to Part 680 - Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports 3c Table 3c to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3c Table 3c to Part 680—Crab Product Codes for...

  4. 50 CFR Table 3c to Part 680 - Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports 3c Table 3c to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3c Table 3c to Part 680—Crab Product Codes for...

  5. Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

  6. Cellulose production and cellulose synthase gene detection in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Valera, Maria José; Torija, Maria Jesús; Mas, Albert; Mateo, Estibaliz

    2015-02-01

    The ability of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) to produce cellulose has gained much industrial interest due to the physical and chemical characteristics of bacterial cellulose. The production of cellulose occurs in the presence of oxygen and in a glucose-containing medium, but it can also occur during vinegar elaboration by the traditional method. The vinegar biofilm produced by AAB on the air-liquid interface is primarily composed of cellulose and maintains the cells in close contact with oxygen. In this study, we screened for the ability of AAB to produce cellulose using different carbon sources in the presence or absence of ethanol. The presence of cellulose in biofilms was confirmed using the fluorochrome Calcofluor by microscopy. Moreover, the process of biofilm formation was monitored under epifluorescence microscopy using the Live/Dead BacLight Kit. A total of 77 AAB strains belonging to 35 species of Acetobacter, Komagataeibacter, Gluconacetobacter, and Gluconobacter were analysed, and 30 strains were able to produce a cellulose biofilm in at least one condition. This cellulose production was correlated with the PCR amplification of the bcsA gene that encodes cellulose synthase. A total of eight degenerated primers were designed, resulting in one primer pair that was able to detect the presence of this gene in 27 AAB strains, 26 of which formed cellulose. PMID:25381910

  7. Evaluation of cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol) membranes.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Maha M; Koschella, Andreas; Kadry, Ghada; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Cellulose was isolated from rice straw and converted to carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). Both polymers were crosslinked with poly(vinyl alcholo) (PVA). The physical properties of the resulting membranes were characterized by FT-IR, TGA, DSC and SEM. The cellulose and CMC were first prepared from bleached rice straw pulp. The infrared spectroscopy of the resulting polymer membranes indicated a decrease in the absorbance of the OH group at 3300-3400 cm(-1), which is due to bond formation with either the cellulose or CMC with the PVA. The thermal stability of PVA/cellulose and PVA/CMC membranes was lower than PVA membrane. The surface of the resulting polymer membranes showed smooth surface in case of the PVA/CMC membrane and rough surface in case of the PVA/cellulose membrane. Desalination test, using 0.2% NaCl, showed that pure PVA membranes had no effect while membranes containing either cellulose or CMC as filler were able to decrease the content of the NaCl from the solution by 25% and 15%, respectively. Transport properties, including water and chloroform vapor were studied. The moisture transport was reduced by the presence of both cellulose and CMC. Moreover, the membranes containing cellulose and CMC showed significantly reduced flux compared to the pure PVA. The water sorption, solubility and soaking period at different pH solutions were also studied and showed that the presence of both cellulose and CMC influences the properties. PMID:23618287

  8. Epstein-Barr virus EBNA3C represses Cp, the major promoter for EBNA expression, but has no effect on the promoter of the cell gene CD21.

    PubMed Central

    Radkov, S A; Bain, M; Farrell, P J; West, M; Rowe, M; Allday, M J

    1997-01-01

    EBNA3C is a potent repressor of transcription when bound to DNA as a fusion with the DNA binding domain (DBD) of GALA. A survey of promoters has revealed that the wild-type, unfused EBNA3C can specifically repress expression from reporter plasmids containing the Epstein-Barr virus Cp latency-associated promoter. Repression of Cp activity required amino acids 207 to 368, which encompasses a region resembling a basic DBD adjacent to a leucine zipper DNA binding motif and a site which binds to the cellular factor CBF1/RBP-Jkappa. However, amino acids 207 to 368 are dispensable when the protein is bound to DNA as a fusion with the GAL4 DBD, thus implicating this region in DNA binding. Mutation of the CBF1/RBP-Jkappa binding site in EBNA3C abrogated repression, strongly suggesting that CBF1/RBP-Jkappa is necessary for targeting the viral protein to Cp. Consistent with this result, mutation of the EBNA2 response element (a CBF1/RBP-Jkappa binding site) in Cp also prevented significant repression. In addition, amino acids 346 to 543, which were previously defined as important for the repressor activity of the GAL4-EBNA3C fusion proteins, also appear to be necessary for the repression of Cp. Since repression by these fusions was not observed in all cell types, it seems likely that EBNA3C either depends on a corepressor which may interact with amino acids 346 to 543 or is modified in a cell-specific manner in order to repress. These data are consistent with EBNA3C contributing to the regulation of EBNA expression in latently infected B cells through CBF1/RBP-Jkappa and another factor, but this need not directly involve EBNA2. Finally, although it has been reported that EBNA3C can upregulate CD21 in some B cells, we were unable to demonstrate any effect of EBNA3C on reporter plasmids which contain the CD21 promoter. PMID:9343213

  9. Chemical synthesis of lactic acid from cellulose catalysed by lead(II) ions in water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Binju; Zhang, Qinghong; Wan, Xiaoyue; Tang, Zhenchen; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Chun; Cao, Zexing; Wang, Guichang; Wan, Huilin

    2013-01-01

    The direct transformation of cellulose, which is the main component of lignocellulosic biomass, into building-block chemicals is the key to establishing biomass-based sustainable chemical processes. Only limited successes have been achieved for such transformations under mild conditions. Here we report the simple and efficient chemocatalytic conversion of cellulose in water in the presence of dilute lead(II) ions, into lactic acid, which is a high-value chemical used for the production of fine chemicals and biodegradable plastics. The lactic acid yield from microcrystalline cellulose and several lignocellulose-based raw biomasses is >60% at 463 K. Both theoretical and experimental studies suggest that lead(II) in combination with water catalyses a series of cascading steps for lactic acid formation, including the isomerization of glucose formed via the hydrolysis of cellulose into fructose, the selective cleavage of the C3-C4 bond of fructose to trioses and the selective conversion of trioses into lactic acid. PMID:23846730

  10. Coordinated Cyclic-Di-GMP Repression of Salmonella Motility through YcgR and Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Zorraquino, Violeta; García, Begoña; Latasa, Cristina; Echeverz, Maite; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Valle, Jaione

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a secondary messenger that controls a variety of cellular processes, including the switch between a biofilm and a planktonic bacterial lifestyle. This nucleotide binds to cellular effectors in order to exert its regulatory functions. In Salmonella, two proteins, BcsA and YcgR, both of them containing a c-di-GMP binding PilZ domain, are the only known c-di-GMP receptors. BcsA, upon c-di-GMP binding, synthesizes cellulose, the main exopolysaccharide of the biofilm matrix. YcgR is dedicated to c-di-GMP-dependent inhibition of motility through its interaction with flagellar motor proteins. However, previous evidences indicate that in the absence of YcgR, there is still an additional element that mediates motility impairment under high c-di-GMP levels. Here we have uncovered that cellulose per se is the factor that further promotes inhibition of bacterial motility once high c-di-GMP contents drive the activation of a sessile lifestyle. Inactivation of different genes of the bcsABZC operon, mutation of the conserved residues in the RxxxR motif of the BcsA PilZ domain, or degradation of the cellulose produced by BcsA rescued the motility defect of ΔycgR strains in which high c-di-GMP levels were reached through the overexpression of diguanylate cyclases. High c-di-GMP levels provoked cellulose accumulation around cells that impeded flagellar rotation, probably by means of steric hindrance, without affecting flagellum gene expression, exportation, or assembly. Our results highlight the relevance of cellulose in Salmonella lifestyle switching as an architectural element that is both essential for biofilm development and required, in collaboration with YcgR, for complete motility inhibition. PMID:23161026

  11. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  12. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; et al

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongatedmore » structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.« less

  13. Essential 170-kDa subunit for degradation of crystalline cellulose by Clostridium cellulovorans cellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Doi, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The cellulase complex from Clostridium cellulovorans has been purified and its subunit composition determined. The complex exhibits cellulase activity against crystalline cellulose as well as carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) and cellobiohydrolase activities. Three major subunits are present with molecular masses of 170, 100, and 70 kDa. The 100-kDa subunit is the major CMCase, although at least four other, minor subunits show CMCase activity. The 170-kDa subunit has the highest affinity for cellulose, does not have detectable enzymatic activity, but is necessary for cellulase activity. Immunological studies indicate that the 170-kDa subunit is not required for binding of the catalytic subunits to cellulose and therefore does not function solely as an anchor protein. Thus this core subunit must have multiple functions. The authors propose a working hypothesis that the binding of the 170-kDa subunit converts the crystalline cellulose to a form that is capable of being hydrolyzed in a cooperative fashion by the associated catalytic subunits.

  14. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  15. Degradation of cellulose by basidiomycetous fungi.

    PubMed

    Baldrian, Petr; Valásková, Vendula

    2008-05-01

    Cellulose is the main polymeric component of the plant cell wall, the most abundant polysaccharide on Earth, and an important renewable resource. Basidiomycetous fungi belong to its most potent degraders because many species grow on dead wood or litter, in environment rich in cellulose. Fungal cellulolytic systems differ from the complex cellulolytic systems of bacteria. For the degradation of cellulose, basidiomycetes utilize a set of hydrolytic enzymes typically composed of endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase and beta-glucosidase. In some species, the absence of cellobiohydrolase is substituted by the production of processive endoglucanases combining the properties of both of these enzymes. In addition, systems producing hydroxyl radicals based on cellobiose dehydrogenase, quinone redox cycling or glycopeptide-based Fenton reaction are involved in the degradation of several plant cell wall components, including cellulose. The complete cellulolytic complex used by a single fungal species is typically composed of more than one of the above mechanisms that contribute to the utilization of cellulose as a source of carbon or energy or degrade it to ensure fast substrate colonization. The efficiency and regulation of cellulose degradation differs among wood-rotting, litter-decomposing, mycorrhizal or plant pathogenic fungi and yeasts due to the different roles of cellulose degradation in the physiology and ecology of the individual groups. PMID:18371173

  16. Recycling of cellulosic fibers by enzymatic process.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, K M; Dadashian, F; Montazer, M

    2012-02-01

    In this research, enzymatic treatment as an environmental friendly process has been used for recycling process of old cellulosic wastes such as cotton, viscose, and lyocell. Cellulase hydrolyses cellulosic chains and shortens cellulosic fibers. This study investigates to detect the optimum enzyme concentration and time of treatments for suitable changes of length and weight loss. The main purposes of this article are shortening of cellulosic fibers and evaluating of enzymatic treatment in different kind of cellulosic fibers. According to the data of experiments, with the increase of enzyme concentration and the treatment time, the length and weight loss percentage of the cellulosic fibers has been decreased. The length and weight loss percentage of treated viscose is more than that of lyocell and cotton fibers. Optimized condition, reaction time, and enzyme concentration have been determined by mean length of treated cellulosic samples. Suitable longitudinal distribution of fiber for papermaking industries is in the range of 0 to 4 mm. Optimum enzyme concentration and treatment time for recycling cotton, lyocell, and viscose fibers are 2% and 48 h for cotton and lyocell and 0.5% and 48 h for viscose, respectively. According to the data of experiment, the length of treated fibers is appropriate for its usage as a raw material in papermaking industries. PMID:22161212

  17. Enhancement of Cellulose Degradation by Cattle Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Yasutaka; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Aburai, Kenichi; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ruike, Tatsushi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Saccharification of cellulose is a promising technique for producing alternative source of energy. However, the efficiency of conversion of cellulose into soluble sugar using any currently available methodology is too low for industrial application. Many additives, such as surfactants, have been shown to enhance the efficiency of cellulose-to-sugar conversion. In this study, we have examined first whether cattle saliva, as an additive, would enhance the cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, and subsequently elucidated the mechanism by which cattle saliva enhanced this conversion. Although cattle saliva, by itself, did not degrade cellulose, it enhanced the cellulase-catalyzed degradation of cellulose. Thus, the amount of reducing sugar produced increased approximately 2.9-fold by the addition of cattle saliva. We also found that non-enzymatic proteins, which were present in cattle saliva, were responsible for causing the enhancement effect. Third, the mechanism of cattle saliva mediated enhancement of cellulase activity was probably similar to that of the canonical surfactants. Cattle saliva is available in large amounts easily and cheaply, and it can be used without further purification. Thus, cattle saliva could be a promising additive for efficient saccharification of cellulose on an industrial scale. PMID:26402242

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  19. Cellulose nanofibrils aerogels generated from jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinyou; Yu, Liangbo; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Nie; Li, Xiuhong; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-30

    In this work, we report the cellulose nanofibrils extracted from the pristine jute fibers via the pretreatments followed by the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and mechanical disintegration. The effects of pretreatments by using the NaOH solution and dimethyl sulfoxide solvent on the fiber morphology and macro/micro-structures were investigated by polarizing microscope and synchrotron radiation wide/small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS/SAXS). The cellulose nanofibrils exhibit a diameter ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm and a length of several micrometers, which have been assembled into cellulose aerogels by the lyophilization of as-prepared nanofibrils dispersions with various concentrations. The results indicated that the hierarchical structures of as-prepared cellulose aerogels were dependent on the dispersion concentrations. The WAXS results show that the typical cellulose aerogels are coexistence of cellulose I and cellulose II, which has a great promise for many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical, liquid filtration, catalysts, bio-nanocomposites, and tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:24815398

  20. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Cellulose Derivatives for Water Repellent Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, we will discuss the synthesis and structural characterizations of nitro-benzyl cellulose (1), amino-benzyl cellulose (2) and pentafluoro –benzyl cellulose (3). All cellulose derivatives are synthesized by etherification process in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide homogene...

  2. Palladium-catalyzed arylation of 2H-chromene: a new entry to pyrano[2,3-c]carbazoles.

    PubMed

    Ranjith Reddy, K; Siva Reddy, A; Dhaked, Devendra K; Rasheed, S K; Pathania, Anup Singh; Shankar, Ravi; Malik, Fayaz; Das, Parthasarathi

    2015-09-21

    Pyrano[2,3-c]carbazoles which are biologically valuable and synthetically challenging frameworks are synthesized in high yields over five steps from commercially available resorcinol. Palladium-catalyzed arylation remains a key step in this novel strategy. The versatility of this protocol has been demonstrated by the synthesis of naturally occurring alkaloid clauraila C and 7-methoxyglycomaurin. The anti-proliferative activity of these designed compounds (5a, 5f, and 5l) has been evaluated in a cancer cell line (MOLT-4). The molecular docking study revealed that this pyrano[2,3-c]carbazole class of molecules selectively occupies the colchicine binding site of the tubulin-polymer. PMID:26235231

  3. Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, B.M.

    1986-12-23

    A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

  4. Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Bruce M.

    1986-01-01

    A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

  5. Organic functionalization of 3C-SiC surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schoell, Sebastian J; Sachsenhauser, Matthias; Oliveros, Alexandra; Howgate, John; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S; Frewin, Christopher L; Saddow, Stephen E; Sharp, Ian D

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate the functionalization of n-type (100) and (111) 3C-SiC surfaces with organosilanes. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of amino-propyldiethoxymethylsilane (APDEMS) and octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODTMS) are formed via wet chemical processing techniques. Their structural, chemical, and electrical properties are investigated using static water contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing that the organic layers are smooth and densely packed. Furthermore, combined contact potential difference and surface photovoltage measurements demonstrate that the heterostructure functionality and surface potential can be tuned by utilizing different organosilane precursor molecules. Molecular dipoles are observed to significantly affect the work functions of the modified surfaces. Furthermore, the magnitude of the surface band bending is reduced following reaction of the hydroxylated surfaces with organosilanes, indicating that partial passivation of electrically active surface states is achieved. Micropatterning of organic layers is demonstrated by lithographically defined oxidation of organosilane-derived monolayers in an oxygen plasma, followed by visualization of resulting changes of the local wettability, as well as fluorescence microscopy following immobilization of fluorescently labeled BSA protein. PMID:23357505

  6. Effluent sampling of Titan 3 C vehicle exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Storey, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Downwind in situ ground-level measurements of the exhaust from a Titan 3 C launch vehicle were made during a normal launch. The measurement activity was conducted as part of an overall program to obtain field data for comparison with the multilayer dispersion model currently being used to predict the behavior of rocket vehicle exhaust clouds. All measurements were confined to land, ranging from the launch pad to approximately 2 kilometers downwind from the pad. Measurement systems included detectors for hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon dioxide (CO2), and particulates (Al2O3). Airborne and ground-based optical systems were employed to monitor exhaust cloud rise, growth, and movement. These measurement systems, located along the ground track (45 deg azimuth from the launch pad) of the exhaust cloud, showed no effluents attributable to the launch. Some hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide were detected in the surface wind direction (15 deg azimuth) from the pad. Comparisons with the model were made in three areas: (1) assumption of cloud geometry at stabilization; (2) prediction of cloud stabilization altitude; and (3) prediction of the path of cloud travel. In addition, the importance of elemental analyses of the particulate samples is illustrated.

  7. EBV Nuclear Antigen 3C Mediates Regulation of E2F6 to Inhibit E2F1 Transcription and Promote Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Saha, Abhik; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is considered a ubiquitous herpesvirus with the ability to cause latent infection in humans worldwide. EBV-association is evidently linked to different types of human malignancies, mainly of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Of interest is the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) which is critical for EBV-mediated immortalization. Recently, EBNA3C was shown to bind the E2F1 transcription regulator. The E2F transcription factors have crucial roles in various cellular functions, including cell cycle, DNA replication, DNA repair, cell mitosis, and cell fate. Specifically, E2F6, one of the unique E2F family members, is known to be a pRb-independent transcription repressor of E2F-target genes. In our current study, we explore the role of EBNA3C in regulating E2F6 activities. We observed that EBNA3C plays an important role in inducing E2F6 expression in LCLs. Our study also shows that EBNA3C physically interacts with E2F6 at its amino and carboxy terminal domains and they form a protein complex in human cells. In addition, EBNA3C stabilizes the E2F6 protein and is co-localized in the nucleus. We also demonstrated that both EBNA3C and E2F6 contribute to reduction in E2F1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, E2F1 forms a protein complex with EBNA3C and E2F6, and EBNA3C competes with E2F1 for E2F6 binding. E2F6 is also recruited by EBNA3C to the E2F1 promoter, which is critical for EBNA3C-mediated cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical role for E2F family members in EBV-induced malignancies, and provide new insights for targeting E2F transcription factors in EBV-associated cancers as potential therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:27548379

  8. EBV Nuclear Antigen 3C Mediates Regulation of E2F6 to Inhibit E2F1 Transcription and Promote Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yonggang; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Saha, Abhik; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is considered a ubiquitous herpesvirus with the ability to cause latent infection in humans worldwide. EBV-association is evidently linked to different types of human malignancies, mainly of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Of interest is the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) which is critical for EBV-mediated immortalization. Recently, EBNA3C was shown to bind the E2F1 transcription regulator. The E2F transcription factors have crucial roles in various cellular functions, including cell cycle, DNA replication, DNA repair, cell mitosis, and cell fate. Specifically, E2F6, one of the unique E2F family members, is known to be a pRb-independent transcription repressor of E2F-target genes. In our current study, we explore the role of EBNA3C in regulating E2F6 activities. We observed that EBNA3C plays an important role in inducing E2F6 expression in LCLs. Our study also shows that EBNA3C physically interacts with E2F6 at its amino and carboxy terminal domains and they form a protein complex in human cells. In addition, EBNA3C stabilizes the E2F6 protein and is co-localized in the nucleus. We also demonstrated that both EBNA3C and E2F6 contribute to reduction in E2F1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, E2F1 forms a protein complex with EBNA3C and E2F6, and EBNA3C competes with E2F1 for E2F6 binding. E2F6 is also recruited by EBNA3C to the E2F1 promoter, which is critical for EBNA3C-mediated cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical role for E2F family members in EBV-induced malignancies, and provide new insights for targeting E2F transcription factors in EBV-associated cancers as potential therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:27548379

  9. Hydrolyzability of xylan after adsorption on cellulose: Exploration of xylan limitation on enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Kena; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Junhua

    2016-09-01

    During pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials, the dissolved xylan would re-adsorb on cellulose, and then inhibits the cellulose hydrolysis by cellulases. However, the hydrolyzability of xylan adsorbed on cellulose is not clear. In this work, the adsorption behavior of xylans on celluloses and the hydrolysis of adsorbed xylan by xylanase (XYL) were investigated. The results indicated that the adsorption of beechwood xylan (BWX) and oat spelt xylan (OSX) on Avicel was conformed to Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm. Higher ion strength increased the adsorption of BWX on Avicel, but not that of OSX. Both BWX and OSX adsorbed on Avicel and corn stover after dilute acid pretreatment (CS-DA) could be hydrolyzed by XYL. Compared to OSX, BWX adsorbed on cellulosic materials could be more easily hydrolyzed by XYL. Thus, supplementation of XYL could hydrolyze the xylan adsorbed on cellulose and potentially improved hydrolysis efficiency of lignocelluloses. PMID:27185150

  10. Homogeneous preparation of cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) from sugarcane bagasse cellulose in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kelin; Wang, Ben; Cao, Yan; Li, Huiquan; Wang, Jinshu; Lin, Weijiang; Mu, Chaoshi; Liao, Dankui

    2011-05-25

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) were prepared homogeneously in a 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) ionic liquid system from sugarcane bagasse (SB). The reaction temperature, reaction time, and molar ratio of butyric (propionic) anhydride/anhydroglucose units in the cellulose affect the butyryl (B) or propionyl (P) content of CAB or CAP samples. The (13)C NMR data revealed the distribution of the substituents of CAB and CAP. The thermal stability of sugar cane bagasse cellulose was found by thermogravimetric analysis to have decreased after chemical modification. After reaction, the ionic liquid was effectively recycled and reused. This study provides a new way for high-value-added utilization of SB and realizing the objective of turning waste into wealth. PMID:21452895

  11. Adsorption properties of cross-linked cellulose-epichlorohydrin polymers in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Udoetok, Inimfon A; Dimmick, Raquel M; Wilson, Lee D; Headley, John V

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was cross-linked with epichlorohydrin (EP) at variable levels (CLE-0.5, CLE-2 and CLE-4), where CLE-i denotes the cellulose to EP mole ratios. The cross-linked products were characterized by TGA and FT-IR spectroscopy, pH at the point of zero charge (pHpzc), water swelling, and dye-adsorption methods employing two types of dyes [phenolphthalein (phth) and p-nitrophenol (PNP)]. The characterization methods provide evidence of cross-linking of cellulose in accordance with variations in surface area, PZC, available surface hydroxyl groups, and thermal stability when compared against pristine cellulose. The pHpzc of the sorbent materials was ∼ 6.5 indicating a negative surface charge occurs above pHpzc. The cross-linked polymers possess greater swelling properties relative to pristine cellulose. Detailed adsorption studies were carried out at pH 9 for cellulose and CLE-i with five types single component carboxylate anions [2-hexyldecanoic acid (S1), trans-4-pentylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid (S2), 2-dicyclohexylacetic acid (S3), adamantane carboxylic acid (S4), and cyclohexane carboxylic acid (S5)] at 295 K. The uptake properties of PNP with cellulose and CLE-i were also compared at pH 5 and 9, respectively. CLE-2 had the highest uptake of PNP (Qm=1.22 × 10(-1)mmol/g, pH 9) and S1 (Qm=4.27 mg/g) while cellulose and CLE-4 had the strongest binding affinity (1.43 L/mmol and 5.90 × 10(-2)L/mg), respectively. Uptake of PNP by CLE-0.5 at pH 5 (Q m=5.30 × 10(-2)mmol/g) was higher than uptake at pH 9 (Qm=3.11 × 10(-2)mmol/g). Sorption of CLE-4 with S1, S2 and S3 showed that relative uptake of the surrogates had the following order: S3>S2>S1, where S2 had the strongest binding affinity to CLE-i. CLE-2 had the highest sorption capacity towards Si in an equimolar mixture with evidence of molecular selective uptake. At pH 9, low uptake was mainly related to electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged sorbent surface and the carboxylate head groups of Si

  12. Quantification of the CBD-FITC conjugates surface coating on cellulose fibres

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ricardo; Amaral, António L; Ferreira, Eugénio C; Mota, Manuel; Vilanova, Manuel; Ruel, Katia; Gama, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Background Cellulose Binding Domains (CBD) were conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The surface concentration of the Binding Domains adsorbed on cellulose fibres was determined by fluorescence image analysis. Results For a CBD-FITC concentration of 60 mg/L, a coating fraction of 78% and 110% was estimated for Portucel and Whatman fibres, respectively. For a saturating CBD concentration, using Whatman CF11 fibres, a surface concentration of 25.2 × 10-13 mol/mm2 was estimated, the equivalent to 4 protein monolayers. This result does not imply the existence of several adsorbed protein layers. Conclusion It was verified that CBDs were able to penetrate the fibres, according to confocal microscopy and TEM-immunolabelling analysis. The surface concentration of adsorbed CBDs was greater on amorphous fibres (phosphoric acid swollen) than on more crystalline ones (Whatman CF11 and Sigmacell 20). PMID:18184429

  13. Improved assay for quantitating adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, M A; White, B A; Hespell, R B

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative technique suitable for the determination of adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose was developed. This technique employs adherence of cells to cellulose disks and alleviates the problem of nonspecific cell entrapment within cellulose particles. By using this technique, it was demonstrated that the adherence of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD1 to cellulose was inhibited by formaldehyde, methylcellulose, and carboxymethyl cellulose. Adherence was unaffected by acid hydrolysates of methylcellulose, glucose, and cellobiose. PMID:2782879

  14. Observations of Titan 3C-4 Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan 3C-4 Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper will present a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots will also be shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) believed to be associated with the Titan break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN# 25001, 33509, 33510) and the parent rocket body. Color index data will be used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In 2012, the SSN added 16 additional fragments to the catalogue. MODEST acquired magnitude data on ten Titan fragments in late 2012 and early 2013. The magnitude distribution of all the observed fragments are analyzed as a function of time. In order to better characterize the breakup fragments spectral measurements were acquired on the original rocket body and five Titan fragments using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., Aluminum and various paints) and categorized based on known absorption features for spacecraft materials.

  15. Reactive Liftoff of Crystalline Cellulose Particles

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Andrew R.; Krumm, Christoph; Vinter, Katherine P.; Paulsen, Alex D.; Zhu, Cheng; Maduskar, Saurabh; Joseph, Kristeen E.; Greco, Katharine; Stelatto, Michael; Davis, Eric; Vincent, Brendon; Hermann, Richard; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Schmidt, Lanny D.; Fan, Wei; Rothstein, Jonathan P.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The condition of heat transfer to lignocellulosic biomass particles during thermal processing at high temperature (>400 °C) dramatically alters the yield and quality of renewable energy and fuels. In this work, crystalline cellulose particles were discovered to lift off heated surfaces by high speed photography similar to the Leidenfrost effect in hot, volatile liquids. Order of magnitude variation in heat transfer rates and cellulose particle lifetimes was observed as intermediate liquid cellulose droplets transitioned from low temperature wetting (500–600 °C) to fully de-wetted, skittering droplets on polished surfaces (>700 °C). Introduction of macroporosity to the heated surface was shown to completely inhibit the cellulose Leidenfrost effect, providing a tunable design parameter to control particle heat transfer rates in industrial biomass reactors. PMID:26057818

  16. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... additive is used in accordance with good manufacturing practice. ... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive hydroxypropyl... accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The additive consists of one of the following: (1)...

  17. Rheological properties of sulfoacetate derivatives of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Chauvelon, Gaëlle; Doublier, Jean-Louis; Buléon, Alain; Thibault, Jean-François; Saulnier, Luc

    2003-04-01

    Water-soluble cellulose acetate sulfate derivatives (CAS) have been prepared through chemical reaction involving sulfuric acid as a catalyst. These CAS have been obtained from cellulosic materials of different origins (pure cellulose, wheat bran, maize bran) and their rheological behavior in salt-free aqueous solution has been estimated in dilute and semi-dilute regime using dynamic viscoelastic and viscosity measurements. Influence of concentration, temperature of solubilization and temperature of measurement has been investigated. Weak gel-like properties were exhibited at elevated concentration (typically above 7-8 g/L). These systems also exhibited thixotropic properties: the structure was partly broken down upon shearing and recovered at rest. They also displayed thermoreversibility with large hysteresis, the melting temperature being approximately 15 degrees C higher than the temperature at which gelation took place. These overall observations clearly indicate that these distinctive properties arise from intermolecular association of the macromolecular chains of the cellulose derivative. PMID:12668095

  18. Conversion of cellulosic materials to sugar

    DOEpatents

    Wilke, Charles R.; Mitra, Gautam

    1976-08-03

    A process for the production of sugar, mainly glucose, by the enzymatic degradation of cellulosic materials, particularly cellulosic wastes, which comprises hydrolyzing the cellulosic material in the presence of cellulase enzyme to produce a sugar solution and recovering from the hydrolysis products a major proportion of the cellulase enzyme used in the hydrolysis reaction for re-use. At least a portion of the required makeup cellulase enzyme is produced in a two-stage operation wherein, in the first stage, a portion of the output sugar solution is utilized to grow a cellulase-secreting microorganism, and, in the second stage, cellulase enzyme formation is induced in the microorganism-containing culture medium by the addition of an appropriate inducer, such as a cellulosic material. Cellulase enzyme is precipitated from the culture liquid by the addition of an organic solvent material, such as a low molecular weight alkyl ketone or alcohol, and the cellulase precipitate is then fed to the hydrolysis reaction.

  19. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether containing ethoxy (OC2H5) groups attached by an ether linkage and containing on an anhydrous basis not...

  20. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether containing ethoxy (OC2H5) groups attached by an ether linkage and containing on an anhydrous basis not...

  1. Dissolution enthalpies of cellulose in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Helena; Parviainen, Arno; Virtanen, Tommi; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Serimaa, Ritva; Grönqvist, Stina; Maloney, Thaddeus; Maunu, Sirkka Liisa

    2014-11-26

    In this work, interactions between cellulose and ionic liquids were studied calorimetrically and by optical microscopy. Two novel ionic liquids (1,5-Diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium propionate and N-methyl-1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium dimethyl phosphate) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate-water mixtures were used as solvents. Optical microscopy served in finding the extent of dissolution and identifying the dissolution pattern of the cellulose sample. Calorimetric studies identified a peak relating to dissolution of cellulose in solvent. The transition did, however, not indicate complete dissolution, but rather dissolution inside fibre or fibrils. This method was used to study differences between four cellulose samples with different pretreatment or origins. PMID:25256460

  2. Reactive Liftoff of Crystalline Cellulose Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Andrew R.; Krumm, Christoph; Vinter, Katherine P.; Paulsen, Alex D.; Zhu, Cheng; Maduskar, Saurabh; Joseph, Kristeen E.; Greco, Katharine; Stelatto, Michael; Davis, Eric; Vincent, Brendon; Hermann, Richard; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Schmidt, Lanny D.; Fan, Wei; Rothstein, Jonathan P.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.

    2015-06-01

    The condition of heat transfer to lignocellulosic biomass particles during thermal processing at high temperature (>400 °C) dramatically alters the yield and quality of renewable energy and fuels. In this work, crystalline cellulose particles were discovered to lift off heated surfaces by high speed photography similar to the Leidenfrost effect in hot, volatile liquids. Order of magnitude variation in heat transfer rates and cellulose particle lifetimes was observed as intermediate liquid cellulose droplets transitioned from low temperature wetting (500-600 °C) to fully de-wetted, skittering droplets on polished surfaces (>700 °C). Introduction of macroporosity to the heated surface was shown to completely inhibit the cellulose Leidenfrost effect, providing a tunable design parameter to control particle heat transfer rates in industrial biomass reactors.

  3. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... additive is used in accordance with good manufacturing practice. ... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive hydroxypropyl... accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The additive consists of one of the following: (1)...

  4. Reactive Liftoff of Crystalline Cellulose Particles.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Andrew R; Krumm, Christoph; Vinter, Katherine P; Paulsen, Alex D; Zhu, Cheng; Maduskar, Saurabh; Joseph, Kristeen E; Greco, Katharine; Stelatto, Michael; Davis, Eric; Vincent, Brendon; Hermann, Richard; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Schmidt, Lanny D; Fan, Wei; Rothstein, Jonathan P; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The condition of heat transfer to lignocellulosic biomass particles during thermal processing at high temperature (>400 °C) dramatically alters the yield and quality of renewable energy and fuels. In this work, crystalline cellulose particles were discovered to lift off heated surfaces by high speed photography similar to the Leidenfrost effect in hot, volatile liquids. Order of magnitude variation in heat transfer rates and cellulose particle lifetimes was observed as intermediate liquid cellulose droplets transitioned from low temperature wetting (500-600 °C) to fully de-wetted, skittering droplets on polished surfaces (>700 °C). Introduction of macroporosity to the heated surface was shown to completely inhibit the cellulose Leidenfrost effect, providing a tunable design parameter to control particle heat transfer rates in industrial biomass reactors. PMID:26057818

  5. Rapid saccharification for production of cellulosic biofuels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Seok; Wi, Seung Gon; Lee, Soo Jung; Lee, Yoon-Gyo; Kim, Yeong-Suk; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2014-04-01

    The economical production of biofuels is hindered by the recalcitrance of lignocellulose to processing, causing high consumption of processing enzymes and impeding hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. We determined the major rate-limiting factor in the hydrolysis of popping pre-treated rice straw (PPRS) by examining cellulase adsorption to lignin and cellulose, amorphogenesis of PPRS, and re-hydrolysis. Based on the results, equivalence between enzyme loading and the open structural area of cellulose was required to significantly increase productive adsorption of cellulase and to accelerate enzymatic saccharification of PPRS. Amorphogenesis of PPRS by phosphoric acid treatment to expand open structural area of the cellulose fibers resulted in twofold higher cellulase adsorption and increased the yield of the first re-hydrolysis step from 13% to 46%. The total yield from PPRS was increased to 84% after 3h. These results provide evidence that cellulose structure is one of major effects on the enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:24607460

  6. Mechanistic Insight into the Chemical Exfoliation and Functionalization of Ti3C2 MXene.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pooja; Mishra, Avanish; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Singh, Abhishek K

    2016-09-14

    MXene, a two-dimensional layer of transition metal carbides/nitrides, showed great promise for energy storage, sensing, and electronic applications. MXene are chemically exfoliated from the bulk MAX phase; however, mechanistic understanding of exfoliation and subsequent functionalization of these technologically important materials is still lacking. Here, using density-functional theory we show that exfoliation of Ti3C2 MXene proceeds via HF insertion through edges of Ti3AlC2 MAX phase. Spontaneous dissociation of HF and subsequent termination of edge Ti atoms by H/F weakens Al-MXene bonds. Consequent opening of the interlayer gap allows further insertion of HF that leads to the formation of AlF3 and H2, which eventually come out of the MAX, leaving fluorinated MXene behind. Density of state and electron localization function shows robust binding between F/OH and Ti, which makes it very difficult to obtain controlled functionalized or pristine MXene. Analysis of the calculated Gibbs free energy (ΔG) shows fully fluorinated MXene to be lowest in energy, whereas the formation of pristine MXene is thermodynamically least favorable. In the presence of water, mixed functionalized Ti3C2Fx(OH)1-x (x ranges from 0 to 1) MXene can be obtained. The ΔG values for the mixed functionalized MXenes are very close in energy, indicating the random and nonuniform functionalization of MXene. The microscopic understanding gained here unveils the challenges in exfoliation and controlling the functionalization of MXene, which is essential for its practical application. PMID:27537784

  7. Cellulose biosynthesis and function in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, P; Mayer, R; Benziman, M

    1991-01-01

    The current model of cellulose biogenesis in plants, as well as bacteria, holds that the membranous cellulose synthase complex polymerizes glucose moieties from UDP-Glc into beta-1,4-glucan chains which give rise to rigid crystalline fibrils upon extrusion at the outer surface of the cell. The distinct arrangement and degree of association of the polymerizing enzyme units presumably govern extracellular chain assembly in addition to the pattern and width of cellulose fibril deposition. Most evident for Acetobacter xylinum, polymerization and assembly appear to be tightly coupled. To date, only bacteria have been effectively studied at the biochemical and genetic levels. In A. xylinum, the cellulose synthase, composed of at least two structurally similar but functionally distinct subunits, is subject to a multicomponent regulatory system. Regulation is based on the novel nucleotide cyclic diguanylic acid, a positive allosteric effector, and the regulatory enzymes maintaining its intracellular turnover: diguanylate cyclase and Ca2(+)-sensitive bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) phosphodiesterase. Four genes have been isolated from A. xylinum which constitute the operon for cellulose synthesis. The second gene encodes the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase; the functions of the other three gene products are still unknown. Exclusively an extracellular product, bacterial cellulose appears to fulfill diverse biological roles within the natural habitat, conferring mechanical, chemical, and physiological protection in A. xylinum and Sarcina ventriculi or facilitating cell adhesion during symbiotic or infectious interactions in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium species. A. xylinum is proving to be most amenable for industrial purposes, allowing the unique features of bacterial cellulose to be exploited for novel product applications. Images PMID:2030672

  8. Effect of the particle size of cellulose from sweet potato residues on lipid metabolism and cecal conditions in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjia; Gui, Yu; Guo, Ting; Wang, Qianqian; Liu, Xiong

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of the particle size of cellulose from sweet potato residues on lipid metabolism and cecal conditions in ovariectomized rats. Forty mature female Wistar rats were divided into five groups. The sham-operated group was used as the sham control. The other four groups were double-ovariectomized and assigned to the model, ordinary cellulose (100 g kg(-1) diet), microcrystalline cellulose (100 g kg(-1) diet), and cellulose nanocrystal (100 g kg(-1) diet) groups. As the cellulose particle size decreased, the body weight gain and food intake were decreased. The plasma lipids and hepatic lipids were decreased. In addition, the mRNA levels of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, farnesoid X receptor, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase were decreased, whereas those of ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and intestinal bile acid binding protein were increased. The cecum weight, cecum content, and short-chain fatty acid concentration and the amount of total bile acids in the small intestinal content, as well as the bile acids and neutral steroids in fecal excretion, were increased. These results indicate that as the particle size decreased, cellulose was more effective in preventing ovarian hormone deficiency-induced hyperlipidemia and in improving intestinal health. PMID:25710810

  9. Cellulose fractionation with IONCELL-P.

    PubMed

    Stepan, A M; Monshizadeh, A; Hummel, M; Roselli, A; Sixta, H

    2016-10-01

    IONCELL-P is a solvent fractionation process, which can separate pulps almost quantitatively into pure cellulose and hemicellulose fractions using IL-water mixtures. In this work the role of the molecular weight of cellulose on its solubility in ionic liquid-water mixtures is studied. The aim of this study was to understand and identify the determining factors of this IONCELL-P fractionation. Cotton linters (CL) served as model cellulose substrate and was degraded by ozone treatment to adjust the molecular weight to that of hemicelluloses and low molar mass cellulose in commercial pulps. The ozone treated CLs were subjected to the IONCELL-P process using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([emim][OAc]) and water mixtures with a water content between 13.5 and 19wt%. Based on the molar mass distributions of dissolved and undissolved cellulose the effect of the molecular weight of cellulose in IL-water mixture appears to be a key factor in the fractionation process. PMID:27312618

  10. Enthalpic studies of xyloglucan-cellulose interactions.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marie; Bizot, Hervé; Chambat, Gérard; Marais, Marie-France; Zykwinska, Agata; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Driguez, Hugues; Buléon, Alain

    2010-06-14

    We report a study of xyloglucan (XG)-cellulose interactions made possible by the preparation of various well-defined cellulosic and xyloglucosidic substrates. Bacterial microcrystalline cellulose (BMCC) as well as cellulose whiskers (CellWhisk) were used as cellulosic substrates. Xyloglucosidic substrates were obtained from Rubus cells and Tamarindus indica seeds. Different primary structure characteristics of XGs such as the backbone length and the nature of the side chains, as well as their repartition, were considered in order to examine the influence of the primary structure on their interaction capacity. Two complementary approaches were carried out: first, the determination of adsorption isotherms and its associated models, and second, an enthalpic study using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). This study highlighted that an increase of XG interaction capacity occurred with increasing XG molecular weight. Furthermore, we determined that a minimum of 12 glucosyl residues on the backbone is required to observe significant interactions. Moreover, both the presence of trisaccharidic side chains with fucosyl residues and an increase of unsubstituted glucosyl residues enhanced XG-cellulose interactions. The evolution of adsorption isotherms with temperature and ITC measurements showed that two different processes were occurring, one exothermic and one endothermic, respectively. Although the presence of an exothermic interaction mechanism has long been established, the presence of an endothermic interaction mechanism has never been reported. PMID:20433133

  11. Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

    1996-09-01

    Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

  12. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization. PMID:26151670

  13. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization. PMID:26151670

  14. A mammalian cell-based reverse two-hybrid system for functional analysis of 3C viral protease of human enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Ching; Shih, Shin-Ru; Chang, Ten-Yuan; Tseng, Huan-Yi; Shih, Ya-Feng; Yen, Kuei-Jung; Chen, Wei-Chun; Shie, Jiun-Jie; Fang, Jim-Min; Liang, Po-Huang; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Hsu, John T-A

    2008-04-01

    Although several cell-based reporter assays have been developed for screening of viral protease inhibitors, most of these assays have a significant limitation in that numerous false positives can be generated for the compounds that are interfering with reporter gene detection due to the cellular viability. To improve, we developed a mammalian cell-based assay based on the reverse two-hybrid system to monitor the proteolytic activity of human enterovirus 71 (EV71) 3C protease and to validate the cytotoxicity of compounds at the same time. In this system, the GAL4 DNA binding domain (M3) and transactivation domain (VP16) were fused, in-frame, with 3C or 3C(mut). The 3C(mut) was an inactivated protease with mutations at the predicted catalytic triad. The reporter plasmid contains a secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) gene under the control of GAL4 activating sequences. We demonstrated that M3-3C-VP16 failed to turn on the expression of SEAP due to the separation of M3 and the VP16 domains by self-cleavage of 3C. In contrast, SEAP expression was induced by the M3-3C(mut)-VP16 fusion protein or the M3-3C-VP16 in cells treated with AG7088, a potent inhibitor of human rhinoviruses (HRVs) 3C protease. Potentially, this protease detection system should greatly facilitate anti-EV71 drug discovery through a high-throughput screening. PMID:18190777

  15. Engineering of Family-5 Glycoside Hydrolase (Cel5A) from an Uncultured Bacterium for Efficient Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Telke, Amar A.; Zhuang, Ningning; Ghatge, Sunil S.; Lee, Sook-Hee; Ali Shah, Asad; Khan, Haji; Um, Youngsoon; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Chung, Young Ryun; Lee, Kon Ho; Kim, Seon-Won

    2013-01-01

    Cel5A, an endoglucanase, was derived from the metagenomic library of vermicompost. The deduced amino acid sequence of Cel5A shows high sequence homology with family-5 glycoside hydrolases, which contain a single catalytic domain but no distinct cellulose-binding domain. Random mutagenesis and cellulose-binding module (CBM) fusion approaches were successfully applied to obtain properties required for cellulose hydrolysis. After two rounds of error-prone PCR and screening of 3,000 mutants, amino acid substitutions were identified at various positions in thermotolerant mutants. The most heat-tolerant mutant, Cel5A_2R2, showed a 7-fold increase in thermostability. To enhance the affinity and hydrolytic activity of Cel5A on cellulose substrates, the family-6 CBM from Saccharophagus degradans was fused to the C-terminus of the Cel5A_2R2 mutant using overlap PCR. The Cel5A_2R2-CBM6 fusion protein showed 7-fold higher activity than the native Cel5A on Avicel and filter paper. Cellobiose was a major product obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulosic substrates by the fusion enzyme, which was identified by using thin layer chromatography analysis. PMID:23785445

  16. Enhanced cellulose degradation by nano-complexed enzymes: Synergism between a scaffold-linked exoglucanase and a free endoglucanase.

    PubMed

    Moraïs, Sarah; Heyman, Arnon; Barak, Yoav; Caspi, Jonathan; Wilson, David B; Lamed, Raphael; Shoseyov, Oded; Bayer, Edward A

    2010-06-01

    Protein molecular scaffolds are attracting interest as natural candidates for the presentation of enzymes and acceleration of catalytic reactions. We have previously reported evidence that the stable protein 1 (SP1) from Populustremula can be employed as a molecular scaffold for the presentation of either catalytic or structural binding (cellulosomal cohesin) modules. In the present work, we have displayed a potent exoglucanase (Cel6B) from the aerobic cellulolytic bacterium, Thermobifida fusca, on a cohesin-bearing SP1 scaffold. For this purpose, a chimaeric form of the enzyme, fused to a cellulosomal dockerin module, was prepared. Full incorporation of 12 dockerin-bearing exoglucanase molecules onto the cohesin-bearing scaffold was achieved. Cellulase activity was tested on two cellulosic substrates with different levels of crystallinity, and the activity of the scaffold-linked exoglucanase was significantly reduced, compared to the free dockerin-containing enzyme. However, addition of relatively low concentrations of a free wild-type endoglucanase (T. fusca Cel5A) that bears a cellulose-binding module, in combination with the complexed exoglucanase resulted in a marked rise in activity on both cellulosic substrates. The endoglucanase cleaves internal sites of the cellulose chains, and the new chain ends of the substrate were now readily accessible to the scaffold-borne exoglucanase, thereby resulting in highly effective, synergistic degradation of cellulosic substrates. PMID:20438772

  17. Full-Length Semaphorin-3C Is an Inhibitor of Tumor Lymphangiogenesis and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mumblat, Yelena; Kessler, Ofra; Ilan, Neta; Neufeld, Gera

    2015-06-01

    Semaphorins play important regulatory roles in diverse processes such as axon guidance, angiogenesis, and immune responses. We find that semaphorin-3C (sema3C) induces the collapse of the cytoskeleton of lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) in a neuropilin-2-, plexin-D1-, and plexin-A1-dependent manner, while most other semaphorins, including antiangiogenic semaphorins such as sema3A do not. Sema3C is cleaved, like other class-3 semaphorins, by furin-like pro-protein convertases (FPPC). Cleaved sema3C (p65-Sema3C) was unable to induce the collapse of the cytoskeleton of LEC. FPPC are strongly upregulated in tumor cells. In order to examine the effects of full-length sema3C on tumor progression, we therefore generated an active point mutated furin cleavage-resistant sema3C (FR-sema3C). FR-sema3C inhibited potently proliferation of LEC and to a lesser extent proliferation of human umbilical vein-derived endothelial cells. FR-sema3C also inhibited VEGF-C-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-3, ERK1/2, and AKT. Expression of recombinant FR-sema3C in metastatic, triple-negative LM2-4 breast cancer cells did not affect their migration or proliferation in vitro. However, tumors derived from FR-sema3C-expressing LM2-4 cells implanted in mammary fat pads developed at a slower rate, contained a lower concentration of blood vessels and lymph vessels, and metastasized much less effectively to lymph nodes. Interestingly, p65-Sema3C, but not FR-sema3C, rendered A549 lung cancer cells resistant to serum deprivation, suggesting that previously reported protumorigenic activities of sema3C may be due to p65-Sema3C produced by tumor cells. Our observations suggest that FR-sema3C may be further developed into a novel antitumorigenic drug. PMID:25808871

  18. Position-specific measurement of oxygen isotope ratios in cellulose: Isotopic exchange during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, John S.; Cheng, Shuying; Juchelka, Dieter; Loader, Neil J.; McCarroll, Danny; Switsur, V. Roy; Gautam, Lata

    2013-07-01

    We describe the first reported method for the measurement of oxygen isotope ratios at each position in the glucose units of the cellulose molecule. The overall process comprises a series of synthetic organic sequences, by which α-cellulose is hydrolysed to glucose, and oxygen atoms at specific positions in the glucose molecule are removed in samples of benzoic acid for measurement of δ18O. Values of δ18O at specific positions in cellulose are calculated from these δ18O values and the overall δ18O value of the cellulose. We apply the method to determine the degree to which oxygen atoms at each position undergo isotopic exchange with water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, such as occurs in the cambium of trees. To do this we extract α-cellulose from wheat seedlings germinated in the dark in aqueous media of differing oxygen isotope ratios. Results indicate that oxygen atoms at positions 5 and 6 (O-5 and O-6 respectively) undergo around 80% exchange with medium water, O-3 undergoes around 50% exchange, and O-2 and O-4 do not undergo isotopic exchange. The results have important implications for extracting palaeoclimatic records from oxygen isotope time series obtained from tree ring cellulose. As O-5 and O-6 undergo significant exchange with medium water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, oxygen isotopes at these positions in tree ring cellulose should carry a predominantly trunk (source) water signal. On the other hand, O-2 and O-4 should retain the isotopic signature of leaf water in tree ring cellulose. Our method therefore potentially enables the separate reconstruction of past temperature and humidity data from oxygen isotope ratios of tree ring cellulose - something that has hitherto not been possible. The measured degrees of isotopic exchange are to some extent unexpected and cannot be fully explained using current biochemical mechanisms, suggesting that knowledge of these processes is incomplete.

  19. Simultaneous Multiwavelength Monitoring of 3C66A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettcher, M.

    2004-01-01

    The radio-selected BL Lac object 3C66A was the target of an intensive multiwavelength campaign from Sept. 2003 through Feb. 2004. It was monitored by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) collaboration, in tandem with 20 X-ray monitoring observations by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), VHE gamma-ray observations by STACEE and VERITAS, and long-term monitoring at radio frequencies. In addition. 9 observations using the VLBA are being carried out during the campaign and throughout the year 2004 to follow possible structural changes of the source. 21 pointings with RXTE during the period Sept. 15 - Dec. 27, 2003. All collected data have been fully analyzed, and first results have already been published at the 8th HEAD Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in Sept. 2004, and will also be presented at the 205th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA, in Jan. 2005. A first Journal paper, to be submitted to the Astrophysical Journal, is currently in preparation, and we plan to have it ready for submission in January 2005. A gradual brightening of the source over the course of the campaign was observed at all optical frequencies, culminating in a very bright flare at the end of January 2004. Optical light curves indicate intraday microvariability on time scales down to about 1.3 hours. No significant color-magnitude correlation for the entire data set was evident, but there is a slight indication of a gradual spectral softening in the optical over the entire duration of multi-day outbursts (in both the rising and decaying phase). The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon spectral index of approx. 2.1, indicating that the RXTE energy band might be located right at the intersection of the synchrotron and the high-energy emission components. No significant flux or spectral variability at X-ray energies was detected, though there seems to be a trend of very modest brightening in tandem with the optical flux. The first 4 VLBA epochs indicate a rather smooth jet with

  20. Apo- and Cellopentaose-bound Structures of the Bacterial Cellulose Synthase Subunit BcsZ

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Olga; Zimmer, Jochen

    2012-10-25

    Cellulose, a very abundant extracellular polysaccharide, is synthesized in a finely tuned process that involves the activity of glycosyl-transferases and hydrolases. The cellulose microfibril consists of bundles of linear {beta}-1,4-glucan chains that are synthesized inside the cell; however, the mechanism by which these polymers traverse the cell membrane is currently unknown. In Gram-negative bacteria, the cellulose synthase complex forms a trans-envelope complex consisting of at least four subunits. Although three of these subunits account for the synthesis and translocation of the polysaccharide, the fourth subunit, BcsZ, is a periplasmic protein with endo-{beta}-1,4-glucanase activity. BcsZ belongs to family eight of glycosyl-hydrolases, and its activity is required for optimal synthesis and membrane translocation of cellulose. In this study we report two crystal structures of BcsZ from Escherichia coli. One structure shows the wild-type enzyme in its apo form, and the second structure is for a catalytically inactive mutant of BcsZ in complex with the substrate cellopentaose. The structures demonstrate that BcsZ adopts an ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 6}-barrel fold and that it binds four glucan moieties of cellopentaose via highly conserved residues exclusively on the nonreducing side of its catalytic center. Thus, the BcsZ-cellopentaose structure most likely represents a posthydrolysis state in which the newly formed nonreducing end has already left the substrate binding pocket while the enzyme remains attached to the truncated polysaccharide chain. We further show that BcsZ efficiently degrades {beta}-1,4-glucans in in vitro cellulase assays with carboxymethyl-cellulose as substrate.

  1. Suite of activity-based probes for cellulose-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné-Hines, Lacie M; Anderson, Lindsey N; Weaver, Holly M; Brown, Joseph N; Koech, Phillip K; Nicora, Carrie D; Hofstad, Beth A; Smith, Richard D; Wilkins, Michael J; Callister, Stephen J; Wright, Aaron T

    2012-12-19

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome-producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes, in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose-degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic microbial cellulose-degrading systems and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated with biofuel development. PMID:23176123

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis and recrystallization behavior of initially amorphous cellulose.

    PubMed

    Bertran, M S; Dale, B E

    1985-02-01

    Cellulose samples from cotton and wood pulps with varying low degrees of crystallinity (mechanically decrystallized) were studied. The influence of initial cellulose crystallinity on sugar yield after enzymatic hydrolysis was determined by two different methods. As expected, samples with low crystallinity were much more accessible to enzymatic attack and glucose yields were higher than were samples of high initial crystallinity. Hydrolysis of cellulose seems more dependent on cellulose crystallinity than on the source of cellulose. It is known that decrystallized or amorphous cellulose can recrystallize under proper conditions, e.g., during acid hydrolysis. The data reported here also reveal some recrystallization during enzymatic hydrolysis which probably occurs simulataneously with a selective enzymatic attack on the amorphous regions of cellulose. In all cases, the amorphous celluloses recrystallized in the original lattice form, that of native cellulose. PMID:18553653

  3. Versatile Molding Process for Tough Cellulose Hydrogel Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Shinohara, Yoshie; Takizawa, Junko; Ren, Sixiao; Sagisaka, Kento; Lin, Yudeng; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Hinestroza, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Shape-persistent and tough cellulose hydrogels were fabricated by a stepwise solvent exchange from a homogeneous ionic liquid solution of cellulose exposure to methanol vapor. The cellulose hydrogels maintain their shapes under changing temperature, pH, and solvents. The micrometer-scale patterns on the mold were precisely transferred onto the surface of cellulose hydrogels. We also succeeded in the spinning of cellulose hydrogel fibers through a dry jet-wet spinning process. The mechanical property of regenerated cellulose fibers improved by the drawing of cellulose hydrogel fibers during the spinning process. This approach for the fabrication of tough cellulose hydrogels is a major advance in the fabrication of cellulose-based structures with defined shapes. PMID:26537533

  4. Versatile Molding Process for Tough Cellulose Hydrogel Materials.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Shinohara, Yoshie; Takizawa, Junko; Ren, Sixiao; Sagisaka, Kento; Lin, Yudeng; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Hinestroza, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Shape-persistent and tough cellulose hydrogels were fabricated by a stepwise solvent exchange from a homogeneous ionic liquid solution of cellulose exposure to methanol vapor. The cellulose hydrogels maintain their shapes under changing temperature, pH, and solvents. The micrometer-scale patterns on the mold were precisely transferred onto the surface of cellulose hydrogels. We also succeeded in the spinning of cellulose hydrogel fibers through a dry jet-wet spinning process. The mechanical property of regenerated cellulose fibers improved by the drawing of cellulose hydrogel fibers during the spinning process. This approach for the fabrication of tough cellulose hydrogels is a major advance in the fabrication of cellulose-based structures with defined shapes. PMID:26537533

  5. Versatile Molding Process for Tough Cellulose Hydrogel Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Shinohara, Yoshie; Takizawa, Junko; Ren, Sixiao; Sagisaka, Kento; Lin, Yudeng; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Hinestroza, Juan P.

    2015-11-01

    Shape-persistent and tough cellulose hydrogels were fabricated by a stepwise solvent exchange from a homogeneous ionic liquid solution of cellulose exposure to methanol vapor. The cellulose hydrogels maintain their shapes under changing temperature, pH, and solvents. The micrometer-scale patterns on the mold were precisely transferred onto the surface of cellulose hydrogels. We also succeeded in the spinning of cellulose hydrogel fibers through a dry jet-wet spinning process. The mechanical property of regenerated cellulose fibers improved by the drawing of cellulose hydrogel fibers during the spinning process. This approach for the fabrication of tough cellulose hydrogels is a major advance in the fabrication of cellulose-based structures with defined shapes.

  6. Cleavage of cellulose by a CBM33 protein

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Zarah; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Westereng, Bjørge; Bunæs, Anne C; Stenstrøm, Yngve; MacKenzie, Alasdair; Sørlie, Morten; Horn, Svein J; Eijsink, Vincent GH

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial proteins categorized as family 33 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM33) were recently shown to cleave crystalline chitin, using a mechanism that involves hydrolysis and oxidation. We show here that some members of the CBM33 family cleave crystalline cellulose as demonstrated by chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses of soluble products released from Avicel or filter paper on incubation with CelS2, a CBM33-containing protein from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). These enzymes act synergistically with cellulases and may thus become important tools for efficient conversion of lignocellulosic biomass. Fungal proteins classified as glycoside hydrolase family 61 that are known to act synergistically with cellulases are likely to use a similar mechanism. PMID:21748815

  7. A recombinant triblock protein polymer with dispersant and binding properties for digital printing.

    PubMed

    Qi, Min; O'Brien, John P; Yang, Jianjun

    2008-01-01

    A structured triblock protein was designed to explore the potential of engineered peptides to function as high-performance ink dispersants and binders. The protein consists of three functional elements, including a pigment binding domain, a hydrophilic linker, and a printing surface binding domain. To construct such a chimeric protein, a carbon black binding peptide, FHENWPS, and a cellulose binding peptide, THKTSTQRLLAA, were identified from phage display libraries through biopanning, based on their strong and specific binding affinities to carbon black and cellulose. They were used as carbon black and cellulose binding domains, respectively, in a recombinant triblock protein. A linker sequence, PTPTPTPTPTPTPTPTPTPTPTP, was adapted from endoglucanase A of the bacterium Cellulomonas fimi, as a small, rigid, and hydrophilic interdomain linker. When incorporated into the triblock structure between the carbon black and cellulose binding sequences, the linker sufficiently isolates these two elements and allows dual binding activity. The structured triblock protein was shown to disperse carbon black particles and attach it to paper surfaces. Thus, the utility of structured proteins having useful dispersant and binding properties for digital printing inks was demonstrated. PMID:17972282

  8. New Insights into Hydrogen Bonding and Stacking Interactions in Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this quantum chemical study, we explore hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) and stacking interactions in different crystalline cellulose allomorphs, namely cellulose I and cellulose IIII. We consider a model system representing a cellulose crystalline core, made from six cellobiose units arranged in three layers with two chains per layer. We calculate the contributions of intrasheet and intersheet interactions to the structure and stability in both cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores. Reference structures for this study were generated from molecular dynamics simulations of water-solvated cellulose I and IIII fibrils. A systematic analysis of various conformations describing different mutual orientations of cellobiose units is performed using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) with the M06-2X with 6-31+G (d, p) basis sets. We dissect the nature of the forces that stabilize the cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores and quantify the relative strength of H-bonding and stacking interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that individual H-bonding interactions are stronger in cellulose I than in cellulose IIII. We also observe a significant contribution from cooperative stacking interactions to the stabilization of cellulose I . In addition, the theory of atoms-in-molecules (AIM) has been employed to characterize and quantify these intermolecular interactions. AIM analyses highlight the role of nonconventional CH O H-bonding in the cellulose assemblies. Finally, we calculate molecular electrostatic potential maps for the cellulose allomorphs that capture the differences in chemical reactivity of the systems considered in our study.

  9. Properties of cellulose derivatives produced from radiation—Modified cellulose pulps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iller, Edward; Stupińska, Halina; Starostka, Paweł

    2007-07-01

    The aim of project was elaboration of radiation methods for properties modification of cellulose pulps using for derivatives production. The selected cellulose pulps were exposed to an electron beam with energy 10 MeV in a linear accelerator. After irradiation pulps underwent the structural and physico-chemical investigations. The laboratory test for manufacturing carboxymethylocellulose (CMC), cellulose carbamate (CC) and cellulose acetate (CA) with cellulose pulps irradiated dose 10 and 15 kGy have been performed. Irradiation of the pulp influenced its depolimerisation degree and resulted in the drop of viscosity of CMC. However, the expected level of cellulose activation expressed as a rise of the substitution degree or increase of the active substance content in the CMC sodium salt was not observed. In the case of cellulose esters (CC, CA) formation, the action of ionising radiation on cellulose pulps with the dose 10 and 15 kGy enables obtaiment of the average values of polimerisation degree as required for CC soluble in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. The properties of derivatives prepared by means of radiation and classic methods were compared.

  10. Cellulose-clay layered nanocomposite films fabricated from aqueous cellulose/LiOH/urea solution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Quanling; Wu, Chun-Nan; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2014-01-16

    Transparent and flexible cellulose-clay (montmorillonite, MTM) nanocomposite films are prepared from cellulose/LiOH/urea solutions. The results show that the composites possess intercalated nanolayered structures. Almost no Na ions are present in MTM, probably because they are substituted by Li ions. The nanocomposite films possess high mechanical strength and gas barrier properties, and lower coefficients of thermal expansion than those of the original cellulose film. In particular, the composite film of 85% cellulose and 15% MTM has the highest tensile strength and Young's modulus 161 and 180% greater than those of the 100% cellulose film, and coefficient of thermal expansion and oxygen permeability at 50-75% RH decrease to 60 and 42-33%, respectively. Moreover, the initial hydrophilic nature of cellulose film changes to somewhat hydrophobic through incorporation of hydrophilic MTM platelets. This is probably because the orientation of cellulose chains on the film surface changes by the formation of numerous hydrogen bonds between cellulose molecules and MTM platelets. PMID:24188852

  11. Engineering of a novel cellulose-adherent cellulolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae for cellulosic biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Sasaki, Kengo; den Haan, Riaan; Inokuma, Kentaro; Ogino, Chiaki; van Zyl, Willem H.; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Cellulosic biofuel is the subject of increasing attention. The main obstacle toward its economic feasibility is the recalcitrance of lignocellulose requiring large amount of enzyme to break. Several engineered yeast strains have been developed with cellulolytic activities to reduce the need for enzyme addition, but exhibiting limited effect. Here, we report the successful engineering of a cellulose-adherent Saccharomyces cerevisiae displaying four different synergistic cellulases on the cell surface. The cellulase-displaying yeast strain exhibited clear cell-to-cellulose adhesion and a “tearing” cellulose degradation pattern; the adhesion ability correlated with enhanced surface area and roughness of the target cellulose fibers, resulting in higher hydrolysis efficiency. The engineered yeast directly produced ethanol from rice straw despite a more than 40% decrease in the required enzyme dosage for high-density fermentation. Thus, improved cell-to-cellulose interactions provided a novel strategy for increasing cellulose hydrolysis, suggesting a mechanism for promoting the feasibility of cellulosic biofuel production. PMID:27079382

  12. 17 CFR 270.3c-5 - Beneficial ownership by knowledgeable employees and certain other persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beneficial ownership by knowledgeable employees and certain other persons. 270.3c-5 Section 270.3c-5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.3c-5 Beneficial ownership...

  13. 18 CFR 3c.3 - Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF CONDUCT § 3c.3 Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. (a) Employees shall, in fulfilling the obligation of 5 CFR 2635.101(b)(11), report fraud, waste..., abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. 3c.3 Section 3c.3 Conservation of...

  14. 17 CFR 270.3c-2 - Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ownership in small business investment companies. 270.3c-2 Section 270.3c-2 Commodity and Securities... 1940 § 270.3c-2 Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies. For the... the outstanding voting securities of any issuer which is a small business investment company...

  15. 17 CFR 270.3c-2 - Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ownership in small business investment companies. 270.3c-2 Section 270.3c-2 Commodity and Securities... 1940 § 270.3c-2 Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies. For the... the outstanding voting securities of any issuer which is a small business investment company...

  16. 17 CFR 270.3c-2 - Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ownership in small business investment companies. 270.3c-2 Section 270.3c-2 Commodity and Securities... 1940 § 270.3c-2 Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies. For the... the outstanding voting securities of any issuer which is a small business investment company...

  17. 17 CFR 270.3c-2 - Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ownership in small business investment companies. 270.3c-2 Section 270.3c-2 Commodity and Securities... 1940 § 270.3c-2 Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies. For the... the outstanding voting securities of any issuer which is a small business investment company...

  18. Biohydrogen production from cellulosic hydrolysate produced via temperature-shift-enhanced bacterial cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yung-Chung; Su, Yi-Chen; Chen, Chun-Yen; Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Kuo-Shing; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2009-12-01

    A "temperature-shift" strategy was developed to improve reducing sugar production from bacterial hydrolysis of cellulosic materials. In this strategy, production of cellulolytic enzymes with Cellulomonas uda E3-01 was promoted at a preferable temperature (35 degrees C), while more efficient enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis was achieved under an elevated culture temperature (45 degrees C), at which cell growth was inhibited to avoid consumption of reducing sugar. This temperature-shift strategy was shown to markedly increase the reducing sugar (especially, monosaccharide and disaccharide) concentration in the hydrolysate while hydrolyzing pure (carboxymethyl-cellulose, xylan, avicel and cellobiose) and natural (rice husk, rice straw, bagasse and Napier-grass) cellulosic materials. The cellulosic hydrolysates from CMC and xylan were successfully converted to H(2) via dark fermentation with Clostridium butyricum CGS5, attaining a maximum hydrogen yield of 4.79 mmol H(2)/g reducing sugar. PMID:19604692

  19. Acid hydrolysis of cellulosic fibres: Comparison of bleached kraft pulp, dissolving pulps and cotton textile cellulose.

    PubMed

    Palme, Anna; Theliander, Hans; Brelid, Harald

    2016-01-20

    The behaviour of different cellulosic fibres during acid hydrolysis has been investigated and the levelling-off degree of polymerisation (LODP) has been determined. The study included a bleached kraft pulp (both never-dried and once-dried) and two dissolving pulps (once-dried). Additionally, cotton cellulose from new cotton sheets and sheets discarded after long-time use was studied. Experimental results from the investigation, together with results found in literature, imply that ultrastructural differences between different fibres affect their susceptibility towards acid hydrolysis. Drying of a bleached kraft pulp was found to enhance the rate of acid hydrolysis and also result in a decrease in LODP. This implies that the susceptibility of cellulosic fibres towards acid hydrolysis is affected by drying-induced stresses in the cellulose chains. In cotton cellulose, it was found that use and laundering gave a substantial loss in the degree of polymerisation (DP), but that the LODP was only marginally affected. PMID:26572472

  20. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Kumar, Amit; Kundu, Chanakya N.; Verma, Subhash C.; Choudhuri, Tathagata

    2014-01-05

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C. - Highlights: • EBV-encoded EBNA3C suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas. • EBNA3C binds to p73 to suppress its apoptotic effect. • EBNA3C maintains latency by regulating downstream mitochondrial pathways.

  1. Ancient Origin of cGAS-STING Reveals Mechanism of Universal 2',3' cGAMP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kranzusch, Philip J; Wilson, Stephen C; Lee, Amy S Y; Berger, James M; Doudna, Jennifer A; Vance, Russell E

    2015-09-17

    In humans, the cGAS-STING immunity pathway signals in response to cytosolic DNA via 2',3' cGAMP, a cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) second messenger containing mixed 2'-5' and 3'-5' phosphodiester bonds. Prokaryotes also produce CDNs, but these are exclusively 3' linked, and thus the evolutionary origins of human 2',3' cGAMP signaling are unknown. Here we illuminate the ancient origins of human cGAMP signaling by discovery of a functional cGAS-STING pathway in Nematostella vectensis, an anemone species >500 million years diverged from humans. Anemone cGAS appears to produce a 3',3' CDN that anemone STING recognizes through nucleobase-specific contacts not observed in human STING. Nevertheless, anemone STING binds mixed-linkage 2',3' cGAMP indistinguishably from human STING, trapping a unique structural conformation not induced by 3',3' CDNs. These results reveal that human mixed-linkage cGAMP achieves universal signaling by exploiting a deeply conserved STING conformational intermediate, providing critical insight for therapeutic targeting of the STING pathway. PMID:26300263

  2. BINDING OF CHLOROFORM TO THE CYSTEINE OF HEMOGLOBIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The products of the covalent binding of chloroform to rat hemoglobin during microsomal metabolism were isolated and identified by gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectroscopy (MS). After isolation by Proteinase K hydrolysis, amino acid analysis and cellulose thin-layer chromatog...

  3. Structural and Inhibitor Studies of Norovirus 3C-like Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Kim, Yunjeong; Lovell, Scott; Prakash, Om; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses have a single-stranded, positive sense 7–8 kb RNA genome, which encodes a polyprotein precursor processed by a virus-encoded 3C-like cysteine protease (3CLpro) to generate mature non-structural proteins. Because processing of the polyprotein is essential for virus replication, norovirus 3CLpro has been targeted for the discovery of anti-norovirus small molecule therapeutics. Thus, we performed functional, structural and inhibition studies of norovirus 3CLpro with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay, X-ray crystallography, and NMR spectroscopy with a synthetic protease inhibitor. Three 3CLpro from Norwalk virus (NV, genogroup I), MD145 (genogroup II) and murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1, genogroup V) were optimized for a FRET assay, and compared for the inhibitory activities of a synthetic protease inhibitor (GC376). The apo 3D structures of NV 3CLpro determined with X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy were further analyzed. In addition, the binding mode of NV 3CLpro-GC376 was compared with X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. The results of this report provide insight into the interaction of NV 3CLpro with substrate/inhibitor for better understanding of the enzyme and antiviral drug development. PMID:24055466

  4. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-01-01

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized. PMID:26999188

  5. Neuronal expression of ILEI/FAM3C and its reduction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Watanabe, Naoki; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Nishimura, Masaki

    2016-08-25

    Decrease in brain amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is a leading strategy for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the intrinsic mechanism of the regulation of brain Aβ production is largely unknown. Previously, we reported that ILEI (also referred to as FAM3C) binds to the γ-secretase complex and suppresses Aβ production without inhibiting γ-secretase activity. In this study, we examined ILEI expression in mouse brain using immunohistochemistry and subcellular fractionation. Brain ILEI showed widespread expression in neurons and ependymal cells but not in glial and vascular endothelial cells. Neuronal ILEI resided in perinuclear vesicular structures, which were positive for a marker protein of the trans-Golgi network. Although ILEI immunostaining was negative at synaptic terminals, synaptosome fractionation analysis suggested that ILEI was enriched in presynaptic terminals, particularly in the active zone-docked synaptic vesicles. ILEI expression levels in brain peaked during the postnatal period and declined with age. In comparison with age-matched control brains, the number of ILEI-immunoreactive neurons decreased in AD brains, although the subcellular localization was unaltered. Our results suggest that a decline of ILEI expression may cause accumulation of Aβ in the brain and the eventual development of AD. PMID:27256505

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Two Cellulose Morphology Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 Producing Cellulose with Lower Crystallinity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the

  7. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the

  8. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh -hui; Lai, Hsin -Chih

    2015-03-19

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To addressmore » this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan

  9. Supercritical angle fluorescence biosensor for the detection of molecular interactions on cellulose-modified glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laib, Stephan; Krieg, Alexander; Rankl, Michael; Seeger, Stefan

    2006-09-01

    Cellulose films have been proposed as a convenient substrate for producing flat and homogeneous surface coatings. Additionally, amino-labelled cellulose species, like aminopropyltrimethylsilylethercellulose (ATMSC), are excellent support matrices for covalent binding of biomolecules, with low probe density and prevention of non-specific adsorption of unbound analyte molecules. Due to ATMSC films fulfil important requirements as substrate for analyse techniques of surface-tethered proteins and nucleic acids, we consequently report a new preparation for DNA-functionalised surfaces. Single-stranded DNA molecules are covalently coupled to cellulose-coated glass cover slips to interact with complementary free Cy5-labelled oligonucleotides in solution. Hybridisation efficiencies at the new substrate and at standard surface coatings are determined by detection of the surface-generated fluorescence. In order to discriminate against the fluorescence from unbound oligonucleotides the detection volume was restricted to the surface by collecting supercritical angle fluorescence (SAF). Thus, it is demonstrated that cellulose films are utilised to investigate DNA-hybridisation reactions highly sensitive.

  10. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  11. Clean conversion of cellulose into fermentable glucose.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Zhuang, Junping; Lin, Lu; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2009-01-01

    We studied the process of conversion of microcrystalline-cellulose into fermentable glucose in the formic acid reaction system using cross polarization/magic angle spinning (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that formic acid as an active agent was able to effectively penetrate into the interior space of the cellulose molecules, thus collapsing the rigid crystalline structure and allowing hydrolysis to occur easily in the amorphous zone as well as in the crystalline zone. The microcrystalline-cellulose was hydrolyzed using formic acid and 4% hydrochloric acid under mild conditions. The effects of hydrochloric acid concentration, the ratio of solid to liquid, temperature (55-75 degrees C) and retention time (0-9 h), and the concentration of glucose were analyzed. The hydrolysis velocities of microcrystalline-cellulose were 6.14 x 10(-3) h(-1) at 55 degrees C, 2.94 x 10(-2) h(-1) at 65 degrees C, and 6.84x10(-2) h(-1) at 75 degrees C. The degradation velocities of glucose were 0.01 h(-1) at 55 degrees C, 0.14 h(-1) at 65 degrees C, 0.34 h(-1) at 75 degrees C. The activation energy of microcrystalline-cellulose hydrolysis was 105.61 kJ/mol, and the activation energy of glucose degradation was 131.37 kJ/mol. PMID:19409478

  12. Biocompatibility of Bacterial Cellulose Based Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Fernando G.; Commeaux, Solene; Troncoso, Omar P.

    2012-01-01

    Some bacteria can synthesize cellulose when they are cultivated under adequate conditions. These bacteria produce a mat of cellulose on the top of the culture medium, which is formed by a three-dimensional coherent network of pure cellulose nanofibers. Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been widely used in different fields, such as the paper industry, electronics and tissue engineering due to its remarkable mechanical properties, conformability and porosity. Nanocomposites based on BC have received much attention, because of the possibility of combining the good properties of BC with other materials for specific applications. BC nanocomposites can be processed either in a static or an agitated medium. The fabrication of BC nanocomposites in static media can be carried out while keeping the original mat structure obtained after the synthesis to form the final nanocomposite or by altering the culture media with other components. The present article reviews the issue of biocompatibility of BC and BC nanocomposites. Biomedical aspects, such as surface modification for improving cell adhesion, in vitro and in vivo studies are given along with details concerning the physics of network formation and the changes that occur in the cellulose networks due to the presence of a second phase. The relevance of biocompatibility studies for the development of BC-based materials in bone, skin and cardiovascular tissue engineering is also discussed. PMID:24955750

  13. Molecular imprinting of caffeine on cellulose/silica composite and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Rajinder Singh

    This dissertation presents a study to prepare molecularly imprinted inorganic/organic hybrid composite which not only confirm the higher binding capabilities for the target molecule (template) but also discriminate its structural analogs. Molecularly imprinted Cellulose/Silica composite (MIP) was prepared by using caffeine as the template. Silica derived from TEOS by using sol-gel techniques was deposited on cheap, abundant organic matrix such as cellulose, which can provide a filtering medium while coffee brewing. Removal of the template from the precursor was verified by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Remarkably reduced intensity of -NH2 scissor like mode of caffeine and the presence of traces of "N" by elemental analysis, confirmed the complete removal of caffeine on washing with ethanol. Cellulose to TEOS mass ratio of 2:1 was found to be close to optimal during our analysis. Energy dispersive spectroscopy results leads to an important fact that the deposition of silica was stable even at 373 K. Focus was on the adsorption affinities of caffeine by MIP and was tested by performing relative adsorption of caffeine by MIP and blank (standard) using demountable path length cell in IR. It was observed that MIP showed almost 3-folds higher adsorption capabilities as compared to blank. The initial rate of adsorption of caffeine by MIP is much higher than blank which is one of the desirable feature according the its intended use. The higher adsorption of caffeine by MIP not only depends on the amount of silica deposited but also the available binding sites present on its surface. Selectivity of MIP was also verified by the competitive adsorption of caffeine and its structure analogs such as theophylline. Clearly, MIP showed greater and more rapid binding capabilities for caffeine than theophylline. At short contact times, the binding capability for caffeine is almost 1.8 times greater than the binding capabilities for theophylline.

  14. Comparison of physical properties of regenerated cellulose films fabricated with different cellulose feedstocks in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Pang, JinHui; Wu, Miao; Zhang, QiaoHui; Tan, Xin; Xu, Feng; Zhang, XueMing; Sun, RunCang

    2015-05-01

    With the serious "white pollution" resulted from the non-biodegradable plastic films, considerable attention has been directed toward the development of renewable and biodegradable cellulose-based film materials as substitutes of petroleum-derived materials. In this study, environmentally friendly cellulose films were successfully prepared using different celluloses (pine, cotton, bamboo, MCC) as raw materials and ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate as a solvent. The SEM and AFM indicated that all cellulose films displayed a homogeneous and smooth surface. In addition, the FT-IR and XRD analysis showed the transition from cellulose I to II was occurred after the dissolution and regeneration process. Furthermore, the cellulose films prepared by cotton linters and pine possessed the most excellent thermal stability and mechanical properties, which were suggested by the highest onset temperature (285°C) and tensile stress (120 MPa), respectively. Their excellent properties of regenerated cellulose films are promising for applications in food packaging and medical materials. PMID:25659673

  15. Prospects for Irradiation in Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Anita; Aggarwal, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Anuja; Yadav, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Second generation bioethanol production technology relies on lignocellulosic biomass composed of hemicelluloses, celluloses, and lignin components. Cellulose and hemicellulose are sources of fermentable sugars. But the structural characteristics of lignocelluloses pose hindrance to the conversion of these sugar polysaccharides into ethanol. The process of ethanol production, therefore, involves an expensive and energy intensive step of pretreatment, which reduces the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and makes feedstock more susceptible to saccharification. Various physical, chemical, biological, or combined methods are employed to pretreat lignocelluloses. Irradiation is one of the common and promising physical methods of pretreatment, which involves ultrasonic waves, microwaves, γ-rays, and electron beam. Irradiation is also known to enhance the effect of saccharification. This review explains the role of different radiations in the production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:26839707

  16. Magnetic alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Fumiko; Kimura, Tsunehisa

    2008-04-01

    The alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers under magnetic fields are reported. Static and rotating magnetic fields were used to align cellulose fibers with sizes ranging from millimeter to nanometer sizes. Cellulose fibers of the millimeter order, which were prepared for papermaking, and much smaller fibers with micrometer to nanometer sizes prepared by the acid hydrolysis of larger ones underwent magnetic alignment. Under a rotating field, a uniaxial alignment of fibers was achieved. The alignment was successfully fixed by the photopolymerization of a UV-curable resin precursor used as matrix. A monodomain chiral nematic film was prepared from an aqueous suspension of nanofibers. Using a field modulator inserted in a homogeneous magnetic field, simultaneous alignment and patterning were achieved.

  17. Bacterial cellulose membrane as separation medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shibazaki, Hideki; Kuga, Shigenori; Onabe, Fumihiko; Usuda, Makoto . Faculty of Agriculture)

    1993-11-10

    A thin membrane of bacterial cellulose (BC) obtained from Acetobacter culture was tested for its performance as a dialysis membrane in aqueous systems. The BC membrane showed superior mechanical strength to that of a dialysis-grade regenerated cellulose membrane, allowing the use of a thinner membrane than the latter. As a result, the BC membrane gave higher permeation rates for poly(ethylene glycols) as probe solutes. The cutoff molecular weight of the original BC membrane, significantly greater than that of regenerated cellulose, could be modified by concentrated alkali treatments of the membrane. The nature of the change at the ultrastructural level caused by the alkali treatments was studied by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Chemical genetics to examine cellulose biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Long-term efforts to decode plant cellulose biosynthesis via molecular genetics and biochemical strategies are being enhanced by the ever-expanding scale of omics technologies. An alternative approach to consider are the prospects for inducing change in plant metabolism using exogenously supplied chemical ligands. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors (CBIs) have been identified among known herbicides, during diverse combinatorial chemical libraries screens, and natural chemical screens from microbial agents. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the inhibitory effects of CBIs and further group them by how they influence fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase A proteins. Additional attention is paid to the continuing development of the CBI toolbox to explore the cell biology and genetic mechanisms underpinning effector molecule activity. PMID:23372572

  19. Orientation of cellulose nanowhiskers in polyvinyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvien, I.; Oksman, K.

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study was to align cellulose nanowhiskers in a polymer using a strong magnetic field and thereby obtain a unidirectional reinforced nanocomposite. Cellulose whiskers (2 wt. %) were incorporated in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix using solution casting with water as the solvent. The suspension was cast and the water was evaporated while a homogeneous magnetic field of 7 T was applied. Different microscopy investigations of prepared nanocomposites indicated that the cellulose whiskers were oriented perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis further strengthened the idea of alignment because the results showed that the dynamic modulus of the nanocomposite was around 2 GPa higher at room temperature in the aligned direction compared to the transverse direction.

  20. Prospects for Irradiation in Cellulosic Ethanol Production.

    PubMed

    Saini, Anita; Aggarwal, Neeraj K; Sharma, Anuja; Yadav, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Second generation bioethanol production technology relies on lignocellulosic biomass composed of hemicelluloses, celluloses, and lignin components. Cellulose and hemicellulose are sources of fermentable sugars. But the structural characteristics of lignocelluloses pose hindrance to the conversion of these sugar polysaccharides into ethanol. The process of ethanol production, therefore, involves an expensive and energy intensive step of pretreatment, which reduces the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and makes feedstock more susceptible to saccharification. Various physical, chemical, biological, or combined methods are employed to pretreat lignocelluloses. Irradiation is one of the common and promising physical methods of pretreatment, which involves ultrasonic waves, microwaves, γ-rays, and electron beam. Irradiation is also known to enhance the effect of saccharification. This review explains the role of different radiations in the production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:26839707

  1. Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose with high antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Chaker, Achraf; Boufi, Sami

    2015-10-20

    Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose (C-NFC) has been prepared via a high pressure homogenization using quaternized cellulose fibers with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. It has been shown that the quaternization of dried softwood pulp facilitated the defibrillation processes and prevented clogging of the homogenizer. The effects of the trimethylammonium chloride content on the fibrillation yield, the transparency degree of the gel, the rheological behavior of the NFC suspension and their electrokinetic properties were investigated. AFM observation showed that the NFC suspension consisted of individualized cellulose I nanofibrils 4-5nm in width and length in the micronic scale. In addition to their strong reinforcing potential, the inclusion of C-NFC into a polymer matrix was shown to efficiently enhance the antibacterial activity. The reinforcing potential of C-NFC, studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), was compared to anionic NFC and the difference was explained in terms of the nanofibrils capacities to build up a strong networks held by hydrogen bonding. PMID:26256179

  2. Polypeptide composition of bacterial cyclic diguanylic acid-dependent cellulose synthase and the occurrence of immunologically crossreacting proteins in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, R.; Ross, P.; Weinhouse, H.; Amikam, D.; Volman, G.; Ohana, P.; Benziman, M. ); Calhoon, R.D.; Wong, Hing C.; Emerick, A.W. )

    1991-06-15

    To comprehend the catalytic and regulatory mechanism of the cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)-dependent cellulose synthase of Acetobacter xylinum and its relatedness to similar enzymes in other organisms, the structure of this enzyme was analyzed at the polypeptide level. The enzyme, purified 350-fold by enzyme-product entrapment, contains three major peptides (90, 67, and 54 kDa), which, based on direct photoaffinity and immunochemical labeling and amino acid sequence analysis, are constituents of the native cellulose synthase. Labeling of purified synthase with either ({sup 32}P)c-di-GMP or ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)UDP-glucose indicates that activator- and substrate-specific binding sites are most closely associated with the 67- and 54-kDa peptides, respectively, whereas marginal photolabeling is detected in the 90-k-Da peptide. However, antibodies raised against a protein derived from the cellulose synthase structural gene (bcsB) specifically label all three peptides. The authors suggest that the structurally related 67- and 54-kDa peptides are fragments proteolytically derived from the 90-kDa peptide encoded by bcsB. The anti-cellulose synthase antibodies crossreact with a similar set of peptides derived from other cellulose-producing microorganisms and plants such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Rhizobium leguminosarum, mung bean, peas, barley, and cotton. The occurrence of such cellulose synthase-like structures in plant species suggests that a common enzymatic mechanism for cellulose biogenesis is employed throughout nature.

  3. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose Iβ and cellulose II.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sunghyun; French, Alfred D; Condon, Brian D; Concha, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose Iβ materials simply based on intensity at 18° 2θ in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16° 2θ intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and the degree of polymorphic conversion, we simulated the diffraction patterns of cotton celluloses (Iβ and II) and compared the simulated amorphous fractions with the Segal values. The diffraction patterns of control and mercerized cottons, respectively, were simulated with perfect crystals of cellulose Iβ (1.54° FWHM) and cellulose II (2.30° FWHM) as well as 10% and 35% amorphous celluloses. Their Segal amorphous fractions were 15% and 31%, respectively. The higher Segal amorphous fraction for control cotton was attributed to the peak overlap. Although the amorphous fraction was set in the simulation, the peak overlap induced by the increase of FWHM further enhanced the Segal amorphous intensity of cellulose Iβ. For cellulose II, the effect of peak overlap was smaller; however the lower reflection of the amorphous cellulose scattering in its Segal amorphous location resulted in smaller Segal amorphous fractions. Despite this underestimation, the relatively good agreement of the Segal method with the simulation for mercerized cotton was attributed to the incomplete conversion to cellulose II. The (1-10) and (110) peaks of cellulose Iβ remained near the Segal amorphous location of cellulose II for blends of control and mercerized cotton fibers. PMID:26453844

  4. Cellulose nanocrystals, nanofibers, and their composites as renewable smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Zhai, Lindong; Mun, Seongcheol; Ko, Hyun-U.; Yun, Young-Min

    2015-04-01

    Cellulose is one of abundant renewable biomaterials in the world. Over 1.5 trillion tons of cellulose is produced per year in nature by biosynthesis, forming microfibrils which in turn aggregate to form cellulose fibers. Using new effective methods these microfibrils can be disintegrated from the fibers to nanosized materials, so called cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) and cellulose nanofiber (CNF). The CNC and CNF have extremely good strength properties, dimensional stability, thermal stability and good optical properties on top of their renewable behavior, which can be a building block of new materials. This paper represents recent advancement of cellulose nanocrystals and cellulose nanofibers, followed by their possibility for smart materials. Natural behaviors, extraction, modification of cellulose nanocrystals and fibers are explained and their synthesis with nanomaterials is introduced, which is necessary to meet the technological requirements for smart materials. Also, its challenges are addressed.

  5. Nanocrystalline cellulose from coir fiber: preparation, properties, and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nanocrystalline cellulose derived from various botanical sources offers unique and potentially useful characteristics. In principle, any cellulosic material can be considered as a potential source of a nanocrystalline material, including crops, crop residues, and agroindustrial wastes. Because of t...

  6. Nanocomposite Edible Films from Mango Puree Reinforced with Cellulose Nanofibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose nanoreinforcements have been used to improve mechanical and barrier properties of biopolymers, whose performance is usually poor when compared to those of synthetic polymers. Nanocomposite edible films have been developed by adding cellulose nanofibers (CNF) in different concentrations (u...

  7. Cavitation milling of natural cellulose to nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, Dipak Vitthal; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2010-06-01

    Cavitation holds the promise of a new and exciting approach to fabricate both top down and bottom up nanostructures. Cavitation bubbles are created when a liquid boils under less than atmospheric pressure. The collapse process occurs supersonically and generates a host of physical and chemical effects. We have made an attempt to fabricate natural cellulose material using hydrodynamic as well as acoustic cavitation. The cellulose material having initial size of 63 micron was used for the experiments. 1% (w/v) slurry of cellulose sample was circulated through the hydrodynamic cavitation device or devices (orifice) for 6h. The average velocity of the fluid through the device was 10.81m/s while average pressure applied was 7.8 kg/cm(2). Cavitation number was found to be 2.61. The average particle size obtained after treatment was 1.36 micron. This hydrodynamically processed sample was sonicated for 1h 50 min. The average size of ultrasonically processed particles was found to be 301 nm. Further, the cellulose particles were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to see the effect of cavitation on crystallinity (X(c)) as well as on melting temperature (T(m)). Cellulose structures consist of amorphous as well as crystalline regions. The initial raw sample was 86.56% crystalline but due to the effect of cavitation, the crystallinity reduced to 37.76%. Also the melting temperature (T(m)) was found to be reduced from 101.78 degrees C of the original to 60.13 degrees C of the processed sample. SEM images for the cellulose (processed and unprocessed) shows the status and fiber-fiber alignment and its orientation with each other. Finally cavitation has proved to be very efficient tool for reduction in size from millimeter to nano scale for highly crystalline materials. PMID:20362487

  8. Processing of cellulose for the advancement of biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Brian James

    2011-12-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose polymers is currently a rate-limiting step in the bioconversion of biomass to biofuels. Cellulose polymers self assemble to form crystalline structures stabilized by a complex network of intermolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding. The network of interactions in crystalline cellulose (cellulose nanostructure) poses an energy barrier that limits enzymatic degradation as apparent from the activity of Cel5H. To improve the degradability of cellulose the intermolecular interactions must be disrupted. The interactions of the cellulose nanostructure prevent solubilization by water and most other common solvents, but some organic solvents aid degradation of cellulose suggesting they influence cellulose nanostructure. The objective of this work is to understand the influence of solvents on cellulose nanostructure with the goal of improving the degradability of cellulose nanostructure using solvents. To understand solvent interaction with cellulose, phosphoric acid was used to first solubilize cellulose (PAS cellulose) followed by adding an organic liquid or water to wash the phosphate from the system. The Flory Huggins theory was used to predict wash liquids that could favorably interact with cellulose. A favorable wash liquid was predicted to prevent the reformation of crystalline domains to yield a disrupted cellulose nanostructure, which should be more degradable. Low molecular weight alcohols and glycols were calculated to be favorable wash liquids. Washing PAS cellulose with the predicted favorable liquids yielded semi-transparent gel-like materials compared to the opaque white precipitate formed when water or unfavorable solvents were used in the wash. Fractal analysis of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) of these apparent gels indicated cellulose polymers likely have the properties of clustered rods. This partial disruption increased degradability relative to the water washed PAS cellulose. The apparent rod

  9. Production of nano bacterial cellulose from waste water of candied jujube-processing industry using Acetobacter xylinum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Lifen; Hua, Jiachuan; Jia, Shiru; Zhang, Jianfei; Liu, Hao

    2015-04-20

    The work is aimed to investigate the suitability of waste water of candied jujube-processing industry for the production of bacterial cellulose (BC) by Gluconacetobacter xylinum CGMCC No.2955 and to study the structure properties of bacterial cellulose membranes. After acid pretreatment, the glucose of hydrolysate was higher than that of waste water of candied jujube. The volumetric yield of bacterial cellulose in hydrolysate was 2.25 g/L, which was 1.5-folds of that in waste water of candied jujube. The structures indicated that the fiber size distribution was 3-14 nm in those media with an average diameter being around 5.9 nm. The crystallinity index of BC from pretreatment medium was lower than that of without pretreatment medium and BCs from various media had similar chemical binding. Ammonium citrate was a key factor for improving production yield and the crystallinity index of BC. PMID:25662694

  10. Identification of a cellulose synthase-associated protein required for cellulose biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Kaplinsky, Nick; Bringmann, Martin; Cobb, Alex; Carroll, Andrew; Sampathkumar, Arun; Baskin, Tobias I.; Persson, Staffan; Somerville, Chris R.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose synthase-interactive protein 1 (CSI1) was identified in a two-hybrid screen for proteins that interact with cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms involved in primary plant cell wall synthesis. CSI1 encodes a 2,150-amino acid protein that contains 10 predicted Armadillo repeats and a C2 domain. Mutations in CSI1 cause defective cell elongation in hypocotyls and roots and reduce cellulose content. CSI1 is associated with CESA complexes, and csi1 mutants affect the distribution and movement of CESA complexes in the plasma membrane. PMID:20616083

  11. IR absorption spectra of cellulose obtained from ozonated wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Autlov, S. A.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Bazarnova, N. G.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic curves of ozone absorption by aspen wood were obtained. Processing of wood with peracetic acid gave cellulose samples. The yields of ozonated wood, water-soluble compounds, and cellulose were determined for the samples corresponding to different consumptions of ozone. The IR absorption spectra of wood and cellulose isolated from ozonated wood were analyzed. The supramolecular structure of cellulose can be changed by varying the conditions of wood ozonation.

  12. Loosenin, a novel protein with cellulose-disrupting activity from Bjerkandera adusta

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Expansins and expansin-like proteins loosen cellulose microfibrils, possibly through the rupture of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Together with the use of lignocellulolytic enzymes, these proteins are potential molecular tools to treat plant biomass to improve saccharification yields. Results Here we describe a new type of expansin-related fungal protein that we have called loosenin. Its corresponding gene, loos1, from the basidiomycete Bjerkandera adusta, was cloned and heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. LOOS1 is distantly related to plant expansins through the shared presence of a DPBB domain, however domain II found in plant expansins is absent. LOOS1 binds tightly to cellulose and chitin, and we demonstrate that cotton fibers become susceptible to the action of a commercial cellulase following treatment with LOOS1. Natural fibers of Agave tequilana also become susceptible to hydrolysis by cellulases after loosenin treatment. Conclusions LOOS1 is a new type of protein with disrupting activity on cellulose. LOOS1 binds polysaccharides, and given its enhancing properties on the action of hydrolytic enzymes, LOOS1 represents a potential additive in the production of fermentable sugars from lignocellulose. PMID:21314954

  13. Development of feedstocks for cellulosic biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The inclusion of cellulosic ethanol in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 and the revised Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) has spurred development of the first commercial scale cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. These efforts have also revived interest in the development of dedicated energy crops selected for biomass productivity and for properties that facilitate conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. While many aspects of developing these feedstocks are compatible with current agricultural activities, improving biomass productivity may provide opportunities to expand the potential for biofuel production beyond the classical research objectives associated with improving traditional food and feed crops. PMID:22615716

  14. Chapter 5: Meso-Scale Modeling of Polysaccharides in Plant Cell Walls: An Application to Translation of CBMs on Cellulose Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    A coarse-grained model and force field for simulating cellulose I{beta} surface (1,0,0) was derived, in which each {beta}-D-glucose unit is represented by three beads. The coarse-grained model can reproduce a stable cellulose (1,0,0) surface with an excellent agreement with an all-atom model. When used to study the interaction of the family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM1) with this cellulose surface model, the CBM 'opens' as in earlier atomistic simulations. This cellulose I{beta} surface model produces simulations in which the CBM translates along a broken cellodextrin chain. This processive motion of the exoglucanase cellobiohydrolase I has long been suggested by experimental studies, but has never before been observed in computer simulations.

  15. CVD Growth of 3C-SiC on 4H/6H Mesas

    SciTech Connect

    Neudeck,P.; Trunek, A.; Spry, D.; Powell, J.; Du, H.; Skowronski, M.; Huang, X.; Dudley, M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes growth and characterization of the highest quality reproducible 3C-SiC heteroepitaxial films ever reported. By properly nucleating 3C-SiC growth on top of perfectly on-axis (0001) 4H-SiC mesa surfaces completely free of atomic scale steps and extended defects, growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms completely free of extended crystal defects can be achieved. In contrast, nucleation and growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms on top of 4H-SiC mesas with atomic-scale steps always results in numerous observable dislocations threading through the 3C-SiC epilayer. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and high resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HRXTEM) measurements indicate non-trivial, in-plane, lattice mismatch between the 3C and 4H layers. This mismatch is somewhat relieved in the step-free mesa case via misfit dislocations confined to the 3C/4H interfacial region without dislocations threading into the overlying 3C-SiC layer. These results indicate that the presence or absence of steps at the 3C/4H heteroepitaxial interface critically impacts the quality, defect structure, and relaxation mechanisms of single-crystal heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films.

  16. CFD Growth of 3C-SiC on 4H/6H Mesas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Spry, David J.; Powell, J. Anthony; Du, Hui; Skowronski, Marek; Huang, XianRong; Dudley, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article describes growth and characterization of the highest quality reproducible 3C-SiC heteroepitaxial films ever reported. By properly nucleating 3C-SiC growth on top of perfectly on-axis (0001) 4H-SiC mesa surfaces completely free of atomic scale steps and extended defects, growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms completely free of extended crystal defects can be achieved. In contrast, nucleation and growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms on top of 4H-SiC mesas with atomic-scale steps always results in numerous observable dislocations threading through the 3C-SiC epilayer. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements indicate non-trivial in-plane lattice mismatch between the 3C and 4H layers. This mismatch is somewhat relieved in the step-free mesa case via misfit dislocations confined to the 3C/4H interfacial region without dislocations threading into the overlying 3C-SiC layer. These results indicate that the presence or absence of steps at the 3C/4H heteroepitaxial interface critically impacts the quality, defect structure, and relaxation mechanisms of single-crystal heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films.

  17. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  18. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  19. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  20. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  1. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  2. TREATABILITY STUDY BULLETIN: ENZYME-ACTIVATED CELLULOSE TECHNOLOGY - THORNECO, INC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Enzyme-Activated Cellulose Technology developed by Thorneco, Inc. uses cellulose placed into one or more cylindrical towers to remove metals and organic compounds from an aqueous solution. The cellulose is coated with a proprietary enzyme. Operating parameters that can affe...

  3. Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered.

  4. Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, J.

    1998-12-01

    A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered. 6 figs.

  5. Synergistic proteins for the enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Lee, Hee Jin; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2014-10-01

    Reducing the enzyme loadings for enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulose is required for economically feasible production of biofuels and biochemicals. One strategy is addition of small amounts of synergistic proteins to cellulase mixtures. Synergistic proteins increase the activity of cellulase without causing significant hydrolysis of cellulose. Synergistic proteins exert their activity by inducing structural modifications in cellulose. Recently, synergistic proteins from various biological sources, including bacteria, fungi, and plants, were identified based on genomic data, and their synergistic activities were investigated. Currently, an up-to-date overview of several aspects of synergistic proteins, such as their functions, action mechanisms and synergistic activity, are important for future industrial application. In this review, we summarize the current state of research on four synergistic proteins: carbohydrate-binding modules, plant expansins, expansin-like proteins, and Auxiliary Activity family 9 (formerly GH61) proteins. This review provides critical information to aid in promoting research on the development of efficient and industrially feasible synergistic proteins. PMID:25129610

  6. Preparation of cellulose II and IIII films by allomorphic conversion of bacterial cellulose I pellicles.

    PubMed

    Faria-Tischer, Paula C S; Tischer, Cesar A; Heux, Laurent; Le Denmat, Simon; Picart, Catherine; Sierakowski, Maria-R; Putaux, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    The structural changes resulting from the conversion of native cellulose I (Cel I) into allomorphs II (Cel II) and IIII (Cel IIII) have usually been studied using powder samples from plant or algal cellulose. In this work, the conversion of Cel I into Cel II and Cel IIII was performed on bacterial cellulose films without any mechanical disruption. The surface texture of the films was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the morphology of the constituting cellulose ribbons, by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural changes were characterized using solid-state NMR spectroscopy as well as X-ray and electron diffraction. The allomorphic change into Cel II and Cel IIII resulted in films with different crystallinity, roughness and hydrophobic/hydrophilicity surface and the films remained intact during all process of allomorphic conversion. PMID:25842122

  7. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose IB and cellulose II

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose IB materials simply based on intensity at 18o 20 in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16o 2O intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and th...

  8. Nanomanufacturing metrology for cellulosic nanomaterials: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postek, Michael T.

    2014-08-01

    The development of the metrology and standards for advanced manufacturing of cellulosic nanomaterials (or basically, wood-based nanotechnology) is imperative to the success of this rising economic sector. Wood-based nanotechnology is a revolutionary technology that will create new jobs and strengthen America's forest-based economy through industrial development and expansion. It allows this, previously perceived, low-tech industry to leap-frog directly into high-tech products and processes and thus improves its current economic slump. Recent global investments in nanotechnology programs have led to a deeper appreciation of the high performance nature of cellulose nanomaterials. Cellulose, manufactured to the smallest possible-size ( 2 nm x 100 nm), is a high-value material that enables products to be lighter and stronger; have less embodied energy; utilize no catalysts in the manufacturing, are biologically compatible and, come from a readily renewable resource. In addition to the potential for a dramatic impact on the national economy - estimated to be as much as $250 billion worldwide by 2020 - cellulose-based nanotechnology creates a pathway for expanded and new markets utilizing these renewable materials. The installed capacity associated with the US pulp and paper industry represents an opportunity, with investment, to rapidly move to large scale production of nano-based materials. However, effective imaging, characterization and fundamental measurement science for process control and characterization are lacking at the present time. This talk will discuss some of these needed measurements and potential solutions.

  9. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... manufacturing practice. (2) The additive identified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section is used or intended for.../or minerals. The additive is used in accordance with good manufacturing practice. ... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive...

  10. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufacturing practice. (2) The additive identified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section is used or intended for.../or minerals. The additive is used in accordance with good manufacturing practice. ... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive...

  11. Biomass, Part A: Cellulose and hemicellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.A.; Kellogg, S.T.

    1988-01-01

    This volume covers cellulose and hemicellulose and includes proven and reproducible methods for research related to the conversion of carbohydrate polymers to usable monomeric units. Sections on the preparation of biomass materials and of substrates are included, as are sections on analytical methods and on the purification and assay of enzymes.

  12. HPMC reinforced with different cellulose nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic polymers, made almost entirely from chemicals derived from crude oil, are widely used as primary packaging in the food industry causing environmental issues. Hydroxypropyl Methyl Cellulose (HPMC) can be used as bio-based packaging material. In this study, the application of nanotechnology ...

  13. Environmental sustainability of cellulosic energy cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The environmental sustainability of bioenergy production depends on both direct and indirect effects of the production systems to produce bioenergy feedstocks. This chapter evaluates what is known about the environmental sustainability of cellulosic bioenergy crop production for the types of produc...

  14. [Insights into engineering of cellulosic ethanol].

    PubMed

    Yue, Guojun; Wu, Guoqing; Lin, Xin

    2014-06-01

    For energy security, air pollution concerns, coupled with the desire to sustain the agricultural sector and revitalize the rural economy, many countries have applied ethanol as oxygenate or fuel to supplement or replace gasoline in transportation sector. Because of abundant feedstock resources and effective reduction of green-house-gas emissions, the cellulosic ethanol has attracted great attention. With a couple of pioneers beginning to produce this biofuel from biomass in commercial quantities around the world, it is necessary to solve engineering problems and complete the economic assessment in 2015-2016, gradually enter the commercialization stage. To avoid "competing for food with humans and competing for land with food", the 1st generation fuel ethanol will gradually transit to the 2nd generation cellulosic ethanol. Based on the overview of cellulosic ethanol industrialization from domestic and abroad in recent years, the main engineering application problems encountered in pretreatment, enzymes and enzymatic hydrolysis, pentose/hexose co-fermentation strains and processes, equipment were discussed from chemical engineering and biotechnology perspective. The development direction of cellulosic ethanol technology in China was addressed. PMID:25212000

  15. SANS Study of Cellulose Extracted from Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Heller, William T; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Foston, Marcus B; Myles, Dean A A; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Evans, Barbara R

    2010-01-01

    AbstractLignocellulosic biomass, an abundant renewable natural resource, has the potential to play a major role in generation of renewable biofuels through its conversion to bio-ethanol. Unfortunately, it is a complex biological composite material that shows significant recalcitrance making it a cost-ineffective feedstock for bioethanol production. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to probe the multi-scale structure of cellulosic materials. Cellulose was extracted from milled native switchgrass and switchgrass that had undergone the dilute acid pretreatment method to disrupt the lignocellulose structure. The high-Q structural feature (Q > 0.07 -1) can be assigned to cellulose fibrils based on comparison with the switchgrass purified by solvent extraction of native and dilute acid pretreated and a commercial preparation of microcrystalline cellulose. Dilute acid pretreatment results in an increase in the smallest structural size, a decrease in the interconnectivity of the fibrils; and no change in the smooth domain boundaries at length scales larger than 1000 .

  16. Localization of cellulose synthase in Acetobacter xylinum

    SciTech Connect

    Bureau, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The cytoplasmic and outer membranes of Acetobacter xylinum (ATCC 53582) were isolated by discontinuous sucrose density ultracentrifugation. Both lysozyme and trypsin were required for efficient crude membrane separation. Primary dehydrogenases and NADH oxidase were used as cytoplasmic membrane markers, and 2-keto-3-deoxy-octulosonic acid was used to identify the outer membranes. Cellulose synthetase activity was assayed as the conversion of radioactivity from UDP-(/sup 14/C)glucose into an alkali-insoluble ..beta..-1,4-D-(/sup 14/C)glucan. The cellulosic nature of the product was demonstrated by enzymatic hydrolysis followed by thin-layer chromatography, and by methylation analysis followed by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the in vitro product is cellulose II which is in contrast to the in vivo product, namely cellulose I. In addition, no microfibrillar morphology could be observed from negative stained and metal shadowed preparations of the in vitro product.

  17. Thin blend films of cellulose and polyacrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert; Wang, Howard

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable, biocompatible and biodegradable natural polymer. Cellulose exhibits excellent chemical and mechanical stability, which makes it useful for applications such as construction, filtration, bio-scaffolding and packaging. To further expand the potential applications of cellulose materials, their alloying with synthetic polymers has been investigated. In this study, thin films of cotton linter cellulose (CLC) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) blends with various compositions spanning the entire range from neat CLC to neat PAN were spun cast on silicon wafers from common solutions in dimethyl sulfoxide / ionic liquid mixtures. The morphologies of thin films were characterized using optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray reflectivity. Morphologies of as-cast films are highly sensitive to the film preparation conditions; they vary from featureless smooth films to self-organized ordered nano-patterns to hierarchical structures spanning over multiple length scales from nanometers to tens of microns. By selectively removing the PAN-rich phase, the structures of blend films were studied to gain insights in their very high stability in hot water, acid and salt solutions.

  18. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl...

  19. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl...

  20. Electron (charge) density studies of cellulose models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introductory material first describes electron density approaches and demonstrates visualization of electron lone pairs and bonding as concentrations of electron density. Then it focuses on the application of Bader’s Quantum Theory of Atoms-in-Molecules (AIM) to cellulose models. The purpose of the ...

  1. Optically tunable chiral nematic mesoporous cellulose films.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Maik; Hamad, Wadood Y; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2015-06-21

    Demand for sustainable functional materials has never been larger. The introduction of functionality into pure cellulose might be one step forward in this field as it is one of the most abundant natural biopolymers. In this paper, we demonstrate a straightforward and scalable way to produce iridescent, mesoporous cellulose membranes with tunable colors and porosity. Concomitant assembly of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and condensation of silica precursors results in CNC-silica composites with chiral nematic structures and tunable optical properties. Removal of the stabilizing silica matrix by alkaline or acid treatment gives access to novel chiral nematic mesoporous cellulose (CNMC) films. Importantly, the optical properties and the mesoporosity can be controlled by either varying the silica-to-CNC ratio, or by varying the substrate used during the evaporation-induced self-assembly process. In order to introduce additional functionality, CNMC has been used to stabilize gold nanoparticles with three different concentrations by wet impregnation. These materials are stable in water and can potentially function in sensors, tissue engineering or functional membranes. PMID:25972020

  2. Exploring the Nature of Cellulose Microfibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Ying; Burger, Christian; Ma, Hongyang; Chu, Benjamin; Hsiao, Benjamin S.

    2015-03-20

    Ultrathin cellulose microfibril fractions were extracted from spruce wood powder using combined delignification, TEMPO-catalyzed oxidation, and sonication processes. Small-angle X-ray scattering of these microfibril fractions in a “dilute” aqueous suspension (concentration 0.077 wt %) revealed that their shape was in the form of nanostrip with 4 nm width and only about 0.5 nm thicknesses. We found that these dimensions were further confirmed by TEM and AFM measurements. The 0.5 nm thickness implied that the nanostrip could contain only a single layer of cellulose chains. At a higher concentration (0.15 wt %), SAXS analysis indicated that these nanostrips aggregated into a layered structure. The X-ray diffraction of samples collected at different preparation stages suggested that microfibrils were delaminated along the (110) planes from the Iβ cellulose crystals. Moreover, the degree of oxidation and solid-state 13C NMR characterizations indicated that, in addition to the surface molecules, some inner molecules of microfibrils were also oxidized, facilitating the delamination into cellulose nanostrips.

  3. Microwave Pretreatment For Hydrolysis Of Cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; George, Clifford E.; Lightsey, George R.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave pretreatment enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes into soluble saccharides used as feedstocks for foods, fuels, and other products. Low consumption of energy, high yield, and low risk of proposed hydrolysis process incorporating microwave pretreatment makes process viable alternative to composting.

  4. Chemical modifications of renewable cellulosic materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In agriculture, there is a fair amount of byproducts and waste materials. These materials typically contain significant portions of cellulose and hemicellulose. A good opportunity is to take advantage of these relatively cheap renewable materials, carry out chemical reactions, and increase their v...

  5. Unraveling cellulose microfibrils: a twisted tale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of hydrated cellulose microfibrils are attractive to the textiles industry for their capacity to characterize water interactions with cotton fiber, as well as to the biofuels industry for their potential to provide insight toward efficient mechanisms for conversio...

  6. 3C-SiC/ZnS heterostructured nanospheres with high photocatalytic activity and enhancement mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, L. Z.; Yang, L.; Gan, Z. X.; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-03-15

    3C-SiC/n-type ZnS heterostructured nanospheres synthesized hydrothermally deliver enhanced photocatalytic performance under visible light excitation. The heterostructured catalysts consisting of 3C-SiC and ZnS nanocrystals with a mean size being less than 5 nm exhibit extended light absorption to the visible range. The proper band structure of the 3C-SiC and ZnS nanocrystals and intrinsic electric field induced by the heterojunction promote separation of photoexcited electrons and holes in the ZnS and 3C-SiC nanocrystals resulting in the increased photocatalytic efficiency. The associated mechanism is studied and proposed.

  7. 3C protein of feline coronavirus inhibits viral replication independently of the autophagy pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Li-En; Huang, Wei-Pang; Tang, Da-Jay; Wang, Ying-Ting; Chen, Ching-Tang; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2013-12-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) can cause either asymptomatic enteric infection or fatal peritonitis in cats. Although the mutation of FCoV accessory gene 3c has been suggested to be related to the occurrence of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), how the 3C protein is involved in this phenomenon remains unknown. To investigate the role of the 3C protein, a full-length 3c gene was transiently expressed and the cytoplasmic distribution of the protein was found to be primarily in the perinuclear region. Using 3c-stable expression cells, the replication of a 3c-defective FCoV strain was titrated and a significant decrease in replication (p<0.05) was observed. The mechanism underlying the decreased FIPV replication caused by the 3C protein was further investigated; neither the induction nor inhibition of autophagy rescued the viral replication. Taken together, our data suggest that the 3C protein might have a virulence-suppressing effect in FCoV-infected cats. Deletion of the 3c gene could therefore cause more efficient viral replication, which leads to a fatal infection. PMID:24050534

  8. Essays concerning the cellulosic biofuel industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosburg, Alicia Sue

    Despite market-based incentives and mandated production, the U.S. cellulosic biofuel industry has been slow to develop. This dissertation explores the economic factors that have limited industry development along with important economic tradeoffs that will be encountered with commercial-scale production. The first essay provides an overview of the policies, potential, and challenges of the biofuel industry, with a focus on cellulosic biofuel. The second essay considers the economics of cellulosic biofuel production. Breakeven models of the local feedstock supply system and biofuel refining process are constructed to develop the Biofuel Breakeven (BioBreak) program, a stochastic, Excel-based program that evaluates the feasibility of local biofuel and biomass markets under various policy and market scenarios. An application of the BioBreak program is presented using expected market conditions for 14 local cellulosic biofuel markets that vary by feedstock and location. The economic costs of biofuel production identified from the BioBreak application are higher than frequently anticipated and raise questions about the potential of cellulosic ethanol as a sustainable and economical substitute for conventional fuels. Program results also are extended using life-cycle analysis to evaluate the cost of reducing GHG emissions by substituting cellulosic ethanol for conventional fuel. The third essay takes a closer look at the economic trade-offs within the biorefinery industry and feedstock production processes. A long-run biomass production through bioenergy conversion cost model is developed that incorporates heterogeneity of biomass suppliers within and between local markets. The model builds on previous literature by treating biomass as a non-commoditized feedstock and relaxes the common assumption of fixed biomass density and price within local markets. An empirical application is provided for switchgrass-based ethanol production within U.S. crop reporting districts

  9. Survival potential of wild type cellulose deficient Salmonella from the feed industry

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Biofilm has been shown to be one way for Salmonella to persist in the feed factory environment. Matrix components, such as fimbriae and cellulose, have been suggested to play an important role in the survival of Salmonella in the environment. Multicellular behaviour by Salmonella is often categorized according to colony morphology into rdar (red, dry and rough) expressing curli fimbriae and cellulose, bdar (brown, dry and rough) expressing curli fimbriae and pdar (pink, dry and rough) expressing cellulose. The aim of the study was to look into the distribution of morphotypes among feed and fish meal factory strains of Salmonella, with emphasis on potential differences between morphotypes with regards to survival in the feed factory environment. Results When screening a total of 148 Salmonella ser. Agona, Salmonella ser. Montevideo, Salmonella ser. Senftenberg and Salmonella ser. Typhimurium strains of feed factory, human clinical and reference collection origin, as many as 99% were able to express rough morphology (rdar or bdar). The dominant morphotype was rdar (74%), however as many as 55% of Salmonella ser. Agona and 19% of Salmonella ser. Senftenberg displayed the bdar morphology. Inconsistency in Calcofluor binding, indicating expression of cellulose, was found among 25% of all the strains tested, however Salmonella ser. Agona showed to be highly consistent in Calcofluor binding (98%). In biofilm, Salmonella ser. Agona strains with bdar mophology was found to be equally tolerant to disinfection treatment as strains with rdar morphotype. However, rdar morphology appeared to be favourable in long term survival in biofilm in a very dry environment. Chemical analysis showed no major differences in polysaccharide content between bdar and rdar strains. Our results indicate that cellulose is not a major component of the Salmonella biofilm matrix. Conclusion The bdar morphotype is common among Salmonella ser. Agona strains isolated from the factory

  10. Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2011-11-22

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  11. Chapter 2: Simulations of the Structure of Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J. F.; Himmel, M. E.; Brady, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the homopolymer of (1 {yields} 4)-{beta}-D-glucose. The chemical composition of this polymer is simple, but understanding the conformation and packing of cellulose molecules is challenging. This chapter describes the structure of cellulose from the perspective of molecular mechanics simulations, including conformational analysis of cellobiose and simulations of hydrated cellulose I{beta} with CSFF and GLYCAM06, two sets of force field parameters developed specifically for carbohydrates. Many important features observed in these simulations are sensitive to differences in force field parameters, giving rise to dramatically different structures. The structures and properties of non-naturally occurring cellulose allomorphs (II, III, and IV) are also discussed.

  12. Cellulose-Microtubule Uncoupling Proteins Prevent Lateral Displacement of Microtubules during Cellulose Synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Zhang, Yi; Somssich, Marc; Zhang, Youjun; Fernie, Alisdair R; Persson, Staffan

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth and is the major contributor to plant morphogenesis. Cellulose is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). Nascent cellulose microfibrils become entangled in the cell wall, and further catalysis therefore drives the CSC forward through the membrane: a process guided by cortical microtubules via the protein CSI1/POM2. Still, it is unclear how the microtubules can withstand the forces generated by the motile CSCs to effectively direct CSC movement. Here, we identified a family of microtubule-associated proteins, the cellulose synthase-microtubule uncouplings (CMUs), that located as static puncta along cortical microtubules. Functional disruption of the CMUs caused lateral microtubule displacement and compromised microtubule-based guidance of CSC movement. CSCs that traversed the microtubules interacted with the microtubules via CSI1/POM2, which prompted the lateral microtubule displacement. Hence, we have revealed how microtubules can withstand the propulsion of the CSCs during cellulose biosynthesis and thus sustain anisotropic plant cell growth. PMID:27477947

  13. The Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Plant Cellulose Synthase and Its Assembly into Dimers[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  14. Method and apparatus for treating a cellulosic feedstock

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Burke, Murray J.; Hillier, Sunalie N.

    2015-09-08

    Methods and apparatus for treating, pre-treating, preparing and conveying a cellulosic feedstock, such as for ethanol production, are disclosed. More specifically, the invention relates to methods and apparatus for treating a cellulosic feedstock by mixing and heating the cellulosic feedstock and/or by moistening and heating the cellulosic feedstock. The invention also relates to a holding tank, and a method of utilizing the holding tank whereby bridging may be reduced or eliminated and may result in a product stream from autohydrolysis or hydrolysis having an improved yield. The invention further relates to methods and apparatus for obtaining and conveying a cellulosic feedstock, which may be used for the subsequent production of a fermentable sugar stream from the cellulose and hemicellulose in the cellulosic feedstock wherein the fermentable sugar stream may be used for subsequent ethanol production. The invention also relates to a method and apparatus for withdrawing one or more feedstock stream from a holding tank.

  15. Network Model of Acetobacter Xylinum Cellulose Intercalated by Drug Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klechkovskaya, Vera V.; Volkov, Vladimir V.; Shtykova, Eleonora V.; Arkharova, Natalia A.; Baklagina, Yulia G.; Khripunov, Albert K.; Smyslov, Ruslan Yu.; Borovikova, Ludmila N.; Tkachenko, Albina A.

    It was shown that Acetobacter xylinum cellulose gel-films can sorb silver and selenium nanoparticles stabilized by N-poly(vinyl-2-pirrolidone). The structure of original cellulose matrix, isolated nanoparticles and cellulose with sorbed nanoparticles was characterized by electron diffraction, electron microscopy, small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering methods, and atomic force microscopy. It was found that in static culture Acetobacter xylinum bacterium (strain VKM B-880) may synthesize high-molecular cellulose with narrow molecular weight distribution and a considerable number of carbon sources. The structures of cellulose microfibrilles and ribbons correspond mainly to polymorphous Iβ modification. We concluded from structural studies that textured cellulose films were formed. The sorption conditions of poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-Se° and poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-Ag° nanoparticles were optimized to obtain a cellulose template that can be used in medical practice.

  16. Characterization of cellulose and other exopolysaccharides produced from Gluconacetobacter strains.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-22

    This study characterized the cellulosic and non-cellulosic exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by four Gluconacetobacter strains. The yields of bacterial cellulose and water-soluble polysaccharides were dependent on both carbon source and Gluconacetobacter strain. The carbon substrate also affected the composition of the free EPS. When galactose served as an exclusive carbon source, Gluconacetobacter xylinus (G. xylinus) ATCC 53524 and ATCC 700178 produced a distinct alkaline stable crystalline product, which influenced the crystallization of cellulose. Gluconacetobacter hansenii (G. hansenii) ATCC 23769 and ATCC 53582, however, did not exhibit any significant change in cellulose crystal properties when galactose was used as the carbon source. Microscopic observation further confirmed significant incorporation of EPS into the cellulose composites. The cellulosic network produced from galactose medium showed distinctive morphological and structural features compared to that from glucose medium. PMID:25439946

  17. Characterization of cellulose extracted from oil palm empty fruit bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisak, Muhammad Asri Abdul; Daik, Rusli; Ramli, Suria

    2015-09-01

    Recently, cellulose has been studied by many researchers due to its promising properties such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, hydrophilicity and robustness. Due to that it is applied in many fields such as paper, film, drug delivery, membranes, etc. Cellulose can be extracted from various plants while oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) is the one of its sources. In this study, cellulose was extracted by chemical treatments which involved the use of formic acid and hydrogen peroxide to remove hemicellulose and lignin components. Maximum yield was 43.22%. Based on the FT-IR spectra, the peak of wax (1735 cm-1), hemicellulose (1375 cm-1) and lignin (1248 cm-1 and 1037 cm-1) were not observed in extracted cellulose. TGA analysis showed that the extracted cellulose starts to thermally degrade at 340 °C. The SEM analysis suggested that the cellulose extracted from OPEFB was not much different from commercial cellulose.

  18. The effect of deuteration on the structure of bacterial cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, Garima; Foston, Marcus; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; He, Junhong; Ragauskas, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo generated deuterated bacterial cellulose, cultivated from 100% deuterated glycerol in D2O medium, was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid dissolution and 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A solution NMR method of the dissolved cellulose was used to determine that this bacterial cellulose had 85 % deuterium incorporation. Acetylation and 1H and 2H NMR of deuterated bacterial cellulose indicated near equal deuteration at all sites of the glucopyranosyl ring except C-6 which was partly deuterated. Despite the high level of deuterium incorporation there were no significant differences in the molecular and morphological properties were observed for the deuterated and protio bacterial cellulose samples. The highly deuterated bacterial cellulose presented here can be used as a model substrate for studying cellulose biopolymer properties via future small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies.

  19. Scandium carbides/cyanides in the boron cage: computational prediction of X@B80 (X = Sc2C2, Sc3C2, Sc3CN and Sc3C2CN).

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Qinghua; Li, Lanlan; Tang, Chengchun; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-08-01

    As the first study on metal carbide/cyanide boron clusterfullerenes, the geometries, energies, stabilities and electronic properties of four novel scandium cluster-containing B80 buckyball derivatives, namely Sc2C2@B80, Sc3C2@B80, Sc3CN@B80 and Sc3C2CN@B80, were investigated by means of density functional theory computations. The rather favorable binding energies, which are very close to those of the experimentally abundant carbon fullerene analogues, suggest a considerable possibility to realize these doped boron clusterfullerenes. Their intracluster and cluster-cage bonding natures were thoroughly revealed by various theoretical approaches. In contrast to carbon clusterfullerenes, in which the encaged non-metal atoms mainly play a stabilizing role in the metal clusters, the encapsulated carbon and nitrogen atoms inside the B80 cage covalently bond to the boron framework, resulting in strong cluster-cage interactions. Furthermore, infrared spectra and (11)B nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were simulated and fingerprint peaks were proposed to assist future experimental characterization. PMID:27424658

  20. Molecular Basis for Complement Recognition and Inhibition Determined by Crystallographic Studies of the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor (SCIN) Bound to C3c and C3b

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Brandon L.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Tzekou, Apostolia; Ricklin, Daniel; McWhorter, William J.; Lambris, John D.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2010-10-22

    The human complement system plays an essential role in innate and adaptive immunity by marking and eliminating microbial intruders. Activation of complement on foreign surfaces results in proteolytic cleavage of complement component 3 (C3) into the potent opsonin C3b, which triggers a variety of immune responses and participates in a self-amplification loop mediated by a multi-protein assembly known as the C3 convertase. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has evolved a sophisticated and potent complement evasion strategy, which is predicated upon an arsenal of potent inhibitory proteins. One of these, the staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), acts at the level of the C3 convertase (C3bBb) and impairs downstream complement function by trapping the convertase in a stable but inactive state. Previously, we have shown that SCIN binds C3b directly and competitively inhibits binding of human factor H and, to a lesser degree, that of factor B to C3b. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of SCIN bound to C3b and C3c at 7.5 and 3.5 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively, and show that SCIN binds a critical functional area on C3b. Most significantly, the SCIN binding site sterically occludes the binding sites of both factor H and factor B. Our results give insight into SCIN binding to activated derivatives of C3, explain how SCIN can recognize C3b in the absence of other complement components, and provide a structural basis for the competitive C3b-binding properties of SCIN. In the future, this may suggest templates for the design of novel complement inhibitors based upon the SCIN structure.