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Sample records for 3c cellulose binding

  1. Increased Crystalline Cellulose Activity via Combinations of Amino Acid Changes in the Family 9 Catalytic Domain and Family 3c Cellulose Binding Module of Thermobifida fusca Cel9A ▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongchao; Irwin, Diana C.; Wilson, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid modifications of the Thermobifida fusca Cel9A-68 catalytic domain or carbohydrate binding module 3c (CBM3c) were combined to create enzymes with changed amino acids in both domains. Bacterial crystalline cellulose (BC) and swollen cellulose (SWC) assays of the expressed and purified enzymes showed that three combinations resulted in 150% and 200% increased activity, respectively, and also increased synergistic activity with other cellulases. Several other combinations resulted in drastically lowered activity, giving insight into the need for a balance between the binding in the catalytic cleft on either side of the cleavage site, as well as coordination between binding affinity for the catalytic domain and CBM3c. The same combinations of amino acid variants in the whole enzyme, Cel9A-90, did not increase BC or SWC activity but did have higher filter paper (FP) activity at 12% digestion. PMID:20173060

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  3. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  5. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  6. Binding of cellulose binding modules reveal differences between cellulose substrates

    PubMed Central

    Arola, Suvi; Linder, Markus B.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulase enzymes and their substrates is of central importance to several technological and scientific challenges. Here we report that the binding of cellulose binding modules (CBM) from Trichoderma reesei cellulases Cel6A and Cel7A show a major difference in how they interact with substrates originating from wood compared to bacterial cellulose. We found that the CBM from TrCel7A recognizes the two substrates differently and as a consequence shows an unexpected way of binding. We show that the substrate has a large impact on the exchange rate of the studied CBM, and moreover, CBM-TrCel7A seems to have an additional mode of binding on wood derived cellulose but not on cellulose originating from bacterial source. This mode is not seen in double CBM (DCBM) constructs comprising both CBM-TrCel7A and CBM-TrCel6A. The linker length of DCBMs affects the binding properties, and slows down the exchange rates of the proteins and thus, can be used to analyze the differences between the single CBM. These results have impact on the cellulase research and offer new understanding on how these industrially relevant enzymes act. PMID:27748440

  7. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  8. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. Characterization of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Takagi, M; Hashida, S; Shoseyov, O; Doi, R H; Segel, I H

    1993-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA), a component of the cellulase complex of Clostridium cellulovorans, contains a unique sequence which has been demonstrated to be a cellulose-binding domain (CBD). The DNA coding for this putative CBD was subcloned into pET-8c, an Escherichia coli expression vector. The protein produced under the direction of the recombinant plasmid, pET-CBD, had a high affinity for crystalline cellulose. Affinity-purified CBD protein was used in equilibrium binding experiments to characterize the interaction of the protein with various polysaccharides. It was found that the binding capacity of highly crystalline cellulose samples (e.g., cotton) was greater than that of samples of low crystallinity (e.g., fibrous cellulose). At saturating CBD concentration, about 6.4 mumol of protein was bound by 1 g of cotton. Under the same conditions, fibrous cellulose bound only 0.2 mumol of CBD per g. The measured dissociation constant was in the 1 microM range for all cellulose samples. The results suggest that the CBD binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. Chitin, which has a crystal structure similar to that of cellulose, also was bound by the CBD. The presence of high levels of cellobiose or carboxymethyl cellulose in the assay mixture had no effect on the binding of CBD protein to crystalline cellulose. This result suggests that the CBD recognition site is larger than a simple cellobiose unit or more complex than a repeating cellobiose moiety. This CBD is of particular interest because it is the first CBD from a completely sequenced nonenzymatic protein shown to be an independently functional domain. Images PMID:8376323

  10. Modeling of Carbohydrate Binding Modules Complexed to Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Bomble, Y. J.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for the interaction of two carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with cellulose. The family 1 CBM from Trichoderma reesei's Cel7A cellulase was modeled using molecular dynamics to confirm that this protein selectively binds to the hydrophobic (100) surface of cellulose fibrils and to determine the energetics and mechanisms for locating this surface. Modeling was also conducted of binding of the family 4 CBM from the CbhA complex from Clostridium thermocellum. There is a cleft in this protein, which may accommodate a cellulose chain that is detached from crystalline cellulose. This possibility is explored using molecular dynamics.

  11. Processivity, Substrate Binding, and Mechanism of Cellulose Hydrolysis by Thermobifida fusca Cel9A▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongchao; Irwin, Diana C.; Wilson, David B.

    2007-01-01

    Thermobifida fusca Cel9A-90 is a processive endoglucanase consisting of a family 9 catalytic domain (CD), a family 3c cellulose binding module (CBM3c), a fibronectin III-like domain, and a family 2 CBM. This enzyme has the highest activity of any individual T. fusca enzyme on crystalline substrates, particularly bacterial cellulose (BC). Mutations were introduced into the CD or the CBM3c of Cel9A-68 using site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli; purified; and tested for activity on four substrates, ligand binding, and processivity. The results show that H125 and Y206 play an important role in activity by forming a hydrogen bonding network with the catalytic base, D58; another important supporting residue, D55; and Glc(−1) O1. R378, a residue interacting with Glc(+1), plays an important role in processivity. Several enzymes with mutations in the subsites Glc(−2) to Glc(−4) had less than 15% activity on BC and markedly reduced processivity. Mutant enzymes with severalfold-higher activity on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were found in the subsites from Glc(−2) to Glc(−4). The CBM3c mutant enzymes, Y520A, R557A/E559A, and R563A, had decreased activity on BC but had wild-type or improved processivity. Mutation of D513, a conserved residue at the end of the CBM, increased activity on crystalline cellulose. Previous work showed that deletion of the CBM3c abolished crystalline activity and processivity. This study shows that it is residues in the catalytic cleft that control processivity while the CBM3c is important for loose binding of the enzyme to the crystalline cellulose substrate. PMID:17369336

  12. Mutation analysis of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Doi, R H

    1994-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA) has been previously shown to mediate the interaction between crystalline cellulose substrates and the cellulase enzyme complex of Clostridium cellulovorans. CbpA contains a family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD) which, when expressed independently, binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. A series of N- and C-terminal deletions and a series of small internal deletions of the CBD were created to determine whether the entire region previously described as a CBD is required for the cellulose-binding function. The N- and C-terminal deletions reduced binding affinity by 10- to 100-fold. Small internal deletions of the CBD resulted in substantial reduction of CBD function. Some, but not all, point mutations throughout the sequence had significant disruptive effects on the binding ability of the CBD. Thus, mutations in any region of the CBD had effects on the binding of the fragment to cellulose. The results indicate that the entire 163-amino-acid region of the CBD is required for maximal binding to crystalline cellulose. Images PMID:7961505

  13. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-Like Protein, Functions in Cellulose Assembly through Binding Cellulose Microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baocai; Liu, Xiangling; Yan, Meixian; Zhang, Lanjun; Shi, Yanyun; Zhang, Mu; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang; Zhou, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1), a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD) assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs) function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity. PMID:23990797

  14. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  15. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  16. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  17. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  18. Cellulose chain binding free energy drives the processive move of cellulases on the cellulose surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yefei; Zhang, Shujun; Song, Xiangfei; Yao, Lishan

    2016-09-01

    Processivity is essential for cellulases in their catalysis of cellulose hydrolysis. But what drives the processive move is not well understood. In this work, we use Trichoderma reesei Cel7B as a model system and show that its processivity is directly correlated to the binding free energy difference of a cellulose chain occupying the binding sites -7 to +2 and that occupying sites -7 to -1. Several mutants that have stronger interactions with glycosyl units in sites +1 and +2 than the wild type enzyme show higher processivity. The results suggest that after the release of the product cellobiose located in sites +1 and +2, the enzyme pulls the cellulose chain to fill the vacant sites, which propels its processive move on the cellulose surface. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1873-1880. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928155

  19. Design of Compact Biomimetic Cellulose Binding Peptides as Carriers for Cellulose Catalytic Degradation.

    PubMed

    Khazanov, Netaly; Iline-Vul, Taly; Noy, Efrat; Goobes, Gil; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2016-01-21

    The conversion of biomass into biofuels can reduce the strategic vulnerability of petroleum-based systems and at the same time have a positive effect on global climate issues. Lignocellulose is the cheapest and most abundant source of biomass and consequently has been widely considered as a source for liquid fuel. However, despite ongoing efforts, cellulosic biofuels are still far from commercial realization, one of the major bottlenecks being the hydrolysis of cellulose into simpler sugars. Inspired by the structural and functional modularity of cellulases used by many organisms for the breakdown of cellulose, we propose to mimic the cellulose binding domain (CBD) and the catalytic domain of these proteins by small molecular entities. Multiple copies of these mimics could subsequently be tethered together to enhance hydrolytic activity. In this work, we take the first step toward achieving this goal by applying computational approaches to the design of efficient, cost-effective mimetics of the CBD. The design is based on low molecular weight peptides that are amenable to large-scale production. We provide an optimized design of four short (i.e., ∼18 residues) peptide mimetics based on the three-dimensional structure of a known CBD and demonstrate that some of these peptides bind cellulose as well as or better than the full CBD. The structures of these peptides were studied by circular dichroism and their interactions with cellulose by solid phase NMR. Finally, we present a computational strategy for predicting CBD/peptide-cellulose binding free energies and demonstrate its ability to provide values in good agreement with experimental data. Using this computational model, we have also studied the dissociation pathway of the CBDs/peptides from the surface of cellulose. PMID:26691055

  20. Does the Cellulose-Binding Module Move on the Cellulose Surface?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. S.; Zeng, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S. J.; Ding, S. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Exoglucanases are key enzymes required for the efficient hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. It has been proposed that exoglucanases hydrolyze cellulose chains in a processive manner to produce primarily cellobiose. Usually, two functional modules are involved in the processive mechanism: a catalytic module and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). In this report, single molecule tracking techniques were used to analyze the molecular motion of CBMs labeled with quantum dots (QDs) and bound to cellulose crystals. By tracking the single QD, we observed that the family 2 CBM from Acidothermus cellulolyticus (AcCBM2) exhibited linear motion along the long axis of the cellulose fiber. This apparent movement was observed consistently when different concentrations (25 {micro}M to 25 nM) of AcCBM2 were used. Although the mechanism of AcCBM2 motion remains unknown, single-molecule spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a promising tool for acquiring new fundamental understanding of cellulase action.

  1. Structural basis for entropy-driven cellulose binding by a type-A cellulose-binding module (CBM) and bacterial expansin

    PubMed Central

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Yennawar, Neela H.; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Components of modular cellulases, type-A cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) bind to crystalline cellulose and enhance enzyme effectiveness, but structural details of the interaction are uncertain. We analyzed cellulose binding by EXLX1, a bacterial expansin with ability to loosen plant cell walls and whose domain D2 has type-A CBM characteristics. EXLX1 strongly binds to crystalline cellulose via D2, whereas its affinity for soluble cellooligosaccharides is weak. Calorimetry indicated cellulose binding was largely entropically driven. We solved the crystal structures of EXLX1 complexed with cellulose-like oligosaccharides to find that EXLX1 binds the ligands through hydrophobic interactions of three linearly arranged aromatic residues in D2. The crystal structures revealed a unique form of ligand-mediated dimerization, with the oligosaccharide sandwiched between two D2 domains in opposite polarity. This report clarifies the molecular target of expansin and the specific molecular interactions of a type-A CBM with cellulose. PMID:22927418

  2. Structural basis for entropy-driven cellulose binding by a type-A cellulose-binding module (CBM) and bacterial expansin.

    PubMed

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Yennawar, Neela H; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2012-09-11

    Components of modular cellulases, type-A cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) bind to crystalline cellulose and enhance enzyme effectiveness, but structural details of the interaction are uncertain. We analyzed cellulose binding by EXLX1, a bacterial expansin with ability to loosen plant cell walls and whose domain D2 has type-A CBM characteristics. EXLX1 strongly binds to crystalline cellulose via D2, whereas its affinity for soluble cellooligosaccharides is weak. Calorimetry indicated cellulose binding was largely entropically driven. We solved the crystal structures of EXLX1 complexed with cellulose-like oligosaccharides to find that EXLX1 binds the ligands through hydrophobic interactions of three linearly arranged aromatic residues in D2. The crystal structures revealed a unique form of ligand-mediated dimerization, with the oligosaccharide sandwiched between two D2 domains in opposite polarity. This report clarifies the molecular target of expansin and the specific molecular interactions of a type-A CBM with cellulose.

  3. Primary sequence analysis of Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, O; Takagi, M; Goldstein, M A; Doi, R H

    1992-01-01

    The cbpA gene for the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose binding protein (CbpA), which is part of the multisubunit cellulase complex, has been cloned and sequenced. When cbpA was expressed in Escherichia coli, proteins capable of binding to crystalline cellulose and of interacting with anti-CbpA were observed. The cbpA gene consists of 5544 base pairs and encodes a protein containing 1848 amino acids with a molecular mass of 189,036 Da. The open reading frame is preceded by a Gram-positive-type ribosome binding site. A signal peptide sequence of 28 amino acids is present at its N terminus. The encoded protein is highly hydrophobic with extremely high levels of threonine and valine residues. There are two types of putative cellulose binding domains of approximately 100 amino acids that are slightly hydrophilic and eight conserved, highly hydrophobic beta-sheet regions of approximately 140 amino acids. These latter hydrophobic regions may be the CbpA domains that interact with the different enzymatic subunits of the cellulase complex. Images PMID:1565642

  4. Studies of cellulose binding by cellobiose dehydrogenase and a comparison with cellobiohydrolase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, G; Salumets, A; Divne, C; Pettersson, G

    1997-01-01

    The binding isotherm to cellulose of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been compared with that of cellobiohydrolase 1 (CBH 1) from Trichoderma reesei. CDH binds more strongly but more sparsely to cellulose than does CBH 1. In a classical Scatchard analysis, a better fit to a one-site binding model was obtained for CDH than for CBH 1. The binding of both enzymes decreased in the presence of ethylene glycol, increased in the presence of ammonium sulphate and was unaffected by sodium chloride. Attempts to localize the cellulose-binding site on CDH have also been made by exposing enzymically digested CDH to cellulose and isolating the cellulose-bound peptides. The results suggest that the cellulose-binding site is located internally in the amino acid sequence of CDH. PMID:9210407

  5. Enhancement of acetyl xylan esterase activity on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 cellulose binding module.

    PubMed

    Mai-Gisondi, Galina; Turunen, Ossi; Pastinen, Ossi; Pahimanolis, Nikolaos; Master, Emma R

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the potential to increase the activity of a family 1 carbohydrate esterase on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 carbohydrate binding module (CBM). Specifically, CtCBM3 from Clostridium thermocellum was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the acetyl xylan esterase (AnAXE) from Aspergillus nidulans, and active forms of both AnAXE and AnAXE-CtCBM3 were produced in Pichia pastoris. CtCBM3 fusion had negligible impact on the thermostability or regioselectivity of AnAXE; activities towards acetylated corncob xylan, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and cellobiose octaacetate were also unchanged. By contrast, the activity of AnAXE-CtCBM3 on cellulose acetate increased by two to four times over 24 h, with greater differences observed at earlier time points. Binding studies using microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) and a commercial source of cellulose acetate confirmed functional production of the CtCBM3 domain; affinity gel electrophoresis using acetylated xylan also verified the selectivity of CtCBM3 binding to cellulose. Notably, gains in enzyme activity on cellulose acetate appeared to exceed gains in substrate binding, suggesting that fusion to CtCBM3 increases functional associations between the enzyme and insoluble, high molecular weight cellulosic substrates.

  6. Crystal structure of a bacterial family-III cellulose-binding domain: a general mechanism for attachment to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Tormo, J; Lamed, R; Chirino, A J; Morag, E; Bayer, E A; Shoham, Y; Steitz, T A

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structure of a family-III cellulose-binding domain (CBD) from the cellulosomal scaffoldin subunit of Clostridium thermocellum has been determined at 1.75 A resolution. The protein forms a nine-stranded beta sandwich with a jelly roll topology and binds a calcium ion. conserved, surface-exposed residues map into two defined surfaces located on opposite sides of the molecule. One of these faces is dominated by a planar linear strip of aromatic and polar residues which are proposed to interact with crystalline cellulose. The other conserved residues are contained in a shallow groove, the function of which is currently unknown, and which has not been observed previously in other families of CBDs. On the basis of modeling studies combined with comparisons of recently determined NMR structures for other CBDs, a general model for the binding of CBDs to cellulose is presented. Although the proposed binding of the CBD to cellulose is essentially a surface interaction, specific types and combinations of amino acids appear to interact selectively with glucose moieties positioned on three adjacent chains of the cellulose surface. The major interaction is characterized by the planar strip of aromatic residues, which align along one of the chains. In addition, polar amino acid residues are proposed to anchor the CBD molecule to two other adjacent chains of crystalline cellulose. Images PMID:8918451

  7. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  8. Characteristics of the binding of a bacterial expansin (BsEXLX1) to microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Tae-Wan; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2013-02-01

    Plant expansin proteins induce plant cell wall extension and have the ability to extend and disrupt cellulose. In addition, these proteins show synergistic activity with cellulases during cellulose hydrolysis. BsEXLX1 originating from Bacillus subtilis is a structural homolog of a β-expansin produced by Zea mays (ZmEXPB1). The Langmuir isotherm for binding of BsEXLX1 to microcrystalline cellulose (i.e., Avicel) revealed that the equilibrium binding constant of BsEXLX1 to Avicel was similar to those of other Type A surface-binding carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) to microcrystalline cellulose, and the maximum number of binding sites on Avicel for BsEXLX1 was also comparable to those on microcrystalline cellulose for other Type A CBMs. BsEXLX1 did not bind to cellooligosaccharides, which is consistent with the typical binding behavior of Type A CBMs. The preferential binding pattern of a plant expansin, ZmEXPB1, to xylan, compared to cellulose was not exhibited by BsEXLX1. In addition, the binding capacities of cellulose and xylan for BsEXLX1 were much lower than those for CtCBD3.

  9. DOPI and PALM imaging of single carbohydrate binding modules bound to cellulose nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagel, D. J.; Liu, Y.-S.; Zhong, L.; Luo, Y.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M.; Ding, S.-Y.; Smith, S.

    2011-03-01

    We use single molecule imaging methods to study the binding characteristics of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) to cellulose crystals. The CBMs are carbohydrate specific binding proteins, and a functional component of most cellulase enzymes, which in turn hydrolyze cellulose, releasing simple sugars suitable for fermentation to biofuels. The CBM plays the important role of locating the crystalline face of cellulose, a critical step in cellulase action. A biophysical understanding of the CBM action aids in developing a mechanistic picture of the cellulase enzyme, important for selection and potential modification. Towards this end, we have genetically modified cellulose-binding CBM derived from bacterial source with green fluorescent protein (GFP), and photo-activated fluorescence protein PAmCherry tags, respectively. Using the single molecule method known as Defocused Orientation and Position Imaging (DOPI), we observe a preferred orientation of the CBM-GFP complex relative to the Valonia cellulose nanocrystals. Subsequent analysis showed the CBMs bind to the opposite hydrophobic <110> faces of the cellulose nanocrystals with a welldefined cross-orientation of about { 70°. Photo Activated Localization Microscopy (PALM) is used to localize CBMPAmCherry with a localization accuracy of { 10nm. Analysis of the nearest neighbor distributions along and perpendicular to the cellulose nanocrystal axes are consistent with single-file CBM binding along the fiber axis, and microfibril bundles consisting of close packed { 20nm or smaller cellulose microfibrils.

  10. Binding of arabinan or galactan during cellulose synthesis is extensive and reversible.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dehui; Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia; Gidley, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Arabinans and galactans are major components of the side-chains of pectin in plant cell walls. In order to understand how pectin side-chains interact with cellulose, in this work we studied the interaction of de-branched arabinan (from sugar beet) and linear galactan (from potato) during the synthesis of cellulose by Gluconacetobacter xylinus (ATCC 53524) to mimic in muro assembly. The binding studies reveal that arabinan and galactan are able to bind extensively (>200mg/g of cellulose) during cellulose deposition, and more than pectin (from apple) in the absence of calcium. (13)C NMR revealed that associated arabinan, galactan or apple pectin molecules were neither rigid nor affected cellulose crystallinity, and there was no apparent change in cellulose architecture as reflected in scanning electron micrographs. De-binding of arabinan, galactan or apple pectin occurred as a result of washing, indicating a reversible binding to cellulose, which was modelled in terms of a surface-controlled process. Implications for structural models of primary plant cell walls and possible roles for cellulose binding of arabinan- and galactan-rich pectins in biological processes are discussed.

  11. Binding of arabinan or galactan during cellulose synthesis is extensive and reversible.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dehui; Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia; Gidley, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Arabinans and galactans are major components of the side-chains of pectin in plant cell walls. In order to understand how pectin side-chains interact with cellulose, in this work we studied the interaction of de-branched arabinan (from sugar beet) and linear galactan (from potato) during the synthesis of cellulose by Gluconacetobacter xylinus (ATCC 53524) to mimic in muro assembly. The binding studies reveal that arabinan and galactan are able to bind extensively (>200mg/g of cellulose) during cellulose deposition, and more than pectin (from apple) in the absence of calcium. (13)C NMR revealed that associated arabinan, galactan or apple pectin molecules were neither rigid nor affected cellulose crystallinity, and there was no apparent change in cellulose architecture as reflected in scanning electron micrographs. De-binding of arabinan, galactan or apple pectin occurred as a result of washing, indicating a reversible binding to cellulose, which was modelled in terms of a surface-controlled process. Implications for structural models of primary plant cell walls and possible roles for cellulose binding of arabinan- and galactan-rich pectins in biological processes are discussed. PMID:25933529

  12. Increases thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase by fusion of cellulose binding domain derived from Trichoderma reesei

    SciTech Connect

    Thongekkaew, Jantaporn; Ikeda, Hiroko; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CSLP and fusion enzyme were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 Degree-Sign C for 120-min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme was responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme has an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization. -- Abstract: To improve the thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase (CSLP), the cellulose-binding domain originates from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I was engineered into C-terminal region of the CSLP (CSLP-CBD). The CSLP and CSLP-CBD were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris using the strong methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter and the secretion signal sequence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae ({alpha} factor). The recombinant CSLP and CSLP-CBD were secreted into culture medium and estimated by SDS-PAGE to be 22 and 27 kDa, respectively. The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 Degree-Sign C and retained more than 80% of its activity after 120-min incubation at this temperature. Our results also found that the fusion of fungal exoglucanase cellulose-binding domain to CSLP is responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. This attribute should make it an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization.

  13. GA binding protein augments autophagy via transcriptional activation of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex genes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wan; Swaminathan, Gayathri; Plowey, Edward D

    2014-09-01

    Macroautophagy is a vesicular catabolic trafficking pathway that is thought to protect cells from diverse stressors and to promote longevity. Recent studies have revealed that transcription factors play important roles in the regulation of autophagy. In this study, we have identified GA binding protein (GABP) as a transcriptional regulator of the combinatorial expression of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex genes involved in autophagosome initiation. We performed bioinformatics analyses that demonstrated highly conserved putative GABP sites in genes that encode BECN1/Beclin 1, several BECN1 interacting proteins, and downstream autophagy proteins including the ATG12-ATG5-ATG16L1 complex. We demonstrate that GABP binds to the promoter regions of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex genes and activates their transcriptional activities. Knockdown of GABP reduced BECN1-PIK3C3 complex transcripts, BECN1-PIK3C3 complex protein levels and autophagy in cultured cells. Conversely, overexpression of GABP increased autophagy. Nutrient starvation increased GABP-dependent transcriptional activity of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex gene promoters and increased the recruitment of GABP to the BECN1 promoter. Our data reveal a novel function of GABP in the regulation of autophagy via transcriptional activation of the BECN1-PIK3C3 complex.

  14. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  15. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-binding Module on Cellulose*

    PubMed Central

    Nimlos, Mark R.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Matthews, James F.; Bu, Lintao; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 μs of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose. PMID:22496371

  17. Evidence for in vitro binding of pectin side chains to cellulose.

    PubMed

    Zykwinska, Agata W; Ralet, Marie-Christine J; Garnier, Catherine D; Thibault, Jean-François J

    2005-09-01

    Pectins of varying structures were tested for their ability to interact with cellulose in comparison to the well-known adsorption of xyloglucan. Our results reveal that sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) pectins, which are rich in neutral sugar side chains, can bind in vitro to cellulose. The extent of binding varies with respect to the nature and structure of the side chains. Additionally, branched arabinans (Br-Arabinans) or debranched arabinans (Deb-Arabinans; isolated from sugar beet) and galactans (isolated from potato) were shown bind to cellulose microfibrils. The adsorption of Br-Arabinan and galactan was lower than that of Deb-Arabinan. The maximum adsorption affinity of Deb-Arabinan to cellulose was comparable to that of xyloglucan. The study of sugar beet and potato alkali-treated cell walls supports the hypothesis of pectin-cellulose interaction. Natural composites enriched in arabinans or galactans and cellulose were recovered. The binding of pectins to cellulose microfibrils may be of considerable significance in the modeling of primary cell walls of plants as well as in the process of cell wall assembly.

  18. Cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose properties and structure are reviewed, with a primary focus on crystal structure and polymorphy. This focus highlights the conversion from cellulose I to cellulose II, which converts the molecules to being all parallel to each other in the crystal to being antiparallel. This has been co...

  19. Recognition of xyloglucan by the crystalline cellulose-binding site of a family 3a carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Gomez, Mercedes C; Rydahl, Maja G; Rogowski, Artur; Morland, Carl; Cartmell, Alan; Crouch, Lucy; Labourel, Aurore; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Willats, William G T; Gilbert, Harry J; Knox, J Paul

    2015-08-19

    Type A non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), exemplified by CtCBM3acipA, are widely believed to specifically target crystalline cellulose through entropic forces. Here we have tested the hypothesis that type A CBMs can also bind to xyloglucan (XG), a soluble β-1,4-glucan containing α-1,6-xylose side chains. CtCBM3acipA bound to xyloglucan in cell walls and arrayed on solid surfaces. Xyloglucan and cellulose were shown to bind to the same planar surface on CBM3acipA. A range of type A CBMs from different families were shown to bind to xyloglucan in solution with ligand binding driven by enthalpic changes. The nature of CBM-polysaccharide interactions is discussed. PMID:26193423

  20. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 3C modulates transcription through interaction with the sequence-specific DNA-binding protein J kappa.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, E S; Grossman, S; Johannsen, E; Miller, C; Lin, J; Tomkinson, B; Kieff, E

    1995-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear protein 3C (EBNA 3C) is essential for EBV-mediated transformation of primary B lymphocytes, is turned on by EBNA 2, and regulates transcription of some of the viral and cellular genes which are regulated by EBNA 2. EBNA 2 is targeted to response elements by binding to the DNA sequence-specific, transcriptional repressor protein J kappa. We now show that EBNA 3C also binds to J kappa. EBNA 3C causes J kappa to not bind DNA or EBNA 2. J kappa DNA binding activity in EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells is consequently reduced. More than 10% of the EBNA 3C coimmunoprecipitated with J kappa from extracts of non-EBV-infected B lymphoblasts that had been stably converted to EBNA 3C expression. EBNA 3C in nuclear extracts from these cells (or in vitro-translated EBNA 3C) prevented J kappa from interacting with a high-affinity DNA binding site. Under conditions of transient overexpression in B lymphoblasts, EBNA 2 and EBNA 3C associated with J kappa and less EBNA 2 associated with J kappa when EBNA 3C was coexpressed in the same cell. EBNA 3C had no effect on the activity of a -512/+40 LMP1 promoter-CAT reporter construct that has two upstream J kappa sites, but it did inhibit EBNA 2 transactivation of this promoter. These data are compatible with a role for EBNA 3C as a "feedback" down modulator of EBNA 2-mediated transactivation. EBNA 3C could, in theory, also activate transcription by inhibiting the interaction of the J kappa repressor with its cognate DNA. The interaction of two viral transcriptional regulators with the same cell protein may reflect an unusually high level of complexity or stringency in target gene regulation. PMID:7707539

  1. Visualization of Nanofibrillar Cellulose in Biological Tissues Using a Biotinylated Carbohydrate Binding Module of β-1,4-Glycanase.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Kofoed, Christian; Espersen, Roall; Højgaard, Casper; Winther, Jakob Rahr; Willemoës, Martin; Wedin, Irene; Nuopponen, Markus; Vilske, Sara; Aimonen, Kukka; Weydahl, Ingrid Elise Konow; Alenius, Harri; Norppa, Hannu; Wolff, Henrik; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-08-17

    Nanofibrillar cellulose is a very promising innovation with diverse potential applications including high quality paper, coatings, and drug delivery carriers. The production of nanofibrillar cellulose on an industrial scale may lead to increased exposure to nanofibrillar cellulose both in the working environment and the general environment. Assessment of the potential health effects following exposure to nanofibrillar cellulose is therefore required. However, as nanofibrillar cellulose primarily consists of glucose moieties, detection of nanofibrillar cellulose in biological tissues is difficult. We have developed a simple and robust method for specific and sensitive detection of cellulose fibers, including nanofibrillar cellulose, in biological tissue, using a biotinylated carbohydrate binding module (CBM) of β-1,4-glycanase (EXG:CBM) from the bacterium Cellulomonas fimi. EXG:CBM was expressed in Eschericia coli, purified, and biotinylated. EXG:CBM was shown to bind quantitatively to five different cellulose fibers including four different nanofibrillar celluloses. Biotinylated EXG:CBM was used to visualize cellulose fibers by either fluorescence- or horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-tagged avidin labeling. The HRP-EXG:CBM complex was used to visualize cellulose fibers in both cryopreserved and paraffin embedded lung tissue from mice dosed by pharyngeal aspiration with 10-200 μg/mouse. Detection was shown to be highly specific, and the assay appeared very robust. The present method represents a novel concept for the design of simple, robust, and highly specific detection methods for the detection of nanomaterials, which are otherwise difficult to visualize. PMID:26208679

  2. A small cellulose binding domain protein in Phytophtora is cell wall localized

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose binding domains (CBD) are structurally conserved regions linked to catalytic regions of cellulolytic enzymes. While widespread amongst saprophytic fungi that subsist on plant cell wall polysaccharides, they are not generally present in plant pathogenic fungi. A genome wide survey of CBDs w...

  3. Irreversible inhibitors of the 3C protease of Coxsackie virus through templated assembly of protein-binding fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Daniel; Kaczmarska, Zuzanna; Arkona, Christoph; Schulz, Robert; Tauber, Carolin; Wolber, Gerhard; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Coll, Miquel; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Small-molecule fragments binding to biomacromolecules can be starting points for the development of drugs, but are often difficult to detect due to low affinities. Here we present a strategy that identifies protein-binding fragments through their potential to induce the target-guided formation of covalently bound, irreversible enzyme inhibitors. A protein-binding nucleophile reacts reversibly with a bis-electrophilic warhead, thereby positioning the second electrophile in close proximity of the active site of a viral protease, resulting in the covalent de-activation of the enzyme. The concept is implemented for Coxsackie virus B3 3C protease, a pharmacological target against enteroviral infections. Using an aldehyde-epoxide as bis-electrophile, active fragment combinations are validated through measuring the protein inactivation rate and by detecting covalent protein modification in mass spectrometry. The structure of one enzyme-inhibitor complex is determined by X-ray crystallography. The presented warhead activation assay provides potent non-peptidic, broad-spectrum inhibitors of enteroviral proteases.

  4. Irreversible inhibitors of the 3C protease of Coxsackie virus through templated assembly of protein-binding fragments

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel; Kaczmarska, Zuzanna; Arkona, Christoph; Schulz, Robert; Tauber, Carolin; Wolber, Gerhard; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Coll, Miquel; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule fragments binding to biomacromolecules can be starting points for the development of drugs, but are often difficult to detect due to low affinities. Here we present a strategy that identifies protein-binding fragments through their potential to induce the target-guided formation of covalently bound, irreversible enzyme inhibitors. A protein-binding nucleophile reacts reversibly with a bis-electrophilic warhead, thereby positioning the second electrophile in close proximity of the active site of a viral protease, resulting in the covalent de-activation of the enzyme. The concept is implemented for Coxsackie virus B3 3C protease, a pharmacological target against enteroviral infections. Using an aldehyde-epoxide as bis-electrophile, active fragment combinations are validated through measuring the protein inactivation rate and by detecting covalent protein modification in mass spectrometry. The structure of one enzyme–inhibitor complex is determined by X-ray crystallography. The presented warhead activation assay provides potent non-peptidic, broad-spectrum inhibitors of enteroviral proteases. PMID:27677239

  5. Bacterial Cellulose-Binding Domain Modulates in Vitro Elongation of Different Plant Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Shpigel, Etai; Roiz, Levava; Goren, Raphael; Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant cellulose-binding domain (CBD) derived from the cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium cellulovorans was found to modulate the elongation of different plant cells in vitro. In peach (Prunus persica L.) pollen tubes, maximum elongation was observed at 50 μg mL−1 CBD. Pollen tube staining with calcofluor showed a loss of crystallinity in the tip zone of CBD-treated pollen tubes. At low concentrations CBD enhanced elongation of Arabidopsis roots. At high concentrations CBD dramatically inhibited root elongation in a dose-responsive manner. Maximum effect on root hair elongation was at 100 μg mL−1, whereas root elongation was inhibited at that concentration. CBD was found to compete with xyloglucan for binding to cellulose when CBD was added first to the cellulose, before the addition of xyloglucan. When Acetobacter xylinum L. was used as a model system, CBD was found to increase the rate of cellulose synthase in a dose-responsive manner, up to 5-fold compared with the control. Electron microscopy examination of the cellulose ribbons produced by A. xylinum showed that CBD treatment resulted in a splayed ribbon composed of separate fibrillar subunits, compared with a thin, uniform ribbon in the control. PMID:9701575

  6. Debranching of soluble wheat arabinoxylan dramatically enhances recalcitrant binding to cellulose.

    PubMed

    Selig, Michael J; Thygesen, Lisbeth G; Felby, Claus; Master, Emma R

    2015-03-01

    The presence of xylan is a detriment to the enzymatic saccharification of cellulose in lignocelluloses. The inhibition of the processive cellobiohydrolase Cel7A by soluble wheat arabinoxylan is shown here to increase by 50% following enzymatic treatment with a commercially-purified α-L-arabinofuranosidase. The enhanced inhibitory effect was shown by T2 relaxation time measurements via low field NMR to coincide with an increasing degree of constraint put on the water in xylan solutions. Furthermore, quartz crystal micro-balance with dissipation experiments showed that α-L-arabinofuranosidase treatment considerably increased the rate and rigidity of arabinoxylan mass association with cellulose. These data also suggest significant xylan-xylan adlayer formation occurs following initial binding of debranched arabinoxylan. From this, we speculate the inhibitory effects of xylan to cellulases may result from reduced enzymatic access via the dense association of xylan with cellulose. PMID:25335745

  7. Effects of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase oxidation on cellulose structure and binding of oxidized cellulose oligomers to cellulases.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, Josh V; Crowley, Michael F; Beckham, Gregg T; Payne, Christina M

    2015-05-21

    In nature, polysaccharide glycosidic bonds are cleaved by hydrolytic enzymes for a vast array of biological functions. Recently, a new class of enzymes that utilize an oxidative mechanism to cleave glycosidic linkages was discovered; these enzymes are called lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO). These oxidative enzymes are synergistic with cocktails of hydrolytic enzymes and are thought to act primarily on crystalline regions, in turn providing new sites of productive attachment and detachment for processive hydrolytic enzymes. In the case of cellulose, the homopolymer of β-1,4-d-glucose, enzymatic oxidation occurs at either the reducing end or the nonreducing end of glucose, depending on enzymatic specificity, and results in the generation of oxidized chemical substituents at polymer chain ends. LPMO oxidation of cellulose is thought to produce either a lactone at the reducing end of glucose that can spontaneously or enzymatically convert to aldonic acid or 4-keto-aldose at the nonreducing end that may further oxidize to a geminal diol. Here, we use molecular simulation to examine the effect of oxidation on the structure of crystalline cellulose. The simulations highlight variations in behaviors depending on the chemical identity of the oxidized species and its location within the cellulose fibril, as different oxidized species introduce steric effects that disrupt local crystallinity and in some cases reduce the work needed for polymer decrystallization. Reducing-end oxidations are easiest to decrystallize when located at the end of the fibril, whereas nonreducing end oxidations readily decrystallize from internal cleavage sites despite their lower solvent accessibility. The differential in decrystallization free energy suggests a molecular mechanism consistent with experimentally observed LPMO/cellobiohydrolase synergy. Additionally, the soluble oxidized cellobiose products released by hydrolytic cellulases may bind to the active sites of cellulases with

  8. Increased enzyme binding to substrate is not necessary for more efficient cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dahai; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Sethi, Anurag; Balan, Venkatesh; Gnanakaran, S; Dale, Bruce E

    2013-07-01

    Substrate binding is typically one of the rate-limiting steps preceding enzyme catalytic action during homogeneous reactions. However, interfacial-based enzyme catalysis on insoluble crystalline substrates, like cellulose, has additional bottlenecks of individual biopolymer chain decrystallization from the substrate interface followed by its processive depolymerization to soluble sugars. This additional decrystallization step has ramifications on the role of enzyme-substrate binding and its relationship to overall catalytic efficiency. We found that altering the crystalline structure of cellulose from its native allomorph I(β) to III(I) results in 40-50% lower binding partition coefficient for fungal cellulases, but surprisingly, it enhanced hydrolytic activity on the latter allomorph. We developed a comprehensive kinetic model for processive cellulases acting on insoluble substrates to explain this anomalous finding. Our model predicts that a reduction in the effective binding affinity to the substrate coupled with an increase in the decrystallization procession rate of individual cellulose chains from the substrate surface into the enzyme active site can reproduce our anomalous experimental findings. PMID:23784776

  9. Increased enzyme binding to substrate is not necessary for more efficient cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dahai; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Sethi, Anurag; Balan, Venkatesh; Gnanakaran, S; Dale, Bruce E

    2013-07-01

    Substrate binding is typically one of the rate-limiting steps preceding enzyme catalytic action during homogeneous reactions. However, interfacial-based enzyme catalysis on insoluble crystalline substrates, like cellulose, has additional bottlenecks of individual biopolymer chain decrystallization from the substrate interface followed by its processive depolymerization to soluble sugars. This additional decrystallization step has ramifications on the role of enzyme-substrate binding and its relationship to overall catalytic efficiency. We found that altering the crystalline structure of cellulose from its native allomorph I(β) to III(I) results in 40-50% lower binding partition coefficient for fungal cellulases, but surprisingly, it enhanced hydrolytic activity on the latter allomorph. We developed a comprehensive kinetic model for processive cellulases acting on insoluble substrates to explain this anomalous finding. Our model predicts that a reduction in the effective binding affinity to the substrate coupled with an increase in the decrystallization procession rate of individual cellulose chains from the substrate surface into the enzyme active site can reproduce our anomalous experimental findings.

  10. Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy of Single Carbohydrate Binding Modules on Cellulose Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hor, Amy; Dagel, Daryl; Luu, Quocanh; Savaikar, Madhusudan; Ding, Shi-You; Smith, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Photo Activated Localization Microscopy (PALM) is used to conduct an in vivo study of the binding affinity of polysaccharide-specific Carbohydrate Binding Modules (CBMs) to insoluble cellulose substrates. Two families of CBMs, namely TrCBM1 and CtCBM3, were modified to incorporate photo-activatable mCherry fluorescent protein (PAmCherry), and exposed to highly crystalline Valonia cellulose nano-fibrils. The resulting PALM images show CBMs binding along the nano-fibril long axis in a punctuated linear array, localized with, on average, 10 nm precision. Statistical analysis of the binding events results in nearest neighbor distributions between CBMs. A comparison between TrCBM1 and CtCBM3 reveals a similarity in the nearest neighbor distribution peaks but differences in the overall binding density. The former is attributed to steric hindrance among the CBMs on the nano-fibril whereas the latter is attributed to differences in the CBMs' binding strength. These results are compared to similar distributions derived from TEM measurements of dried samples of CtCBM3-CdSs quantum dot bioconjugates and AFM images of CtCBM3-GFP bound to similar Valonia nano-fibrils. Funding provided by NSF MPS/DMR/BMAT Award # 1206908.

  11. New insights into enzymatic hydrolysis of heterogeneous cellulose by using carbohydrate-binding module 3 containing GFP and carbohydrate-binding module 17 containing CFP

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The in-depth understanding of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose with heterogeneous morphology (that is, crystalline versus amorphous) may help develop better cellulase cocktail mixtures and biomass pretreatment, wherein cost-effective release of soluble sugars from solid cellulosic materials remains the largest obstacle to the economic viability of second generation biorefineries. Results In addition to the previously developed non-hydrolytic fusion protein, GC3, containing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a family 3 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM3) that can bind both surfaces of amorphous and crystalline celluloses, we developed a new protein probe, CC17, which contained a mono-cherry fluorescent protein (CFP) and a family 17 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM17) that can bind only amorphous cellulose surfaces. Via these two probes, the surface accessibilities of amorphous and crystalline celluloses were determined quantitatively. Our results for the enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) suggested that: 1) easily accessible amorphous cellulose on the surface of Avicel is preferentially hydrolyzed at the very early period of hydrolysis (that is, several minutes with a cellulose conversion of 2.8%); 2) further hydrolysis of Avicel is a typical layer-by-layer mechanism, that is, amorphous and crystalline cellulose regions were hydrolyzed simultaneously; and 3) most amorphous cellulose within the interior of the Avicel particles cannot be accessed by cellulase. Conclusions The crystallinity index (CrI), reflecting a mass-average (three-dimensional) cellulose characteristic, did not represent the key substrate surface (two-dimensional) characteristic related to enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:24552554

  12. Glycosylated linkers in multimodular lignocellulose-degrading enzymes dynamically bind to cellulose.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christina M; Resch, Michael G; Chen, Liqun; Crowley, Michael F; Himmel, Michael E; Taylor, Larry E; Sandgren, Mats; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Stals, Ingeborg; Tan, Zhongping; Beckham, Gregg T

    2013-09-01

    Plant cell-wall polysaccharides represent a vast source of food in nature. To depolymerize polysaccharides to soluble sugars, many organisms use multifunctional enzyme mixtures consisting of glycoside hydrolases, lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases, polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases, as well as accessory, redox-active enzymes for lignin depolymerization. Many of these enzymes that degrade lignocellulose are multimodular with carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and catalytic domains connected by flexible, glycosylated linkers. These linkers have long been thought to simply serve as a tether between structured domains or to act in an inchworm-like fashion during catalytic action. To examine linker function, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 and Family 7 cellobiohydrolases (TrCel6A and TrCel7A, respectively) bound to cellulose. During these simulations, the glycosylated linkers bind directly to cellulose, suggesting a previously unknown role in enzyme action. The prediction from the MD simulations was examined experimentally by measuring the binding affinity of the Cel7A CBM and the natively glycosylated Cel7A CBM-linker. On crystalline cellulose, the glycosylated linker enhances the binding affinity over the CBM alone by an order of magnitude. The MD simulations before and after binding of the linker also suggest that the bound linker may affect enzyme action due to significant damping in the enzyme fluctuations. Together, these results suggest that glycosylated linkers in carbohydrate-active enzymes, which are intrinsically disordered proteins in solution, aid in dynamic binding during the enzymatic deconstruction of plant cell walls. PMID:23959893

  13. Glycosylated linkers in multimodular lignocellulose-degrading enzymes dynamically bind to cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Christina M.; Resch, Michael G.; Chen, Liqun; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Taylor, Larry E.; Sandgren, Mats; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Stals, Ingeborg; Tan, Zhongping; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell-wall polysaccharides represent a vast source of food in nature. To depolymerize polysaccharides to soluble sugars, many organisms use multifunctional enzyme mixtures consisting of glycoside hydrolases, lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases, polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases, as well as accessory, redox-active enzymes for lignin depolymerization. Many of these enzymes that degrade lignocellulose are multimodular with carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and catalytic domains connected by flexible, glycosylated linkers. These linkers have long been thought to simply serve as a tether between structured domains or to act in an inchworm-like fashion during catalytic action. To examine linker function, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 and Family 7 cellobiohydrolases (TrCel6A and TrCel7A, respectively) bound to cellulose. During these simulations, the glycosylated linkers bind directly to cellulose, suggesting a previously unknown role in enzyme action. The prediction from the MD simulations was examined experimentally by measuring the binding affinity of the Cel7A CBM and the natively glycosylated Cel7A CBM-linker. On crystalline cellulose, the glycosylated linker enhances the binding affinity over the CBM alone by an order of magnitude. The MD simulations before and after binding of the linker also suggest that the bound linker may affect enzyme action due to significant damping in the enzyme fluctuations. Together, these results suggest that glycosylated linkers in carbohydrate-active enzymes, which are intrinsically disordered proteins in solution, aid in dynamic binding during the enzymatic deconstruction of plant cell walls. PMID:23959893

  14. Cellulose binding domain assisted immobilization of lipase (GSlip-CBD) onto cellulosic nanogel: characterization and application in organic medium.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Zhang, Shaowei; Wu, Gaobing; Wu, Cheng Chao; Chen, JunPeng; Baskaran, R; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-12-01

    A cbd gene was cloned into the C-terminal region of a lip gene from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. The native lipase (43.5 kDa) and CBD-Lip fusion protein (60.2 kDa) were purified to homogeneity by SDS-PAGE. A highly stable cellulosic nanogel was prepared by controlled hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose onto which the CBD-lip fusion protein was immobilized through bio-affinity based binding. The nanogel-bound lipase showed optimum activity at 55 °C, and it remains stable and active at pH 10-10.5. Furthermore, the immobilized lipase showed an over two-fold increase of relative activity in the presence of DMSO, isopropanol, isoamyl alcohol and n-butanol, but a mild activity decrease at a low concentration of methanol and ethanol. The immobilized biocatalyst retained ~50% activity after eight repetitive hydrolytic cycles. Enzyme kinetic studies of the immobilized lipase showed a 1.24 fold increase in Vmax and 5.25 fold increase in kcat towards p-NPP hydrolysis. Additionally, the nanogel bound lipase was tested to synthesize a biodiesel ester, ethyl oleate in DMSO. Kinetic analysis showed the km 100.5 ± 4.3 mmol and Vmax 0.19 ± 0.015 mmolmin(-1) at varied oleic acid concentration. Also, the values of km and Vmax at varying concentration of ethanol were observed to be 95.9 ± 13.9 mmol and 0.22 ± 0.013 mmolmin(-1) respectively. The maximum yield of ethyl oleate 111.2 ± 1.24 mM was obtained under optimized reaction conditions in organic medium. These results suggest that this immobilized biocatalyst can be used as an efficient tool for the biotransformation reactions on an industrial scale. PMID:26590897

  15. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  16. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Resch, Michael G.; Greene, Eric R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  17. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs.

  18. Modular Architecture of Protein Binding Units for Designing Properties of Cellulose Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Malho, Jani-Markus; Arola, Suvi; Laaksonen, Päivi; Szilvay, Géza R; Ikkala, Olli; Linder, Markus B

    2015-01-01

    Molecular biomimetic models suggest that proteins in the soft matrix of nanocomposites have a multimodular architecture. Engineered proteins were used together with nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) to show how this type of architecture leads to function. The proteins consist of two cellulose-binding modules (CBM) separated by 12-, 24-, or 48-mer linkers. Engineering the linkers has a considerable effects on the interaction between protein and NFC in both wet colloidal state and a dry film. The protein optionally incorporates a multimerizing hydrophobin (HFB) domain connected by another linker. The modular structure explains effects in the hydrated gel state, as well as the deformation of composite materials through stress distribution and crosslinking. Based on this work, strategies can be suggested for tuning the mechanical properties of materials through the coupling of protein modules and their interlinking architectures. PMID:26305491

  19. The impact of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding domain mutations on its binding to a cellulose surface: a molecular dynamics free energy study.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Yan, Shihai; Yao, Lishan

    2012-04-01

    A critical role of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) carbohydrate binding domain (CBD) is to bind to a cellulose surface and increase the enzyme concentration on the surface. Several residues of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A CBD, including Y5, N29, Y31, Y32 and Q34, contribute to cellulose binding, as revealed by early experimental studies. To investigate the interactions between these important residues and cellulose, we applied a thermodynamic integration method to calculate the cellulose-Cel7A CBD binding free energy changes caused by Y5A, N29A, Y31A, Y32A and Q34A mutations. The experimental binding trend was successfully predicted, proving the effectiveness of the complex model. For the two polar residue mutants N29A and Q34A, the changes in the electrostatics are comparable to those of van der Waals, while for three Y to A mutants, the free energy differences mainly come from van der Waals interactions. However, in both cases, the electrostatics dominates the interactions between individual residues and cellulose. The side chains of these residues are rigidified after the complex is formed. The binding free energy changes for the two mutants Y5W and Y31W were also determined, and for these the van der Waals interaction was strengthened but the electrostatics was weakened.

  20. Expression, purification, and characterization of the cellulose-binding domain of the scaffoldin subunit from the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed Central

    Morag, E; Lapidot, A; Govorko, D; Lamed, R; Wilchek, M; Bayer, E A; Shoham, Y

    1995-01-01

    The major cellulose-binding domain (CBD) from the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum YS was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified efficiently by a modification of a novel procedure termed affinity digestion. The properties of the purified polypeptide were compared with those of a related CBD derived from a cellulosome-like complex of a similar (but mesophilic) clostridial species, Clostridium cellulovorans. The binding properties of the two proteins with their common substrate were found to be very similar. Despite the similarity in the amino acid sequences of the two CBDs, polyclonal antibodies raised against the CBD from C. thermocellum failed to interact with the protein from C. cellulovorans. Chemical modification of the single cysteine of the CBD had little effect on the binding to cellulose. Biotinylation of this cysteine allowed the efficient binding of avidin to cellulose, and the resultant matrix is appropriate for use as a universal affinity system. PMID:7646033

  1. Addition of a carbohydrate-binding module enhances cellulase penetration into cellulose substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cellulases are of great interest for application in biomass degradation, yet the molecular details of the mode of action of glycoside hydrolases during degradation of insoluble cellulose remain elusive. To further improve these enzymes for application at industrial conditions, it is critical to gain a better understanding of not only the details of the degradation process, but also the function of accessory modules. Method We fused a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) from family 2a to two thermophilic endoglucanases. We then applied neutron reflectometry to determine the mechanism of the resulting enhancements. Results Catalytic activity of the chimeric enzymes was enhanced up to three fold on insoluble cellulose substrates as compared to wild type. Importantly, we demonstrate that the wild type enzymes affect primarily the surface properties of an amorphous cellulose film, while the chimeras containing a CBM alter the bulk properties of the amorphous film. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the CBM improves the efficiency of these cellulases by enabling digestion within the bulk of the film. PMID:23819686

  2. Enzymatic properties of Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum β-glucosidase fused to Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose binding domain and its application in hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The complete degradation of the cellulose requires the synergistic action of endo-β-glucanase, exo-β-glucanase, and β-glucosidase. But endo-β-glucanase and exo-β-glucanase can be recovered by solid–liquid separation in cellulose hydrolysis by their cellulose binding domain (CBD), however, the β-glucosidases cannot be recovered because of most β-glucosidases without the CBD, so additional β-glucosidases are necessary for the next cellulose degradation. This will increase the cost of cellulose degradation. Results The glucose-tolerant β-glucosidase (BGL) from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571 was fused with cellulose binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium cellulovorans cellulosome anchoring protein by a peptide linker. The fusion enzyme (BGL-CBD) gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli with the maximum β-glucosidase activity of 17 U/mL. Recombinant BGL-CBD was purified by heat treatment and following by Ni-NTA affinity. The enzymatic characteristics of the BGL-CBD showed optimal activities at pH 6.0 and 65°C. The fusion of CBD structure enhanced the hydrolytic efficiency of the BGL-CBD against cellobiose, which displayed a 6-fold increase in V max /K m in comparison with the BGL. A gram of cellulose was found to absorb 643 U of the fusion enzyme (BGL-CBD) in pH 6.0 at 50°C for 25 min with a high immobilization efficiency of 90%. Using the BGL-CBD as the catalyst, the yield of glucose reached a maximum of 90% from 100 g/L cellobiose and the BGL-CBD could retain over 85% activity after five batches with the yield of glucose all above 70%. The performance of the BGL-CBD on microcrystalline cellulose was also studied. The yield of the glucose was increased from 47% to 58% by adding the BGL-CBD to the cellulase, instead of adding the Novozyme 188. Conclusions The hydrolytic activity of BGL-CBD is greater than that of the Novozyme 188 in cellulose degradation. The article provides a prospect to decrease significantly the

  3. Identification of functionally important amino acids in the cellulose-binding domain of Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I.

    PubMed Central

    Linder, M.; Mattinen, M. L.; Kontteli, M.; Lindeberg, G.; Ståhlberg, J.; Drakenberg, T.; Reinikainen, T.; Pettersson, G.; Annila, A.

    1995-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) of Trichoderma reesei has two functional domains, a catalytic core domain and a cellulose binding domain (CBD). The structure of the CBD reveals two distinct faces, one of which is flat and the other rough. Several other fungal cellulolytic enzymes have similar two-domain structures, in which the CBDs show a conserved primary structure. Here we have evaluated the contributions of conserved amino acids in CBHI CBD to its binding to cellulose. Binding isotherms were determined for a set of six synthetic analogues in which conserved amino acids were substituted. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy was used to assess the structural effects of the substitutions by comparing chemical shifts, coupling constants, and NOEs of the backbone protons between the wild-type CBD and the analogues. In general, the structural effects of the substitutions were minor, although in some cases decreased binding could clearly be ascribed to conformational perturbations. We found that at least two tyrosine residues and a glutamine residue on the flat face were essential for tight binding of the CBD to cellulose. A change on the rough face had only a small effect on the binding and it is unlikely that this face interacts with cellulose directly. PMID:7549870

  4. The RNA-binding E3 ubiquitin ligase MEX-3C links ubiquitination with MHC-I mRNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Florencia; Bye, Helen; Duncan, Lidia M; Buchet-Poyau, Karine; Billaud, Marc; Wills, Mark R; Lehner, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    RNA-binding E3 ubiquitin ligases were recently identified, though their function remains unclear. While studying the regulation of the MHC class I (MHC-I) pathway, we here characterize a novel role for ubiquitin in mRNA degradation. MHC-I molecules provide ligands for both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes as well as natural killer (NK) cells, and play a central role in innate and adaptive immunity. MHC-I cell-surface expression is closely monitored by NK cells, whose killer immunoglobulin-like receptors encode MHC-I-specific activatory and inhibitory receptors, implying that MHC-I expression needs to be tightly regulated. In a functional siRNA ubiquitome screen we identified MEX-3C, a novel RNA-binding ubiquitin E3 ligase, as responsible for the post-transcriptional, allotype-specific regulation of MHC-I. MEX-3C binds the 3′UTR of HLA-A2 mRNA, inducing its RING-dependent degradation. The RING domain of MEX-3C is not required for HLA-A2 cell-surface downregulation, but regulates the degradation of HLA-A2 mRNA. We have therefore uncovered a novel post-transcriptional pathway for regulation of HLA-A allotypes and provide a link between ubiquitination and mRNA degradation. PMID:22863774

  5. Energy Landscape for the Interaction of the Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module and the Cellulose Surface is Altered by Hydrolyzed Glycosidic Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Beckham, G. T.; Crowley, M. F.; Chang, C. H.; Matthews, J. F.; Bomble, Y. J.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    A multiscale simulation model is used to construct potential and free energy surfaces for the carbohydrate-binding module [CBM] from an industrially important cellulase, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I, on the hydrophobic face of a coarse-grained cellulose I{beta} polymorph. We predict from computation that the CBM alone exhibits regions of stability on the hydrophobic face of cellulose every 5 and 10 {angstrom}, corresponding to a glucose unit and a cellobiose unit, respectively. In addition, we predict a new role for the CBM: specifically, that in the presence of hydrolyzed cellulose chain ends, the CBM exerts a thermodynamic driving force to translate away from the free cellulose chain ends. This suggests that the CBM is not only required for binding to cellulose, as has been known for two decades, but also that it has evolved to both assist the enzyme in recognizing a cellulose chain end and exert a driving force on the enzyme during processive hydrolysis of cellulose.

  6. The use of nanocrystalline cellulose for the binding and controlled release of drugs

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, John K; Letchford, Kevin; Wasserman, Benjamin Z; Ye, Lucy; Hamad, Wadood Y; Burt, Helen M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the use of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) as a drug delivery excipient. NCC crystallites, prepared by an acid hydrolysis method, were shown to have nanoscopic dimensions and exhibit a high degree of crystallinity. These crystallites bound significant quantities of the water soluble, ionizable drugs tetratcycline and doxorubicin, which were released rapidly over a 1-day period. Cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was bound to the surface of NCC and increased the zeta potential in a concentration-dependent manner from −55 to 0 mV. NCC crystallites with CTAB-modified surfaces bound significant quantities of the hydrophobic anticancer drugs docetaxel, paclitaxel, and etoposide. These drugs were released in a controlled manner over a 2-day period. The NCC-CTAB complexes were found to bind to KU-7 cells, and evidence of cellular uptake was observed. PMID:21383857

  7. Cationic polymer brush-modified cellulose nanocrystals for high-affinity virus binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosilo, Henna; McKee, Jason R.; Kontturi, Eero; Koho, Tiia; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Ikkala, Olli; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2014-09-01

    Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and subsequent quaternization of the polymer pendant amino groups. The cationic polymer brush-modified CNCs maintained excellent dispersibility and colloidal stability in water and showed a ζ-potential of +38 mV. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy showed that the modified CNCs electrostatically bind cowpea chlorotic mottle virus and norovirus-like particles with high affinity. Addition of only a few weight percent of the modified CNCs in water dispersions sufficed to fully bind the virus capsids to form micrometer-sized assemblies. This enabled the concentration and extraction of the virus particles from solution by low-speed centrifugation. These results show the feasibility of the modified CNCs in virus binding and concentrating, and pave the way for their use as transduction enhancers for viral delivery applications.Surfaces capable of high-affinity binding of biomolecules are required in several biotechnological applications, such as purification, transfection, and sensing. Therein, the rod-shaped, colloidal cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are appealing due to their large surface area available for functionalization. In order to exploit electrostatic binding, their intrinsically anionic surfaces have to be cationized as biological supramolecules are predominantly anionic. Here we present a facile way to prepare cationic CNCs by surface

  8. A non-proteolytic role for ubiquitin in deadenylation of MHC-I mRNA by the RNA-binding E3-ligase MEX-3C

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Florencia; Rapiteanu, Radu; Sebastiaan Winkler, G.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of protein and mRNA turnover is essential for many cellular processes. We recently showed that ubiquitin—traditionally linked to protein degradation—directly regulates the degradation of mRNAs through the action of a newly identified family of RNA-binding E3 ubiquitin ligases. How ubiquitin regulates mRNA decay remains unclear. Here, we identify a new role for ubiquitin in regulating deadenylation, the initial and often rate-limiting step in mRNA degradation. MEX-3C, a canonical member of this family of RNA-binding ubiquitin ligases, associates with the cytoplasmic deadenylation complexes and ubiquitinates CNOT7(Caf1), the main catalytic subunit of the CCR4-NOT deadenylation machinery. We establish a new role for ubiquitin in regulating MHC-I mRNA deadenylation as ubiquitination of CNOT7 by MEX-3C regulates its deadenylation activity and is required for MHC-I mRNA degradation. Since neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitors rescued MEX-3C-mediated MHC-I mRNA degradation, our findings suggest a new non-proteolytic function for ubiquitin in the regulation of mRNA decay. PMID:26471122

  9. Binding and movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases on crystalline cellulose surfaces revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M

    2013-08-16

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate. PMID:23818525

  10. Stringent Regulation of Complement Lectin Pathway C3/C5 Convertase By C4b-Binding Protein (C4bp)

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Nenoo; Rajagopalan, Rema; Salvi, Veena P.

    2009-01-01

    The complement lectin pathway, an essential component of the innate immune system, is geared for rapid recognition of infections as each C4b deposited via this pathway is capable of forming a C3/C5 convertase. In the present study, role of C4b-binding protein (C4BP) in regulating the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase assembled on zymosan and sheep erythrocytes coated with mannan (EMan) was examined. While the C4BP concentration for inhibiting 50% (IC50) formation of surface-bound C3 convertase on the two surfaces was similar to that obtained for the soluble C3 convertase (1.05 nM), ∼3- and 41-fold more was required to inhibit assembly of the C5 convertase on zymosan (2.81 nM) and EMan (42.66 nM). No difference in binding interactions between C4BP and surface-bound C4b alone or in complex with C3b was observed. Increasing the C4b density on zymosan (14,000-431,000 C4b/Zym) increased the number of C4b bound per C4BP from 2.87 to 8.23 indicating that at high C4b density all seven α-chains of C4BP are engaged in C4b-binding. In contrast, the number of C4b bound per C4BP remained constant (3.79 ± 0.60) when the C4b density on EMan was increased. The data also show that C4BP regulates assembly and decay of the lectin pathway C3/C5 convertase more stringently than the classical pathway C3/C5 convertase because of a ∼7 to 13-fold greater affinity for C4b deposited via the lectin pathway than the classical pathway. C4BP thus regulates efficiently the four times greater potential of the lectin pathway than the classical pathway in generating the C3/C5 convertase and hence production of pro-inflammatory products, which are required to fight infections but occasionally cause pathological inflammatory reactions. PMID:19660812

  11. A new family of rhamnogalacturonan lyases contains an enzyme that binds to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    McKie, V A; Vincken, J P; Voragen, A G; van den Broek, L A; Stimson, E; Gilbert, H J

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas cellulosa is an aerobic bacterium that synthesizes an extensive array of modular cellulases and hemicellulases, which have a modular architecture consisting of catalytic domains and distinct non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). To investigate whether the main-chain-cleaving pectinases from this bacterium also have a modular structure, a library of P. cellulosa genomic DNA, constructed in lambdaZAPII, was screened for pectinase-encoding sequences. A recombinant phage that attacked arabinan, galactan and rhamnogalacturonan was isolated. The encoded enzyme, designated Rgl11A, had a modular structure comprising an N-terminal domain that exhibited homology to Bacillus and Streptomyces proteins of unknown function, a middle domain that exhibited sequence identity to fibronectin-3 domains, and a C-terminal domain that was homologous to family 2a CBMs. Expression of the three modules of the Pseudomonas protein in Escherichia coli showed that its C-terminal module was a functional cellulose-binding domain, and the N-terminal module consisted of a catalytic domain that hydrolysed rhamnogalacturonan-containing substrates. The activity of Rgl11A against apple- and potato-derived rhamnogalacturonan substrates indicated that the enzyme had a strong preference for rhamnogalacturonans that contained galactose side chains, and which were not esterified. The enzyme had an absolute requirement for calcium, a high optimum pH, and catalysis was associated with an increase in absorbance at 235 nm, indicating that glycosidic bond cleavage was mediated via a beta-elimination mechanism. These data indicate that Rgl11A is a rhamnogalacturonan lyase and, together with the homologous Bacillus and Streptomyces proteins, comprise a new family of polysaccharide lyases. The presence of a family 2a CBM in Rgl11A, and in a P. cellulosa pectate lyase described in the accompanying paper [Brown, Mallen, Charnock, Davies and Black (2001) Biochem. J. 355, 155-165] suggests that

  12. Chimeric proteins combining phosphatase and cellulose-binding activities: proof-of-concept and application in the hydrolysis of paraoxon.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Larissa M; Chaimovich, Hernan; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Marana, Sandro R

    2014-05-01

    Phosphatases for organophosphate degradation and carbohydrate-binding domains (CBMs) have potential biotechnological applications. As a proof-of-concept, a soluble chimeric protein that combines acid phosphatase (AppA) from Escherichia coli and a CBM from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (AppA-CBM) was produced in E.coli. AppACBM adsorbed in microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH101 catalyzed the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP). The binding to microcrystalline cellulose displayed saturation behavior with an apparent binding constant (Kb) of 22 ± 5 mg and a maximum binding (Bmax) of 1.500 ± 0.001 enzyme units. Binding was highest at pH 2.5 and decreased above pH 6.5, as previously observed for family 2 CBMs. The Km values for PNPP of AppA-CBM and native AppA were identical (2.7 mM). To demonstrate that this strategy for protein engineering has practical applications and is largely functional, even for phosphatases exhibiting diverse folds, a chimeric protein combining human paraoxonase 1 (hPON1) and the CBM was produced. Both PON1-CBM and hPON1 had identical Km values for paraoxon (1.3 mM). Additionally, hPON1 bound to microcrystalline cellulose with a Kb of 27 ± 3 mg, the same as that observed for AppA-CBM. These data show that the phosphatase domains are as functional in both of the chimeric proteins as they are in the native enzymes and that the CBM domain maintains the same cellulose affinity. Therefore, the engineering of chimeric proteins combining domains of phosphatases and CBMs is fully feasible, resulting in chimeric enzymes that exhibit potential for OP detoxification. PMID:24555432

  13. Specific quantification of Trichoderma reesei cellulases in reconstituted mixtures and its application to cellulase-cellulose binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nidetzky, B. . Inst. of Food Technology Technical Univ. of Graz . Inst. of Biotechnology); Claeyssens, M. . Dept. of Biochemistry, Physiology, and Microbiology)

    1994-10-01

    Specific quantification of the major cellulolytic components of the Trichoderma reesei enzyme complex, i.e., endoglucanases I and III and cellobiohydrolases I and II, are described and, employing a defined mixture of these four cellulases reconstituted according to the composition of the native Trichoderma cellulase complex, used to determine the binding of each individual component onto filter paper. During substrate degradation by this enzyme mixture, the specific adsorption of each individual cellulase gradually increases and no preferential binding of one enzyme component in any particular phase of cellulose hydrolysis is found. T. reesei cellobiohydrolases I and II admixed with endoglucanases I and II represent a full-value'' cellulase system that is capable of degrading semicrystalline cellulose efficiently. In comparison with crude Trichoderma enzyme complex, almost identical adsorption properties and similar hydrolytic efficiency are found for the reconstituted mixture.

  14. Crystal structure of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-01-01

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-β receptor gene (TβR-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, A-site and B-site. Here we report the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA (mTβR-IIDNA). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity. PMID:20079749

  15. Clostridium thermocellum cellulase CelT, a family 9 endoglucanase without an Ig-like domain or family 3c carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, J; Hemjinda, E; Arai, T; Kimura, T; Sakka, K; Ohmiya, K

    2002-08-01

    The celT gene of Clostridium thermocellum strain F1 was found downstream of the mannanase gene man26B [Kurokawa J et al. (2001) Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 65:548-554] in pKS305. The open reading frame of celT consists of 1,833 nucleotides encoding a protein of 611 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 68,510. The mature form of CelT consists of a family 9 cellulase domain and a dockerin domain responsible for cellulosome assembly, but lacks a family 3c carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain, which are often found with family 9 catalytic domains. CelT devoid of the dockerin domain (CelTDeltadoc) was constructed and purified from a recombinant Escherichia coli, and its enzyme properties were examined. CelTDeltadoc showed strong activity toward carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and barley beta-glucan, and low activity toward xylan. The V(max) and K(m) values were 137 micro mol min(-1) mg(-1) and 16.7 mg/ml, respectively, for CMC. Immunological analysis indicated that CelT is a catalytic component of the C. thermocellum F1 cellulosome. This is the first report describing the characterization of a family 9 cellulase without an Ig-like domain or family 3c CBM.

  16. The biosynthesis and wall-binding of hemicelluloses in cellulose-deficient maize cells: an example of metabolic plasticity.

    PubMed

    de Castro, María; Miller, Janice G; Acebes, José Luis; Encina, Antonio; García-Angulo, Penélope; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-04-01

    Cell-suspension cultures (Zea mays L., Black Mexican sweet corn) habituated to 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) survive with reduced cellulose owing to hemicellulose network modification. We aimed to define the hemicellulose metabolism modifications in DCB-habituated maize cells showing a mild reduction in cellulose at different stages in the culture cycle. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, we fed habituated and non-habituated cultures with [(3)H]arabinose, and traced the distribution of (3)H-pentose residues between xylans, xyloglucans and other polymers in several cellular compartments for 5 h. Habituated cells were slower taking up exogenous [(3)H]arabinose. Tritium was incorporated into polysaccharide-bound arabinose and xylose residues, but habituated cells diverted a higher proportion of their new [(3)H]xylose residues into (hetero) xylans at the expense of xyloglucan synthesis. During logarithmic growth, habituated cells showed slower vesicular trafficking of polymers, especially xylans. Moreover, habituated cells showed a decrease in the strong wall-binding of all pentose-containing polysaccharides studied; correspondingly, especially in log-phase cultures, habituation increased the proportion of (3)H-hemicelluloses ([(3)H]xylans and [(3)H]xyloglucan) sloughed into the medium. These findings could be related to the cell walls' cellulose-deficiency, and consequent reduction in binding sites for hemicelluloses; the data could also reflect the habituated cells' reduced capacity to integrate arabinoxylans by extra-protoplasmic phenolic cross-linking, as well as xyloglucans, during wall assembly.

  17. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 3C binds to the N-terminal (NTD) and beta trefoil domains (BTD) of RBP/CSL; Only the NTD interaction is essential for lymphoblastoid cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Calderwood, Michael A.; Lee, Sungwook; Holthaus, Amy M.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Kieff, Elliott; Johannsen, Eric

    2011-05-25

    Association of EBV nuclear proteins EBNA2, EBNA3A and EBNA3C with RBP/CSL, is essential for lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) proliferation. Conserved residues in the EBNA3 homology domain, required for RBP/CSL interaction, lack the W{Phi}P motif that mediates EBNA2 and Notch binding to the RBP/CSL beta-trefoil domain (BTD). We map RBP/CSL interacting residues within EBNA3A(aa128-204) and EBNA3C(aa211-233). The EBNA3A results are consistent with an earlier report (aa125-222), but the EBNA3C domain is unexpectedly small and includes a 'WTP' sequence. This EBNA3C WTP motif confers RBP/CSL binding in vitro, in yeast, and in mammalian cells. Further, an EBNA3C WTP {yields} STP(W227S) mutation impaired BTD binding whereas EBNA3 homology domain mutations disrupted RBP/CSL N-terminal domain (NTD) binding. WTP was not essential for EBNA3C repression of EBNA2 in reporter assays or for maintenance of LCL growth. Our results indicate that EBNA3 proteins interact with multiple RBP/CSL domains, but only NTD interactions are required for LCL growth.

  18. Quinolino[3,4-b]quinoxalines and pyridazino[4,3-c]quinoline derivatives: Synthesis, inhibition of topoisomerase IIα, G-quadruplex binding and cytotoxic properties.

    PubMed

    Palluotto, Fausta; Sosic, Alice; Pinato, Odra; Zoidis, Grigoris; Catto, Marco; Sissi, Claudia; Gatto, Barbara; Carotti, Angelo

    2016-11-10

    The quinoline motif fused with other heterocyclic systems plays an important role in the field of anticancer drug development. An extensive series of tetracyclic quinolino[3,4-b]quinoxalines N-5 or C-6 substituted with basic side chain and a limited number of tricyclic pyridazino[4,3-c]quinolines N-6 substituted were designed, synthesized and evaluated for topoisomerase IIα (Topo IIα) inhibitory activity, ability to bind and stabilize G-quadruplex structures and cytotoxic properties against two human cancer cell lines (HeLa and MCF-7). Almost all of the tested agents showed a high activity as Topo IIα inhibitors and G-quadruplex stabilizers. Among all the derivatives studied, the quinolino[3,4-b]quinoxalines 11 and 23, N-5 and C-6 substituted respectively, stand out as the most promising compounds. Derivative 11 resulted a selective binder to selected G-quadruplex sequences, while derivative 23 displayed the most interesting Topo IIα inhibitory activity (IC50 = 5.14 μM); both showed high cytotoxic activity (IC50 HeLa = 2.04 μM and 2.32 μM, respectively).

  19. The properties of catalytically-inactivated Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I: Role of the cellulose binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Donner, T.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1993-12-31

    Cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) was purified from a crude cellulase by preparative isoelectric focusing. Treatment of CBH I with 1-ethyl-3-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) resulted in its catalytic inactivation but did not abolish its ability to be absorbed to microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). CBH I thus modified possessed a pI of between 8.5 and 9.3 and decreased tryptophan fluorescence compared to native CBH I. A comparison of the effect of native and modified CBH I on the morphology of crystalline cotton cellulose fibers was made using scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Cellulose hydrolysis and binding with Trichoderma reesei Cel5A and Cel7A and their core domains in ionic liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Wahlström, Ronny; Rahikainen, Jenni; Kruus, Kristiina; Suurnäkki, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) dissolve lignocellulosic biomass and have a high potential as pretreatment prior to total enzymatic hydrolysis. ILs are, however, known to inactivate cellulases. In this article, enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and enzyme binding onto the cellulosic substrate were studied in the presence of cellulose-dissolving ILs. Two different ILs, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([DMIM]DMP) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]AcO), and two monocomponent cellulases, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase Cel7A and endoglucanase Cel5A, were used in the study. The role and IL sensitivity of the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) were studied by performing hydrolysis and binding experiments with both the intact cellulases, and their respective core domains (CDs). Based on hydrolysis yields and substrate binding experiments for the intact enzymes and their CDs in the presence of ILs, the function of the CBM appeared to be very IL sensitive. Binding data suggested that the CBM was more important for the substrate binding of endoglucanase Cel5A than for the binding of cellobiohydrolase Cel7A. The CD of Cel7A was able to bind well to cellulose even without a CBM, whereas Cel5A CD had very low binding affinity. Hydrolysis also occurred with Cel5A CD even if this protein had very low binding affinity in all the studied matrices. Binding and hydrolysis were less affected by the studied ILs for Cel7A than for Cel5A. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic study of IL effects on cellulase substrate binding. PMID:24258388

  1. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C binds to BATF/IRF4 or SPI1/IRF4 composite sites and recruits Sin3A to repress CDKN2A.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sizun; Willox, Bradford; Zhou, Hufeng; Holthaus, Amy M; Wang, Anqi; Shi, Tommy T; Maruo, Seiji; Kharchenko, Peter V; Johannsen, Eric C; Kieff, Elliott; Zhao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) repression of CDKN2A p14(ARF) and p16(INK4A) is essential for immortal human B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) growth. EBNA3C ChIP-sequencing identified >13,000 EBNA3C sites in LCL DNA. Most EBNA3C sites were associated with active transcription; 64% were strong H3K4me1- and H3K27ac-marked enhancers and 16% were active promoters marked by H3K4me3 and H3K9ac. Using ENCODE LCL transcription factor ChIP-sequencing data, EBNA3C sites coincided (±250 bp) with RUNX3 (64%), BATF (55%), ATF2 (51%), IRF4 (41%), MEF2A (35%), PAX5 (34%), SPI1 (29%), BCL11a (28%), SP1 (26%), TCF12 (23%), NF-κB (23%), POU2F2 (23%), and RBPJ (16%). EBNA3C sites separated into five distinct clusters: (i) Sin3A, (ii) EBNA2/RBPJ, (iii) SPI1, and (iv) strong or (v) weak BATF/IRF4. EBNA3C signals were positively affected by RUNX3, BATF/IRF4 (AICE) and SPI1/IRF4 (EICE) cooccupancy. Gene set enrichment analyses correlated EBNA3C/Sin3A promoter sites with transcription down-regulation (P < 1.6 × 10(-4)). EBNA3C signals were strongest at BATF/IRF4 and SPI1/IRF4 composite sites. EBNA3C bound strongly to the p14(ARF) promoter through SPI1/IRF4/BATF/RUNX3, establishing RBPJ-, Sin3A-, and REST-mediated repression. EBNA3C immune precipitated with Sin3A and conditional EBNA3C inactivation significantly decreased Sin3A binding at the p14(ARF) promoter (P < 0.05). These data support a model in which EBNA3C binds strongly to BATF/IRF4/SPI1/RUNX3 sites to enhance transcription and recruits RBPJ/Sin3A- and REST/NRSF-repressive complexes to repress p14(ARF) and p16(INK4A) expression. PMID:24344258

  2. The Use of Carbohydrate Binding Modules (CBMs) to Monitor Changes in Fragmentation and Cellulose Fiber Surface Morphology during Cellulase- and Swollenin-induced Deconstruction of Lignocellulosic Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Gourlay, Keith; Hu, Jinguang; Arantes, Valdeir; Penttilä, Merja; Saddler, Jack N.

    2015-01-01

    Although the actions of many of the hydrolytic enzymes involved in cellulose hydrolysis are relatively well understood, the contributions that amorphogenesis-inducing proteins might contribute to cellulose deconstruction are still relatively undefined. Earlier work has shown that disruptive proteins, such as the non-hydrolytic non-oxidative protein Swollenin, can open up and disaggregate the less-ordered regions of lignocellulosic substrates. Within the cellulosic fraction, relatively disordered, amorphous regions known as dislocations are known to occur along the length of the fibers. It was postulated that Swollenin might act synergistically with hydrolytic enzymes to initiate biomass deconstruction within these dislocation regions. Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that preferentially bind to cellulosic substructures were fluorescently labeled. They were imaged, using confocal microscopy, to assess the distribution of crystalline and amorphous cellulose at the fiber surface, as well as to track changes in surface morphology over the course of enzymatic hydrolysis and fiber fragmentation. Swollenin was shown to promote targeted disruption of the cellulosic structure at fiber dislocations. PMID:25527502

  3. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P₃ with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-01-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site. PMID:26857031

  4. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-01-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site. PMID:26857031

  5. Computational studies of the binding profile of phosphoinositide PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 with the pleckstrin homology domain of an oomycete cellulose synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Guanglin; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-02-01

    Saprolegnia monoica is a model organism to investigate Saprolegnia parasitica, an important oomycete which causes considerable loss in aquaculture every year. S. monoica contains cellulose synthases vital for oomycete growth. However, the molecular mechanism of the cellulose biosynthesis process in the oomycete growth is still poorly understood. Some cellulose synthases of S. monoica, such as SmCesA2, are found to contain a plecsktrin homology (PH) domain, which is a protein module widely found in nature and known to bind to phosphoinositides, a class of signaling compounds involved in many biological processes. Understanding the molecular interactions between the PH domain and phosphoinositides would help to unravel the cellulose biosynthesis process of oomycetes. In this work, the binding profile of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3, a typical phosphoinositide, with SmCesA2-PH was studied by molecular docking, molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 is found to bind at a specific site located at β1, β2 and β1-β2 loop of SmCesA2-PH. The high affinity of PtdIns (3,4,5) P3 to SmCesA2-PH is contributed by the free phosphate groups, which have electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions with Lys88, Lys100 and Arg102 in the binding site.

  6. The binding, synergistic and structural characteristics of BsEXLX1 for loosening the main components of lignocellulose: Lignin, xylan, and cellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Chen, Liang; Lin, Hui; Yu, Daobing; Shen, Qi; Wan, Li; Zhao, Yuhua

    2016-10-01

    The bacterial expansin, BsEXLX1, has been studied as a model to understand the synergistic effect of expansins on lignocellulose degradation and the structure-function relationships of expansins. However, the specific mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, the binding, synergistic and structural characteristics of BsEXLX1 for loosening the main components of lignocellulose: lignin, xylan, and cellulose, were further characterized. Results showed that BsEXLX1 preferentially binds to xylan over lignin or cellulose under various conditions. The binding of BsEXLX1 to all substrates increased linearly with the initial concentration of BsEXLX1. But the changing rate of binding (i.e., slope of the line; k value) varied with the incubation temperature. Interestingly, the binding of BsEXLX1 to substrates did not saturate. Mutating residue-125, 126 or 171 indicated their importance for binding, but they were less important for binding to xylan. Through binding assays and homologous modeling, it was concluded that residue-125 and 171 play more important roles in the structural maintenance of BsEXLX1. By comparing the synergistic activity of BsEXLX1 or its mutants, it was found that synergistic activity is not correlated with specific binding. All these results can lead deeper understand about the mechanism of wall loosening by expansins, and further promote the application of expansins in lignocellulose degradation. PMID:27542746

  7. Characterization of hybrid proteins consisting of the catalytic domains of Clostridium and Ruminococcus endoglucanases, fused to Pseudomonas non-catalytic cellulose-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, D M; Durrant, A J; Hazlewood, G P; Gilbert, H J

    1991-01-01

    The N-terminal 160 or 267 residues of xylanase A from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, containing a non-catalytic cellulose-binding domain (CBD), were fused to the N-terminus of the catalytic domain of endoglucanase E (EGE') from Clostridium thermocellum. A further hybrid enzyme was constructed consisting of the 347 N-terminal residues of xylanase C (XYLC) from P. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, which also constitutes a CBD, fused to the N-terminus of endoglucanase A (EGA) from Ruminococcus albus. The three hybrid enzymes bound to insoluble cellulose, and could be eluted such that cellulose-binding capacity and catalytic activity were retained. The catalytic properties of the fusion enzymes were similar to EGE' and EGA respectively. Residues 37-347 and 34-347 of XYLC were fused to the C-terminus of EGE' and the 10 amino acids encoded by the multiple cloning sequence of pMTL22p respectively. The two hybrid proteins did not bind cellulose, although residues 39-139 of XYLC were shown previously to constitute a functional CBD. The putative role of the P. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa CBD in cellulase action is discussed. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1953672

  8. Cloning and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a Trichoderma reesei beta-mannanase gene containing a cellulose binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Stålbrand, H; Saloheimo, A; Vehmaanperä, J; Henrissat, B; Penttilä, M

    1995-01-01

    beta-Mannanase (endo-1,4-beta-mannanase; mannan endo-1,4-beta-mannosidase; EC 3.2.1.78) catalyzes endo-wise hydrolysis of the backbone of mannan and heteromannans, including hemicellulose polysaccharides, which are among the major components of plant cell walls. The gene man1, which encodes beta-mannanase, of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei was isolated from an expression library by using antiserum raised towards the earlier-purified beta-mannanase protein. The deduced beta-mannanase consists of 410 amino acids. On the basis of hydrophobic cluster analysis, the beta-mannanase was assigned to family 5 of glycosyl hydrolases (cellulase family A). The C terminus of the beta-mannanase has strong amino acid sequence similarity to the cellulose binding domains of fungal cellulases and is preceded by a serine-, threonine-, and proline-rich region. Consequently, the beta-mannanase is probably organized similarly to the T. reesei cellulases, having a catalytic core domain separated from the substrate-binding domain by an O-glycosylated linker. Active beta-mannanase was expressed and secreted by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the host. The results indicate that the man1 gene encodes the two beta-mannanases with different isoelectric points (pIs 4.6 and 5.4) purified earlier from T. reesei. PMID:7793911

  9. Characterization of XYN10B, a modular xylanase from the ruminal protozoan Polyplastron multivesiculatum, with a family 22 carbohydrate-binding module that binds to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Devillard, Estelle; Bera-Maillet, Christel; Flint, Harry J; Scott, Karen P; Newbold, C James; Wallace, R John; Jouany, Jean-Pierre; Forano, Evelyne

    2003-01-01

    A new xylanase gene, xyn10B, was isolated from the ruminal protozoan Polyplastron multivesiculatum and the gene product was characterized. XYN10B is the first protozoan family 10 glycoside hydrolase characterized so far and is a modular enzyme comprising a family 22 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) preceding the catalytic domain. The CBM22 was shown to be a true CBM. It showed high affinity for soluble arabinoxylan and is the first example of a CBM22 that binds strongly to celluloses of various crystallinities. The enzymic properties of XYN10B were also analysed. Its optimal temperature and pH for activity were 39 degrees C and 7.0 respectively; these values being close to those of the ruminal ecosystem. The phylogenetic relationships between the XYN10B CBM22 or catalytic domain and related sequences from ruminal and non-ruminal bacteria and eukaryotes are reported. The xyn10B gene is shown to lack introns. PMID:12693992

  10. Contribution of a Xylan-Binding Module to the Degradation of a Complex Cellulosic Substrate by Designer Cellulosomes▿

    PubMed Central

    Moraïs, Sarah; Barak, Yoav; Caspi, Jonathan; Hadar, Yitzhak; Lamed, Raphael; Shoham, Yuval; Wilson, David B.; Bayer, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    Conversion of components of the Thermobifida fusca free-enzyme system to the cellulosomal mode using the designer cellulosome approach can be employed to discover the properties and inherent advantages of the cellulosome system. In this article, we describe the conversion of the T. fusca xylanases Xyn11A and Xyn10B and their synergistic interaction in the free state or within designer cellulosome complexes in order to enhance specific degradation of hatched wheat straw as a model for a complex cellulosic substrate. Endoglucanase Cel5A from the same bacterium and its recombinant dockerin-containing chimera were also studied for their combined effect, together with the xylanases, on straw degradation. Synergism was demonstrated when Xyn11A was combined with Xyn10B and/or Cel5A, and ∼1.5-fold activity enhancements were achieved by the designer cellulosome complexes compared to the free wild-type enzymes. These improvements in activity were due to both substrate-targeting and proximity effects among the enzymes contained in the designer cellulosome complexes. The intrinsic cellulose/xylan-binding module (XBM) of Xyn11A appeared to be essential for efficient substrate degradation. Indeed, only designer cellulosomes in which the XBM was maintained as a component of Xyn11A achieved marked enhancement in activity compared to the combination of wild-type enzymes. Moreover, integration of the XBM in designer cellulosomes via a dockerin module (separate from the Xyn11A catalytic module) failed to enhance activity, suggesting a role in orienting the parent xylanase toward its preferred polysaccharide component of the complex wheat straw substrate. The results provide novel mechanistic insight into the synergistic activity of designer cellulosome components on natural plant cell wall substrates. PMID:20400556

  11. Effect of xylan structure on reactivity in graft copolymerization and subsequent binding to cellulose.

    PubMed

    Littunen, Kuisma; Kilpeläinen, Petri; Junka, Karoliina; Sipponen, Mika; Master, Emma R; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-04-13

    The grafting reactivities with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) of five xylans from hardwood and cereal sources were compared. The structural property that best predicted the reactivities of xylans with GMA was the fraction of 4-O-methylglucuronic acid (MeGlcA) substitution. A comparatively high level of arabinose substitution was also positively correlated to reactivity with GMA. The impact of MeGlcA and arabinose branching groups is likely attributed to the solubilizing effect of these substituents. Consistent with this prediction, low water solubility and high lignin content were found to hinder reactivity. Even though oligomeric substrates have the advantage of water solubility, modified xylo-oligosaccharides were difficult to purify. Accordingly, delignified and high-molecular weight xylans that are soluble or dispersible in water are best suited for this type of backbone derivatization. Adsorption studies with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation indicated that grafting lowered the total adsorption of arabinoxylan but did not significantly affect the fraction of xylans adsorbed irreversibly on cellulose.

  12. Fusing a carbohydrate-binding module into the Aspergillus usamii β-mannanase to improve its thermostability and cellulose-binding capacity by in silico design.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cun-Duo; Li, Jian-Fang; Wei, Xi-Huan; Min, Rou; Gao, Shu-Juan; Wang, Jun-Qing; Yin, Xin; Wu, Min-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The AuMan5A, an acidophilic glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 β-mannanase derived from Aspergillus usamii YL-01-78, consists of an only catalytic domain (CD). To perfect enzymatic properties of the AuMan5A, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) of the Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (TrCBH I), having the lowest binding free energy with cellobiose, was selected by in silico design, and fused into its C-terminus forming a fusion β-mannanase, designated as AuMan5A-CBM. Then, its encoding gene, Auman5A-cbm, was constructed as it was designed theoretically, and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. SDS-PAGE analysis displayed that both recombinant AuMan5A-CBM (reAuMan5A-CBM) and AuMan5A (reAuMan5A) were secreted into the cultured media with apparent molecular masses of 57.3 and 49.8 kDa, respectively. The temperature optimum of the reAuMan5A-CBM was 75°C, being 5°C higher than that of the reAuMan5A. They were stable at temperatures of 68 and 60°C, respectively. Compared with reAuMan5A, the reAuMan5A-CBM showed an obvious decrease in K m and a slight alteration in V max. In addition, the fusion of a CBM of the TrCBH I into the AuMan5A contributed to its cellulose-binding capacity.

  13. A new method for measuring scouring efficiency of natural fibers based on the cellulose-binding domain-beta-glucuronidase fused protein.

    PubMed

    Degani, Ofir; Gepstein, Shimon; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2004-02-01

    Cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) are characterized by their ability to strongly bind to different forms of cellulose. This study examined the use of a recombinant CBD fused to the reporter enzyme beta-glucuronidase (CBD-GUS) to determine the extent of removal of the water-repellent waxy component of cotton fiber cuticles following hydrolytic treatment, i.e., scouring. The CBD-GUS test displayed higher sensitivity and repeatability than conventional water absorb techniques applied in the textile industry. Increases in the levels of CBD-GUS bound to the exposed cellulose correlated to increases in the fabric's hydrophilicity as a function of the severity of the scouring treatment applied, clearly indicating that the amount of bound enzyme increases proportionally with the amount of available binding sites. The binding of CBD-GUS also gave measurable and repeatable results when used on untreated or raw fabrics in comparison with conventional water drop techniques. The quantitative response of the reaction as bound enzyme activity was optimized for fully wettable fabrics. A minimal free enzyme concentration-to-swatch weight ratio of 75:1 was found to be necessary to ensure enzyme saturation (i.e., a linear response), corresponding to a free enzyme-to-bound enzyme ratio of at least 3:5.

  14. Purification, characterization and modular organization of a cellulose-binding protein, CBP105, a processive beta-1,4-endoglucanase from Cellulomonas flavigena.

    PubMed

    Mejia-Castillo, Teresa; Hidalgo-Lara, Maria Eugenia; Brieba, Luis G; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime

    2008-04-01

    A cellulose-binding protein of 105 kDa (CBP105) from Cellulomonas flavigena was purified and its gene was cloned. CBP105 is a processive endoglucanase with maximum activity on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) at pH 7.5 and 60 degrees C. Limited proteolysis suggested that CBP105 is composed of one catalytic domain (CD) and two carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM). The nucleotide sequence of the cbp105 gene (AY729806) indicates that CBP105 is a modular enzyme with a family 9 glycoside hydrolase CD linked to a family 3 CBM, two fibronectin III-like domains and a family 2 CBM. This structural organization may be responsible for CBP105 processive CMC degradation.

  15. Cellulose binding protein from the parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii interacts with Arabidopsis pectin methylesterase: cooperative cell wall modification during parasitism.

    PubMed

    Hewezi, Tarek; Howe, Peter; Maier, Tom R; Hussey, Richard S; Mitchum, Melissa Goellner; Davis, Eric L; Baum, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete a complex of cell wall-digesting enzymes, which aid in root penetration and migration. The soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines also produces a cellulose binding protein (Hg CBP) secretory protein. To determine the function of CBP, an orthologous cDNA clone (Hs CBP) was isolated from the sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii, which is able to infect Arabidopsis thaliana. CBP is expressed only in the early phases of feeding cell formation and not during the migratory phase. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Hs CBP developed longer roots and exhibited enhanced susceptibility to H. schachtii. A yeast two-hybrid screen identified Arabidopsis pectin methylesterase protein 3 (PME3) as strongly and specifically interacting with Hs CBP. Transgenic plants overexpressing PME3 also produced longer roots and exhibited increased susceptibility to H. schachtii, while a pme3 knockout mutant showed opposite phenotypes. Moreover, CBP overexpression increases PME3 activity in planta. Localization studies support the mode of action of PME3 as a cell wall-modifying enzyme. Expression of CBP in the pme3 knockout mutant revealed that PME3 is required but not the sole mechanism for CBP overexpression phenotype. These data indicate that CBP directly interacts with PME3 thereby activating and potentially targeting this enzyme to aid cyst nematode parasitism.

  16. Nanocrystalline Cellulose Improves the Biocompatibility and Reduces the Wear Debris of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene via Weak Binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwen; Feng, Qiang; Sun, Jiashu; Gao, Feng; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Xiaohong; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-26

    The doping of biocompatible nanomaterials into ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) to improve the biocompatibility and reduce the wear debris is of great significance to prolonging implantation time of UHMWPE as the bearing material for artificial joints. This study shows that UHMWPE can form a composite with nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC, a hydrophilic nanosized material with a high aspect ratio) by ball-milling and hot-pressing. Compared to pure UHMWPE, the NCC/UHMWPE composite exhibits improved tribological characteristics with reduced generation of wear debris. The underlying mechanism is related to the weak binding between hydrophilic NCC and hydrophobic UHMWPE. The hydrophilic, rigid NCC particles tend to detach from the UHMWPE surface during friction, which could move with the rubbing surface, serve as a thin lubricant layer, and protect the UHMWPE substrate from abrasion. The biological safety of the NCC/UHMWPE composite, as tested by MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and macrophage RAW264.7 cells, is high, with significantly lower inflammatory responses/cytotoxicity than pure UHMWPE. The NCC/UHMWPE composite therefore could be a promising alternative to the current UHMWPE for bearing applications.

  17. Liver specific transcription factors of the HNF3-, C/EBP- and LFB1-families interact with the A-activator binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, T; Klein-Hitpass, L; Ryffel, G U

    1991-01-01

    The A-activator binding site (AABS), present in the Xenopus A2 vitellogenin gene and several mammalian liver specifically expressed genes, interacts with different liver specific transcription factors including LFB1- and C/EBP-isobinders. We have now isolated some additional proteins interacting with AABS and show that they are HNF3-isobinders. The interactions between AABS and members of the HNF3 family are confirmed by binding studies using bacterially made HNF3-alpha protein. Thus a short DNA module of 24 bp is able to bind proteins of three different families of liver specific transcription factors. Competition experiments in the cell free in vitro transcription show that AABS dependent transcriptional activation is mediated by transcription factors belonging to at least two different families, the C/EBP- and the HNF3-isobinders. Being able to mediate the action of several distinct transactivators, AABS may thus be a prototype for a novel kind of tissue specific promoter modules with unique regulatory capacities. Images PMID:1754374

  18. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  19. Shutoff of RNA polymerase II transcription by poliovirus involves 3C protease-mediated cleavage of the TATA-binding protein at an alternative site: incomplete shutoff of transcription interferes with efficient viral replication.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Pallob; Raychaudhuri, Santanu; Tsai, Weimin; Dasgupta, Asim

    2005-08-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) plays a crucial role in cellular transcription catalyzed by all three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Previous studies have shown that TBP is targeted by the poliovirus (PV)-encoded protease 3C(pro) to bring about shutoff of cellular RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription in PV-infected cells. The processing of the majority of viral precursor proteins by 3C(pro) involves cleavages at glutamine-glycine (Q-G) sites. We present evidence that suggests that the transcriptional inactivation of TBP by 3C(pro) involves cleavage at the glutamine 104-serine 105 (Q104-S105) site of TBP and not at the Q18-G19 site as previously thought. The TBP Q104-S105 cleavage by 3C(pro) is greatly influenced by the presence of an aliphatic amino acid at the P4 position, a hallmark of 3C(pro)-mediated proteolysis. To examine the importance of host cell transcription shutoff in the PV life cycle, stable HeLa cell lines were created that express recombinant TBP resistant to cleavage by the viral proteases, called GG rTBP. Transcription shutoff was significantly impaired and delayed in GG rTBP cells upon infection with poliovirus compared with the cells that express wild-type recombinant TBP (wt rTBP). Infection of GG rTBP cells with poliovirus resulted in small plaques, significantly reduced viral RNA synthesis, and lower viral yields compared to the wt rTBP cell line. These results suggest that a defect in transcription shutoff can lead to inefficient replication of poliovirus in cultured cells.

  20. Characterization of a Cellulase Containing a Family 30 Carbohydrate-Binding Module (CBM) Derived from Clostridium thermocellum CelJ: Importance of the CBM to Cellulose Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Takamitsu; Araki, Rie; Tanaka, Akiyoshi; Karita, Shuichi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Sakka, Kazuo; Ohmiya, Kunio

    2003-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum CelJ is a modular enzyme containing a family 30 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and a family 9 catalytic module at its N-terminal moiety. To investigate the functions of the CBM and the catalytic module, truncated derivatives of CelJ were constructed and characterized. Isothermal titration calorimetric studies showed that the association constants (Ka) of the CBM polypeptide (CBM30) for the binding of cellopentaose and cellohexaose were 1.2 × 104 and 6.4 × 104 M−1, respectively, and that the binding of CBM30 to these ligands is enthalpically driven. Qualitative analyses showed that CBM30 had strong affinity for cellulose and β-1,3-1,4-mixed glucan such as barley β-glucan and lichenan. Analyses of the hydrolytic action of the enzyme comprising the CBM and the catalytic module showed that the enzyme is a processive endoglucanse with strong activity towards carboxymethylcellulose, barley β-glucan and lichenan. By contrast, the catalytic module polypeptide devoid of the CBM showed negligible activity toward these substrates. These observations suggest that the CBM is extremely important not only because it mediates the binding of the enzyme to the substrates but also because it participates in the catalytic function of the enzyme or contributes to maintaining the correct tertiary structure of the family 9 catalytic module for expressing enzyme activity. PMID:12511497

  1. X-ray structure and molecular dynamics simulations of endoglucanase 3 from Trichoderma harzianum: structural organization and substrate recognition by endoglucanases that lack cellulose binding module.

    PubMed

    Prates, Érica T; Stankovic, Ivana; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Liberato, Marcelo V; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Pereira, Nei; Polikarpov, Igor; Skaf, Munir S

    2013-01-01

    Plant biomass holds a promise for the production of second-generation ethanol via enzymatic hydrolysis, but its utilization as a biofuel resource is currently limited to a large extent by the cost and low efficiency of the cellulolytic enzymes. Considerable efforts have been dedicated to elucidate the mechanisms of the enzymatic process. It is well known that most cellulases possess a catalytic core domain and a carbohydrate binding module (CBM), without which the enzymatic activity can be drastically reduced. However, Cel12A members of the glycosyl hydrolases family 12 (GHF12) do not bear a CBM and yet are able to hydrolyze amorphous cellulose quite efficiently. Here, we use X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the molecular basis underlying the catalytic capability of endoglucanase 3 from Trichoderma harzianum (ThEG3), a member of the GHF12 enzymes that lacks a CBM. A comparative analysis with the Cellulomonas fimi CBM identifies important residues mediating interactions of EG3s with amorphous regions of the cellulose. For instance, three aromatic residues constitute a harboring wall of hydrophobic contacts with the substrate in both ThEG3 and CfCBM structures. Moreover, residues at the entrance of the active site cleft of ThEG3 are identified, which might hydrogen bond to the substrate. We advocate that the ThEG3 residues Asn152 and Glu201 interact with the substrate similarly to the corresponding CfCBM residues Asn81 and Arg75. Altogether, these results show that CBM motifs are incorporated within the ThEG3 catalytic domain and suggest that the enzymatic efficiency is associated with the length and position of the substrate chain, being higher when the substrate interact with the aromatic residues at the entrance of the cleft and the catalytic triad. Our results provide guidelines for rational protein engineering aiming to improve interactions of GHF12 enzymes with cellulosic substrates.

  2. Properties of lignin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses isolated from olive cake and olive stones: binding of water, oil, bile acids, and glucose.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rubio-Senent, Fátima; Lama-Muñoz, Antonio; García, Aránzazu; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan

    2014-09-10

    A process based on a steam explosion pretreatment and alkali solution post-treatment was applied to fractionate olive stones (whole and fragmented, without seeds) and olive cake into their main constitutive polymers of cellulose (C), hemicelluloses (H), and lignin (L) under optimal conditions for each fraction according to earlier works. The chemical characterization (chromatographic method and UV and IR spectroscopy) and the functional properties (water- and oil-holding capacities, bile acid binding, and glucose retardation index) of each fraction were analyzed. The in vitro studies showed a substantial bile acid binding activity in the fraction containing lignin from olive stones (L) and the alkaline extractable fraction from olive cake (Lp). Lignin bound significantly more bile acid than any other fraction and an amount similar to that bound by cholestyramine (a cholesterol-lowering, bile acid-binding drug), especially when cholic acid (CA) was tested. These results highlight the health-promoting potential of lignin from olive stones and olive cake extracted from olive byproducts.

  3. celA from Bacillus lautus PL236 encodes a novel cellulose-binding endo-beta-1,4-glucanase.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, C K; Diderichsen, B; Jørgensen, P L

    1992-01-01

    celA from the cellulolytic bacterium Bacillus lautus PL236 encodes EG-A, an endo-beta-1,4-glucanase. An open reading frame of 2,100 bp preceded by a ribosome-binding site encodes a protein with a molecular mass of 76,863 Da with a typical signal sequence. The NH2-terminal active domain of EG-A is not homologous to any reported cellulase or xylanase and may represent a new family of such enzymes. A 150-amino-acid COOH-terminal peptide is homologous to noncatalytic domains in several other cellulases (A. Meinke, N.R. Gilkes, D.G. Kilburn, R.C. Miller, Jr., and R.A.J. Warren, J. Bacteriol. 173:7126-7135, 1991). Upstream of celA, a partial open reading frame encodes a 145-amino-acid peptide which also belongs to the family mentioned. Zymogram analysis of extracts from Escherichia coli and supernatants of Bacillus subtilis and B. megaterium, including protease-deficient mutants thereof, which express celA, revealed two active proteins, EG-A-L and EG-A-S, with Mrs of 74,000 and 57,000, respectively. The proportion of EG-A-L to EG-A-S depends on the extracellular proteolytic activity of the host organism, indicating that EG-A-S arises from posttranslational proteolytic modification of EG-A-L. Since EG-A-S has an NH2 terminus corresponding to the predicted NH2-terminal sequence of EG-A, processing appears to take place between the catalytic and noncatalytic domains described. EG-A-L and EG-A-S were purified to homogeneity and shown to have almost identical characteristics with respect to activity against soluble substrates and pH and temperature dependency. EG-A-L binds strongly to cellulose, in contrast to EG-A-S, and has higher activity against insoluble substrates than the latter. We conclude that the COOH-terminal 17,000-Mr peptide of EG-A-L constitutes a cellulose-binding domain. Images PMID:1592807

  4. INTEGRATED POLARIZATION PROPERTIES OF 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, AND 3C286

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the integrated polarization properties of the four compact radio sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, and 3C286, from 1 to 50 GHz, over a 30 yr time frame spanning 1982-2012. Using the polarized emission of Mars, we have determined that the position angle of the linearly polarized emission of 3C286 rises from 33 Degree-Sign at 8 GHz to 36 Degree-Sign at 45 GHz. There is no evidence for a change in the position angle over time. Using these values, the position angles of the integrated polarized emission from the other three sources are determined as a function of frequency and time. The fractional polarization of 3C286 is found to be slowly rising, at all frequencies, at a rate of {approx}0.015% yr{sup -1}. The fractional polarizations of 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 are all slowly variable, with the variations correlated with changes in the total flux densities of these sources.

  5. A cellulose-binding domain-fused recombinant human T cell connective tissue-activating peptide-III manifests heparanase activity.

    PubMed

    Rechter, M; Lider, O; Cahalon, L; Baharav, E; Dekel, M; Seigel, D; Vlodavsky, I; Aingorn, H; Cohen, I R; Shoseyov, O

    1999-02-24

    The chemokine connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP)-III, which belongs to the leukocyte-derived growth factor family of mediators, was previously shown to be mitogenic for fibroblasts. However, it has recently been shown that CTAP-III, released from platelets, can act like a heparanase enzyme and degrade heparan sulfate. This suggests that CTAP-III may also function as a proinflammatory mediator. We have successfully cloned CTAP-III from a lambdagt11 cDNA library of PHA-activated human CD4(+) T cells and produced recombinant CTAP-III as a fusion protein with a cellulose-binding domain moiety. This recombinant CTAP-III exhibited heparanase activity and released degradation products from metabolically labeled, naturally produced extracellular matrix. We have also developed polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and these antibodies against the recombinant CTAP-III detected the CTAP-III molecule in human T cells, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and placental extracts. Thus, our study provides tools to examine further immune cell behavior in inflamed sites rich with extracellular moieties and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:10049766

  6. CelI, a Noncellulosomal Family 9 Enzyme from Clostridium thermocellum, Is a Processive Endoglucanase That Degrades Crystalline Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Rachel; Rabinovich, Larisa; Yaron, Sima; Bayer, Edward A.; Lamed, Raphael; Gilbert, Harry J.; Shoham, Yuval

    2003-01-01

    The family 9 cellulase gene celI of Clostridium thermocellum, was previously cloned, expressed, and characterized (G. P. Hazlewood, K. Davidson, J. I. Laurie, N. S. Huskisson, and H. J. Gilbert, J. Gen. Microbiol. 139:307-316, 1993). We have recloned and sequenced the entire celI gene and found that the published sequence contained a 53-bp deletion that generated a frameshift mutation, resulting in a truncated and modified C-terminal segment of the protein. The enzymatic properties of the wild-type protein were characterized and found to conform to those of other family 9 glycoside hydrolases with a so-called theme B architecture, where the catalytic module is fused to a family 3c carbohydrate-binding module (CBM3c); CelI also contains a C-terminal CBM3b. The intact recombinant CelI exhibited high levels of activity on all cellulosic substrates tested, with pH and temperature optima of 5.5 and 70°C, respectively, using carboxymethylcellulose as a substrate. Native CelI was capable of solubilizing filter paper, and the distribution of reducing sugar between the soluble and insoluble fractions suggests that the enzyme acts as a processive cellulase. A truncated form of the enzyme, lacking the C terminal CBM3b, failed to bind to crystalline cellulose and displayed reduced activity toward insoluble substrates. A truncated form of the enzyme, in which both the cellulose-binding CBM3b and the fused CBM3c were removed, failed to exhibit significant levels of activity on any of the substrates examined. This study underscores the general nature of this type of enzymatic theme, whereby the fused CBM3c plays a critical accessory role for the family 9 catalytic domain and changes its character to facilitate processive cleavage of recalcitrant cellulose substrates. PMID:12511483

  7. Human eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) protein binds to eIF3c, -d, and -e to promote mRNA recruitment to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nancy; Do, Angelie; Hershey, John W B; Fraser, Christopher S

    2013-11-15

    Recruitment of mRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit requires the coordinated interaction of a large number of translation initiation factors. In mammals, the direct interaction between eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and eIF3 is thought to act as the molecular bridge between the mRNA cap-binding complex and the 40S subunit. A discrete ∼90 amino acid domain in eIF4G is responsible for binding to eIF3, but the identity of the eIF3 subunit(s) involved is less clear. The eIF3e subunit has been shown to directly bind eIF4G, but the potential role of other eIF3 subunits in stabilizing this interaction has not been investigated. It is also not clear if the eIF4A helicase plays a role in stabilizing the interaction between eIF4G and eIF3. Here, we have used a fluorescence anisotropy assay to demonstrate that eIF4G binds to eIF3 independently of eIF4A binding to the middle region of eIF4G. By using a site-specific cross-linking approach, we unexpectedly show that the eIF4G-binding surface in eIF3 is comprised of the -c, -d and -e subunits. Screening multiple cross-linker positions reveals that eIF4G contains two distinct eIF3-binding subdomains within the previously identified eIF3-binding domain. Finally, by employing an eIF4G-dependent translation assay, we establish that both of these subdomains are required for efficient mRNA recruitment to the ribosome and stimulate translation. Our study reveals unexpected complexity to the eIF3-eIF4G interaction that provides new insight into the regulation of mRNA recruitment to the human ribosome.

  8. Cellobiohydrolase Hydrolyzes Crystalline Cellulose on Hydrophobic Faces*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-San; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Haas, Thomas; Ding, Shi-You

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradation of plant biomass is a slow process in nature, and hydrolysis of cellulose is also widely considered to be a rate-limiting step in the proposed industrial process of converting lignocellulosic materials to biofuels. It is generally known that a team of enzymes including endo- and exocellulases as well as cellobiases are required to act synergistically to hydrolyze cellulose to glucose. The detailed molecular mechanisms of these enzymes have yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to image in real-time the structural changes in Valonia cellulose crystals acted upon by the exocellulase cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) from Trichoderma reesei. Under AFM, single enzyme molecules could be observed binding only to one face of the cellulose crystal, apparently the hydrophobic face. The surface roughness of cellulose began increasing after adding CBH I, and the overall size of cellulose crystals decreased during an 11-h period. Interestingly, this size reduction apparently occurred only in the width of the crystal, whereas the height remained relatively constant. In addition, the measured cross-section shape of cellulose crystal changed from asymmetric to nearly symmetric. These observed changes brought about by CBH I action may constitute the first direct visualization supporting the idea that the exocellulase selectively hydrolyzes the hydrophobic faces of cellulose. The limited accessibility of the hydrophobic faces in native cellulose may contribute significantly to the rate-limiting slowness of cellulose hydrolysis. PMID:21282110

  9. Cellulose biosynthesis in Acetobacter xylinum

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    Time-lapse video microscopy has shown periodic reversals during the synthesis of cellulose. In the presence of Congo Red, Acetobacter produces a band of fine fibrils. The direction of cell movement is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of cell, and the rate of movement was decreased. A linear row of particles, presumably the cellulose synthesizing complexes, was found on the outer membrane by freeze-fracture technique. During the cell cycle, the increase of particles in linear row, the differentiation to four linear rows and the separation of the linear rows have been observed. A digitonin-solubilized cellulose synthase was prepared from A. xylinum, and incubated under conditions known to lead to active in vitro synthesis of 1,4-{beta}-D-glucan polymer. Electron microscopy revealed that clusters of fibrils were assembled within minutes. Individual fibrils are 17 {plus minus} 2 angstroms in diameter. Evidence for the cellulosic composition of newly synthesized fibrils was based on incorporation of tritium from UDP-({sup 3}H) glucose binding of gold-labeled cellobiohydrolase, and an electron diffraction pattern identified as cellulose II polymorph instead of cellulose I.

  10. Cellulose Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Fire retardant cellulose insulation is produced by shredding old newspapers and treating them with a combination of chemicals. Insulating material is blown into walls and attics to form a fiber layer which blocks the flow of air. All-Weather Insulation's founders asked NASA/UK-TAP to help. They wanted to know what chemicals added to newspaper would produce an insulating material capable of meeting federal specifications. TAP researched the query and furnished extensive information. The information contributed to successful development of the product and helped launch a small business enterprise which is now growing rapidly.

  11. Cellulose degradation by polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Beeson, William T; Vu, Van V; Span, Elise A; Phillips, Christopher M; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs), also known as lytic PMOs (LPMOs), enhance the depolymerization of recalcitrant polysaccharides by hydrolytic enzymes and are found in the majority of cellulolytic fungi and actinomycete bacteria. For more than a decade, PMOs were incorrectly annotated as family 61 glycoside hydrolases (GH61s) or family 33 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM33s). PMOs have an unusual surface-exposed active site with a tightly bound Cu(II) ion that catalyzes the regioselective hydroxylation of crystalline cellulose, leading to glycosidic bond cleavage. The genomes of some cellulolytic fungi contain more than 20 genes encoding cellulose-active PMOs, suggesting a diversity of biological activities. PMOs show great promise in reducing the cost of conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars; however, many questions remain about their reaction mechanism and biological function. This review addresses, in depth, the structural and mechanistic aspects of oxidative depolymerization of cellulose by PMOs and considers their biological function and phylogenetic diversity.

  12. Cellulose degradation by polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Beeson, William T; Vu, Van V; Span, Elise A; Phillips, Christopher M; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs), also known as lytic PMOs (LPMOs), enhance the depolymerization of recalcitrant polysaccharides by hydrolytic enzymes and are found in the majority of cellulolytic fungi and actinomycete bacteria. For more than a decade, PMOs were incorrectly annotated as family 61 glycoside hydrolases (GH61s) or family 33 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM33s). PMOs have an unusual surface-exposed active site with a tightly bound Cu(II) ion that catalyzes the regioselective hydroxylation of crystalline cellulose, leading to glycosidic bond cleavage. The genomes of some cellulolytic fungi contain more than 20 genes encoding cellulose-active PMOs, suggesting a diversity of biological activities. PMOs show great promise in reducing the cost of conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars; however, many questions remain about their reaction mechanism and biological function. This review addresses, in depth, the structural and mechanistic aspects of oxidative depolymerization of cellulose by PMOs and considers their biological function and phylogenetic diversity. PMID:25784051

  13. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  14. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  15. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  16. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  17. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  18. Molecular and Biochemical Analyses of CbCel9A/Cel48A, a Highly Secreted Multi-Modular Cellulase by Caldicellulosiruptor bescii during Growth on Crystalline Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhuolin; Su, Xiaoyun; Revindran, Vanessa; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    During growth on crystalline cellulose, the thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii secretes several cellulose-degrading enzymes. Among these enzymes is CelA (CbCel9A/Cel48A), which is reported as the most highly secreted cellulolytic enzyme in this bacterium. CbCel9A/Cel48A is a large multi-modular polypeptide, composed of an N-terminal catalytic glycoside hydrolase family 9 (GH9) module and a C-terminal GH48 catalytic module that are separated by a family 3c carbohydrate-binding module (CBM3c) and two identical CBM3bs. The wild-type CbCel9A/Cel48A and its truncational mutants were expressed in Bacillus megaterium and Escherichia coli, respectively. The wild-type polypeptide released twice the amount of glucose equivalents from Avicel than its truncational mutant that lacks the GH48 catalytic module. The truncational mutant harboring the GH9 module and the CBM3c was more thermostable than the wild-type protein, likely due to its compact structure. The main hydrolytic activity was present in the GH9 catalytic module, while the truncational mutant containing the GH48 module and the three CBMs was ineffective in degradation of either crystalline or amorphous cellulose. Interestingly, the GH9 and/or GH48 catalytic modules containing the CBM3bs form low-density particles during hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. Moreover, TM3 (GH9/CBM3c) and TM2 (GH48 with three CBM3 modules) synergistically hydrolyze crystalline cellulose. Deletion of the CBM3bs or mutations that compromised their binding activity suggested that these CBMs are important during hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. In agreement with this observation, seven of nine genes in a C. bescii gene cluster predicted to encode cellulose-degrading enzymes harbor CBM3bs. Based on our results, we hypothesize that C. bescii uses the GH48 module and the CBM3bs in CbCel9A/Cel48A to destabilize certain regions of crystalline cellulose for attack by the highly active GH9 module and other endoglucanases

  19. The high energy source 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonmontigny, Corinna

    1990-01-01

    The properties of 3C 273 are reviewed and an attempt is made to find an answer to the question why 3C 273 is the only extragalactic source so far, which was detected at energies greater than or equal to 50 MeV.

  20. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dimarogona, Maria; Topakas, Evangelos; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs), cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs) and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33). PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future. PMID:24688656

  1. Bacterial cellulose-kaolin nanocomposites for application as biomedical wound healing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanna, Dwi; Alam, Catharina; Toivola, Diana M.; Alam, Parvez

    2013-12-01

    This short communication provides preliminary experimental details on the structure-property relationships of novel biomedical kaolin-bacterial cellulose nanocomposites. Bacterial cellulose is an effective binding agent for kaolin particles forming reticulated structures at kaolin-cellulose interfaces and entanglements when the cellulose fraction is sufficiently high. The mechanical performance of these materials hence improves with an increased fraction of bacterial cellulose, though this also causes the rate of blood clotting to decrease. These composites have combined potential as both short-term (kaolin) and long-term (bacterial cellulose) wound healing materials.

  2. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  3. Adsorption mechanism for xanthene dyes to cellulose granules.

    PubMed

    Tabara, Aya; Yamane, Chihiro; Seguchi, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    The xanthene dyes, erythrosine, phloxine, and rose bengal, were adsorbed to charred cellulose granules. The charred cellulose granules were preliminarily steeped in ionic (NaOH, NaCl, KOH, KCl, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)), nonionic (glucose, sucrose, and ethanol), and amphipathic sucrose fatty acid ester (SFAE) solutions, and adsorption tests on the dye to the steeped and charred cellulose granules were conducted. Almost none of the dye was adsorbed when the solutions of ionic and amphipathic molecules were used, but were adsorbed in the case of steeping in the nonionic molecule solutions. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and the Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) profiles of SFAE which was adsorbed to the charred cellulose granules and extracted by ethyl ether suggested the presence of hydrophobic sites on the surface of the charred cellulose granules. We confirmed that the xanthene dyes could bind to the charred cellulose granules by ionic and hydrophobic bonds.

  4. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  5. A Two-Dimensional Zirconium Carbide by Selective Etching of Al3C3 from Nanolaminated Zr3Al3C5.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zha, Xianhu; Chen, Fan Y; Ye, Qun; Eklund, Per; Du, Shiyu; Huang, Qing

    2016-04-11

    The room-temperature synthesis of a new two-dimensional (2D) zirconium-containing carbide, Zr3C2T(z) MXene is presented. In contrast to traditional preparation of MXene, the layered ternary Zr3Al3C5 material instead of MAX phases is used as source under hydrofluoric acid treatment. The structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of the synthesized 2D carbide are investigated, combined with first-principles density functional calculations. A comparative study on the structrual stability of our obtained 2D Zr3C2T(z) and Ti3C2T(z) MXenes at elevated temperatures is performed. The obtained 2D Zr3C2T(z) exhibits relatively better ability to maintain 2D nature and strucural integrity compared to Ti-based Mxene. The difference in structural stability under high temperature condition is explained by a theoretical investigation on binding energy.

  6. Adherence of Clostridium thermocellum to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, E A; Kenig, R; Lamed, R

    1983-01-01

    The adherence of Clostridium thermocellum, a cellulolytic, thermophilic anaerobe, to its insoluble substrate (cellulose) was studied. The adherence phenomenon was determined to be selective for cellulose. The observed adherence was not significantly affected by various parameters, including salts, pH, temperature, detergents, or soluble sugars. A spontaneous adherence-defective mutant strain (AD2) was isolated from the wild-type strain YS. Antibodies were prepared against the bacterial cell surface and rendered specific to the cellulose-binding factor (CBF) by adsorption to mutant AD2 cells. By using these CBF-specific antibodies, crossed immunoelectrophoresis of cell extracts revealed a single discrete precipitation peak in the parent strain which was absent in the mutant. This difference was accompanied by an alteration in the polypeptide profile whereby sonicates of strain YS contained a 210,000-molecular-weight band which was missing in strain AD2. The CBF antigen could be removed from cell extracts by adsorption to cellulose. A combined gel-overlay--immunoelectrophoretic technique demonstrated that the cellulose-binding properties of the CBF were accompanied by carboxymethylcellulase activity. During the exponential phase of growth, a large part of the CBF antigen and related carboxymethylcellulase activity was associated with the cells of wild-type strain YS. However, the amounts decreased in stationary-phase cells. Cellobiose-grown mutant AD2 cells lacked the cell-associated CBF, but the latter was detected in the extracellular fluid. Increased levels of CBF were observed when cells were grown on cellulose. In addition, mutant AD2 regained cell-associated CBF together with the property of cellulose adherence. The presence of the CBF antigen and related adherence characteristics appeared to be a phenomenon common to other naturally occurring strains of this species. Images PMID:6630152

  7. NATO-3C/Delta launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NATO-3C, the third in a series of NATO defense-related communication satellites, is scheduled to be launched on a delta vehicle from the Eastern Test Range no earlier than November 15, 1978. NATO-3A and -3B were successfully launched by Delta vehicles in April 1976 and January 1977, respectively. The NATO-3C spacecraft will be capable of transmitting voice, data, facsimile, and telex messages among military ground stations. The launch vehicle for the NATO-3C mission will be the Delta 2914 configuration. The launch vehicle is to place the spacecraft in a synchronous transfer orbit. The spacecraft Apogee Kick motor is to be fired at fifth transfer orbit apogee to circularize its orbit at geosynchronous altitude of 35,900 km(22,260 miles) above the equator over the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between 45 and 50 degrees W longitude.

  8. Two pectin lyase genes, pnl-1 and pnl-2, from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. malvae differ in a cellulose-binding domain and in their expression during infection of Malva pusilla.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yangdou; Shih, Jenny; Li, Jieran; Goodwin, Paul H

    2002-07-01

    Two pectin lyase genes, designated pnl-1 and pnl-2, were cloned from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. malvae, a pathogen of round-leaved mallow (Malva pusilla). pnl-1 was isolated using cDNA from infected plant material; pnl-2 was isolated using cDNA from 3-day-old mycelia grown in mallow-cell-wall extract (MCWE) broth. pnl-1 is the first pectinase gene described thus far to encode a cellulose-binding domain (CBD), which is common in cellulases and xylanases, whereas pnl-2 encodes a pectin lyase that lacks a CBD. In pure culture, pnl-1 expression could be detected when purified pectin or glucose was the sole carbon source, but not when MCWE was the sole carbon source. The lack of pnl-1 expression appeared to be due to gene repression by some unknown factor(s) in the cell-wall extract. In contrast, expression of pnl-2 was detected in cultures when MCWE, but not when purified pectin or glucose, was the sole carbon source. In infected tissue, detection of pnl-1 expression by Northern-blot hybridization and by RT-PCR began with the onset of the necrotrophic phase of infection. Expression ofpnl-2 was not detectable by Northern-blot hybridization, but was observed byRT-PCR in both the biotrophic and necrotrophic phases of infection. The differences between pnl-1 and pnl-2 (i.e. pnl-1 encoding a CBD and differences in the expression patterns of both genes) may be related to the requirements of C. gloeosporioides f. sp. malvae to be able to grow in host tissue under the different conditions present during the biotrophic and necrotrophic phases of infection.

  9. The N-Terminal GH10 Domain of a Multimodular Protein from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii Is a Versatile Xylanase/β-Glucanase That Can Degrade Crystalline Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xianli; Wang, Rong; Tu, Tao; Shi, Pengjun; Ma, Rui; Luo, Huiying

    2015-01-01

    The genome of the thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii encodes three multimodular enzymes with identical C-terminal domain organizations containing two consecutive CBM3b modules and one glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 48 (GH48) catalytic module. However, the three proteins differ much in their N termini. Among these proteins, CelA (or C. bescii Cel9A [CbCel9A]/Cel48A) with a GH9/CBM3c binary partner in the N terminus has been shown to use a novel strategy to degrade crystalline cellulose, which leads to its outstanding cellulose-cleaving activity. Here we show that C. bescii Xyn10C (CbXyn10C), the N-terminal GH10 domain from CbXyn10C/Cel48B, can also degrade crystalline cellulose, in addition to heterogeneous xylans and barley β-glucan. The data from substrate competition assays, mutational studies, molecular modeling, and docking point analyses point to the existence of only one catalytic center in the bifunctional xylanase/β-glucanase. The specific activities of the recombinant CbXyn10C on Avicel and filter paper were comparable to those of GH9/CBM3c of the robust CelA expressed in Escherichia coli. Appending one or two cellulose-binding CBM3bs enhanced the activities of CbXyn10C in degrading crystalline celluloses, which were again comparable to those of the GH9/CBM3c-CBM3b-CBM3b truncation mutant of CelA. Since CbXyn10C/Cel48B and CelA have similar domain organizations and high sequence homology, the endocellulase activity observed in CbXyn10C leads us to speculate that CbXyn10C/Cel48B may use the same strategy that CelA uses to hydrolyze crystalline cellulose, thus helping the excellent crystalline cellulose degrader C. bescii acquire energy from the environment. In addition, we also demonstrate that CbXyn10C may be an interesting candidate enzyme for biotechnology due to its versatility in hydrolyzing multiple substrates with different glycosidic linkages. PMID:25819971

  10. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatogrpahic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressin...

  11. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C regulated genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Mar, Jessica C; Maruo, Seiji; Lee, Sungwook; Gewurz, Benjamin E; Johannsen, Eric; Holton, Kristina; Rubio, Renee; Takada, Kenzo; Quackenbush, John; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is an essential transcription factor for EBV transformed lymphoblast cell line (LCL) growth. To identify EBNA3C-regulated genes in LCLs, microarrays were used to measure RNA abundances in each of three different LCLs that conditionally express EBNA3C fused to a 4-OH-Tamoxifen-dependent estrogen receptor hormone binding domain (EBNA3CHT). At least three RNAs were assayed for each EBNA3CHT LCL under nonpermissive conditions, permissive conditions, and nonpermissive conditions with wild-type EBNA3C transcomplementation. Using a two-way ANOVA model of EBNA3C levels, we identified 550 regulated genes that were at least 1.5-fold up- or down-regulated with false discovery rates < 0.01. EBNA3C-regulated genes overlapped significantly with genes regulated by EBNA2 and EBNA3A consistent with coordinated effects on cell gene transcription. Of the 550 EBNA3C-regulated genes, 106 could be placed in protein networks. A seeded Bayesian network analysis of the 80 most significant EBNA3C-regulated genes suggests that RAC1, LYN, and TNF are upstream of other EBNA3C-regulated genes. Gene set enrichment analysis found enrichment for MAP kinase signaling, cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, JAK-STAT signaling, and cell adhesion molecules, implicating these pathways in EBNA3C effects on LCL growth or survival. EBNA3C significantly up-regulated the CXCL12 ligand and its CXCR4 receptor and increased LCL migration. CXCL12 up-regulation depended on EBNA3C's interaction with the cell transcription factor, RBPJ, which is essential for LCL growth. EBNA3C also up-regulated MYC 1.3-fold and down-regulated CDKN2A exons 2 and 3, shared by p16 and p14, 1.4-fold, with false discovery rates < 5 × 10(-4).

  12. Alexa fluor-labeled fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals for bioimaging solid cellulose in spatially structured microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Grate, Jay W; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G; Kelly, Ryan T; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J; Brockman, Fred J; Wilkins, Michael J

    2015-03-18

    Methods to covalently conjugate Alexa Fluor dyes to cellulose nanocrystals, at limiting amounts that retain the overall structure of the nanocrystals as model cellulose materials, were developed using two approaches. In the first, aldehyde groups are created on the cellulose surfaces by reaction with limiting amounts of sodium periodate, a reaction well-known for oxidizing vicinal diols to create dialdehyde structures. Reductive amination reactions were then applied to bind Alexa Fluor dyes with terminal amino-groups on the linker section. In the absence of the reductive step, dye washes out of the nanocrystal suspension, whereas with the reductive step, a colored product is obtained with the characteristic spectral bands of the conjugated dye. In the second approach, Alexa Fluor dyes were modified to contain chloro-substituted triazine ring at the end of the linker section. These modified dyes then were reacted with cellulose nanocrystals in acetonitrile at elevated temperature, again isolating material with the characteristic spectral bands of the Alexa Fluor dye. Reactions with Alexa Fluor 546 are given as detailed examples, labeling on the order of 1% of the total glucopyranose rings of the cellulose nanocrystals at dye loadings of ca. 5 μg/mg cellulose. Fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals were deposited in pore network microfluidic structures (PDMS) and proof-of-principle bioimaging experiments showed that the spatial localization of the solid cellulose deposits could be determined, and their disappearance under the action of Celluclast enzymes or microbes could be observed over time. In addition, single molecule fluorescence microscopy was demonstrated as a method to follow the disappearance of solid cellulose deposits over time, following the decrease in the number of single blinking dye molecules with time instead of fluorescent intensity.

  13. Parameter and Process Significance in Mechanistic Modeling of Cellulose Hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, B.; Barry, A.; Gerhard, J.; Small, J.; Tahar, B.

    2005-12-01

    The rate of cellulose hydrolysis, and of associated microbial processes, is important in determining the stability of landfills and their potential impact on the environment, as well as associated time scales. To permit further exploration in this field, a process-based model of cellulose hydrolysis was developed. The model, which is relevant to both landfill and anaerobic digesters, includes a novel approach to biomass transfer between a cellulose-bound biofilm and biomass in the surrounding liquid. Model results highlight the significance of the bacterial colonization of cellulose particles by attachment through contact in solution. Simulations revealed that enhanced colonization, and therefore cellulose degradation, was associated with reduced cellulose particle size, higher biomass populations in solution, and increased cellulose-binding ability of the biomass. A sensitivity analysis of the system parameters revealed different sensitivities to model parameters for a typical landfill scenario versus that for an anaerobic digester. The results indicate that relative surface area of cellulose and proximity of hydrolyzing bacteria are key factors determining the cellulose degradation rate.

  14. Wrinkle resistant cellulosic textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchens, J.D.; Patton, R.T.; Nadar, R.S.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes a process for treating a cellulosic textile material so as to impart wrinkle resistance and smooth drying properties. It comprises treating the cellulosic textile material with an aqueous solution comprising trans-1,2,3,4-cyclobutane tetracarboxylic acid, and a curing catalyst, and heating the treated material so as to produce esterification and crosslinking of the material with the acid.

  15. Structural Basis for Molecular Discrimination by a 3',3'-cGAMP Sensing Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Aiming; Wang, Xin  C.; Kellenberger, Colleen  A.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta  R.; Jones, Roger  A.; Hammond, Ming  C.; Patel, Dinshaw  J.

    2015-04-07

    Cyclic dinucleotides are second messengers that target the adaptor STING and stimulate the innate immune response in mammals. Besides protein receptors, there are bacterial riboswitches that selectively recognize cyclic dinucleotides. We recently discovered a natural riboswitch that targets 3',3'-cGAMP, which is distinguished from the endogenous mammalian signal 2',3'-cGAMP by its backbone connectivity. Here, we report on structures of the aptamer domain of the 3',3'-cGAMP riboswitch from Geobacter in the 3',3'-cGAMP and c-di-GMP bound states. The riboswitch adopts a tuning forklike architecture with a junctional ligand-binding pocket and different orientations of the arms are correlated with the identity of the bound cyclic dinucleotide. Subsequent biochemical experiments revealed that specificity of ligand recognition can be affected by point mutations outside of the binding pocket, which has implications for both the assignment and reengineering of riboswitches in this structural class.

  16. Evaluating Models of Cellulose Degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

    PubMed Central

    Burnet, Meagan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Neumann, Anthony P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Suen, Garret; Callister, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-sequencing, proteomics, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to further clarify the cellulolytic mechanism of F. succinogenes. Our RNA-sequence analysis shows that genes encoding type II and III secretion systems, fibro-slime proteins, and pili are differentially expressed on cellulose, relative to glucose. A subcellular fractionation of cells grown on cellulose revealed that carbohydrate active enzymes associated with cellulose deconstruction and fibro-slime proteins were greater in the extracellular medium, as compared to the periplasm and outer membrane fractions. TEMs of samples harvested at mid-exponential and stationary phases of growth on cellulose and glucose showed the presence of grooves in the cellulose between the bacterial cells and substrate, suggesting enzymes work extracellularly for cellulose degradation. Membrane vesicles were only observed in stationary phase cultures grown on cellulose. These results provide evidence that F. succinogenes attaches to cellulose fibers using fibro-slime and pili, produces cellulases, such as endoglucanases, that are secreted extracellularly using type II and III secretion systems, and degrades the cellulose into cellodextrins that are then imported back into the periplasm for further digestion by β-glucanases and other cellulases. PMID:26629814

  17. Evaluating models of cellulose degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

    DOE PAGES

    Burnet, Meagan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Neumann, Anthony P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Suen, Garret; Callister, Stephen J.

    2015-12-02

    Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve a combination of cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-sequencing, proteomics, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to further elucidate the cellulolytic mechanism of F. succinogenes. Our RNA-sequence analysis shows that genes encoding Type II and III secretion systems, fibro-slime proteins,more » and pili are differentially expressed on cellulose, relative to glucose. A subcellular fractionation of cells grown on cellulose revealed that carbohydrate active enzymes associated with cellulose deconstruction and fibro-slime proteins were greater in the extracellular media, as compared to the periplasm and outer membrane fractions. TEMs of samples harvested at mid-exponential and stationary phases of growth on cellulose and glucose showed the presence of grooves in the cellulose between the bacterial cells and substrate, suggesting enzymes work extracellularly for cellulose degradation. Membrane vesicles were only observed in stationary phase cultures grown on cellulose. Furthermore, these results provide evidence that F. succinogenes attaches to cellulose fibers using fibro-slime and pili, produces cellulases, such as endoglucanases, that are secreted extracellularly using type II and III secretion systems, and degrades the cellulose into cellodextrins that are then imported back into the periplasm for further digestion by β-glucanases and other cellulases.« less

  18. Evaluating Models of Cellulose Degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85.

    PubMed

    Burnet, Meagan C; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Neumann, Anthony P; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; Suen, Garret; Callister, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-sequencing, proteomics, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to further clarify the cellulolytic mechanism of F. succinogenes. Our RNA-sequence analysis shows that genes encoding type II and III secretion systems, fibro-slime proteins, and pili are differentially expressed on cellulose, relative to glucose. A subcellular fractionation of cells grown on cellulose revealed that carbohydrate active enzymes associated with cellulose deconstruction and fibro-slime proteins were greater in the extracellular medium, as compared to the periplasm and outer membrane fractions. TEMs of samples harvested at mid-exponential and stationary phases of growth on cellulose and glucose showed the presence of grooves in the cellulose between the bacterial cells and substrate, suggesting enzymes work extracellularly for cellulose degradation. Membrane vesicles were only observed in stationary phase cultures grown on cellulose. These results provide evidence that F. succinogenes attaches to cellulose fibers using fibro-slime and pili, produces cellulases, such as endoglucanases, that are secreted extracellularly using type II and III secretion systems, and degrades the cellulose into cellodextrins that are then imported back into the periplasm for further digestion by β-glucanases and other cellulases. PMID:26629814

  19. Ca²+ sorption on regenerated cellulose fibres.

    PubMed

    Fitz-Binder, Christa; Bechtold, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    High calcium content in cellulose materials can cause considerable problems in pulp processing, textile chemical treatment and consumer use, e.g. dyeing operations or household laundry. The Ca(2+) binding capacity of cellulose also is of relevance in food and medical applications. Through their carboxyl group content regenerated cellulose fibres can act as weak anion exchangers, thus all types of regenerated cellulose fibres such as lyocell, viscose and modal fibres, show a distinct ability to bind Ca(2+) ions. The binding capacity is limited by the carboxyl group content, which was determined with 15 mmol/kg for lyocell fibres and 20 mmol/kg for viscose fibres, using the Methylene Blue sorption method. The presence of bound Ca(2+) also was demonstrated by complex formation with alizarin. The molar ratio between carboxylic group content and bound Ca(2+) ions was one Ca(2+) ion for a single carboxyl group. As a result of Ca(2+) sorption a positive net charge of the cellulose results and another anion has to be bound as counter ion for reasons of charge neutralisation. Results of potentiometric titrations indicate HCO(3)(-) to be present as counter ion in the Ca(2+) cellulose system. Thus under the experimental conditions studied, bound Ca(2+) is proposed to be present in the form COO(-)Ca(2+)HCO(3)(-).

  20. Fulton Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect

    Sumait, Necy; Cuzens, John; Klann, Richard

    2015-07-24

    Final report on work performed by BlueFire on the deployment of acid hydrolysis technology to convert cellulosic waste materials into renewable fuels, power and chemicals in a production facility to be located in Fulton, Mississippi.

  1. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Eric A.; Demain, Arnold L.; Madia, Ashwin

    1985-09-10

    A method of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of a reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  2. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

    1983-05-13

    A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  3. Cellulose nanocrystal-filled carboxymethyl cellulose nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Choi, YongJae; Simonsen, John

    2006-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are one of the important application areas for nanotechnology. Naturally derived organic nanophase materials are of special interest in the case of polymer nanocomposites. Carboxymethyl cellulose is a polyelectrolyte derived from natural materials. It has been extensively studied as a hydrogel polymer. Methods to modify the mechanical properties of gels and films made from CMC are of interest in our lab and in the commercial marketplace. The effect of nano-sized fillers on the properties of CMC-based composites is of interest in the development of novel or improved applications for hydrogel polymers in general and CMC in particular. This project investigated cellulose nanocrystals (CNXLs) as a filler in CMC and compared the effects to microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). The composite material was composed of CMC, MCC or CNXL, with glycerin as a plasticizer. CNXL and MCC concentrations ranged from 5% to 30%. Glycerin concentrations were kept constant at 10%. CNXLs improved the strength and stiffness of the resulting composite compared to MCC. In addition, a simple heat treatment was found to render the nanocomposite water resistant.

  4. Re-constructing our models of cellulose and primary cell wall assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The cellulose microfibril has more subtlety than is commonly recognized. Details of its structure may influence how matrix polysaccharides interact with its distinctive hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces to form a strong yet extensible structure. Recent advances in this field include the first structures of bacterial and plant cellulose synthases and revised estimates of microfibril structure, reduced from 36 to 18 chains. New results also indicate that cellulose interactions with xyloglucan are more limited than commonly believed, whereas pectin-cellulose interactions are more prevalent. Computational results indicate that xyloglucan binds tightest to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose microfibrils. Wall extensibility may be controlled at limited regions (“biomechanical hotspots”) where cellulose-cellulose contacts are made, potentially mediated by trace amounts of xyloglucan. PMID:25460077

  5. Multiwavelength observations of giant radio galaxy 3C 35 and 3C 284

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We report multi wavelength observations of large radio galaxy 3C35 and 3C284. The low frequency observations were done with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) starting from 150 MHz. The high frequency observations were done with Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). Our main motivation for these observations is to estimate the spectral ages of these galaxies and to examine any proof of extended emission at low radio frequencies due to an earlier cycle of activity. The spectral age is measured by fitting the spectra with different spectral ageing models e.g. Kardashev-Pacholczyk (KP), Jaffe-Perola (JP) and Continuous Injection (CI).

  6. Multifrequency Monitoring of 3C 120, 3C 279, and PKS 1510--089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Aller, M. F.; Balonek, T. J.; Gomez, J.-L.; McHardy, I. M.; Terasranta, H.; Raiteri, C.; Tosti, G.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze contemporaneous X-ray, optical, and radio light curves of 3C 120, ABC 279, and PKS 1510-089 on timescales from a few to hundreds of days over a 3-5 year period. The results show the diverse connections between variability properties at different frequencies for different blazers.

  7. The resolved outflow from 3C 48

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, the mass is ∼6 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow.

  8. Electrospinning cellulose based nanofibers for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nartker, Steven

    2009-12-01

    . Using cellulose nitrate in biosensor materials provides excellent antibody binding characteristics that are resistant to pH changes. Sensors will be constructed of electrospun materials and compared to existing materials. The main advantage of electrospinning fiber mats is the increased surface area, and controllable morphology, which ultimately affects biosensor performance. Characterization tools will include Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM), BET N2 adsorption, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and AC impedance.

  9. Observing cellulose biosynthesis and membrane translocation in crystallo.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jacob L W; McNamara, Joshua T; Fischer, Michael; Rich, Jamie; Chen, Hong-Ming; Withers, Stephen G; Zimmer, Jochen

    2016-03-17

    Many biopolymers, including polysaccharides, must be translocated across at least one membrane to reach their site of biological function. Cellulose is a linear glucose polymer synthesized and secreted by a membrane-integrated cellulose synthase. Here, in crystallo enzymology with the catalytically active bacterial cellulose synthase BcsA-BcsB complex reveals structural snapshots of a complete cellulose biosynthesis cycle, from substrate binding to polymer translocation. Substrate- and product-bound structures of BcsA provide the basis for substrate recognition and demonstrate the stepwise elongation of cellulose. Furthermore, the structural snapshots show that BcsA translocates cellulose via a ratcheting mechanism involving a 'finger helix' that contacts the polymer's terminal glucose. Cooperating with BcsA's gating loop, the finger helix moves 'up' and 'down' in response to substrate binding and polymer elongation, respectively, thereby pushing the elongated polymer into BcsA's transmembrane channel. This mechanism is validated experimentally by tethering BcsA's finger helix, which inhibits polymer translocation but not elongation.

  10. Observing cellulose biosynthesis and membrane translocation in crystallo

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jacob L.W.; McNamara, Joshua T.; Fischer, Michael; Rich, Jamie; Chen, Hong-Ming; Withers, Stephen G.; Zimmer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Many biopolymers, including polysaccharides, must be translocated across at least one membrane to reach their site of biological function. Cellulose is a linear glucose polymer synthesized and secreted by a membrane-integrated cellulose synthase. In crystallo enzymology with the catalytically-active bacterial cellulose synthase BcsA-B complex reveals structural snapshots of a complete cellulose biosynthesis cycle, from substrate binding to polymer translocation. Substrate and product-bound structures of BcsA provide the basis for substrate recognition and demonstrate the stepwise elongation of cellulose. Furthermore, the structural snapshots show that BcsA translocates cellulose via a ratcheting mechanism involving a “finger helix” that contacts the polymer's terminal glucose. Cooperating with BcsA's gating loop, the finger helix moves ‘up’ and ‘down’ in response to substrate binding and polymer elongation, respectively, thereby pushing the elongated polymer into BcsA’s transmembrane channel. This mechanism is validated experimentally by tethering BcsA's finger helix, which inhibits polymer translocation but not elongation. PMID:26958837

  11. Compositions and methods comprising cellulase variants with reduced affinity to non-cellulosic materials

    DOEpatents

    Cascao-Pereira, Luis G.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R; Liu, Amy D.

    2012-08-07

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having reduced binding to non-cellulosic materials. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase, compositions comprising said cellulase, methods of identifying cellulose variants and methods of using the compositions.

  12. An Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Mechanism of Cellulose Biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, Amanda; Chen, Maohui; Cockburn, Darrell; Regli, Sarah; Clarke, Anthony; Dutcher, John; Lipkowski, Jacek; Roscoe, Sharon

    2009-03-01

    Cellulose, a biopolymer consisting of long chain β-(1->4) linked glucose sugars, is used as structural material by plants and bacteria. Degradation of cellulose to glucose, a sugar easily fermented to ethanol, occurs by the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase enzymes. The enzymes have a complex structure including carbohydrate binding modules and catalytic domains responsible for the binding and degradation of cellulose, respectively. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study native cellulose films prepared from Acetobacter xylinum using a novel application of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. These films allowed AFM images of single fibers and their microfibril structure to be obtained. Further in situ AFM studies of single fibers were performed in solution using cellulolytic enzymes. The in situ degradation of cellulose fibers was monitored over 20-hours using AFM. These studies provided insight into the degradation timeline of a single fiber. Complementary studies of proteins adsorbed on cellulose fibers revealed information about the binding of the enzymes to the substrate. Studying the modular enzyme action separately will provide insight into the mechanism of cellulose binding and contribute to our understanding of the degradation process.

  13. Compositions and methods comprising cellulase variants with reduced affinity to non-cellulosic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cascao-Pereira, Luis G; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R; Liu, Amy D

    2015-04-07

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having reduced binding to non-cellulosic materials. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase, compositions comprising said cellulase, methods of identifying cellulose variants and methods of using the compositions.

  14. Photosynthesis of C3, C3-C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E; Tissue, David T; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-07-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3-C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l(-1)) and glacial (180 μl l(-1)) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3-C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3-C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3-C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3-C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3-C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments.

  15. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  16. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  17. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  18. Load distribution in native cellulose.

    PubMed

    Hinterstoisser, Barbara; Akerholm, Margaretha; Salmén, Lennart

    2003-01-01

    The properties of cellulose materials are dependent on interactions between and within the cellulose chains. To investigate the deformation behavior of cellulose and its relation to molecular straining, sheets with fibers oriented preferably in one direction were studied by dynamic FT-IR spectroscopy. Celluloses with different origins (spruce pulp, Cladophora cellulose, cotton linters) were used. The sheets were stretched sinusoidally at low strains and small amplitudes while being irradiated with polarized infrared radiation. The cellulose fibers showed mainly an elastic response. The cellulose fibers showed mainly an elastic response. The glucose rings and the C-O-C bridges connecting adjacent rings, as well as the O(3)H.O(5) intramolecular hydrogen bonds are the components mainly deformed under stress, whereas the O(2)H.O(6) intramolecular hydrogen bonds play a minor role. The load distribution was also found to be different in the different allomorphic forms of cellulose I, namely, I(alpha) and I(beta).

  19. A simple, efficient method for coupling DNA to cellulose. Development of the method and application to mRNA purification.

    PubMed

    Moss, L G; Moore, J P; Chan, L

    1981-12-25

    A simple, efficient method to couple covalently DNA to cellulose is described. It utilizes the bifunctional oxirane 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether to activate cellulose and subsequently to link DNA to the cellulose. The optimal conditions for the latter reaction included use of a dehydration technique whereby DNA and activated cellulose were allowed to react on a glass slide in 0.1 N NaOH. Initial volume of the reaction was important; less than or equal to 250 microliters/50 mg cellulose was necessary for maximum efficiency. At DNA concentrations of less than or equal to 4 micrograms/mg cellulose, efficiency of binding was 90%. Binding studies using nucleotide homopolymers indicated that the order of the relative efficiencies of binding was poly(dT) greater than poly(dC) = poly(dA) greater than poly(dG). DNAs subjected to the binding conditions had an average of 0-1 breaks/molecule (for a 915-base DNA). A cloned double-stranded cDNA was coupled to cellulose by this technique. The cDNA was coupled to cellulose by this technique. The DNA-cellulose matrix was successfully used to purify the complementary mRNA from total poly(A)-enriched RNA by affinity chromatography. This method is very simple and highly efficient and can be conveniently adapted for the covalent coupling of various DNA species to cellulose for affinity chromatography.

  20. Dissolving process of a cellulose bunch in ionic liquids: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Suojiang; Yao, Yingying; Yao, Xiaoqian; Xu, Junli; Lu, Xingmei

    2015-07-21

    In recent years, a variety of ionic liquids (ILs) were found to be capable of dissolving cellulose and mechanistic studies were also reported. However, there is still a lack of detailed information at the molecular level. Here, long time molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose bunch in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EmimCl), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BmimCl) and water were performed to analyze the inherent interaction and dissolving mechanism. Complete dissolution of the cellulose bunch was observed in EmimAc, while little change took place in EmimCl and BmimCl, and nothing significant happened in water. The deconstruction of the hydrogen bond (H-bond) network in cellulose was found and analyzed quantitatively. The synergistic effect of cations and anions was revealed by analyzing the whole dissolving process. Initially, cations bind to the side face of the cellulose bunch and anions insert into the cellulose strands to form H-bonds with hydroxyl groups. Then cations start to intercalate into cellulose chains due to their strong electrostatic interaction with the entered anions. The H-bonds formed by Cl(-) cannot effectively separate the cellulose chain and that is the reason why EmimCl and BmimCl dissolve cellulose more slowly. These findings deepen people's understanding on how ILs dissolve cellulose and would be helpful for designing new efficient ILs to dissolve cellulose. PMID:26095890

  1. Wood Extractives Promote Cellulase Activity on Cellulosic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Timo; Salas, Carlos; Kelley, Stephen S; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2015-10-12

    Deposition of hydrophobic wood extractives and representative model compounds, on the surface of cellulose prior to enzymatic hydrolysis was found to either enhance or inhibit the action of cellulase enzymes. The effect of these compounds was correlated with their chemical structure, which may in part explain the differential effects observed between softwood and hardwood extractives. Specifically, the addition of sterol, enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose by 54%, whereas the addition of a triglyceride could inhibit the hydrolysis by 49%. The effects of the different extractives' could be explained by considering their Hansen solubility parameters. The amphiphilic and/or hydrophobic character of model extractives was found to be the variable that affected the deposition of extractives on cellulose surfaces and the eventual adsorption of cellulolytic enzymes on it. The observed beneficial effects of extractives are likely related to a reduction in the irreversible binding of the enzymes on the cellulose surface.

  2. Visualization of Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I and endoglucanase I on aspen cellulose by using monoclonal antibody-colloidal gold conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, R.A.; Grohmann, K.; Himmel, M.E. ); Ellis, R.P.; Todd, R.J.; Johnson, T.J.A. )

    1991-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) and endoglucanase I (EG I) were conjugated to 10- and 15-nm colloidal gold particles, respectively. The binding of CBH I and EG I was visualized by utilizing the MAb-colloidal gold probes. The visualization procedure involved immobilization of cellulose microfibrils on copper electron microscopy grids, incubation of the cellulose-coated grids with cellulase(s), binding of MAb-colloidal gold conjugates to cellulase(s), and visualization via transmission electron microscopy. CBH I was seen bound to apparent crystalline cellulose as well as apparent amorphous cellulose. EG I was seen bound extensively to apparent amorphous cellulose with minimal binding to crystalline cellulose.

  3. Visualization of Trichoderma reesei Cellobiohydrolase I and Endoglucanase I on Aspen Cellulose by Using Monoclonal Antibody-Colloidal Gold Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Nieves, Rafael A.; Ellis, Robert P.; Todd, Roberta J.; Johnson, Timothy J. A.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) and endoglucanase I (EG I) were conjugated to 10- and 15-nm colloidal gold particles, respectively. The binding of CBH I and EG I was visualized by utilizing the MAb-colloidal gold probes. The visualization procedure involved immobilization of cellulose microfibrils on copper electron microscopy grids, incubation of the cellulose-coated grids with cellulase(s), binding of MAb-colloidal gold conjugates to cellulase(s), and visualization via transmission electron microscopy. CBH I was seen bound to apparent crystalline cellulose as well as apparent amorphous cellulose. EG I was seen bound extensively to apparent amorphous cellulose with minimal binding to crystalline cellulose. Images PMID:16348581

  4. THE ACCELERATING JET OF 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, S. D.; Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the proper motions of the subparsec scale jet of the quasar 3C 279 at 15 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array shows significant accelerations in four of nine superluminal features. Analysis of these motions is combined with the analysis of flux density light curves to constrain values of Lorentz factor and viewing angle (and their derivatives) for each component. The data for each of these components are consistent with significant changes to the Lorentz factor, viewing angle, and azimuthal angle, suggesting jet bending with changes in speed. We see that for these observed components Lorentz factors are in the range {Gamma} = 10-41, viewing angles are in the range thetav = 0. Degree-Sign 1-5. Degree-Sign 0, and intrinsic (source frame) flux density is in the range, F{sub {nu},int} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Jy. Considering individual components, the Lorentz factors vary from {Gamma} = 11-16 for C1, {Gamma} = 31-41 for C5, {Gamma} = 29-41 for C6, and {Gamma} = 9-12 for C8, indicating that there is no single underlying flow speed to the jet and likely we are seeing pattern speeds from shocks in the jet. The viewing angles vary in time from 0. Degree-Sign 6 to 1. Degree-Sign 5 in the case of C1 (the least extreme example), from 0. Degree-Sign 5 to 5. Degree-Sign 0 in the case of C8, and from 0. Degree-Sign 1 to 0. Degree-Sign 9 for C5 (the last two being the most extreme examples). The intrinsic flux density varies by factors from 1.4 for C8 and 430 for C5. Theoretical analysis of the accelerations also indicates potential jet bending. In addition, for one component, C5, polarization measurements also set limits to the trajectory of the jet.

  5. The Resolved Outflow from 3C 48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 103-104 cm-3, the mass is ~6 × 106 M ⊙, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11574. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Some of the

  6. Visualization of cellulases bound to cellulose microfibrils: Evidence for endo/exo synergism

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, R.A.; Himmel, M.E.; Ellis, R.P.

    1993-12-31

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) and endoglucanase I (EG I) were conjugated to 10-nm and 15-nm colloidal gold particles, respectively. The binding of CBH I and EG I to cellulose was visualized by utilizing the MAb-colloidal gold probes. The visualization procedure involved immobilization of cellulose microfibrils on copper EM grids, incubation of the cellulose-coated grids with cellulase(s), binding of MAb-colloidal gold conjugates to cellulase(s), and visualization via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Apparent differences in the substrate binding preferences for gold-labelled CBH I and EG I were observed; however, the actual structure of the cellulose at these sites was not confirmed. Sites showing binding of both enzymes sometimes showed patterns of coordination suggestive of the {open_quotes}progressive{close_quotes} cellulase action model. The sensitivity of this technique was evident when micrographs were observed in 3-D.

  7. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  8. Cellulose Synthesis and Its Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shundai; Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Gu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer synthesized on land, is made of linear chains of ß (1–4) linked D-glucose. As a major structural component of the cell wall, cellulose is important not only for industrial use but also for plant growth and development. Cellulose microfibrils are tethered by other cell wall polysaccharides such as hemicellulose, pectin, and lignin. In higher plants, cellulose is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized rosette cellulose synthase complexes. Despite the recent advances using a combination of molecular genetics, live cell imaging, and spectroscopic tools, many aspects of the cellulose synthesis remain a mystery. In this chapter, we highlight recent research progress towards understanding the mechanism of cellulose synthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:24465174

  9. The Arabidopsis COBRA protein facilitates cellulose crystallization at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sorek, Nadav; Sorek, Hagit; Kijac, Aleksandra; Szemenyei, Heidi J; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Wemmer, David E; Somerville, Chris R

    2014-12-12

    Mutations in the Arabidopsis COBRA gene lead to defects in cellulose synthesis but the function of COBRA is unknown. Here we present evidence that COBRA localizes to discrete particles in the plasma membrane and is sensitive to inhibitors of cellulose synthesis, suggesting that COBRA and the cellulose synthase complex reside in close proximity on the plasma membrane. Live-cell imaging of cellulose synthesis indicated that, once initiated, cellulose synthesis appeared to proceed normally in the cobra mutant. Using isothermal calorimetry, COBRA was found to bind individual β1-4-linked glucan chains with a KD of 3.2 μm. Competition assays suggests that COBRA binds individual β1-4-linked glucan chains with higher affinity than crystalline cellulose. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the cell wall of the cobra mutant also indicated that, in addition to decreases in cellulose amount, the properties of the cellulose fibrils and other cell wall polymers differed from wild type by being less crystalline and having an increased number of reducing ends. We interpret the available evidence as suggesting that COBRA facilitates cellulose crystallization from the emerging β1-4-glucan chains by acting as a "polysaccharide chaperone." PMID:25331944

  10. Characterization of a novel swollenin from Penicillium oxalicum in facilitating enzymatic saccharification of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant expansins and fungal swollenin that can disrupt crystalline cellulose have great potential for applications in conversion of biomass. Recent studies have been mainly focused on Trichoderma reesei swollenin that show relatively low activity in the promotion of cellulosic hydrolysis. Our aim was to isolate a novel swollenin with greater disruptive activity, to establish an efficient way of producing recombinant swollenin, and to optimize the procedure using swollenin in facilitation of cellulosic hydrolysis. Results A novel gene encoding a swollenin-like protein, POSWOI, was isolated from the filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum by Thermal Asymmetric Interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR). It consisted of a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM1) followed by a linker connected to a family 45 endoglucanase-like domain. Using the cellobiohydrolase I promoter, recombinant POSWOI was efficiently produced in T. reesei with a yield of 105 mg/L, and showed significant disruptive activity on crystalline cellulose. Simultaneous reaction with both POSWOI and cellulases enhanced the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose Avicel by approximately 50%. Using a POSWOI-pretreatment procedure, cellulases can produce nearly twice as many reducing sugars as without pretreatment. The mechanism by which POSWOI facilitates the saccharification of cellulose was also studied using a cellulase binding assay. Conclusion We present a novel fungal swollenin with considerable disruptive activity on crystalline cellulose, and develop a better procedure for using swollenin in facilitating cellulosic hydrolysis. We thus provide a new approach for the effective bioconversion of cellulosic biomass. PMID:23688024

  11. The Arabidopsis COBRA protein facilitates cellulose crystallization at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sorek, Nadav; Sorek, Hagit; Kijac, Aleksandra; Szemenyei, Heidi J; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Wemmer, David E; Somerville, Chris R

    2014-12-12

    Mutations in the Arabidopsis COBRA gene lead to defects in cellulose synthesis but the function of COBRA is unknown. Here we present evidence that COBRA localizes to discrete particles in the plasma membrane and is sensitive to inhibitors of cellulose synthesis, suggesting that COBRA and the cellulose synthase complex reside in close proximity on the plasma membrane. Live-cell imaging of cellulose synthesis indicated that, once initiated, cellulose synthesis appeared to proceed normally in the cobra mutant. Using isothermal calorimetry, COBRA was found to bind individual β1-4-linked glucan chains with a KD of 3.2 μm. Competition assays suggests that COBRA binds individual β1-4-linked glucan chains with higher affinity than crystalline cellulose. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the cell wall of the cobra mutant also indicated that, in addition to decreases in cellulose amount, the properties of the cellulose fibrils and other cell wall polymers differed from wild type by being less crystalline and having an increased number of reducing ends. We interpret the available evidence as suggesting that COBRA facilitates cellulose crystallization from the emerging β1-4-glucan chains by acting as a "polysaccharide chaperone."

  12. Cleavage of interferon regulatory factor 7 by enterovirus 71 3C suppresses cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Xue, Qinghua; Jin, Qi; He, Bin; Wang, Jianwei

    2013-02-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a positive-stranded RNA virus which is capable of inhibiting innate immunity. Among virus-encoded proteins, the 3C protein compromises the type I interferon (IFN-I) response mediated by retinoid acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) or Toll-like receptor 3 that activates interferon regulatory 3 (IRF3) and IRF7. In the present study, we report that enterovirus 71 downregulates IRF7 through the 3C protein, which inhibits the function of IRF7. When expressed in mammalian cells, the 3C protein mediates cleavage of IRF7 rather than that of IRF3. This process is insensitive to inhibitors of caspase, proteasome, lysosome, and autophagy. H40D substitution in the 3C active site abolishes its activity, whereas R84Q or V154S substitution in the RNA binding motif has no effect. Furthermore, 3C-mediated cleavage occurs at the Q189-S190 junction within the constitutive activation domain of IRF7, resulting in two cleaved IRF7 fragments that are incapable of activating IFN expression. Ectopic expression of wild-type IRF7 limits EV71 replication. On the other hand, expression of the amino-terminal domain of IRF7 enhances EV71 infection, which correlates with its ability to interact with and inhibit IRF3. These results suggest that control of IRF7 by the 3C protein may represent a viral mechanism to escape cellular responses. PMID:23175366

  13. KIF3C and KIF3A Form a Novel Neuronal Heteromeric Kinesin That Associates with Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Muresan, Virgil; Abramson, Tatiana; Lyass, Asya; Winter, Dirk; Porro, Elena; Hong, Filbert; Chamberlin, Nancy L.; Schnapp, Bruce J.

    1998-01-01

    We have cloned from rat brain the cDNA encoding an 89,828-Da kinesin-related polypeptide KIF3C that is enriched in brain, retina, and lung. Immunocytochemistry of hippocampal neurons in culture shows that KIF3C is localized to cell bodies, dendrites, and, in lesser amounts, to axons. In subcellular fractionation experiments, KIF3C cofractionates with a distinct population of membrane vesicles. Native KIF3C binds to microtubules in a kinesin-like, nucleotide-dependent manner. KIF3C is most similar to mouse KIF3B and KIF3A, two closely related kinesins that are normally present as a heteromer. In sucrose density gradients, KIF3C sediments at two distinct densities, suggesting that it may be part of two different multimolecular complexes. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that KIF3C is in part associated with KIF3A, but not with KIF3B. Unlike KIF3B, a significant portion of KIF3C is not associated with KIF3A. Consistent with these biochemical properties, the distribution of KIF3C in the CNS has both similarities and differences compared with KIF3A and KIF3B. These results suggest that KIF3C is a vesicle-associated motor that functions both independently and in association with KIF3A. PMID:9487132

  14. Synthesis of Multifunctional Cellulose Nanocrystals for Lectin Recognition and Bacterial Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juan; Butchosa, Núria; Jayawardena, H. Surangi N.; Park, JaeHyeung; Zhou, Qi; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional cellulose nanocrystals have been synthesized and applied as a new type of glyconanomaterial in lectin binding and bacterial imaging. The cellulose nanocrystals were prepared by TEMPO-mediated oxidation and acidic hydrolysis, followed by functionalization with a quinolone fluorophore and carbohydrate ligands. The cellulose nanocrystals were subsequently applied in interaction studies with carbohydrate-binding proteins and in bacterial imaging. The results show that the functional cellulose nanocrystals could selectively recognize the corresponding cognate lectins. In addition, mannosylated nanocrystals were shown to selectively interact with FimH-presenting E. coli, as detected by TEM and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These glyconanomaterials provide a new application of cellulose nanocrystals in biorecognition and imaging. PMID:25738860

  15. Interactions of arabinoxylan and (1,3)(1,4)-β-glucan with cellulose networks.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Wilson, Sarah M; Bacic, Antony; Gidley, Michael J

    2015-04-13

    To identify interactions of relevance to the structure and properties of the primary cell walls of cereals and grasses, we used arabinoxylan and (1,3)(1,4)-β-glucan, major polymers in cereal/grass primary cell walls, to construct composites with cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Both polymers associated prolifically with cellulose without becoming rigid or altering the nature or extent of cellulose crystallinity. Mechanical properties were modestly affected compared with xyloglucan or pectin (characteristic components of nongrass primary cell walls) composites with cellulose. In situ depletion of arabinoxylan arabinose side chains within preformed cellulose composites resulted in phase separation, with only limited enhancement of xylan-cellulose interactions. These results suggest that arabinoxylan and (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-d-glucan are not functional homologues for either xyloglucan or pectin in the way they interact with cellulose networks. Association of cell-wall polymers with cellulose driven by entropic amelioration of high energy cellulose/water interfaces should be considered as a third type of interaction within cellulose-based cell walls, in addition to molecular binding (enthalpic driving force) exhibited by, for example, xyloglucans or mannans, and interpenetrating networks based on, for example, pectins. PMID:25756836

  16. A single molecule study of cellulase hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-San; Luo, Yonghua; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Smith, Steve; Ding, Shi-You

    2010-02-01

    Cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I), a processive exoglucanase secreted by Trichoderma reesei, is one of the key enzyme components in a commercial cellulase mixture currently used for processing biomass to biofuels. CBH I contains a family 7 glycoside hydrolase catalytic module, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), and a highlyglycosylated linker peptide. It has been proposed that the CBH I cellulase initiates the hydrolysis from the reducing end of one cellulose chain and successively cleaves alternate β-1,4-glycosidic bonds to release cellobiose as its principal end product. The role each module of CBH I plays in the processive hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose has yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, we use a single-molecule approach that combines optical (Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscopy, or TIRF-M) and non-optical (Atomic Force Microscopy, or AFM) imaging techniques to analyze the molecular motion of CBM tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP), and to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBM and CBH I. The preliminary results have revealed a confined nanometer-scale movement of the TrCBM1-GFP bound to cellulose, and decreases in cellulose crystal size as well as increases in surface roughness during CBH I hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

  17. Fractionation of xyloglucan fragments and their interaction with cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Vincken, J P; de Keizer, A; Beldman, G; Voragen, A G

    1995-01-01

    Tamarind seed xyloglucan was partially degraded with a purified endoglucanase (endoV) from Trichoderma viride. Analysis by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography showed that this digest was composed of fragments consisting of 1 to 10 repeating oligosaccharide units ([xg]1-[xg]10). To study the adsorption of xyloglucan fragments to cellulose in detail, this digest was fractionated on BioGel P-6. Fragments were separated satisfactorily up to 5 repeating oligosaccharide units ([xg]5). The galactose substitution of the fragments increased with increasing molecular weight. The BioGel P-6 pools, as well as polymeric xyloglucan ([xg] infinity), were tested for their ability to interact with Avicel crystalline cellulose. Quantitative binding to cellulose occurred for sequences consisting of (at least) 4 repeating units. The adsorption of [xg]4 to Avicel was very high relative to that of [xg] infinity. The dimensions of these fragments were such that they could also penetrate the smaller pores of cellulose. Apparently, the effective surface area for the polymers is much smaller. Adsorption isotherms of [xg] infinity and [xg]4 showed a pattern that is typical for polydisperse systems. However, the mechanisms underlying these patterns were different. At high xyloglucan concentrations, this polydispersity resulted in preferential adsorption of the larger molecules in the case of [xg] infinity and a more extensive colonization of the smaller pores of cellulose in the case of [xg]4. The pH influenced the interaction between xyloglucan (fragments) and cellulose to only a small extent. PMID:7659752

  18. Genomics of aerobic cellulose utilization systems in actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Iain; Abt, Birte; Lykidis, Athanasios; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose degrading enzymes have important functions in the biotechnology industry, including the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Anaerobes including Clostridium species organize cellulases and other glycosyl hydrolases into large complexes known as cellulosomes. In contrast, aerobic actinobacteria utilize systems comprised of independently acting enzymes, often with carbohydrate binding domains. Numerous actinobacterial genomes have become available through the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project. We identified putative cellulose-degrading enzymes belonging to families GH5, GH6, GH8, GH9, GH12, GH48, and GH51 in the genomes of eleven members of the actinobacteria. The eleven organisms were tested in several assays for cellulose degradation, and eight of the organisms showed evidence of cellulase activity. The three with the highest cellulase activity were Actinosynnema mirum, Cellulomonas flavigena, and Xylanimonas cellulosilytica. Cellobiose is known to induce cellulolytic enzymes in the model organism Thermobifida fusca, but only Nocardiopsis dassonvillei showed higher cellulolytic activity in the presence of cellobiose. In T. fusca, cellulases and a putative cellobiose ABC transporter are regulated by the transcriptional regulator CelR. Nine organisms appear to use the CelR site or a closely related binding site to regulate an ABC transporter. In some, CelR also regulates cellulases, while cellulases are controlled by different regulatory sites in three organisms. Mining of genome data for cellulose degradative enzymes followed by experimental verification successfully identified several actinobacteria species which were not previously known to degrade cellulose as cellulolytic organisms.

  19. Genomics of Aerobic Cellulose Utilization Systems in Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Iain; Abt, Birte; Lykidis, Athanasios; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose degrading enzymes have important functions in the biotechnology industry, including the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Anaerobes including Clostridium species organize cellulases and other glycosyl hydrolases into large complexes known as cellulosomes. In contrast, aerobic actinobacteria utilize systems comprised of independently acting enzymes, often with carbohydrate binding domains. Numerous actinobacterial genomes have become available through the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project. We identified putative cellulose-degrading enzymes belonging to families GH5, GH6, GH8, GH9, GH12, GH48, and GH51 in the genomes of eleven members of the actinobacteria. The eleven organisms were tested in several assays for cellulose degradation, and eight of the organisms showed evidence of cellulase activity. The three with the highest cellulase activity were Actinosynnema mirum, Cellulomonas flavigena, and Xylanimonas cellulosilytica. Cellobiose is known to induce cellulolytic enzymes in the model organism Thermobifida fusca, but only Nocardiopsis dassonvillei showed higher cellulolytic activity in the presence of cellobiose. In T. fusca, cellulases and a putative cellobiose ABC transporter are regulated by the transcriptional regulator CelR. Nine organisms appear to use the CelR site or a closely related binding site to regulate an ABC transporter. In some, CelR also regulates cellulases, while cellulases are controlled by different regulatory sites in three organisms. Mining of genome data for cellulose degradative enzymes followed by experimental verification successfully identified several actinobacteria species which were not previously known to degrade cellulose as cellulolytic organisms. PMID:22723998

  20. Glycine decarboxylase in C3, C4 and C3-C4 intermediate species.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Stefanie; Westhoff, Peter; Gowik, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) plays a central role in photorespiration. GDC is localized in the mitochondria and together with serine hydroxymethyltransferase it converts two molecules of glycine to one molecule of serine, CO2 and NH3. Overexpression of GDC subunits in the C3 species Arabidopsis thaliana can increase the metabolic flux through the photorespiratory pathway leading to enhanced photosynthetic efficiency and consequently to an enhanced biomass production of the transgenic plants. Changing the spatial expression patterns of GDC subunits was an important step during the evolution of C3-C4 intermediate and likely also C4 plants. Restriction of the GDC activity to the bundle sheath cells led to the establishment of a photorespiratory CO2 pump. PMID:27038285

  1. On the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c classification.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina

    2012-10-01

    As there are ambiguities in classification of the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c, relatively frequent in populations of Northern Asia, we analyzed all three haplogroup-defining markers M48, M77 and M86 in C3-M217-individuals from Siberia, Eastern Asia and Eastern Europe. We have found that haplogroup C3c is characterized by the derived state at M48, whereas mutations at both M77 and M86 define subhaplogroup C3c1. The branch defined by M48 alone would belong to subhaplogroup C3c*, characteristic for some populations of Central and Eastern Siberia, such as Koryaks, Evens, Evenks and Yukaghirs. Subhaplogroup C3c* individuals could be considered as remnants of the Neolithic population of Siberia, based on the age of C3c*-short tandem repeat variation amounting to 4.5 ± 2.4 thousand years. PMID:22810113

  2. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation.

  3. Structural Basis for Molecular Discrimination by a 3',3'-cGAMP Sensing Riboswitch

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Aiming; Wang, Xin  C.; Kellenberger, Colleen  A.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta  R.; Jones, Roger  A.; Hammond, Ming  C.; Patel, Dinshaw  J.

    2015-04-07

    Cyclic dinucleotides are second messengers that target the adaptor STING and stimulate the innate immune response in mammals. Besides protein receptors, there are bacterial riboswitches that selectively recognize cyclic dinucleotides. We recently discovered a natural riboswitch that targets 3',3'-cGAMP, which is distinguished from the endogenous mammalian signal 2',3'-cGAMP by its backbone connectivity. Here, we report on structures of the aptamer domain of the 3',3'-cGAMP riboswitch from Geobacter in the 3',3'-cGAMP and c-di-GMP bound states. The riboswitch adopts a tuning forklike architecture with a junctional ligand-binding pocket and different orientations of the arms are correlated with the identity of the boundmore » cyclic dinucleotide. Subsequent biochemical experiments revealed that specificity of ligand recognition can be affected by point mutations outside of the binding pocket, which has implications for both the assignment and reengineering of riboswitches in this structural class.« less

  4. Structural basis for molecular discrimination by a 3',3'-cGAMP sensing riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Ren, Aiming; Wang, Xin C; Kellenberger, Colleen A; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Jones, Roger A; Hammond, Ming C; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-04-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides are second messengers that target the adaptor STING and stimulate the innate immune response in mammals. Besides protein receptors, there are bacterial riboswitches that selectively recognize cyclic dinucleotides. We recently discovered a natural riboswitch that targets 3',3'-cGAMP, which is distinguished from the endogenous mammalian signal 2',3'-cGAMP by its backbone connectivity. Here, we report on structures of the aptamer domain of the 3',3'-cGAMP riboswitch from Geobacter in the 3',3'-cGAMP and c-di-GMP bound states. The riboswitch adopts a tuning fork-like architecture with a junctional ligand-binding pocket and different orientations of the arms are correlated with the identity of the bound cyclic dinucleotide. Subsequent biochemical experiments revealed that specificity of ligand recognition can be affected by point mutations outside of the binding pocket, which has implications for both the assignment and reengineering of riboswitches in this structural class. PMID:25818298

  5. Processes for treating cellulosic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladisch, Michael R. (Inventor); Kohlman, Karen L. (Inventor); Westgate, Paul L. (Inventor); Weil, Joseph R. (Inventor); Yang, Yiqi (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed are processes for pretreating cellulosic materials in liquid water by heating the materials in liquid water at a temperature at or above their glass transition temperature but not substantially exceeding 220.degree. C., while maintaining the pH of the reaction medium in a range that avoids substantial autohydrolysis of the cellulosic materials. Such pretreatments minimize chemical changes to the cellulose while leading to physical changes which substantially increase susceptibility to hydrolysis in the presence of cellulase.

  6. Dissecting the contribution of EBNA3C domains important for EBV-induced B-cell growth and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jie; Prasad Aj, Mahadesh; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Robertson, Erle S.

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic gammaherpes virus which is linked to pathogenesis of several human lymphatic malignancies. The EBV essential latent antigen EBNA3C is critical for efficient conversion of primary human B-lymphocytes to lymphoblastic cell lines and for continued LCL growth. EBNA3C, an EBV latent antigen with oncogenic potential can bind and regulate the functions of a wide range of cellular transcription factors. In our current reverse genetics study, we deleted the full length EBNA3C, and independently the RBP-Jκ and Nm23-H1 binding sites within EBNA3C using BACmid recombinant engineering methodology. Our experiments demonstrated that deletion of the EBV EBNA3C open reading frame (ORF) and more specifically the residues 621–675 which binds Nm23H1 and SUMO-1 showed a significant reduction in the ability of the cells to proliferate. Furthermore, they exhibited lower infectivity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also showed that recombinant EBV with deletions of the EBNA3C ORF, as well as a recombinant with residues 621–675 within EBNA3C ORF deleted had diminished abilities to activate CD40. Our study also revealed that the full length (1–992) and 621–675 aa deletions of EBNA3C when compared to wild type EBV infected PBMCs had differential expression patterns for the phosphorylation of MAP kinases specifically p38, JNK and ERK. Regulation of β-catenin also differed among wild type and EBNA3C deleted mutants. These temporal differences in signaling activities of these recombinant viruses in PBMCs is likely important in defining their functional importance in EBV-mediated B-cell transformation. PMID:26336822

  7. Cellulose biogenesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Organisms that synthesize cellulose can be found amongst the bacteria, protistans, fungi, and animals, but it is in plants that the importance of cellulose in function (as the major structural constituent of plant cell walls) and economic use (as wood and fiber) can be best appreciated. The structure of cellulose and its biosynthesis have been the subjects of intense investigation. One of the most important insights gained from these studies is that the synthesis of cellulose by living organisms involves much more than simply the polymerization of glucose into a (1{r_arrow}4)-{beta}-linked polymer. The number of glucoses in a polymer (the degree of polymerization), the crystalline form assumed by the glucan chains when they crystallize to form a microfibril, and the dimensions and orientation of the microfibrils are all subject to cellular control. Instead of cellulose biosynthesis, a more appropriate term might be cellulose biogenesis, to emphasize the involvement of cellular structures and mechanisms in controlling polymerization and directing crystallization and deposition. Dictyostelium discoideum is uniquely suitable for the study of cellulose biogenesis because of its amenability to experimental study and manipulation and the extent of our knowledge of its basic cellular mechanisms (as will be evident from the rest of this volume). In this chapter, I will summarize what is known about cellulose biogenesis in D. discoideum, emphasizing its potential to illuminate our understanding both of D. discoideum development and plant cellulose biogenesis.

  8. EBNA3C regulates p53 through induction of Aurora kinase B.

    PubMed

    Jha, Hem C; Yang, Karren; El-Naccache, Darine W; Sun, Zhiguo; Robertson, Erle S

    2015-03-20

    In multicellular organisms p53 maintains genomic integrity through activation of DNA repair, and apoptosis. EBNA3C can down regulate p53 transcriptional activity. Aurora kinase (AK) B phosphorylates p53, which leads to degradation of p53. Aberrant expression of AK-B is a hallmark of numerous human cancers. Therefore changes in the activities of p53 due to AK-B and EBNA3C expression is important for understanding EBV-mediated cell transformation. Here we show that the activities of p53 and its homolog p73 are dysregulated in EBV infected primary cells which can contribute to increased cell transformation. Further, we showed that the ETS-1 binding site is crucial for EBNA3C-mediated up-regulation of AK-B transcription. Further, we determined the Ser 215 residue of p53 is critical for functional regulation by AK-B and EBNA3C and that the kinase domain of AK-B which includes amino acid residues 106, 111 and 205 was important for p53 regulation. AK-B with a mutation at residue 207 was functionally similar to wild type AK-B in terms of its kinase activities and knockdown of AK-B led to enhanced p73 expression independent of p53. This study explores an additional mechanism by which p53 is regulated by AK-B and EBNA3C contributing to EBV-induced B-cell transformation.

  9. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose to yield glucose

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, George T.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Bose, Arindam

    1979-01-01

    A process to yield glucose from cellulose through acid hydrolysis. Cellulose is recovered from cellulosic materials, preferably by pretreating the cellulosic materials by dissolving the cellulosic materials in Cadoxen or a chelating metal caustic swelling solvent and then precipitating the cellulose therefrom. Hydrolysis is accomplished using an acid, preferably dilute sulfuric acid, and the glucose is yielded substantially without side products. Lignin may be removed either before or after hydrolysis.

  10. Noncovalent Dispersion and Functionalization of Cellulose Nanocrystals with Proteins and Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenwen; Arola, Suvi; Malho, Jani-Markus; Kontturi, Eero; Linder, Markus B; Laaksonen, Päivi

    2016-04-11

    Native cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are valuable high quality materials with potential for many applications including the manufacture of high performance materials. In this work, a relatively effortless procedure was introduced for the production of CNCs, which gives a nearly 100% yield of crystalline cellulose. However, the processing of the native CNCs is hindered by the difficulty in dispersing them in water due to the absence of surface charges. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed a one-step procedure for dispersion and functionalization of CNCs with tailored cellulose binding proteins. The process is also applicable for polysaccharides. The tailored cellulose binding proteins are very efficient for the dispersion of CNCs due to the selective interaction with cellulose, and only small fraction of proteins (5-10 wt %, corresponds to about 3 μmol g(-1)) could stabilize the CNC suspension. Xyloglucan (XG) enhanced the CNC dispersion above a fraction of 10 wt %. For CNC suspension dispersed with carboxylmethyl cellulose (CMC) we observed the most long-lasting stability, up to 1 month. The cellulose binding proteins could not only enhance the dispersion of the CNCs, but also functionalize the surface. This we demonstrated by attaching gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to the proteins, thus, forming a monolayer of GNPs on the CNC surface. Cryo transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) imaging confirmed the attachment of the GNPs to CNC solution conditions. PMID:26907991

  11. A kinetic study of Trichoderma reesei Cel7B catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiangfei; Zhang, Shujun; Wang, Yefei; Li, Jingwen; He, Chunyan; Yao, Lishan

    2016-06-01

    One prominent feature of Trichoderma reesei (Tr) endoglucanases catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis is that the reaction slows down quickly after it starts (within minutes). But the mechanism of the slowdown is not well understood. A structural model of Tr- Cel7B catalytic domain bound to cellulose was built computationally and the potentially important binding residues were identified and tested experimentally. The 13 tested mutants show different binding properties in the adsorption to phosphoric acid swollen cellulose and filter paper. Though the partitioning parameter to filter paper is about 10 times smaller than that to phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, a positive correlation is shown for two substrates. The kinetic studies show that the reactions slow down quickly for both substrates. This slowdown is not correlated to the binding constant but anticorrelated to the enzyme initial activity. The amount of reducing sugars released after 24h by Cel7B in phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, Avicel and filter paper cellulose hydrolysis is correlated with the enzyme activity against a soluble substrate p-nitrophenyl lactoside. Six of the 13 tested mutants, including N47A, N52D, S99A, N323D, S324A, and S346A, yield ∼15-35% more reducing sugars than the wild type (WT) Cel7B in phosphoric acid swollen cellulose and filter paper hydrolysis. This study reveals that the slowdown of the reaction is not due to the binding of the enzyme to cellulose. The activity of Tr- Cel7B against the insoluble substrate cellulose is determined by the enzyme's capability in hydrolyzing the soluble substrate. PMID:27178789

  12. A kinetic study of Trichoderma reesei Cel7B catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiangfei; Zhang, Shujun; Wang, Yefei; Li, Jingwen; He, Chunyan; Yao, Lishan

    2016-06-01

    One prominent feature of Trichoderma reesei (Tr) endoglucanases catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis is that the reaction slows down quickly after it starts (within minutes). But the mechanism of the slowdown is not well understood. A structural model of Tr- Cel7B catalytic domain bound to cellulose was built computationally and the potentially important binding residues were identified and tested experimentally. The 13 tested mutants show different binding properties in the adsorption to phosphoric acid swollen cellulose and filter paper. Though the partitioning parameter to filter paper is about 10 times smaller than that to phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, a positive correlation is shown for two substrates. The kinetic studies show that the reactions slow down quickly for both substrates. This slowdown is not correlated to the binding constant but anticorrelated to the enzyme initial activity. The amount of reducing sugars released after 24h by Cel7B in phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, Avicel and filter paper cellulose hydrolysis is correlated with the enzyme activity against a soluble substrate p-nitrophenyl lactoside. Six of the 13 tested mutants, including N47A, N52D, S99A, N323D, S324A, and S346A, yield ∼15-35% more reducing sugars than the wild type (WT) Cel7B in phosphoric acid swollen cellulose and filter paper hydrolysis. This study reveals that the slowdown of the reaction is not due to the binding of the enzyme to cellulose. The activity of Tr- Cel7B against the insoluble substrate cellulose is determined by the enzyme's capability in hydrolyzing the soluble substrate.

  13. Citrate-Linked Keto- and Aldo-Hexose Monosaccharide Cellulose Conjugates Demonstrate Selective Human Neutrophil Elastase-Lowering Activity in Cotton Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Judson V.; Caston-Pierre, Sonya

    2013-01-01

    Sequestration of harmful proteases as human neutrophil elastase (HNE) from the chronic wound environment is an important goal of wound dressing design and function. Monosaccharides attached to cellulose conjugates as ester-appended aldohexoses and ketohexoses were prepared on cotton gauze as monosccharide-citrate-cellulose-esters for HNE sequestration. The monosaccharide-cellulose analogs demonstrated selective binding when the derivatized cotton dressings were measured for sequestration of HNE. Each monosaccharide-cellulose conjugate was prepared as a cellulose citrate-linked monosaccharide ester on the cotton wound dressing, and assayed under wound exudate-mimicked conditions for elastase sequestration activity. A series of three aldohexose and four ketohexose ester cellulose conjugates were prepared on cotton gauze through citric acid-cellulose cross linking esterification. The monosaccharide portion of the conjugate was characterized by hydrolysis of the citrate-monosaccharide ester bond, and subsequent analysis of the free monosaccharide with high performance anion exchange chromatography. The ketohexose and aldohexose conjugate levels on cotton were quantified on cotton using chromatography and found to be present in milligram/gram amounts. The citrate-cellulose ester bonds were characterized with FTIR. Ketohexose-citrate-cellulose conjugates sequestered more elastase activity than aldohexose-citrate-cellulose conjugates. The monosaccharide cellulose conjugate families each gave distinctive profiles in elastase-lowering effects. Possible mechanisms of elastase binding to the monosaccharide-cellulose conjugates are discussed. PMID:24955952

  14. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isogai, Akira; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Fukuzumi, Hayaka

    2011-01-01

    Native wood celluloses can be converted to individual nanofibers 3-4 nm wide that are at least several microns in length, i.e. with aspect ratios >100, by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and successive mild disintegration in water. Preparation methods and fundamental characteristics of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCN) are reviewed in this paper. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups are selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface by TEMPO-mediated oxidation without any changes to the original crystallinity (~74%) or crystal width of wood celluloses. Electrostatic repulsion and/or osmotic effects working between anionically-charged cellulose microfibrils, the ζ-potentials of which are approximately -75 mV in water, cause the formation of completely individualized TOCN dispersed in water by gentle mechanical disintegration treatment of TEMPO-oxidized wood cellulose fibers. Self-standing TOCN films are transparent and flexible, with high tensile strengths of 200-300 MPa and elastic moduli of 6-7 GPa. Moreover, TOCN-coated poly(lactic acid) films have extremely low oxygen permeability. The new cellulose-based nanofibers formed by size reduction process of native cellulose fibers by TEMPO-mediated oxidation have potential application as environmentally friendly and new bio-based nanomaterials in high-tech fields.

  15. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Akira; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Fukuzumi, Hayaka

    2011-01-01

    Native wood celluloses can be converted to individual nanofibers 3-4 nm wide that are at least several microns in length, i.e. with aspect ratios>100, by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and successive mild disintegration in water. Preparation methods and fundamental characteristics of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCN) are reviewed in this paper. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups are selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface by TEMPO-mediated oxidation without any changes to the original crystallinity (∼74%) or crystal width of wood celluloses. Electrostatic repulsion and/or osmotic effects working between anionically-charged cellulose microfibrils, the ζ-potentials of which are approximately -75 mV in water, cause the formation of completely individualized TOCN dispersed in water by gentle mechanical disintegration treatment of TEMPO-oxidized wood cellulose fibers. Self-standing TOCN films are transparent and flexible, with high tensile strengths of 200-300 MPa and elastic moduli of 6-7 GPa. Moreover, TOCN-coated poly(lactic acid) films have extremely low oxygen permeability. The new cellulose-based nanofibers formed by size reduction process of native cellulose fibers by TEMPO-mediated oxidation have potential application as environmentally friendly and new bio-based nanomaterials in high-tech fields.

  16. Intermolecular interactions and 3D structure in cellulose-NaOH-urea aqueous system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiwei; Fang, Yan; Xiang, Junfeng; Ma, Yanping; Lu, Ang; Kang, Hongliang; Huang, Yong; Guo, Hongxia; Liu, Ruigang; Zhang, Lina

    2014-08-28

    The dissolution of cellulose in NaOH/urea aqueous solution at low temperature is a key finding in cellulose science and technology. In this paper, (15)N and (23)Na NMR experiments were carried out to clarify the intermolecular interactions in cellulose/NaOH/urea aqueous solution. It was found that there are direct interactions between OH(-) anions and amino groups of urea through hydrogen bonds and no direct interaction between urea and cellulose. Moreover, Na(+) ions can interact with both cellulose and urea in an aqueous system. These interactions lead to the formation of cellulose-NaOH-urea-H2O inclusion complexes (ICs). (23)Na relaxation results confirmed that the formation of urea-OH(-) clusters can effectively enhance the stability of Na(+) ions that attracted to cellulose chains. Low temperature can enhance the hydrogen bonding interaction between OH(-) ions and urea and improve the binding ability of the NaOH/urea/H2O clusters that attached to cellulose chains. Cryo-TEM observation confirmed the formation of cellulose-NaOH-urea-H2O ICs, which is in extended conformation with mean diameter of about 3.6 nm and mean length of about 300 nm. Possible 3D structure of the ICs was proposed by the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) theoretical calculation, revealing the O3H···O5 intramolecular hydrogen bonds could remain in the ICs. This work clarified the interactions in cellulose/NaOH/urea aqueous solution and the 3D structure of the cellulose chain in dilute cellulose/NaOH/urea aqueous solution.

  17. Cellulose Synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Alan R. White; Ann G. Matthysse

    2004-07-31

    We have cloned the celC gene and its homologue from E. coli, yhjM, in an expression vector and expressed the both genes in E. coli; we have determined that the YhjM protein is able to complement in vitro cellulose synthesis by extracts of A. tumefaciens celC mutants, we have purified the YhjM protein product and are currently examining its enzymatic activity; we have examined whole cell extracts of CelC and various other cellulose mutants and wild type bacteria for the presence of cellulose oligomers and cellulose; we have examined the ability of extracts of wild type and cellulose mutants including CelC to incorporate UDP-14C-glucose into cellulose and into water-soluble, ethanol-insoluble oligosaccharides; we have made mutants which synthesize greater amounts of cellulose than the wild type; and we have examined the role of cellulose in the formation of biofilms by A. tumefaciens. In addition we have examined the ability of a putative cellulose synthase gene from the tunicate Ciona savignyi to complement an A. tumefaciens celA mutant. The greatest difference between our knowledge of bacterial cellulose synthesis when we started this project and current knowledge is that in 1999 when we wrote the original grant very few bacteria were known to synthesize cellulose and genes involved in this synthesis were sequenced only from Acetobacter species, A. tumefaciens and Rhizobium leguminosarum. Currently many bacteria are known to synthesize cellulose and genes that may be involved have been sequenced from more than 10 species of bacteria. This additional information has raised the possibility of attempting to use genes from one bacterium to complement mutants in another bacterium. This will enable us to examine the question of which genes are responsible for the three dimensional structure of cellulose (since this differs among bacterial species) and also to examine the interactions between the various proteins required for cellulose synthesis. We have carried out one

  18. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing. PMID:26964959

  19. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing.

  20. Why Are C3-C4 Intermediate Species Rare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Field, C. B.; Berry, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    While C3-C4 intermediate photosynthesis is thought to represent the evolutionary bridge between C3 and C4 photosynthesis, C3-C4 intermediate species are ecologically rare in comparison to both C3 and C4 species. Here, we report results from a laboratory experiment, field observations, and model simulations that suggest a new explanation for the ecological rarity of C3-C4 intermediate species. In the laboratory experiment, we combined gas exchange and fluorescence to characterize the temperature response of photosynthesis in three closely-related species in the genus Flaveria that are representatives of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways. The leaf temperature that maximized the quantum yield for CO2 assimilation (Topt(ΦCO2)) was 24.9 ± 0.7°C in Flaveria robusta (C3), 29.8 ± 1.0°C in F. chloraefolia (C3-C4), and 35.7 ± 0.8°C in F. bidentis (C4), and was linearly related to the temperature sensitivity of the coupling between CO2 assimilation and electron transport (d(ΦCO2/ ΦPSII)/dT)). While F. chloraefolia does not simultaneously occur with F. robusta and F. bidentis in naturally-assembled communities, this C3-C4 intermediate species does occur with other C3 and C4 species. During the growing season in two of these mixed-photosynthetic-type communities, leaf temperatures for F. chloraefolia were similar to the Topt(ΦCO2) determined in the laboratory. A model of maximum potential carbon gain suggests that competitive coexistence of C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species could be dependent on a temperature regime that highlights the distinct relative advantages of the C3-C4 intermediate pathway. In combination, these results suggest that the relative temperature sensitivity of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways combined with environmental variation in temperature may help to explain why C3-C4 intermediate species are generally rare.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C targets p53 and modulates its transcriptional and apoptotic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Fuming; Saha, Abhik; Murakami, Masanao; Kumar, Pankaj; Knight, Jason S.; Cai Qiliang; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Robertson, Erle S.

    2009-06-05

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancers and the corresponding encoded protein induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest at the G1/S checkpoint in response to DNA damage. To date, previous studies have shown that antigens encoded by human tumor viruses such as SV40 large T antigen, adenovirus E1A and HPV E6 interact with p53 and disrupt its functional activity. In a similar fashion, we now show that EBNA3C, one of the EBV latent antigens essential for the B-cell immortalization in vitro, interacts directly with p53. Additionally, we mapped the interaction of EBNA3C with p53 to the C-terminal DNA-binding and the tetramerization domain of p53, and the region of EBNA3C responsible for binding to p53 was mapped to the N-terminal domain of EBNA3C (residues 130-190), previously shown to interact with a number of important cell-cycle components, specifically SCF{sup Skp2}, cyclin A, and cMyc. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBNA3C substantially represses the transcriptional activity of p53 in luciferase based reporter assays, and rescues apoptosis induced by ectopic p53 expression in SAOS-2 (p53{sup -/-}) cells. Interestingly, we also show that the DNA-binding ability of p53 is diminished in the presence of EBNA3C. Thus, the interaction between the p53 and EBNA3C provides new insights into the mechanism(s) by which the EBNA3C oncoprotein can alter cellular gene expression in EBV associated human cancers.

  2. Cellulose membrane as a biomaterial: from hydrolysis to depolymerization with electron beam.

    PubMed

    Eo, Mi Young; Fan, Huan; Cho, Yun Ju; Kim, Soung Min; Lee, Suk Keun

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose membrane (CM) is a major component of plant cell walls and is both a chemically and mechanically stable synthetic polymer with many applications for use in tissue engineering. However, due to its dissolution difficulty, there are no known physiologically relevant or pharmaceutically clinical applications for this polymer. Thus, research is underway on controlled and adjusted forms of cellulose depolymerization. To advance the study of applying CM for tissue engineering, we have suggested new possibilities for electron beam (E-beam) treatment of CM. Treatment of CM with an E-beam can modify physical, chemical, molecular and biological properties, so it can be studied continuously to improve its usefulness and to enhance value. We review clinical applications of CM, cellulose binding domains, cellulose crosslinking proteins, conventional hydrolysis of cellulose, and depolymerization with radiation and focus our experiences with depolymerization of E-beam irradiated CM in this article.

  3. Cellulose membrane as a biomaterial: from hydrolysis to depolymerization with electron beam.

    PubMed

    Eo, Mi Young; Fan, Huan; Cho, Yun Ju; Kim, Soung Min; Lee, Suk Keun

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose membrane (CM) is a major component of plant cell walls and is both a chemically and mechanically stable synthetic polymer with many applications for use in tissue engineering. However, due to its dissolution difficulty, there are no known physiologically relevant or pharmaceutically clinical applications for this polymer. Thus, research is underway on controlled and adjusted forms of cellulose depolymerization. To advance the study of applying CM for tissue engineering, we have suggested new possibilities for electron beam (E-beam) treatment of CM. Treatment of CM with an E-beam can modify physical, chemical, molecular and biological properties, so it can be studied continuously to improve its usefulness and to enhance value. We review clinical applications of CM, cellulose binding domains, cellulose crosslinking proteins, conventional hydrolysis of cellulose, and depolymerization with radiation and focus our experiences with depolymerization of E-beam irradiated CM in this article. PMID:27418974

  4. Spider Silk-CBD-Cellulose Nanocrystal Composites: Mechanism of Assembly.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Sigal; Shtein, Zvi; Ben-Shalom, Tal; Lapidot, Shaul; Tamburu, Carmen; Hu, Xiao; Kluge, Jonathan A; Raviv, Uri; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of cellulose-spider silk bio-nanocomposites comprised of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and recombinant spider silk protein fused to a cellulose binding domain (CBD) is described. Silk-CBD successfully binds cellulose, and unlike recombinant silk alone, silk-CBD self-assembles into microfibrils even in the absence of CNCs. Silk-CBD-CNC composite sponges and films show changes in internal structure and CNC alignment related to the addition of silk-CBD. The silk-CBD sponges exhibit improved thermal and structural characteristics in comparison to control recombinant spider silk sponges. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the silk-CBD sponge was higher than the control silk sponge and similar to native dragline spider silk fibers. Gel filtration analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that silk-CBD, but not the recombinant silk control, formed a nematic liquid crystalline phase similar to that observed in native spider silk during the silk spinning process. Silk-CBD microfibrils spontaneously formed in solution upon ultrasonication. We suggest a model for silk-CBD assembly that implicates CBD in the central role of driving the dimerization of spider silk monomers, a process essential to the molecular assembly of spider-silk nanofibers and silk-CNC composites. PMID:27649169

  5. Spider Silk-CBD-Cellulose Nanocrystal Composites: Mechanism of Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Meirovitch, Sigal; Shtein, Zvi; Ben-Shalom, Tal; Lapidot, Shaul; Tamburu, Carmen; Hu, Xiao; Kluge, Jonathan A.; Raviv, Uri; Kaplan, David L.; Shoseyov, Oded

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of cellulose-spider silk bio-nanocomposites comprised of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and recombinant spider silk protein fused to a cellulose binding domain (CBD) is described. Silk-CBD successfully binds cellulose, and unlike recombinant silk alone, silk-CBD self-assembles into microfibrils even in the absence of CNCs. Silk-CBD-CNC composite sponges and films show changes in internal structure and CNC alignment related to the addition of silk-CBD. The silk-CBD sponges exhibit improved thermal and structural characteristics in comparison to control recombinant spider silk sponges. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the silk-CBD sponge was higher than the control silk sponge and similar to native dragline spider silk fibers. Gel filtration analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that silk-CBD, but not the recombinant silk control, formed a nematic liquid crystalline phase similar to that observed in native spider silk during the silk spinning process. Silk-CBD microfibrils spontaneously formed in solution upon ultrasonication. We suggest a model for silk-CBD assembly that implicates CBD in the central role of driving the dimerization of spider silk monomers, a process essential to the molecular assembly of spider-silk nanofibers and silk-CNC composites. PMID:27649169

  6. Spider Silk-CBD-Cellulose Nanocrystal Composites: Mechanism of Assembly.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Sigal; Shtein, Zvi; Ben-Shalom, Tal; Lapidot, Shaul; Tamburu, Carmen; Hu, Xiao; Kluge, Jonathan A; Raviv, Uri; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2016-09-18

    The fabrication of cellulose-spider silk bio-nanocomposites comprised of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and recombinant spider silk protein fused to a cellulose binding domain (CBD) is described. Silk-CBD successfully binds cellulose, and unlike recombinant silk alone, silk-CBD self-assembles into microfibrils even in the absence of CNCs. Silk-CBD-CNC composite sponges and films show changes in internal structure and CNC alignment related to the addition of silk-CBD. The silk-CBD sponges exhibit improved thermal and structural characteristics in comparison to control recombinant spider silk sponges. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the silk-CBD sponge was higher than the control silk sponge and similar to native dragline spider silk fibers. Gel filtration analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that silk-CBD, but not the recombinant silk control, formed a nematic liquid crystalline phase similar to that observed in native spider silk during the silk spinning process. Silk-CBD microfibrils spontaneously formed in solution upon ultrasonication. We suggest a model for silk-CBD assembly that implicates CBD in the central role of driving the dimerization of spider silk monomers, a process essential to the molecular assembly of spider-silk nanofibers and silk-CNC composites.

  7. Correlation between cellulose thin film supramolecular structures and interactions with water.

    PubMed

    Tammelin, Tekla; Abburi, Ramarao; Gestranius, Marie; Laine, Christiane; Setälä, Harri; Österberg, Monika

    2015-06-01

    Water interactions of ultra-thin films of wood-derived polysaccharides were investigated by using surface sensitive methods, Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These approaches allow systematic molecular level detection and reveal information on the inherent behaviour of biobased materials with nanosensitivity. The influence of structural features of cellulose films i.e. crystallinity, surface roughness and porosity on water interactions was clarified. Cellulose films were prepared using spin-coating and Langmuir-Schaefer deposition to obtain thin films of equal thickness, identical cellulose origin, simultaneously with different supramolecular structures. The uptake/release of water molecules and swelling were characterized using QCM-D, and the structural features of the films were evaluated by AFM. More crystalline cellulose film possessed nanoporosity and as a consequence higher accessible surface area (more binding sites for water) and thus, it was capable of binding more water molecules in humid air and when immersed in water when compared to amorphous cellulose film. Due to the ordered structure, more crystalline cellulose film remained rigid and elastic although the water binding ability was more pronounced compared to amorphous film. The lower amount of bound water induced softening of the amorphous cellulose film and the elastic layer became viscoelastic at high humidity. Finally, cellulose thin films were modified by adsorbing a layer of 1-butyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl xylan, and the effect on moisture uptake was investigated. It was found that the supramolecular structure of the cellulose substrate has an effect not only on the adsorbed amount of xylan derivative but also on the water interactions of the material. PMID:25903294

  8. Towards Large Area Growth of 3C-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliauskas, Remigijus; Liljedahl, Rickard; Syvaejaervi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositza

    2010-11-01

    In this work we have analyzed the possibility of upscaling the growth of 3C-SiC. The growth was done at different temperatures to find limiting mechanisms of the growth rate and to examine the morphology of grown layers. Coverage by 3C-SiC increases when increasing temperature, however more twins appeared. Activation energy of the growth is 130 kcal/mol--showing that growth rate limiting mechanism is sublimation of the source. We discuss the influence of large area 6H-SiC wafers on the formation of 3C-SiC, in which the change in basal plane orientation could also influence the growth of 3C-SiC.

  9. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydroxypropyl cellulose. 172.870 Section 172.870... Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive hydroxypropyl cellulose may be safely used in food, except...) The additive consists of one of the following: (1) A cellulose ether containing propylene...

  10. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose...

  11. 21 CFR 172.868 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethyl cellulose. 172.868 Section 172.868 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.868 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose...

  12. Cellulose Derivatives for Water Repellent Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this poster presentation, we will discuss the synthesis and structural characterizations of nitro-benzyl cellulose (1), amino-benzyl cellulose (2) and pentafluoro –benzyl cellulose (3). All cellulose derivatives are synthesized by etherification process in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide h...

  13. Cellulose Derivatives for Water Repellent Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthesis and structural characterizations of nitro-benzyl cellulose, amino-benzyl cellulose and pentafluoro –benzyl cellulose were carried out. Cellulose derivatives were synthesized by etherification process in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide homogeneous solution. Nitrobenzylation was effec...

  14. Radiation degradation of cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, J.; Arnold, G.; Baer, M.; Langguth, H.; Gey, M.; Hübert, S.

    The application of straw and other cellulose polymers as feedstuff for ruminants is limited by its low digestibility. During recent decades it was attempted to increase the digestibility of straw by several chemical and physical methods. In this work some results of the degradation of gamma and electron treated wheat straw are reported. Complex methods of treatment (e.g. radiation influence and influence of lyes) are taken into consideration. In vitro-experiments with radiation treated straw show that the digestibility can be increased from 20 % up to about 80 %. A high pressure liquid chromatography method was used to analyze the hydrolysates. The contents of certain species of carbohydrates in the hydrolysates in dependence on the applied dose are given.

  15. Assemblies of Cellulose Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumacheva, Eugenia

    The entropically driven coassembly of nanorods (cellulose nanocrystals, CNCs) and different types of nanoparticles (NPs), including dye-labeled latex NPs, carbon dots and plasmonic NPs was experimentally studied in aqueous suspensions and in solid films. In mixed CNC-NP suspensions, phase separation into an isotropic NP-rich and a chiral nematic CNC-rich phase took place; the latter contained a significant amount of NPs. Drying the mixed suspension resulted in CNC-NP films with planar disordered layers of NPs, which alternated with chiral nematic CNC-rich regions. In addition, NPs were embedded in the chiral nematic domains. The stratified morphology of the films, together with a random distribution of NPs in the anisotropic phase, led to the films having close-to-uniform fluorescence, birefringence, and circular dichroism properties.

  16. Thermophilic degradation of cellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1982-12-01

    The conversion of cellulosic biomass to chemical feedstocks and fuel by microbial fermentation is an important objective of developing biotechnology. Direct fermentation of cellulosic derivatives to ethanol by thermophilic bacteria offers a promising approach to this goal. Fermentations at elevated temperatures lowers the energy demand for cooling and also facilitates the recovery of volatile products. In addition, thermophilic microorganisms possess enzymes with greater stability than those from mesophilic microorganisms. Three anaerobic thermophilic cocultures that ferment cellulosic substrate mainly to ethanol have been described: Clostridium thermocellum/Clostriidium thermohydrosulfuricum, C. thermocellum/Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum, and C. thermocellum/Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus sp. nov. The growth characteristics and metabolic features of these cocultures are reviewed.

  17. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, Myles A.; Morris, Robert S.

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

  18. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    PubMed

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved.

  19. Cellulose conversion under heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dhepe, Paresh L; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    In view of current problems such as global warming, high oil prices, food crisis, stricter environmental laws, and other geopolitical scenarios surrounding the use of fossil feedstocks and edible resources, the efficient conversion of cellulose, a non-food biomass, into energy, fuels, and chemicals has received much attention. The application of heterogeneous catalysis could allow researchers to develop environmentally benign processes that lead to selective formation of value-added products from cellulose under relatively mild conditions. This Minireview gives insight into the importance of biomass utilization, the current status of cellulose conversion, and further transformation of the primary products obtained.

  20. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, M.A.; Morris, R.S.

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorption agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure. 3 figs.

  1. Two structurally discrete GH7-cellobiohydrolases compete for the same cellulosic substrate fiber

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellulose consisting of arrays of linear beta-1,4 linked glucans, is the most abundant carbon-containing polymer present in biomass. Recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose towards enzymatic degradation is widely reported and is the result of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds within and among the linear glucans. Cellobiohydrolases are enzymes that attack crystalline cellulose. Here we report on two forms of glycosyl hydrolase family 7 cellobiohydrolases common to all Aspergillii that attack Avicel, cotton cellulose and other forms of crystalline cellulose. Results Cellobiohydrolases Cbh1 and CelD have similar catalytic domains but only Cbh1 contains a carbohydrate-binding domain (CBD) that binds to cellulose. Structural superpositioning of Cbh1 and CelD on the Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A 3-dimensional structure, identifies the typical tunnel-like catalytic active site while Cbh1 shows an additional loop that partially obstructs the substrate-fitting channel. CelD does not have a CBD and shows a four amino acid residue deletion on the tunnel-obstructing loop providing a continuous opening in the absence of a CBD. Cbh1 and CelD are catalytically functional and while specific activity against Avicel is 7.7 and 0.5 U.mg prot-1, respectively specific activity on pNPC is virtually identical. Cbh1 is slightly more stable to thermal inactivation compared to CelD and is much less sensitive to glucose inhibition suggesting that an open tunnel configuration, or absence of a CBD, alters the way the catalytic domain interacts with the substrate. Cbh1 and CelD enzyme mixtures on crystalline cellulosic substrates show a strong combinatorial effort response for mixtures where Cbh1 is present in 2:1 or 4:1 molar excess. When CelD was overrepresented the combinatorial effort could only be partially overcome. CelD appears to bind and hydrolyze only loose cellulosic chains while Cbh1 is capable of opening new cellulosic substrate molecules away from the cellulosic

  2. Evaluating models of cellulose degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, Meagan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Neumann, Anthony P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Suen, Garret; Callister, Stephen J.

    2015-12-02

    Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve a combination of cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-sequencing, proteomics, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to further elucidate the cellulolytic mechanism of F. succinogenes. Our RNA-sequence analysis shows that genes encoding Type II and III secretion systems, fibro-slime proteins, and pili are differentially expressed on cellulose, relative to glucose. A subcellular fractionation of cells grown on cellulose revealed that carbohydrate active enzymes associated with cellulose deconstruction and fibro-slime proteins were greater in the extracellular media, as compared to the periplasm and outer membrane fractions. TEMs of samples harvested at mid-exponential and stationary phases of growth on cellulose and glucose showed the presence of grooves in the cellulose between the bacterial cells and substrate, suggesting enzymes work extracellularly for cellulose degradation. Membrane vesicles were only observed in stationary phase cultures grown on cellulose. Furthermore, these results provide evidence that F. succinogenes attaches to cellulose fibers using fibro-slime and pili, produces cellulases, such as endoglucanases, that are secreted extracellularly using type II and III secretion systems, and degrades the cellulose into cellodextrins that are then imported back into the periplasm for further digestion by β-glucanases and other cellulases.

  3. Fine Structure in 3C 120 and 3C 84. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., 24 Aug. 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, L. K.

    1976-01-01

    Seven epochs of very long baseline radio interferometric observations of the Seyfert galaxies 3C 120 and 3C 84, at 3.8-cm wave length using stations at Westford, Massachusetts, Goldstone, California, Green Bank, West Virginia, and Onsala, Sweden, have been analyzed for source structure. An algorithm for reconstructing the brightness distribution of a spatially confined source from fringe amplitude and so called closure phase data has been developed and successfully applied to artificially generated test data and to data on the above mentioned sources. Over the two year time period of observation, 3C 120 was observed to consist of a double source showing apparent super relativistic expansion and separation velocities. The total flux changes comprising one outburst can be attributed to one of these components. 3C 84 showed much slower changes, evidently involving flux density changes in individual stationary components rather than relative motion.

  4. RXTE, VLBA, Optical, and Radio Monitoring of the Quasars 3C 279, PKS 1510--089, and 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Aller, M. F.; McHardy, I. M.; Balonek, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    We are continuing our combined RXTE X-ray, VLBA imaging (at 43 GHz), optical (several observatories), and radio (University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory) monitoring of the quasars 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089, and have started similar monitoring of 3C 273. X-ray flares in 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089 are associated with ejections of superluminal components. In addition, there is a close connection between the optical and X-ray variability of 3C 279. There is a strong correlation between the 14.5 GHz and X-ray variability of PKS 1510-089 in 1997 and 1998 (with the radio leading the X-ray) that becomes weaker in subsequent years. X-ray fluctuations occur on a variety of timescales in 3C 273, with a major prolonged outburst in mid-2001. The lead author will discuss the correlations in terms of inverse Compton models for the X-ray emission coupled with synchrotron models for the lower-frequency radiation. Synchrotron self-Compton models can explain the "reverse" time lag in PKS 1510-089 is well as the variable correlation between the X-ray variations and those at lower frequencies in this object and in 3C 279.

  5. Cellulose pretreatments of lignocellulosic substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, J.; Westgate, P.; Kohlmann, K.; Ladisch, M. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Cellulose in inedible plant materials, forestry residues, and municipal wastes must be pretreated to disrupt its physical structure, thereby making its hydrolysis to glucose practical. Developments since 1991 are summarized.

  6. Chromophores in lignin-free cellulosic materials belong to three compound classes. Chromophores in cellulosics, XII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The CRI (chromophore release and identification) method isolates well-defined chromophoric substances from different cellulosic matrices, such as highly bleached pulps, cotton linters, bacterial cellulose, viscose or lyocell fibers, and cellulose acetates. The chromophores are present only in extrem...

  7. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls.

  8. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  9. Polarization-maintaining amplifier based on 3C fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enokidani, Jun; Ito, Rumi; Sakurai, Tsutomu; Shin, Sumida; Tei, Kazuyoku

    2015-03-01

    Chirally-Coupled-Core (3C) fiber structure can preserve a single mode quality and even a linear polarization for a large core size. A principal advantage of fiber laser is its compatibility with monolithic integration and robust system. But so far, devices such as a combiner using the 3C fibers have not been reported. Here we report the first demonstration of such monolithic amplifier structure which contains an active fiber and a combiner based on 3C fibers. A single-stage amplifier is seeded by an EO Q-switched micro-laser and pumped by two high power fiber pigtailed 976-nm laser diodes via an in-house fabricated (2 + 1) × 1 pump signal combiner. The active fiber is based on a 3-m-long, 3C Yb-doped fiber (33 μm/250 μm core/cladding diameter with 0.06/0.46 NA). The amplifier demonstrates scaling up to 30W average power and 150 kW peak power in 0.3mJ, 2ns pulses. The beam profiles and beam qualities were characterized as its output power was varied up to 30W. The beam profile was maintained at a high beam quality of around M2=1.2. The spectral properties of the 3C fiber were also characterized as its output peak power was varied.

  10. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyley, Samuel; Thielemans, Wim

    2014-06-01

    Chemical modification of cellulose nanocrystals is an increasingly popular topic in the literature. This review analyses the type of cellulose nanocrystal modification reactions that have been published in the literature thus far and looks at the steps that have been taken towards analysing the products of the nanocrystal modifications. The main categories of reactions carried out on cellulose nanocrystals are oxidations, esterifications, amidations, carbamations and etherifications. More recently nucleophilic substitutions have been used to introduce more complex functionality to cellulose nanocrystals. Multi-step modifications are also considered. This review emphasizes quantification of modification at the nanocrystal surface in terms of degree of substitution and the validity of conclusions drawn from different analysis techniques in this area. The mechanisms of the modification reactions are presented and considered with respect to the effect on the outcome of the reactions. While great strides have been made in the quality of analytical data published in the field of cellulose nanocrystal modification, there is still vast scope for improvement, both in data quality and the quality of analysis of data. Given the difficulty of surface analysis, cross-checking of results from different analysis techniques is fundamental for the development of reliable cellulose nanocrystal modification techniques.

  11. Nanomechanics of cellulose crystals and cellulose-based polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakzad, Anahita

    Cellulose-polymer composites have potential applications in aerospace and transportation areas where lightweight materials with high mechanical properties are needed. In addition, these economical and biodegradable composites have been shown to be useful as polymer electrolytes, packaging structures, optoelectronic devices, and medical implants such as wound dressing and bone scaffolds. In spite of the above mentioned advantages and potential applications, due to the difficulties associated with synthesis and processing techniques, application of cellulose crystals (micro and nano sized) for preparation of new composite systems is limited. Cellulose is hydrophilic and polar as opposed to most of common thermoplastics, which are non-polar. This results in complications in addition of cellulose crystals to polymer matrices, and as a result in achieving sufficient dispersion levels, which directly affects the mechanical properties of the composites. As in other composite materials, the properties of cellulose-polymer composites depend on the volume fraction and the properties of individual phases (the reinforcement and the polymer matrix), the dispersion quality of the reinforcement through the matrix and the interaction between CNCs themselves and CNC and the matrix (interphase). In order to develop economical cellulose-polymer composites with superior qualities, the properties of individual cellulose crystals, as well as the effect of dispersion of reinforcements and the interphase on the properties of the final composites should be understood. In this research, the mechanical properties of CNC polymer composites were characterized at the macro and nano scales. A direct correlation was made between: - Dispersion quality and macro-mechanical properties - Nanomechanical properties at the surface and tensile properties - CNC diameter and interphase thickness. Lastly, individual CNCs from different sources were characterized and for the first time size-scale effect on

  12. Optical variability of PHL 1811 and 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Kurtanidze, O.; Liu, Y.; Yuan, Y. H.; Hao, J. M.; Cai, W.; Xiao, H. B.; Pei, Z. Y.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we reported the optical photometry monitoring results for two brightest nearby quasars, PHL 1811 and 3C 273 using the ST-6 camera at Abastumani Observatory, Georgia. For PHL 1811, we found 3 microvariability events with time scale of ΔT = 6.0 min. For 3C273, we found that the largest variations are ΔV = 0.369 +/- 0.028 mag, ΔR = 0.495 +/- 0.076 mag, and ΔI = 0.355 +/- 0.009 mag. When periodicity analysis methods are adopted to the available data, a period of p = 5.80 +/- 1.12 years is obtained for PHL 1811, and p = 21.10 +/- 0.14, 10.00 +/- 0.14, 7.30 +/- 0.09, 13.20 +/- 0.09, 2.10 +/- 0.06, and 0.68 +/- 0.05 years are obtained for 3C 273.

  13. Energetics and structural stability of Cs3C60

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Susumu; Umemoto, Koichiro; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, MarvinL.

    2003-12-15

    Using the ab initio pseudo potential total-energy method and the density-functional theory, we study the energetics of face-centered-cubic Cs3C60 which is a material of great interest as a possible high transition-temperature superconductor. At the optimized lattice constant the volume per C60 is found to be smaller than the most stable hexagon-coordination A15 phase, while the total energy of the fcc phase is about 0.9 eV higher than the A15 phase. These results indicate that a low-temperature and high-pressure synthesis method might be a possible way to produce the fcc Cs3C60 phase. In addition, it is also found that the A15 Cs3C60 should show a phase transformation from a hexagon-coordination phase to a pentagon-coordination phase under hydrostatic pressure.

  14. Graphene/3C-SiC Hybrid Nanolaminate.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Bing; Heuser, Steffen; Huang, Nan; Fu, Haiyuan; Jiang, Xin

    2015-12-30

    In this work, we demonstrate a one-step approach to create graphene/3C-SiC nanolaminate structure using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. Layer-by-layer arrangement of thin 3C-SiC layers and graphene sheets is obtained with the thicknesses of the individual 3C-SiC layers and graphene sheets being 5-10 nm and 2-5 nm, respectively. An intimate contact between 3C-SiC and the graphene sheets is achieved and the nanolaminate film shows a high room temperature conductivity of 96.1 S/cm. A dedicated structural analysis of the nanolaminates by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals that the growth of the nanolaminates follows an iterative process: preferential graphene nucleation around the planar defects at the central region of the SiC layer, leading to the "splitting" of the SiC layer; and the thickening of the SiC layer after being "split". A growth mechanism based on both kinetics and thermodynamics is proposed. Following the proposed mechanism, it is possible to control the layer thickness of the graphene/3C-SiC hybrid nanolaminate by manipulating the carbon concentration in the gas phase, which is further experimentally verified. The high electrical conductivity, large surface area porous structure, feasible integration on different substrates (metal, Mo; semiconductor, Si and 2H-SiC; insulator, diamond) of the graphene/3C-SiC hybrid nanolaminate as well as other unprecedented advantages of the nanolaminate structure make it very promising for applications in mechanical, energy, and sensor-related areas. PMID:26650041

  15. Producing Glucose 6-Phosphate from Cellulosic Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Bacik, John-Paul; Klesmith, Justin R.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Jarboe, Laura R.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Mark, Brian L.; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The most abundant carbohydrate product of cellulosic biomass pyrolysis is the anhydrosugar levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranose), which can be converted to glucose 6-phosphate by levoglucosan kinase (LGK). In addition to the canonical kinase phosphotransfer reaction, the conversion requires cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring to allow ATP-dependent phosphorylation of the sugar O6 atom. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that LGK binds two magnesium ions in the active site that are additionally coordinated with the nucleotide and water molecules to result in ideal octahedral coordination. To further verify the metal binding sites, we co-crystallized LGK in the presence of manganese instead of magnesium and solved the structure de novo using the anomalous signal from four manganese atoms in the dimeric structure. The first metal is required for catalysis, whereas our work suggests that the second is either required or significantly promotes the catalytic rate. Although the enzyme binds its sugar substrate in a similar orientation to the structurally related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK), it forms markedly fewer bonding interactions with the substrate. In this orientation, the sugar is in an optimal position to couple phosphorylation with ring cleavage. We also observed a second alternate binding orientation for levoglucosan, and in these structures, ADP was found to bind with lower affinity. These combined observations provide an explanation for the high Km of LGK for levoglucosan. Greater knowledge of the factors that contribute to the catalytic efficiency of LGK can be used to improve applications of this enzyme for levoglucosan-derived biofuel production. PMID:26354439

  16. Gravity effects on cellulose assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. M. Jr; Kudlicka, K.; Cousins, S. K.; Nagy, R.; Brown RM, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on cellulose synthesis using the model system of Acetobacter xylinum was the subject of recent investigations using The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Reduced Gravity Laboratory, a modified KC-135 aircraft designed to produce 20 sec of microgravity during the top of a parabolic dive. Approximately 40 parabolas were executed per mission, and a period of 2 x g was integral to the pullout phase of each parabola. Cellulose biosynthesis was initiated on agar surfaces, liquid growth medium, and buffered glucose during parabolic flight and terminated with 2.0% sodium azide or 50.0% ethanol. While careful ground and in-flight controls indicated normal, compact ribbons of microbial cellulose, data from five different flights consistently showed that during progression into the parabola regime, the cellulose ribbons became splayed. This observation suggests that some element of the parabola (the 20 sec microgravity phase, the 20 sec 2 x g phase, or a combination of both) was responsible for this effect. Presumably the cellulose I alpha crystalline polymorph normally is produced under strain, and the microgravity/hypergravity combination may relieve this stress to produce splayed ribbons. An in-flight video microscopy analysis of bacterial motions during a parabolic series demonstrated that the bacteria continue to synthesize cellulose during all phases of the parabolic series. Thus, the splaying may be a reflection of a more subtle alteration such as reduction of intermicrofibrillar hydrogen bonding. Long-term microgravity exposures during spaceflight will be necessary to fully understand the cellulose alterations from the short-term microgravity experiments.

  17. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  18. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  19. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs.

  20. The linear polarization of 3C 345 in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Wolinski, Karen G.; Smith, Paul S.; Impey, C. D.; Bless, Robert C.; Nelson, M. J.; Percival, J. W.; Taylor, M. J.; Elliot, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The linear polarization of 3C 345, a superluminal radio source and OVV quasar, was observed in two bandpasses in the ultraviolet (centered at 2160 A and 2770 A) in 1993 April using the High Speed Photometer on the Hubble Space Telescope. The quasar is significantly polarized in the UV (p greater than 5%). Ground-based polarimetry was obtained 11 days later, but a difference in the position angle between the observations in the visible and those in the UV indicate that the magnitude of the polarization of 3C 345 may have changed over that time. If the two observation sets represent the same state of spectral polarization, then the large UV flux implies that either the polarization of the synchrotron continuum must stop decreasing in the UV, or that there is an additional source of polarized flux in the ultraviolet. Only if the UV observations represent a spectral polarization state with the same position angle in the visible seen previously in 3C 345 can the polarized flux be represented by a single power law consistent with the three-component model of Smith et al. This model consists of a polarized synchrotron component, an unpolarized component from the broad-line region, and an unpolarized component attributed to thermal radiation from an optically thick accretion disk. Additional simultaneous polarimetry in the UV and visible will be required to further constrain models of the continuum emission processes in 3C 345 and determine if the UV polarized flux is synchrotron in origin.

  1. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  2. Revisiting correlations between broad-line and jet emission variations for AGNs: 3C 120 and 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. T.; Bai, J. M.; Feng, H. C.; Li, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We restudy the issue of cross-correlations between broad-line and jet emission variations, and aim to locate the position of a radio (and gamma-ray) emitting region in a jet of active galactic nuclei. Considering the radial profiles of the radius and number density of clouds in a spherical broad-line region (BLR), we derive new formulae connecting the jet-emitting position Rjet to the time lag τob between broad-line and jet emission variations, and the BLR radius. Also, formulae are derived for a disc-like BLR and a spherical shell BLR. The model-independent flux randomization/random subset selection method is used to estimate τob. For 3C 120, positive lags of about 0.3 yr are found between the 15 GHz emission and the Hβ, Hγ and He II λ4686 lines, including broad-line data in a newly published paper, indicating that the line variations lead the 15 GHz ones. Each of the broad-line light curves corresponds to a radio outburst. Rjet = 1.1-1.5 parsec (pc) is obtained for 3C 120. For 3C 273, a common feature of negative time lags is found in the cross-correlation functions between light curves of radio emission and the Balmer lines, as well as Lyα λ1216 and C IV λ1549 lines. Rjet = 1.0-2.6 pc is obtained for 3C 273. The estimated Rjet is comparable for 3C 120 and 3C 273, and the gamma-ray-emitting positions will be within ˜1-3 pc from the central engines. Comparisons show that the cloud number density and radius radial distributions and the BLR structures have only negligible effects on Rjet.

  3. G3-C12 Peptide Reverses Galectin-3 from Foe to Friend for Active Targeting Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Lian; Yang, Qingqing; Shan, Wei; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Galectin-3 is overexpressed by numerous carcinomas and is a potential target for active tumor treatments. On the other hand, galectin-3 also plays a key role in cancer progression and prevents cells from undergoing apoptosis, thereby offsetting the benefits of active targeting drugs. However, the relative contribution of the protective antiapoptotic effects of galectin-3 and the proapoptotic effects of galectin-3-targeted therapies has remained yet unrevealed. Here, we show that a galectin-3-binding peptide G3-C12 could reverse galectin-3 from foe to friend for active targeting delivery system. Results showed G3-C12 modified N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer doxorubicin conjugates (G3-C12-HPMA-Dox) could internalize into galectin-3 overexpressed PC-3 cells via a highly specific ligand-receptor pathway (2.2 times higher cellular internalization than HPMA-Dox). The internalized Dox stimulated the translocation of galectin-3 to the mitochondria to prevent from apoptosis. In turn, this caused G3-C12-HPMA-Dox to concentrate into the mitochondria after binding to galectin-3 intracellularly. Initially, mitochondrial galectin-3 weakened Dox-induced mitochondrial damage; however, as time progressed, G3-C12 active-mediation allowed increasing amounts of Dox to be delivered to the mitochondria, which eventually induced higher level of apoptosis than nontargeted copolymers. In addition, G3-C12 downregulates galectin-3 expression, 0.43 times lower than control cells, which could possibly be responsible for the suppressed cell migration. Thus, G3-C12 peptide exerts sequential targeting to both cell membrane and mitochondria via regulating galectin-3, and eventually reverses and overcomes the protective effects of galectin-3; therefore, it could be a promising agent for the treatment of galectin-3-overexpressing cancers. PMID:26393405

  4. Connection Between X-Ray Emission and Relativistic Jets in the Radio Galaxies 3C 111 and 3C 120

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Margo F.

    2005-01-01

    This work represents a part of a longterm study of the X-ray flux variability in radio galaxies and its relation to flux and structural changes in the associated radio jet. The work described here included: 1) continued study of the emission properties of the FR I radio galaxy 3C 120 known to exhibit a jet/disk connection from our past work; and 2) the commencement of monitoring of a second radio galaxy, the FR I1 object 3C 111 which was selected because of similar radio and X-ray properties to 3C 120, including the presence of Fe K a emission. The association between X-ray dips and new superluminal components, suggesting a picture in which the radio jet is fed by accretion events near the black hole, was identified in 3C 120 using combined RXTE and radio flux monitoring data and bi-monthly to monthly imaging data from the VLBA at 43 GHz. Such data were also obtained for both targets during the period described here. Specific goals were to more broadly investigate the X-ray dip/superluminal connection in 3C 120, thereby determining the epochs of X-ray minima and superluminal ejections more accurately (and hence more precisely determining the distance between the accretion disk and the core of the radio jet), and to determine whether a similar pattern is present in the data for a second radio galaxy. In 3C 111 a different time scale (longer time delays between X-ray dips and superluminal ejections) was expected due to the higher black hole mass implied by its higher radio luminosity: no black hole mass is published for this object but one can be determined from a PDS analysis of the RXTE data. The addition of the second source to the study would identify whether a similar connection was present in other sources and, if found, would provide important information on how time scale (and hence size scale) of accretion disk/jet systems depends on black hole mass. The grant included funding for the reduction and analysis of data obtained during the time period of Rossi

  5. Microfibrillated cellulose: morphology and accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Herrick, F.W.; Casebier, R.L.; Hamilton, J.K.; Sandberg, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) is prepared by subjecting dilute slurries of cellulose fibers to repeated high-pressure homogenizing action. A highly microfibrillated product will have a gel-like appearance at 2% concentration in water. Such gels have pseudoplastic viscosity properties and are very fluid when stirred at high shear rate. The relative viscosity of 2% MFC dispersions may be used as a measure of the degree of homogenization or microfibrillation of a given wood cellulose pulp. The water retention value of an MFC product can also be used as an indicator for degree of homogenization. Structurally, MFC appears to be a web of interconnected fibrils and microfibrils, the latter having diameters in the range 10-100 nm as observed in scanning and transmission electron micrographs. Chemical studies have revealed that MFC is only moderately degraded, while being greatly expanded in surface area. The accessibility of cellulose in MFC is only moderately degraded, while being greatly expanded in surface area. The accessibility of cellulose in MFC toward chemical reagents is greatly increased. Higher reactivity was demonstrated in dilute cupriethylenediamine solubility, triphenylmethylation, acetylation, periodate oxidation, and mineral acid and cellulase enzyme hydrolysis rates. 16 references, 8 figures, 7 tables.

  6. Crystalline Ni3C as both carbon source and catalyst for graphene nucleation: a QM/MD study

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Menggai; Li, Kai; Guan, Wei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Page, Alister; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nucleation from crystalline Ni3C has been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulations based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. It was observed that the lattice of Ni3C was quickly relaxed upon thermal annealing at high temperature, resulting in an amorphous Ni3C catalyst structure. With the aid of the mobile nickel atoms, inner layer carbon atoms precipitated rapidly out of the surface and then formed polyyne chains and Y-junctions. The frequent sinusoidal-like vibration of the branched carbon configurations led to the formation of nascent graphene precursors. In light of the rapid decomposition of the crystalline Ni3C, it is proposed that the crystalline Ni3C is unlikely to be a reaction intermediate in the CVD-growth of graphene at high temperatures. However, results present here indicate that Ni3C films can be employed as precursors in the synthesis of graphene with exciting possibility. PMID:26169042

  7. Carbohydrate-binding modules from a thermostable Rhodothermus marinus xylanase: cloning, expression and binding studies.

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hachem, M; Nordberg Karlsson, E; Bartonek-Roxâ, E; Raghothama, S; Simpson, P J; Gilbert, H J; Williamson, M P; Holst, O

    2000-01-01

    The two N-terminally repeated carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM4-1 and CBM4-2) encoded by xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus were produced in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Binding assays to insoluble polysaccharides showed binding to insoluble xylan and to phosphoric-acid-swollen cellulose but not to Avicel or crystalline cellulose. Binding to insoluble substrates was significantly enhanced by the presence of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions. The binding affinities for soluble polysaccharides were tested by affinity electrophoresis; strong binding occurred with different xylans and beta-glucan. CBM4-2 displayed a somewhat higher binding affinity than CBM4-1 for both soluble and insoluble substrates but both had similar specificities. Binding to short oligosaccharides was measured by NMR; both modules bound with similar affinities. The binding of the modules was shown to be dominated by enthalpic forces. The binding modules did not contribute with any significant synergistic effects on xylan hydrolysis when incubated with a Xyn10A catalytic module. This is the first report of family 4 CBMs with affinity for both insoluble xylan and amorphous cellulose. PMID:10600638

  8. Are Cellulosome Scaffolding Protein CipC and CBM3-Containing Protein HycP, Involved in Adherence of Clostridium cellulolyticum to Cellulose?

    PubMed Central

    Ferdinand, Pierre-Henri; Borne, Romain; Trotter, Valentine; Pagès, Sandrine; Tardif, Chantal; Fierobe, Henri-Pierre; Perret, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium cellulolyticum, a mesophilic anaerobic bacterium, produces highly active enzymatic complexes called cellulosomes. This strain was already shown to bind to cellulose, however the molecular mechanism(s) involved is not known. In this context we focused on the gene named hycP, encoding a 250-kDa protein of unknown function, containing a Family-3 Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM3) along with 23 hyaline repeat modules (HYR modules). In the microbial kingdom the gene hycP is only found in C. cellulolyticum and the very close strain recently sequenced Clostridium sp BNL1100. Its presence in C. cellulolyticum guided us to analyze its function and its putative role in adhesion of the cells to cellulose. The CBM3 of HycP was shown to bind to crystalline cellulose and was assigned to the CBM3b subfamily. No hydrolytic activity on cellulose was found with a mini-protein displaying representative domains of HycP. A C. cellulolyticum inactivated hycP mutant strain was constructed, and we found that HycP is neither involved in binding of the cells to cellulose nor that the protein has an obvious role in cell growth on cellulose. We also characterized the role of the cellulosome scaffolding protein CipC in adhesion of C. cellulolyticum to cellulose, since cellulosome scaffolding protein has been proposed to mediate binding of other cellulolytic bacteria to cellulose. A second mutant was constructed, where cipC was inactivated. We unexpectedly found that CipC is only partly involved in binding of C. cellulolyticum to cellulose. Other mechanisms for cellulose adhesion may therefore exist in C. cellulolyticum. In addition, no cellulosomal protuberances were observed at the cellular surface of C. cellulolyticum, what is in contrast to reports from several other cellulosomes producing strains. These findings may suggest that C. cellulolyticum has no dedicated molecular mechanism to aggregate the cellulosomes at the cellular surface. PMID:23935995

  9. Extraction of palm tree cellulose and its functionalization via graft copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Al-Hoqbani, Abdulmajeed A; Abdel-Halim, E S; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2014-09-01

    The work in this paper was planned with the aim of extracting the cellulosic component of palm tree waste and functionalizing this cellulose through graft copolymerization with acrylic acid. The cellulose extraction included hot alkali treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide to remove the non-cellulosic binding materials. The alkali treatment was followed by an oxidative bleaching using peracid/hydrogen peroxide mixture with the aim of removing the rest of non-cellulosic materials to improve the fiber hydrophilicity and accessibility towards further grafting reaction. Optimum conditions for cellulose extraction are boiling in 5% (W/V) NaOH in a material to liquor ratio of 1:20 for 1 h then bleaching with 60 ml/l bleaching mixture at initial pH value of 6.5 for 30 min. The pH of the bleaching medium is turned to the alkaline range 11 and bleaching continues for extra 30 min. Graft copolymerization reaction was initiated by potassium bromate/thiourea dioxide redox system. Optimum conditions for grafting are 30 mmol of potassium bromate, 30 mmol of thiourea dioxide and 150 g of acrylic acid (each per 100 g of cellulose). The polymerization reaction was carried out for 120 min at 50°C using a material to liquor ratio of 1:20. PMID:25020080

  10. Development of nonflammable cellulosic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttinger, M.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a moldable cellulosic foam for use in Skylab instrument storage cushions is considered. Requirements include density of 10 lb cu ft or less, minimal friability with normal handling, and nonflammability in an atmosphere of 70 percent oxygen and 30 percent nitrogen at 6.2 psia. A study of halogenated foam components was made, including more highly chlorinated binders, halogen-containing additives, and halogenation of the cellulose. The immediate objective was to reduce the density of the foam through reduction in inorganic phosphate without sacrificing flame-retarding properties of the foams. The use of frothing techniques was investigated, with particular emphasis on a urea-formaldehyde foam. Halogen-containing flame retardants were deemphasized in favor of inorganic salts and the preparation of phosphate and sulphate esters of cellulose. Utilization of foam products for civilian applications was also considered.

  11. Microbial Cellulose Assembly in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. Malcolm, Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Based on evidence indicating a possible correlation between hypo-gravity conditions and alteration of cellulose production by the gram negative bacterium, Acetobacter xylinum, a ground-based study for a possible long term Space Shuttle flight has been conducted. The proposed experiment for A. xylinum aboard the Shuttle is the BRIC (Biological Research in a Canister), a metal container containing spaces for nine Petri plates. Using a common experimental design, the cellulose production capability as well as the survivability of the A. xylinum strains NQ5 and AY201 have been described. It should now be possible to use the BRIC for the first long term microgravity experiments involving the biosynthesis of cellulose.

  12. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Samaneh Sadat; Mohammadi, Kourosh; Ji, Kong-shu

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4) D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA) proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family. PMID:27314060

  13. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Samaneh Sadat; Mohammadi, Kourosh; Ji, Kong-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4) D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA) proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family. PMID:27314060

  14. Cellulose Modifications and Their Future Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this poster, we will describe the synthesis and structural characterizations of a benzyl-, nitrobenzyl-, and aminobenzyl celluloses. Nitrobenzyl- and aminobenzyl cellulose derivatives are synthesized by etherification process in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide homogeneous solution. Nitrobe...

  15. A molecular description of cellulose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Joshua T; Morgan, Jacob L W; Zimmer, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, and certain organisms from bacteria to plants and animals synthesize cellulose as an extracellular polymer for various biological functions. Humans have used cellulose for millennia as a material and an energy source, and the advent of a lignocellulosic fuel industry will elevate it to the primary carbon source for the burgeoning renewable energy sector. Despite the biological and societal importance of cellulose, the molecular mechanism by which it is synthesized is now only beginning to emerge. On the basis of recent advances in structural and molecular biology on bacterial cellulose synthases, we review emerging concepts of how the enzymes polymerize glucose molecules, how the nascent polymer is transported across the plasma membrane, and how bacterial cellulose biosynthesis is regulated during biofilm formation. Additionally, we review evolutionary commonalities and differences between cellulose synthases that modulate the nature of the cellulose product formed. PMID:26034894

  16. A Molecular Description of Cellulose Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Joshua T.; Morgan, Jacob L.W.; Zimmer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, and certain organisms from bacteria to plants and animals synthesize cellulose as an extracellular polymer for various biological functions. Humans have used cellulose for millennia as a material and an energy source, and the advent of a lignocellulosic fuel industry will elevate it to the primary carbon source for the burgeoning renewable energy sector. Despite the biological and societal importance of cellulose, the molecular mechanism by which it is synthesized is now only beginning to emerge. On the basis of recent advances in structural and molecular biology on bacterial cellulose synthases, we review emerging concepts of how the enzymes polymerize glucose molecules, how the nascent polymer is transported across the plasma membrane, and how bacterial cellulose biosynthesis is regulated during biofilm formation. Additionally, we review evolutionary commonalities and differences between cellulose synthases that modulate the nature of the cellulose product formed. PMID:26034894

  17. Reverse osmosis cellulose and cellulosic membranes prepared by repeated drying and rewetting

    SciTech Connect

    Black, L.E.; Wan, W.K.

    1989-08-15

    In a method for separating extraction solvents from extract of raffinate phases by selectively permeating the extraction solvent through a cellulose or cellulosic membrane under reverse conditions. This paper describes an improvement comprising using a cellulose or cellulosic membrane which has been dried, rewet and redried before being used to effect the desired separation.

  18. Chitinase-like1/pom-pom1 and its homolog CTL2 are glucan-interacting proteins important for cellulose biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Saxe, Friederike; Ibáñez, Ana Belén; Vodermaier, Vera; Konlechner, Cornelia; Sampathkumar, Arun; Rüggeberg, Markus; Aichinger, Ernst; Neumetzler, Lutz; Burgert, Ingo; Somerville, Chris; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Persson, Staffan

    2012-02-01

    Plant cells are encased by a cellulose-containing wall that is essential for plant morphogenesis. Cellulose consists of β-1,4-linked glucan chains assembled into paracrystalline microfibrils that are synthesized by plasma membrane-located cellulose synthase (CESA) complexes. Associations with hemicelluloses are important for microfibril spacing and for maintaining cell wall tensile strength. Several components associated with cellulose synthesis have been identified; however, the biological functions for many of them remain elusive. We show that the chitinase-like (CTL) proteins, CTL1/POM1 and CTL2, are functionally equivalent, affect cellulose biosynthesis, and are likely to play a key role in establishing interactions between cellulose microfibrils and hemicelluloses. CTL1/POM1 coincided with CESAs in the endomembrane system and was secreted to the apoplast. The movement of CESAs was compromised in ctl1/pom1 mutant seedlings, and the cellulose content and xyloglucan structures were altered. X-ray analysis revealed reduced crystalline cellulose content in ctl1 ctl2 double mutants, suggesting that the CTLs cooperatively affect assembly of the glucan chains, which may affect interactions between hemicelluloses and cellulose. Consistent with this hypothesis, both CTLs bound glucan-based polymers in vitro. We propose that the apoplastic CTLs regulate cellulose assembly and interaction with hemicelluloses via binding to emerging cellulose microfibrils. PMID:22327741

  19. CHITINASE-LIKE1/POM-POM1 and Its Homolog CTL2 Are Glucan-Interacting Proteins Important for Cellulose Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Bauer, Stefan; Hématy, Kian; Saxe, Friederike; Ibáñez, Ana Belén; Vodermaier, Vera; Konlechner, Cornelia; Sampathkumar, Arun; Rüggeberg, Markus; Aichinger, Ernst; Neumetzler, Lutz; Burgert, Ingo; Somerville, Chris; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Persson, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    Plant cells are encased by a cellulose-containing wall that is essential for plant morphogenesis. Cellulose consists of β-1,4-linked glucan chains assembled into paracrystalline microfibrils that are synthesized by plasma membrane–located cellulose synthase (CESA) complexes. Associations with hemicelluloses are important for microfibril spacing and for maintaining cell wall tensile strength. Several components associated with cellulose synthesis have been identified; however, the biological functions for many of them remain elusive. We show that the chitinase-like (CTL) proteins, CTL1/POM1 and CTL2, are functionally equivalent, affect cellulose biosynthesis, and are likely to play a key role in establishing interactions between cellulose microfibrils and hemicelluloses. CTL1/POM1 coincided with CESAs in the endomembrane system and was secreted to the apoplast. The movement of CESAs was compromised in ctl1/pom1 mutant seedlings, and the cellulose content and xyloglucan structures were altered. X-ray analysis revealed reduced crystalline cellulose content in ctl1 ctl2 double mutants, suggesting that the CTLs cooperatively affect assembly of the glucan chains, which may affect interactions between hemicelluloses and cellulose. Consistent with this hypothesis, both CTLs bound glucan-based polymers in vitro. We propose that the apoplastic CTLs regulate cellulose assembly and interaction with hemicelluloses via binding to emerging cellulose microfibrils. PMID:22327741

  20. Electron beam irradiation of cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Mark; Stipanovic, Arthur; Winter, William; Cheng, Kun; Manning, Mellony; Spiese, Jessica; Galloway, Richard A.; Cleland, Marshall R.

    2009-07-01

    Using a 90 kW, 3 MeV Dynamitron™, the molecular weight of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was reduced from 82,000 to 5000 Da with a dose of 100 kGy. The relative crystallinity of the MCC was reduced from 87% to 45% with a dose of 1000 kGy. The available surface area, an indication on how well cellulose will react with chemical agents, was increased from 274 m 2/g for the control sample (0 kGy) to 318 m 2/g at a dose 1000 kGy.

  1. X-Ray Monitoring of 3C120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Hugh

    The goal of this program is to characterize the variability at both X- ray and optical wavelengths simultaneously for the high luminosity, radio-loud AGN(RLAGN), 3C 120. The key question that is most central to the study of the variability of both RLAGN and radio-quiet AGN(RQAGN) is to identify a ''characteristic timescale", e.g. breaks (''knees") or spikes in the power density spectrum. There are now several RQAGN (e.g., NGC 3516 and Akn 120) for which characteristic timescales (i.e., knee frequencies) have been detected. However there is no RLAGN for which a knee frequency has been observed. The Seyfert-like RLAGN, 3C 120 offers a special opportunity for a possible first detection of a knee frequency in RLAGN.

  2. Anaerobic fermentations of cellulose to methane

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, H.D. Jr.; Odom, M.

    1981-01-01

    A review with 54 references is presented. Subjects discussed include cellulose degradation in the presence of high sulfate, interspecies H transfer, cellulose fermentation to CH4 and CO2, cellulose fermentation in the rumen, interaction between primary and ancillary microorganisms, and H metabolism in desulfovibrio.

  3. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydroxypropyl cellulose. 172.870 Section 172.870... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive hydroxypropyl cellulose may be safely used in food, except standardized foods that do not provide for such use,...

  4. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    DOEpatents

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-12-23

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

  5. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydroxypropyl cellulose. 172.870 Section 172.870... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.870 Hydroxypropyl cellulose. The food additive hydroxypropyl cellulose may be safely used in food, except standardized foods that do not provide for such use,...

  6. Iodine catalyzed acetylation of starch and cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch and cellulose, earth's most abundant biopolymers, are of tremendous economic importance. Over 90% of cotton and 50% of wood are made of cellulose. Wood and cotton are the major resources for all cellulose products such as paper, textiles, construction materials, cardboard, as well as such c...

  7. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  8. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  9. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  10. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  11. 21 CFR 573.420 - Ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.420 Ethyl cellulose. The food additive ethyl cellulose may be safely used in animal feed in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is a cellulose ether...

  12. Microbial Cellulose Utilization: Fundamentals and Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Lynd, Lee R.; Weimer, Paul J.; van Zyl, Willem H.; Pretorius, Isak S.

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental features of microbial cellulose utilization are examined at successively higher levels of aggregation encompassing the structure and composition of cellulosic biomass, taxonomic diversity, cellulase enzyme systems, molecular biology of cellulase enzymes, physiology of cellulolytic microorganisms, ecological aspects of cellulase-degrading communities, and rate-limiting factors in nature. The methodological basis for studying microbial cellulose utilization is considered relative to quantification of cells and enzymes in the presence of solid substrates as well as apparatus and analysis for cellulose-grown continuous cultures. Quantitative description of cellulose hydrolysis is addressed with respect to adsorption of cellulase enzymes, rates of enzymatic hydrolysis, bioenergetics of microbial cellulose utilization, kinetics of microbial cellulose utilization, and contrasting features compared to soluble substrate kinetics. A biological perspective on processing cellulosic biomass is presented, including features of pretreated substrates and alternative process configurations. Organism development is considered for “consolidated bioprocessing” (CBP), in which the production of cellulolytic enzymes, hydrolysis of biomass, and fermentation of resulting sugars to desired products occur in one step. Two organism development strategies for CBP are examined: (i) improve product yield and tolerance in microorganisms able to utilize cellulose, or (ii) express a heterologous system for cellulose hydrolysis and utilization in microorganisms that exhibit high product yield and tolerance. A concluding discussion identifies unresolved issues pertaining to microbial cellulose utilization, suggests approaches by which such issues might be resolved, and contrasts a microbially oriented cellulose hydrolysis paradigm to the more conventional enzymatically oriented paradigm in both fundamental and applied contexts. PMID:12209002

  13. Microbial cellulose utilization: fundamentals and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lynd, Lee R; Weimer, Paul J; van Zyl, Willem H; Pretorius, Isak S

    2002-09-01

    Fundamental features of microbial cellulose utilization are examined at successively higher levels of aggregation encompassing the structure and composition of cellulosic biomass, taxonomic diversity, cellulase enzyme systems, molecular biology of cellulase enzymes, physiology of cellulolytic microorganisms, ecological aspects of cellulase-degrading communities, and rate-limiting factors in nature. The methodological basis for studying microbial cellulose utilization is considered relative to quantification of cells and enzymes in the presence of solid substrates as well as apparatus and analysis for cellulose-grown continuous cultures. Quantitative description of cellulose hydrolysis is addressed with respect to adsorption of cellulase enzymes, rates of enzymatic hydrolysis, bioenergetics of microbial cellulose utilization, kinetics of microbial cellulose utilization, and contrasting features compared to soluble substrate kinetics. A biological perspective on processing cellulosic biomass is presented, including features of pretreated substrates and alternative process configurations. Organism development is considered for "consolidated bioprocessing" (CBP), in which the production of cellulolytic enzymes, hydrolysis of biomass, and fermentation of resulting sugars to desired products occur in one step. Two organism development strategies for CBP are examined: (i) improve product yield and tolerance in microorganisms able to utilize cellulose, or (ii) express a heterologous system for cellulose hydrolysis and utilization in microorganisms that exhibit high product yield and tolerance. A concluding discussion identifies unresolved issues pertaining to microbial cellulose utilization, suggests approaches by which such issues might be resolved, and contrasts a microbially oriented cellulose hydrolysis paradigm to the more conventional enzymatically oriented paradigm in both fundamental and applied contexts.

  14. The double-lobed blazar 3C 371

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Lind, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    High dynamic range VLA imaging reveals, for the first time, that the blazar 3C 371 exhibits very low surface brightness twin radio lobes. These lobes straddle the dominant compact core and have a projected extent of about 42/h kpc. A weak component located in the western lobe shares the morphology, size, and inferred magnetic field configuration of radio source hot spots. A continuous wiggling jet connects this hot spot with the compact core. Double lobes, hot spots, and one-sided jets are traits of extended, edge-brightened radio sources. The discovery of corresponding components in 3C 371's extended emission suggests that this emission is an edge-brightened double, viewed at a large enough angle to the line of sight that the radio lobes do not overlap. A moderate viewing angle is consistent with 3C 371's low bolometric luminosity for a blazar. The diffuse radio halo that surrounds the twin lobes may be related to the fat bridges or bridge distortions shown by edge-brightened doubles with similar radio powers.

  15. Voltammetry of Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82}

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.R.; Dorn, H.C.; Stevenson, S.; Burbank, P.M.; Gibson, J.R.

    1997-01-15

    This paper describes the first electrochemical data for a polymetallic endohedral metallofullerene. The voltammetric behavior of Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82} resembles that for La@C{sub 82} and Y@C{sub 82}, indicating that the identity of the metal does not influence dramatically the energies of the metallofullerene molecular orbitals. The three Sc atoms, however, transfer more electrons from the encapsulated metals to the cage than the monometallic counterparts, accounting for the differences in the voltammetry for Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82}. The similarity of the voltammetry of Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82} with that of the monometallic fullerenes suggests that Sc{sub 3}{sup +4}@C{sub 82}{sup 4-} may describe the formal charges on the Sc trimer and the C{sub 82} cage of these species. Metallofullerene electronic structure and physical properties should be better understood as more metallofullerenes become available for investigation. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. AGN feedback on the ISM of 3C 236

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labiano, A.; García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Usero, A.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Tremblay, G.; Neri, R.; Fuente, A.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T.

    2013-03-01

    We have carried out 1mm/3mm continuum and 12CO(2-1) line high resolution observations to identify the footprints of AGN feedback on 3C 236. The CO emission comes from a spatially resolved disk characterized by a regular rotating pattern. Within the limits imposed by the sensitivity and velocity coverage of our data, we do not detect any outflow signatures in the cold molecular gas. Re-inspection of optical and IR spectra, shows the presence of a previously unknown ionized gas outflow. The star-formation efficiency in 3C 236, is consistent with the value measured in normal galaxies, which follow the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt law. This result, confirmed to hold in other young radio sources examined in this work, is in stark contrast with the factor of 10-50 lower SFE that has been claimed to characterize evolved powerful radio galaxies. The recent reactivation of the AGN in 3C 236 is a likely explanation for the early evolutionary status of its molecular disk.

  17. The milliarcsecond structure of 3C 273 at 22 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Zensus, J.A.; Biretta, J.A.; Unwin, S.C.; Cohen, M.H. Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-12-01

    The first VLBI images at 22 GHz of the jet in the quasar 3C 273 are presented. In addition to the compact core region, two emission regions can be identified with features seen at lower frequencies; they separate from the core with constant speeds of 0.65 + or - 0.09 and 0.92 + or - 0.11 mas/yr, corresponding to apparent superluminal motion of 4.3 + or - 0.3c and 6.1 + or - 0.3c (for Ho = 100 km/s Mpc, qo = 0.5). The core region brightened at about the estimated epoch of zero separation for the latest superluminal component, suggesting a causal relationship. The curved ridge line of the jet smoothly extends inward towards the core, although no pronounced bends in the range of core distance 0.5-2.5 mas are seen. No significant evidence is found against a common path of subsequent superluminal features. An apparent frequency dependence in the position of one superluminal feature tentatively suggests that opacity effects across the jet direction are present. The results are consistent with an interpretation of the superluminal features as shocks in an underlying relativistic flow, although alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. 43 refs.

  18. The Trails of Superluminal Jet Components in 3C 111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadler, M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Homan, D. C.; Agudo, I.; Kellermann, K. I.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Lister, M. L.; Zensus, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The parsec-scale radio jet of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111 has been monitored since 1995 as part of the 2cm Survey and MOJAVE monitoring observations conducted with the VLBA. Here, we present results from 18 epochs of VLBA observations of 3C 111 and from 18 years of radio flux density monitoring observations conducted at the University of Michigan. A major radio flux-density outburst of 3C 111 occurred in 1996 and was followed by a particularly bright plasma ejection associated with a superluminal jet component. This major event allows us to study a variety of processes associated with outbursts of radio-loud AGN in much greater detail than possible in other cases: the primary perturbation gives rise to the formation of a forward and a backward-shock, which both evolve in characteristically different ways and allow us to draw conclusions about the workflow of jet-production events; the expansion, acceleration and recollimation of the ejected jet plasma in an environment with steep pressure and density gradients are revealed; trailing components are formed in the wake of the primary perturbation as a result of Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities from the interaction of the jet with the external medium. The jet-medium interaction is further scrutinized by the linear-polarization signature of jet components traveling along the jet and passing a region of steep pressure/density gradients.

  19. Ionic Liquids and Cellulose: Dissolution, Chemical Modification and Preparation of New Cellulosic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Mehmet; Sardon, Haritz; Mecerreyes, David

    2014-01-01

    Due to its abundance and a wide range of beneficial physical and chemical properties, cellulose has become very popular in order to produce materials for various applications. This review summarizes the recent advances in the development of new cellulose materials and technologies using ionic liquids. Dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquids has been used to develop new processing technologies, cellulose functionalization methods and new cellulose materials including blends, composites, fibers and ion gels. PMID:25000264

  20. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-07-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization.

  1. Purification of aqueous cellulose ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Bartscherer, K.A.; de Pablo, J.J.; Bonnin, M.C.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1990-07-01

    Manufacture of cellulose ethers usually involves high amounts of salt by-products. For application of the product, salt must be removed. In this work, we have studied the injection of high-pressure CO{sub 2} into an aqueous polymer-salt solution; we find that upon addition of isopropanol in addition to CO{sub 2}, the solution separates into two phases. One phase is rich in polymer and water, and the other phase contains mostly isopropanol, water and CO{sub 2}. The salt distributes between the two phases, thereby offering interesting possibilities for development of a new purification process for water-soluble polymers. This work presents experimental phase-equilibrium data for hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose with sodium acetate and potassium sulfate, respectively, in the region 40{degree}C and 30 to 80 bar. Based on these data, we suggest a process for the manufacture and purification of water-soluble cellulose ethers. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Assimilatory Sulfate Reduction in C3, C3-C4, and C4 Species of Flaveria1

    PubMed Central

    Koprivova, Anna; Melzer, Michael; von Ballmoos, Peter; Mandel, Therese; Brunold, Christian; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    The activity of the enzymes catalyzing the first two steps of sulfate assimilation, ATP sulfurylase and adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), are confined to bundle sheath cells in several C4 monocot species. With the aim to analyze the molecular basis of this distribution and to determine whether it was a prerequisite or a consequence of the C4 photosynthetic mechanism, we compared the intercellular distribution of the activity and the mRNA of APR in C3, C3-C4, C4-like, and C4 species of the dicot genus Flaveria. Measurements of APR activity, mRNA level, and protein accumulation in six Flaveria species revealed that APR activity, cysteine, and glutathione levels were significantly higher in C4-like and C4 species than in C3 and C3-C4 species. ATP sulfurylase and APR mRNA were present at comparable levels in both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of C4 species Flaveria trinervia. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of APR protein in chloroplasts of both cell types. These findings, taken together with results from the literature, show that the localization of assimilatory sulfate reduction in the bundle sheath cells is not ubiquitous among C4 plants and therefore is neither a prerequisite nor a consequence of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:11598228

  3. Production of Bacterial Cellulose from Alternate Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David Neil; Hamilton, Melinda Ann

    2000-05-01

    Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS & HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

  4. Production of bacterial cellulose from alternate feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    D. N. Thompson; M. A. Hamilton

    2000-05-07

    Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS and HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

  5. Enzyme-gold affinity labelling of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Berg, R H; Erdos, G W; Gritzali, M; Brown, R D

    1988-04-01

    The enzyme-linked colloidal gold affinity labelling technique was tested as a method to localize cellulose on thin sections of plant cell walls and slime mold spores. Commercially available cellulase from cultures of Trichoderma reesei, the main components being cellobiohydrolase I and II (CBH I, CBH II) and endoglucanase (EG), was linked to colloidal gold by using standard techniques and applied as a dilute, buffered suspension to thin sections. After brief exposure, e.g., 15-30 minutes, cellulose exposed on the surface of sections was labelled with the enzyme-gold complex. Poststaining did not appear to have a deleterious effect on the labelled sections. The specificity of labelling was demonstrated by its complete inhibition when carboxymethylcellulose was incorporated in the labelling mixture, by lack of labelling of 1,4-beta-mannans or 1,3-beta-xylans in noncellulosic walls of marine algae, by lack of labelling of 1,4-beta-glucans in chitin, by much lower labelling density when done at 4 degrees C, and by lack of labelling when sections were predigested with cellulase. Labelling with the crude commercial cellulase was compared to labelling with purified CBH I-, CBH II-, and EG-linked colloidal gold, and the labelling pattern was similar. This method was found useful on conventionally fixed material and required no special preparation other than the use of inert (Ni or Au) grids and 0.5% gelatin to reduce nonspecific binding of the gold complex. Labelling was similar in the several embedding resins tested: LR White, Lowicryl K4M, Epon 812, and Spurr's.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3C Facilitates G1-S Transition by Stabilizing and Enhancing the Function of Cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Abhik; Halder, Sabyasachi; Upadhyay, Santosh K.; Lu, Jie; Kumar, Pankaj; Murakami, Masanao; Cai, Qiliang; Robertson, Erle S.

    2011-01-01

    EBNA3C, one of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent antigens, is essential for primary B-cell transformation. Cyclin D1, a key regulator of G1 to S phase progression, is tightly associated and aberrantly expressed in numerous human cancers. Previously, EBNA3C was shown to bind to Cyclin D1 in vitro along with Cyclin A and Cyclin E. In the present study, we provide evidence which demonstrates that EBNA3C forms a complex with Cyclin D1 in human cells. Detailed mapping experiments show that a small N-terminal region which lies between amino acids 130–160 of EBNA3C binds to two different sites of Cyclin D1- the N-terminal pRb binding domain (residues 1–50), and C-terminal domain (residues 171–240), known to regulate Cyclin D1 stability. Cyclin D1 is short-lived and ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation has been targeted as a means of therapeutic intervention. Here, we show that EBNA3C stabilizes Cyclin D1 through inhibition of its poly-ubiquitination, and also increases its nuclear localization by blocking GSK3β activity. We further show that EBNA3C enhances the kinase activity of Cyclin D1/CDK6 which enables subsequent ubiquitination and degradation of pRb. EBNA3C together with Cyclin D1-CDK6 complex also efficiently nullifies the inhibitory effect of pRb on cell growth. Moreover, an sh-RNA based strategy for knock-down of both cyclin D1 and EBNA3C genes in EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) shows a significant reduction in cell-growth. Based on these results, we propose that EBNA3C can stabilize as well as enhance the functional activity of Cyclin D1 thereby facilitating the G1-S transition in EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. PMID:21347341

  7. Protein phosphatase complex PP5/PPP2R3C dephosphorylates P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 and down-regulates the expression and function.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Miho; Noguchi, Kohji; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2014-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp)/ABCB1 is a key molecule of multidrug resistance in cancer. Protein phosphatase (PP) 2A, regulatory subunit B, gamma (PPP2R3C), which is a regulatory subunit of PP2A and PP5, was identified as a binding candidate to P-gp. Immunoprecipitation-western blotting revealed that PP5 and PPP2R3C were coprecipitated with P-gp, while PP2A was not. PP5/PPP2R3C dephosphorylated protein kinase A/protein kinase C-phosphorylation of P-gp. Knockdown of PP5 and/or PPP2R3C increased P-gp expression and lowered the sensitivity to vincristine and doxorubicin. Consequently, our results indicate that PP5/PPP2R3C negatively regulates P-gp expression and function.

  8. A morpholinium ionic liquid for cellulose dissolution.

    PubMed

    Raut, Dilip G; Sundman, Ola; Su, Weiqing; Virtanen, Pasi; Sugano, Yasuhito; Kordas, Krisztian; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2015-10-01

    A series of substituted morpholinium ionic salts and allyl ammonium acetates were prepared. Amongst those, N-allyl-N-methylmorpholinium acetate ([AMMorp][OAc]) was found to dissolve cellulose readily without any pre-processing of native cellulose. At 120°C, [AMMorp][OAc] could dissolve 30 wt%, 28 wt% and 25 wt% of cellulose with degree of polymerization (DPn) - 789, 1644 and 2082 respectively, in 20 min. Importantly, SEC analysis indicated that no discernible changes occurred in terms of the degree of polymerization of the different celluloses after regeneration. Furthermore, when comparing the cellulose dissolution capability of these newly synthesized ionic liquids, it is evident that the combination of all three constituents - the morpholinium cation, the existence of an allyl group and choosing the acetate anion are essential for efficient cellulose dissolution. The structure and morphology of the regenerated cellulosic materials were characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, CP/MAS (13)C NMR and FTIR, respectively. PMID:26076596

  9. Cellulose nanomaterials in water treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-05-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials' potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials' beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization.

  10. Cellulose Nanomaterials in Water Treatment Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles François; Wiesner, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials’ potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials’ beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization. PMID:25837659

  11. Cellulose nanomaterials in water treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-05-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials' potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials' beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization. PMID:25837659

  12. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    George, Johnsy; Sabapathi, S N

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. PMID:26604715

  13. A morpholinium ionic liquid for cellulose dissolution.

    PubMed

    Raut, Dilip G; Sundman, Ola; Su, Weiqing; Virtanen, Pasi; Sugano, Yasuhito; Kordas, Krisztian; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2015-10-01

    A series of substituted morpholinium ionic salts and allyl ammonium acetates were prepared. Amongst those, N-allyl-N-methylmorpholinium acetate ([AMMorp][OAc]) was found to dissolve cellulose readily without any pre-processing of native cellulose. At 120°C, [AMMorp][OAc] could dissolve 30 wt%, 28 wt% and 25 wt% of cellulose with degree of polymerization (DPn) - 789, 1644 and 2082 respectively, in 20 min. Importantly, SEC analysis indicated that no discernible changes occurred in terms of the degree of polymerization of the different celluloses after regeneration. Furthermore, when comparing the cellulose dissolution capability of these newly synthesized ionic liquids, it is evident that the combination of all three constituents - the morpholinium cation, the existence of an allyl group and choosing the acetate anion are essential for efficient cellulose dissolution. The structure and morphology of the regenerated cellulosic materials were characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, CP/MAS (13)C NMR and FTIR, respectively.

  14. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    PubMed Central

    George, Johnsy; Sabapathi, SN

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. PMID:26604715

  15. The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.; Vio, R.; Cappellaro, E; Turatto, M Padova Osservatorio Astronomico, Padua )

    1990-08-01

    The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446 is investigated using power spectrum and structure function analysis along with a new set of observations that extend the available data till 1989. No contradiction is found between the PS and SF analyses. The presence of the 1540-day periodicity is strengthened by the occurrence of the 1988 luminosity peak, suggesting that the next burst will occur in the northern spring of 1992. The time series of the quasar is nonstationary. The light variations are determined by a sequence of luminosity bursts, mostly regularly spaced in time and lasting up to 2 yr. 25 refs.

  16. SUZAKU OBSERVATION OF THE GIANT RADIO GALAXY 3C 326

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Seta, Hiromi; Gandhi, Poshak; Hayato, Asami; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hada, Kazuhiro; Matsuta, Keiko

    2009-11-20

    A Suzaku observation of a giant radio galaxy, 3C 326, which has a physical size of about 2 Mpc, was conducted on 2008 January 19-21. In addition to several X-ray sources, diffuse emission was significantly detected and associated with its west lobe, but the east lobe was contaminated by an unidentified X-ray source WARP J1552.4+2007. After careful evaluation of the X-ray and non-X-ray background, the 0.4-7 keV X-ray spectrum of the west lobe is described by a power-law model modified with the Galactic absorption. The photon index and 1 keV flux density were derived as GAMMA = 1.82{sup +0.26}{sub -0.24} +- 0.04 and S {sub X} = 19.4{sup +3.3}{sub -3.2} +- 3.0 nJy, respectively, where the first and second errors represent the statistical and systematic ones. The diffuse X-rays were attributed to be inverse Compton (IC) radiation by the synchrotron radio electrons scattering off the cosmic microwave background photons. This radio galaxy is the largest among those with lobes detected through IC X-ray emission. A comparison of the radio to X-ray fluxes yields the energy densities of electron and magnetic field as u{sub e} = (2.3 +- 0.3 +- 0.3) x 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -3} and u{sub m} = (1.2{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} +- 0.2) x 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -3}, respectively. The galaxy is suggested to host a low-luminosity nucleus with an absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminosity of <2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}, together with a relatively weak radio core. The energetics in the west lobe of 3C 326 were compared with those of moderate radio galaxies with a size of approx100 kpc. The west lobe of 3C 326 is confirmed to agree with the correlations for the moderate radio galaxies, u{sub e} propor to D {sup -2.2+}-{sup 0.4} and u{sub m} propor to D {sup -2.4+}-{sup 0.4}, where D is their total physical size. This implies that the lobes of 3C 326 are still being energized by the jet, despite the current weakness of the nuclear activity.

  17. Cellulose and hemicellulose decomposition by forest soil bacteria proceeds by the action of structurally variable enzymatic systems

    PubMed Central

    López-Mondéjar, Rubén; Zühlke, Daniela; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that bacteria contribute actively to the decomposition of cellulose and hemicellulose in forest soil; however, their role in this process is still unclear. Here we performed the screening and identification of bacteria showing potential cellulolytic activity from litter and organic soil of a temperate oak forest. The genomes of three cellulolytic isolates previously described as abundant in this ecosystem were sequenced and their proteomes were characterized during the growth on plant biomass and on microcrystalline cellulose. Pedobacter and Mucilaginibacter showed complex enzymatic systems containing highly diverse carbohydrate-active enzymes for the degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, which were functionally redundant for endoglucanases, β-glucosidases, endoxylanases, β-xylosidases, mannosidases and carbohydrate-binding modules. Luteibacter did not express any glycosyl hydrolases traditionally recognized as cellulases. Instead, cellulose decomposition was likely performed by an expressed GH23 family protein containing a cellulose-binding domain. Interestingly, the presence of plant lignocellulose as well as crystalline cellulose both trigger the production of a wide set of hydrolytic proteins including cellulases, hemicellulases and other glycosyl hydrolases. Our findings highlight the extensive and unexplored structural diversity of enzymatic systems in cellulolytic soil bacteria and indicate the roles of multiple abundant bacterial taxa in the decomposition of cellulose and other plant polysaccharides. PMID:27125755

  18. Cellulose and hemicellulose decomposition by forest soil bacteria proceeds by the action of structurally variable enzymatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Mondéjar, Rubén; Zühlke, Daniela; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Evidence shows that bacteria contribute actively to the decomposition of cellulose and hemicellulose in forest soil; however, their role in this process is still unclear. Here we performed the screening and identification of bacteria showing potential cellulolytic activity from litter and organic soil of a temperate oak forest. The genomes of three cellulolytic isolates previously described as abundant in this ecosystem were sequenced and their proteomes were characterized during the growth on plant biomass and on microcrystalline cellulose. Pedobacter and Mucilaginibacter showed complex enzymatic systems containing highly diverse carbohydrate-active enzymes for the degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, which were functionally redundant for endoglucanases, β-glucosidases, endoxylanases, β-xylosidases, mannosidases and carbohydrate-binding modules. Luteibacter did not express any glycosyl hydrolases traditionally recognized as cellulases. Instead, cellulose decomposition was likely performed by an expressed GH23 family protein containing a cellulose-binding domain. Interestingly, the presence of plant lignocellulose as well as crystalline cellulose both trigger the production of a wide set of hydrolytic proteins including cellulases, hemicellulases and other glycosyl hydrolases. Our findings highlight the extensive and unexplored structural diversity of enzymatic systems in cellulolytic soil bacteria and indicate the roles of multiple abundant bacterial taxa in the decomposition of cellulose and other plant polysaccharides.

  19. Cellulose and hemicellulose decomposition by forest soil bacteria proceeds by the action of structurally variable enzymatic systems.

    PubMed

    López-Mondéjar, Rubén; Zühlke, Daniela; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that bacteria contribute actively to the decomposition of cellulose and hemicellulose in forest soil; however, their role in this process is still unclear. Here we performed the screening and identification of bacteria showing potential cellulolytic activity from litter and organic soil of a temperate oak forest. The genomes of three cellulolytic isolates previously described as abundant in this ecosystem were sequenced and their proteomes were characterized during the growth on plant biomass and on microcrystalline cellulose. Pedobacter and Mucilaginibacter showed complex enzymatic systems containing highly diverse carbohydrate-active enzymes for the degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, which were functionally redundant for endoglucanases, β-glucosidases, endoxylanases, β-xylosidases, mannosidases and carbohydrate-binding modules. Luteibacter did not express any glycosyl hydrolases traditionally recognized as cellulases. Instead, cellulose decomposition was likely performed by an expressed GH23 family protein containing a cellulose-binding domain. Interestingly, the presence of plant lignocellulose as well as crystalline cellulose both trigger the production of a wide set of hydrolytic proteins including cellulases, hemicellulases and other glycosyl hydrolases. Our findings highlight the extensive and unexplored structural diversity of enzymatic systems in cellulolytic soil bacteria and indicate the roles of multiple abundant bacterial taxa in the decomposition of cellulose and other plant polysaccharides. PMID:27125755

  20. Chiral Plasmonics Using Twisting along Cellulose Nanocrystals as a Template for Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majoinen, Johanna; Hassinen, Jukka; Haataja, Johannes S; Rekola, Heikki T; Kontturi, Eero; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Ras, Robin H A; Törmä, Päivi; Ikkala, Olli

    2016-07-01

    The right-handed twist along aqueous dispersed cellulose nanocrystals allows right-handed chiral plasmonics upon electrostatic binding of gold nanoparticles in dilute environment, through tuning the particle sizes and concentrations. Simulations using nanoparticle coordinates from cryo-electron tomography confirm the experimental results. The finding suggests generalization for other chiral and helical colloidal templates for nanoscale chiral plasmonics.

  1. Multiwavelength variability analysis of the FSRQ 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.; León-Tavares, J.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Fernandes, S.; Schlegel, E. M.; López-Rodríguez, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present a multifrequency analysis of the variability in the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 from 2008 to 2014. Our multiwavelength dataset includes gamma-ray data from Fermi/LAT (Abdo et al. 2009), observations in 1mm from SMA (Gurwell et al. 2007), Near Infrared from OAGH (Carramiñana & Carrasco 2009) and SMARTS (Bonning et al. 2012); optical V band from the Steward Observatory (Smith et al. 2009) and SMARTS; optical spectra from OAGH (Patiño-Álvarez et al. 2013) and the Steward Observatory; and polarization spectra from the Steward Observatory. The light curves are shown in Fig. 1. Six out of seven optical activity periods identified within our dataset show clear counterparts in mm, NIR and gamma-rays, however, the late 2011 - early 2012 optical flare does not have a counterpart in the GeV regime. In this contribution, we discuss the flaring evolution of 3C 279 and speculate about the production of the anomalous activity period.

  2. Shocked Molecular Gas in the SNR 3C391

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, D. C.-J.; Wright, M. C. H.; Frail, D. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Wilner, D. J.

    1999-05-01

    The discovery of OH (1720 MHz) masers in supernova remnants (SNRs) provides us with a convenient method for identifying promising candidates for studies of SNR/molecular cloud interactions. One remnant which is an ideal subject is 3C391. Here, single dish observations reveal a myriad of molecular lines from a giant shocked cloud at the blast-wave of the remnant. We present recent millimeter-wave observations of 3C391 with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array. We have imaged the region towards the OH maser in HCN (J=1--0) and HCO+ (J=1--0) at a resolution of 4 arcsec. The morphology and brightness of the emission in HCO+ and HCN are similar; we resolve the shocked cloud seen by Frail and Mitchell (1998) into several clumps of characteristic size 10 arcsec. The maser is midway between two of these clumps, rather than being coincident with the peak column density. The clumps all have similar spectra with line-widths of ~ 30 km s(-1) , although there is evidence for a velocity gradient between the clumps. We examine the physical conditions of the shocked environment and discuss the relative abundances of the molecules. A companion study of the interaction between the SNR W51C and an associated molecular cloud is underway.

  3. Investigation and characterization of oxidized cellulose and cellulose nanofiber films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han

    Over the last two decades, a large amount of research has focused on natural cellulose fibers, since they are "green" and renewable raw materials. Recently, nanomaterials science has attracted wide attention due to the large surface area and unique properties of nanoparticles. Cellulose certainly is becoming an important material in nanomaterials science, with the increasing demand of environmentally friendly materials. In this work, a novel method of preparing cellulose nanofibers (CNF) is being presented. This method contains up to three oxidation steps: periodate, chlorite and TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl) oxidation. The first two oxidation steps are investigated in the first part of this work. Cellulose pulp was oxidized to various extents by a two step-oxidation with sodium periodate, followed by sodium chlorite. The oxidized products can be separated into three different fractions. The mass ratio and charge content of each fraction were determined. The morphology, size distribution and crystallinity index of each fraction were measured by AFM, DLS and XRD, respectively. In the second part of this work, CNF were prepared and modified under various conditions, including (1) the introduction of various amounts of aldehyde groups onto CNF by periodate oxidation; (2) the carboxyl groups in sodium form on CNF were converted to acid form by treated with an acid type ion-exchange resin; (3) CNF were cross-linked in two different ways by employing adipic dihydrazide (ADH) as cross-linker and water-soluble 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylaminopropyl)] carbodiimide (EDC) as carboxyl-activating agent. Films were fabricated with these modified CNF suspensions by vacuum filtration. The optical, mechanical and thermo-stability properties of these films were investigated by UV-visible spectrometry, tensile test and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) and water contact angle (WCA) of these films were also studied.

  4. Single-molecule imaging analysis of elementary reaction steps of Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) hydrolyzing crystalline cellulose Iα and IIII.

    PubMed

    Shibafuji, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akihiko; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Naohisa; Fukuda, Shingo; Watanabe, Hiroki; Samejima, Masahiro; Ando, Toshio; Noji, Hiroyuki; Koivula, Anu; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Iino, Ryota

    2014-05-16

    Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) is a molecular motor that directly hydrolyzes crystalline celluloses into water-soluble cellobioses. It has recently drawn attention as a tool that could be used to convert cellulosic materials into biofuel. However, detailed mechanisms of action, including elementary reaction steps such as binding, processive hydrolysis, and dissociation, have not been thoroughly explored because of the inherent challenges associated with monitoring reactions occurring at the solid/liquid interface. The crystalline cellulose Iα and IIII were previously reported as substrates with different crystalline forms and different susceptibilities to hydrolysis by TrCel7A. In this study, we observed that different susceptibilities of cellulose Iα and IIII are highly dependent on enzyme concentration, and at nanomolar enzyme concentration, TrCel7A shows similar rates of hydrolysis against cellulose Iα and IIII. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and high speed atomic force microscopy, we also determined kinetic constants of the elementary reaction steps for TrCel7A against cellulose Iα and IIII. These measurements were performed at picomolar enzyme concentration in which density of TrCel7A on crystalline cellulose was very low. Under this condition, TrCel7A displayed similar binding and dissociation rate constants for cellulose Iα and IIII and similar fractions of productive binding on cellulose Iα and IIII. Furthermore, once productively bound, TrCel7A processively hydrolyzes and moves along cellulose Iα and IIII with similar translational rates. With structural models of cellulose Iα and IIII, we propose that different susceptibilities at high TrCel7A concentration arise from surface properties of substrate, including ratio of hydrophobic surface and number of available lanes. PMID:24692563

  5. Single-molecule imaging analysis of elementary reaction steps of Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) hydrolyzing crystalline cellulose Iα and IIII.

    PubMed

    Shibafuji, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akihiko; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Naohisa; Fukuda, Shingo; Watanabe, Hiroki; Samejima, Masahiro; Ando, Toshio; Noji, Hiroyuki; Koivula, Anu; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Iino, Ryota

    2014-05-16

    Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) is a molecular motor that directly hydrolyzes crystalline celluloses into water-soluble cellobioses. It has recently drawn attention as a tool that could be used to convert cellulosic materials into biofuel. However, detailed mechanisms of action, including elementary reaction steps such as binding, processive hydrolysis, and dissociation, have not been thoroughly explored because of the inherent challenges associated with monitoring reactions occurring at the solid/liquid interface. The crystalline cellulose Iα and IIII were previously reported as substrates with different crystalline forms and different susceptibilities to hydrolysis by TrCel7A. In this study, we observed that different susceptibilities of cellulose Iα and IIII are highly dependent on enzyme concentration, and at nanomolar enzyme concentration, TrCel7A shows similar rates of hydrolysis against cellulose Iα and IIII. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and high speed atomic force microscopy, we also determined kinetic constants of the elementary reaction steps for TrCel7A against cellulose Iα and IIII. These measurements were performed at picomolar enzyme concentration in which density of TrCel7A on crystalline cellulose was very low. Under this condition, TrCel7A displayed similar binding and dissociation rate constants for cellulose Iα and IIII and similar fractions of productive binding on cellulose Iα and IIII. Furthermore, once productively bound, TrCel7A processively hydrolyzes and moves along cellulose Iα and IIII with similar translational rates. With structural models of cellulose Iα and IIII, we propose that different susceptibilities at high TrCel7A concentration arise from surface properties of substrate, including ratio of hydrophobic surface and number of available lanes.

  6. Cellulose Aggregation under Hydrothermal Pretreatment Conditions.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Kovalenko, Andriy; Skaf, Munir S

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, represents a resource for sustainable production of biofuels. Thermochemical treatments make lignocellulosic biomaterials more amenable to depolymerization by exposing cellulose microfibrils to enzymatic or chemical attacks. In such treatments, the solvent plays fundamental roles in biomass modification, but the molecular events underlying these changes are still poorly understood. Here, the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation has been employed to analyze the role of water in cellulose aggregation under different thermodynamic conditions. The results show that, under ambient conditions, highly structured hydration shells around cellulose create repulsive forces that protect cellulose microfibrils from aggregating. Under hydrothermal pretreatment conditions, however, the hydration shells lose structure, and cellulose aggregation is favored. These effects are largely due to a decrease in cellulose-water interactions relative to those at ambient conditions, so that cellulose-cellulose attractive interactions become prevalent. Our results provide an explanation to the observed increase in the lateral size of cellulose crystallites when biomass is subject to pretreatments and deepen the current understanding of the mechanisms of biomass modification. PMID:27301535

  7. Biodegradation of cellulose acetate by Neisseria sicca.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K; Yamauchi, T; Nakasu, F; Ohe, T

    1996-10-01

    Bacteria capable of assimilating cellulose acetate, strains SB and SC, were isolated from soil on a medium containing cellulose acetate as a carbon source, and identified as Neisseria sicca. Both strains degraded cellulose acetate membrane filters (degree of substitution, DS, mixture of 2.8 and 2.0) and textiles (DS, 2.34) in a medium containing cellulose acetate (DS, 2.34) or its oligomer, but were not able to degrade these materials in a medium containing cellobiose octaacetate. Biodegradation of cellulose acetate (DS, 1.81 and 2.34) on the basis of biochemical oxygen demand reached 51 and 40% in the culture of N. sicca SB and 60 and 45% in the culture of N. sicca SC within 20 days. A decrease in the acetyl content of degraded cellulose acetate films and powder was confirmed by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. After 10-day cultivation of N. sicca SB and SC, the number-average molecular weight of residual cellulose acetate decreased by 9 and 5%, respectively. Activities of enzymes that released acetic acid and produced reducing sugars from cellulose acetate were mainly present in the culture supernatant. Reactivity of enzymes for cellulose acetate (DS, 1.81) was higher than that for cellulose acetate (DS, 2.34).

  8. First-principles study of helium trapping in cementite Fe3C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B. L.; Ping, D. H.; Geng, W. T.

    2014-01-01

    We report a first-principles density functional theory study of helium distribution in cementite Fe3C. The solution energy of interstitial He is similar to that in bcc Fe; by contrast, the substitutional He (replacing Fe) is remarkably (0.74 eV) more stable than in the latter, due to the easiness of Fe vacancy formation in Fe3C. Therefore, He is predicted to be significantly more soluble in cementite than in Fe matrix. We find the binding potencies of both a substitutional-interstitial He pair (0.21 eV) and a substitutional-substitutional He pair (0.22 eV) are noticeably weaker in cementite than in bcc Fe, indicating a less powerful self-trapping. As a consequence, small size cementite in ferritic steels might serve as scattered trapping centers for He, mitigate helium bubble growth, and make the steel more swelling resistant while under neutron irradiation, just as dispersed oxide particles do.

  9. Major Optical Outburst of Two Blazars: 3C66A and OJ287

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, K. K.; Ramsey, B. D.; Soundararajaperumal, S.; Pukalenthi, S.; Rosario, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Differential CCD photometric observations of 3C66A and OJ287 were carried out on 16 and 35 nights between December 1995 and March 1996, at the Vainu Bappu Observatory, India, as part of the blazar monitoring program. During this period we detected major optical outbursts (brightness of 3C66A and OJ287 increased by 0.8 and 1 mag, respectively) of these two blazars on timescales of two months. Integrating the outburst profiles we find that both the blazars released around 10(exp 53) erg. Such large amount of energy may come from the release of binding energy of a compact star when tidally disrupted by a super-massive black hole at the center of these blazars. Also we extend this model to explain the observed multifrequency (radio through gamma-ray) outburst of these two blazars and show that this model will be able to explain the outburst phenomena of other blazars. These new results will be presented with a detailed discussion of the suggested model.

  10. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, An; Gomes, Thiago C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  11. Evidence for a cyclic diguanylic acid-dependent cellulose synthase in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Y; Mayer, R; Benziman, M; Delmer, D

    1991-01-01

    Because numerous attempts to detect an activity for a cellulose synthase in plants have failed, we have taken a different approach toward detecting polypeptides involved in this process. The uniqueness of the structure and function of cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) as an activator of the cellulose synthase of the bacterium Acetobacter xylinum makes it an attractive probe to use in a search for a c-di-GMP receptor that might be involved in the process in plants. Direct photolabeling with 32P-c-di-GMP has been used, therefore, to identify in plants two membrane polypeptides of 83 and 48 kD derived from cotton fibers that possess properties consistent with their being components of a c-di-GMP-dependent cellulose synthase. Based upon several criteria, the 48-kD species is proposed to be derived by proteolytic cleavage of the 83-kD polypeptide. Both polypeptides bind c-di-GMP with high affinity and specificity and show antigenic relatedness to the bacterial cellulose synthase, and the N-terminal sequence of the 48-kD polypeptide also indicates relatedness to the bacterial synthase. Ability to detect both cotton fiber polypeptides by photolabeling increases markedly in extracts derived from fibers entering the active phase of secondary wall cellulose synthesis. These results provide a basis for future work aimed at identifying and characterizing genes involved in cellulose synthesis in plants. PMID:1668373

  12. 17 CFR 270.3c-4 - Definition of “common trust fund” as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of âcommon trust... 1940 § 270.3c-4 Definition of “common trust fund” as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act. The term common trust fund as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act (15 U.S.C. 80a-3(c)(3)) shall include a...

  13. A Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose Degrading Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes, in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic microbial cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated with biofuel development. PMID:23176123

  14. Suite of Activity-Based Probes for Cellulose-Degrading Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Weaver, Holly M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-12-19

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry, and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for LC-MS analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic cellulose degrading systems, and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated within biofuel development.

  15. An Efficient, Regioselective Pathway to Cationic and Zwitterionic N-Heterocyclic Cellulose Ionomers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu; Liu, Jianzhao; Esker, Alan R; Edgar, Kevin J

    2016-02-01

    Cationic derivatives of cellulose and other polysaccharides are attractive targets for biomedical applications due to their propensity for electrostatically binding with anionic biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and certain proteins. To date, however, relatively few practical synthetic methods have been described for their preparation. Herein, we report a useful and efficient strategy for cationic cellulose ester salt preparation by the reaction of 6-bromo-6-deoxycellulose acetate with pyridine or 1-methylimidazole. Dimethyl sulfoxide solvent favored this displacement reaction to produce cationic cellulose acetate derivatives, resulting in high degrees of substitution (DS) exclusively at the C-6 position. These cationic cellulose derivatives bearing substantial, permanent positive charge exhibit surprising thermal stability, dissolve readily in water, and bind strongly with a hydrophilic and anionic surface, supporting their potential for a variety of applications such as permeation enhancement, mucoadhesion, and gene or drug delivery. Expanding upon this chemistry, we reacted a 6-imidazolyl-6-deoxycellulose derivative with 1,3-propane sultone to demonstrate the potential for further elaboration to regioselectively substituted zwitterionic cellulose derivatives.

  16. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  17. Magnetic Mesoporous Photonic Cellulose Films.

    PubMed

    Giese, Michael; Blusch, Lina K; Schlesinger, Maik; Meseck, Georg R; Hamad, Wadood Y; Arjmand, Mohammad; Sundararaj, Uttandaraman; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2016-09-13

    Novel hybrid materials of cellulose and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and characterized. The materials combine the chiral nematic structural features of mesoporous photonic cellulose (MPC) with the magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4). The photonic, magnetic, and dielectric properties of the hybrid materials were investigated during the dynamic swelling and deswelling of the MPC films. It was observed that the dielectric properties of the generated MPC films increased tremendously following swelling in water, endorsing efficient swelling ability of the generated mesoporous films. The high magnetic permeability of the developed MPC films in conjunction with their superior dielectric properties, predominantly in the swollen state, makes them interesting for electromagnetic interference shielding applications. PMID:27588561

  18. 17 CFR 270.3c-3 - Definition of certain terms used in section 3(c)(1) of the Act with respect to certain debt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... investment companies. 270.3c-3 Section 270.3c-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.3c-3 Definition of certain... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of certain...

  19. Development of potent inhibitors of the coxsackievirus 3C protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eui Seung; Lee, Won Gil; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Rho, Seong Hwan; Im, Isak; Yang, Sung Tae; Sellamuthu, Saravanan; Lee, Yong Jae; Kwon, Sun Jae; Park, Ohkmae K.; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Park, Woo Jin . E-mail: wjpark@gist.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Chul . E-mail: yongchul@gist.ac.kr

    2007-06-22

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3C protease (3CP) plays essential roles in the viral replication cycle, and therefore, provides an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of human diseases caused by CVB3 infection. CVB3 3CP and human rhinovirus (HRV) 3CP have a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity. Comparative modeling of these two 3CPs revealed one prominent distinction; an Asn residue delineating the S2' pocket in HRV 3CP is replaced by a Tyr residue in CVB3 3CP. AG7088, a potent inhibitor of HRV 3CP, was modified by substitution of the ethyl group at the P2' position with various hydrophobic aromatic rings that are predicted to interact preferentially with the Tyr residue in the S2' pocket of CVB3 3CP. The resulting derivatives showed dramatically increased inhibitory activities against CVB3 3CP. In addition, one of the derivatives effectively inhibited the CVB3 proliferation in vitro.

  20. Milliarcsecond polarization structure of the superluminal quasar 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David H.; Kollgaard, Ronald I.; Brown, Leslie F.; Gabuzda, Denise C.; Wardle, John F. C.

    1990-09-01

    A 2 x 10 marcsec-resolution determination is presented for the total intensity and linear polarization structures of the superluminal quasar 3C 273 at 5 GHz. Substantial polarized flux was detected from several superluminal components of the jet, whose fractional polarization increased symmetrically with distance from the core; the most distant component is highly polarized and exhibits a highly ordered magnetic field. Within a few marcsec of the core, the inferred magnetic field orientation varies rapidly with position along the jet. The primarily longitudinal magnetic field orientation is concluded to become established within 20 marcsec of the core. A highly disorganized magnetic field is the most plausible explanation for the low degree of polarization in the innermost regions of the jet.

  1. Trisodium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7)

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tris­odium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7), has been solved and refined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional theory (DFT). There are two independent five-coordinate Na+ and one six-coordinate Na+ cations in the asymmetric unit. The [NaO5] and [NaO6] polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework. There are channels parallel to the a and b axes in which the remainder of the citrate anions reside. The only hydrogen bonds are an intra­molecular one between the hy­droxy group and one of the terminal carboxyl­ate O atoms and an intermolecular one between a methylene group and the hydroxyl O atom. PMID:27308044

  2. Anisotropies in the HI gas distribution toward 3C 196

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The local Galactic Hi gas was found to contain cold neutral medium (CNM) filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission. These filaments appear to be dominated by the magnetic field and in this case turbulence is expected to show distinct anisotropies. Aims: We use the Galactic Effelsberg-Bonn Hi Survey (EBHIS) to derive 2D turbulence spectra for the Hi distribution in direction to 3C 196 and two more comparison fields. Methods: Prior to Fourier transform we apply a rotational symmetric 50% Tukey window to apodize the data. We derive average as well as position angle dependent power spectra. Anisotropies in the power distribution are defined as the ratio of the spectral power in orthogonal directions. Results: We find strong anisotropies. For a narrow range in position angle, in direction perpendicular to the filaments and the magnetic field, the spectral power is on average more than an order of magnitude larger than parallel. In the most extreme case the anisotropy reaches locally a factor of 130. Anisotropies increase on average with spatial frequency as predicted by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995, ApJ, 438, 763), at the same time the Kolmogorov spectral index remains almost unchanged. The strongest anisotropies are observable for a narrow range in velocity and decay with a power law index close to -8/3, almost identical to the average isotropic spectral index of -2.9 <γ< -2.6. Conclusions: Hi filaments, associated with linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations in direction to 3C 196, show turbulence spectra with marked anisotropies. Decaying anisotropies appear to indicate that we witness an ongoing shock passing the Hi and affecting the observed Faraday depth.

  3. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  4. Enzymatic degradation studies of pectin and cellulose from red beets.

    PubMed

    Dongowski, G

    2001-10-01

    The influence of structural features of the cell wall polysaccharides pectin and cellulose on the enzymatic degradation of red beet was evaluated. Alcohol-insoluble substances and acetone-insoluble residues were prepared from red beets and characterized with respect to the content of dietary fibre, pectin fractions, neutral saccharide composition and water absorption. The high-methylated and high-acetylated pectin component was partly soluble in water and in EDTA. Pectin was hardly extractable from alcohol-insoluble substances as well as from red beets. Isolated pectin could not be completely degraded by pectolytic enzymes. After de-acetylation, the pectic acid from red beets was degradable in a similar rate like citrus pectic acid. From alcohol-insoluble substances, several cellulose and lignin fractions were prepared and analysed. A cellulose preparation from red beets was intensely degraded by cellulases with high activities as shown by the release of reducing end-groups, viscosity and scanning electron microscopy. Cell wall preparations from red beets were able to bind high amounts of water. A decrease in water absorption during enzymatic action or changes in viscosity and flow behaviour are sensitive markers for decomposition or depolymerization processes. Furthermore, an inhibitor of microbial enzymes was isolated from red beets and acetone-insoluble residues. The main reason for the poor enzymatic liquefaction or maceration of red beets by pectolytic and cellulolytic enzymes is the high degree of acetylation of the pectin component.

  5. Engineering of a novel cellulose-adherent cellulolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae for cellulosic biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Sasaki, Kengo; den Haan, Riaan; Inokuma, Kentaro; Ogino, Chiaki; van Zyl, Willem H; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Cellulosic biofuel is the subject of increasing attention. The main obstacle toward its economic feasibility is the recalcitrance of lignocellulose requiring large amount of enzyme to break. Several engineered yeast strains have been developed with cellulolytic activities to reduce the need for enzyme addition, but exhibiting limited effect. Here, we report the successful engineering of a cellulose-adherent Saccharomyces cerevisiae displaying four different synergistic cellulases on the cell surface. The cellulase-displaying yeast strain exhibited clear cell-to-cellulose adhesion and a "tearing" cellulose degradation pattern; the adhesion ability correlated with enhanced surface area and roughness of the target cellulose fibers, resulting in higher hydrolysis efficiency. The engineered yeast directly produced ethanol from rice straw despite a more than 40% decrease in the required enzyme dosage for high-density fermentation. Thus, improved cell-to-cellulose interactions provided a novel strategy for increasing cellulose hydrolysis, suggesting a mechanism for promoting the feasibility of cellulosic biofuel production. PMID:27079382

  6. Effects of reaction conditions on cellulose structures synthesized in vitro by bacterial cellulose synthases.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Paavo A; Sugiyama, Junji; Imai, Tomoya

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was synthesized by cellulose synthases extracted from the Komagataeibacter xylinus (formerly known as Gluconacetobacter xylinus). The effects of temperature and centrifugation of the reaction solution on the synthesis products were investigated. Cellulose with number-average degree of polymerization (DPn) roughly in the range 60-80 and cellulose II crystal structure was produced under all conditions. The amount of cellulose varied with temperature and centrifugation, and the centrifugation at 2000 × g also slightly reduced the DPn. Cellulose production was maximal around the temperature 35 °C and without centrifugation. At higher temperatures and during centrifugation at 2000 × g the proteins started to denature, causing differences also in the morphology of the cellulosic aggregates, as seen with electron microscopy. These observations serve as a basis for discussions about the factors affecting the structure formation and chain length of in vitro synthesized cellulose. PMID:26572398

  7. Effects of reaction conditions on cellulose structures synthesized in vitro by bacterial cellulose synthases.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Paavo A; Sugiyama, Junji; Imai, Tomoya

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was synthesized by cellulose synthases extracted from the Komagataeibacter xylinus (formerly known as Gluconacetobacter xylinus). The effects of temperature and centrifugation of the reaction solution on the synthesis products were investigated. Cellulose with number-average degree of polymerization (DPn) roughly in the range 60-80 and cellulose II crystal structure was produced under all conditions. The amount of cellulose varied with temperature and centrifugation, and the centrifugation at 2000 × g also slightly reduced the DPn. Cellulose production was maximal around the temperature 35 °C and without centrifugation. At higher temperatures and during centrifugation at 2000 × g the proteins started to denature, causing differences also in the morphology of the cellulosic aggregates, as seen with electron microscopy. These observations serve as a basis for discussions about the factors affecting the structure formation and chain length of in vitro synthesized cellulose.

  8. The case for cellulose production on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rummel, John D.

    1989-01-01

    From examining the consequences of not requiring that all wastes from life support be recycled back to the food plants, it is concluded that cellulose production on Mars could be an important input for many nonmetabolic material requirements on Mars. The fluxes of carbon in cellulose production would probably exceed those in food production, and therefore settlements on Mars could utilize cellulose farms in building a Mars infrastructure.

  9. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  10. High performance cellulose nanocomposites: comparing the reinforcing ability of bacterial cellulose and nanofibrillated cellulose.

    PubMed

    Lee, Koon-Yang; Tammelin, Tekla; Schulfter, Kerstin; Kiiskinen, Harri; Samela, Juha; Bismarck, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    This work investigates the surface and bulk properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and bacterial cellulose (BC), as well as their reinforcing ability in polymer nanocomposites. BC possesses higher critical surface tension of 57 mN m(-1) compared to NFC (41 mN m(-1)). The thermal degradation temperature in both nitrogen and air atmosphere of BC was also found to be higher than that of NFC. These results are in good agreement with the higher crystallinity of BC as determined by XRD, measured to be 71% for BC as compared to NFC of 41%. Nanocellulose papers were prepared from BC and NFC. Both papers possessed similar tensile moduli and strengths of 12 GPa and 110 MPa, respectively. Nanocomposites were manufactured by impregnating the nanocellulose paper with an epoxy resin using vacuum assisted resin infusion. The cellulose reinforced epoxy nanocomposites had a stiffness and strength of approximately ∼8 GPa and ∼100 MPa at an equivalent fiber volume fraction of 60 vol.-%. In terms of the reinforcing ability of NFC and BC in a polymer matrix, no significant difference between NFC and BC was observed. PMID:22839594

  11. Cellulose Synthase Complexes: Composition and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Live cell imaging has greatly advanced our knowledge on the molecular mechanism by which cellulose is deposited. Both the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton are involved in assuring the proper distribution, organization, and dynamics of cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). This review is an update on the most recent progress on the characterization of the composition, regulation, and trafficking of CSCs. With the newly identified cellulose synthase interactive protein 1 (CSI1) on hand, we begin to unveil the mystery of an intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and microtubules. PMID:22639663

  12. Synthesis, micellization behavior and alcohol induced amphipathic cellulose film of cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fang; Liu, Ya-nan; Yu, Jian-ling; Li, Hai-peng; Li, Gang

    2015-08-01

    This paper presented a novel preparation method of the cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant, and the surfactant was used to prepare amphipathic cellulose membrane. The native cotton cellulose was tailored to cellulose segments in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. Then, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic modification of cellulose segments were carried out by esterification and graft polymerization of the ɛ-caprolactone (ɛ-CL) monomer onto the hydroxyl group of cellulose as well as sulphonation with sulfamic acid. The amphipathic cellulose membrane was made by cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. The molecular structure of amphipathic cellulose surfactant was confirmed by FT-IR, and its surface active properties were investigated by Wilhelmy plate method and Steady-state fluorescence probe method, respectively. Experimental results showed that cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant caused low interfacial tension of 48.62 mN/m and its critical micelle concentration (cmc) value was 0.65 wt% when the grafting ratio of cellulose-g-PCL (poly-caprolactone) was 25.40%. The contact angle between a droplet of water and the surface of membrane was 90.84o, and the surface free energy of the alcohol induced cellulose membrane was 15.7 mJ/m2. This study may help increase using natural and biodegradable surface-activity materials with improved properties as surfactants.

  13. Synthesis, micellization behavior and alcohol induced amphipathic cellulose film of cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fang; Liu, Ya-nan; Yu, Jian-ling; Li, Hai-peng; Li, Gang

    2015-08-01

    This paper presented a novel preparation method of the cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant, and the surfactant was used to prepare amphipathic cellulose membrane. The native cotton cellulose was tailored to cellulose segments in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. Then, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic modification of cellulose segments were carried out by esterification and graft polymerization of the ɛ-caprolactone (ɛ-CL) monomer onto the hydroxyl group of cellulose as well as sulphonation with sulfamic acid. The amphipathic cellulose membrane was made by cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. The molecular structure of amphipathic cellulose surfactant was confirmed by FT-IR, and its surface active properties were investigated by Wilhelmy plate method and Steady-state fluorescence probe method, respectively. Experimental results showed that cellulose-based amphiphilic surfactant caused low interfacial tension of 48.62 mN/m and its critical micelle concentration (cmc) value was 0.65 wt% when the grafting ratio of cellulose-g-PCL (poly-caprolactone) was 25.40%. The contact angle between a droplet of water and the surface of membrane was 90.84o, and the surface free energy of the alcohol induced cellulose membrane was 15.7 mJ/m2. This study may help increase using natural and biodegradable surface-activity materials with improved properties as surfactants.

  14. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    DOE PAGES

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; Payyavula, Raja S.; Samuel, Reichel; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose,more » a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.« less

  15. Simultaneous cellulose conversion and hydrogen production assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV-light photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guan; Ni, Chengsheng; Huang, Xiubing; Welgamage, Aakash; Lawton, Linda A; Robertson, Peter K J; Irvine, John T S

    2016-01-28

    Photocatalytic conversion of cellulose to sugars and carbon dioxide with simultaneous production of hydrogen assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV or solar light irradiation was achieved upon immobilization of cellulose onto a TiO2 photocatalyst. This approach enables production of hydrogen from water without using valuable sacrificial agents, and provides the possibility for recovering sugars as liquid fuels.

  16. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling.

  17. The Aligned z~1 Radio Galaxy 3C 280

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Susan E.; Stockton, Alan; Lacy, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The z~1 radio galaxy 3C 280 has a particularly striking rest-frame UV morphology, with multiple line and continuum components precisely aligned with the radio structure, including an obvious semicircular arc. Here we explore the nature of these various components by bringing together Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based imaging, ground-based spectroscopy, and radio mapping. From plausible decompositions of the spectra, we show that the continuum of the nuclear component is likely dominated by a combination of nebular thermal continuum, quasar light, and light from old stars. A component that falls directly on the probable path of the radio jet shows mostly nebular thermal continuum and includes contributions from a relatively young stellar population with age around 100 Myr. The arc appears to be completely dominated by line emission and nebular thermal continuum, with no evidence for a significant stellar contribution. Although much of the aligned light is in UV components, the underlying old elliptical galaxy is also well aligned with the radio axis. The elliptical galaxy is well fitted by a de Vaucouleurs profile, probably has a moderately old stellar population (~3 Gyr), and is a massive system with a velocity dispersion of σ~270 km s-1 that implies that it contains a supermassive black hole. Although the arc and the extended emission surrounding the eastern lobe suggest that interactions between the radio lobe and jet must have been important in creating the UV morphology, the ionization and kinematic properties in these components are more consistent with photoionization than shock excitation. 3C 280 may be a transition object between the compact steep-spectrum radio galaxies, which seem to be shock-dominated, and the extended radio sources, which may have evolved past this phase and rarely show shock signatures. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  18. Epstein-Barr virus EBNA3C represses Cp, the major promoter for EBNA expression, but has no effect on the promoter of the cell gene CD21.

    PubMed Central

    Radkov, S A; Bain, M; Farrell, P J; West, M; Rowe, M; Allday, M J

    1997-01-01

    EBNA3C is a potent repressor of transcription when bound to DNA as a fusion with the DNA binding domain (DBD) of GALA. A survey of promoters has revealed that the wild-type, unfused EBNA3C can specifically repress expression from reporter plasmids containing the Epstein-Barr virus Cp latency-associated promoter. Repression of Cp activity required amino acids 207 to 368, which encompasses a region resembling a basic DBD adjacent to a leucine zipper DNA binding motif and a site which binds to the cellular factor CBF1/RBP-Jkappa. However, amino acids 207 to 368 are dispensable when the protein is bound to DNA as a fusion with the GAL4 DBD, thus implicating this region in DNA binding. Mutation of the CBF1/RBP-Jkappa binding site in EBNA3C abrogated repression, strongly suggesting that CBF1/RBP-Jkappa is necessary for targeting the viral protein to Cp. Consistent with this result, mutation of the EBNA2 response element (a CBF1/RBP-Jkappa binding site) in Cp also prevented significant repression. In addition, amino acids 346 to 543, which were previously defined as important for the repressor activity of the GAL4-EBNA3C fusion proteins, also appear to be necessary for the repression of Cp. Since repression by these fusions was not observed in all cell types, it seems likely that EBNA3C either depends on a corepressor which may interact with amino acids 346 to 543 or is modified in a cell-specific manner in order to repress. These data are consistent with EBNA3C contributing to the regulation of EBNA expression in latently infected B cells through CBF1/RBP-Jkappa and another factor, but this need not directly involve EBNA2. Finally, although it has been reported that EBNA3C can upregulate CD21 in some B cells, we were unable to demonstrate any effect of EBNA3C on reporter plasmids which contain the CD21 promoter. PMID:9343213

  19. Microtubules and cellulose biosynthesis: the emergence of new players.

    PubMed

    Li, Shundai; Lei, Lei; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Gu, Ying

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules determine the orientation of newly formed cellulose microfibrils in expanding cells. There are many hypotheses regarding how the information is transduced across the plasma membrane from microtubules to cellulose microfibrils. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the co-alignment between microtubules and cellulose microfibrils were not revealed until the recent discovery of cellulose synthase interacting (CSI) proteins. Characterization of CSIs and additional cellulose synthase-associated proteins will greatly advance the knowledge of how cellulose microfibrils are organized.

  20. [Terahertz and Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Cellulose].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-hua; Zhang, Le; Shentu, Nan-ying

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the Terahertz's application prospect, corn, wheat husk and reed were used to detect their Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy, and be compared with that of cellulose powder. The experimental results show that all of their absorption peaks exist at 1.75, 1.62, 1.1, and 0.7 THz. Absorption intensity of cellulose powder, corn, wheat husk and reed were compared in some frequencies points. It finds that corn, wheat husk and reed have higher absorption intensity than cellulose powder in early frequency domain. However, absorption intensity of cellulose powder is the strongest at 1.62 THz. Cellulose content in corn, wheat husk and reed were detected by using the method of chemical analysis. The peaks of absorption coefficient are related to their cellulose content at this frequency. It shows that plant cellulose occur lattice vibration in the frequency. Deformation, bending, flexing, and other changes appear to their functional keys. Quantum chemical calculation was carried out by using density functional theory to cellulose and the structure diagram of cellulose molecular formula was obtained. It also finds some absorption peaks exist at 0.7, 1.1, and 1.75 THz. Characterization of cellulose clusters mainly includes CH2, OH, CH, and so on. Glucose hydroxyl radical on the ring is active in the cellulose chain. Where hydroxyl related chemical reaction can occur, Hydroxyl can also be integrated into the intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bond. Terahertz wave can promote hydrogen bond vibration. This kind of vibration is weak in the intermolecular interaction. The vibration and rotating happen in dipole transition. The crystal lattice rotates and is absorptive in low frequency, and large molecular skeleton vibrates. All of them can show different intensity and position of the absorption peak in the terahertz band. Corn and cellulose were analyzed by infrared spectrum. The reverse and vibration mode of cellulose was discussed. The absorption peak is

  1. [Terahertz and Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Cellulose].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-hua; Zhang, Le; Shentu, Nan-ying

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the Terahertz's application prospect, corn, wheat husk and reed were used to detect their Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy, and be compared with that of cellulose powder. The experimental results show that all of their absorption peaks exist at 1.75, 1.62, 1.1, and 0.7 THz. Absorption intensity of cellulose powder, corn, wheat husk and reed were compared in some frequencies points. It finds that corn, wheat husk and reed have higher absorption intensity than cellulose powder in early frequency domain. However, absorption intensity of cellulose powder is the strongest at 1.62 THz. Cellulose content in corn, wheat husk and reed were detected by using the method of chemical analysis. The peaks of absorption coefficient are related to their cellulose content at this frequency. It shows that plant cellulose occur lattice vibration in the frequency. Deformation, bending, flexing, and other changes appear to their functional keys. Quantum chemical calculation was carried out by using density functional theory to cellulose and the structure diagram of cellulose molecular formula was obtained. It also finds some absorption peaks exist at 0.7, 1.1, and 1.75 THz. Characterization of cellulose clusters mainly includes CH2, OH, CH, and so on. Glucose hydroxyl radical on the ring is active in the cellulose chain. Where hydroxyl related chemical reaction can occur, Hydroxyl can also be integrated into the intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bond. Terahertz wave can promote hydrogen bond vibration. This kind of vibration is weak in the intermolecular interaction. The vibration and rotating happen in dipole transition. The crystal lattice rotates and is absorptive in low frequency, and large molecular skeleton vibrates. All of them can show different intensity and position of the absorption peak in the terahertz band. Corn and cellulose were analyzed by infrared spectrum. The reverse and vibration mode of cellulose was discussed. The absorption peak is

  2. Pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb

    Sugars are the feedstocks for many promising advanced cellulosic biofuels. Traditional sugars derived from starch and sugar crops are limited in their availability. In principle, more plentiful supply of sugars can be obtained from depolymerization of cellulose, the most abundant form of biomass in the world. Breaking the glycosidic bonds between the pyranose rings in the cellulose chain to liberate glucose has usually been pursued by enzymatic hydrolysis although a purely thermal depolymerization route to sugars is also possible. Fast pyrolysis of pure cellulose yields primarily levoglucosan, an anhydrosugar that can be hydrolyzed to glucose. However, naturally occurring alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEM) in biomass are strongly catalytic toward ring-breaking reactions that favor formation of light oxygenates over anhydrosugars. Removing the AAEM by washing was shown to be effective in increasing the yield of anhydrosugars; but this process involves removal of large amount of water from biomass that renders it energy intensive and thereby impractical. In this work passivation of the AAEM (making them less active or inactive) using mineral acid infusion was explored that will increase the yield of anhydrosugars from fast pyrolysis of biomass. Mineral acid infusion was tried by previous researchers, but the possibility of chemical reactions between infused acid and AAEM in the biomass appears to have been overlooked, possibly because metal cations might be expected to already be substantially complexed to chlorine or other strong anions that are found in biomass. Likewise, it appears that previous researchers assumed that as long as AAEM cations were in the biomass, they would be catalytically active regardless of the nature of their complexion with anions. On the contrary, we hypothesized that AAEM can be converted to inactive or less active salts using mineral acids. Various biomass feedstocks were infused with mineral (hydrochloric, nitric, sulfuric and

  3. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  4. [Audiometry in the cellulose industry].

    PubMed

    Corrao, C R; Milano, L; Pedulla, P; Carlesi, G; Bacaloni, A; Monaco, E

    1993-01-01

    A noise level dosimetry and audiometric testing were conducted in a cellulose factory to determine the hazardous noise level and the prevalence of noise induced hearing loss among the exposed workers. The noise level was recorded up to 90 db (A) in several working areas. 18 workers, potentially exposed to noise injury, evidenced a significant hearing loss. While no evidence of noise injury was recorded in a control group of 100 subjects. This finding suggest a strict relationship between audiometric tests, the noise level recorded in the working place and the working seniority of exposed employers. PMID:7720969

  5. Optical and mechanical properties of nanofibrillated cellulose: Toward a robust platform for next-generation green technologies.

    PubMed

    Simão, Claudia D; Reparaz, Juan S; Wagner, Markus R; Graczykowski, Bartlomiej; Kreuzer, Martin; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; García, Yamila; Malho, Jani-Markus; Goñi, Alejandro R; Ahopelto, Jouni; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M

    2015-08-01

    Nanofibrillated cellulose, a polymer that can be obtained from one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature, is being increasingly explored due to its outstanding properties for packaging and device applications. Still, open challenges in engineering its intrinsic properties remain to address. To elucidate the optical and mechanical stability of nanofibrillated cellulose as a standalone platform, herein we report on three main findings: (i) for the first time an experimental determination of the optical bandgap of nanofibrillated cellulose, important for future modeling purposes, based on the onset of the optical bandgap of the nanofibrillated cellulose film at Eg≈275 nm (4.5 eV), obtained using absorption and cathodoluminescence measurements. In addition, comparing this result with ab-initio calculations of the electronic structure the exciton binding energy is estimated to be Eex≈800 meV; (ii) hydrostatic pressure experiments revealed that nanofibrillated cellulose is structurally stable at least up to 1.2 GPa; and (iii) surface elastic properties with repeatability better than 5% were observed under moisture cycles with changes of the Young modulus as large as 65%. The results obtained show the precise determination of significant properties as elastic properties and interactions that are compared with similar works and, moreover, demonstrate that nanofibrillated cellulose properties can be reversibly controlled, supporting the extended potential of nanofibrillated cellulose as a robust platform for green-technology applications.

  6. Observations of Titan 3C-4 Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan 3C-4 Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper will present a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots will also be shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) believed to be associated with the Titan break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN# 25001, 33509, 33510) and the parent rocket body. Color index data will be used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In 2012, the SSN added 16 additional fragments to the catalogue. MODEST acquired magnitude data on ten Titan fragments in late 2012 and early 2013. The magnitude distribution of all the observed fragments are analyzed as a function of time. In order to better characterize the breakup fragments spectral measurements were acquired on the original rocket body and five Titan fragments using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., Aluminum and various paints) and categorized based on known absorption features for spacecraft materials.

  7. Multispectral Imaging of the Jet in 3C346

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. P.; Gardner, J. P.; Heap, S. R.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    1998-12-01

    Much progress has been made towards understanding the physics of extra-galactic jet flow in the past 10 years, through numerical modeling and detailed multi-frequency radio mapping. However, we still admit that basic parameters such as the magnetic field strength, the particle density, the bulk Lorentz factor and jet configuration (e.g., fast inner jet and slower outer sheath), and the nature and need for shocks remain unknown. However, by resolving the jets spectrally and spatially and pushing the observations to the higher energies with sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the cooling scale lengths, we can place unique constraints on the physical composition of, and acceleration mechanisms in, extra-galactic jets. The tightest constraints on the physics of jets come not from radio observations, but from observations in the optical, UV, and x-ray, where the lifetimes of the synchrotron emitting particles are measured in hundreds of years and the particles travel distances of hundreds of parsecs. To this end, we present radio through vacuum ultraviolet (STIS FUV-MAMA) spatially resolved images of the radio jet in 3C346 and use them examine the spatial variation of the spectral indices. Because the lifetime of the synchrotron radiating particles is inversely proportional to the observed frequency we can use the vastly different timescales (and therefore length scales) over which the radio (t ~ 10(5-7) yr.) and ultraviolet (t ~ 10(2-3) yr.) emitting particles cool to begin to place constraints on the magnetic field strengths. Also, the curvature of the spectrum as a function of position can be compared with aging models to constrain the magnetic field strength and to test the hypothesis that the magnetic field in radio jets may be substantially below equipartition (Heinz and Begelman 1997).

  8. Multiwavelength Observations of 3C66A in 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, M.; Joshi, M.; Fossati, G.; Smith, I. A.; Mukherjee, R.; Bramel, D.; Cui, W.; WEBT Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The radio-selected BL Lac object 3C66A was the target of an intensive multiwavelength observing campaign in the last quarter of 2003 and early 2004. It was monitored by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) collaboration of optical observers, in tandem with 20 X-ray monitoring observations by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), VHE gamma-ray observations by STACEE and VERITAS, and long-term monitoring at radio frequencies. In addition, 9 high-spatial-resolution observations using the VLA are being carried out during the campaign and throughout the year 2004 to follow possible structural changes of the source. A gradual brightening of the source over the course of the campaign was observed at all optical frequencies, culminating in a very bright flare at the end of January 2004. Optical light curves indicate intraday microvariability on time scales down to about 1.3 hours. No significant color-magnitude correlation for the entire data set was evident, but there is a slight indication of a hardness - intensity anti-correlation on intraday time scales. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon spectral index of ˜ 2.1, indicating that the RXTE energy band might be located right at the intersection of the synchrotron and the high-energy emission components of the broadband spectral energy distribution. No significant flux or spectral variability at X-ray energies was detected. We extracted snapshot spectral energy distributions at various times throughout the campaign, and present first spectral fits to those SEDs. This work was partially supported by NASA RXTE GO grant no. NNG 04GB13G.

  9. Synthesis of surface bound silver nanoparticles on cellulose fibers using lignin as multi-functional agent.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sixiao; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2015-10-20

    Lignin has proven to be highly effective "green" multi-functional binding, complexing and reducing agents for silver cations as well as capping agents for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles on ultra-fine cellulose fibrous membranes. Silver nanoparticles could be synthesized in 10min to be densely distributed and stably bound on the cellulose fiber surfaces at up to 2.9% in mass. Silver nanoparticle increased in sizes from 5 to 100nm and became more polydispersed in size distribution on larger fibers and with longer synthesis time. These cellulose fiber bound silver nanoparticles did not agglomerate under elevated temperatures and showed improved thermal stability. The presence of alkali lignin conferred moderate UV absorbing ability in both UV-B and UV-C regions whereas the bound silver nanoparticles exhibited excellent antibacterial activities toward Escherichia coli. PMID:26256169

  10. Synthesis of surface bound silver nanoparticles on cellulose fibers using lignin as multi-functional agent.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sixiao; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2015-10-20

    Lignin has proven to be highly effective "green" multi-functional binding, complexing and reducing agents for silver cations as well as capping agents for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles on ultra-fine cellulose fibrous membranes. Silver nanoparticles could be synthesized in 10min to be densely distributed and stably bound on the cellulose fiber surfaces at up to 2.9% in mass. Silver nanoparticle increased in sizes from 5 to 100nm and became more polydispersed in size distribution on larger fibers and with longer synthesis time. These cellulose fiber bound silver nanoparticles did not agglomerate under elevated temperatures and showed improved thermal stability. The presence of alkali lignin conferred moderate UV absorbing ability in both UV-B and UV-C regions whereas the bound silver nanoparticles exhibited excellent antibacterial activities toward Escherichia coli.

  11. Comparison of physical properties of regenerated cellulose films fabricated with different cellulose feedstocks in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Pang, JinHui; Wu, Miao; Zhang, QiaoHui; Tan, Xin; Xu, Feng; Zhang, XueMing; Sun, RunCang

    2015-05-01

    With the serious "white pollution" resulted from the non-biodegradable plastic films, considerable attention has been directed toward the development of renewable and biodegradable cellulose-based film materials as substitutes of petroleum-derived materials. In this study, environmentally friendly cellulose films were successfully prepared using different celluloses (pine, cotton, bamboo, MCC) as raw materials and ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate as a solvent. The SEM and AFM indicated that all cellulose films displayed a homogeneous and smooth surface. In addition, the FT-IR and XRD analysis showed the transition from cellulose I to II was occurred after the dissolution and regeneration process. Furthermore, the cellulose films prepared by cotton linters and pine possessed the most excellent thermal stability and mechanical properties, which were suggested by the highest onset temperature (285°C) and tensile stress (120 MPa), respectively. Their excellent properties of regenerated cellulose films are promising for applications in food packaging and medical materials.

  12. Effect of rheological properties of dissolved cellulose/microfibrillated cellulose blend suspensions on film forming.

    PubMed

    Saarikoski, Eve; Rissanen, Marja; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-03-30

    Enzymatically treated cellulose was dissolved in a NaOH/ZnO solvent system and mixed together with microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in order to find the threshold in which MFC fibers form a percolation network within the dissolved cellulose solution and in order to improve the properties of regenerated cellulose films. In the aqueous state, correlations between the rheological properties of dissolved cellulose/MFC blend suspensions and MFC fiber concentrations were investigated and rationalized. In addition, rheological properties of diluted MFC suspensions were characterized and a correlation with NaOH concentration was found, thus partly explaining the flow properties of dissolved cellulose/MFC blend suspensions. Finally, based on results from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), MFC addition had strengthening/plasticizing effect on regenerated cellulose films if low concentrations of MFC, below the percolation threshold (5.5-6 wt%, corresponding to 0.16-0.18 wt% of MFC in the blend suspensions), were used.

  13. EBV Nuclear Antigen 3C Mediates Regulation of E2F6 to Inhibit E2F1 Transcription and Promote Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yonggang; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Saha, Abhik; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is considered a ubiquitous herpesvirus with the ability to cause latent infection in humans worldwide. EBV-association is evidently linked to different types of human malignancies, mainly of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Of interest is the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) which is critical for EBV-mediated immortalization. Recently, EBNA3C was shown to bind the E2F1 transcription regulator. The E2F transcription factors have crucial roles in various cellular functions, including cell cycle, DNA replication, DNA repair, cell mitosis, and cell fate. Specifically, E2F6, one of the unique E2F family members, is known to be a pRb-independent transcription repressor of E2F-target genes. In our current study, we explore the role of EBNA3C in regulating E2F6 activities. We observed that EBNA3C plays an important role in inducing E2F6 expression in LCLs. Our study also shows that EBNA3C physically interacts with E2F6 at its amino and carboxy terminal domains and they form a protein complex in human cells. In addition, EBNA3C stabilizes the E2F6 protein and is co-localized in the nucleus. We also demonstrated that both EBNA3C and E2F6 contribute to reduction in E2F1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, E2F1 forms a protein complex with EBNA3C and E2F6, and EBNA3C competes with E2F1 for E2F6 binding. E2F6 is also recruited by EBNA3C to the E2F1 promoter, which is critical for EBNA3C-mediated cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical role for E2F family members in EBV-induced malignancies, and provide new insights for targeting E2F transcription factors in EBV-associated cancers as potential therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:27548379

  14. EBV Nuclear Antigen 3C Mediates Regulation of E2F6 to Inhibit E2F1 Transcription and Promote Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yonggang; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Saha, Abhik; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is considered a ubiquitous herpesvirus with the ability to cause latent infection in humans worldwide. EBV-association is evidently linked to different types of human malignancies, mainly of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Of interest is the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) which is critical for EBV-mediated immortalization. Recently, EBNA3C was shown to bind the E2F1 transcription regulator. The E2F transcription factors have crucial roles in various cellular functions, including cell cycle, DNA replication, DNA repair, cell mitosis, and cell fate. Specifically, E2F6, one of the unique E2F family members, is known to be a pRb-independent transcription repressor of E2F-target genes. In our current study, we explore the role of EBNA3C in regulating E2F6 activities. We observed that EBNA3C plays an important role in inducing E2F6 expression in LCLs. Our study also shows that EBNA3C physically interacts with E2F6 at its amino and carboxy terminal domains and they form a protein complex in human cells. In addition, EBNA3C stabilizes the E2F6 protein and is co-localized in the nucleus. We also demonstrated that both EBNA3C and E2F6 contribute to reduction in E2F1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, E2F1 forms a protein complex with EBNA3C and E2F6, and EBNA3C competes with E2F1 for E2F6 binding. E2F6 is also recruited by EBNA3C to the E2F1 promoter, which is critical for EBNA3C-mediated cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical role for E2F family members in EBV-induced malignancies, and provide new insights for targeting E2F transcription factors in EBV-associated cancers as potential therapeutic intervention strategies.

  15. EBV Nuclear Antigen 3C Mediates Regulation of E2F6 to Inhibit E2F1 Transcription and Promote Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra; Saha, Abhik; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is considered a ubiquitous herpesvirus with the ability to cause latent infection in humans worldwide. EBV-association is evidently linked to different types of human malignancies, mainly of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Of interest is the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) which is critical for EBV-mediated immortalization. Recently, EBNA3C was shown to bind the E2F1 transcription regulator. The E2F transcription factors have crucial roles in various cellular functions, including cell cycle, DNA replication, DNA repair, cell mitosis, and cell fate. Specifically, E2F6, one of the unique E2F family members, is known to be a pRb-independent transcription repressor of E2F-target genes. In our current study, we explore the role of EBNA3C in regulating E2F6 activities. We observed that EBNA3C plays an important role in inducing E2F6 expression in LCLs. Our study also shows that EBNA3C physically interacts with E2F6 at its amino and carboxy terminal domains and they form a protein complex in human cells. In addition, EBNA3C stabilizes the E2F6 protein and is co-localized in the nucleus. We also demonstrated that both EBNA3C and E2F6 contribute to reduction in E2F1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, E2F1 forms a protein complex with EBNA3C and E2F6, and EBNA3C competes with E2F1 for E2F6 binding. E2F6 is also recruited by EBNA3C to the E2F1 promoter, which is critical for EBNA3C-mediated cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical role for E2F family members in EBV-induced malignancies, and provide new insights for targeting E2F transcription factors in EBV-associated cancers as potential therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:27548379

  16. Diffraction from nonperiodic models of cellulose crystals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Powder and fiber diffraction patterns were calculated for model cellulose crystallites with chains 20 glucose units long. Model sizes ranged from four chains to 169 chains, based on cellulose I' coordinates, and were subjected to various combinations of energy minimization and molecular dynamics (M...

  17. Idealized powder diffraction patterns for cellulose polymorphs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose samples are routinely analyzed by X-ray diffraction to determine their crystal type (polymorph) and crystallinity. However, the connection is seldom made between those efforts and the crystal structures of cellulose that have been determined with synchrotron X-radiation and neutron diffrac...

  18. Enzymatic degradation of (ligno)cellulose.

    PubMed

    Bornscheuer, Uwe; Buchholz, Klaus; Seibel, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Glycoside-degrading enzymes play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass into low-price biofuels and high-value-added chemicals. New insight into protein functions and substrate structures, the kinetics of recognition, and degradation events has resulted in a substantial improvement of our understanding of cellulose degradation. PMID:25136976

  19. Cellulose Triacetate Dielectric Films For Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Jow, T. Richard

    1994-01-01

    Cellulose triacetate investigated for use as dielectric material in high-energy-density capacitors for pulsed-electrical-power systems. Films of cellulose triacetate metalized on one or both sides for use as substrates for electrodes and/or as dielectrics between electrodes in capacitors. Used without metalization as simple dielectric films. Advantages include high breakdown strength and self-healing capability.

  20. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis.

  1. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daniel I. C.; Avgerinos, George C.

    1983-01-01

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

  2. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26590309

  3. Salmonella promotes virulence by repressing cellulose production.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Lee, Eun-Jin; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-04-21

    Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. In bacteria, cellulose confers protection against environmental insults and is a constituent of biofilms typically formed on abiotic surfaces. We report that, surprisingly, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium makes cellulose when inside macrophages. We determine that preventing cellulose synthesis increases virulence, whereas stimulation of cellulose synthesis inside macrophages decreases virulence. An attenuated mutant lacking the mgtC gene exhibited increased cellulose levels due to increased expression of the cellulose synthase gene bcsA and of cyclic diguanylate, the allosteric activator of the BcsA protein. Inactivation of bcsA restored wild-type virulence to the Salmonella mgtC mutant, but not to other attenuated mutants displaying a wild-type phenotype regarding cellulose. Our findings indicate that a virulence determinant can promote pathogenicity by repressing a pathogen's antivirulence trait. Moreover, they suggest that controlling antivirulence traits increases long-term pathogen fitness by mediating a trade-off between acute virulence and transmission.

  4. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cellulose ether containing propylene glycol groups attached by an ether linkage which contains, on an... viscosity of 145 centipoises for 10 percent by weight aqueous solution at 25 °C. (2) A cellulose ether containing propylene glycol groups attached by an ether linkage having a hydroxypropoxy (OC3H6OH) content...

  5. 21 CFR 172.870 - Hydroxypropyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cellulose ether containing propylene glycol groups attached by an ether linkage which contains, on an... viscosity of 145 centipoises for 10 percent by weight aqueous solution at 25 °C. (2) A cellulose ether containing propylene glycol groups attached by an ether linkage having a hydroxypropoxy (OC3H6OH) content...

  6. Synthesis of Cellulose Acetate from Cotton Byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton burr and cottonseed hull are relatively inexpensive cotton byproducts. In an effort to derive greater value out of these natural renewable materials, we have succeeded in converting part of them into cellulose acetate without prior chemical breakdown or physical separation of cellulose, ligni...

  7. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOEpatents

    Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

    1983-07-26

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

  8. Salmonella promotes virulence by repressing cellulose production

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Mauricio H.; Lee, Eun-Jin; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. In bacteria, cellulose confers protection against environmental insults and is a constituent of biofilms typically formed on abiotic surfaces. We report that, surprisingly, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium makes cellulose when inside macrophages. We determine that preventing cellulose synthesis increases virulence, whereas stimulation of cellulose synthesis inside macrophages decreases virulence. An attenuated mutant lacking the mgtC gene exhibited increased cellulose levels due to increased expression of the cellulose synthase gene bcsA and of cyclic diguanylate, the allosteric activator of the BcsA protein. Inactivation of bcsA restored wild-type virulence to the Salmonella mgtC mutant, but not to other attenuated mutants displaying a wild-type phenotype regarding cellulose. Our findings indicate that a virulence determinant can promote pathogenicity by repressing a pathogen's antivirulence trait. Moreover, they suggest that controlling antivirulence traits increases long-term pathogen fitness by mediating a trade-off between acute virulence and transmission. PMID:25848006

  9. Salmonella promotes virulence by repressing cellulose production.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Lee, Eun-Jin; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-04-21

    Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. In bacteria, cellulose confers protection against environmental insults and is a constituent of biofilms typically formed on abiotic surfaces. We report that, surprisingly, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium makes cellulose when inside macrophages. We determine that preventing cellulose synthesis increases virulence, whereas stimulation of cellulose synthesis inside macrophages decreases virulence. An attenuated mutant lacking the mgtC gene exhibited increased cellulose levels due to increased expression of the cellulose synthase gene bcsA and of cyclic diguanylate, the allosteric activator of the BcsA protein. Inactivation of bcsA restored wild-type virulence to the Salmonella mgtC mutant, but not to other attenuated mutants displaying a wild-type phenotype regarding cellulose. Our findings indicate that a virulence determinant can promote pathogenicity by repressing a pathogen's antivirulence trait. Moreover, they suggest that controlling antivirulence traits increases long-term pathogen fitness by mediating a trade-off between acute virulence and transmission. PMID:25848006

  10. Single-cell protein from waste cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, C. E.; Callihan, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The recycle, reuse, or reclamation of single cell protein from liquid and solid agricultural waste fibers by a fermentation process is reported. It is shown that cellulose comprises the bulk of the fibers at 50% to 55% of the dry weight of the refuse and that its biodegradability is of prime importance in the choice of a substrate. The application of sodium hydroxide followed by heat and pressure serves to de-polymerize and disrupt lignin structure while swelling the cellulose to increase water uptake and pore volume. Some of the lignin, hemi-celluloses, ash, and cellulose of the material is hydrolized and solubilized. Introduction of microorganisms to the substrate fibers mixed with nutrients produces continuous fermentation of cellulose for further protein extraction and purification.

  11. Reactor optimization for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.H.; Gharpuray, M.M.; Fan, L.T.

    1982-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose furnishes sugar which can be subsequently fermented to ethanol. The production of such sugar at relatively low cost is essential for commercially viable production of ethanol. Many processes have been developed for converting cellulosic materials to sugar, and their economic feasibility has been analyzed; however, relatively little has been done to optimize such processes. A comprehensive mechanistic kinetic model for enzymatic degradation was established previously; it takes into account the structure of cellulose, mode of action of celluloytic enzyme, and mode of interaction between the enzyme and the cellulosic substrate. In the present work this model has been applied to the optimal design of cellulose hydrloysis reactors. Both batch and continously stirred reactors have been considered for this purpose. The fractional contributions of various cost parameters to the production cost have been estimated. The sensitivity of sugar cost to the important cost parameters, such as raw material and enzyme costs, have been examined. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  12. Biofunctional Paper via Covalent Modification of Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Arthur; Shang, Jing; Cheng, Fang; Paik, Bradford A.; Kaplan, Justin M.; Andrade, Rodrigo B.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Paper-based analytical devices are the subject of growing interest for the development of low-cost point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring technologies and research tools for limited-resource settings. However, there are limited chemistries available for the conjugation of biomolecules to cellulose for use in biomedical applications. Herein, divinyl sulfone (DVS) chemistry was demonstrated to covalently immobilize small molecules, proteins and DNA onto the hydroxyl groups of cellulose membranes through nucleophilic addition. Assays on modified cellulose using protein-carbohydrate and protein-glycoprotein interactions as well as oligonucleotide hybridization showed that the membrane’s bioactivity was specific, dose-dependent, and stable over a long period of time. Use of an inkjet printer to form patterns of biomolecules on DVS-activated cellulose illustrates the adaptability of the DVS functionalization technique to pattern sophisticated designs, with potential applications in cellulose-based lateral flow devices. PMID:22708701

  13. Production and purification of the isolated family 2a carbohydrate-binding module from Cellulomonas fimi.

    PubMed

    Jing, Haiqiang; Cockburn, Darrell; Zhang, Qinxian; Clarke, Anthony J

    2009-03-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant polymer on Earth and in recent years, renewed interest has developed in its use for the production of biofuels and other value added products. Cellulose is degraded to glucose by the concerted action of cellulolytic enzymes that include cellulases, cellobiohydrolases, and beta-glucosidases. In many cases, these enzymes are multi-modular, being comprised of distinct catalytic and carbohydrate-binding modules. The latter appear to aid in both the adsorption of the enzymes to the insoluble cellulose substrate and the destabilization of the hydrogen-bonding network within the crystalline substrate. To better understand these dynamic processes, we have engineered a carbohydrate-binding module that can be attached to the probe of an atomic force microscope. Thus, the coding sequence for the leader peptide and carbohydrate-binding module from the Cellulomonas fimi cellulase A (cenA) was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace Thr87 of this module with Cys to facilitate covalent binding of the module to gold-plated AFM probes. The recombinant proteins with cleavable N-terminal His-tags were purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of affinity and anion-exchange chromatographies using Ni(2+)-NTA-agarose and Source Q, respectively. Their ability to bind insoluble cellulose was demonstrated using a cellulose-binding assay involving the micro-crystalline cellulose, Avicel.

  14. Mechanistic Insight into the Chemical Exfoliation and Functionalization of Ti3C2 MXene.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pooja; Mishra, Avanish; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Singh, Abhishek K

    2016-09-14

    MXene, a two-dimensional layer of transition metal carbides/nitrides, showed great promise for energy storage, sensing, and electronic applications. MXene are chemically exfoliated from the bulk MAX phase; however, mechanistic understanding of exfoliation and subsequent functionalization of these technologically important materials is still lacking. Here, using density-functional theory we show that exfoliation of Ti3C2 MXene proceeds via HF insertion through edges of Ti3AlC2 MAX phase. Spontaneous dissociation of HF and subsequent termination of edge Ti atoms by H/F weakens Al-MXene bonds. Consequent opening of the interlayer gap allows further insertion of HF that leads to the formation of AlF3 and H2, which eventually come out of the MAX, leaving fluorinated MXene behind. Density of state and electron localization function shows robust binding between F/OH and Ti, which makes it very difficult to obtain controlled functionalized or pristine MXene. Analysis of the calculated Gibbs free energy (ΔG) shows fully fluorinated MXene to be lowest in energy, whereas the formation of pristine MXene is thermodynamically least favorable. In the presence of water, mixed functionalized Ti3C2Fx(OH)1-x (x ranges from 0 to 1) MXene can be obtained. The ΔG values for the mixed functionalized MXenes are very close in energy, indicating the random and nonuniform functionalization of MXene. The microscopic understanding gained here unveils the challenges in exfoliation and controlling the functionalization of MXene, which is essential for its practical application. PMID:27537784

  15. Simultaneous Multiwavelength Monitoring of 3C66A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettcher, M.

    2004-01-01

    The radio-selected BL Lac object 3C66A was the target of an intensive multiwavelength campaign from Sept. 2003 through Feb. 2004. It was monitored by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) collaboration, in tandem with 20 X-ray monitoring observations by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), VHE gamma-ray observations by STACEE and VERITAS, and long-term monitoring at radio frequencies. In addition. 9 observations using the VLBA are being carried out during the campaign and throughout the year 2004 to follow possible structural changes of the source. 21 pointings with RXTE during the period Sept. 15 - Dec. 27, 2003. All collected data have been fully analyzed, and first results have already been published at the 8th HEAD Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in Sept. 2004, and will also be presented at the 205th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA, in Jan. 2005. A first Journal paper, to be submitted to the Astrophysical Journal, is currently in preparation, and we plan to have it ready for submission in January 2005. A gradual brightening of the source over the course of the campaign was observed at all optical frequencies, culminating in a very bright flare at the end of January 2004. Optical light curves indicate intraday microvariability on time scales down to about 1.3 hours. No significant color-magnitude correlation for the entire data set was evident, but there is a slight indication of a gradual spectral softening in the optical over the entire duration of multi-day outbursts (in both the rising and decaying phase). The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon spectral index of approx. 2.1, indicating that the RXTE energy band might be located right at the intersection of the synchrotron and the high-energy emission components. No significant flux or spectral variability at X-ray energies was detected, though there seems to be a trend of very modest brightening in tandem with the optical flux. The first 4 VLBA epochs indicate a rather smooth jet with

  16. Simulations of cellulose translocation in the bacterial cellulose synthase suggest a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose

    DOE PAGES

    Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zimmer, Jochen; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-01-29

    The processive cycle of the bacterial cellulose synthase (Bcs) includes the addition of a single glucose moiety to the end of a growing cellulose chain followed by the translocation of the nascent chain across the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation and its precise location within the processive cycle are not well understood. In particular, the molecular details of how a polymer (cellulose) whose basic structural unit is a dimer (cellobiose) can be constructed by adding one monomer (glucose) at a time are yet to be elucidated. Here, we have utilized molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations tomore » the shed light on these questions. We find that translocation forward by one glucose unit is quite favorable energetically, giving a free energy stabilization of greater than 10 kcal mol-1. In addition, there is only a small barrier to translocation, implying that translocation is not rate limiting within the Bcs processive cycle (given experimental rates for cellulose synthesis in vitro). Perhaps most significantly, our results also indicate that steric constraints at the transmembrane tunnel entrance regulate the dimeric structure of cellulose. Namely, when a glucose molecule is added to the cellulose chain in the same orientation as the acceptor glucose, the terminal glucose freely rotates upon forward motion, thus suggesting a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose. We characterize both the conserved and non-conserved enzyme-polysaccharide interactions that drive translocation, and find that 20 of the 25 residues that strongly interact with the translocating cellulose chain in the simulations are well conserved, mostly with polar or aromatic side chains. Our results also allow for a dynamical analysis of the role of the so-called 'finger helix' in cellulose translocation that has been observed structurally. Taken together, these findings aid in the elucidation of the translocation steps of the Bcs processive

  17. Simulations of cellulose translocation in the bacterial cellulose synthase suggest a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zimmer, Jochen; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-01-01

    The processive cycle of the bacterial cellulose synthase (Bcs) includes the addition of a single glucose moiety to the end of a growing cellulose chain followed by the translocation of the nascent chain across the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation and its precise location within the processive cycle are not well understood. In particular, the molecular details of how a polymer (cellulose) whose basic structural unit is a dimer (cellobiose) can be constructed by adding one monomer (glucose) at a time are yet to be elucidated. Here, we have utilized molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to the shed light on these questions. We find that translocation forward by one glucose unit is quite favorable energetically, giving a free energy stabilization of greater than 10 kcal/mol. In addition, there is only a small barrier to translocation, implying that translocation is not rate limiting within the Bcs processive cycle (given experimental rates for cellulose synthesis in vitro). Perhaps most significantly, our results also indicate that steric constraints at the transmembrane tunnel entrance regulate the dimeric structure of cellulose. Namely, when a glucose molecule is added to the cellulose chain in the same orientation as the acceptor glucose, the terminal glucose freely rotates upon forward motion, thus suggesting a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose. We characterize both the conserved and non-conserved enzyme-polysaccharide interactions that drive translocation, and find that 20 of the 25 residues that strongly interact with the translocating cellulose chain in the simulations are well conserved, mostly with polar or aromatic side chains. Our results also allow for a dynamical analysis of the role of the so-called `finger helix' in cellulose translocation that has been observed structurally. Taken together, these findings aid in the elucidation of the translocation steps of the Bcs processive cycle and

  18. Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

  19. Chemical synthesis of lactic acid from cellulose catalysed by lead(II) ions in water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Binju; Zhang, Qinghong; Wan, Xiaoyue; Tang, Zhenchen; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Chun; Cao, Zexing; Wang, Guichang; Wan, Huilin

    2013-01-01

    The direct transformation of cellulose, which is the main component of lignocellulosic biomass, into building-block chemicals is the key to establishing biomass-based sustainable chemical processes. Only limited successes have been achieved for such transformations under mild conditions. Here we report the simple and efficient chemocatalytic conversion of cellulose in water in the presence of dilute lead(II) ions, into lactic acid, which is a high-value chemical used for the production of fine chemicals and biodegradable plastics. The lactic acid yield from microcrystalline cellulose and several lignocellulose-based raw biomasses is >60% at 463 K. Both theoretical and experimental studies suggest that lead(II) in combination with water catalyses a series of cascading steps for lactic acid formation, including the isomerization of glucose formed via the hydrolysis of cellulose into fructose, the selective cleavage of the C3-C4 bond of fructose to trioses and the selective conversion of trioses into lactic acid. PMID:23846730

  20. Evaluation of cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol) membranes.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Maha M; Koschella, Andreas; Kadry, Ghada; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Cellulose was isolated from rice straw and converted to carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). Both polymers were crosslinked with poly(vinyl alcholo) (PVA). The physical properties of the resulting membranes were characterized by FT-IR, TGA, DSC and SEM. The cellulose and CMC were first prepared from bleached rice straw pulp. The infrared spectroscopy of the resulting polymer membranes indicated a decrease in the absorbance of the OH group at 3300-3400 cm(-1), which is due to bond formation with either the cellulose or CMC with the PVA. The thermal stability of PVA/cellulose and PVA/CMC membranes was lower than PVA membrane. The surface of the resulting polymer membranes showed smooth surface in case of the PVA/CMC membrane and rough surface in case of the PVA/cellulose membrane. Desalination test, using 0.2% NaCl, showed that pure PVA membranes had no effect while membranes containing either cellulose or CMC as filler were able to decrease the content of the NaCl from the solution by 25% and 15%, respectively. Transport properties, including water and chloroform vapor were studied. The moisture transport was reduced by the presence of both cellulose and CMC. Moreover, the membranes containing cellulose and CMC showed significantly reduced flux compared to the pure PVA. The water sorption, solubility and soaking period at different pH solutions were also studied and showed that the presence of both cellulose and CMC influences the properties.

  1. Cellulose production and cellulose synthase gene detection in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Valera, Maria José; Torija, Maria Jesús; Mas, Albert; Mateo, Estibaliz

    2015-02-01

    The ability of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) to produce cellulose has gained much industrial interest due to the physical and chemical characteristics of bacterial cellulose. The production of cellulose occurs in the presence of oxygen and in a glucose-containing medium, but it can also occur during vinegar elaboration by the traditional method. The vinegar biofilm produced by AAB on the air-liquid interface is primarily composed of cellulose and maintains the cells in close contact with oxygen. In this study, we screened for the ability of AAB to produce cellulose using different carbon sources in the presence or absence of ethanol. The presence of cellulose in biofilms was confirmed using the fluorochrome Calcofluor by microscopy. Moreover, the process of biofilm formation was monitored under epifluorescence microscopy using the Live/Dead BacLight Kit. A total of 77 AAB strains belonging to 35 species of Acetobacter, Komagataeibacter, Gluconacetobacter, and Gluconobacter were analysed, and 30 strains were able to produce a cellulose biofilm in at least one condition. This cellulose production was correlated with the PCR amplification of the bcsA gene that encodes cellulose synthase. A total of eight degenerated primers were designed, resulting in one primer pair that was able to detect the presence of this gene in 27 AAB strains, 26 of which formed cellulose.

  2. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  3. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    DOE PAGES

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; et al

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongatedmore » structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.« less

  4. Essential 170-kDa subunit for degradation of crystalline cellulose by Clostridium cellulovorans cellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Doi, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The cellulase complex from Clostridium cellulovorans has been purified and its subunit composition determined. The complex exhibits cellulase activity against crystalline cellulose as well as carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) and cellobiohydrolase activities. Three major subunits are present with molecular masses of 170, 100, and 70 kDa. The 100-kDa subunit is the major CMCase, although at least four other, minor subunits show CMCase activity. The 170-kDa subunit has the highest affinity for cellulose, does not have detectable enzymatic activity, but is necessary for cellulase activity. Immunological studies indicate that the 170-kDa subunit is not required for binding of the catalytic subunits to cellulose and therefore does not function solely as an anchor protein. Thus this core subunit must have multiple functions. The authors propose a working hypothesis that the binding of the 170-kDa subunit converts the crystalline cellulose to a form that is capable of being hydrolyzed in a cooperative fashion by the associated catalytic subunits.

  5. Essential 170-kDa subunit for degradation of crystalline cellulose by Clostridium cellulovorans cellulase.

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, O; Doi, R H

    1990-01-01

    The cellulase complex from Clostridium cellulovorans has been purified and its subunit composition determined. The complex exhibits cellulase activity against crystalline cellulose as well as carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) and cellobiohydrolase activities. Three major subunits are present with molecular masses of 170, 100, and 70 kDa. The 100-kDa subunit is the major CMCase, although at least four other, minor subunits show CMCase activity. The 170-kDa subunit has the highest affinity for cellulose, does not have detectable enzymatic activity, but is necessary for cellulase activity. Immunological studies indicate that the 170-kDa subunit is not required for binding of the catalytic subunits to cellulose and therefore does not function solely as an anchor protein. Thus this core subunit must have multiple functions. We propose a working hypothesis that the binding of the 170-kDa subunit converts the crystalline cellulose to a form that is capable of being hydrolyzed in a cooperative fashion by the associated catalytic subunits. Images PMID:2107547

  6. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize. PMID:25012190

  7. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  8. Enhancement of Cellulose Degradation by Cattle Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Yasutaka; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Aburai, Kenichi; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ruike, Tatsushi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Saccharification of cellulose is a promising technique for producing alternative source of energy. However, the efficiency of conversion of cellulose into soluble sugar using any currently available methodology is too low for industrial application. Many additives, such as surfactants, have been shown to enhance the efficiency of cellulose-to-sugar conversion. In this study, we have examined first whether cattle saliva, as an additive, would enhance the cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, and subsequently elucidated the mechanism by which cattle saliva enhanced this conversion. Although cattle saliva, by itself, did not degrade cellulose, it enhanced the cellulase-catalyzed degradation of cellulose. Thus, the amount of reducing sugar produced increased approximately 2.9-fold by the addition of cattle saliva. We also found that non-enzymatic proteins, which were present in cattle saliva, were responsible for causing the enhancement effect. Third, the mechanism of cattle saliva mediated enhancement of cellulase activity was probably similar to that of the canonical surfactants. Cattle saliva is available in large amounts easily and cheaply, and it can be used without further purification. Thus, cattle saliva could be a promising additive for efficient saccharification of cellulose on an industrial scale. PMID:26402242

  9. Recycling of cellulosic fibers by enzymatic process.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, K M; Dadashian, F; Montazer, M

    2012-02-01

    In this research, enzymatic treatment as an environmental friendly process has been used for recycling process of old cellulosic wastes such as cotton, viscose, and lyocell. Cellulase hydrolyses cellulosic chains and shortens cellulosic fibers. This study investigates to detect the optimum enzyme concentration and time of treatments for suitable changes of length and weight loss. The main purposes of this article are shortening of cellulosic fibers and evaluating of enzymatic treatment in different kind of cellulosic fibers. According to the data of experiments, with the increase of enzyme concentration and the treatment time, the length and weight loss percentage of the cellulosic fibers has been decreased. The length and weight loss percentage of treated viscose is more than that of lyocell and cotton fibers. Optimized condition, reaction time, and enzyme concentration have been determined by mean length of treated cellulosic samples. Suitable longitudinal distribution of fiber for papermaking industries is in the range of 0 to 4 mm. Optimum enzyme concentration and treatment time for recycling cotton, lyocell, and viscose fibers are 2% and 48 h for cotton and lyocell and 0.5% and 48 h for viscose, respectively. According to the data of experiment, the length of treated fibers is appropriate for its usage as a raw material in papermaking industries.

  10. Enhancement of Cellulose Degradation by Cattle Saliva.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yasutaka; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Aburai, Kenichi; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ruike, Tatsushi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Saccharification of cellulose is a promising technique for producing alternative source of energy. However, the efficiency of conversion of cellulose into soluble sugar using any currently available methodology is too low for industrial application. Many additives, such as surfactants, have been shown to enhance the efficiency of cellulose-to-sugar conversion. In this study, we have examined first whether cattle saliva, as an additive, would enhance the cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, and subsequently elucidated the mechanism by which cattle saliva enhanced this conversion. Although cattle saliva, by itself, did not degrade cellulose, it enhanced the cellulase-catalyzed degradation of cellulose. Thus, the amount of reducing sugar produced increased approximately 2.9-fold by the addition of cattle saliva. We also found that non-enzymatic proteins, which were present in cattle saliva, were responsible for causing the enhancement effect. Third, the mechanism of cattle saliva mediated enhancement of cellulase activity was probably similar to that of the canonical surfactants. Cattle saliva is available in large amounts easily and cheaply, and it can be used without further purification. Thus, cattle saliva could be a promising additive for efficient saccharification of cellulose on an industrial scale.

  11. Cellulose nanofibrils aerogels generated from jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinyou; Yu, Liangbo; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Nie; Li, Xiuhong; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-30

    In this work, we report the cellulose nanofibrils extracted from the pristine jute fibers via the pretreatments followed by the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and mechanical disintegration. The effects of pretreatments by using the NaOH solution and dimethyl sulfoxide solvent on the fiber morphology and macro/micro-structures were investigated by polarizing microscope and synchrotron radiation wide/small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS/SAXS). The cellulose nanofibrils exhibit a diameter ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm and a length of several micrometers, which have been assembled into cellulose aerogels by the lyophilization of as-prepared nanofibrils dispersions with various concentrations. The results indicated that the hierarchical structures of as-prepared cellulose aerogels were dependent on the dispersion concentrations. The WAXS results show that the typical cellulose aerogels are coexistence of cellulose I and cellulose II, which has a great promise for many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical, liquid filtration, catalysts, bio-nanocomposites, and tissue engineering scaffolds.

  12. Cellulose nanofibrils aerogels generated from jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinyou; Yu, Liangbo; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Nie; Li, Xiuhong; Bian, Fenggang; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-30

    In this work, we report the cellulose nanofibrils extracted from the pristine jute fibers via the pretreatments followed by the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and mechanical disintegration. The effects of pretreatments by using the NaOH solution and dimethyl sulfoxide solvent on the fiber morphology and macro/micro-structures were investigated by polarizing microscope and synchrotron radiation wide/small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS/SAXS). The cellulose nanofibrils exhibit a diameter ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm and a length of several micrometers, which have been assembled into cellulose aerogels by the lyophilization of as-prepared nanofibrils dispersions with various concentrations. The results indicated that the hierarchical structures of as-prepared cellulose aerogels were dependent on the dispersion concentrations. The WAXS results show that the typical cellulose aerogels are coexistence of cellulose I and cellulose II, which has a great promise for many potential applications, such as pharmaceutical, liquid filtration, catalysts, bio-nanocomposites, and tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:24815398

  13. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  14. 21 CFR 172.872 - Methyl ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methyl ethyl cellulose. 172.872 Section 172.872... Methyl ethyl cellulose. The food additive methyl ethyl cellulose may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions. (a) The additive is a cellulose ether having the...

  15. Conversion of cotton byproducts to mixed cellulose esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton byproducts, such as cotton burr and cottonseed hull, can be used as low-cost feedstock for the production of specialty chemicals. The conversion of these cellulosic byproducts into mixed cellulose esters, e.g., cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), was stud...

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Cellulose Derivatives for Water Repellent Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, we will discuss the synthesis and structural characterizations of nitro-benzyl cellulose (1), amino-benzyl cellulose (2) and pentafluoro –benzyl cellulose (3). All cellulose derivatives are synthesized by etherification process in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide homogene...

  17. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling. PMID:26839412

  18. 18 CFR 3c.3 - Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF CONDUCT § 3c.3 Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. (a) Employees shall, in fulfilling the obligation of 5 CFR 2635.101(b)(11), report fraud, waste..., abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. 3c.3 Section 3c.3 Conservation of...

  19. 18 CFR 3c.3 - Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF CONDUCT § 3c.3 Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. (a) Employees shall, in fulfilling the obligation of 5 CFR 2635.101(b)(11), report fraud, waste..., abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. 3c.3 Section 3c.3 Conservation of...

  20. 40 CFR 152.112 - Approval of registration under FIFRA sec. 3(c)(5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sec. 3(c)(5). 152.112 Section 152.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Applications § 152.112 Approval of registration under FIFRA sec. 3(c)(5). EPA will approve an application under the criteria of FIFRA sec. 3(c)(5) only if: (a) The Agency has determined that the application...

  1. Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Bruce M.

    1986-01-01

    A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

  2. High-flux cellulose acetate membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Boeddeker, K.W.; Finken, H.; Wenzlaff, A.

    1981-01-01

    Three routes to increase the permeate flux of asymmetric cellulose diacetate membranes of the Loeb-Sourirajan type were investigated: increasing the hydrophilicity of the membranes; increasing their compaction stability, and employing a swelling agent which allows for higher solvent-to-polymer ratio in the casting solution. The effect of casting solution composition on flux and rejection of formamide-modified cellulose acetate membrane is included, illustrating the general capability of this membrane type as function of solvent concentration. Membranes of casting solution composition cellulose diacetate/acetone/formamide 23/52/25 were used as reference membranes in the work. 6 figures. (DP)

  3. Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, B.M.

    1986-12-23

    A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

  4. Ancient Origin of cGAS-STING Reveals Mechanism of Universal 2',3' cGAMP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kranzusch, Philip J; Wilson, Stephen C; Lee, Amy S Y; Berger, James M; Doudna, Jennifer A; Vance, Russell E

    2015-09-17

    In humans, the cGAS-STING immunity pathway signals in response to cytosolic DNA via 2',3' cGAMP, a cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) second messenger containing mixed 2'-5' and 3'-5' phosphodiester bonds. Prokaryotes also produce CDNs, but these are exclusively 3' linked, and thus the evolutionary origins of human 2',3' cGAMP signaling are unknown. Here we illuminate the ancient origins of human cGAMP signaling by discovery of a functional cGAS-STING pathway in Nematostella vectensis, an anemone species >500 million years diverged from humans. Anemone cGAS appears to produce a 3',3' CDN that anemone STING recognizes through nucleobase-specific contacts not observed in human STING. Nevertheless, anemone STING binds mixed-linkage 2',3' cGAMP indistinguishably from human STING, trapping a unique structural conformation not induced by 3',3' CDNs. These results reveal that human mixed-linkage cGAMP achieves universal signaling by exploiting a deeply conserved STING conformational intermediate, providing critical insight for therapeutic targeting of the STING pathway. PMID:26300263

  5. Structural and Inhibitor Studies of Norovirus 3C-like Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Kim, Yunjeong; Lovell, Scott; Prakash, Om; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses have a single-stranded, positive sense 7–8 kb RNA genome, which encodes a polyprotein precursor processed by a virus-encoded 3C-like cysteine protease (3CLpro) to generate mature non-structural proteins. Because processing of the polyprotein is essential for virus replication, norovirus 3CLpro has been targeted for the discovery of anti-norovirus small molecule therapeutics. Thus, we performed functional, structural and inhibition studies of norovirus 3CLpro with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay, X-ray crystallography, and NMR spectroscopy with a synthetic protease inhibitor. Three 3CLpro from Norwalk virus (NV, genogroup I), MD145 (genogroup II) and murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1, genogroup V) were optimized for a FRET assay, and compared for the inhibitory activities of a synthetic protease inhibitor (GC376). The apo 3D structures of NV 3CLpro determined with X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy were further analyzed. In addition, the binding mode of NV 3CLpro-GC376 was compared with X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. The results of this report provide insight into the interaction of NV 3CLpro with substrate/inhibitor for better understanding of the enzyme and antiviral drug development. PMID:24055466

  6. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-01-01

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized. PMID:26999188

  7. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Kumar, Amit; Kundu, Chanakya N.; Verma, Subhash C.; Choudhuri, Tathagata

    2014-01-05

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C. - Highlights: • EBV-encoded EBNA3C suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas. • EBNA3C binds to p73 to suppress its apoptotic effect. • EBNA3C maintains latency by regulating downstream mitochondrial pathways.

  8. Adsorption properties of cross-linked cellulose-epichlorohydrin polymers in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Udoetok, Inimfon A; Dimmick, Raquel M; Wilson, Lee D; Headley, John V

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was cross-linked with epichlorohydrin (EP) at variable levels (CLE-0.5, CLE-2 and CLE-4), where CLE-i denotes the cellulose to EP mole ratios. The cross-linked products were characterized by TGA and FT-IR spectroscopy, pH at the point of zero charge (pHpzc), water swelling, and dye-adsorption methods employing two types of dyes [phenolphthalein (phth) and p-nitrophenol (PNP)]. The characterization methods provide evidence of cross-linking of cellulose in accordance with variations in surface area, PZC, available surface hydroxyl groups, and thermal stability when compared against pristine cellulose. The pHpzc of the sorbent materials was ∼ 6.5 indicating a negative surface charge occurs above pHpzc. The cross-linked polymers possess greater swelling properties relative to pristine cellulose. Detailed adsorption studies were carried out at pH 9 for cellulose and CLE-i with five types single component carboxylate anions [2-hexyldecanoic acid (S1), trans-4-pentylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid (S2), 2-dicyclohexylacetic acid (S3), adamantane carboxylic acid (S4), and cyclohexane carboxylic acid (S5)] at 295 K. The uptake properties of PNP with cellulose and CLE-i were also compared at pH 5 and 9, respectively. CLE-2 had the highest uptake of PNP (Qm=1.22 × 10(-1)mmol/g, pH 9) and S1 (Qm=4.27 mg/g) while cellulose and CLE-4 had the strongest binding affinity (1.43 L/mmol and 5.90 × 10(-2)L/mg), respectively. Uptake of PNP by CLE-0.5 at pH 5 (Q m=5.30 × 10(-2)mmol/g) was higher than uptake at pH 9 (Qm=3.11 × 10(-2)mmol/g). Sorption of CLE-4 with S1, S2 and S3 showed that relative uptake of the surrogates had the following order: S3>S2>S1, where S2 had the strongest binding affinity to CLE-i. CLE-2 had the highest sorption capacity towards Si in an equimolar mixture with evidence of molecular selective uptake. At pH 9, low uptake was mainly related to electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged sorbent surface and the carboxylate head groups of Si.

  9. Adsorption properties of cross-linked cellulose-epichlorohydrin polymers in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Udoetok, Inimfon A; Dimmick, Raquel M; Wilson, Lee D; Headley, John V

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was cross-linked with epichlorohydrin (EP) at variable levels (CLE-0.5, CLE-2 and CLE-4), where CLE-i denotes the cellulose to EP mole ratios. The cross-linked products were characterized by TGA and FT-IR spectroscopy, pH at the point of zero charge (pHpzc), water swelling, and dye-adsorption methods employing two types of dyes [phenolphthalein (phth) and p-nitrophenol (PNP)]. The characterization methods provide evidence of cross-linking of cellulose in accordance with variations in surface area, PZC, available surface hydroxyl groups, and thermal stability when compared against pristine cellulose. The pHpzc of the sorbent materials was ∼ 6.5 indicating a negative surface charge occurs above pHpzc. The cross-linked polymers possess greater swelling properties relative to pristine cellulose. Detailed adsorption studies were carried out at pH 9 for cellulose and CLE-i with five types single component carboxylate anions [2-hexyldecanoic acid (S1), trans-4-pentylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid (S2), 2-dicyclohexylacetic acid (S3), adamantane carboxylic acid (S4), and cyclohexane carboxylic acid (S5)] at 295 K. The uptake properties of PNP with cellulose and CLE-i were also compared at pH 5 and 9, respectively. CLE-2 had the highest uptake of PNP (Qm=1.22 × 10(-1)mmol/g, pH 9) and S1 (Qm=4.27 mg/g) while cellulose and CLE-4 had the strongest binding affinity (1.43 L/mmol and 5.90 × 10(-2)L/mg), respectively. Uptake of PNP by CLE-0.5 at pH 5 (Q m=5.30 × 10(-2)mmol/g) was higher than uptake at pH 9 (Qm=3.11 × 10(-2)mmol/g). Sorption of CLE-4 with S1, S2 and S3 showed that relative uptake of the surrogates had the following order: S3>S2>S1, where S2 had the strongest binding affinity to CLE-i. CLE-2 had the highest sorption capacity towards Si in an equimolar mixture with evidence of molecular selective uptake. At pH 9, low uptake was mainly related to electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged sorbent surface and the carboxylate head groups of Si

  10. Improved assay for quantitating adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, M A; White, B A; Hespell, R B

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative technique suitable for the determination of adherence of ruminal bacteria to cellulose was developed. This technique employs adherence of cells to cellulose disks and alleviates the problem of nonspecific cell entrapment within cellulose particles. By using this technique, it was demonstrated that the adherence of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD1 to cellulose was inhibited by formaldehyde, methylcellulose, and carboxymethyl cellulose. Adherence was unaffected by acid hydrolysates of methylcellulose, glucose, and cellobiose. PMID:2782879

  11. Multifrequency VLBI follow up study of strong γ-ray flares in the blazars 3C273 and 3C279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisakov, Mikhail M.; Kovalev, Yuri Y.

    2015-03-01

    We present multifrequency VLBI observations of the blazars 3C273 and 3C279 after detecting strong γ-ray flares in both of them. 3C273 exhibited a prominent flare in γ-rays in September 2009 which was followed by a strong flare in the 7 mm VLBI core and emergence of a new feature in the parsec scale jet. We have used time delay between flares in different wavebands together with kinematic analysis to determine that the γ-ray emission zone in 3C273 is located 3.6-5.3 pc upstream from the apparent 7 mm core. We have also analyzed frequency dependent core position to measure a deprojected distance between 7 mm core and the true base of the jet: 1-6 pc for 3C273 and 1-3 pc for 3C279, depending on observing epoch. For 3C279 light curve analysis did not give a robust γ-radio delay because there were too many overlapping flares in this source during considered period.

  12. Dissolution of cellulose with a novel solvent and formation of regenerated cellulose fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haibo; Miao, Jiaojiao; Yu, Yongqi; Zhang, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A new cellulose solution was prepared by a new cellulose solvent, tetrabutylammonium acetate (TBAA)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). A new kind of regenerated cellulose fibers was spun successfully for the first time from the cellulose solution by a wet spinning system. The dissolving process of cellulose in TBAA/DMSO was observed by confocal laser scanning microscope. The rheological of the cellulose dopes was determined by rotated rheometer, and the results showed that the cellulose/TBAA/DMSO solution was a typical shear-thinning fluid. In addition, the morphology, chemical structure and mechanical properties of the prepared cellulose fibers were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), 13C CP/MAS NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electronic tensile tester, respectively. The SEM patterns showed that the regenerated fibers possessed a smooth surface and circular cross section. The results from 13C NMR and XRD patterns indicated that the novel fibers mainly exhibited amorphous cellulose. Meanwhile, the novel fibers have good mechanical properties.

  13. Kinetics of precipitation of cellulose from cellulose-NMMO-water solutions.

    PubMed

    Biganska, Olga; Navard, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The regeneration of a solid, crystallized cellulose solution in a N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO)-water mixture was studied by measuring the diffusion coefficient of both the water uptake from the regenerating bath and the NMMO outflow to this bath. The diffusion coefficient of water going to the cellulose solution is about 10 times larger than the diffusion coefficient of NMMO leaving the solution. This difference expresses the strongly hygroscopic character of NMMO. None of these coefficients depends on cellulose molecular weight showing that no major rearrangement of cellulose chains occurs at the beginning of the regeneration. The diffusion coefficient of water is not influenced by the cellulose concentration, whereas the diffusion coefficient of NMMO decreases strongly when the cellulose concentration increases. Extrapolating the diffusion coefficient of NMMO versus cellulose concentration to zero shows that the maximal concentration of cellulose in NMMO-water is about 15%. Above this value, undissolved cellulose should be present. From the influence of the NMMO content in the water regenerating bath, it is possible to see that NMMO is removed from the solution if the bath has a NMMO content lower than 60%, to be compared with the 80% NMMO concentration in the solution. PMID:16004432

  14. Dissolution enthalpies of cellulose in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Helena; Parviainen, Arno; Virtanen, Tommi; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Serimaa, Ritva; Grönqvist, Stina; Maloney, Thaddeus; Maunu, Sirkka Liisa

    2014-11-26

    In this work, interactions between cellulose and ionic liquids were studied calorimetrically and by optical microscopy. Two novel ionic liquids (1,5-Diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium propionate and N-methyl-1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium dimethyl phosphate) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate-water mixtures were used as solvents. Optical microscopy served in finding the extent of dissolution and identifying the dissolution pattern of the cellulose sample. Calorimetric studies identified a peak relating to dissolution of cellulose in solvent. The transition did, however, not indicate complete dissolution, but rather dissolution inside fibre or fibrils. This method was used to study differences between four cellulose samples with different pretreatment or origins.

  15. Conversion of cellulosic materials to sugar

    DOEpatents

    Wilke, Charles R.; Mitra, Gautam

    1976-08-03

    A process for the production of sugar, mainly glucose, by the enzymatic degradation of cellulosic materials, particularly cellulosic wastes, which comprises hydrolyzing the cellulosic material in the presence of cellulase enzyme to produce a sugar solution and recovering from the hydrolysis products a major proportion of the cellulase enzyme used in the hydrolysis reaction for re-use. At least a portion of the required makeup cellulase enzyme is produced in a two-stage operation wherein, in the first stage, a portion of the output sugar solution is utilized to grow a cellulase-secreting microorganism, and, in the second stage, cellulase enzyme formation is induced in the microorganism-containing culture medium by the addition of an appropriate inducer, such as a cellulosic material. Cellulase enzyme is precipitated from the culture liquid by the addition of an organic solvent material, such as a low molecular weight alkyl ketone or alcohol, and the cellulase precipitate is then fed to the hydrolysis reaction.

  16. Dissolution enthalpies of cellulose in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Helena; Parviainen, Arno; Virtanen, Tommi; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Serimaa, Ritva; Grönqvist, Stina; Maloney, Thaddeus; Maunu, Sirkka Liisa

    2014-11-26

    In this work, interactions between cellulose and ionic liquids were studied calorimetrically and by optical microscopy. Two novel ionic liquids (1,5-Diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium propionate and N-methyl-1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium dimethyl phosphate) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate-water mixtures were used as solvents. Optical microscopy served in finding the extent of dissolution and identifying the dissolution pattern of the cellulose sample. Calorimetric studies identified a peak relating to dissolution of cellulose in solvent. The transition did, however, not indicate complete dissolution, but rather dissolution inside fibre or fibrils. This method was used to study differences between four cellulose samples with different pretreatment or origins. PMID:25256460

  17. Reactive Liftoff of Crystalline Cellulose Particles

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Andrew R.; Krumm, Christoph; Vinter, Katherine P.; Paulsen, Alex D.; Zhu, Cheng; Maduskar, Saurabh; Joseph, Kristeen E.; Greco, Katharine; Stelatto, Michael; Davis, Eric; Vincent, Brendon; Hermann, Richard; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Schmidt, Lanny D.; Fan, Wei; Rothstein, Jonathan P.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The condition of heat transfer to lignocellulosic biomass particles during thermal processing at high temperature (>400 °C) dramatically alters the yield and quality of renewable energy and fuels. In this work, crystalline cellulose particles were discovered to lift off heated surfaces by high speed photography similar to the Leidenfrost effect in hot, volatile liquids. Order of magnitude variation in heat transfer rates and cellulose particle lifetimes was observed as intermediate liquid cellulose droplets transitioned from low temperature wetting (500–600 °C) to fully de-wetted, skittering droplets on polished surfaces (>700 °C). Introduction of macroporosity to the heated surface was shown to completely inhibit the cellulose Leidenfrost effect, providing a tunable design parameter to control particle heat transfer rates in industrial biomass reactors. PMID:26057818

  18. Rapid saccharification for production of cellulosic biofuels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Seok; Wi, Seung Gon; Lee, Soo Jung; Lee, Yoon-Gyo; Kim, Yeong-Suk; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2014-04-01

    The economical production of biofuels is hindered by the recalcitrance of lignocellulose to processing, causing high consumption of processing enzymes and impeding hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. We determined the major rate-limiting factor in the hydrolysis of popping pre-treated rice straw (PPRS) by examining cellulase adsorption to lignin and cellulose, amorphogenesis of PPRS, and re-hydrolysis. Based on the results, equivalence between enzyme loading and the open structural area of cellulose was required to significantly increase productive adsorption of cellulase and to accelerate enzymatic saccharification of PPRS. Amorphogenesis of PPRS by phosphoric acid treatment to expand open structural area of the cellulose fibers resulted in twofold higher cellulase adsorption and increased the yield of the first re-hydrolysis step from 13% to 46%. The total yield from PPRS was increased to 84% after 3h. These results provide evidence that cellulose structure is one of major effects on the enzymatic hydrolysis.

  19. Cellulose biosynthesis and function in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, P; Mayer, R; Benziman, M

    1991-01-01

    The current model of cellulose biogenesis in plants, as well as bacteria, holds that the membranous cellulose synthase complex polymerizes glucose moieties from UDP-Glc into beta-1,4-glucan chains which give rise to rigid crystalline fibrils upon extrusion at the outer surface of the cell. The distinct arrangement and degree of association of the polymerizing enzyme units presumably govern extracellular chain assembly in addition to the pattern and width of cellulose fibril deposition. Most evident for Acetobacter xylinum, polymerization and assembly appear to be tightly coupled. To date, only bacteria have been effectively studied at the biochemical and genetic levels. In A. xylinum, the cellulose synthase, composed of at least two structurally similar but functionally distinct subunits, is subject to a multicomponent regulatory system. Regulation is based on the novel nucleotide cyclic diguanylic acid, a positive allosteric effector, and the regulatory enzymes maintaining its intracellular turnover: diguanylate cyclase and Ca2(+)-sensitive bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) phosphodiesterase. Four genes have been isolated from A. xylinum which constitute the operon for cellulose synthesis. The second gene encodes the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase; the functions of the other three gene products are still unknown. Exclusively an extracellular product, bacterial cellulose appears to fulfill diverse biological roles within the natural habitat, conferring mechanical, chemical, and physiological protection in A. xylinum and Sarcina ventriculi or facilitating cell adhesion during symbiotic or infectious interactions in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium species. A. xylinum is proving to be most amenable for industrial purposes, allowing the unique features of bacterial cellulose to be exploited for novel product applications. Images PMID:2030672

  20. Role of endo-1,4-beta-glucanases from neisseria sicca SB in synergistic degradation of cellulose acetate.

    PubMed

    Moriyoshi, Kunihiko; Ohmoto, Takashi; Ohe, Tatsuhiko; Sakai, Kiyofumi

    2003-02-01

    An enzyme hydrolyzing beta-1,4 bonds in cellulose acetate was purified 10.5-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity from a culture supernatant of Neisseria sicca SB, which assimilate cellulose acetate as the sole carbon and energy source. The enzyme was an endo-1,4-beta-glucanase, to judge from the substrate specificity and hydrolysis products of cellooligosaccharides, we named it endo-1,4-beta-glucanase I (EG I). Its molecular mass was 50 kDa, 9 kDa larger than EG II from this strain, and its isoelectric point was 5.0. Results of N-terminal and inner-peptide sequences of both enzymes, and a similarity search, suggested that EG I contained a carbohydrate-binding module at the N-terminus and that EG II lacked this module. The pH and temperature optima of EG I were 5.0-6.0 and 45 degrees C. It hydrolyzed water-soluble cellulose acetate (degree of substitution, 0.88) and carboxymethyl cellulose. The Km and Vmax for these compounds were 0.296% and 1.29 micromol min(-1) mg(-1), and 0.448% and 13.6 micromol min(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Both glucanases and cellulose acetate esterase from this strain degraded water-insoluble cellulose acetate synergistically.

  1. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization. PMID:26151670

  2. Cellulose fractionation with IONCELL-P.

    PubMed

    Stepan, A M; Monshizadeh, A; Hummel, M; Roselli, A; Sixta, H

    2016-10-01

    IONCELL-P is a solvent fractionation process, which can separate pulps almost quantitatively into pure cellulose and hemicellulose fractions using IL-water mixtures. In this work the role of the molecular weight of cellulose on its solubility in ionic liquid-water mixtures is studied. The aim of this study was to understand and identify the determining factors of this IONCELL-P fractionation. Cotton linters (CL) served as model cellulose substrate and was degraded by ozone treatment to adjust the molecular weight to that of hemicelluloses and low molar mass cellulose in commercial pulps. The ozone treated CLs were subjected to the IONCELL-P process using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([emim][OAc]) and water mixtures with a water content between 13.5 and 19wt%. Based on the molar mass distributions of dissolved and undissolved cellulose the effect of the molecular weight of cellulose in IL-water mixture appears to be a key factor in the fractionation process. PMID:27312618

  3. Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

    1996-09-01

    Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

  4. Cellulose fractionation with IONCELL-P.

    PubMed

    Stepan, A M; Monshizadeh, A; Hummel, M; Roselli, A; Sixta, H

    2016-10-01

    IONCELL-P is a solvent fractionation process, which can separate pulps almost quantitatively into pure cellulose and hemicellulose fractions using IL-water mixtures. In this work the role of the molecular weight of cellulose on its solubility in ionic liquid-water mixtures is studied. The aim of this study was to understand and identify the determining factors of this IONCELL-P fractionation. Cotton linters (CL) served as model cellulose substrate and was degraded by ozone treatment to adjust the molecular weight to that of hemicelluloses and low molar mass cellulose in commercial pulps. The ozone treated CLs were subjected to the IONCELL-P process using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([emim][OAc]) and water mixtures with a water content between 13.5 and 19wt%. Based on the molar mass distributions of dissolved and undissolved cellulose the effect of the molecular weight of cellulose in IL-water mixture appears to be a key factor in the fractionation process.

  5. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction microprobe studies of the conversion of cellulose I to ethylenediamine-cellulose I

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Wada, Masahisa; Hanson, B. Leif; Langan, Paul

    2010-08-03

    Structural changes during the treatment of films of highly crystalline microfibers of Cladophora cellulose with ethylenediamine (EDA) have been studied by time-resolved X-ray microprobe diffraction methods. As EDA penetrates the sample and converts cellulose I to EDA-cellulose I, the measured profile widths of reflections reveal changes in the shapes and average dimensions of cellulose I and EDA-cellulose I crystals. The (200) direction of cellulose I is most resistant to EDA penetration, with EDA penetrating most effectively at the hydrophilic edges of the hydrogen bonded sheets of cellulose chains. Most of the cellulose chains in the initial crystals of cellulose I are incorporated into crystals of EDA-cellulose I. The size of the emerging EDA-cellulose I crystals is limited to about half of their size in cellulose I, most likely due to strains introduced by the penetration of EDA molecules. There is no evidence of any gradual structural transition from cellulose I to EDA-cellulose I involving a continuously changing intermediate phase. Rather, the results point to a rapid transition to EDA-cellulose I in regions of the microfibrils that have been penetrated by EDA.

  6. Position-specific measurement of oxygen isotope ratios in cellulose: Isotopic exchange during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, John S.; Cheng, Shuying; Juchelka, Dieter; Loader, Neil J.; McCarroll, Danny; Switsur, V. Roy; Gautam, Lata

    2013-07-01

    We describe the first reported method for the measurement of oxygen isotope ratios at each position in the glucose units of the cellulose molecule. The overall process comprises a series of synthetic organic sequences, by which α-cellulose is hydrolysed to glucose, and oxygen atoms at specific positions in the glucose molecule are removed in samples of benzoic acid for measurement of δ18O. Values of δ18O at specific positions in cellulose are calculated from these δ18O values and the overall δ18O value of the cellulose. We apply the method to determine the degree to which oxygen atoms at each position undergo isotopic exchange with water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, such as occurs in the cambium of trees. To do this we extract α-cellulose from wheat seedlings germinated in the dark in aqueous media of differing oxygen isotope ratios. Results indicate that oxygen atoms at positions 5 and 6 (O-5 and O-6 respectively) undergo around 80% exchange with medium water, O-3 undergoes around 50% exchange, and O-2 and O-4 do not undergo isotopic exchange. The results have important implications for extracting palaeoclimatic records from oxygen isotope time series obtained from tree ring cellulose. As O-5 and O-6 undergo significant exchange with medium water during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis, oxygen isotopes at these positions in tree ring cellulose should carry a predominantly trunk (source) water signal. On the other hand, O-2 and O-4 should retain the isotopic signature of leaf water in tree ring cellulose. Our method therefore potentially enables the separate reconstruction of past temperature and humidity data from oxygen isotope ratios of tree ring cellulose - something that has hitherto not been possible. The measured degrees of isotopic exchange are to some extent unexpected and cannot be fully explained using current biochemical mechanisms, suggesting that knowledge of these processes is incomplete.

  7. Suite of activity-based probes for cellulose-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné-Hines, Lacie M; Anderson, Lindsey N; Weaver, Holly M; Brown, Joseph N; Koech, Phillip K; Nicora, Carrie D; Hofstad, Beth A; Smith, Richard D; Wilkins, Michael J; Callister, Stephen J; Wright, Aaron T

    2012-12-19

    Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome-producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes, in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose-degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic microbial cellulose-degrading systems and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated with biofuel development. PMID:23176123

  8. Apo- and Cellopentaose-bound Structures of the Bacterial Cellulose Synthase Subunit BcsZ

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Olga; Zimmer, Jochen

    2012-10-25

    Cellulose, a very abundant extracellular polysaccharide, is synthesized in a finely tuned process that involves the activity of glycosyl-transferases and hydrolases. The cellulose microfibril consists of bundles of linear {beta}-1,4-glucan chains that are synthesized inside the cell; however, the mechanism by which these polymers traverse the cell membrane is currently unknown. In Gram-negative bacteria, the cellulose synthase complex forms a trans-envelope complex consisting of at least four subunits. Although three of these subunits account for the synthesis and translocation of the polysaccharide, the fourth subunit, BcsZ, is a periplasmic protein with endo-{beta}-1,4-glucanase activity. BcsZ belongs to family eight of glycosyl-hydrolases, and its activity is required for optimal synthesis and membrane translocation of cellulose. In this study we report two crystal structures of BcsZ from Escherichia coli. One structure shows the wild-type enzyme in its apo form, and the second structure is for a catalytically inactive mutant of BcsZ in complex with the substrate cellopentaose. The structures demonstrate that BcsZ adopts an ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 6}-barrel fold and that it binds four glucan moieties of cellopentaose via highly conserved residues exclusively on the nonreducing side of its catalytic center. Thus, the BcsZ-cellopentaose structure most likely represents a posthydrolysis state in which the newly formed nonreducing end has already left the substrate binding pocket while the enzyme remains attached to the truncated polysaccharide chain. We further show that BcsZ efficiently degrades {beta}-1,4-glucans in in vitro cellulase assays with carboxymethyl-cellulose as substrate.

  9. CFD Growth of 3C-SiC on 4H/6H Mesas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Spry, David J.; Powell, J. Anthony; Du, Hui; Skowronski, Marek; Huang, XianRong; Dudley, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article describes growth and characterization of the highest quality reproducible 3C-SiC heteroepitaxial films ever reported. By properly nucleating 3C-SiC growth on top of perfectly on-axis (0001) 4H-SiC mesa surfaces completely free of atomic scale steps and extended defects, growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms completely free of extended crystal defects can be achieved. In contrast, nucleation and growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms on top of 4H-SiC mesas with atomic-scale steps always results in numerous observable dislocations threading through the 3C-SiC epilayer. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements indicate non-trivial in-plane lattice mismatch between the 3C and 4H layers. This mismatch is somewhat relieved in the step-free mesa case via misfit dislocations confined to the 3C/4H interfacial region without dislocations threading into the overlying 3C-SiC layer. These results indicate that the presence or absence of steps at the 3C/4H heteroepitaxial interface critically impacts the quality, defect structure, and relaxation mechanisms of single-crystal heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films.

  10. CVD Growth of 3C-SiC on 4H/6H Mesas

    SciTech Connect

    Neudeck,P.; Trunek, A.; Spry, D.; Powell, J.; Du, H.; Skowronski, M.; Huang, X.; Dudley, M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes growth and characterization of the highest quality reproducible 3C-SiC heteroepitaxial films ever reported. By properly nucleating 3C-SiC growth on top of perfectly on-axis (0001) 4H-SiC mesa surfaces completely free of atomic scale steps and extended defects, growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms completely free of extended crystal defects can be achieved. In contrast, nucleation and growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms on top of 4H-SiC mesas with atomic-scale steps always results in numerous observable dislocations threading through the 3C-SiC epilayer. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and high resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HRXTEM) measurements indicate non-trivial, in-plane, lattice mismatch between the 3C and 4H layers. This mismatch is somewhat relieved in the step-free mesa case via misfit dislocations confined to the 3C/4H interfacial region without dislocations threading into the overlying 3C-SiC layer. These results indicate that the presence or absence of steps at the 3C/4H heteroepitaxial interface critically impacts the quality, defect structure, and relaxation mechanisms of single-crystal heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films.

  11. Enhancing T-DNA Transfer Efficiency in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Cells Using Extracellular Cellulose and Lectin.

    PubMed

    Gürel, Filiz; Uçarlı, Cüneyt; Tufan, Feyza; Kalaskar, Deepak M

    2015-06-01

    A major limitation of transforming barley tissues by Agrobacterium tumefaciens is the low frequency of T-DNA transfer due to recalcitrance of barley as a host. The effect of extracellular cellulose and lectin on Agrobacterium transformation efficiency was investigated in this study. Barley callus cultures were transformed with the AGL1 strain containing the vector pBI121 in the presence of 10 mg mL(-1) cellulose or 0.001, 0.05 and 0.1 mg mL(-1) lectin. Addition of cellulose significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased the number of GUS spots by 50 % compared to standard conditions in the presence of only 200 μM acetosyringone (AS). Frequency of G418-resistant aggregates on the surfaces of callus cultures was 29 and 71.5 %, following AS and AS + cellulose treatments, respectively, after 4 weeks of selection. Presence of 0.05 or 0.1 mg mL(-1) lectin also increased the number of GUS spots and frequency of G418-resistant cells in the selection period, but the increase in blue spots was not significant. We examined the effect of lectin and cellulose on bacterial attachment to callus tissues. Both cellulose and lectin were found to have a significant positive effect on the numbers of bacteria attached to barley callus. Epifluorescence microscopy revealed that Agrobacterium cells had accumulated in the scaffolds of irregular fibrous cellulose with a mean particle size of 200 μm. Expression of nptII in transformed callus lines confirmed the stable transformation of the gene. Our study showed for the first time the binding of Agrobacterium cells to fibrous cellulose and also demonstrated how polysaccharides and glycoproteins can be used to improve T-DNA transfer in monocotyledon transformation procedures.

  12. Versatile Molding Process for Tough Cellulose Hydrogel Materials.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Shinohara, Yoshie; Takizawa, Junko; Ren, Sixiao; Sagisaka, Kento; Lin, Yudeng; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Hinestroza, Juan P

    2015-11-05

    Shape-persistent and tough cellulose hydrogels were fabricated by a stepwise solvent exchange from a homogeneous ionic liquid solution of cellulose exposure to methanol vapor. The cellulose hydrogels maintain their shapes under changing temperature, pH, and solvents. The micrometer-scale patterns on the mold were precisely transferred onto the surface of cellulose hydrogels. We also succeeded in the spinning of cellulose hydrogel fibers through a dry jet-wet spinning process. The mechanical property of regenerated cellulose fibers improved by the drawing of cellulose hydrogel fibers during the spinning process. This approach for the fabrication of tough cellulose hydrogels is a major advance in the fabrication of cellulose-based structures with defined shapes.

  13. Versatile Molding Process for Tough Cellulose Hydrogel Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Shinohara, Yoshie; Takizawa, Junko; Ren, Sixiao; Sagisaka, Kento; Lin, Yudeng; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Hinestroza, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Shape-persistent and tough cellulose hydrogels were fabricated by a stepwise solvent exchange from a homogeneous ionic liquid solution of cellulose exposure to methanol vapor. The cellulose hydrogels maintain their shapes under changing temperature, pH, and solvents. The micrometer-scale patterns on the mold were precisely transferred onto the surface of cellulose hydrogels. We also succeeded in the spinning of cellulose hydrogel fibers through a dry jet-wet spinning process. The mechanical property of regenerated cellulose fibers improved by the drawing of cellulose hydrogel fibers during the spinning process. This approach for the fabrication of tough cellulose hydrogels is a major advance in the fabrication of cellulose-based structures with defined shapes. PMID:26537533

  14. New Insights into Hydrogen Bonding and Stacking Interactions in Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this quantum chemical study, we explore hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) and stacking interactions in different crystalline cellulose allomorphs, namely cellulose I and cellulose IIII. We consider a model system representing a cellulose crystalline core, made from six cellobiose units arranged in three layers with two chains per layer. We calculate the contributions of intrasheet and intersheet interactions to the structure and stability in both cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores. Reference structures for this study were generated from molecular dynamics simulations of water-solvated cellulose I and IIII fibrils. A systematic analysis of various conformations describing different mutual orientations of cellobiose units is performed using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) with the M06-2X with 6-31+G (d, p) basis sets. We dissect the nature of the forces that stabilize the cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores and quantify the relative strength of H-bonding and stacking interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that individual H-bonding interactions are stronger in cellulose I than in cellulose IIII. We also observe a significant contribution from cooperative stacking interactions to the stabilization of cellulose I . In addition, the theory of atoms-in-molecules (AIM) has been employed to characterize and quantify these intermolecular interactions. AIM analyses highlight the role of nonconventional CH O H-bonding in the cellulose assemblies. Finally, we calculate molecular electrostatic potential maps for the cellulose allomorphs that capture the differences in chemical reactivity of the systems considered in our study.

  15. Kinetics of cellulose regeneration from cellulose--NaOH--water gels and comparison with cellulose--N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide--water solutions.

    PubMed

    Gavillon, Roxane; Budtova, Tatiana

    2007-02-01

    The regeneration kinetics of cellulose from cellulose--NaOH--water gels immersed in a nonsolvent bath is studied in detail. Cellulose concentration, bath type, and temperature were varied, and diffusion coefficients were determined. The results were compared with data measured and taken from the literature on the regeneration kinetics of cellulose from cellulose--N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) monohydrate solutions. Different theories developed for the transport behavior of solutes in hydrogels or in porous media were tested on the systems studied. While the diffusion of NaOH from cellulose--NaOH--water gels into water has to be described with "porous media" approaches, the interpretation of NMMO diffusion is complicated because of the change of NMMO's state during regeneration (from solid crystalline to liquid) and the high concentration of NMMO in the sample. The activation energies were calculated from diffusion coefficient dependence on temperature for both systems and compared with the ones obtained from the rheological measurements. The activation energy of cellulose--NaOH--water systems does not depend on cellulose concentration or the way of measurement. This result shows that whatever the system is, pure NaOH--water solution, cellulose--NaOH--water solution, or cellulose--NaOH--water gel, it is NaOH hydrate with or without cellulose in solution, which is moving in the system. The swelling of cellulose in different nonsolvent liquids such as water or different alcohols during regeneration was investigated and interpreted using the Hildebrand parameter. PMID:17291065

  16. Engineering of a novel cellulose-adherent cellulolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae for cellulosic biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Sasaki, Kengo; den Haan, Riaan; Inokuma, Kentaro; Ogino, Chiaki; van Zyl, Willem H.; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Cellulosic biofuel is the subject of increasing attention. The main obstacle toward its economic feasibility is the recalcitrance of lignocellulose requiring large amount of enzyme to break. Several engineered yeast strains have been developed with cellulolytic activities to reduce the need for enzyme addition, but exhibiting limited effect. Here, we report the successful engineering of a cellulose-adherent Saccharomyces cerevisiae displaying four different synergistic cellulases on the cell surface. The cellulase-displaying yeast strain exhibited clear cell-to-cellulose adhesion and a “tearing” cellulose degradation pattern; the adhesion ability correlated with enhanced surface area and roughness of the target cellulose fibers, resulting in higher hydrolysis efficiency. The engineered yeast directly produced ethanol from rice straw despite a more than 40% decrease in the required enzyme dosage for high-density fermentation. Thus, improved cell-to-cellulose interactions provided a novel strategy for increasing cellulose hydrolysis, suggesting a mechanism for promoting the feasibility of cellulosic biofuel production. PMID:27079382

  17. Isolation of cellulose from rice straw and its conversion into cellulose acetate catalyzed by phosphotungstic acid.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guozhi; Wang, Min; Liao, Chongjing; Fang, Tao; Li, Jianfen; Zhou, Ronghui

    2013-04-15

    Cellulose was isolated from rice straw by pretreatment with dilute alkaline and acid solutions successively, and it was further transferred into cellulose acetate in the presence of acetic anhydride and phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40·6H2O). The removal of hemicellulose and lignin was affected by the concentration of KOH and the immersion time in acetic acid solution, and 83wt.% content of cellulose in the treated rice straw was obtained after pretreatment with 4% KOH and immersion in acetic acid for 5h. Phosphotungstic acid was found to be an effective catalyst for the acetylation of the cellulose derived from rice straw. The degree of substitution (DS) values revealed a significant effect for the solubility of cellulose acetate, and the acetone-soluble cellulose acetate with DS values around 2.2 can be obtained by changing the amount of phosphotungstic acid and the time of acetylation. Both the structure of cellulose separated from rice straw and cellulose acetate were confirmed by FTIR and XRD.

  18. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  19. Antigens of monoclonal antibody NB3C4 are novel markers for oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, K; Kametani, F; Shimoda, Y; Fujimaki, K; Sakurai, Y; Kitamura, K; Asou, H; Nomura, M

    2001-02-12

    We produced NB3C4, a novel monoclonal antibody specific for oligodendrocytes, using human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells. NB3C4 specifically recognized oligodendrocytes in the CNS, although it bound to neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells and oligodendrocytes in vitro. Double immunofluorescence staining of rat brain using NB3C4 and anti-GST-pi, anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), or anti-neurofilament 200 (NF) antibody revealed that anti-GST-pi antibody identified an oligodendrocyte marker recognizing NB3C4-positive cells, while both anti-GFAP and anti-NF antibody did not. Western blotting of rat brain homogenates showed that NB3C4 bound three proteins of 22-28 kDa, while the anti-GST-pi recognized a 27 kDa protein. Therefore, antigens recognized by NB3C4 could be novel markers for oligodendrocytes.

  20. Acid hydrolysis of cellulosic fibres: Comparison of bleached kraft pulp, dissolving pulps and cotton textile cellulose.

    PubMed

    Palme, Anna; Theliander, Hans; Brelid, Harald

    2016-01-20

    The behaviour of different cellulosic fibres during acid hydrolysis has been investigated and the levelling-off degree of polymerisation (LODP) has been determined. The study included a bleached kraft pulp (both never-dried and once-dried) and two dissolving pulps (once-dried). Additionally, cotton cellulose from new cotton sheets and sheets discarded after long-time use was studied. Experimental results from the investigation, together with results found in literature, imply that ultrastructural differences between different fibres affect their susceptibility towards acid hydrolysis. Drying of a bleached kraft pulp was found to enhance the rate of acid hydrolysis and also result in a decrease in LODP. This implies that the susceptibility of cellulosic fibres towards acid hydrolysis is affected by drying-induced stresses in the cellulose chains. In cotton cellulose, it was found that use and laundering gave a substantial loss in the degree of polymerisation (DP), but that the LODP was only marginally affected.

  1. Isotherms for adsorption of cellobiohydrolase I and II from Trichoderma reesei on microcrystalline cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Medve, J.; Tjerneld, F.; Stahlberg, J.

    1997-04-01

    Adsorption to microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) of pure cellobiohydrolase I and II (CBH I and CBH II) from Trichoderma reesei has been studied. Adsorption isotherms of the enzymes were measured at 4{degree}C using CBH I and CBH II alone and in reconstituted equimolar mixtures. Several models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Jovanovic) were tested to describe the experimental adsorption isotherms. The isotherms did not follow the basic (one site) Langmuir equation that has often been used to describe adsorption isotherms of cellulases; correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) were only 0.926 and 0.947, for CBH I and II, respectively. The experimental isotherms were best described by a model of Langmuir type with two adsorption sites and by a combined Langmuir-Freundlich model (analogous to the Hill equation); using these models the correlation coefficients were in most cases higher than 0.995. Apparent binding parameters derived from the two sites Langmuir model indicated stronger binding of CBH II compared to CBH I; the distribution coefficients were 20.7 and 3.7 L/g for the two enzymes, respectively. The binding capacity was higher for CBH I than for CBH II. The isotherms when analyzed with the combined model indicated presence of unequal binding sites on cellulose and/or negative cooperativity in the binding of the enzyme molecules. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. 3C-SiC/ZnS heterostructured nanospheres with high photocatalytic activity and enhancement mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, L. Z.; Yang, L.; Gan, Z. X.; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-03-15

    3C-SiC/n-type ZnS heterostructured nanospheres synthesized hydrothermally deliver enhanced photocatalytic performance under visible light excitation. The heterostructured catalysts consisting of 3C-SiC and ZnS nanocrystals with a mean size being less than 5 nm exhibit extended light absorption to the visible range. The proper band structure of the 3C-SiC and ZnS nanocrystals and intrinsic electric field induced by the heterojunction promote separation of photoexcited electrons and holes in the ZnS and 3C-SiC nanocrystals resulting in the increased photocatalytic efficiency. The associated mechanism is studied and proposed.

  3. Synthesis and X-ray studies of novel 3-C-nitromethyl-hexofuranoses.

    PubMed

    Turks, Māris; Vēze, Krista; Kiseļovs, Gļebs; Mackeviča, Jevgeņija; Lugiņina, Jevgeņija; Mishnev, Anatoly; Marković, Dean

    2014-06-01

    A practical method for the synthesis of three novel 3-C-nitromethyl-hexofuranoses is reported. The Henry reaction on a 1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-α-d-gulofuranose-derived ketone provided a 3-C-branched gulo-isomer as the sole reaction product. The dehydration-rehydration of the latter yielded an isopropylidene-protected 3-C-nitromethyl-galactofuranose. The reaction sequence can be also used for the synthesis of a 3-deoxy-3-C-nitromethyl-hexofuranose derivative with a gulo-configuration. Two of the newly obtained carbohydrate derivatives were characterized by X-ray crystallography.

  4. The nature of the optical variations of Seyfert galaxy 3C 120

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.R. Austin State Univ., TX )

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from 61 years of optical observations of the Seyfert galaxy 3C 120. A previously published model of the 3C 120 light curve, derived from power spectrum analysis, is found to be valid for historical as well as current data. It is concluded that the optical variations of 3C 120 can be separated into a linear component, a sinusoidal component, and rapid, high-amplitude flares. Possible sources of the regular variations observed in 3C 120 are also suggested in the context of accretion models and other theoretical models. 15 refs.

  5. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh -hui; Lai, Hsin -Chih

    2015-03-19

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To addressmore » this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Two Cellulose Morphology Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 Producing Cellulose with Lower Crystallinity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the

  7. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the

  8. Nondestructive, real-time determination and visualization of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin by luminescent oligothiophenes

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Ferdinand X.; Bäck, Marcus; Steiner, Svava E.; Melican, Keira; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Edlund, Ulrica; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    Enabling technologies for efficient use of the bio-based feedstock are crucial to the replacement of oil-based products. We investigated the feasibility of luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) for non-destructive, rapid detection and quality assessment of lignocellulosic components in complex biomass matrices. A cationic pentameric oligothiophene denoted p-HTEA (pentamer hydrogen thiophene ethyl amine) showed unique binding affinities to cellulose, lignin, hemicelluloses, and cellulose nanofibrils in crystal, liquid and paper form. We exploited this finding using spectrofluorometric methods and fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, for sensitive, simultaneous determination of the structural and compositional complexities of native lignocellulosic biomass. With exceptional photostability, p-HTEA is also demonstrated as a dynamic sensor for real-time monitoring of enzymatic cellulose degradation in cellulolysis. These results demonstrate the use of p-HTEA as a non-destructive tool for the determination of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin in complex biomass matrices, thereby aiding in the optimization of biomass-converting technologies. PMID:27759105

  9. Molecular imprinting of caffeine on cellulose/silica composite and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Rajinder Singh

    This dissertation presents a study to prepare molecularly imprinted inorganic/organic hybrid composite which not only confirm the higher binding capabilities for the target molecule (template) but also discriminate its structural analogs. Molecularly imprinted Cellulose/Silica composite (MIP) was prepared by using caffeine as the template. Silica derived from TEOS by using sol-gel techniques was deposited on cheap, abundant organic matrix such as cellulose, which can provide a filtering medium while coffee brewing. Removal of the template from the precursor was verified by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Remarkably reduced intensity of -NH2 scissor like mode of caffeine and the presence of traces of "N" by elemental analysis, confirmed the complete removal of caffeine on washing with ethanol. Cellulose to TEOS mass ratio of 2:1 was found to be close to optimal during our analysis. Energy dispersive spectroscopy results leads to an important fact that the deposition of silica was stable even at 373 K. Focus was on the adsorption affinities of caffeine by MIP and was tested by performing relative adsorption of caffeine by MIP and blank (standard) using demountable path length cell in IR. It was observed that MIP showed almost 3-folds higher adsorption capabilities as compared to blank. The initial rate of adsorption of caffeine by MIP is much higher than blank which is one of the desirable feature according the its intended use. The higher adsorption of caffeine by MIP not only depends on the amount of silica deposited but also the available binding sites present on its surface. Selectivity of MIP was also verified by the competitive adsorption of caffeine and its structure analogs such as theophylline. Clearly, MIP showed greater and more rapid binding capabilities for caffeine than theophylline. At short contact times, the binding capability for caffeine is almost 1.8 times greater than the binding capabilities for theophylline.

  10. Clean conversion of cellulose into fermentable glucose.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Zhuang, Junping; Lin, Lu; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2009-01-01

    We studied the process of conversion of microcrystalline-cellulose into fermentable glucose in the formic acid reaction system using cross polarization/magic angle spinning (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that formic acid as an active agent was able to effectively penetrate into the interior space of the cellulose molecules, thus collapsing the rigid crystalline structure and allowing hydrolysis to occur easily in the amorphous zone as well as in the crystalline zone. The microcrystalline-cellulose was hydrolyzed using formic acid and 4% hydrochloric acid under mild conditions. The effects of hydrochloric acid concentration, the ratio of solid to liquid, temperature (55-75 degrees C) and retention time (0-9 h), and the concentration of glucose were analyzed. The hydrolysis velocities of microcrystalline-cellulose were 6.14 x 10(-3) h(-1) at 55 degrees C, 2.94 x 10(-2) h(-1) at 65 degrees C, and 6.84x10(-2) h(-1) at 75 degrees C. The degradation velocities of glucose were 0.01 h(-1) at 55 degrees C, 0.14 h(-1) at 65 degrees C, 0.34 h(-1) at 75 degrees C. The activation energy of microcrystalline-cellulose hydrolysis was 105.61 kJ/mol, and the activation energy of glucose degradation was 131.37 kJ/mol.

  11. Biocompatibility of Bacterial Cellulose Based Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Fernando G.; Commeaux, Solene; Troncoso, Omar P.

    2012-01-01

    Some bacteria can synthesize cellulose when they are cultivated under adequate conditions. These bacteria produce a mat of cellulose on the top of the culture medium, which is formed by a three-dimensional coherent network of pure cellulose nanofibers. Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been widely used in different fields, such as the paper industry, electronics and tissue engineering due to its remarkable mechanical properties, conformability and porosity. Nanocomposites based on BC have received much attention, because of the possibility of combining the good properties of BC with other materials for specific applications. BC nanocomposites can be processed either in a static or an agitated medium. The fabrication of BC nanocomposites in static media can be carried out while keeping the original mat structure obtained after the synthesis to form the final nanocomposite or by altering the culture media with other components. The present article reviews the issue of biocompatibility of BC and BC nanocomposites. Biomedical aspects, such as surface modification for improving cell adhesion, in vitro and in vivo studies are given along with details concerning the physics of network formation and the changes that occur in the cellulose networks due to the presence of a second phase. The relevance of biocompatibility studies for the development of BC-based materials in bone, skin and cardiovascular tissue engineering is also discussed. PMID:24955750

  12. New product development: Cellulose/egg white protein blend fibers.

    PubMed

    Tomczyńska-Mleko, Marta; Terpiłowski, Konrad; Mleko, Stanisław

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the research was to form mixed cellulose/egg white isolate (EWI) fibers. Cellulose was dissolved in the Schweitzer's reagent. The blend fibers were obtained by simultaneous cellulose fiber formation and acid-induced gelation of EWI in 33% sulphuric acid solution. Increased storage modulus was noted for the blend fibers in comparison to the cellulose fibers. EWI alone formed fibers which were composed of microfibers with the average diameter of about 80 nm. Cellulose fibers had a loose microstructure with about 10 μm gaps and rough surface. The addition of EWI caused that the surface of the fiber was even more rough with a tendency to form microfibers, which were not observed for cellulose alone. EWI protein molecules had the tendency to bridge the voids between cellulose microfibers. Protein in the blend fibrils formed more branched aggregates than in the EWI fibrils, which was probably caused by interactions with copper ions. Both in cellulose and cellulose/EWI fibrils, the cellulose crystallized in cellulose II monoclinic system. Reduction in COH groups was noted, which was probably caused by interactions between the cellulose and proteins molecules. EWI/cellulose interactions caused formation of β-sheet type structures.

  13. Synthesis of Highly Polymerized Water-soluble Cellulose Acetate by the Side Reaction in Carboxylate Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium Acetate.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jinhui; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jun; Lu, Fachuang; Wang, Bo; Xu, Feng; Ma, Mingguo; Zhang, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we describe a novel one-step method to prepare water-soluble cellulose acetate (WSCA) with higher degree of polymerization values (DP = 650-680) by in situ activation of carboxyl group in ionic liquid. First of all, cellulose was dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc) and reacted with dichloroacetyl chloride (Cl2AcCl) in order to make cellulose dichloroacetate. Under various conditions, a series of water soluble products were produced. Elemental analysis and NMR results confirmed that they were cellulose acetate with DS (degree of substitution) values in the range from 0.30 to 0.63. NMR studies demonstrated that Cl2AcCl reacted with acetate anion of EmimAc producing a mixed anhydride that acetylated cellulose. Other acylating reagents such as benzoyl chloride, chloroacetyl chloride can also work similarly. 2D NMR characterization suggested that 6-mono-O-acetyl moiety, 3,6-di-O-acetylcellulose and 2,6-di-O-acetyl cellulose were all synthesized and the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in anhydro-glucose units was in the order C-6>C-3>C-2. This work provides an alternative way to make WSCA, meanwhile, also services as a reminder that the activity of EmimAc toward carbohydrate as acylating reagents could be a problem, because the expected acylated products may not be resulted and recycling of this ionic liquid could also be difficult. PMID:27644545

  14. Synthesis of Highly Polymerized Water-soluble Cellulose Acetate by the Side Reaction in Carboxylate Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jinhui; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jun; Lu, Fachuang; Wang, Bo; Xu, Feng; Ma, Mingguo; Zhang, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we describe a novel one-step method to prepare water-soluble cellulose acetate (WSCA) with higher degree of polymerization values (DP = 650–680) by in situ activation of carboxyl group in ionic liquid. First of all, cellulose was dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc) and reacted with dichloroacetyl chloride (Cl2AcCl) in order to make cellulose dichloroacetate. Under various conditions, a series of water soluble products were produced. Elemental analysis and NMR results confirmed that they were cellulose acetate with DS (degree of substitution) values in the range from 0.30 to 0.63. NMR studies demonstrated that Cl2AcCl reacted with acetate anion of EmimAc producing a mixed anhydride that acetylated cellulose. Other acylating reagents such as benzoyl chloride, chloroacetyl chloride can also work similarly. 2D NMR characterization suggested that 6-mono-O-acetyl moiety, 3,6-di-O-acetylcellulose and 2,6-di-O-acetyl cellulose were all synthesized and the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in anhydro-glucose units was in the order C-6>C-3>C-2. This work provides an alternative way to make WSCA, meanwhile, also services as a reminder that the activity of EmimAc toward carbohydrate as acylating reagents could be a problem, because the expected acylated products may not be resulted and recycling of this ionic liquid could also be difficult. PMID:27644545

  15. Synthesis of Highly Polymerized Water-soluble Cellulose Acetate by the Side Reaction in Carboxylate Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium Acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Jinhui; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jun; Lu, Fachuang; Wang, Bo; Xu, Feng; Ma, Mingguo; Zhang, Xueming

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we describe a novel one-step method to prepare water-soluble cellulose acetate (WSCA) with higher degree of polymerization values (DP = 650–680) by in situ activation of carboxyl group in ionic liquid. First of all, cellulose was dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc) and reacted with dichloroacetyl chloride (Cl2AcCl) in order to make cellulose dichloroacetate. Under various conditions, a series of water soluble products were produced. Elemental analysis and NMR results confirmed that they were cellulose acetate with DS (degree of substitution) values in the range from 0.30 to 0.63. NMR studies demonstrated that Cl2AcCl reacted with acetate anion of EmimAc producing a mixed anhydride that acetylated cellulose. Other acylating reagents such as benzoyl chloride, chloroacetyl chloride can also work similarly. 2D NMR characterization suggested that 6-mono-O-acetyl moiety, 3,6-di-O-acetylcellulose and 2,6-di-O-acetyl cellulose were all synthesized and the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in anhydro-glucose units was in the order C-6>C-3>C-2. This work provides an alternative way to make WSCA, meanwhile, also services as a reminder that the activity of EmimAc toward carbohydrate as acylating reagents could be a problem, because the expected acylated products may not be resulted and recycling of this ionic liquid could also be difficult.

  16. Synthesis of Highly Polymerized Water-soluble Cellulose Acetate by the Side Reaction in Carboxylate Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium Acetate.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jinhui; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jun; Lu, Fachuang; Wang, Bo; Xu, Feng; Ma, Mingguo; Zhang, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we describe a novel one-step method to prepare water-soluble cellulose acetate (WSCA) with higher degree of polymerization values (DP = 650-680) by in situ activation of carboxyl group in ionic liquid. First of all, cellulose was dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc) and reacted with dichloroacetyl chloride (Cl2AcCl) in order to make cellulose dichloroacetate. Under various conditions, a series of water soluble products were produced. Elemental analysis and NMR results confirmed that they were cellulose acetate with DS (degree of substitution) values in the range from 0.30 to 0.63. NMR studies demonstrated that Cl2AcCl reacted with acetate anion of EmimAc producing a mixed anhydride that acetylated cellulose. Other acylating reagents such as benzoyl chloride, chloroacetyl chloride can also work similarly. 2D NMR characterization suggested that 6-mono-O-acetyl moiety, 3,6-di-O-acetylcellulose and 2,6-di-O-acetyl cellulose were all synthesized and the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in anhydro-glucose units was in the order C-6>C-3>C-2. This work provides an alternative way to make WSCA, meanwhile, also services as a reminder that the activity of EmimAc toward carbohydrate as acylating reagents could be a problem, because the expected acylated products may not be resulted and recycling of this ionic liquid could also be difficult.

  17. Scandium carbides/cyanides in the boron cage: computational prediction of X@B80 (X = Sc2C2, Sc3C2, Sc3CN and Sc3C2CN).

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Qinghua; Li, Lanlan; Tang, Chengchun; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-08-01

    As the first study on metal carbide/cyanide boron clusterfullerenes, the geometries, energies, stabilities and electronic properties of four novel scandium cluster-containing B80 buckyball derivatives, namely Sc2C2@B80, Sc3C2@B80, Sc3CN@B80 and Sc3C2CN@B80, were investigated by means of density functional theory computations. The rather favorable binding energies, which are very close to those of the experimentally abundant carbon fullerene analogues, suggest a considerable possibility to realize these doped boron clusterfullerenes. Their intracluster and cluster-cage bonding natures were thoroughly revealed by various theoretical approaches. In contrast to carbon clusterfullerenes, in which the encaged non-metal atoms mainly play a stabilizing role in the metal clusters, the encapsulated carbon and nitrogen atoms inside the B80 cage covalently bond to the boron framework, resulting in strong cluster-cage interactions. Furthermore, infrared spectra and (11)B nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were simulated and fingerprint peaks were proposed to assist future experimental characterization.

  18. Scandium carbides/cyanides in the boron cage: computational prediction of X@B80 (X = Sc2C2, Sc3C2, Sc3CN and Sc3C2CN).

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Qinghua; Li, Lanlan; Tang, Chengchun; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-08-01

    As the first study on metal carbide/cyanide boron clusterfullerenes, the geometries, energies, stabilities and electronic properties of four novel scandium cluster-containing B80 buckyball derivatives, namely Sc2C2@B80, Sc3C2@B80, Sc3CN@B80 and Sc3C2CN@B80, were investigated by means of density functional theory computations. The rather favorable binding energies, which are very close to those of the experimentally abundant carbon fullerene analogues, suggest a considerable possibility to realize these doped boron clusterfullerenes. Their intracluster and cluster-cage bonding natures were thoroughly revealed by various theoretical approaches. In contrast to carbon clusterfullerenes, in which the encaged non-metal atoms mainly play a stabilizing role in the metal clusters, the encapsulated carbon and nitrogen atoms inside the B80 cage covalently bond to the boron framework, resulting in strong cluster-cage interactions. Furthermore, infrared spectra and (11)B nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were simulated and fingerprint peaks were proposed to assist future experimental characterization. PMID:27424658

  19. Polypeptide composition of bacterial cyclic diguanylic acid-dependent cellulose synthase and the occurrence of immunologically crossreacting proteins in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, R.; Ross, P.; Weinhouse, H.; Amikam, D.; Volman, G.; Ohana, P.; Benziman, M. ); Calhoon, R.D.; Wong, Hing C.; Emerick, A.W. )

    1991-06-15

    To comprehend the catalytic and regulatory mechanism of the cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)-dependent cellulose synthase of Acetobacter xylinum and its relatedness to similar enzymes in other organisms, the structure of this enzyme was analyzed at the polypeptide level. The enzyme, purified 350-fold by enzyme-product entrapment, contains three major peptides (90, 67, and 54 kDa), which, based on direct photoaffinity and immunochemical labeling and amino acid sequence analysis, are constituents of the native cellulose synthase. Labeling of purified synthase with either ({sup 32}P)c-di-GMP or ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)UDP-glucose indicates that activator- and substrate-specific binding sites are most closely associated with the 67- and 54-kDa peptides, respectively, whereas marginal photolabeling is detected in the 90-k-Da peptide. However, antibodies raised against a protein derived from the cellulose synthase structural gene (bcsB) specifically label all three peptides. The authors suggest that the structurally related 67- and 54-kDa peptides are fragments proteolytically derived from the 90-kDa peptide encoded by bcsB. The anti-cellulose synthase antibodies crossreact with a similar set of peptides derived from other cellulose-producing microorganisms and plants such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Rhizobium leguminosarum, mung bean, peas, barley, and cotton. The occurrence of such cellulose synthase-like structures in plant species suggests that a common enzymatic mechanism for cellulose biogenesis is employed throughout nature.

  20. Alteration of in vivo cellulose ribbon assembly by carboxymethylcellulose and other cellulose derivatives

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    In vivo cellulose ribbon assembly by the Gram-negative bacterium Acetobacter xylinum can be altered by incubation in carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), a negatively charged water-soluble cellulose derivative, and also by incubation in a variety of neutral, water-soluble cellulose derivatives. In the presence of all of these substituted celluloses, normal fasciation of microfibril bundles to form the typical twisting ribbon is prevented. Alteration of ribbon assembly is most extensive in the presence of CMC, which often induces synthesis of separate, intertwining bundles of microfibrils. Freeze- etch preparations of the bacterial outer membrane suggest that particles that are thought to be associated with cellulose synthesis or extrusion may be specifically organized to mediate synthesis of microfibril bundles. These data support the previous hypothesis that the cellulose ribbon of A. xylinum is formed by a hierarchical, cell- directed, self-assembly process. The relationship of these results to the regulation of cellulose microfibril size and wall extensibility in plant cell walls is discussed. PMID:6889605

  1. Comparison of physical properties of regenerated cellulose films fabricated with different cellulose feedstocks in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Pang, JinHui; Wu, Miao; Zhang, QiaoHui; Tan, Xin; Xu, Feng; Zhang, XueMing; Sun, RunCang

    2015-05-01

    With the serious "white pollution" resulted from the non-biodegradable plastic films, considerable attention has been directed toward the development of renewable and biodegradable cellulose-based film materials as substitutes of petroleum-derived materials. In this study, environmentally friendly cellulose films were successfully prepared using different celluloses (pine, cotton, bamboo, MCC) as raw materials and ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate as a solvent. The SEM and AFM indicated that all cellulose films displayed a homogeneous and smooth surface. In addition, the FT-IR and XRD analysis showed the transition from cellulose I to II was occurred after the dissolution and regeneration process. Furthermore, the cellulose films prepared by cotton linters and pine possessed the most excellent thermal stability and mechanical properties, which were suggested by the highest onset temperature (285°C) and tensile stress (120 MPa), respectively. Their excellent properties of regenerated cellulose films are promising for applications in food packaging and medical materials. PMID:25659673

  2. Highly ordered cellulose II crystalline regenerated from cellulose hydrolyzed by 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yongjun; Song, Younghan; Kwak, Seung-Yeop; Kim, Hyungsup

    2016-02-10

    This research focused on the preparation of highly ordered cellulose II crystalline by cellulose hydrolysis in ionic liquid, and the influence of molecular mobility on recrystallization of cellulose. The molar mass of cellulose was controlled by hydrolysis using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BmimCl). The molecular mobility of cellulose dissolved in BmimCl was characterized by rheological properties. After characterization of cellulose solution and regeneration, change of molar mass and conversion to crystalline were monitored using gel-permeation chromatography and powder X-ray diffraction, respectively. The molar mass of the cellulose in BmimCl was remarkably decreased with an increase in duration time, resulting in better mobility and a lower conformational constraint below critical molar mass. The decrease in molar mass surprisingly increased the crystallinity up to ∼ 85%, suggesting a recrystallization rate dependence of the mobility. The correlation between the mobility and recrystallization rate represented quit different behavior above and below a critical molar mass, which strongly demonstrated to the effect of mobility on the conversion of amorphous state to crystalline structure.

  3. Chemical genetics to examine cellulose biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Long-term efforts to decode plant cellulose biosynthesis via molecular genetics and biochemical strategies are being enhanced by the ever-expanding scale of omics technologies. An alternative approach to consider are the prospects for inducing change in plant metabolism using exogenously supplied chemical ligands. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors (CBIs) have been identified among known herbicides, during diverse combinatorial chemical libraries screens, and natural chemical screens from microbial agents. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the inhibitory effects of CBIs and further group them by how they influence fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase A proteins. Additional attention is paid to the continuing development of the CBI toolbox to explore the cell biology and genetic mechanisms underpinning effector molecule activity. PMID:23372572

  4. Development of bioconversion of cellulosic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, R.; Monceaux, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements during the past decade in cellulolytic enzymes for conversion of cellulosic and lignocellulosic materials to glucose and by fermentation to ethanol and other products have led to development of a practical commercial process. A pilot plant based on utilization of the advanced Trichoderma reesei fungal enzyme systems available, utilized in a fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation system, has been operated successfully at an eastern pulp and paper mill. Successive improvements in techniques and operating conditions for this pilot plant, with a capacity of 1 t/d feedstock input, has led to production of ethanol with conversions of 80-90% of theoretical, based on cellulose content of the feedstock. With the data and knowledge in hand, this technology is now ready for use in a proposed demonstration facility with a nominal capacity of 50-100 t/d of feedstock. Projected economics are presented for proposed commercial facilities processing up to 500 t/d of cellulosic wastes.

  5. Low-energy irradiation effects in cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Polvi, Jussi; Nordlund, Kai

    2014-01-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we determined the threshold energy for creating defects as a function of the incident angle for all carbon and oxygen atoms in the cellulose monomer. Our analysis shows that the damage threshold energy is strongly dependent on the initial recoil direction and on average slightly higher for oxygen atoms than for carbon atoms in cellulose chain. We also performed cumulative bombardment simulations mimicking low-energy electron irradiation (such as TEM imaging) on cellulose. Analyzing the results, we found that formation of free molecules and broken glucose rings were the most common forms of damage, whereas cross-linking and chain scission were less common. Pre-existing damage was found to increase the probability of cross-linking.

  6. Prospects for Irradiation in Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Anita; Aggarwal, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Anuja; Yadav, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Second generation bioethanol production technology relies on lignocellulosic biomass composed of hemicelluloses, celluloses, and lignin components. Cellulose and hemicellulose are sources of fermentable sugars. But the structural characteristics of lignocelluloses pose hindrance to the conversion of these sugar polysaccharides into ethanol. The process of ethanol production, therefore, involves an expensive and energy intensive step of pretreatment, which reduces the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and makes feedstock more susceptible to saccharification. Various physical, chemical, biological, or combined methods are employed to pretreat lignocelluloses. Irradiation is one of the common and promising physical methods of pretreatment, which involves ultrasonic waves, microwaves, γ-rays, and electron beam. Irradiation is also known to enhance the effect of saccharification. This review explains the role of different radiations in the production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:26839707

  7. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose Iβ and cellulose II.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sunghyun; French, Alfred D; Condon, Brian D; Concha, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose Iβ materials simply based on intensity at 18° 2θ in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16° 2θ intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and the degree of polymorphic conversion, we simulated the diffraction patterns of cotton celluloses (Iβ and II) and compared the simulated amorphous fractions with the Segal values. The diffraction patterns of control and mercerized cottons, respectively, were simulated with perfect crystals of cellulose Iβ (1.54° FWHM) and cellulose II (2.30° FWHM) as well as 10% and 35% amorphous celluloses. Their Segal amorphous fractions were 15% and 31%, respectively. The higher Segal amorphous fraction for control cotton was attributed to the peak overlap. Although the amorphous fraction was set in the simulation, the peak overlap induced by the increase of FWHM further enhanced the Segal amorphous intensity of cellulose Iβ. For cellulose II, the effect of peak overlap was smaller; however the lower reflection of the amorphous cellulose scattering in its Segal amorphous location resulted in smaller Segal amorphous fractions. Despite this underestimation, the relatively good agreement of the Segal method with the simulation for mercerized cotton was attributed to the incomplete conversion to cellulose II. The (1-10) and (110) peaks of cellulose Iβ remained near the Segal amorphous location of cellulose II for blends of control and mercerized cotton fibers.

  8. Paper actuators made with cellulose and hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehwan; Yun, Sungryul; Mahadeva, Suresha K; Yun, Kiju; Yang, Sang Yeol; Maniruzzaman, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Recently, cellulose has been re-discovered as a smart material that can be used as sensor and actuator materials, which is termed electro-active paper (EAPap). This paper reports recent advances in paper actuators made with cellulose and hybrid materials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes, conducting polymers and ionic liquids. Two distinct actuator principles in EAPap actuators are demonstrated: piezoelectric effect and ion migration effect in cellulose. Piezoelectricity of cellulose EAPap is quite comparable with other piezoelectric polymers. But, it is biodegradable, biocompatible, mechanically strong and thermally stable. To enhance ion migration effect in the cellulose, polypyrrole conducting polymer and ionic liquids were nanocoated on the cellulose film. This hybrid cellulose EAPap nanocomposite exhibits durable bending actuation in an ambient humidity and temperature condition. Fabrication, characteristics and performance of the cellulose EAPap and its hybrid EAPap materials are illustrated. Also, its possibility for remotely microwave-driven paper actuator is demonstrated.

  9. Nanocrystalline cellulose from coir fiber: preparation, properties, and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nanocrystalline cellulose derived from various botanical sources offers unique and potentially useful characteristics. In principle, any cellulosic material can be considered as a potential source of a nanocrystalline material, including crops, crop residues, and agroindustrial wastes. Because of t...

  10. 17 CFR 270.3c-2 - Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies. 270.3c-2 Section 270.3c-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT...

  11. 17 CFR 270.3c-2 - Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definition of beneficial ownership in small business investment companies. 270.3c-2 Section 270.3c-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT...

  12. 50 CFR Table 3c to Part 680 - Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Product Codes for Economic Data... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3c Table 3c to Part 680—Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports Code Description 01 Whole crab. 80 Sections. 81 Meats. 97 Other (specify)....

  13. 50 CFR Table 3c to Part 680 - Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Product Codes for Economic Data... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3c Table 3c to Part 680—Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports Code Description 01 Whole crab. 80 Sections. 81 Meats. 97 Other (specify)....

  14. 50 CFR Table 3c to Part 680 - Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Product Codes for Economic Data... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3c Table 3c to Part 680—Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports Code Description 01 Whole crab. 80 Sections. 81 Meats. 97 Other (specify)....

  15. Production of nano bacterial cellulose from waste water of candied jujube-processing industry using Acetobacter xylinum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Lifen; Hua, Jiachuan; Jia, Shiru; Zhang, Jianfei; Liu, Hao

    2015-04-20

    The work is aimed to investigate the suitability of waste water of candied jujube-processing industry for the production of bacterial cellulose (BC) by Gluconacetobacter xylinum CGMCC No.2955 and to study the structure properties of bacterial cellulose membranes. After acid pretreatment, the glucose of hydrolysate was higher than that of waste water of candied jujube. The volumetric yield of bacterial cellulose in hydrolysate was 2.25 g/L, which was 1.5-folds of that in waste water of candied jujube. The structures indicated that the fiber size distribution was 3-14 nm in those media with an average diameter being around 5.9 nm. The crystallinity index of BC from pretreatment medium was lower than that of without pretreatment medium and BCs from various media had similar chemical binding. Ammonium citrate was a key factor for improving production yield and the crystallinity index of BC.

  16. Production of nano bacterial cellulose from waste water of candied jujube-processing industry using Acetobacter xylinum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Lifen; Hua, Jiachuan; Jia, Shiru; Zhang, Jianfei; Liu, Hao

    2015-04-20

    The work is aimed to investigate the suitability of waste water of candied jujube-processing industry for the production of bacterial cellulose (BC) by Gluconacetobacter xylinum CGMCC No.2955 and to study the structure properties of bacterial cellulose membranes. After acid pretreatment, the glucose of hydrolysate was higher than that of waste water of candied jujube. The volumetric yield of bacterial cellulose in hydrolysate was 2.25 g/L, which was 1.5-folds of that in waste water of candied jujube. The structures indicated that the fiber size distribution was 3-14 nm in those media with an average diameter being around 5.9 nm. The crystallinity index of BC from pretreatment medium was lower than that of without pretreatment medium and BCs from various media had similar chemical binding. Ammonium citrate was a key factor for improving production yield and the crystallinity index of BC. PMID:25662694

  17. Processing of cellulose for the advancement of biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Brian James

    2011-12-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose polymers is currently a rate-limiting step in the bioconversion of biomass to biofuels. Cellulose polymers self assemble to form crystalline structures stabilized by a complex network of intermolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding. The network of interactions in crystalline cellulose (cellulose nanostructure) poses an energy barrier that limits enzymatic degradation as apparent from the activity of Cel5H. To improve the degradability of cellulose the intermolecular interactions must be disrupted. The interactions of the cellulose nanostructure prevent solubilization by water and most other common solvents, but some organic solvents aid degradation of cellulose suggesting they influence cellulose nanostructure. The objective of this work is to understand the influence of solvents on cellulose nanostructure with the goal of improving the degradability of cellulose nanostructure using solvents. To understand solvent interaction with cellulose, phosphoric acid was used to first solubilize cellulose (PAS cellulose) followed by adding an organic liquid or water to wash the phosphate from the system. The Flory Huggins theory was used to predict wash liquids that could favorably interact with cellulose. A favorable wash liquid was predicted to prevent the reformation of crystalline domains to yield a disrupted cellulose nanostructure, which should be more degradable. Low molecular weight alcohols and glycols were calculated to be favorable wash liquids. Washing PAS cellulose with the predicted favorable liquids yielded semi-transparent gel-like materials compared to the opaque white precipitate formed when water or unfavorable solvents were used in the wash. Fractal analysis of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) of these apparent gels indicated cellulose polymers likely have the properties of clustered rods. This partial disruption increased degradability relative to the water washed PAS cellulose. The apparent rod

  18. Eukaryotic initiation factor 3C silencing inhibits cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jinmin; Wang, Zhiming; Wang, Yaowu; Liang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Zongmao; Jiao, Baohua

    2015-06-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 3, subunit c (eIF3c), an oncogene overexpressed in human cancers, plays an important role in cell tumorigenesis and proliferation. However, studies assessing its function in gliomas are scarce. The present study evaluated for the first time, the role of eIF3c in gliomas. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to assess eIF3c expression in 95 human glioma samples and normal brain tissues. Then, the eIF3c mRNA levels were detected in tumor and normal brain specimens by quantitative RT-PCR. In addition, eIF3c mRNA levels were assessed in four glioma cell lines (U87, U251, A172 and U373) by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The RNA interference (RNAi) technology was employed to knock down the eIF3c gene in the U251 cells. Western blot analysis, BrdU assay and flow cytometry were used to measure eIF3c protein levels, cell proliferation, cell apoptosis and cell cycle, respectively. The eIF3c protein was overexpressed in the human glioma specimens. In agreement, the eIF3c mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in the human glioma tissues compared with the normal brain samples (P<0.0001). In addition, eIF3c mRNA was detected in all the glioma cell lines. Silencing the eIF3c gene in the U251 cells by RNAi significantly suppressed cell proliferation (P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (P<0.01). Finally, a stark decrease was observed in the G1 phase cell number (P<0.01), while the S and G2 phase cells were significantly increased (P<0.01) after eIF3c knockdown. These findings suggest that eIF3c is overexpressed in human gliomas and essential for their proliferation and survival. Therefore, inhibiting eIF3c expression may constitute an effective therapy for human glioma.

  19. Peptidyl aldehyde NK-1.8k suppresses enterovirus 71 and enterovirus 68 infection by targeting protease 3C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaxin; Yang, Ben; Zhai, Yangyang; Yin, Zheng; Sun, Yuna; Rao, Zihe

    2015-05-01

    Enterovirus (EV) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease in the Pacific-Asia region. In particular, EV71 causes severe central nervous system infections, and the fatality rates from EV71 infection are high. Moreover, an outbreak of respiratory illnesses caused by an emerging EV, EV68, recently occurred among over 1,000 young children in the United States and was also associated with neurological infections. Although enterovirus has emerged as a considerable global public health threat, no antiviral drug for clinical use is available. In the present work, we screened our compound library for agents targeting viral protease and identified a peptidyl aldehyde, NK-1.8k, that inhibits the proliferation of different EV71 strains and one EV68 strain and that had a 50% effective concentration of 90 nM. Low cytotoxicity (50% cytotoxic concentration, >200 μM) indicated a high selective index of over 2,000. We further characterized a single amino acid substitution inside protease 3C (3C(pro)), N69S, which conferred EV71 resistance to NK-1.8k, possibly by increasing the flexibility of the substrate binding pocket of 3C(pro). The combination of NK-1.8k and an EV71 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitor or entry inhibitor exhibited a strong synergistic anti-EV71 effect. Our findings suggest that NK-1.8k could potentially be developed for anti-EV therapy. PMID:25691647

  20. Photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction on 3C-SiC photoanode in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun Tae; Iwasaki, Takayuki; Hatano, Mutsuko

    2015-04-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction on a 3C-SiC photoanode is demonstrated in aqueous solution with Pt and Ag counter electrodes. It is demonstrated that 3C-SiC has sufficient potential for CO2 reduction by confirming the band-edge structure. Then, the CO2 reduction is realized by connecting the 3C-SiC photoanode with the counter electrode. As the products of the PEC reaction with an applied bias of 1 V (vs counter electrode) to the 3C-SiC photoanode, hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were analyzed by highly sensitive micro-gas chromatography, by which the time dependence of the gas products can be analyzed. Under light illumination of the 3C-SiC photoanode, CO2 reduction occurred while producing 2.5 and 9 nmol of CO gas with the Pt and Ag counter electrodes, respectively, after the reaction for 3000 s.

  1. Interaction of steroid--peroxidase conjugates with cellulose immunosorbents in aqueous and micellar media.

    PubMed

    Eryomin, A N; Metelitza, D I

    1998-10-01

    In 0.1 M bicarbonate buffer (pH 9.0) and in microemulsions of aerosol OT (AOT) and its mixture with Triton X-45 in heptane, antibodies against cortisol (anti-COR) and progesterone (anti-PROG) were covalently immobilized on fine-porous cellulose filters (0.6 cm diameter) after sodium periodate oxidation. Immunosorbents obtained in different media were characterized in terms of antibody-bound density and antigen-binding capacity with respect to peroxidase--steroid conjugates HP--COR-11 and HP--PROG-4 containing 11 molecules of cortisol and four progesterone molecules, respectively. For all immunosorbents antigen-binding capacity expressed as peroxidase activity of immune complexes formed on the solid cellulose phase in aqueous and micellar media was determined. Dissociation constants of immunocomplexes on the cellulose formed in aqueous and micellar media were determined using ELISA. In all cases Kd values in aqueous media were approximately 10-8 M and were significantly lower than corresponding values of dissociation constants of immune complexes in mixed microemulsions of AOT and Triton X-45. PMID:9864448

  2. Chapter 5: Meso-Scale Modeling of Polysaccharides in Plant Cell Walls: An Application to Translation of CBMs on Cellulose Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    A coarse-grained model and force field for simulating cellulose I{beta} surface (1,0,0) was derived, in which each {beta}-D-glucose unit is represented by three beads. The coarse-grained model can reproduce a stable cellulose (1,0,0) surface with an excellent agreement with an all-atom model. When used to study the interaction of the family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM1) with this cellulose surface model, the CBM 'opens' as in earlier atomistic simulations. This cellulose I{beta} surface model produces simulations in which the CBM translates along a broken cellodextrin chain. This processive motion of the exoglucanase cellobiohydrolase I has long been suggested by experimental studies, but has never before been observed in computer simulations.

  3. Molecular Basis for Complement Recognition and Inhibition Determined by Crystallographic Studies of the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor (SCIN) Bound to C3c and C3b

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Brandon L.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Tzekou, Apostolia; Ricklin, Daniel; McWhorter, William J.; Lambris, John D.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2010-10-22

    The human complement system plays an essential role in innate and adaptive immunity by marking and eliminating microbial intruders. Activation of complement on foreign surfaces results in proteolytic cleavage of complement component 3 (C3) into the potent opsonin C3b, which triggers a variety of immune responses and participates in a self-amplification loop mediated by a multi-protein assembly known as the C3 convertase. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has evolved a sophisticated and potent complement evasion strategy, which is predicated upon an arsenal of potent inhibitory proteins. One of these, the staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), acts at the level of the C3 convertase (C3bBb) and impairs downstream complement function by trapping the convertase in a stable but inactive state. Previously, we have shown that SCIN binds C3b directly and competitively inhibits binding of human factor H and, to a lesser degree, that of factor B to C3b. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of SCIN bound to C3b and C3c at 7.5 and 3.5 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively, and show that SCIN binds a critical functional area on C3b. Most significantly, the SCIN binding site sterically occludes the binding sites of both factor H and factor B. Our results give insight into SCIN binding to activated derivatives of C3, explain how SCIN can recognize C3b in the absence of other complement components, and provide a structural basis for the competitive C3b-binding properties of SCIN. In the future, this may suggest templates for the design of novel complement inhibitors based upon the SCIN structure.

  4. 21 CFR 172.872 - Methyl ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methyl ethyl cellulose. 172.872 Section 172.872... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.872 Methyl ethyl cellulose. The food additive methyl ethyl cellulose... a cellulose ether having the general formula [C6H(10 -x-y)O5(CH3)x(C2H5)y]n, where x is the...

  5. 21 CFR 172.872 - Methyl ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methyl ethyl cellulose. 172.872 Section 172.872... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.872 Methyl ethyl cellulose. The food additive methyl ethyl cellulose... a cellulose ether having the general formula [C6H(10 -x-y)O5(CH3)x(C2H5)y]n, where x is the...

  6. 21 CFR 172.872 - Methyl ethyl cellulose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methyl ethyl cellulose. 172.872 Section 172.872... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.872 Methyl ethyl cellulose. The food additive methyl ethyl cellulose... a cellulose ether having the general formula [C6H(10 -x-y)O5(CH3)x(C2H5)y]n, where x is the...

  7. IR absorption spectra of cellulose obtained from ozonated wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Autlov, S. A.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Bazarnova, N. G.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic curves of ozone absorption by aspen wood were obtained. Processing of wood with peracetic acid gave cellulose samples. The yields of ozonated wood, water-soluble compounds, and cellulose were determined for the samples corresponding to different consumptions of ozone. The IR absorption spectra of wood and cellulose isolated from ozonated wood were analyzed. The supramolecular structure of cellulose can be changed by varying the conditions of wood ozonation.

  8. Identification of a cellulose synthase-associated protein required for cellulose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Kaplinsky, Nick; Bringmann, Martin; Cobb, Alex; Carroll, Andrew; Sampathkumar, Arun; Baskin, Tobias I; Persson, Staffan; Somerville, Chris R

    2010-07-20

    Cellulose synthase-interactive protein 1 (CSI1) was identified in a two-hybrid screen for proteins that interact with cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms involved in primary plant cell wall synthesis. CSI1 encodes a 2,150-amino acid protein that contains 10 predicted Armadillo repeats and a C2 domain. Mutations in CSI1 cause defective cell elongation in hypocotyls and roots and reduce cellulose content. CSI1 is associated with CESA complexes, and csi1 mutants affect the distribution and movement of CESA complexes in the plasma membrane. PMID:20616083

  9. Development of feedstocks for cellulosic biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The inclusion of cellulosic ethanol in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 and the revised Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) has spurred development of the first commercial scale cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. These efforts have also revived interest in the development of dedicated energy crops selected for biomass productivity and for properties that facilitate conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. While many aspects of developing these feedstocks are compatible with current agricultural activities, improving biomass productivity may provide opportunities to expand the potential for biofuel production beyond the classical research objectives associated with improving traditional food and feed crops. PMID:22615716

  10. New tetracyclic tacrine analogs containing pyrano[2,3-c]pyrazole: efficient synthesis, biological assessment and docking simulation study.

    PubMed

    Khoobi, Mehdi; Ghanoni, Farzaneh; Nadri, Hamid; Moradi, Alireza; Pirali Hamedani, Morteza; Homayouni Moghadam, Farshad; Emami, Saeed; Vosooghi, Mohsen; Zadmard, Reza; Foroumadi, Alireza; Shafiee, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    A new series of tacrine-based acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors 7a-l were designed by replacing the benzene ring of tacrine with aryl-dihydropyrano[2,3-c]pyrazole. The poly-functionalized hybrid molecules 7a-l were efficiently synthesized through multi-component reaction and subsequent Friedländer reaction between the obtained pyrano[2,3-c]pyrazoles and cyclohexanone. Most of target compounds showed potent and selective anti-AChE activity at sub-micromolar range. The most potent compound 7h bearing a 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl group was more active than reference drug tacrine. The representative compound 7h could significantly protect neurons against oxidative stress as potent as quercetin at low concentrations. The docking study of compound 7h with AChE enzyme revealed that the (R)-enantiomer binds preferably to CAS while the (S)-enantiomer prone to be a PAS binder. PMID:25462245

  11. CVD growth and properties of boron phosphide on 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padavala, Balabalaji; Frye, C. D.; Wang, Xuejing; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Edgar, J. H.

    2016-09-01

    Improving the crystalline quality of boron phosphide (BP) is essential for realizing its full potential in semiconductor device applications. In this study, 3C-SiC was tested as a substrate for BP epitaxy. BP films were grown on 3C-SiC(100)/Si, 3C-SiC(111)/Si, and 3C-SiC(111)/4H-SiC(0001) substrates in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Films were produced with good crystalline orientation and morphological features in the temperature range of 1000-1200 °C using a PH3+B2H6+H2 mixture. Rotational twinning was absent in the BP due to the crystal symmetry-matching with 3C-SiC. Confocal 3D Raman imaging of BP films revealed primarily uniform peak shift and peak widths across the scanned area, except at defects on the surface. Synchrotron white beam X-ray topography showed the epitaxial relationship between BP and 3C-SiC was (100) < 011 > BP||(100) < 011 > 3C-SiC and (111) < 11 2 ̅ > BP||(111) < 11 2 ̅ > 3C-SiC. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis indicated residual tensile strain in the films and improved crystalline quality at temperatures below 1200 °C. These results indicated that BP properties could be further enhanced by employing high quality bulk 3C-SiC or 3C-SiC epilayers on 4H-SiC substrates.

  12. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  13. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  14. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  15. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  16. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  17. TREATABILITY STUDY BULLETIN: ENZYME-ACTIVATED CELLULOSE TECHNOLOGY - THORNECO, INC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Enzyme-Activated Cellulose Technology developed by Thorneco, Inc. uses cellulose placed into one or more cylindrical towers to remove metals and organic compounds from an aqueous solution. The cellulose is coated with a proprietary enzyme. Operating parameters that can affe...

  18. Growth properties of Cellulomonas flavigena mutants affected in cellulose utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Béguin, P; Eisen, H

    1978-01-01

    The role of cellobiose metabolism in cellulose utilization by Cellulomonas flavigena was investigated by studying mutants unable to grow on cellobiose or cellulose. The results show that the ability to utilize cellulose is strictly dependent on the ability to utilize cellobiose. PMID:415038

  19. Growth properties of Cellulomonas flavigena mutants affected in cellulose utilization.

    PubMed

    Béguin, P; Eisen, H

    1978-02-01

    The role of cellobiose metabolism in cellulose utilization by Cellulomonas flavigena was investigated by studying mutants unable to grow on cellobiose or cellulose. The results show that the ability to utilize cellulose is strictly dependent on the ability to utilize cellobiose.

  20. Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered.