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Sample records for 3c clamped downhole

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2002-09-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2002-05-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  3. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-08-21

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  4. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2006-05-05

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  5. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2005-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-12-31

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-03-31

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-06-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2002-12-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-05-31

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2003-09-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS.

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2003-01-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2003-12-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2003-07-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-05-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  17. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2006-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400

  18. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C.; Hills, Richard G.; Striker, Richard P.

    1991-07-16

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  19. Downhole hydraulic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Gregory, Danny L.; Hardee, Harry C.; Smallwood, David O.

    1992-01-01

    A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

  20. Downhole tool adapted for telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2010-12-14

    A cycleable downhole tool such as a Jar, a hydraulic hammer, and a shock absorber adapted for telemetry. This invention applies to other tools where the active components of the tool are displaced when the tool is rotationally or translationally cycled. The invention consists of inductive or contact transmission rings that are connected by an extensible conductor. The extensible conductor permits the transmission of the signal before, after, and during the cycling of the tool. The signal may be continuous or intermittent during cycling. The invention also applies to downhole tools that do not cycle, but in operation are under such stress that an extensible conductor is beneficial. The extensible conductor may also consist of an extensible portion and a fixed portion. The extensible conductor also features clamps that maintain the conductor under stresses greater than that seen by the tool, and seals that are capable of protecting against downhole pressure and contamination.

  1. Downhole tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, David R.; Muradov, Andrei; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2007-03-20

    A double shouldered downhole tool connection comprises box and pin connections having mating threads intermediate mating primary and secondary shoulders. The connection further comprises a secondary shoulder component retained in the box connection intermediate a floating component and the primary shoulders. The secondary shoulder component and the pin connection cooperate to transfer a portion of makeup load to the box connection. The downhole tool may be selected from the group consisting of drill pipe, drill collars, production pipe, and reamers. The floating component may be selected from the group consisting of electronics modules, generators, gyroscopes, power sources, and stators. The secondary shoulder component may comprises an interface to the box connection selected from the group consisting of radial grooves, axial grooves, tapered grooves, radial protrusions, axial protrusions, tapered protrusions, shoulders, and threads.

  2. Rigid clamp

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.; Burt, Jack D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a clamp mechanism that can be used to attach or temporarily support objects inside of tubular goods. The clamp mechanism can also be modified so that it grips objects. The clamp has a self-centering feature to accommodate out-of-roundness or other internal defections in tubular objects such as pipe. A plurality of clamping shoes are expanded by a linkage which is preferably powered by a motor to contact the inside of a pipe. The motion can be reversed and jaw elements can be connected to the linkage so as to bring the jaws together to grab an object.

  3. Rigid clamp

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, G.L.; Burt, J.D.

    1994-07-12

    The invention relates to a clamp mechanism that can be used to attach or temporarily support objects inside of tubular goods. The clamp mechanism can also be modified so that it grips objects. The clamp has a self-centering feature to accommodate out-of-roundness or other internal defections in tubular objects such as pipe. A plurality of clamping shoes are expanded by a linkage which is preferably powered by a motor to contact the inside of a pipe. The motion can be reversed and jaw elements can be connected to the linkage so as to bring the jaws together to grab an object. 12 figs.

  4. Downhole Dynamometer Data Processor

    1996-08-19

    The Downhole Dynamometer Database contains data taken during tests made on a number of different wells using both a surface dynamometer and a number of different downhole dynamometer tools. DOWNDYN allows the user to perform four different functions on the database: select a data file, choose information from the file, and either plot or export that information.

  5. Downhole telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, R.A.; Kadlec, E.R.

    1994-11-08

    A downhole telemetry system is described for optically communicating to the surface operating parameters of a drill bit during ongoing drilling operations. The downhole telemetry system includes sensors mounted with a drill bit for monitoring at least one operating parameter of the drill bit and generating a signal representative thereof. The downhole telemetry system includes means for transforming and optically communicating the signal to the surface as well as means at the surface for producing a visual display of the optically communicated operating parameters of the drill bit. 7 figs.

  6. Downhole telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Kadlec, Emil R.

    1994-01-01

    A downhole telemetry system is described for optically communicating to the surface operating parameters of a drill bit during ongoing drilling operations. The downhole telemetry system includes sensors mounted with a drill bit for monitoring at least one operating parameter of the drill bit and generating a signal representative thereof. The downhole telemetry system includes means for transforming and optically communicating the signal to the surface as well as means at the surface for producing a visual display of the optically communicated operating parameters of the drill bit.

  7. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David O.; Montoya, Paul C.; Muir, James F.; Wayland, Jr., J. Robert

    1987-01-01

    An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

  8. Downhole Data Transmission System

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe

    2004-04-06

    A system for transmitting data through a string of down-hole components. In accordance with one aspect, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each downhole component includes a pin end and a box end, with the pin end of one downhole component being adapted to be connected to the box end of another. Each pin end includes external threads and an internal pin face distal to the external threads. Each box end includes an internal shoulder face with internal threads distal to the internal shoulder face. The internal pin face and the internal shoulder face are aligned with and proximate each other when the pin end of the one component is threaded into a box end of the other component.

  9. Three phase downhole separator process

    DOEpatents

    Cognata, Louis John

    2008-06-24

    Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

  10. Distributed downhole drilling network

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Fox, Joe; Pixton, David S.

    2006-11-21

    A high-speed downhole network providing real-time data from downhole components of a drilling strings includes a bottom-hole node interfacing to a bottom-hole assembly located proximate the bottom end of a drill string. A top-hole node is connected proximate the top end of the drill string. One or several intermediate nodes are located along the drill string between the bottom-hole node and the top-hole node. The intermediate nodes are configured to receive and transmit data packets transmitted between the bottom-hole node and the top-hole node. A communications link, integrated into the drill string, is used to operably connect the bottom-hole node, the intermediate nodes, and the top-hole node. In selected embodiments, a personal or other computer may be connected to the top-hole node, to analyze data received from the intermediate and bottom-hole nodes.

  11. Downhole transmission system

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2008-01-15

    A transmission system in a downhole component comprises a data transmission element in both ends of the downhole component. Each data transmission element houses an electrically conducting coil in a MCEI circular trough. An electrical conductor connects both the transmission elements. The electrical conductor comprises at least three electrically conductive elements insulated from each other. In the preferred embodiment the electrical conductor comprises an electrically conducting outer shield, an electrically conducting inner shield and an electrical conducting core. In some embodiments of the present invention, the electrical conductor comprises an electrically insulating jacket. In other embodiments, the electrical conductor comprises a pair of twisted wires. In some embodiments, the electrical conductor comprises semi-conductive material.

  12. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  13. Clamp usable as jig and lifting clamp

    DOEpatents

    Tsuyama, Yoshizo

    1976-01-01

    There is provided a clamp which is well suited for use as a lifting clamp for lifting and moving materials of assembly in a shipyard, etc. and as a pulling jig in welding and other operations. The clamp comprises a clamp body including a shackle for engagement with a pulling device and a slot for receiving an article, and a pair of jaws provided on the leg portions of the clamp body on the opposite sides of the slot to grip the article in the slot, one of said jaws consisting of a screw rod and the other jaw consisting of a swivel jaw with a spherical surface, whereby when the article clamped in the slot by the pair of jaws tends to slide in any direction with respect to the clamp body, the article is more positively gripped by the pair of jaws.

  14. Downhole steam injector

    DOEpatents

    Donaldson, A. Burl; Hoke, Donald E.

    1983-01-01

    An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

  15. Method and system for downhole clock synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-11-28

    A method and system for use in synchronizing at least two clocks in a downhole network are disclosed. The method comprises determining a total signal latency between a controlling processing element and at least one downhole processing element in a downhole network and sending a synchronizing time over the downhole network to the at least one downhole processing element adjusted for the signal latency. Electronic time stamps may be used to measure latency between processing elements. A system for electrically synchronizing at least two clocks connected to a downhole network comprises a controlling processing element connected to a synchronizing clock in communication over a downhole network with at least one downhole processing element comprising at least one downhole clock. Preferably, the downhole network is integrated into a downhole tool string.

  16. Downhole heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1999-09-01

    The downhole heat exchanger (DHE) eliminates the problem of disposal of geothermal fluid, since only heat is taken from the well. The exchanger consists of a system of pipes or tubes suspended in the well through which clean secondary water is pumped or allowed to circulate by natural convection. These systems offer substantial economic savings over surface heat exchangers where a single-well system is adequate (typically less than 0.8 MWt, with well depths up to about 500 ft) and may be economical under certain conditions at well depths to 1500 ft. Several designs have proven successful; but, the most popular are a simple hairpin loop or multiple loops of iron pipe (similar to the tubes in a U-tube and shell exchanger) extending to near the well bottom. An experimental design consisting of multiple small tubes with headers at each end suspended just below the water surface appears to offer economic and heating capacity advantages. The paper describes design and construction details and New Zealand`s experience with downhole heat exchangers.

  17. Downhole pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment. The original motivation was to maintain Dave Reagor`s high-temperature superconducting electronics at 75 K, but the study has evolved to include three target design criteria: cooling at 30 C in a 300 C environment, cooling at 75 K in a 50 C environment, cooling at both 75 K and 30 C in a 250 C environment. These specific temperatures were chosen arbitrarily, as representative of what is possible. The primary goals are low cost, reliability, and small package diameter. Pulse-tube refrigeration is a rapidly growing sub-field of cryogenic refrigeration. The pulse tube refrigerator has recently become the simplest, cheapest, most rugged and reliable low-power cryocooler. The authors expect this technology will be applicable downhole because of the ratio of hot to cold temperatures (in absolute units, such as Kelvin) of interest in deep drilling is comparable to the ratios routinely achieved with cryogenic pulse-tube refrigerators.

  18. Drilling jar for use in a downhole network

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; McPherson, James; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-01-31

    Apparatus and methods for integrating transmission cable into the body of selected downhole tools, such as drilling jars, having variable or changing lengths. A wired downhole-drilling tool is disclosed in one embodiment of the invention as including a housing and a mandrel insertable into the housing. A coiled cable is enclosed within the housing and has a first end connected to the housing and a second end connected to the mandrel. The coiled cable is configured to stretch and shorten in accordance with axial movement between the housing and the mandrel. A clamp is used to fix the coiled cable with respect to the housing, the mandrel, or both, to accommodate a change of tension in the coiled cable.

  19. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Muir, J.F.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1985-06-19

    The present invention relates to an empirical electrical method for remote sensing of steam quality utilizing flow-through grids which allow measurement of the electrical properties of a flowing two-phase mixture. The measurement of steam quality in the oil field is important to the efficient application of steam assisted recovery of oil. Because of the increased energy content in higher quality steam it is important to maintain the highest possible steam quality at the injection sandface. The effectiveness of a steaming operation without a measure of steam quality downhole close to the point of injection would be difficult to determine. Therefore, a need exists for the remote sensing of steam quality.

  20. Downhole data transmission system

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe

    2006-06-20

    A system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In one aspect, the system includes first and second magnetically conductive, electrically insulating elements at both ends of the component. Each element includes a first U-shaped trough with a bottom, first and second sides and an opening between the two sides. Electrically conducting coils are located in each trough. An electrical conductor connects the coils in each component. In operation, a varying current applied to a first coil in one component generates a varying magnetic field in the first magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element, which varying magnetic field is conducted to and thereby produces a varying magnetic field in the second magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element of a connected component, which magnetic field thereby generates a varying electrical current in the second coil in the connected component.

  1. Downhole Data Transmission System

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe

    2003-12-30

    A system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In one aspect, the system includes first and second magnetically conductive, electrically insulating elements at both ends of the component. Each element includes a first U-shaped trough with a bottom, first and second sides and an opening between the two sides. Electrically conducting coils are located in each trough. An electrical conductor connects the coils in each component. In operation, a varying current applied to a first coil in one component generates a varying magnetic field in the first magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element, which varying magnetic field is conducted to and thereby produces a varying magnetic field in the second magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element of a connected component, which magnetic field thereby generates a varying electrical current in the second coil in the connected component.

  2. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  3. Downhole recording system for MWD

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Downhole recording systems are an important category of measurement-while-drilling (MWD) systems that has been obscured by the recent concentration of development work on mud-pulse communications systems. The recording system can serve a segment of the MWD market that cannot be economically served, at present, by systems having real-time data communications. This paper describes the development of a downhole recording system. 2 refs.

  4. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  5. Quick-attach clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vano, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Clamp of the slideable jaw type can be applied to moving lines such as cables or ropes. The clamp has a trigger-operated jaw that can be attached to a redrop parachute on a moving tow cable. The trigger mechanism maintains the jaws retracted in the housing until they are released for clamping.

  6. Downhole hydraulic actuated pump

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a downhole hydraulically actuated pump assembly of the type having a main housing within which an engine and pump is enclosed; a connecting rod, an engine piston, a pump plunger, means by which the engine and connecting rod reciprocate the pump plunger and thereby produces fluid; the main housing has a lower end having a formation fluid inlet; and upper end having a power fluid inlet; and, a produced fluid outlet; the plunger divides one marginal end of the housing into upper and lower production chambers; the lower end of the connecting rod is hollow and extends through the plunger into fluid communication with the formation fluid inlet to provide a source of formation fluid for the upper and lower production chambers; a traveling value assembly contained within the plunger and arranged to transfer formation fluid from the hollow rod, through the plunger, and into the upper and lower production chambers, respectively, as the plunger upstrokes and downstrokes; produced fluid valve means by which fluid flows from the upper and lower production chambers and through the produced fluid outlet.

  7. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

    2013-03-19

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  8. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    DOEpatents

    Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Brown, Malcolm P.; Stancel, Robert

    2012-06-05

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  9. Transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

    2006-05-30

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

  10. Downhole frac monitoring system developed

    SciTech Connect

    Sarda, J.P.; Wittrisch, C.; Perreau, P.; Deflandre, J.P.

    1987-04-06

    A hydraulic fracture monitoring system makes it possible to determine the azimuth, length, and height of hydraulic fractures. Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP) has designed, patented, and field tested the system, which is designated Simfrac. It consists of a downhole monitoring tool with real-time surface readout and recording of microseismic events generated during the fracture opening or closing that occurs after the injection of fracture fluids. Combining Simfrac Interpretation with mathematical models can provide a better image of downhole stresses improved hydraulic fracture design, and can indicate optimum drill sites.

  11. Insulated pipe clamp design

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.J.; Hyde, L.L.; Wagner, S.E.; Severud, L.K.

    1980-01-01

    Thin wall large diameter piping for breeder reactor plants can be subjected to significant thermal shocks during reactor scrams and other upset events. On the Fast Flux Test Facility, the addition of thick clamps directly on the piping was undesired because the differential metal temperatures between the pipe wall and the clamp could have significantly reduced the pipe thermal fatigue life cycle capabilities. Accordingly, an insulated pipe clamp design concept was developed. The design considerations and methods along with the development tests are presented. Special considerations to guard against adverse cracking of the insulation material, to maintain the clamp-pipe stiffness desired during a seismic event, to minimize clamp restraint on the pipe during normal pipe heatup, and to resist clamp rotation or spinning on the pipe are emphasized.

  12. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  13. Battery switch for downhole tools

    DOEpatents

    Boling, Brian E.

    2010-02-23

    An electrical circuit for a downhole tool may include a battery, a load electrically connected to the battery, and at least one switch electrically connected in series with the battery and to the load. The at least one switch may be configured to close when a tool temperature exceeds a selected temperature.

  14. West Flank Downhole Temperature Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2008-03-01

    Downhole temperature data for the three wells inside the West Flank FORGE footprint; 83-11, TCH 74-2 and TCH 48-11. TCH 74-2 and TCH 48-11 were both collected before 1990 and 83-11 was collected in 2009. The are compiled into one spreadsheet for ease of visualization.

  15. Downhole steam generation: material studies

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, E.K.; Weirick, L.J.; Muir, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    One enhanced oil recovery technique for extracting heavy crude from deep reservoirs by steam at the bottom of an injection well. Development of a downhole steam generator that will produce steam and inject it into formations at depths greater than 2500 feet is one objective of a Department of Energy/Sandia National Laboratories development effort - Project DEEP STEAM. Extensive material studies have been performed in support of Project DEEP STEAM; current efforts are devoted primarily to the selection and evaluation of materials for use in downhole steam generators. This paper presents observations of the performance of candidate metals and refractory ceramics (combustor liners) during tests of two prototypic, high pressure, diesel/air combustion, direct contact, downhole steam generators. The first downhole test of such a generator provides data on the performance of various metals (304L, 310 and 316S stainless steels and plain carbon steel) exposed for several weeks to a warm, aerated saltwater environment. A number of corrosion mechanisms acted to cause severely degraded perforance of some of the metals. Several refractory liner designs were evaluated during ground level tests of a generator having a ceramic-lined combustion chamber. Of the two refractories employed, alumina and silicon carbide, the alumina liners exhibited more serious surface degradation and corrosion.

  16. Reusable thermal cycling clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Fripp, A. L.; Crouch, R. K. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A reusable metal clamp for retaining a fused quartz ampoule during temperature cycling in the range of 20 deg C to 1000 deg C is described. A compressible graphite foil having a high radial coefficient of thermal expansion is interposed between the fused quartz ampoule and metal clamp to maintain a snug fit between these components at all temperature levels in the cycle.

  17. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.L.

    1981-01-07

    Am improved apparatus is described for the downhole injection of steam into boreholes, for tertiary oil recovery. It includes an oxidant supply, a fuel supply, an igniter, a water supply, an oxidant compressor, and a combustor assembly. The apparatus is designed for efficiency, preheating of the water, and cooling of the combustion chamber walls. The steam outlet to the borehole is provided with pressure-responsive doors for closing the outlet in response to flameout. (DLC)

  18. Downhole electro-hydraulic vertical shear wave seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.H.

    1993-07-20

    A downhole electro-hydraulic vertical shear wave seismic source to be lowered into a wellbore is described comprising: a source cylindrical housing; a reaction mass means for generating seismic shear waves, said reaction mass means having an actuator with an actuator piston and actuator cylinder and located internal to said source cylindrical housing to isolate said actuator from wellbore fluid and pressure, said reaction mass including transversely formed holes through which hydraulic cylinders connected to contact pads pass, said holes having a significantly larger diameter than said hydraulic cylinders; a clamping means to clamp said source cylindrical housing to the wellbore, said clamping means including two serrated pads radiused to match an inside diameter of casing located in said wellbore and hydraulic cylinders having internal compact stacks of spring washers for retraction for actuating said serrated pads; a compact and soft urethane spring for suspending said reaction mass; and a threaded guide rod passing vertically through said urethane spring to allow spring compression to be adjusted until said actuator piston is precisely centered with no differential hydraulic pressure across said actuator piston.

  19. Laser beam guard clamps

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, Richard K.

    2010-09-07

    A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

  20. A monogenean without clamps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their host. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans attach to the surface of fish gills by highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 50 years...

  1. Downhole component with a pressure equalization passageway

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Reynolds, Jay T.; Breihan, James W.; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-08-22

    The present invention includes a downhole component adapted for transmitting downhole data. The downhole component includes a threaded end on a downhole component. The threaded end furthermore includes an interior region, and exterior region, and a mating surface wherein a cavity is formed. A data transmission element is disposed in the cavity and displaces a volume of the cavity. At least one passageway is formed in the threaded region between interior and exterior regions. The passageway is in fluid communication with both the interior and exterior regions and thereby relieves pressure build up of thread lubricant upon tool joint make up.

  2. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

    1983-03-01

    Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

  3. Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Ronald L.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a downhole oxidant compressor is used to compress relatively low pressure (atmospheric) oxidant, such as air, to a relatively high pressure prior to mixing with fuel for combustion. The multi-stage compressor receives motive power through a shaft driven by a gas turbine powered by the hot expanding combustion gases. The main flow of compressed oxidant passes through a velocity increasing nozzle formed by a reduced central section of the compressor housing. An oxidant bypass feedpipe leading to peripheral oxidant injection nozzles of the combustion chamber are also provided. The downhole compressor allows effective steam generation in deep wells without need for high pressure surface compressors. Feedback preheater means are provided for preheating fuel in a preheat chamber. Preheating of the water occurs in both a water feed line running from aboveground and in a countercurrent water flow channel surrounding the combustor assembly. The countercurrent water flow channels advantageously serve to cool the combustion chamber wall. The water is injected through slotted inlets along the combustion chamber wall to provide an unstable boundary layer and stripping of the water from the wall for efficient steam generation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at the steam outlet for closing and sealing the combustion chamber from entry of reservoir fluids in the event of a flameout.

  4. Clamping characteristics study on different types of clamping unit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhiwei; Liu, Haichao; Xie, Pengcheng; Yang, Weimin

    2015-05-22

    Plastic products are becoming more and more widely used in aerospace, IT, digital electronics and many other fields. With the development of technology, the requirement of product precision is getting higher and higher. However, type and working performance of clamping unit play a decisive role in product precision. Clamping characteristics of different types of clamping unit are discussed in this article, which use finite element numerical analysis method through the software ABAQUS to study the clamping uniformity, and detect the clamping force repeatability precision. The result shows that compared with toggled three-platen clamping unit, clamping characteristics of internal circulation two-platen clamping unit are better, for instance, its mold cavity deformation and force that bars and mold parting surface suffered are more uniform, and its clamping uniformity and repeatability precision is also better.

  5. Harsh environments electronics : downhole applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, Paul Thomas

    2011-03-01

    The development and operational sustainment of renewable (geothermal) and non-renewable (fossil fuel) energy resources will be accompanied by increasingly higher costs factors: exploration and site preparation, operational maintenance and repair. Increased government oversight in the wake of the Gulf oil spill will only add to the cost burden. It is important to understand that downhole conditions are not just about elevated temperatures. It is often construed that military electronics are exposed to the upper limit in terms of extreme service environments. Probably the harshest of all service conditions for electronics and electrical equipment are those in oil, gas, and geothermal wells. From the technology perspective, advanced materials, sensors, and microelectronics devices are benefificial to the exploration and sustainment of energy resources, especially in terms of lower costs. Besides the need for the science that creates these breakthroughs - there is also a need for sustained engineering development and testing. Downhole oil, gas, and geothermal well applications can have a wide range of environments and reliability requirements: Temperature, Pressure, Vibration, Corrosion, and Service duration. All too frequently, these conditions are not well-defifined because the application is labeled as 'high temperature'. This ambiguity is problematic when the investigation turns to new approaches for electronic packaging solutions. The objective is to develop harsh environment, electronic packaging that meets customer requirements of cost, performance, and reliability. There are a number of challenges: (1) Materials sets - solder alloys, substrate materials; (2) Manufacturing process - low to middle volumes, low defect counts, new equipment technologies; and (3) Reliability testing - requirements documents, test methods and modeling, relevant standards documents. The cost to develop and sustain renewable and non-renewable energy resources will continue to escalate

  6. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  7. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  8. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOEpatents

    Glowka, D.A.

    1994-09-06

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

  9. Mask side wall clamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaijkens, G. J. P.; Rosielle, P. C. J. N.; Steinbuch, M.

    2013-04-01

    Current state-of-the-art optical lithography scanners using 193nm wavelength lasers and numerical apertures of 1.35 have reached fundamental printing limits. Yet, consumer demands and device trends continue to drive smaller feature sizes, and most IC manufacturers have already navigated beyond the lithographic printing limits by turning to double patterning techniques.1 Requiring an extra lithography step for these techniques, it is essential to keep costs down by e.g. increasing wafer throughput. Currently, leading edge immersion scanners consistently produce over 190 wafers per hour (wph). However, to keep decreasing the cost per transistor, higher throughputs of 250 wph are key targets for the year 20132. Amongst others, higher throughput can be acquired by increasing acceleration of the positioning stages. One of the constraining technologies is the current mask or reticle clamping concept due to its friction based acceleration. While current reticle accelerations amount to 150 m/s2, some research3 has already been performed to reticle stage accelerations of 400 m/s2. In this paper, a novel reticle clamping concept is presented. The concept is shown to be suitable for accelerations larger than 400 m/s2 entirely eliminating reticle slip, whilst meeting specifications for clamping induced error with a pattern deformation of < 0.12 nm on wafer stage level (WS) and comprising high clamp stiffness.

  10. Clamp for detonating fuze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderman, E. J.

    1968-01-01

    Quick acting clamp provides physical support for a closely confined detonating fuse in an application requiring removal and replacement at frequent intervals during test. It can be designed with a base of any required strength and configuration to permit the insertion of an object.

  11. Development of the downhole dynamometer database

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, J.R.; Mansure, A.

    1997-02-01

    The Downhole Dynamometer Database is a compilation of test data collected with a set of five downhole tools built by Albert Engineering under contract to Sandia National Laboratories. The downhole dynamometer tools are memory tools deployed in the sucker rod string with sensors to measure pressure, temperature, load, and acceleration. The acceleration data is processed to yield position, so that a load vs. position dynagraph can be generated using data collected downhole. With five tools in the hole at one time, all measured data and computed dynagraphs from five different positions in the rod string are available. The purpose of the Database is to provide industry with a complete and high quality measurement of downhole sucker rod pumping dynamics. To facilitate use of the database, Sandia has developed a Microsoft Windows-based interface that functions as a visualizer and browser to the more than 40 MBytes of data. The interface also includes a data export feature to allow users to extract data from the database for use in their own programs. This paper includes a description of the downhole dynamometer tools, data collection program, database content, and a few illustrations of the data contained in the downhole dynamometer database.

  12. Insights from the downhole dynamometer database

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, J.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Downhole Dynamometer Database is a compilation of test data collected with a set of five downhole tools built by Albert Engineering under contract to Sandia National Laboratories. The downhole dynamometer tools are memory tools deployed in the sucker rod string with sensors to measure pressure, temperature, load, and acceleration. The acceleration data is processed to yield position, so that a load vs. position dynagraph can be generated using data collected downhole. With five tools in the hole at one time, all measured data and computed dynagraphs from five different positions in the rod string are available. The purpose of the Database is to provide industry with a complete and high quality measurement of downhole sucker rod pumping dynamics. To facilitate use of the database, Sandia has developed a Microsoft Windows-based interface that functions as a visualizer and browser to the more than 40 MBytes of data. The interface also includes a data export feature to allow users to extract data from the database for use in their own programs. Following a brief description of the downhole dynamometer tools, data collection program, and database content, this paper will illustrate a few of the interesting and unique insights gained from the downhole data.

  13. [Clamping procedures in hepatic surgery].

    PubMed

    Frangov, T; Dimitrova, V; Kasten, D; Bismiut, A

    2005-01-01

    The advance of liver surgery and transplantation offers a new procedures--vascular clamping. Results of hepatic resections depends essentially on proper control of intraoperative hemorrhage. We present here the different procedures for vascular clamping and discussing their indications. Four parametres can be used to define the type of clamping: 1) place of application--control of arterial or glisson pedicles and portal veins (pedicles, selective hilar, suprahilar and intrahepatic clamps), suprahepatic veins or vena cava; 2) selectivity--partial or total clamp of hepatic blood supply; 3) duration--continuous or intermittent; 4) association measures to favor tolerence to ischemia (cooling, preservation fluids) or to limit downstream consequences (extracorporal circulaton, derivation). The clamping procedures depends on the localisation of the lesion and its relationships with the great vessels, presence of liver desease and the patients general and cardiovascular status. The aim is to use clamp moderate, favoring selective clamps to avoid ischemia. PMID:18693516

  14. Downhole synthetic seismic profiles in elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X

    1990-02-01

    A multichannel lattice filter structure is utilized to represent seismic waves propagating in adjacent layers in an elastic medium. Using this model, an explicit time-domain solution for arbitrary source and receiver locations is obtained as an arma (autoregressive and moving-average) process. The lattice and arma structures have given rise to an effective algorithm for the calculation of offset/downhole synthetic seismograms. A large range of recently developed offset/downhole seismic survey geometries, such as the Yo-Yo arrangement, can thus be simulated. In addition, the explicit solutions for upgoing and downgoing waves provide new insight into the properties of general downhole seismic signals, including wave-mode conversion effects and multiple reflections. Furthermore, offset/downhole seismograms generated by a line source (i.e., 2D point source) can also be constructed by superposition of plane waves with different incidence angles.

  15. Immediate or early cord clamping vs delayed clamping.

    PubMed

    Hutchon, D J R

    2012-11-01

    Over the past 40 years, there have been a number of review articles attempting to rationalise cord clamping practice. Early cord clamping was originally thought to be important in active management of the third stage of labour, but this was never evidence based. Without an evidence base to justify it, early cord clamping in clinical practice has remained very variable. There is good evidence that early cord clamping leads to hypovolaemia, anaemia and low iron stores in the neonate. We review all the evidence and discuss possible reasons why some obstetricians and midwives persevere with early clamping. We explain how a variable definition, defective education, deferred responsibility between obstetrician and paediatrician, variable guidelines and a lack of appreciation for the potential harm of the intervention, have all contributed. This study describes how the need for early cord clamping can be avoided in practically all clinical complications of birth.

  16. Nonlinear modal interactions in clamped-clamped mechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Westra, H J R; Poot, M; van der Zant, H S J; Venstra, W J

    2010-09-10

    A theoretical and experimental investigation is presented on the intermodal coupling between the flexural vibration modes of a single clamped-clamped beam. Nonlinear coupling allows an arbitrary flexural mode to be used as a self-detector for the amplitude of another mode, presenting a method to measure the energy stored in a specific resonance mode. The observed complex nonlinear dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model based on coupling of the modes via the beam extension; the same mechanism is responsible for the well-known Duffing nonlinearity in clamped-clamped beams. PMID:20867605

  17. Energy harvesting under excitation of clamped-clamped beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Ashok; Alomari, Almuatasim; Aggarwal, Mohan; Bandyopadhyay, Alak

    2016-04-01

    In this article, a piezoelectric energy harvesting has been developed experimentally and theoretically based on Euler- Bernoulli Theory. A PVDF piezoelectric thick film has attached along of clamped-clamped beam under sinusoidal base excitation of shaker. The results showed a good agreement between the experimental and simulation of suggested model. The voltage output frequency response function (FRF), current FRF, and output power has been studied under short and open circuit conditions at first vibration mode. The mode shape of the clamped-clamped beam for first three resonance frequency has been modeled and investigated using COMSOL Multiphysics and MATLAB.

  18. Cantilever clamp fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A device is disclosed for sealing and clamping a cylindrical element which is to be attached to an object such as a wall, a pressurized vessel or another cylindrical element. The device includes a gland having an inner cylindrical wall, which is threaded at one end and is attached at a bendable end to a deformable portion, which in turn is attached to one end of a conical cantilever structure. The other end of the cantilever structure connects at a bendable area to one end of an outer cylindrical wall. The opposite end of cylindrical wall terminates in a thickened portion, the radially outer surface of which is adapted to accommodate a tool for rotating the gland. The terminal end of cylindrical wall also includes an abutment surface, which is adapted to engage a seal, which in turn engages a surface of a receiver. The receiver further includes a threaded portion for engagement with the threaded portion of gland whereby a tightening rotation of gland relative to receiver will cause relative movement between cylindrical walls and of gland. This movement causes a rotation of the conical structure and thus a bending action at bending area and at the bending end of the upper end of inner cylindrical wall. These rotational and bending actions result in a forcing of the deformable portion radially inwardly so as to contact and deform a pipe. This forcible contact creates a seal between gland and pipe, and simultaneously clamps the pipe in position.

  19. DHE (downhole heat exchangers). [Downhole Heat Exchangers (DHE)

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1990-11-01

    The use of downhole heat exchangers (DHE) for residential or commercial space and domestic water heating and other applications has several desirable features. Systems are nearly or completely passive -- that is, no or very little geothermal water or steam is produced from the well either reducing or completely eliminating surface environmental concerns and the need for disposal systems or injection wells. Initial cost of pumps and installation are eliminated or reduced along with pumping power costs and maintenance costs associated with pumping often corrosive geothermal fluids. Many residential and small commercial systems do not require circulating pumps because the density difference in the incoming and outgoing sides of the loop are sufficient to overcome circulating friction losses in the entire system. The major disadvantage of DHEs is their dependence on natural heat flow. In areas where geological conditions provide high permeability and a natural hydraulic gradient, DHEs can provide a substantial quantity of heat. A single 500-ft (152 m) well in Klamath Falls, Oregon, supplies over one megawatt thermal and output is apparently limited by the surface area of pipe that can be installed in the well bore. In contrast, DHEs used in conjunction with heat pumps may supply less than 8 KW from a well of similar depth. Here output is limited by conductive heat flow with perhaps a small contribution from convection near the well bore. The highest capacity DHE reported to date, in Turkey, supplies 6 MW thermal from an 820-ft (250 m) well. There were two main goals for this project. The first was to gather, disseminate and exchange internationally information on DHES. The second was to perform experiments that would provide insight into well bore/aquifer interaction and thereby provide more information on which to base DHE designs. 27 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-10-13

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed. The month of June, 2004 was primarily occupied with the writing of the Phase I Final Report, the sole deliverable of Phase I, which will be submitted in the next quarter. Redesign of the laboratory prototype and design of the downhole (Phase II) prototype was begun.

  1. 275 C Downhole Microcomputer System

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hutchens; Hooi Miin Soo

    2008-08-31

    An HC11 controller IC and along with serial SRAM and ROM support ICs chip set were developed to support a data acquisition and control for extreme temperature/harsh environment conditions greater than 275 C. The 68HC11 microprocessor is widely used in well logging tools for control, data acquisition, and signal processing applications and was the logical choice for a downhole controller. This extreme temperature version of the 68HC11 enables new high temperature designs and additionally allows 68HC11-based well logging tools and MWD tools to be upgraded for high temperature operation in deep gas reservoirs, The microcomputer chip consists of the microprocessor ALU, a small boot ROM, 4 kbyte data RAM, counter/timer unit, serial peripheral interface (SPI), asynchronous serial interface (SCI), and the A, B, C, and D parallel ports. The chip is code compatible with the single chip mode commercial 68HC11 except for the absence of the analog to digital converter system. To avoid mask programmed internal ROM, a boot program is used to load the microcomputer program from an external mask SPI ROM. A SPI RAM IC completes the chip set and allows data RAM to be added in 4 kbyte increments. The HC11 controller IC chip set is implemented in the Peregrine Semiconductor 0.5 micron Silicon-on-Sapphire (SOS) process using a custom high temperature cell library developed at Oklahoma State University. Yield data is presented for all, the HC11, SPI-RAM and ROM. The lessons learned in this project were extended to the successful development of two high temperature versions of the LEON3 and a companion 8 Kbyte SRAM, a 200 C version for the Navy and a 275 C version for the gas industry.

  2. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Daly, Jeffery E.

    2009-05-05

    A system for transmitting information between downhole components has a first downhole component with a first mating surface and a second downhole component having a second mating surface configured to substantially mate with the first mating surface. The system also has a first transmission element with a first communicating surface and is mounted within a recess in the first mating surface. The first transmission element also has an angled surface. The recess has a side with multiple slopes for interacting with the angled surface, each slope exerting a different spring force on the first transmission element. A second transmission element has a second communicating surface mounted proximate the second mating surface and adapted to communicate with the first communicating surface.

  3. Dual-cone double-helical downhole logging device

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Jiunn S.

    1984-01-01

    A broadband downhole logging device includes a double-helix coil wrapped over a dielectric support and surrounded by a dielectric shield. The device may also include a second coil longitudinally aligned with a first coil and enclosed within the same shield for measuring magnetic permeability of downhole formations and six additional coils for accurately determining downhole parameters.

  4. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael A.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2006-02-21

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force, urging them closer together."

  5. Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael; Fox, Joe

    2005-07-05

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

  6. Downhole pump unseating apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, M.L.

    1991-04-09

    This patent describes a fluid producing borehole having a downhole pump assembly located at a lower end of a tubing string for producing fluid from a pay zone, wherein some parts of the pump assembly are affixed to a hold-down and the hold-down is telescopingly received in sealed relationship within a seating nipple, the combination with the pump assembly of an apparatus for unsticking a downhole pump assembly by pushing the hold-down in an uphole direction and thereby forcing the hold-down to become unseated from the seating nipple.

  7. Downhole Elemental Analysis with LIBS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreschini, Paolo; Zacny, Kris; Rickman, Doug

    2011-01-01

    vertical stage; a second actuator at the top of the downhole probe allows radial scanning of the borehole. Analysis of iron and titanium in lunar simulant with LIBS was performed in air using the method of standard addition. The results for lunar simulant NU-LHT-2M show a value for the concentration of iron ranging between 2.29% and 3.05% depending on the atomic line selected. The accepted value for the sample analyzed is 2.83%, showing the capability for the system in development to provide qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis in real-time.

  8. Downhole elemental analysis with LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreschini, P.; Zacny, K.; Rickman, D.

    2011-12-01

    top of the downhole probe allows radial scanning of the borehole. Analysis of iron and titanium in lunar simulant with LIBS was performed in air using the method of standard addition. The results for lunar simulant NU-LHT-2M show a value for the concentration of iron ranging between 2.29% and 3.05% depending on the atomic line selected. The accepted value for the sample analyzed is 2.83%, showing the capability for the system in development to provide qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis in real-time.

  9. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Briles, Scott D.; Neagley, Daniel L.; Coates, Don M.; Freund, Samuel M.

    2004-07-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  10. Development of PDC Bits for Downhole Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Karasawa, H.; Ohno, T.

    1995-01-01

    To develop polycrystalline hamond compact (PDC) bits of the full-face type which can be applied to downhole motor drilling, drilling tests for granite and two types of andesite were conducted using bits with 98.43 and 142.88 mm diameters. The bits successfully drilled these types of rock at rotary speeds from 300 to 400 rpm.

  11. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe R.

    2004-10-05

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  12. Internal V-Band Clamp

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Hafenrichter, Everett S.; Chapa, Agapito C.; Harris, Steven M.; Martinez, Marcus J.; Baty, Roy S.

    2006-02-28

    A system for clamping two tubular members together in an end-to-end relationship uses a split ring with a V-shaped outer rim that can engage a clamping surface on each member. The split ring has a relaxed closed state where the ends of the ring are adjacent and the outside diameter of the split ring is less than the minimum inside diameter of the members at their ends. The members are clamped when the split ring is spread into an elastically stretched position where the ring rim is pressed tightly against the interior surfaces of the members. Mechanisms are provided for removing the spreader so the split ring will return to the relaxed state, releasing the clamped members.

  13. Management of umbilical cord clamping.

    PubMed

    Webbon, Lucy

    2013-02-01

    The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) has updated its third stage of labour guidelines (RCM 2012) to be clearly supportive of a delay in umbilical cord clamping, although specific guidance on timing is yet to be announced. It is therefore imperative that both midwives and student midwives understand and are able to integrate delaying into their practice, as well as communicating to women the benefits; only in this way can we give women fully informed choices on this aspect of care. The main benefit of delayed cord clamping is the protection it can provide in reducing childhood anaemia, which is a major issue, especially in poorer countries. A review of the evidence found no risks linked to delayed clamping, and no evidence that it cannot be used in combination with the administration of uterotonic drugs. Delayed cord clamping can be especially beneficial for pre term and compromised babies.

  14. Downhole transmission system comprising a coaxial capacitor

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Johnson, Monte L.; Bartholomew, David B.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Rawle, Michael

    2011-05-24

    A transmission system in a downhole component comprises a plurality of data transmission elements. A coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer conductor is disposed within a passage in the downhole component such that at least one capacitor is disposed in the passage and having a first terminal coupled to the inner conductor and a second terminal coupled to the outer conductor. Preferably the transmission element comprises an electrically conducting coil. Preferably, within the passage a connector is adapted to electrically connect the inner conductor of the coaxial cable and the lead wire. The coaxial capacitor may be disposed between and in electrically communication with the connector and the passage. In another embodiment a connector is adapted to electrical connect a first and a second portion of the inner conductor of the coaxial cable and a coaxial capacitor is in electrical communication with the connector and the passage.

  15. Data transmission element for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-01-31

    A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

  16. Polished Downhole Transducer Having Improved Signal Coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2006-03-28

    Apparatus and methods to improve signal coupling in downhole inductive transmission elements to reduce the dispersion of magnetic energy at the tool joints and to provide consistent impedance and contact between transmission elements located along the drill string. A transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools is disclosed in one embodiment of the invention as including an annular core constructed of a magnetically conductive material. The annular core forms an open channel around its circumference and is configured to form a closed channel by mating with a corresponding annular core along an annular mating surface. The mating surface is polished to provide improved magnetic coupling with the corresponding annular core. An annular conductor is disposed within the open channel.

  17. Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Hall; David R. , Fox; Joe

    2007-04-03

    A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

  18. Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1995-12-19

    A system is described for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver. 7 figs.

  19. Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver.

  20. Method and apparatus of assessing down-hole drilling conditions

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Johnson, Monte L.; Bartholomew, David B.; Fox, Joe

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for use in assessing down-hole drilling conditions are disclosed. The apparatus includes a drill string, a plurality of sensors, a computing device, and a down-hole network. The sensors are distributed along the length of the drill string and are capable of sensing localized down-hole conditions while drilling. The computing device is coupled to at least one sensor of the plurality of sensors. The data is transmitted from the sensors to the computing device over the down-hole network. The computing device analyzes data output by the sensors and representative of the sensed localized conditions to assess the down-hole drilling conditions. The method includes sensing localized drilling conditions at a plurality of points distributed along the length of a drill string during drilling operations; transmitting data representative of the sensed localized conditions to a predetermined location; and analyzing the transmitted data to assess the down-hole drilling conditions.

  1. Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

    1999-10-17

    A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

  2. Split-tapered joint clamping device

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, Max J.; Schwartz, Jr., John F.

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to a clamping device for removably attaching a tool element to a bracket element wherein a bracket element is disposed in a groove in the tool and a clamping member is disposed in said groove and in engagement with a clamping face of the bracket and a wall of the groove and with the clamping member having pivot means engaging the bracket and about which the clamping member rotates.

  3. Loading clamps for DNA replication and repair.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Linda B

    2009-05-01

    Sliding clamps and clamp loaders were initially identified as DNA polymerase processivity factors. Sliding clamps are ring-shaped protein complexes that encircle and slide along duplex DNA, and clamp loaders are enzymes that load these clamps onto DNA. When bound to a sliding clamp, DNA polymerases remain tightly associated with the template being copied, but are able to translocate along DNA at rates limited by rates of nucleotide incorporation. Many different enzymes required for DNA replication and repair use sliding clamps. Clamps not only increase the processivity of these enzymes, but may also serve as an attachment point to coordinate the activities of enzymes required for a given process. Clamp loaders are members of the AAA+ family of ATPases and use energy from ATP binding and hydrolysis to catalyze the mechanical reaction of loading clamps onto DNA. Many structural and functional features of clamps and clamp loaders are conserved across all domains of life. Here, the mechanism of clamp loading is reviewed by comparing features of prokaryotic and eukaryotic clamps and clamp loaders.

  4. Micromachined patch-clamp apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat

    2012-12-04

    A micromachined patch-clamp apparatus is disclosed for holding one or more cells and providing electrical, chemical, or mechanical stimulation to the cells during analysis with the patch-clamp technique for studying ion channels in cell membranes. The apparatus formed on a silicon substrate utilizes a lower chamber formed from silicon nitride using surface micromachining and an upper chamber formed from a molded polymer material. An opening in a common wall between the chambers is used to trap and hold a cell for analysis using the patch-clamp technique with sensing electrodes on each side of the cell. Some embodiments of the present invention utilize one or more electrostatic actuators formed on the substrate to provide mechanical stimulation to the cell being analyzed, or to provide information about mechanical movement of the cell in response to electrical or chemical stimulation.

  5. Downhole seismic logging for high-resolution reflection surveying in unconsolidated overburden

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.A.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.; Harris, J.B.; Pugin, A.; Skvortsov, A.; Goriainov, N.N.

    1998-07-01

    Downhole seismic velocity logging techniques have been developed and applied in support of high-resolution reflection seismic surveys. Data obtained from downhole seismic logging can provide accurate velocity-depth functions and directly correlate seismic reflections to depth. The methodologies described in this paper are designed for slimhole applications in plastic-cased boreholes (minimum ID of 50 mm) and with source and detector arrays that yield similar frequency ranges and vertical depth resolutions as the surface reflection surveys. Compressional- (P-) wave logging uses a multichannel hydrophone array with 0.5-m detector spacings in a fluid-filled borehole and a high-frequency, in-hole shotgun source at the surface. Overlapping array positions downhole results in redundant first-arrival data which can be processed to provide accurate interval velocities. The data also can be displayed as a record suite, showing reflections and directly correlating reflection events with depths. Example applications include identification of gas zones, lithological boundaries within unconsolidated sediments, and the overburden-bedrock interface. Shear- (S-) wave logging uses a slimhole, well-locked, three-component (3-C) geophone pod and a horizontally polarized, hammer-and-loaded-plate source at ground surface. In unconsolidated sediments, shear-wave velocity contrasts can be associated with changes in material density or dynamic shear modulus, which in turn can be related to consolidation. Example applications include identification of a lithological boundary for earthquake hazard applications and mapping massive ice within permafrost materials.

  6. INTEGRATED POLARIZATION PROPERTIES OF 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, AND 3C286

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the integrated polarization properties of the four compact radio sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, and 3C286, from 1 to 50 GHz, over a 30 yr time frame spanning 1982-2012. Using the polarized emission of Mars, we have determined that the position angle of the linearly polarized emission of 3C286 rises from 33 Degree-Sign at 8 GHz to 36 Degree-Sign at 45 GHz. There is no evidence for a change in the position angle over time. Using these values, the position angles of the integrated polarized emission from the other three sources are determined as a function of frequency and time. The fractional polarization of 3C286 is found to be slowly rising, at all frequencies, at a rate of {approx}0.015% yr{sup -1}. The fractional polarizations of 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 are all slowly variable, with the variations correlated with changes in the total flux densities of these sources.

  7. Structure of a Sliding Clamp on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Georgescu,R.; Kim, S.; Yurieva, O.; Kuriyan, J.; Kong, X.; O'Donnell, M.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the E. coli {beta} clamp polymerase processivity factor has been solved in complex with primed DNA. Interestingly, the clamp directly binds the DNA duplex and also forms a crystal contact with the ssDNA template strand, which binds into the protein-binding pocket of the clamp. We demonstrate that these clamp-DNA interactions function in clamp loading, perhaps by inducing the ring to close around DNA. Clamp binding to template ssDNA may also serve to hold the clamp at a primed site after loading or during switching of multiple factors on the clamp. Remarkably, the DNA is highly tilted as it passes through the {beta} ring. The pronounced 22 angle of DNA through {beta} may enable DNA to switch between multiple factors bound to a single clamp simply by alternating from one protomer of the ring to the other.

  8. Automated planar patch-clamp.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Carol J; Möller, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the plasma membrane and the membranes of intracellular organelles of both excitable and non-excitable cells. Ion channels are vital to a wide variety of biological processes and are prominent components of the nervous system and cardiovascular system, as well as controlling many metabolic functions. Furthermore, ion channels are known to be involved in many disease states and as such have become popular therapeutic targets. For many years now manual patch-clamping has been regarded as one of the best approaches for assaying ion channel function, through direct measurement of ion flow across these membrane proteins. Over the last decade there have been many remarkable breakthroughs in the development of technologies enabling the study of ion channels. One of these breakthroughs is the development of automated planar patch-clamp technology. Automated platforms have demonstrated the ability to generate high-quality data with high throughput capabilities, at great efficiency and reliability. Additional features such as simultaneous intracellular and extracellular perfusion of the cell membrane, current clamp operation, fast compound application, an increasing rate of parallelization, and more recently temperature control have been introduced. Furthermore, in addition to the well-established studies of over-expressed ion channel proteins in cell lines, new generations of planar patch-clamp systems have enabled successful studies of native and primary mammalian cells. This technology is becoming increasingly popular and extensively used both within areas of drug discovery as well as academic research. Many platforms have been developed including NPC-16 Patchliner(®) and SyncroPatch(®) 96 (Nanion Technologies GmbH, Munich), CytoPatch™ (Cytocentrics AG, Rostock), PatchXpress(®) 7000A, IonWorks(®) Quattro and IonWorks Barracuda™, (Molecular Devices, LLC); Dynaflow(®) HT (Cellectricon

  9. Recent Data from CSMIP Instrumented Downhole Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graizer, V.; Shakal, A.

    2004-12-01

    The California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP) operates 19 downhole geotechnical arrays throughout California, with 8 arrays in Southern and 11 arrays in Northern California. 13 arrays were instrumented with the support and cooperation of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). Three more arrays are expected to be instrumented soon. More than 30 low amplitude recordings from earthquakes with 2.4downhole array at Treasure Island near San Francisco was installed in 1992 with instruments located at the surface, in fill, alluvium and rock. Transfer functions from the surface to rock (at 104 and 122 m depth) were computed. Both horizontal components demonstrate strong amplifications at: 0.8, 1.9, 3.4, 4.4, 5.8 and 6.8 Hz. The first frequency is associated with the depth to the rock (h = 88 m, average Vs=261 m/s, f = Vs/4h gives 0.74 Hz). During the last year, new low amplitude data were recorded at downhole arrays. An important set of records was obtained during the December 22, 2003 M6.5 San Simeon earthquake at the three arrays: Treasure Island, San Francisco - Bay Bridge, and Hayward - San Mateo Bridge at epicentral distances of 230-260 km. The records from the San Simeon earthquake obtained at different depths demonstrate a similar pattern to that shown during the Hector Mine earthquake: In contrast to accelerations (high frequency part of seismic signal), displacements (relatively low frequency part of seismic signal) demonstrate minimal near-surface site amplification. The one

  10. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  11. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  12. Method for bonding a transmission line to a downhole tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2007-11-06

    An apparatus for bonding a transmission line to the central bore of a downhole tool includes a pre-formed interface for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. The pre-formed interface includes a first surface that substantially conforms to the outside contour of a transmission line and a second surface that substantially conforms to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. In another aspect of the invention, a method for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool includes positioning a transmission line near the inside wall of a downhole tool and placing a mold near the transmission line and the inside wall. The method further includes injecting a bonding material into the mold and curing the bonding material such that the bonding material bonds the transmission line to the inside wall.

  13. Down-hole periodic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

    1982-10-28

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  14. Automatic downhole card generation and classification

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto Filho, M.A.; Tygel, M.; Rocha, A.F.; Morooka, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Sucker rod pumping system is a very important artificial lift method. The surface dynamometer card (SDC) is a plot of the load versus the pumping cycle measured at the polished rod. The SDC shape is assumed to reflect the actual pumping conditions. However, SDC is a composition of the actual downhole pump dynamics and the noise added during the information transmission along the sucker rod. The difficulty in recognizing specific SDC shapes augments as the amount of noise increases mainly as a function of the well depth. Filtering algorithms may be developed with the purpose of obtaining the downhole dynamometer card (DDC) from the recorded SDC. Artificial Intelligence may provide the adequate tools for DDC classification. The present paper describes an intelligent system which automatically calculates DDC by SDC algorithm filtering, and classifies DDC taking into consideration a set of patterns associated to the most frequent abnormal pumping operating conditions. This system is actually running at different Brazilian Oil Fields. The paper describes the main characteristics of the filtering algorithm; it shows how linear mathematical programming and neural nets are used for DDC classification, and presents results collected at different pumping conditions. These results show that the system is highly reliable in correctly identifying the actual pumping conditions through DDC classification.

  15. Data transmission system for a downhole component

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., Tracy H.; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-05-09

    The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

  16. Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Fox, Joe; Briscoe, Michael

    2005-01-18

    The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

  17. A clamped rectangular plate containing a crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    The general problem of a rectangular plate clamped along two parallel sides and containing a crack parallel to the clamps is considered. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations and the asymptotic behavior of the stress state near the corners is investigated. Numerical examples are considered for a clamped plate without a crack and with a centrally located crack, and the stress intensity factors and the stresses along the clamps are calculated.

  18. Clamping down on mammalian meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Lyndaker, Amy M; Vasileva, Ana; Wolgemuth, Debra J; Weiss, Robert S; Lieberman, Howard B

    2013-01-01

    The RAD9A-RAD1-HUS1 (9-1-1) complex is a PCNA-like heterotrimeric clamp that binds damaged DNA to promote cell cycle checkpoint signaling and DNA repair. While various 9-1-1 functions in mammalian somatic cells have been established, mounting evidence from lower eukaryotes predicts critical roles in meiotic germ cells as well. This was investigated in 2 recent studies in which the 9-1-1 complex was disrupted specifically in the mouse male germline through conditional deletion of Rad9a or Hus1. Loss of these clamp subunits led to severely impaired fertility and meiotic defects, including faulty DNA double-strand break repair. While 9-1-1 is critical for ATR kinase activation in somatic cells, these studies did not reveal major defects in ATR checkpoint pathway signaling in meiotic cells. Intriguingly, this new work identified separable roles for 9-1-1 subunits, namely RAD9A- and HUS1-independent roles for RAD1. Based on these studies and the high-level expression of the paralogous proteins RAD9B and HUS1B in testis, we propose a model in which multiple alternative 9-1-1 clamps function during mammalian meiosis to ensure genome maintenance in the germline. PMID:24013428

  19. Clamping down on clamps and clamp loaders--the eukaryotic replication factor C.

    PubMed

    Mossi, R; Hübscher, U

    1998-06-01

    DNA transactions such as DNA replication and DNA repair require the concerted action of many enzymes, together with other proteins and non-protein cofactors. Among them three main accessory proteins, replication factor C (RF-C), proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and replication protein A (RP-A), are essential for accurate and processive DNA synthesis by DNA polymerases. RF-C is a complex consisting of five polypeptides with distinct functions. RF-C can bind to a template-primer junction and, in the presence of ATP, load the PCNA clamp onto DNA, thereby recruiting DNA polymerases to the site of DNA synthesis. RF-C not only acts as a clamp loader in DNA replication and DNA repair, but there is some evidence that it could be involved in several other processes such as transcription, S-phase checkpoint regulation, apoptosis, differentiation and telomere-length regulation.

  20. Dynamics of Open DNA Sliding Clamps.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    A range of enzymes in DNA replication and repair bind to DNA-clamps: torus-shaped proteins that encircle double-stranded DNA and act as mobile tethers. Clamps from viruses (such as gp45 from the T4 bacteriophage) and eukaryotes (PCNAs) are homotrimers, each protomer containing two repeats of the DNA-clamp motif, while bacterial clamps (pol III β) are homodimers, each protomer containing three DNA-clamp motifs. Clamps need to be flexible enough to allow opening and loading onto primed DNA by clamp loader complexes. Equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study DNA-clamp conformation in open and closed forms. The E. coli and PCNA clamps appear to prefer closed, planar conformations. Remarkably, gp45 appears to prefer an open right-handed spiral conformation in solution, in agreement with previously reported biophysical data. The structural preferences of DNA clamps in solution have implications for understanding the duty cycle of clamp-loaders. PMID:27148748

  1. Dynamics of Open DNA Sliding Clamps

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    A range of enzymes in DNA replication and repair bind to DNA-clamps: torus-shaped proteins that encircle double-stranded DNA and act as mobile tethers. Clamps from viruses (such as gp45 from the T4 bacteriophage) and eukaryotes (PCNAs) are homotrimers, each protomer containing two repeats of the DNA-clamp motif, while bacterial clamps (pol III β) are homodimers, each protomer containing three DNA-clamp motifs. Clamps need to be flexible enough to allow opening and loading onto primed DNA by clamp loader complexes. Equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study DNA-clamp conformation in open and closed forms. The E. coli and PCNA clamps appear to prefer closed, planar conformations. Remarkably, gp45 appears to prefer an open right-handed spiral conformation in solution, in agreement with previously reported biophysical data. The structural preferences of DNA clamps in solution have implications for understanding the duty cycle of clamp-loaders. PMID:27148748

  2. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing for Earthquake Engineering Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Rohay, Alan C.

    2008-10-17

    Downhole seismic testing is one field test that is commonly used to determine compression-wave (P) and shear-wave (S) velocity profiles in geotechnical earthquake engineering investigations. These profiles are required input in evaluations of the responses to earthquake shaking of geotechnical sites and structures at these sites. In the past, traditional downhole testing has generally involved profiling in the 30- to 150-m depth range. As the number of field seismic investigations at locations with critical facilities has increased, profiling depths have also increased. An improved downhole test that can be used for wave velocity profiling to depths of 300 to 600 m or more is presented.

  3. Signal connection for a downhole tool string

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Bradford, Kline; Fox, Joe; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-08-29

    A signal transmission connection for a tool string used in exploration and production of natural resources, namely: oil, gas, and geothermal energy resources. The connection comprises first and second annular elements deployed in cooperative association with each other. The respective elements comprise inductive transducers that are capable of two-way signal transmission between each other, with downhole components of the tool string, and with ground-level equipment. The respective inductive transducers comprise one or more conductive loops housed within ferrite troughs, or within ferrite trough segments. When energized, the conductive loops produce a magnetic field suitable for transmitting the signal. The second element may be rotational in drilling applications. The respective elements may be fitted with electronic equipment to aid and manipulate the transmission of the signal. The first element may also be in communication with the World Wide Web.

  4. Progressive cavity pump for downhole inflatable packer

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.A.

    1992-03-24

    This patent describes a downhole inflatable packer pump. It comprises: case means for attaching to a lower testing string portion and having an inlet and an outlet, the outlet being communicable with an inflatable packer at a location below the pump; mandrel means, rotatably disposed within the case means, for connecting to an upper testing string portion for mutual rotation therewith and rotating within the case means; an elastomeric pump stator disposed in the case means, the stator having a convoluted inner surface; a rotor extending form the mandrel means and into the stator, the rotor having a convoluted outer surface, the stator and rotor defining a plurality of cavities therebetween, whereby rotation of the rotor within the stator moves fluid progressively from cavity to cavity and thereby from the inlet to the outlet; passageway means for providing fluid communication between the lower testing string portion and the upper testing string portion, the passageway means being sealing separated from the cavities.

  5. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pantea, Cristian

    2012-05-04

    The projects objectives and purpose are to: (1) development a multipurpose acoustic sensor for downhole fluid monitoring in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs over typical ranges of pressures and temperatures and demonstrate its capabilities and performance for different EGS systems; (2) determine in real-time and in a single sensor package several parameters - temperature, pressure, fluid flow and fluid properties; (3) needed in nearly every phase of an EGS project, including Testing of Injection and Production Wells, Reservoir Validation, Inter-well Connectivity, Reservoir Scale Up and Reservoir Sustainability. (4) Current sensors are limited to operating at lower temperatures, but the need is for logging at high temperatures. The present project deals with the development of a novel acoustic-based sensor that can work at temperatures up to 374 C, in inhospitable environments.

  6. High-speed pressure clamp.

    PubMed

    Besch, Stephen R; Suchyna, Thomas; Sachs, Frederick

    2002-10-01

    We built a high-speed, pneumatic pressure clamp to stimulate patch-clamped membranes mechanically. The key control element is a newly designed differential valve that uses a single, nickel-plated piezoelectric bending element to control both pressure and vacuum. To minimize response time, the valve body was designed with minimum dead volume. The result is improved response time and stability with a threefold decrease in actuation latency. Tight valve clearances minimize the steady-state air flow, permitting us to use small resonant-piston pumps to supply pressure and vacuum. To protect the valve from water contamination in the event of a broken pipette, an optical sensor detects water entering the valve and increases pressure rapidly to clear the system. The open-loop time constant for pressure is 2.5 ms for a 100-mmHg step, and the closed-loop settling time is 500-600 micros. Valve actuation latency is 120 micros. The system performance is illustrated for mechanically induced changes in patch capacitance.

  7. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, Bruce P.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Striker, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  8. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

    1993-02-23

    A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  9. Diverless pipeline repair clamp: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Lane, B. )

    1992-04-01

    The objective of this project sponsored by the Pipeline Research Committee of the American Gas Association, is to develop a system suitable for repairing small leaks on deepwater pipelines. Phase I of the project, completed in 1990 by Stress Engineering Services, Inc. investigated the types of problems that would have to be overcome to effect a diverless clamp-type repair. Several repair systems were investigated and ten mechanisms were proposed that could be used to secure two clamp halves together. This current Phase 11 effort, is to take two most promising clamp concepts from Phase 1, further evaluate hardware and installation issues, develop conceptual designs, and determine which concept should be carried forward to detailed design. The two concepts evaluated were (1) a bolted split-sleeve clamp suited for ROV installation, and (2) a hydraulically self-actuating clamp requiring only placement on the pipe and actuation by ROV hydraulic hot stabs. Both concepts were evaluated for a 12-inch (324 mm) nominal pipe diameter with an ANSI 900 (15.3 mPa) pressure rating, presuming either system could be adapted to a wider range of pipe sizes and design pressures. Based on the results of this investigation a modified bolted split-sleeve clamp was recommended over the hydraulically self-actuating clamp. The main reasons are (1) the bolted split-sleeve clamp can be adapted to installation by a ROV, (2) sealing and clamping mechanisms borrow from available proven technology, (3) it would require less development effort than the hydraulically self-actuating clamp, and (4) the bolted split-sleeve clamp would probably result in a simpler, less costly design.

  10. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing.

  11. Continuous chain bit with downhole cycling capability

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, Don F.; St. Clair, Jack A.; Togami, Henry K.

    1983-01-01

    A continuous chain bit for hard rock drilling is capable of downhole cycling. A drill head assembly moves axially relative to a support body while the chain on the head assembly is held in position so that the bodily movement of the chain cycles the chain to present new composite links for drilling. A pair of spring fingers on opposite sides of the chain hold the chain against movement. The chain is held in tension by a spring-biased tensioning bar. A head at the working end of the chain supports the working links. The chain is centered by a reversing pawl and piston actuated by the pressure of the drilling mud. Detent pins lock the head assembly with respect to the support body and are also operated by the drilling mud pressure. A restricted nozzle with a divergent outlet sprays drilling mud into the cavity to remove debris. Indication of the centered position of the chain is provided by noting a low pressure reading indicating proper alignment of drilling mud slots on the links with the corresponding feed branches.

  12. Downhole pump with retrievable nozzle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes improvement in a system for producing fluid from a wellbore wherein a downhole jet pump has a main body with there being a passageway extending therethrough and the passageway having an upper end opposed to a lower end; there being power fluid inlet means at the upper end of the passageway for connecting the pump to a source of power fluid, formation fluid inlet means at the lower end of the passageway for connecting the pump to a source of formation fluid; and a produced fluid outlet through which spent power fluid admixed with formation fluid can flow. The improvement comprises: the pump includes a nozzle and a throat affixed together in spaced relationship respective to one another and forming a unitary assembly for producing formation fluid in response to power fluid flowing therethrough; a seating cavity formed between the upper end and the lower end of the passageway; the seating cavity is axially aligned with the upper end of the passageway; the seating cavity having an upper cylindrical part spaced from a lower cylindrical part with there being a formation fluid working chamber formed therebetween and connected to the formation fluid inlet.

  13. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing. PMID:27475167

  14. Time to implement delayed cord clamping.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2014-03-01

    Immediate umbilical cord clamping after delivery is routine in the United States despite little evidence to support this practice. Numerous trials in both term and preterm neonates have demonstrated the safety and benefit of delayed cord clamping. In premature neonates, delayed cord clamping has been shown to stabilize transitional circulation, lessening needs for inotropic medications and reducing blood transfusions, necrotizing enterocolitis, and intraventricular hemorrhage. In term neonates, delayed cord clamping has been associated with decreased iron-deficient anemia and increased iron stores with potential valuable effects that extend beyond the newborn period, including improvements in long-term neurodevelopment. The failure to more broadly implement delayed cord clamping in neonates ignores published benefits of increased placental blood transfusion at birth and may represent an unnecessary harm for vulnerable neonates.

  15. Downhole Vibration Monitoring and Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. The key feature of this system is its use of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) to allow the damping coefficient to be changed extensively, rapidly and reversibly without the use of mechanical valves, but only by the application of a current. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Much of the effort was devoted to the design and testing of the MRF damper, itself. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and a final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006, with the objectives of building precommercial prototypes, testing them in a drilling laboratory and the field; developing and implementing a commercialization plan. All of these have been accomplished. The Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) prototypes have been successfully proven in testing at the TerraTek drilling facility and at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC.) Based on the results of these tests, we have signed a definitive development and distribution agreement with Smith, and commercial deployment is underway. This current version of the DVMCS monitors and controls axial vibrations. Due to time and budget constraints of this program, it was not possible to complete a system that would also deal with lateral and torsional (stick-slip) vibrations as originally planned; however, this effort is continuing without DOE

  16. Software defined down-hole telemetric systems: training course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Danilaev, Dmitry P.; Denisenko, Pavel E.; Dautova, Rezeda V.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Sakhabutdinov, Airat Z.; Feofilaktov, Sergey V.

    2015-03-01

    The paper is devoted for presentation of training course for applications and construction principles of poly-harmonic (two-frequency or four-frequency) cw laser systems for characterization of different nonlinear scattering effects in fibers and reflection of devices based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) in down-hole telemetric sensor nets, which are widely used in down-hole telemetric systems. In particular, we'll speak about evaluation of Mandelstam-Brillouin gain contour, Raman scattering contours and FBG reflection spectra characterization. Investigation methods and approaches are based on the unity of resonant structures of generated fiber responses on exciting and probing radiation or external physical fields for all given effects. The main decision is based on poly-harmonic probing of formed resonance responses. Training course united idea is software defined approach for down-hole parameters characterization in spite of measuring conversion principles.

  17. Transistorized circuit clamps voltage with 0.1 percent error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Transistorized clamping circuit clamps either of two voltage levels to input of digital-to-analog resistive matrix with 0.1 percent error. Clamping circuit technique has analog, digital, and hybrid circuit applications.

  18. The monogenean which lost its clamps.

    PubMed

    Justine, Jean-Lou; Rahmouni, Chahrazed; Gey, Delphine; Schoelinck, Charlotte; Hoberg, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their hosts. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans usually attach to the surface of fish gills using highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 60 years ago, the clamps were considered to be absent but few specimens were available and this observation was later questioned. In addition, genera within the family Protomicrocotylidae have either clamps of the "gastrocotylid" or the "microcotylid" types; this puzzled systematists because these clamp types are characteristic of distinct, major groups. Discovery of another, new, species of the genus Lethacotyle, has allowed us to explore the nature of the attachment structures in protomicrocotylids. Lethacotyle vera n. sp. is described from the gills of the carangid Caranx papuensis off New Caledonia. It is distinguished from Lethacotyle fijiensis, the only other species of the genus, by the length of the male copulatory spines. Sequences of 28S rDNA were used to build a tree, in which Lethacotyle vera grouped with other protomicrocotylids. The identity of the host fish was confirmed with COI barcodes. We observed that protomicrocotylids have specialized structures associated with their attachment organ, such as lateral flaps and transverse striations, which are not known in other monogeneans. We thus hypothesized that the clamps in protomicrocotylids were sequentially lost during evolution, coinciding with the development of other attachment structures. To test the hypothesis, we calculated the surfaces of clamps and body in 120 species of gastrocotylinean monogeneans, based on published descriptions. The ratio of clamp surface: body surface was the lowest in protomicrocotylids. We conclude that clamps in protomicrocotylids are vestigial organs, and that occurrence of "gastrocotylid" and simpler "microcotylid" clamps within the same family are steps in an

  19. The Monogenean Which Lost Its Clamps

    PubMed Central

    Justine, Jean-Lou; Rahmouni, Chahrazed; Gey, Delphine; Schoelinck, Charlotte; Hoberg, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites face a daily challenge: to remain attached to their hosts. Polyopisthocotylean monogeneans usually attach to the surface of fish gills using highly specialized structures, the sclerotized clamps. In the original description of the protomicrocotylid species Lethacotyle fijiensis, described 60 years ago, the clamps were considered to be absent but few specimens were available and this observation was later questioned. In addition, genera within the family Protomicrocotylidae have either clamps of the “gastrocotylid” or the “microcotylid” types; this puzzled systematists because these clamp types are characteristic of distinct, major groups. Discovery of another, new, species of the genus Lethacotyle, has allowed us to explore the nature of the attachment structures in protomicrocotylids. Lethacotyle vera n. sp. is described from the gills of the carangid Caranx papuensis off New Caledonia. It is distinguished from Lethacotyle fijiensis, the only other species of the genus, by the length of the male copulatory spines. Sequences of 28S rDNA were used to build a tree, in which Lethacotyle vera grouped with other protomicrocotylids. The identity of the host fish was confirmed with COI barcodes. We observed that protomicrocotylids have specialized structures associated with their attachment organ, such as lateral flaps and transverse striations, which are not known in other monogeneans. We thus hypothesized that the clamps in protomicrocotylids were sequentially lost during evolution, coinciding with the development of other attachment structures. To test the hypothesis, we calculated the surfaces of clamps and body in 120 species of gastrocotylinean monogeneans, based on published descriptions. The ratio of clamp surface: body surface was the lowest in protomicrocotylids. We conclude that clamps in protomicrocotylids are vestigial organs, and that occurrence of “gastrocotylid” and simpler “microcotylid” clamps within the same family are

  20. Voltage clamp effects on bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Y; Eisenbach, M

    1984-01-01

    To examine whether or not sensory signaling in bacteria is by way of fluctuations in membrane potential, we studied the effect of clamping the potential on bacterial chemotaxis. The potential was clamped by valinomycin, a K+ -specific ionophore, in the presence of K+. Despite the clamped potential, sensory signaling did occur: both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis cells were still excitable and adaptable under these conditions. It is concluded that signaling in the excitation and adaptation steps of chemotaxis is not by way of fluctuations in the membrane potential. PMID:6430873

  1. RUBBER BEARINGS FOR DOWN-HOLE PUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Bob Sullivan Mammoth Pacific, L.P.

    2005-09-07

    Synopsis of project activity: 1998--Awarded cost share grant from DOE. 1st Qtr 1999--Developed fail safe lubricating system. 2nd Qtr 1999--Performed first large scale test with nitrile based bearings. It failed due to material swelling. Failure was blamed on improper tolerance. 3rd Qtr 1999--Material tests were performed with autoclaves and exposure tests to Casa Diablo fluids. Testing of Viton materials began. Alternate bearing designs were developed to limit risk of improper tolerances. 4th Qtr 1999--Site testing indicated a chemical attack on the bearing material caused the test failure and not improper bearing tolerance. 1st Qtr 2000--The assistance of Brookhaven National Laboratory was obtained in evaluating the chemical attack. The National Laboratory also began more elaborate laboratory testing on bearing materials. 2nd Qtr 2000--Testing indicated Viton was an inappropriate material due to degradation in Casa Diablo fluid. Testing of EPDM began. 3rd Qtr 2001--EPDM bearings were installed for another large scale test. Bearings failed again due to swelling. Further testing indicated that larger then expected oil concentrations existed in lubricating water geothermal fluid causing bearing failure. 2002-2003--Searched for and tested several materials that would survive in hot salt and oil solutions. Kalrez{reg_sign}, Viton{reg_sign}ETP 500 and Viton{reg_sign}GF were identified as possible candidates. 2003-2005--Kalrez{reg_sign}has shown superior resistance to downhole conditions at Casa Diablo from among the various materials tested. Viton ETP-500 indicated a life expectancy of 13 years and because it is significantly less expensive then Kalrez{reg_sign}, it was selected as the bearing material for future testing. Unfortunately during the laboratory testing period Dupont Chemical chose to stop manufacturing this specific formulation and replaced it with Viton ETP 600S. The material is available with six different fillers; three based on zinc oxide and three

  2. Downhole receiver function: A case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehta, K.; Snieder, R.; Graizer, V.

    2007-01-01

    Receiver function is defined as the spectral ratio of the radial component and the vertical component of the ground motion. It is used to characterize converted waves. We extend the use of the receiver function to downhole data using waves recorded in a borehole, excited by an earthquake of magnitude 4.0 near San Francisco, California, on 26 June 1994. The focal depth of the event was 6.6 km and the epicenter was located at a distance of 12.6 km from the borehole array. Six three-component sensors were located at different depths in a borehole. To extract a coherent response of the near-surface from the incoherent earthquake waves, we deconvolve the waves recorded by the sensors at different depths with the waves recorded by the sensor on the surface. Deconvolution applied to the waves in the S-time window recorded by the radial component result in an upgoing and a downgoing wave propagating with S-wave velocity. For the waves in the P-time window recorded by the radial component, deconvolution also gives an upgoing and a down-going wave propagating with S-wave velocity. This interesting result suggests a P-to-S conversion at a depth below the deepest sensor. To diagnose this we compute the receiver function for the borehole recording of the earthquake waves. The receiver function shows an upgoing wave with an arrival close to time t = 0 for the deepest sensor. The agreement of the upgoing wave in the receiver function with the travel-time curve for the P-to-S converted wave, calculated using the P- and the S-wave velocity profile, supports the hypothesis of a pronounced P-to-S conversion. We present a synthetic example to illustrate that the first arrival of the receiver function applied to borehole data gives the upward-propagating P-to-S converted wave. To corroborate the observation of the mode conversion, we apply receiver function to a different earthquake data recorded by the same borehole array in 1998. The focal depth of the event was 6.9 km and the

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  4. Organ protection during aortic cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kak Khee; Groeneveld, Menno; Lu, Joyce Ja-Ning; van Diemen, Pepijn; Jongkind, Vincent; Wisselink, Willem

    2016-09-01

    Open surgical repair of an aortic aneurysm requires aortic cross-clamping, resulting in temporary ischemia of all organs and tissues supplied by the aorta distal to the clamp. Major complications of open aneurysm repair due to aortic cross-clamping include renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and postoperative colonic ischemia in case of supra- and infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair. Ischemia-reperfusion injury results in excessive production of reactive oxygen species and in oxidative stress, which can lead to multiple organ failure. Several perioperative protective strategies have been suggested to preserve renal function during aortic cross-clamping, such as pharmacotherapy and therapeutic hypothermia of the kidneys. In this chapter, we will briefly discuss the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion injury and the preventative measures that can be taken to avoid abdominal organ injury. Finally, techniques to minimize the risk of complications during and after open aneurysm repair will be presented. PMID:27650341

  5. Structural analysis of a eukaryotic sliding DNA clamp-clamp loadercomplex.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Gregory D.; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    2006-06-17

    Sliding clamps are ring-shaped proteins that encircle DNA and confer high processivity on DNA polymerases. Here we report the crystal structure of the five-protein clamp loader complex (replication factor-C, RFC) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bound to the sliding clamp (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA). Tight interfacial coordination of the ATP analogue ATP-?-S by RFC results in a spiral arrangement of the ATPase domains of the clamp loader above the PCNA ring. Placement of a model for primed DNA within the central hole of PCNA reveals a striking correspondence between the RFC spiral and the grooves of the DNA double helix. This model, in which the clamp loader complex locks onto primed DNA in a screw-cap-like arrangement, provides a simple explanation for the process by which the engagement of primer-template junctions by the RFC:PCNA complex results in ATP hydrolysis and release of the sliding clamp on DNA.

  6. Slim hole MWD tool accurately measures downhole annular pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Burban, B.; Delahaye, T. )

    1994-02-14

    Measurement-while-drilling of downhole pressure accurately determines annular pressure losses from circulation and drillstring rotation and helps monitor swab and surge pressures during tripping. In early 1993, two slim-hole wells (3.4 in. and 3 in. diameter) were drilled with continuous real-time electromagnetic wave transmission of downhole temperature and annular pressure. The data were obtained during all stages of the drilling operation and proved useful for operations personnel. The use of real-time measurements demonstrated the characteristic hydraulic effects of pressure surges induced by drillstring rotation in the small slim-hole annulus under field conditions. The interest in this information is not restricted to the slim-hole geometry. Monitoring or estimating downhole pressure is a key element for drilling operations. Except in special cases, no real-time measurements of downhole annular pressure during drilling and tripping have been used on an operational basis. The hydraulic effects are significant in conventional-geometry wells (3 1/2-in. drill pipe in a 6-in. hole). This paper describes the tool and the results from the field test.

  7. Coupon holder for corrosion test downhole in a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M.B.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes a wellbore having a downhole pump at the lower end of a production tubing string, a sucker rod string positioned within a production tubing and connected to reciprocate the downhole pump, the combination with the sucker rod string of an apparatus for measuring the rate of corrosion downhole in the borehole. It comprises a main body having opposed ends, means for forming a connection at the opposed ends by which the main body is series connected within the rod string to thereby suspend the apparatus downhole in the borehole, and further comprising; an axial chamber formed by an interior wall surface in the main body; radial ports extending through a sidewall of the main body and communicating the axial chamber with the exterior of the main body; wherein, the radial ports are oblated and include a lower curved end which is sloped downwardly and outwardly with respect to the longitudinal axis whereby reciprocation of the apparatus forces well fluid to flow through the chamber into contact with the coupon; the main body being comprised of an upper member and a lower member; means threadedly attaching the upper and lower members together in a removable manner; the chamber being a bore formed in the lower member; the insulating means being mounted to an end wall of the upper member; the end wall also defining the upper end of the chamber, the coupon extending downwardly into the bore formed in the lower member.

  8. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection: Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Peter F.

    1982-10-08

    A consolidated reference of materials for downhole equipment used in geothermal energy exploitation is nearing completion. The reference is a summary of recent developments in the areas of tubular goods materials, highly alloyed metals, high temperature cements, high temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downwell pumps. A brief overview is presented in this paper.

  9. Downhole steam generator with improved preheating, combustion, and protection features

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.L.

    1981-01-07

    For tertiary oil recovery, a downhole steam generator is designed which provides for efficient counterflow cooling of the combustion chamber walls and preheating of the fuel and water. Pressure-responsive doors are provided for closing and opening the outlet in response to flameout, thereby preventing flooding of the combustion chamber. (DLC)

  10. The application and design of downhole heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Freeston, D.H.; Pan, H.

    1985-01-01

    The direct use of low temperature geothermal fluids is finding increased usage around the world for space heating, air conditioning, etc. For non-artesian wells the conventional means of circulating the hot fluids is by a downhole turbine pump, with the geofluid being either returned to the reservoir or rejected to waste. The latter is the more common, with results, in some cases, of excessive drawdown of the reservoir and consequent environmental problems. The downhole heat exchanger, utilising a single or multiple ''U'' tube, can alleviate the above problems. Experience at Klamath Falls in Oregon, U.S.A., and at Rotorua and Taupo, New Zealand, shows that these devices are capable, given a good permeable reservoir with temperatures around 100C, of delivering up to 1 MW of thermal energy from a conventional shallow well (50 to 200 m). This paper discusses the application of the downhole heat exchanger for space heating using examples from New Zealand and Klamath Falls systems, and reports a recent study on the parameters necessary to achieve an optimum design. The discussion is based on a laboratory model, a computer simulation an full-scale tests on operational downhole heat exchangers in New Zealand.

  11. Fallon FORGE GIS and Downhole Well Lithology Data

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2015-12-23

    ArcGIS Map Package with MT Station Locations, 2D Seismic Lines, Well data, Known Regional Hydrothermal Systems, Regional Historic Earthquake Seismicity, Regional Temperature Gradient Data, Regional Heat Flow Data, Regional Radiogenic Heat Production, Local Geology, Land Status, Cultural Data, 2m Temperature Probe Data, and Gravity Data. Also a detailed down-hole lithology notes are provided.

  12. Site Specific Analysis of Recent CSMIP Downhole Array Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, H.; Graizer, V.; Shakal, A.

    2003-12-01

    California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP) started operating downhole arrays in 1989 to provide essential data for studying the effects of local soil conditions. As of September 2003, 19 downhole arrays were instrumented, 13 of those with cooperation of California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). More than 90 low amplitude recordings from earthquakes with 2.0downhole array was instrumented in May 2003 at Rohnert Park in Sonoma. The accelerometers are installed at the surface, depth of 11 m, and 47 m. The M4.3 Santa Rosa earthquake of May 25, 2003 is recorded at the array with the maximum acceleration of 0.9%g. The low amplitude recordings are used to evaluate P- and S- wave velocities at the site. The velocities obtained by correlation analysis agree with those of suspension logging. The M4.8 earthquake of September 3, 2002 is recorded at Los Angeles Obregon Park downhole array. The array was installed in 2000 and its local site geology consists of deep alluvium over sandstone. The accelerometers are installed at the surface and depth of 69 m. The recordings of the earthquake are used to correlate seismic wave motion at the surface and depth in horizontal and vertical directions. The S- and P- wave velocities obtained by correlation analysis are compared with those of suspension logging method. The new geotechnical array at Aptos in Santa Cruz is designed to study the effects of the cliff on seismic ground motion. The accelerometers are located at the surface and planned to install at depth of 30 m. Also, a three components accelerometer recorder is installed about 15 m south of the borehole toward the seacliff near bluff. The low

  13. Comparative evaluation of surface and downhole steam-generation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, C.

    1982-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the application of heat to reservoirs containing high API gravity oils can substantially improve recovery. Although steam injection is currently the principal thermal recovery method, heat transmission losses associated with delivery of the steam from the surface generators to the oil-bearing formation has limited conventional steam injection to shallow reservoirs. The objective of the Department of Energy's Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology required to economically produce heavy oil from deep reservoirs. The tasks included in this effort are the development and evaluation of thermally efficient delivery systems and downhole steam generation systems. This paper compares the technical and economic performance of conventional surface steam drives, which are strongly influenced by heat losses, with (a) thermally efficient delivery (through insulated strings) of surface generated steam, (b) low pressure combustion downhole steam generation, (c) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation using air as the oxygen source, and (d) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation substituting pure oxygen for air. The selection of a preferred technology based upon either total efficiency or cost is found to be strongly influenced by reservoir depth, steam mass flow rate, and sandface steam quality. Therefore, a parametric analysis has been performed which examines varying depths, injection rates and steam qualities. Results indicate that the technologies are not readily distinguishable for low injectivity reservoirs in which conventional steam drives are feasible. However, high injection rates produce a notable cost difference between high pressure combustion systems and the other technologies. Issues that must be addressed before gaining further insight into the economic viability of downhole steam generation are discussed.

  14. Diverless pipeline repair clamp, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a system suitable for repairing small leaks in deep water pipelines. It is assumed that leak repair operations at the water depths in question will be performed by Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV`s). This report summarizes the results of the third and final phase of this project. Phase 3 work included design, manufacture, and dry testing of (1) a one-half scale model of a 12 inch repair clamp, (2) a full-scale bolt test fixture to demonstrate bolt containment and startup under realistic misalignment of the clamp halves, and (3) a full-scale one-way cylinder for end seal activation. Phase 3 also included a study commissioned from Oceaneering directed at defining the interfaces of the clamp package and the ROV, including suggested procedures for deployment and positioning of the clamp package on the pipeline. Issues regarding bolt make-up by the ROV were also studied in detail and limitations in bolting capability were outlined. The conclusion of this work is that the clamping system described herein may be implemented in a direct manner. The design issues causing the most concern have been resolved through laboratory tests. Note however that all testing performed was mechanical in nature and performed in a dry environment. The recommended next development step, prior to declaring the system operational, is to manufacture a fully outfitted clamp package and to perform installation tests in a controlled underwater environment using a typical deepwater ROV. Wet tests are required in order to demonstrate ROV interfaces and installation procedures, however, the major mechanical features represented by the clamp design as well as its operation have been proven.

  15. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  16. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  17. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  18. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  19. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  20. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  1. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  2. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  3. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  4. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cable clamps and grips. 18.40 Section 18.40... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable (trailing) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided...

  5. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  6. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  7. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  8. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  9. 33 CFR 183.532 - Clips, straps, and hose clamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Clips, straps, and hose clamps..., straps, and hose clamps. (a) Each clip, strap, and hose clamp must: (1) Be made from a corrosion... under § 183.590, a hose clamp installed on a fuel line system requiring metallic fuel lines or...

  10. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Goodman, Miriam B.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2011-04-01

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or "clamps" the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of μN force and nm up to tens of μm displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  11. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  12. An Ultrasonic Clamp for Bloodless Partial Nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril; Bouchoux, Guillaume; Murat, François Joseph; Birer, Alain; Theillère, Yves; Chapelon, Jean Yves; Cathignol, Dominique

    2007-05-01

    Maximum conservation of the kidney is preferable through partial nephrectomy for patients at risk of disease recurrence of renal cancers. Haemostatic tools are needed in order to achieve bloodless surgery and reduce post surgery morbidity. Two piezo-ceramic transducers operating at a frequency of 4 MHz were mounted on each arm of a clamp. When used for coagulation purposes, two transducers situated on opposite arms of the clamp were driven simultaneously. Heat delivery was optimized as each transducers mirrored back to targeted tissues the wave generated by the opposite transducer. Real-time treatment monitoring with an echo-based technique was also envisaged with this clamp. Therapy was periodically interrupted so one transducer could generate a pulse. The echo returning from the opposite transducer was treated. Coagulation necroses were obtained in vitro on substantial thicknesses (23-38mm) of pig liver over exposure durations ranging from 30s to 130s, and with acoustic intensities of less than 15W/cm2 per transducer. Both kidneys of two pigs were treated in vivo with the clamp (14.5W/cm2 for 90s), and the partial nephrectomies performed proved to be bloodless. In vitro and in vivo, wide transfixing lesions corresponded to an echo energy decrease superior to -10dB and parabolic form of the time of flight versus treatment time. In conclusion, this ultrasound clamp has proven to be an excellent mean for achieving monitored haemostasis in kidney.

  13. Compact, Stiff, Remotely-Actuable Quick-Release Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Ted W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a clamp that is compact and lightweight, yet provides high holding strength and stiffness or rigidity. The clamp uses a unique double slant interface design which provides mechanical advantages to resist forces applied to the clamp member as the load increases. The clamp allows for rapid and remote-activated release of the clamp jaws by applying only a small operating force to an over-center lock/release mechanism, such as by pulling a manual tether.

  14. Fiber optic accelerometer based on clamped beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a fiber optic accelerometer (FOA) based on camped beam is proposed. The clamped beam is used as the elastic element and a mass installed on the clamped beam is used as the inertial element. The accelerometer is based on a fiber optic Michelson interferometer and has a sensing arm and a reference arm. The optical fiber of the sensing arm is wrapped on the clamped beam and the mass, which are both cylinder shaped. The sensitivity of the FOA is analyzed based on the theory of elasticity; the frequency response is analyzed based on the theory of vibration. Experiment is carried out to test the performance of the fiber optic accelerometer. The experiment results show a high sensitivity and a flat frequency response within the low frequency range of 5-250 Hz, which agrees well with the theoretical result.

  15. Perspectives on implementing delayed cord clamping.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Mayri Sagady

    2015-01-01

    Expanding evidence supports delayed cord clamping (DCC) for both term and preterm infants. This article explores issues that may be keeping early cord clamping (ECC) in place as usual practice. Professional organizations almost universally recommend DCC for preterm infants, but some reserve recommending it for term infants only in resource-poor settings. Concerns about polycythemia and jaundice persist in the literature, while years of published randomized controlled trials do not support the assumptions behind the concerns. New data suggest that DCC may improve resuscitative efforts in compromised infants. Multiple perspectives are offered for consideration when thinking about incorporating DCC into practice.

  16. Kinetic analysis of PCNA clamp binding and release in the clamp loading reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C

    PubMed Central

    Marzahn, Melissa R.; Hayner, Jaclyn N.; Meyer, Jennifer A.; Bloom, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases require a sliding clamp to achieve processive DNA synthesis. The toroidal clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders, members of the AAA+ family of ATPases. These enzymes utilize the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform a variety of cellular functions. In this study, a clamp loader-clamp binding assay was developed to measure the rates of ATP-dependent clamp binding and ATP-hydrolysis-dependent clamp release for the S. cerevisiae clamp loader (RFC) and clamp (PCNA). Pre-steady-state kinetics of PCNA binding showed that although ATP binding to RFC increases affinity for PCNA, ATP binding rates and ATP-dependent conformational changes in RFC are fast relative to PCNA binding rates. Interestingly, RFC binds PCNA faster than the Escherichia coli γ complex clamp loader binds the β-clamp. In the process of loading clamps on DNA, RFC maintains contact with PCNA while PCNA closes, as the observed rate of PCNA closing is faster than the rate of PCNA release, precluding the possibility of an open clamp dissociating from DNA. Rates of clamp closing and release are not dependent on the rate of the DNA binding step and are also slower than reported rates of ATP hydrolysis, showing that these rates reflect unique intramolecular reaction steps in the clamp loading pathway. PMID:25450506

  17. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

  18. Analyzing the dynamic behavior of downhole equipment during drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, J.A.; Caskey, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced geothermal drilling systems will require a bottom hole assembly (BHA) which utilizes sophisticated electronic and mechanical equipment to accomplish faster, more trouble free, smarter drilling. The bit-drill string/formation interaction during drilling imposes complex, intermittent dynamic loading on the downhole equipment. A finite element computer code, GEODYN, is being developed to allow analysis of the structural response of the downhole equipment during drilling and to simulate the drilling phenomena (i.e. penetration, direction, etc.). Phase 1 GEODYN, completed early in 1984, provides the capability to model the dynamic response of a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit interacting with a non-homogeneous formation. Succeeding development phases will allow inclusion of stabilizers and, eventually, the entire drill string in addition to facilitating drill ahead simulation.

  19. Use of Downhole Motors in Geothermal Drilling in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Pyle, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the use of downhole motors in the Tiwi geothermal field in the Philippines, The discussion includes the application Of a Dyna-Drill with insert-type bits for drilling through surface alluvium. The economics of this type of drilling are compared to those of conventional rotary drilling. The paper also describes the use of a turbodrill that drills out scale as the well produces geothermal fluids.

  20. High power laser downhole cutting tools and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2015-01-20

    Downhole cutting systems, devices and methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems and devices for the laser cutting operations within a borehole in the earth. These systems and devices can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform cutting operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

  1. Apparatus and method for downhole injection of radioactive tracer

    DOEpatents

    Potter, R.M.; Archuleta, J.; Fink, C.F.

    The disclosure relates to downhole injection of radioactive /sup 82/Br and monitoring its progress through fractured structure to determine the nature thereof. An ampule containing granular /sup 82/Br is remotely crushed and water is repeatedly flushed through it to cleanse the instrument as well as inject the /sup 82/Br into surrounding fractured strata. A sensor in a remote horehole reads progress of the radioactive material through fractured structure.

  2. Apparatus and method for downhole injection of radioactive tracer

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Robert M.; Archuleta, Jacobo R.; Fink, Conrad F.

    1983-01-01

    The disclosure relates to downhole injection of radioactive .sup.82 Br and monitoring its progress through fractured structure to determine the nature thereof. An ampule containing granular .sup.82 Br is remotely crushed and water is repeatedly flushed through it to cleanse the instrument as well as inject the .sup.82 Br into surrounding fractured strata. A sensor in a remote borehole reads progress of the radioactive material through fractured structure.

  3. System for loading executable code into volatile memory in a downhole tool

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte L.

    2007-09-25

    A system for loading an executable code into volatile memory in a downhole tool string component comprises a surface control unit comprising executable code. An integrated downhole network comprises data transmission elements in communication with the surface control unit and the volatile memory. The executable code, stored in the surface control unit, is not permanently stored in the downhole tool string component. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the downhole tool string component comprises boot memory. In another embodiment, the executable code is an operating system executable code. Preferably, the volatile memory comprises random access memory (RAM). A method for loading executable code to volatile memory in a downhole tool string component comprises sending the code from the surface control unit to a processor in the downhole tool string component over the network. A central processing unit writes the executable code in the volatile memory.

  4. Tuning Fork Oscillators as Downhole Viscometers in Oilfield Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Miguel; Bernero, Greg; Alvarez, Oliverio; Ham, Gregory; Max, Deffenbaugh; Sensors Development Team

    2015-03-01

    The commerciality of oil wells is greatly influenced by the physical properties of the fluids being produced. A key parameter in determining how producible the hydrocarbons are is their viscosity. Pressure and temperature changes in recovering a downhole sample to the surface can alter viscosity while accurate downhole measurement of this critical property remains a rudimentary effort in the industry. In this presentation we describe the challenges of measuring and quantifying the viscosity of reservoir fluids in situ at downhole conditions, as well as present an overview of some of the different measurement techniques currently used. Additionally, we show our characterization of a piezoelectric tuning fork oscillator used as a viscosity sensor. In an attempt to recreate the environment found in oil wells, its mechanical and electrical properties were studied while the device was immersed in different fluids and, separately, under different conditions of pressure and temperature. This device is a first step toward the development of an inexpensive, integrated, and miniaturized sensing platform for the in situ characterization of reservoir fluids.

  5. Patch-clamp amplifiers on a chip.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Pujitha; Culurciello, Eugenio; Yang, Youshan; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Kindlmann, Peter J; Sigworth, Fred J

    2010-10-15

    We present the first, fully integrated, two-channel implementation of a patch-clamp measurement system. With this "PatchChip" two simultaneous whole-cell recordings can be obtained with rms noise of 8pA in a 10kHz bandwidth. The capacitance and series-resistance of the electrode can be compensated up to 10pF and 100MΩ respectively under computer control. Recordings of hERG and Na(v) 1.7 currents demonstrate the system's capabilities, which are on par with large, commercial patch-clamp instrumentation. By reducing patch-clamp amplifiers to a millimeter size micro-chip, this work paves the way to the realization of massively parallel, high-throughput patch-clamp systems for drug screening and ion-channel research. The PatchChip is implemented in a 0.5μm silicon-on-sapphire process; its size is 3×3mm(2) and the power consumption is 5mW per channel with a 3.3V power supply.

  6. [Spinal cord ischemia following subrenal aortic clamping].

    PubMed

    Battisti, G; Marigliani, M; Stio, F; Iavarone, C

    1990-01-01

    The paraplegia caused by an aortic clamping just below the Renal artery is a rare but very complication in aortic surgery. Such a complication is even rarer if we consider the few cases reported in literature following a reconstructive surgery for occlusive chronic diseases of aortiliac axes. The authors have studied the case of a patient bearing the syndrome of Leriche; this one had an aortic clamping below the kidney and soon after developed an acute ischaemic syndrome below the spinal medulla with flaccid paraparesis, anal and vesical sphincteric diseases and persistence of deep tactile sensibility. After a reconstruction of vascular anatomy of the medulla they emphasize the importance, in such a disease, of the "arteria radicularis magna" of Adamkievicz and its place of origin. After they discuss the severe physioopathologic moments that are connected: with the direct ischaemia following aortic clamping in the cases where the arteria radicularis magna rises at a level lower than the clamping itself; with the embolism or thrombosis caused by surgical manipulation peroperatively (it might be the cause of paraplegia more frequent in aneurysmectomia surgery); with the severe hypotension per- and post operatively for the existence of arteriosclerotic disease of the lumbar arteries. Finally they analyses preoperatively diagnostic possibilities and per operatively methods used in preventing this sort of complication.

  7. Patch-clamp amplifiers on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Weerakoon, Pujitha; Culurciello, Eugenio; Yang, Youshan; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Kindlmann, Peter J.; Sigworth, Fred J.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first, fully-integrated, two-channel implementation of a patch-clamp measurement system. With this “PatchChip” two simultaneous whole-cell recordings can be obtained with rms noise of 8 pA in a 10 kHz bandwidth. The capacitance and series-resistance of the electrode can be compensated up to 10 pF and 100 MΩ respectively under computer control. Recordings of hERG and Nav 1.7 currents demonstrate the system's capabilities, which are on par with large, commercial patch-clamp instrumentation. By reducing patch-clamp amplifiers to a millimeter size micro-chip, this work paves the way to the realization of massively-parallel, high-throughput patch-clamp systems for drug screening and ion-channel research. The PatchChip is implemented in a 0.5 μm silicon-on-sapphire process; its size is 3 × 3 mm2 and the power consumption is 5 mW per channel with a 3.3 V power supply. PMID:20637803

  8. Π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J; Santos, Michael S; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the 'π-clamp', that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  9. Analytical chemistry: Clamping down on cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetskaya, Irina A.; Gorodetsky, Alon A.

    2015-07-01

    An electrochemical clamp assay that enables the rapid and sensitive detection of nucleic acids containing single base mutations has now been developed. It has been shown to differentiate between cancer patient samples featuring a specific mutation, and controls from healthy donors or other cancer patients, all directly in unprocessed serum.

  10. Π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J; Santos, Michael S; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the 'π-clamp', that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics. PMID:26791894

  11. Planar patch clamp: advances in electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Andrea; Farre, Cecilia; Haarmann, Claudia; Haythornthwaite, Ali; Kreir, Mohamed; Stoelzle, Sonja; George, Michael; Fertig, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels have gained increased interest as therapeutic targets over recent years, since a growing number of human and animal diseases have been attributed to defects in ion channel function. Potassium channels are the largest and most diverse family of ion channels. Pharmaceutical agents such as Glibenclamide, an inhibitor of K(ATP) channel activity which promotes insulin release, have been successfully sold on the market for many years. So far, only a small group of the known ion channels have been addressed as potential drug targets. The functional testing of drugs on these ion channels has always been the bottleneck in the development of these types of pharmaceutical compounds.New generations of automated patch clamp screening platforms allow a higher throughput for drug testing and widen this bottleneck. Due to their planar chip design not only is a higher throughput achieved, but new applications have also become possible. One of the advantages of planar patch clamp is the possibility of perfusing the intracellular side of the membrane during a patch clamp experiment in the whole-cell configuration. Furthermore, the extracellular membrane remains accessible for compound application during the experiment.Internal perfusion can be used not only for patch clamp experiments with cell membranes, but also for those with artificial lipid bilayers. In this chapter we describe how internal perfusion can be applied to potassium channels expressed in Jurkat cells, and to Gramicidin channels reconstituted in a lipid bilayer. PMID:18998092

  12. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  13. The high energy source 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonmontigny, Corinna

    1990-01-01

    The properties of 3C 273 are reviewed and an attempt is made to find an answer to the question why 3C 273 is the only extragalactic source so far, which was detected at energies greater than or equal to 50 MeV.

  14. Dynamics and Stability of Pinned-Clamped and Clamped-Pinned Cylindrical Shells Conveying Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A. K.; Wong, S. S. T.; Païdoussis, M. P.

    2001-11-01

    The paper examines the dynamics and stability of fluid-conveying cylindrical shells having pinned-clamped or clamped-pinned boundary conditions, where ``pinned'' is an abbreviation for ``simply supported''. Flügge's equations are used to describe the shell motion, while the fluid-dynamic perturbation pressure is obtained utilizing the linearized potential flow theory. The solution is obtained using two methods - the travelling wave method and the Fourier-transform approach. The results obtained by both methods suggest that the negative damping of the clamped-pinned systems and positive damping of the pinned-clamped systems, observed by previous investigators for any arbitrarily small flow velocity, are simply numerical artefacts; this is reinforced by energy considerations, in which the work done by the fluid on the shell is shown to be zero. Hence, it is concluded that both systems are conservative.

  15. Single molecule study of a processivity clamp sliding on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Kwon, Y; Johnson, A; Hollars, C; O?Donnell, M; Camarero, J A; Barsky, D

    2007-07-05

    Using solution based single molecule spectroscopy, we study the motion of the polIII {beta}-subunit DNA sliding clamp ('{beta}-clamp') on DNA. Present in all cellular (and some viral) forms of life, DNA sliding clamps attach to polymerases and allow rapid, processive replication of DNA. In the absence of other proteins, the DNA sliding clamps are thought to 'freely slide' along the DNA; however, the abundance of positively charged residues along the inner surface may create favorable electrostatic contact with the highly negatively charged DNA. We have performed single-molecule measurements on a fluorescently labeled {beta}-clamp loaded onto freely diffusing plasmids annealed with fluorescently labeled primers of up to 90 bases. We find that the diffusion constant for 1D diffusion of the {beta}-clamp on DNA satisfies D {le} 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s, much slower than the frictionless limit of D = 10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s. We find that the {beta} clamp remains at the 3-foot end in the presence of E. coli single-stranded binding protein (SSB), which would allow for a sliding clamp to wait for binding of the DNA polymerase. Replacement of SSB with Human RP-A eliminates this interaction; free movement of sliding clamp and poor binding of clamp loader to the junction allows sliding clamp to accumulate on DNA. This result implies that the clamp not only acts as a tether, but also a placeholder.

  16. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  19. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5175 - Carotid artery clamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid artery clamp. 882.5175 Section 882.5175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5175 Carotid artery clamp. (a) Identification. A carotid artery clamp is a device that is surgically placed around a patient's carotid...

  1. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4460 Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used...

  2. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prevent strain on both ends of each cable or cord leading from a machine to a detached or separately... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cable clamps and grips. 18.40 Section 18.40... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable...

  3. 33 CFR 183.560 - Hose clamps: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hose clamps: Installation. 183... Hose clamps: Installation. Each hose clamp on a hose from the fuel tank to the fuel inlet connection on the engine, a hose between the fuel pump and the carburetor, or a vent line must: (a) Be used...

  4. 33 CFR 183.560 - Hose clamps: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hose clamps: Installation. 183... Hose clamps: Installation. Each hose clamp on a hose from the fuel tank to the fuel inlet connection on the engine, a hose between the fuel pump and the carburetor, or a vent line must: (a) Be used...

  5. 33 CFR 183.560 - Hose clamps: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hose clamps: Installation. 183... Hose clamps: Installation. Each hose clamp on a hose from the fuel tank to the fuel inlet connection on the engine, a hose between the fuel pump and the carburetor, or a vent line must: (a) Be used...

  6. 33 CFR 183.560 - Hose clamps: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hose clamps: Installation. 183... Hose clamps: Installation. Each hose clamp on a hose from the fuel tank to the fuel inlet connection on the engine, a hose between the fuel pump and the carburetor, or a vent line must: (a) Be used...

  7. 33 CFR 183.560 - Hose clamps: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hose clamps: Installation. 183... Hose clamps: Installation. Each hose clamp on a hose from the fuel tank to the fuel inlet connection on the engine, a hose between the fuel pump and the carburetor, or a vent line must: (a) Be used...

  8. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  9. Carbon nanotube-clamped metal atomic chain

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Yin, Li-Chang; Li, Feng; Liu, Chang; Yu, Wan-Jing; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Wu, Bo; Lee, Young-Hee; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Metal atomic chain (MAC) is an ultimate one-dimensional structure with unique physical properties, such as quantized conductance, colossal magnetic anisotropy, and quantized magnetoresistance. Therefore, MACs show great potential as possible components of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices. However, MACs are usually suspended between two macroscale metallic electrodes; hence obvious technical barriers exist in the interconnection and integration of MACs. Here we report a carbon nanotube (CNT)-clamped MAC, where CNTs play the roles of both nanoconnector and electrodes. This nanostructure is prepared by in situ machining a metal-filled CNT, including peeling off carbon shells by spatially and elementally selective electron beam irradiation and further elongating the exposed metal nanorod. The microstructure and formation process of this CNT-clamped MAC are explored by both transmission electron microscopy observations and theoretical simulations. First-principles calculations indicate that strong covalent bonds are formed between the CNT and MAC. The electrical transport property of the CNT-clamped MAC was experimentally measured, and quantized conductance was observed. PMID:20427743

  10. π-Clamp Mediated Cysteine Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is a grand challenge in chemistry. Protecting groups or catalysts must be used to selectively modify one site among many that are similarly reactive. General strategies are rare such the local chemical environment around the target site is tuned for selective transformation. Here we show a four amino acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the “π-clamp”, tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for the site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We used the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues (e.g. antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes), which was impossible with prior cysteine modification methods. The modified π-clamp antibodies retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach for site-selective chemistry and provides opportunities to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics. PMID:26791894

  11. A mathematical model for the downhole orbital vibrator source

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, W.

    1994-12-31

    An analytical expression for the downhole orbital vibrator source is proposed by approximating the source as rotating radial forces applied to the borehole wall. Decomposition of this expression indicates that the source is equivalent to the sum of four imaginary non-rotational sources. These imaginary sources, in conjunction with Green`s functions, provide a direct way of generating synthetic seismograms. They are used in this paper to obtain the displacement in homogeneous isotropic and transversely isotropic (TI) media. Evaluation of the displacement suggests that the source would be useful in detecting shear wave anisotropy by crosshole experiments.

  12. Inductive coupler for downhole components and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Fox, Joe; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-10-03

    An inductive coupler for downhole components. The inductive coupler includes an annular housing having a recess defined by a bottom portion and two opposing side wall portions. At least one side wall portion includes a lip extending toward but not reaching the other side wall portion. A plurality of generally U-shaped MCEI segments, preferably comprised of ferrite, are disposed in the recess and aligned so as to form a circular trough. The coupler further includes a conductor disposed within the circular trough and a polymer filling spaces between the segments, the annular housing and the conductor.

  13. Downhole corrosion inhibition in CO{sub 2} floods

    SciTech Connect

    Bartrip, K.A.

    2000-04-01

    While a few CO{sub 2} floods operate without special attention to corrosion inhibition, most will experience corrosion problems and failures without special programs. This article discusses the chemical and physical forces at work in CO{sub 2}-flood downhole corrosion, the type of testing needed to identify effective inhibitors for this environment, the improvements offered by newer chemistries, and the importance of application techniques. The change in corrosive tendencies that occurs over time as a CO{sub 2}-flood well is produced also is discussed.

  14. Experiment 2030. EE-2 Temperature Log and Downhole Water Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, Charles O.

    1983-07-29

    A temperature log and downhole water sample run were conducted in EE-2 on July 13, 1983. The temperature log was taken to show any changes which had occurred in the fracture-to-wellbore intersections as a result of the Experiment 2020 pumping and to locate fluid entries for taking the water sample. The water sample was requested primarily to determine the arsenic concentration in EE-2 fluids (see memo from C.Grigsby, June 28, 1983 concerning arsenic in EE-3 samples.) The temperature log was run using the thermistor in the ESS-6 water samples.

  15. Evaluation of a downhole tiltmeter array for monitoring hydraulic fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Engler, B.P.; Branagan, P.T.; Wilmer, R.; Wolhart, S.L.

    1997-03-01

    A series of hydraulic-fracture experiments using a downhole tiltmeter array, called an inclinometer array, was conducted at the Department of Energy (DOE)/Gas Research Institute (GRI) Multi-Site facility in Colorado. The inclinometer array was used to measure the deformation of the reservoir rock in response to hydraulic fracture opening and confirm microseismically measured results. In addition, the inclinometer array was found to be a useful tool for accurately measuring closure stress, measuring residual widths of both propped and unpropped fractures, estimating proppant distribution, and evaluating values of in situ moduli.

  16. Working member of a helical downhole motor for drilling wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kochnev, A.M.; Vshivkov, A.N.; Goldobin, V.B.

    1993-06-22

    A working member of a helical downhole motor is described for drilling wells comprising: separate tubular sections having helical teeth arranged in succession and interconnected by connecting elements, each connecting element having the form of a ring, rigidly secured at the tubular sections and having helical teeth of a pitch and a direction equal to a pitch and a direction, respectively, of the helical teeth of the tubular sections, whereas a profile of the helical teeth of the ring is equidistant to a profile of the helical teeth of the sections.

  17. DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENT COMPLETIONS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Tubel

    2003-03-24

    The first quarter of the Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications was characterized by the evaluation and determination of the specifications required for the development of the system for permanent applications in wellbores to the optimization of hydrocarbon production. The system will monitor and transmit in real time pressure and temperature information from downhole using the production tubing as the medium for the transmission of the acoustic waves carrying digital information. The most common casing and tubing sizes were determined by interfacing with the major oil companies to obtain information related to their wells. The conceptual design was created for both the wireless gauge section of the tool as well as the power generation module. All hardware for the wireless gauge will be placed in an atmospheric pressure chamber located on the outside of a production tubing with 11.4 centimeter (4-1/2 inch) diameter. This mounting technique will reduce cost as well as the diameter and length of the tool and increase the reliability of the system. The power generator will use piezoelectric wafers to generate electricity based on the flow of hydrocarbons through an area in the wellbore where the tool will be deployed. The goal of the project is to create 1 Watt of power continuously.

  18. DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENT COMPLETIONS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Tubel

    2003-07-05

    The third quarter of the project was dedicated to creating the detailed design for the manufacturing of the mechanical system for wireless communications and the power generation module. Another emphasis for the quarter was the development of the surface system and acoustic detector for the downhole tool for 2 way communications. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) All detailed drawings for manufacturing of the wireless communications gauge and power generator were completed and the drawings were forward to a machine shop for manufacturing. (2) The power generator was incorporated to the mandrel of the wireless gauge reducing the length of the tool by 25% and manufacturing cost by about 35%. (3) The new piezoelectric acoustic generator was manufactured successfully and it was delivered during this quarter. The assembly provides a new technique to manufacture large diameter piezoelectric based acoustic generators. (4) The acoustic two-way communications development progressed significantly. The real time firmware for the surface system was developed and the processor was able to detect and process the data frame transmitted from downhole. The analog section of the tool was also developed and it is being tested for filtering capabilities and signal detection and amplification. (5) The new transformer to drive the piezoelectric wafer assembly was designed and manufactured. The transformer has been received and it will go through testing and evaluation during the next quarter.

  19. NATO-3C/Delta launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NATO-3C, the third in a series of NATO defense-related communication satellites, is scheduled to be launched on a delta vehicle from the Eastern Test Range no earlier than November 15, 1978. NATO-3A and -3B were successfully launched by Delta vehicles in April 1976 and January 1977, respectively. The NATO-3C spacecraft will be capable of transmitting voice, data, facsimile, and telex messages among military ground stations. The launch vehicle for the NATO-3C mission will be the Delta 2914 configuration. The launch vehicle is to place the spacecraft in a synchronous transfer orbit. The spacecraft Apogee Kick motor is to be fired at fifth transfer orbit apogee to circularize its orbit at geosynchronous altitude of 35,900 km(22,260 miles) above the equator over the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between 45 and 50 degrees W longitude.

  20. Biological cell controllable patch-clamp microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penmetsa, Siva; Nagrajan, Krithika; Gong, Zhongcheng; Mills, David; Que, Long

    2010-12-01

    A patch-clamp (PC) microchip with cell sorting and positioning functions is reported, which can avoid drawbacks of random cell selection or positioning for a PC microchip. The cell sorting and positioning are enabled by air bubble (AB) actuators. AB actuators are pneumatic actuators, in which air pressure is generated by microheaters within sealed microchambers. The sorting, positioning, and capturing of 3T3 cells by this type of microchip have been demonstrated. Using human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 as the model, experiments have been demonstrated by this microchip as a label-free technical platform for real-time monitoring of the cell viability.

  1. Optimization of a clamped plate silencer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunqi; Han, Jun; Huang, Lixi

    2007-02-01

    A previous theoretical study [L. Huang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 2628-2638 (2006)] shows that, in a duct, a simply supported plate covering a side-branch rigid cavity can function effectively as a wave reflector over a broad range of low to medium frequencies. In this study, analytical formulation is extended to the boundary condition of clamped plate, which is easier to implement in practice. The theoretical model is tested experimentally using balsawood, which has a very high stiffness to mass ratio. The spectral peaks and shapes of the measured TL are in agreement with those calculated theoretically, attempts are also made to account for the considerable sound absorption in the rig. Further numerical studies based on the validated model show that, for a uniform plate, the optimal stopband is narrower and the lower band limit is worse than that of the simply supported configuration. However, a wave reflector using nonuniform, clamped plates with thinner ends out-performs the simply supported configuration in every aspect. Analyses show that the improvement is attributed to the increased acoustic radiation efficiency over the bulk length of the nonuniform plate, which behaves more like a rigid plate.

  2. Laser-assisted patch clamping: a methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Laser microsurgery can be used to perform both cell biological manipulations, such as targeted cell ablation, and molecular genetic manipulations, such as genetic transformation and chromosome dissection. In this report, we describe a laser microsurgical method that can be used either to ablate single cells or to ablate a small area (1-3 microns diameter) of the extracellular matrix. In plants and microorganisms, the extracellular matrix consists of the cell wall. While conventional patch clamping of these cells, as well as of many animal cells, requires enzymatic digestion of the extracellular matrix, we illustrate that laser microsurgery of a portion of the wall enables patch clamp access to the plasma membrane of higher plant cells remaining situated in their tissue environment. What follows is a detailed description of the construction and use of an economical laser microsurgery system, including procedures for single cell and targeted cell wall ablation. This methodology will be of interest to scientists wishing to perform cellular or subcellular ablation with a high degree of accuracy, or wishing to study how the extracellular matrix affects ion channel function.

  3. Patch-Clamp Technologies for Ion Channel Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigworth, Fred J.; Klemic, Kathryn G.

    The electrical activity of living cells can be monitored in various ways, but for the study of ion channels and the drugs that affect them, the patch-clamp techniques are the most sensitive. In this chapter the principles of patch-clamp recording are reviewed, and recent developments in microfabricated patch-clamp electrodes are described.Technical challenges and prospects for the future are discussed.

  4. 275 C Downhole Switched-Mode Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hutchens; Vijay Madhuravasal

    2008-08-31

    A vee-square (V2) control based controller IC is developed for a switch mode power supply capable of operating at extreme temperature/harsh environment conditions. A buck type regulator with silicon carbide power junction field effect transistors (JFET) as power devices is used to analyze the performance of controller. Special emphases are made on the analog sub-blocks--voltage reference, operational transconductance amplifier and comparator as individual building blocks. Transformer coupled gate drives and high temperature operable magnetic cores and capacitors are identified and tested for use in the design. Conventional ceramic chip packaging of ICs combined with lead carrier type mounting of passive filter components is introduced for hybrid packaging of the complete product. The developed SMPS is anticipated to support the operation of down-hole microcontrollers and other electronics devices that require low/medium power filtered dc inputs over an operating temperature of 275 C.

  5. Element for use in an inductive coupler for downhole components

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2009-03-31

    An element for use in an inductive coupler for downhole components comprises an annular housing having a generally circular recess. The element further comprises a plurality of generally linear, magnetically conductive segments. Each segment includes a bottom portion, an inner wall portion, and an outer wall portion. The portions together define a generally linear trough from a first end to a second end of each segment. The segments are arranged adjacent to each other within the housing recess to form a generally circular trough. The ends of at least half of the segments are shaped such that the first end of one of the segments is complementary in form to the second end of an adjacent segment. In one embodiment, all of the ends are angled. Preferably, the first ends are angled with the same angle and the second ends are angled with the complementary angle.

  6. DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENT COMPLETIONS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Tubel

    2003-10-14

    The fourth quarter of the project was dedicated to the manufacturing of the mechanical system for wireless communications and the power generation module and inspection pre assembly of the mechanical components. Another emphasis for the quarter was the development of filter control and signal detection software. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) Dimensional issues were resolved and revised drawings for manufacturing of the wireless communications gauge and power generator were completed and sent to a machine shop for manufacturing. (2) Finalized the requirements and fittings and connections for testing the tool in the Halliburton flow loop. (3) The new acoustic generator was manufactured successfully and it was delivered during this quarter. The assembly will be outsourced for plastic coating in preparation for hostile environment use. (4) The acoustic two-way communications development continued to progress. The real time firmware for the surface system was developed and the processor was able to detect and process the data frame transmitted from downhole. The analog section of the tool was also developed and it is being tested for filtering capabilities and signal detection and amplification. (5) The new transformer to drive the acoustic generator assembly was manufactured and was successfully tested. Spring mandrel design showed increased acoustic output on the pipe and was implemented. (6) PCBA board carrier with board set was tested for function and fit and is 100% complete. (7) Filter control software is complete and software to allow modification of communication parameters dynamically is 50% complete. (8) All mechanical parts to assemble the wireless gauge and power generator have been received and verified to be within specification. (9) Acoustic generator has been assembled in the tool mandrel and tested successfully. (10) The circuit required to harvest the power generated downhole has been designed and the power generator

  7. Lithostratigraphy from downhole logs in Hole AND-1B, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Trevor; Morin, Roger H.; Jarrard, Richard D.; Jackolski, Chris L.; Henrys, Stuart A.; Niessen, Frank; Magens, Diana; Kuhn, Gerhard; Monien, Donata; Powell, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    The ANDRILL (Antarctic Drilling Project) McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS) project drilled 1285 m of sediment in Hole AND–1B, representing the past 12 m.y. of glacial history. Downhole geophysical logs were acquired to a depth of 1018 mbsf (meters below seafloor), and are complementary to data acquired from the core. The natural gamma radiation (NGR) and magnetic susceptibility logs are particularly useful for understanding lithological and paleoenvironmental change at ANDRILL McMurdo Ice Shelf Hole AND–1B. NGR logs cover the entire interval from the seafloor to 1018 mbsf, and magnetic susceptibility and other logs covered the open hole intervals between 692 and 1018 and 237–342 mbsf. In the upper part of AND–1B, clear alternations between low and high NGR values distinguish between diatomite (lacking minerals containing naturally radioactive K, U, and Th) and diamictite (containing K-bearing clays, K-feldspar, mica, and heavy minerals). In the lower open hole logged section, NGR and magnetic susceptibility can also distinguish claystones (rich in K-bearing clay minerals, relatively low in magnetite) and diamictites (relatively high in magnetite). Sandstones can be distinguished by their high resistivity values in AND–1B. On the basis of these three downhole logs, diamictite, claystones, and sandstones can be predicted correctly for 74% of the 692–1018 mbsf interval. The logs were then used to predict facies for the 6% of this interval that was unrecovered by coring. Given the understanding of the physical property characteristics of different facies, it is also possible to identify subtle changes in lithology from the physical properties and help refine parts of the lithostratigraphy, for example, the varying terrigenous content of diatomites and the transitions from subice diamictite to open-water diatomite.

  8. The how and why of downhole safety valves

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1986-01-01

    Downhole safety valves are designed to prevent the uncontrolled production of oil or gas from a well, in the event of damage to the Christmas tree or flow lines, or failure of surface control equipment. The first downhole safety valves were fairly simple devices invented primarily to protect caisson-type completions offshore from blowing out as a result of a collision on the surface. Caisson completions were vulnerable to damage because the wellhead was protected only by some pilings-frequently wood-driven into the ocean floow in shallow waters. The wells were drilled from submersible barges, usually, in near shore or inland waters. There was justified concern collisions could occur, with workboats or sports-fishing boats, to the extent that well control would be lost. Another concern was severe weather which could damage caisson-type completions-and platforms-to allow uncontrolled flow from wells. One of the manufacturers registered the name Storm Choke for its product, a name that has almost become generic, although still under legal protection. Early models of subsurface safety valves worked on the velocity principle. If flow through the tubing exceeded a fixed maximum, the valve would close. At that time, the maximum was established at something higher than the well's allowable producing rate. Since allowables are no longer effective, the maximum is fixed by the well's characteristics relative to reservoir damage, sand production, or water coning. The reasons subsurface safety valves are used remain the same, but today's designs are high-tech, many can be controlled from the surface, testing is fairly simple, and platform wells can be shut in individually or all at one time.

  9. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, B. K.; Shepherd, S. D.; Pender, C. W.; Wood, B. E.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps from LDEF are described. The measurements were made using a hemiellipsoidal mirror reflectometer with interferometer for wavelengths between 2-15 microns. The tray clamps investigated were from locations about the entire spacecraft and provided the opportunity for comparing the effects of atomic oxygen at each location. Results indicate there was essentially no dependence on atomic oxygen fluence for the surfaces studied, but there did appear to be a slight dependence on solar radiation exposure. The reflectances of the front sides of the tray clamps consistently were slightly higher than for the protected rear tray clamp surfaces.

  10. An Optimal Cell Detection Technique for Automated Patch Clamping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    While there are several hardware techniques for the automated patch clamping of cells that describe the equipment apparatus used for patch clamping, very few explain the science behind the actual technique of locating the ideal cell for a patch clamping procedure. We present a machine vision approach to patch clamping cell selection by developing an intelligent algorithm technique that gives the user the ability to determine the good cell to patch clamp in an image within one second. This technique will aid the user in determining the best candidates for patch clamping and will ultimately save time, increase efficiency and reduce cost. The ultimate goal is to combine intelligent processing with instrumentation and controls in order to produce a complete turnkey automated patch clamping system capable of accurately and reliably patch clamping cells with a minimum amount of human intervention. We present a unique technique that identifies good patch clamping cell candidates based on feature metrics of a cell's (x, y) position, major axis length, minor axis length, area, elongation, roundness, smoothness, angle of orientation, thinness and whether or not the cell is only particularly in the field of view. A patent is pending for this research.

  11. Voltage clamp experiments on ventricular myocardial fibres

    PubMed Central

    Beeler, G. W.; Reuter, H.

    1970-01-01

    1. A voltage clamp method utilizing a sucrose gap and glass microelectrodes was developed and used to study dog ventricular myocardial fibre bundles. The limitations and the reliability of this method are demonstrated by a series of tests. 2. A dynamic sodium current, excited at membrane potentials more positive than -65 mV, was measured. The equilibrium potential for this large, rapid inward current depends directly on [Na]o, shifting 29·0 ± 2·3 mV (± S.E. of mean), as opposed to a theoretically expected value of 30·6 mV, when [Na]o is reduced to 31% of normal. 3. Sodium current is inactivated by conditioning depolarizations. Complete inactivation occurs with conditioning potentials more positive than -45 mV, and 50% inactivation occurs at about -55 mV. The location of the inactivation curve shifts along the voltage axis, when [Ca]o is varied between 0·2 and 7·2 mM. 4. A second, much smaller and slower net inward current, with a threshold around -30 mV, and an equilibrium potential above +40 mV was also observed. 5. The `steady-state' current—voltage relationship (after 300-600 msec) exhibits inward-going (anomalous) rectification with negative slope between -50 and -25 mV. 6. A small, very slowly developing component of outward current was observed at inside positive potentials. The equilibrium potential for this current, although slightly dependent on [K]o, is neither identical with the potassium equilibrium potential nor with the resting potential in normal Tyrode solution. 7. Anatomical limitations, primarily resistance in the extracellular space within the bundle, prevent complete characterization of the rapid, large sodium current, but do not limit the application of the clamp method to the study of other, smaller and slower currents. The evidence for this is discussed extensively in the Appendix. PMID:5503866

  12. Method and apparatus for transmitting and receiving data to and from a downhole tool

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2007-03-13

    A transmission line network system for transmitting and/or receiving data from a downhole tool. The invention is achieved by providing one or more transceiving elements, preferably rings, at either end of a downhole tool. A conduit containing a coaxial cable capable of communicating an electrical signal is attached to the transceiving element and extends through a central bore of the downhole tool and through the central bore of any tool intermediate the first transceiving element and a second transceiving element. Upon receiving an electrical signal from the cable, the second transceiving element may convert such signal to a magnetic field. The magnetic field may be detected by a third transceiving element in close proximity to the second transceiving element. In this manner, many different tools may be included in a downhole transmission network without requiring substantial modification, if any, of any particular tool.

  13. Apparatus for downhole drilling communications and method for making and using the same

    DOEpatents

    Normann, R.A.; Lockwood, G.J.; Gonzales, M.

    1998-03-03

    An apparatus for downhole drilling communications is presented. The apparatus includes a spool and end pieces for maintaining the spool at the bottom of a drill string near a drill bit during drilling operations. The apparatus provides a cable for communicating signals between a downhole electronics package and a surface receiver in order to perform measurements while drilling. A method of forming the apparatus is also set forth wherein the apparatus is formed about a central spindle and lathe. 6 figs.

  14. Apparatus for downhole drilling communications and method for making and using the same

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Lockwood, Grant J.; Gonzales, Meliton

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for downhole drilling communications is presented. The apparatus includes a spool and end pieces for maintaining the spool at the bottom of a drill string near a drill bit during drilling operations. The apparatus provides a cable for communicating signals between a downhole electronics package and a surface receiver in order to perform measurements while drilling. A method of forming the apparatus is also set forth wherein the apparatus is formed about a central spindle and lathe.

  15. Use of pattern-recognition techniques in analyzing downhole dynamometer cards

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, R.R. ); Jennings, J.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Four pattern-matching methods are presented to evaluate the downhole condition of sucker-rod-pumped wells. Comparing the generated pump dynagraph of a well being tested to various downhole dynagraphs characteristic of particular rod-pump problems allows the pattern-matching methods to diagnose a variety of different pump conditions. In the future, one of the pattern-matching methods could be incorporated into an automated system designed to monitor the performance of an oilfield's rod-pumped wells.

  16. Report covering examination of parts from downhole steam generators. [Combustor head and sleeve parts

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, F. S.; Meier, G. H.

    1983-08-01

    Combustor head and sleeve parts were examined by using optical and scanning electron metallography after use in oxygen/diesel and air/diesel downhole steam generators. The degradation of the different alloy components is described in terms of reactions with oxygen, sulfur and carbon in the presence of cyclic stresses, all generated by the combustion process. Recommendations are presented for component materials (alloys and coatings) to extend component lives in the downhole steam generators. 9 references, 22 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Combination Space Station Handrail Clamp and Pointing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A device for attaching an experiment carrier to a space station handrail is provided. The device has two major components, a clamping mechanism for attachment to a space station handrail, and a pointing carrier on which an experiment package can be mounted and oriented. The handrail clamp uses an overcenter mechanism and the carrier mechanism uses an adjustable preload ball and socket for carrier positioning. The handrail clamp uses a stack of disk springs to provide a spring loaded button. This configuration provides consistent clamping force over a range of possible handrail thicknesses. Three load points are incorporated in the clamping mechanism thereby spreading the clamping load onto three separate points on the handrail. A four bar linkage is used to provide for a single actuation lever for all three load points. For additional safety, a secondary lock consisting of a capture plate and push lock keeps the clamp attached to the handrail in the event of main clamp failure. For the carrier positioning mechanism, a ball in a spring loaded socket uses friction to provide locking torque; however. the ball and socket are torque limited so that the ball ran slip under kick loads (125 pounds or greater). A lead screw attached to disk spring stacks is used to provide an adjustable spring force on the socket. A locking knob is attached to the lead screw to allow for hand manipulation of the lead screw.

  18. Mitochondria are clamped to vacuoles for lipid transport.

    PubMed

    Klecker, Till; Westermann, Benedikt

    2014-07-14

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Elbaz-Alon et al. (2014) and Hönscher et al. (2014) describe a contact site between mitochondria and the lysosome-like yeast vacuole named vCLAMP (vacuole and mitochondria patch). They show that vCLAMP plays a role in lipid exchange, thereby linking mitochondria to the endomembrane system.

  19. 21 CFR 876.5160 - Urological clamp for males.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urological clamp for males. 876.5160 Section 876.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5160 Urological clamp for...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5160 - Urological clamp for males.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urological clamp for males. 876.5160 Section 876.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5160 Urological clamp for...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5160 - Urological clamp for males.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urological clamp for males. 876.5160 Section 876.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5160 Urological clamp for...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5160 - Urological clamp for males.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urological clamp for males. 876.5160 Section 876.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5160 Urological clamp for...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5160 - Urological clamp for males.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urological clamp for males. 876.5160 Section 876.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5160 Urological clamp for...

  4. Evaluation of clamp effects on LMFBR piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Loop-type liquid metal breeder reactor plants utilize thin-wall piping to mitigate through-wall thermal gradients due to rapid thermal transients. These piping loops require a support system to carry the combined weight of the pipe, coolant and insulation and to provide attachments for seismic restraints. The support system examined here utilizes an insulated pipe clamp designed to minimize the stresses induced in the piping. To determine the effect of these clamps on the pipe wall a non-linear, two-dimensional, finite element model of the clamp, insulation and pipe wall was used to determine the clamp/pipe interface load distributions which were then applied to a three-dimensional, finite element model of the pipe. The two-dimensional interaction model was also utilized to estimate the combined clamp/pipe stiffness.

  5. Surface-Source Downhole Seismic Analysis in R

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Eric M.

    2007-01-01

    This report discusses a method for interpreting a layered slowness or velocity model from surface-source downhole seismic data originally presented by Boore (2003). I have implemented this method in the statistical computing language R (R Development Core Team, 2007), so that it is freely and easily available to researchers and practitioners that may find it useful. I originally applied an early version of these routines to seismic cone penetration test data (SCPT) to analyze the horizontal variability of shear-wave velocity within the sediments in the San Francisco Bay area (Thompson et al., 2006). A more recent version of these codes was used to analyze the influence of interface-selection and model assumptions on velocity/slowness estimates and the resulting differences in site amplification (Boore and Thompson, 2007). The R environment has many benefits for scientific and statistical computation; I have chosen R to disseminate these routines because it is versatile enough to program specialized routines, is highly interactive which aids in the analysis of data, and is freely and conveniently available to install on a wide variety of computer platforms. These scripts are useful for the interpretation of layered velocity models from surface-source downhole seismic data such as deep boreholes and SCPT data. The inputs are the travel-time data and the offset of the source at the surface. The travel-time arrivals for the P- and S-waves must already be picked from the original data. An option in the inversion is to include estimates of the standard deviation of the travel-time picks for a weighted inversion of the velocity profile. The standard deviation of each travel-time pick is defined relative to the standard deviation of the best pick in a profile and is based on the accuracy with which the travel-time measurement could be determined from the seismogram. The analysis of the travel-time data consists of two parts: the identification of layer-interfaces, and the

  6. Cell-Detection Technique for Automated Patch Clamping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    A unique and customizable machinevision and image-data-processing technique has been developed for use in automated identification of cells that are optimal for patch clamping. [Patch clamping (in which patch electrodes are pressed against cell membranes) is an electrophysiological technique widely applied for the study of ion channels, and of membrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the membranes. Patch clamping is used in many biological research fields such as neurobiology, pharmacology, and molecular biology.] While there exist several hardware techniques for automated patch clamping of cells, very few of those techniques incorporate machine vision for locating cells that are ideal subjects for patch clamping. In contrast, the present technique is embodied in a machine-vision algorithm that, in practical application, enables the user to identify good and bad cells for patch clamping in an image captured by a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera attached to a microscope, within a processing time of one second. Hence, the present technique can save time, thereby increasing efficiency and reducing cost. The present technique involves the utilization of cell-feature metrics to accurately make decisions on the degree to which individual cells are "good" or "bad" candidates for patch clamping. These metrics include position coordinates (x,y) in the image plane, major-axis length, minor-axis length, area, elongation, roundness, smoothness, angle of orientation, and degree of inclusion in the field of view. The present technique does not require any special hardware beyond commercially available, off-the-shelf patch-clamping hardware: A standard patchclamping microscope system with an attached CCD camera, a personal computer with an imagedata- processing board, and some experience in utilizing imagedata- processing software are all that are needed. A cell image is first captured by the microscope CCD camera and image-data-processing board, then the image

  7. Drilling Optimization Utilizing Surface Instrumentaton for Downhole Event Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Greg Deskins

    2006-02-01

    This DOE project was undertaken to develop and test an instrumented data-acquisition sub that is mounted in a drill string below the top drive and used to detect downhole events. Data recorded at the surface during drilling operations would then be processed and presented to the driller to discern undesirable drilling conditions and help optimize drilling rates and maximize the life of components in the BHA. This instrumented sub was originally conceived and developed solely as a single-point collection center for rig data that would be used in a number of Noble's products. The sub was designed to collect hook load, rotary torque, rotary speed, rotary position, drill pipe pressure, mud temperature, triaxial vibration, and triaxial magnetometer data. The original design and fabrication was by Sandia National Labs under Noble's direction, which was then tested with Sandia's diagnostics-while-drilling downhole package. After initial results were analyzed, the team surmised that important information describing performance and condition of the bottom-hole assembly (BHA) was embedded in the data recorded by the instrumented sub, and began investigating the potential of using surface measurements from the sub to highlight problems occurring downhole before they could be discerned by the driller. Later, a proposal was submitted to DOE for funding to more broadly investigate use of the system for detecting downhole problems while drilling. Soon after DOE awarded this contract, the Noble team responsible for the previous developments was disbanded and their work terminated (due to factors unrelated to the sub development). This change halted the complementary work that Noble had planned to conduct during the DOE project, and necessitated that all the development work be completed by the DOE project. More effort was expended on the project to develop a field-ready prototype than was originally foreseen. The sub's design had to be significantly modified during the project

  8. Inductive coupler for downhole components and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Briscoe, Michael A.; Sneddon, Cameron; Fox, Joe

    2006-05-09

    The present invention includes a method of making an inductive coupler for downhole components. The method includes providing an annular housing, preferably made of steel, the housing having a recess. A conductor, preferably an insulated wire, is also provided along with a plurality of generally U-shaped magnetically conducting, electrically insulating (MCEI) segments. Preferably, the MCEI segments comprise ferrite. An assembly is formed by placing the plurality of MCEI segments within the recess in the annular housing. The segments are aligned to form a generally circular trough. A first portion of the conductor is placed within the circular trough. This assembly is consolidated with a meltable polymer which fills spaces between the segments, annular housing and the first portion of the conductor. The invention also includes an inductive coupler including an annular housing having a recess defined by a bottom portion and two opposing side wall portions. At least one side wall portion includes a lip extending toward but not reaching the other side wall portion. A plurality of generally U-shaped MCEI segments, preferably comprised of ferrite, are disposed in the recess and aligned so as to form a circular trough. The coupler further includes a conductor disposed within the circular trough and a polymer filling spaces between the segments, the annular housing and the conductor.

  9. Advances in downhole sampling of high temperature solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bayhurst, G.K.; Janecky, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    A fluid sampler capable of sampling hot and/or deep wells has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In collaboration with Leutert Instruments, an off-the-shelf sampler design was modified to meet gas-tight and minimal chemical reactivity/contamination specifications for use in geothermal wells and deep ocean drillholes. This downhole sampler has been routinely used at temperatures up to 300{degrees}C and hole depths of greater than 5 km. We have tested this sampler in various continental wells, including Valles Caldera VC-2a and VC-2b, German KTB, Cajon Pass, and Yellowstone Y-10. Both the standard commercial and enhanced samplers have also been used to obtain samples from a range of depths in the Ocean Drilling Project's hole 504B and during recent mid-ocean ridge drilling efforts. The sampler has made it possible to collect samples at temperatures and conditions beyond the limits of other tools with the added advantage of chemical corrosion resistance.

  10. Downhole steam generator with improved preheating/cooling features

    DOEpatents

    Donaldson, A. Burl; Hoke, Donald E.; Mulac, Anthony J.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for downhole steam generation employing dual-stage preheaters for liquid fuel and for the water. A first heat exchange jacket for the fuel surrounds the fuel/oxidant mixing section of the combustor assembly downstream of the fuel nozzle and contacts the top of the combustor unit of the combustor assembly, thereby receiving heat directly from the combustion of the fuel/oxidant. A second stage heat exchange jacket surrounds an upper portion of the oxidant supply line adjacent the fuel nozzle receiving further heat from the compression heat which results from pressurization of the oxidant. The combustor unit includes an inner combustor sleeve whose inner wall defines the combustion zone. The inner combustor sleeve is surrounded by two concentric water channels, one defined by the space between the inner combustor sleeve and an intermediate sleeve, and the second defined by the space between the intermediate sleeve and an outer cylindrical housing. The channels are connected by an annular passage adjacent the top of the combustor assembly and the countercurrent nature of the water flow provides efficient cooling of the inner combustor sleeve. An annular water ejector with a plurality of nozzles is provided to direct water downwardly into the combustor unit at the boundary of the combustion zone and along the lower section of the intermediate sleeve.

  11. Load-deflection characteristics of small bore insulated pipe clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Severud, L.K.; Clark, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    High temperature LMFBR piping is subject to rapid temperature changes during transient events. Typically, this pipe is supported by specially designed insulated pipe clamps to prevent excessive thermal stress from developing during these transients. The special insulated clamps used on both FFTF and CRBR piping utilize a Belleville spring arrangement to compensate for pipe thermal expansion. Analysis indicates that this produces a non-linear, directionally sensitive clamp spring rate. Since these spring rates influence the seismic response of a supported piping system, it was deemed necessary to evaluate them further by test. This has been accomplished for the FFTF clamps. A more standard insulated pipe clamp, which does not incorporate Belleville springs to accommodate thermal expansion, was also tested. This type clamp is simple in design, and economically attractive. It may have wide application prospects for use in LMFBR small bore auxiliary piping operating at temperatures below 427/sup 0/C. Load deflection tests were conducted on 2.54 CM and 7.62 CM diameter samples of these commercial clamps.

  12. Multiwavelength observations of giant radio galaxy 3C 35 and 3C 284

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We report multi wavelength observations of large radio galaxy 3C35 and 3C284. The low frequency observations were done with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) starting from 150 MHz. The high frequency observations were done with Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). Our main motivation for these observations is to estimate the spectral ages of these galaxies and to examine any proof of extended emission at low radio frequencies due to an earlier cycle of activity. The spectral age is measured by fitting the spectra with different spectral ageing models e.g. Kardashev-Pacholczyk (KP), Jaffe-Perola (JP) and Continuous Injection (CI).

  13. Patch voltage clamp of squid axon membrane.

    PubMed

    Fishman, H M

    1975-12-01

    A small area (patch) of the external surface of a squid axon can be "isolated" electrically from the surrounding bath by means of a pair of concentric glass pipettes. The seawater-filled inner pipette makes contact with the axon and constitutes the external access to the patch. The outer pipette is used to direct flowing sucrose solution over the area surrounding the patch of membrane underlying the inner pipette. Typically, sucrose isolated patches remain in good condition (spike amplitude greater than 90 mV) for periods of approximately one half hour. Patches of axon membrane which had previously been exposed to sucrose solution were often excitable. Membrane survival of sucrose treatment apparently arises from an outflow of ions from the axon and perhaps satellite cells into the interstitial cell space surrounding the exolemma. Estimate of the total access resistance (electrode plus series resistance) to the patch is about 100 komega (7 omega cm2). Patch capacitance ranges from 10-100 pF, which suggests areas of 10(-4) to 10(-5) cm2 and resting patch resistances of 10-100 Momega. Shunt resistance through the interstitial space exposed to sucrose solution, which isolates the patch, is typically 1-2 Momega. These parameters indicate that good potential control and response times can be achieved on a patch. Furthermore, spatial uniformity is demonstrated by measurement of an exoplasmic isopotential during voltage clamp of an axon patch. The method may be useful for other preparations in which limited membrane area is available or in special instances such as in the measurement of membrane conduction noise. PMID:1214276

  14. Multifrequency Monitoring of 3C 120, 3C 279, and PKS 1510--089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Aller, M. F.; Balonek, T. J.; Gomez, J.-L.; McHardy, I. M.; Terasranta, H.; Raiteri, C.; Tosti, G.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze contemporaneous X-ray, optical, and radio light curves of 3C 120, ABC 279, and PKS 1510-089 on timescales from a few to hundreds of days over a 3-5 year period. The results show the diverse connections between variability properties at different frequencies for different blazers.

  15. The resolved outflow from 3C 48

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, the mass is ∼6 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow.

  16. Downhole geophysical observatories: best installation practices and a case history from Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Bulut, Fatih; Bohnhoff, Marco; Raub, Christina; Kartal, Recai F.; Alver, Fatih; Malin, Peter E.

    2015-09-01

    Downhole sensors of different types and in various environments provide substantial benefit to signal quality. They also add the depth dimension to measurements performed at the Earths' surface. Sensor types that particularly benefit from downhole installation due to the absence of near-surface noise include piezometers, seismometers, strainmeters, thermometers, and tiltmeters. Likewise, geochemical and environmental measurements in a borehole help eliminate near-surface weathering and cultural effects. Installations from a few hundred meter deep to a few kilometer deep dramatically reduce surface noise levels—the latter noticeably also reduces the hypocentral distance for shallow microearthquakes. The laying out of a borehole network is always a compromise of local boundary conditions and the involved drilling costs. The installation depth and procedure for a long-term downhole observatory can range from time limited installations, with a retrieval option, to permanently cemented sensors. Permanently cemented sensors have proven to be long-term stable with non-deteriorating coupling and borehole integrity. However, each type needs to be carefully selected and planned according to the research aims. A convenient case study is provided by a new installation of downhole seismometers along the shoreline of the eastern Marmara Sea in Turkey. These stations are being integrated into the regional net for monitoring the North Anatolian Fault Zone. Here we discuss its design, installation, and first results. We conclude that, despite the logistical challenges and installation costs, the superior quality of downhole data puts this technique at the forefront of applied and fundamental research.

  17. A clamp-like biohybrid catalyst for DNA oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dongen, Stijn F. M.; Clerx, Joost; Nørgaard, Kasper; Bloemberg, Tom G.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.; Trakselis, Michael A.; Nelson, Scott W.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.

    2013-11-01

    In processive catalysis, a catalyst binds to a substrate and remains bound as it performs several consecutive reactions, as exemplified by DNA polymerases. Processivity is essential in nature and is often mediated by a clamp-like structure that physically tethers the catalyst to its (polymeric) template. In the case of the bacteriophage T4 replisome, a dedicated clamp protein acts as a processivity mediator by encircling DNA and subsequently recruiting its polymerase. Here we use this DNA-binding protein to construct a biohybrid catalyst. Conjugation of the clamp protein to a chemical catalyst with sequence-specific oxidation behaviour formed a catalytic clamp that can be loaded onto a DNA plasmid. The catalytic activity of the biohybrid catalyst was visualized using a procedure based on an atomic force microscopy method that detects and spatially locates oxidized sites in DNA. Varying the experimental conditions enabled switching between processive and distributive catalysis and influencing the sliding direction of this rotaxane-like catalyst.

  18. Planar patch-clamp force microscopy on living cells.

    PubMed

    Pamir, Evren; George, Michael; Fertig, Niels; Benoit, Martin

    2008-05-01

    Here we report a new combination of the patch-clamp technique with the atomic force microscope (AFM). A planar patch-clamp chip microstructured from borosilicate glass was used as a support for mechanical probing of living cells. The setup not only allows for immobilizing even a non-adherent cell for measurements of its mechanical properties, but also for simultaneously measuring the electrophysiological properties of a single cell. As a proof of principle experiment we measured the voltage-induced membrane movement of HEK293 and Jurkat cells in the whole-cell voltage clamp configuration. The results of these measurements are in good agreement with previous studies. By using the planar patch-clamp chip for immobilization, the AFM not only can image non-adhering cells, but also gets easily access to an electrophysiologically controlled cellular probe at low vibrational noise. PMID:17933465

  19. Feasibility evaluation of downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Langhus, B. G.; Belieu, S.

    1999-01-31

    The largest volume waste stream associated with oil and gas production is produced water. A survey conducted by the American Petroleum Institute estimated that 20.9 billion barrels of produced water were disposed of in 1985 (Wakim 1987). Of this total, 91% was disposed of through disposal wells or was injected for enhanced oil recovery projects. Treatment and disposal of produced water represents a significant cost for operators. A relatively new technology, downhole oil/water separators (DOWS), has been developed to reduce the cost of handling produced water. DOWS separate oil and gas from produced water at the bottom of the well and reinject some of the produced water into another formation or another horizon within the same formation, while the oil and gas are pumped to the surface. Since much of the produced water is not pumped to the surface, treated, and pumped from the surface back into a deep formation, the cost of handling produced water is greatly reduced. When DOWS are used, additional oil may be recovered as well. In cases where surface processing or disposal capacity is a limiting factor for further production within a field, the use of DOWS to dispose of some of the produced water can allow additional production within that field. Simultaneous injection using DOWS minimizes the opportunity for contamination of underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) through leaks in tubing and casing during the injection process. This report uses the acronym 'DOWS' although the technology may also be referred to as DHOWS or as dual injection and lifting systems (DIALS). Simultaneous injection using DOWS has the potential to profoundly influence the domestic oil industry. The technology has been shown to work in limited oil field applications in the United States and Canada. Several technical papers describing DOWS have been presented at oil and gas industry conferences, but for the most part, the information on the DOWS technology has not been widely transferred

  20. Downhole fluid analysis and asphaltene science for petroleum reservoir evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Oliver C; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Zuo, Julian Y; Dong, Chengli

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum reservoirs are enshrouded in mysteries associated with all manner of geologic and fluid complexities that Mother Nature can inspire. Efficient exploitation of petroleum reservoirs mandates elucidation of these complexities; downhole fluid analysis (DFA) has proven to be indispensable for understanding both fluids and reservoir architecture. Crude oil consists of dissolved gases, liquids, and dissolved solids, known as the asphaltenes. These different fluid components exhibit fluid gradients vertically and laterally, which are best revealed by DFA, with its excellent precision and accuracy. Compositional gradient analysis falls within the purview of thermodynamics. Gas-liquid equilibria can be treated with a cubic equation of state (EoS), such as the Peng-Robinson EoS, a modified van der Waals EoS. In contrast, the first EoS for asphaltene gradients, the Flory-Huggins-Zuo (FHZ) EoS, was developed only recently. The resolution of the asphaltene molecular and nanocolloidal species in crude oil, which is codified in the Yen-Mullins model of asphaltenes, enabled the development of this EoS. The combination of DFA characterization of gradients of reservoir crude oil with the cubic EoS and FHZ EoS analyses brings into view wide-ranging reservoir concerns, such as reservoir connectivity, fault-block migration, heavy oil gradients, tar mat formation, huge disequilibrium fluid gradients, and even stochastic variations of reservoir fluids. New petroleum science and DFA technology are helping to offset the increasing costs and technical difficulties of exploiting ever-more-remote petroleum reservoirs.

  1. Force-controlled patch clamp of beating cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Dario; Amarouch, Mohamed-Yassine; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Abriel, Hugues; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-03-11

    From its invention in the 1970s, the patch clamp technique is the gold standard in electrophysiology research and drug screening because it is the only tool enabling accurate investigation of voltage-gated ion channels, which are responsible for action potentials. Because of its key role in drug screening, innovation efforts are being made to reduce its complexity toward more automated systems. While some of these new approaches are being adopted in pharmaceutical companies, conventional patch-clamp remains unmatched in fundamental research due to its versatility. Here, we merged the patch clamp and atomic force microscope (AFM) techniques, thus equipping the patch-clamp with the sensitive AFM force control. This was possible using the FluidFM, a force-controlled nanopipette based on microchanneled AFM cantilevers. First, the compatibility of the system with patch-clamp electronics and its ability to record the activity of voltage-gated ion channels in whole-cell configuration was demonstrated with sodium (NaV1.5) channels. Second, we showed the feasibility of simultaneous recording of membrane current and force development during contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes. Force feedback allowed for a gentle and stable contact between AFM tip and cell membrane enabling serial patch clamping and injection without apparent cell damage. PMID:25639960

  2. Photosynthesis of C3, C3-C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E; Tissue, David T; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-07-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3-C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l(-1)) and glacial (180 μl l(-1)) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3-C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3-C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3-C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3-C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3-C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments.

  3. Apparatus and method for compensating for clock drift in downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Johnson, Monte L.; Bartholomew, David B.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy

    2007-08-07

    A precise downhole clock that compensates for drift includes a prescaler configured to receive electrical pulses from an oscillator. The prescaler is configured to output a series of clock pulses. The prescaler outputs each clock pulse after counting a preloaded number of electrical pulses from the oscillator. The prescaler is operably connected to a compensator module for adjusting the number loaded into the prescaler. By adjusting the number that is loaded into the prescaler, the timing may be advanced or retarded to more accurately synchronize the clock pulses with a reference time source. The compensator module is controlled by a counter-based trigger module configured to trigger the compensator module to load a value into the prescaler. Finally, a time-base logic module is configured to calculate the drift of the downhole clock by comparing the time of the downhole clock with a reference time source.

  4. An improved finite-difference calculation of downhole dynamometer cards for sucker-rod pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Everitt, T.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Sucker-rod pumping is the most widely used means of artificial lift. About 85% to 90% of all producing wells in the U.S. are rod-pumped. Thus, a reliable method of analyzing these pumping system is a necessity. For many years, the surface dynamometer has been used to analyze sucker-rod systems. Interpretation of actual pump conditions from surface dynamometer cards is often difficult, if not impossible. Results obtained from surface cards are strictly qualitative and are dependent on the analyzer's expertise. The ideal analysis procedure would be to measure the actual pump conditions with a downhole dynamometer. However, this situation is not economically feasible. Therefore, an accurate method of calculating downhole pump cards form measured surface cards is needed. This paper presents a method for calculating these downhole cards that uses a finite-difference representation of the wave equation. First, a brief description of previous calculation techniques is given.

  5. Operating manual for the R200 downhole recorder with Tandy 102 retriever

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Roy A.; Rorabaugh, James I.

    1988-01-01

    The R200 Downhole Recorder is a battery-powered device that, when placed in a well casing, monitors water levels for a period of up to 1 year. This instrument measures a 1- to 70-ft range of water levels. These water level data can be retrieved through use of a commercially available portable microcomputer. The R200 Downhole Recorder was developed at the U. S. Geological Survey 's Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility, Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. This operating manual describes the R200 Downhole Recorder, provides initial set-up instructions, and gives directions for on-site operation. Design specifications and routine maintenance steps are included. The R200 data-retriever program is a user-friendly, menu-driven program. The manual guides the user through the procedures required to perform specific operations. Numerous screens are reproduced in the text with a discussion of user input for desired responses. Help is provided for specific problems. (USGS)

  6. Operating manual for the R200 downhole recorder with husky hunter retriever

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Roy A.; Rorabaugh, James I.

    1988-01-01

    The R200 Downhole Recorder is a battery-powered device that, when placed in a well casing, monitors water levels for a period of up to 1 year. This instrument measures a 1- to 70-foot range of water levels. These water-level data can be retrieved through use of a commercially available portable microcomputer. The R200 Downhole Recorder was developed at the U.S. Geological Survey 's Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility, Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. This operating manual describes the R200 Downhole Recorder, provides initial set-up instructions, and gives directions for on-site operation. Design specifications and routine maintenance steps are included. The R200 data-retriever program is a user-friendly, menu-driven program. The manual guides the user through the procedures required to perform specific operations. Numerous screens are reproduced in the text with a discussion of user input for desired responses. Help is provided for specific problems. (USGS)

  7. Development of a High Pressure/High Temperature Down-hole Turbine Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Plamp

    2008-06-30

    As oil & natural gas deposits become more difficult to obtain by conventional means, wells must extend to deeper more heat-intensive environments. The technology of the drilling equipment required to reach these depths has exceeded the availability of electrical power sources needed to operate these tools. Historically, logging while drilling (LWD) and measure while drilling (MWD) devices utilized a wireline to supply power and communication from the operator to the tool. Lithium ion batteries were used in scenarios where a wireline was not an option, as it complicated operations. In current downhole applications, lithium ion battery (LIB) packs are the primary source for electrical power. LIB technology has been proven to supply reliable downhole power at temperatures up to 175 °C. Many of the deeper well s reach ambient temperatures above 200 °C, creating an environment too harsh for current LIB technology. Other downfalls of LIB technology are cost, limitations on charge cycles, disposal issues and possible safety hazards including explosions and fires. Downhole power generation can also be achieved by utilizing drilling fluid flow and converting it to rotational motion. This rotational motion can be harnessed to spin magnets around a series of windings to produce power proportional to the rpm experienced by the driven assembly. These generators are, in most instances, driven by turbine blades or moyno-based drilling fluid pumps. To date, no commercially available downhole power generators are capable of operating at ambient temperatures of 250 °C. A downhole power g enerator capable of operation in a 250 °C and 20,000 psi ambient environment will be an absolute necessity in the future. Dexter Magnetic Technologies’ High-Pressure High-Temperature (HPHT) Downhole Turbine Generator is capable of operating at 250 °C and 20, 000 psi, but has not been tested in an actual drilling application. The technology exists, but to date no company has been willing to

  8. THE ACCELERATING JET OF 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, S. D.; Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the proper motions of the subparsec scale jet of the quasar 3C 279 at 15 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array shows significant accelerations in four of nine superluminal features. Analysis of these motions is combined with the analysis of flux density light curves to constrain values of Lorentz factor and viewing angle (and their derivatives) for each component. The data for each of these components are consistent with significant changes to the Lorentz factor, viewing angle, and azimuthal angle, suggesting jet bending with changes in speed. We see that for these observed components Lorentz factors are in the range {Gamma} = 10-41, viewing angles are in the range thetav = 0. Degree-Sign 1-5. Degree-Sign 0, and intrinsic (source frame) flux density is in the range, F{sub {nu},int} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Jy. Considering individual components, the Lorentz factors vary from {Gamma} = 11-16 for C1, {Gamma} = 31-41 for C5, {Gamma} = 29-41 for C6, and {Gamma} = 9-12 for C8, indicating that there is no single underlying flow speed to the jet and likely we are seeing pattern speeds from shocks in the jet. The viewing angles vary in time from 0. Degree-Sign 6 to 1. Degree-Sign 5 in the case of C1 (the least extreme example), from 0. Degree-Sign 5 to 5. Degree-Sign 0 in the case of C8, and from 0. Degree-Sign 1 to 0. Degree-Sign 9 for C5 (the last two being the most extreme examples). The intrinsic flux density varies by factors from 1.4 for C8 and 430 for C5. Theoretical analysis of the accelerations also indicates potential jet bending. In addition, for one component, C5, polarization measurements also set limits to the trajectory of the jet.

  9. The Resolved Outflow from 3C 48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 103-104 cm-3, the mass is ~6 × 106 M ⊙, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11574. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Some of the

  10. Proximal clamping levels in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Büket, S; Atay, Y; Islamoğlu, F; Yağdi, T; Posacioğlu, H; Alat, I; Cikirikçioğlu, M; Yüksel, M; Durmaz, I

    1999-01-01

    In the surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm, the single proximal cross-clamp can be placed at 3 alternative aortic levels: infrarenal, hiatal, and thoracic. We performed this retrospective study to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 main aortic clamping locations. Eighty patients presented at our institution with abdominal aortic aneurysms from March 1993 through May 1998. Fifty of these patients had intact aneurysms and underwent elective surgery, and 30 had ruptured aneurysms that necessitated emergency surgery. Proximal aortic clamping was applied at the infrarenal level in 24 patients (22 from the intact aneurysm group, 2 from the ruptured group), at the hiatal level in 34 patients (22 intact, 12 ruptured), and at the thoracic level (descending aorta) via a limited left lateral thoracotomy in 22 patients (6 intact, 16 ruptured). Early mortality rates (within 30 days) were 4% (2 of 50 patients) among patients with intact aneurysms and 40% (12 of 30 patients) among those with ruptured aneurysms. In the 2 patients from the intact aneurysm group, proximal aortic clamps were applied at the hiatal level. In the ruptured aneurysm group, proximal aortic clamps were placed at the thoracic level in 10 patients, the infrarenal level in 1, and the hiatal level in 1. According to our study, the clinical status of the patient and the degree of operative urgency--as determined by the extent of the aneurysm--generally dictate the proximal clamp location. Patients who present with aneurysmal rupture or hypovolemic shock benefit from thoracic clamping, because it restores the blood pressure and allows time to replace the volume deficit. Infrarenal placement is advantageous in patients with intact aneurysms if there is sufficient space for the clamp between the renal arteries and the aortic aneurysm. In patients with juxtarenal aneurysms, hiatal clamping enables safe and easy anastomosis to the healthy aorta. Clamping at this level also helps prevent

  11. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Bobby E.; Cromwell, Brian K.; Pender, Charles W.; Shepherd, Seth D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements (2-15 microns) that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps retrieved from the LDEF spacecraft. These clamps were used for maintaining the experiments in place and were located at various locations about the spacecraft. Changes in reflectance of the tray clamps at these locations were compared with atomic oxygen fluxes at the same locations. A decrease in absorption band depth was seen for the surfaces exposed to space indicating that there was some surface layer erosion. In all of the surfaces measured, little evidence of contamination was observed and none of the samples showed evidence of the brown nicotine stain that was so prominent in other experiments. Total emissivity values were calculated for both exposed and unexposed tray clamp surfaces. Only small differences, usually less than 1 percent, were observed. The spectral reflectances were measured using a hemi-ellipsoidal mirror reflectometer matched with an interferometer spectrometer. The rapid scanning capability of the interferometer allowed the reflectance measurements to be made in a timely fashion. The ellipsoidal mirror has its two foci separated by 2 inches and located on the major axis. A blackbody source was located at one focus while the tray clamp samples were located at the conjugate focus. The blackbody radiation was modulated and then focused by the ellipsoid onto the tray clamps. Radiation reflected from the tray clamp was sampled by the interferometer by viewing through a hole in the ellipsoid. A gold mirror (reflectance approximately 98 percent) was used as the reference surface.

  12. Measuring beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in youth: Does the hyperglycemic clamp suffice?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity, disposition index (DI), calculated from two clamps (2cDI, insulin sensitivity from the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and first-phase insulin from the hyperglycemic clamp) with the DI calculated from the hyperglycemic clamp alone (hcD...

  13. Dynamic Clamp in Cardiac and Neuronal Systems Using RTXI

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Francis A.; Butera, Robert J.; Christini, David J.; White, John A.; Dorval, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    The injection of computer-simulated conductances through the dynamic clamp technique has allowed researchers to probe the intercellular and intracellular dynamics of cardiac and neuronal systems with great precision. By coupling computational models to biological systems, dynamic clamp has become a proven tool in electrophysiology with many applications, such as generating hybrid networks in neurons or simulating channelopathies in cardiomyocytes. While its applications are broad, the approach is straightforward: synthesizing traditional patch clamp, computational modeling, and closed-loop feedback control to simulate a cellular conductance. Here, we present two example applications: artificial blocking of the inward rectifier potassium current in a cardiomyocyte and coupling of a biological neuron to a virtual neuron through a virtual synapse. The design and implementation of the necessary software to administer these dynamic clamp experiments can be difficult. In this chapter, we provide an overview of designing and implementing a dynamic clamp experiment using the Real-Time eXperiment Interface (RTXI), an open- source software system tailored for real-time biological experiments. We present two ways to achieve this using RTXI’s modular format, through the creation of a custom user-made module and through existing modules found in RTXI’s online library. PMID:25023319

  14. Axon voltage-clamp simulations. I. Methods and tests.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J W; Ramón, F; Joyner, R W

    1975-01-01

    This is the first in a series of four papers in which we present the numerical simulation of the application of the voltage clamp technique to excitable cells. In this paper we describe the application of the Crank-Nicolson (1947) method for the solution of the parabolic partial differential equations that describe a cylindrical cell in which the ionic conductances are functions of voltage and time (Hodgkin and Huxley, 1952). This method is compared with other methods in terms of accuracy and speed of solution for a propagated action potential. In addition, differential equations representing a simple voltage-clamp electronic circuit are presented. Using the voltage clamp circuit equations, we simulate the voltage clamp of a single isopotential membrane patch and show how the parameters of the circuit affect the transient response of the patch to a step change in the control potential.The stimulation methods presented in this series of papers allow the evaluation of voltage clamp control of an excitable cell or a syncytium of excitable cells. To the extent that membrane parameters and geometrical factors can be determined, the methods presented here provide solutions for the voltage profile as a function of time. PMID:1174640

  15. A novel method for patch-clamp automation.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, D; Merrill, T; Iwanow, A; Dunlop, J; Bowlby, M

    2006-05-01

    An increasing demand of the pharmaceutical industry for automated electrophysiological stations for ion channel drug discovery has recently resulted in the development of several commercial platforms for secondary and safety screening of ion channel modulators. These commercial systems have demonstrated an enhanced throughput, however, often at the expense of some quality-sensitive aspects of traditional patch-clamp recordings. To improve data quality and content, we have developed a patch-clamp robot that fully automates manual patch-clamp recordings, including patch pipette handling, gigaseal formation, obtaining whole-cell or perforated-cell configuration, drug application, and data acquisition. Utilization of glass micropipettes results in high-quality electrophysiological recordings with an overall success rate of about 30% in perforated-cell mode. A fast drug application system with low volume requirements (1-1.5 ml) allows the study of ligand-gated ion channels on a millisecond scale. As proof-of-concept, we present two assays developed for voltage-gated human ether-a-go-go-related and ligand-gated alpha(7) nicotinic receptor ion channels. The system throughput was a single concentration-response curve every 30-40 min or 12-17 6-point concentration-response curves daily, representing a significant improvement of typical manual patch-clamp throughput. This system represents an efficient method for patch-clamp automation without the need for a complex and expensive electrophysiological set-up for cell visualization.

  16. Automated ion channel screening: patch clamping made easy.

    PubMed

    Farre, Cecilia; Stoelzle, Sonja; Haarmann, Claudia; George, Michael; Brüggemann, Andrea; Fertig, Niels

    2007-04-01

    Efficient high resolution techniques are required for screening efforts and research targeting ion channels. The conventional patch clamp technique, a high resolution but low efficiency technique, has been established for 25 years. Recent advances have opened up new possibilities for automated patch clamping. This new technology meets the need of drug developers for higher throughput and facilitates new experimental approaches in ion channel research. Specifically, Nanion's electrophysiology workstations, the Port-a-Patch and the Patchliner, have been successfully introduced as high-quality automated patch clamp platforms for industry as well as academic users. Both platforms give high quality patch clamp recordings, capable of true giga-seals and stable recordings, accessible to the user without the need for years of practical training. They also offer sophisticated experimental possibilities, such as accurate and fast ligand application, temperature control and internal solution exchange. This article describes the chip-based patch clamp technology and its usefulness in ion channel drug screening and academic research.

  17. [Delayed cord clamping in the interest of the newborn child].

    PubMed

    Scherjon, S A; Smit, Y

    2008-06-21

    The importance of delayed cord clamping, both for the preterm and for the term newborn, for the prevention ofneonatal anaemia (during the neonatal period and/or at the age of3 months) and furthermore to reduce the need of blood transfusions, has recently been demonstrated in controlled clinical studies and meta-analyses. Physiological and pathophysiological factors also provide a rationale for delayed cord clamping: neonatal blood volume may increase by 32% if cord clamping is delayed until the umbilical cord has completely stopped pulsating. A slow transition, involving closure of the ductus arteriosus and the foramen ovale cordis and gradual filling of the neonatal systemic circulation, contributes to the opening of the alveoli due to perfusion of the alveolar capillaries. No disadvantages, such as polycythaemia or hyperbilirubinaemia, have been described with regard to preterm neonates, whereas the incidence of intracranial haemorrhages is reduced. Also for the mother, no disadvantages of late clamping have been determined. As a standard procedure, the baby's umbilical cord should not be clamped until at least 3 minutes have passed. One should wait at least 30 seconds during the birth of children for whom a more active approach is necessary. Of all people, these children will benefit from a good Hb level.

  18. 30 CFR 250.1158 - How do I receive approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons? 250.1158 Section 250.1158 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... downhole commingle hydrocarbons? (a) Before you perforate a well, you must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor to commingle hydrocarbons produced from multiple reservoirs within...

  19. 30 CFR 250.1158 - How do I receive approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons? 250.1158 Section 250.1158 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... downhole commingle hydrocarbons? (a) Before you perforate a well, you must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor to commingle hydrocarbons produced from multiple reservoirs within...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1158 - How do I receive approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons? 250.1158 Section 250.1158 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... downhole commingle hydrocarbons? (a) Before you perforate a well, you must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor to commingle hydrocarbons produced from multiple reservoirs within...

  1. 30 CFR 250.1158 - How do I receive approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons? 250.1158 Section 250.1158 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... approval to downhole commingle hydrocarbons? (a) Before you perforate a well, you must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor to commingle hydrocarbons produced from multiple reservoirs within...

  2. Downhole geothermal well sensors comprising a hydrogen-resistant optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-02-08

    A new class of optical fiber based thermal sensors has been invented. The new sensors comprise hydrogen-resistant optical fibers which are able to withstand a hot, hydrogen-containing environment as is often found in the downhole well environment.

  3. Hysteresis modeling of clamp band joint with macro-slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhaoye; Cui, Delin; Yan, Shaoze; Chu, Fulei

    2016-01-01

    Clamp band joints are commonly used to connect spacecrafts with launch vehicles. Due to the frictional slippage between the joint components, hysteresis behavior might occur at joint interfaces under cyclic loading. The joint hysteresis will bring friction damping into the launching systems. In this paper, a closed-form hysteresis model for the clamp band joint is developed based on theoretical and numerical analyses of the interactions of the joint components. Then, the hysteresis model is applied to investigating the dynamic response of a payload fastened by the clamp band joint, where the nonlinearity and friction damping effects of the joint is evaluated. The proposed analytical model, which is validated by both finite element analyses and quasi-static experiments, has a simple form with sound accuracy and can be incorporated into the dynamic models of launching systems conveniently.

  4. Umbilical cord clamping. An analysis of a usual neonatological conduct.

    PubMed

    Papagno, L

    1998-01-01

    Here we described a critical analysis of the neonatological procedure of early cord clamping, meaning this, within 40 seconds after birth. Fifty three cases are here analysed, in which this practice was not performed, but instead a late umbilical cord clamping was done after birth or after the cord had stopped beating. Variations in hematocrito values within 24 to 36 hours after birth were studied. A transitory polycithemia, with a maximum peak 12 hours post-delivery was observed. These values returned to normal levels between 24 and 36 hours after birth. K vitamin was not administered to any of the newborns. No pathology appeared related to this transitory polycithemia. In can be concluded that the late umbilical cord clamping represents no risk to the new-born and that the pathological phenomena described under these circumstances may be attributed to the increase in K vitamin dependent coagulation factors that are induced by the routinary administration of phitonadione to all normal newborns.

  5. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-03-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the impact of downhole vibration stimulation on oil production rates in a mature waterflood field. Oil & Gas Consultants International, Inc. (OGCI) will manage the project in close cooperation with the Osage Tribe as the tests will be conducted in Osage County, Oklahoma, the mineral estate of the Osage Tribe. The field is owned and operated by Calumet Oil Company. Phillips Petroleum Company will contribute their proprietary vibration core analysis of cores recovered from the pilot test area. To achieve the project objectives, the work has been divided into nine tasks, some are concurrent, while other tasks rely on completion of previous steps. The operator, Calumet Oil Company operates several field in Osage County Oklahoma. The North Burbank Unit will be the site of the test. The team will then determine where within the field to optimally locate the vibration test well. With the location determined, the test well will be drilled, cored, logged and 7-inch production casing run and cemented. In a parallel effort, OGCI will be designing, building, and testing a new version of the downhole vibration tool based on their patented and field proven whirling orbital vibrator. With the field test tool built to run in 7-inch casing. Reliability testing of the downhole tool and surface power source will be conducted in nearby field operated by Calumet Oil Company. After the core is recovered, Phillips Petroleum Company will be conducting laboratory tests utilizing their proprietary sonic core apparatus to determine fluid flow response to a range of vibration frequencies. These results, in turn, will allow final adjustments to the frequency generation mechanisms of the downhole vibration tool. One or more offset wells, near to the vibration test well, will be equipped with downhole geophones and or hydro-phones to determine the strength of signal and if the producing formation has a characteristic resonant frequency response

  6. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  7. Glycine decarboxylase in C3, C4 and C3-C4 intermediate species.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Stefanie; Westhoff, Peter; Gowik, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) plays a central role in photorespiration. GDC is localized in the mitochondria and together with serine hydroxymethyltransferase it converts two molecules of glycine to one molecule of serine, CO2 and NH3. Overexpression of GDC subunits in the C3 species Arabidopsis thaliana can increase the metabolic flux through the photorespiratory pathway leading to enhanced photosynthetic efficiency and consequently to an enhanced biomass production of the transgenic plants. Changing the spatial expression patterns of GDC subunits was an important step during the evolution of C3-C4 intermediate and likely also C4 plants. Restriction of the GDC activity to the bundle sheath cells led to the establishment of a photorespiratory CO2 pump. PMID:27038285

  8. On the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c classification.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina

    2012-10-01

    As there are ambiguities in classification of the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c, relatively frequent in populations of Northern Asia, we analyzed all three haplogroup-defining markers M48, M77 and M86 in C3-M217-individuals from Siberia, Eastern Asia and Eastern Europe. We have found that haplogroup C3c is characterized by the derived state at M48, whereas mutations at both M77 and M86 define subhaplogroup C3c1. The branch defined by M48 alone would belong to subhaplogroup C3c*, characteristic for some populations of Central and Eastern Siberia, such as Koryaks, Evens, Evenks and Yukaghirs. Subhaplogroup C3c* individuals could be considered as remnants of the Neolithic population of Siberia, based on the age of C3c*-short tandem repeat variation amounting to 4.5 ± 2.4 thousand years. PMID:22810113

  9. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation.

  10. A band clamp with a spring toggle lever

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, M.

    1974-01-01

    Clamp could have several applications, as it provides tolerance for both expansion and contraction. It might be useful with firemen's breathing apparatus and luggage racks and other freight-carrying equipment. Also, using same piece as handle and spring reduces production costs by reducing number of parts.

  11. Stability of simply supported and clamped elliptical plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. V.; Rao, B. N.; Prasad, K. L.

    1992-12-01

    Formulas are developed for estimating the elastic stability of an elliptical plate under compressive forces uniformly distributed around the edge of the plate. Then, a Cartesian coordinate system is used to perform the stability analysis of simply supported and clamped elliptical plates by following the Rayleigh-Ritz technique with a three-term deflection function.

  12. Free vibration of simply supported and clamped elliptical plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. L.; Rao, A. V.; Rao, B. N.

    1992-10-01

    An approximate formulation of a simply supported and clamped elliptical plate is described which is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz technique with a three-term deflection function. A comparison of the fundamental frequency parameters for the case under consideration is presented.

  13. Management of Senile Ptosis with Levator Muscle Resection Using the Putterman Clamp

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Putterman clamp, a muscle clamp, is commonly used in conjunctival müllerectomies. We report 3 cases of senile ptosis repaired with levator muscle resection using the Putterman clamp. The redundant levator aponeurosis was removed with electrocautery after clamping with the Putterman clamp. The levator muscle was refixed to the tarsus with three 4-0 Vicryl stitches after adjusting the height of the eyelid fissure. No intraoperative difficulties were encountered. Ecchymosis and edema were limited in the immediate postoperative period. No complications were noted during the follow-up. The benefits of using the Putterman clamp in levator muscle resection are illustrated in these cases. PMID:27482474

  14. Clamped-filament elongation model for actin-based motors.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Richard B; Purich, Daniel L

    2002-01-01

    Although actin-based motility drives cell crawling and intracellular locomotion of organelles and certain pathogens, the underlying mechanism of force generation remains a mystery. Recent experiments demonstrated that Listeria exhibit episodes of 5.4-nm stepwise motion corresponding to the periodicity of the actin filament subunits, and extremely small positional fluctuations during the intermittent pauses [S. C. Kuo and J. L. McGrath. 2000. Nature. 407:1026-1029]. These findings suggest that motile bacteria remain firmly bound to actin filament ends as they elongate, a behavior that appears to rule out previous models for actin-based motility. We propose and analyze a new mechanochemical model (called the "Lock, Load & Fire" mechanism) for force generation by means of affinity-modulated, clamped-filament elongation. During the locking step, the filament's terminal ATP-containing subunit binds tightly to a clamp situated on the surface of a motile object; in the loading step, actin.ATP monomer(s) bind to the filament end, an event that triggers the firing step, wherein ATP hydrolysis on the clamped subunit attenuates the filament's affinity for the clamp. This last step initiates translocation of the new ATP-containing terminus to the clamp, whereupon another cycle begins anew. This model explains how surface-tethered filaments can grow while exerting flexural or tensile force on the motile surface. Moreover, stochastic simulations of the model reproduce the signature motions of Listeria. This elongation motor, which we term actoclampin, exploits actin's intrinsic ATPase activity to provide a simple, high-fidelity enzymatic reaction cycle for force production that does not require elongating filaments to dissociate from the motile surface. This mechanism may operate whenever actin polymerization is called upon to generate the forces that drive cell crawling or intracellular organelle motility. PMID:11806905

  15. Downhole well log and core montages from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.; Lewis, R.E.; Winters, W.J.; Lee, M.W.; Rose, K.K.; Boswell, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well was an integral part of an ongoing project to determine the future energy resource potential of gas hydrates on the Alaska North Slope. As part of this effort, the Mount Elbert well included an advanced downhole geophysical logging program. Because gas hydrate is unstable at ground surface pressure and temperature conditions, a major emphasis was placed on the downhole-logging program to determine the occurrence of gas hydrates and the in-situ physical properties of the sediments. In support of this effort, well-log and core data montages have been compiled which include downhole log and core-data obtained from the gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in the Mount Elbert well. Also shown are numerous reservoir parameters, including gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity log traces calculated from available downhole well log and core data. ?? 2010.

  16. Vibration control of a flexible clamped-clamped plate based on an improved FULMS algorithm and laser displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lingbo; Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Xian-min

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a novel active resonant vibration control experiment of a flexible clamped-clamped plate using an improved filtered-U least mean square (FULMS) algorithm and laser displacement measurement. Different from the widely used PZT sensors or acceleration transducers, the vibration of the flexible clamped-clamped plate is measured by a non-contact laser displacement measurement sensor with higher measurement accuracy and without additional load to the plate. The conventional FULMS algorithm often uses fixed step size and needs reference signal related to the external disturbance signal. However, the fixed step size method cannot obtain a fast convergence speed and it will result in a low residual error. Thus, a variable step size method is investigated. In addition, it is difficult to extract reference signal related to the vibration source directly in the practical application. Therefore, it is practically useful that a reference signal is constructed by both the controller parameters and the vibration residual signal. The experimental results demonstrate that the improved FULMS algorithm has better vibration control effect than the proportional derivative (PD) feedback control algorithm and the fixed step-size control algorithm.

  17. Timing of umbilical cord clamping: effect on iron endowment of the newborn and later iron status.

    PubMed

    Chaparro, Camila M

    2011-11-01

    The optimal timing of umbilical cord clamping has been debated in the scientific literature for at least the last century, when cord clamping practices shifted from delayed towards immediate clamping. Recent research provides evidence for the beneficial effect of delayed cord clamping on infant iron status. The present review describes the physiological basis for the impact of cord clamping time on total body iron at birth and the relationship between birth body iron, as affected by cord clamping time, and iron status later in infancy. This research is discussed in the context of current clamping practices, which tend towards early cord clamping in most settings, as well as the high levels of anemia present in young infants in many countries worldwide.

  18. Simulation analysis of the oil/water structure in the downhole with presence of hydrocyclone separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, I. E.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    The maturing oil fields with increasing water production can pose a challenge in terms of produced water handling and disposal issues. This paper presents the modelling and simulation procedure of the two-phase flow of water/oil in a downhole using ANSYS- FLUENT 14 software. The developed procedure successfully simulated the production zone and the interaction of the two fluids in a natural environment where the reservoir pressure is the sole driving force. The results show significant difference of volume distribution in the flows with different oil content. The model can become an essential tool to assist in prediction of the behavior of oil/water mixture flow in the wellbores, and to serve in designing downhole oil/water separators.

  19. Biased insert for installing data transmission components in downhole drilling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Briscoe, Michael A.; Garner, Kory K.; Wilde, Tyson J.

    2007-04-10

    An apparatus for installing data transmission hardware in downhole tools includes an insert insertable into the box end or pin end of drill tool, such as a section of drill pipe. The insert typically includes a mount portion and a slide portion. A data transmission element is mounted in the slide portion of the insert. A biasing element is installed between the mount portion and the slide portion and is configured to create a bias between the slide portion and the mount portion. This biasing element is configured to compensate for varying tolerances encountered in different types of downhole tools. In selected embodiments, the biasing element is an elastomeric material, a spring, compressed gas, or a combination thereof.

  20. High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Matthew; Hazelton, Craig; Kano, Kimi

    2010-12-31

    The development of highly reliable downhole equipment is an essential element in enabling the widespread utilization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The downhole equipment used in these systems will be required to operate at high voltages and temperatures on the order of 200 to 250°C (and eventually to 300°C). These conditions exceed the practical operating ranges of currently available thermoplastic wire insulations, and thus limit the operating lifetime of tools such as Electric Submersible Pumps (ESPs). In this work, high-temperature insulations based on composite materials were developed and demonstrated. The products of this work were found to exhibit electrical resistivities and dielectric breakdown strengths that PEEK at temperatures above 250C. In addition, sub-scale motor windings were fabricated and tested to validate the performance of this technology

  1. Tracking CO2 Geosequestration Using Downhole Gravity Gradiometry, Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S.; O'Neill, C.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration is a vital technique for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and anthropogenic global warming. The viability of CO2 geosequestration, and the ability to prevent any leakage or migration depends on the capacity to monitor, and model, the CO2 reservoir. Downhole gravity gradiometry offers an additional capability to CO2 monitoring, and here we demonstrate the downhole gradient effect of CO2 injection at the Otway Basin, Victoria, by the CO2CRC corporation. Data from reservoir modelling has been simulated to calculate gravity gradients to gain an understanding of the behaviour of CO2 once injected into geological storage. Monte Carlo simulations were utilised to determine the uncertainties inherent in the deep subsurface. Presently; models have been created to demonstrate the response caused by the injection of CO2, and we present a statistical analysis to constrain the uncertainties posed by the results.

  2. An Internal Coaxial Cable Electrical Connector For Use In Downhole Tools

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael

    2005-11-29

    A coaxial cable electrical connector more specifically an internal coaxial cable connector placed within a coaxial cable and its constituent components. A coaxial cable connector is in electrical communcation with an inductive transformer and a coaxial cable. The connector is in electrical communication with the outer housing of the inductive transfonner. A generally coaxial center conductor, a portion of which could be the coil in the inductive transformer, passes through the connector, is electrically insulated from the connector, and is in electrical communication with the conductive care of the coaxial cable. A plurality of bulbous pliant tabs on the coaxial cable connector mechanically engage the inside diameter of the coaxial cable thus grounding the transformer to the coaxial cable. The coaxial cable and inductive transformer are disposed within downhole tools to transmit electrical signals between downhole tools within a drill string.

  3. Linear and radial flow targets for characterizing downhole flow in perforations

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M. ); Tariq, S.M. ); Halleck, P.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Two types of sandstone targets are commonly used to test flow efficiency of shaped-charge jet perforations: linear targets, in which flow enters only the unperforated end of the cylindrical sample, and radial targets, in which flow enters through the end and sides of the sample. To determine which of these targets best represents downhole conditions, the flow distribution along the length of a perforation has been studied by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element analyses. Linear and radial laboratory targets have been compared with downhole perforations under varying conditions. For ideal perforations, the low-shot-density (LSD) case is adequately represented by the radial target, while the high-shot-density (HSD) case falls between the two targets. With realistic crushed and damaged zones, the HSD closely matches the linear target, and the LSD case falls between the two targets.

  4. Why Are C3-C4 Intermediate Species Rare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Field, C. B.; Berry, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    While C3-C4 intermediate photosynthesis is thought to represent the evolutionary bridge between C3 and C4 photosynthesis, C3-C4 intermediate species are ecologically rare in comparison to both C3 and C4 species. Here, we report results from a laboratory experiment, field observations, and model simulations that suggest a new explanation for the ecological rarity of C3-C4 intermediate species. In the laboratory experiment, we combined gas exchange and fluorescence to characterize the temperature response of photosynthesis in three closely-related species in the genus Flaveria that are representatives of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways. The leaf temperature that maximized the quantum yield for CO2 assimilation (Topt(ΦCO2)) was 24.9 ± 0.7°C in Flaveria robusta (C3), 29.8 ± 1.0°C in F. chloraefolia (C3-C4), and 35.7 ± 0.8°C in F. bidentis (C4), and was linearly related to the temperature sensitivity of the coupling between CO2 assimilation and electron transport (d(ΦCO2/ ΦPSII)/dT)). While F. chloraefolia does not simultaneously occur with F. robusta and F. bidentis in naturally-assembled communities, this C3-C4 intermediate species does occur with other C3 and C4 species. During the growing season in two of these mixed-photosynthetic-type communities, leaf temperatures for F. chloraefolia were similar to the Topt(ΦCO2) determined in the laboratory. A model of maximum potential carbon gain suggests that competitive coexistence of C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species could be dependent on a temperature regime that highlights the distinct relative advantages of the C3-C4 intermediate pathway. In combination, these results suggest that the relative temperature sensitivity of the C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 photosynthetic pathways combined with environmental variation in temperature may help to explain why C3-C4 intermediate species are generally rare.

  5. Fluid flow monitoring in oilfields using downhole measurements of electrokinetic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. D.; Saunders, J. H.; Pain, C. C.

    2006-12-01

    Permanently installed downhole sensors are increasingly being deployed to provide `real-time' reservoir data during hydrocarbon production, which helps to reduce uncertainty in the reservoir description and contributes to reservoir management decisions. Where wells are equipped with inflow control valves (so called `intelligent' wells), it is possible to develop a feedback loop between measurement and control to optimize production. We suggest that measurements of electrokinetic potential during production, using permanently installed downhole electrodes, could be used to detect water encroachment towards an intelligent oil well. Downhole electrodes mounted at the production well on the outside of insulated casing, have been successfully applied in subsurface resistivity surveys during oil production. Similar technology could be used to measure electrokinetic potential. Moreover, recent and ongoing work has changed our understanding of electrokinetic coupling under two-phase conditions. We present the results of numerical simulations of fluid movement during hydrocarbon production, using a new formulation which captures both the changing fluid distributions and the resulting electrical potentials. We suggest that encroaching water causes changes in electrokinetic potential at the production well which could be resolved above background electrical noise; indeed, changes in water saturation could be detected several 10's to 100's of metres away from the well. This contrasts with most other downhole monitoring techniques, which sample only the region immediately adjacent to the wellbore. Signal resolution is improved if the water has a relatively low salinity, and the pressure gradient into the well is large. However, significant uncertainties remain concerning the nature of electrokinetic coupling during the flow of oil and water, particularly in mixed and oil-wet reservoirs.

  6. Downhole steam generator using low-pressure fuel and air supply

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.L.

    1981-01-07

    For tertiary oil recovery, an apparatus for downhole steam generation is designed in which water is not injected directly onto the flame in the combustor, the combustion process is isolated from the reservoir pressure, the fuel and oxidant are supplied to the combustor at relatively low pressures, and the hot exhaust gases is prevented from entering the earth formation but is used to preheat the fuel and oxidant and water. The combustion process is isolated from the steam generation process. (DLC)

  7. Applications of a downhole programmable microprocessor for a geothermal borehole inspection tool

    SciTech Connect

    Jermance, R.L.; Moore, T.K.; Archuleta, J.; Hinz, K.

    1987-01-01

    The high-temperature scanning borehole inspection system is currently being developed jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Westfalische Berggewerkschaftskasse (WBK) of West Germany. The downhole instrument is a digital televiewer that utilized a microprocessor to digitize, process and transmit the acoustic information to the surface acquisition and control system. The primary operation of the downhole acoustic assembly uses a piezoelectric crystal acting as a receiver-transmitter which is mounted on the rotating head. The crystal emits a burst of acoustic energy that propagates through the borehole fluid with a portion of the energy reflected by the borehole wall back to the crystal. The time of travel and the amplitude of the reflected signal are conditioned by the microprocessor and transmitted along with other pertinent data to the surface data processing center. This instrument has been designed specifically for use in geothermal borehole environments to determine the location of fractures intersecting the borehole and provide information concerning overall borehole conditions. It may also be used for definitive casing inspection. The instrument essentially eliminates operator interaction for downhole control and simplifies assembly and maintenance procedures.

  8. An Internal Coaxial Cable Electrical Connector For Use In Downhole Tools

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael

    2005-09-20

    A seal for a coaxial cable electrical connector more specifically an internal seal for a coaxial cable connector placed within a coaxial cable and its constituent components. A coaxial cable connector is in electrical communcation with an inductive transformer and a coaxial cable. The connector is in electrical communication with the outer housing of the inductive transformer. A generally coaxial center conductor, a portion of which could be the coil in the inductive transformer, passes through the connector, is electrically insulated from the connector, and is in electrical communication with the conductive core of the coaxial cable. The electrically insulating material also doubles as a seal to safegaurd against penetration of fluid, thus protecting against shorting out of the electrical connection. The seal is a multi-component seal, which is pre-compressed to a desired pressure rating. The coaxial cable and inductive transformer are disposed within downhole tools to transmit electrical signals between downhole tools within a drill string. The internal coaxial cable connector and its attendant seal can be used in a plurality of downhole tools, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars.

  9. DNA Sliding Clamps: Just the Right Twist to Load onto DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Barsky, D; Venclovas, C

    2005-10-24

    Two recent papers illuminate a long sought step in DNA sliding clamp loading. One paper reveals the structure of the PCNA clamp wrapped around DNA--still open from being loaded--while a second paper discovers that the clamp may assist this process by forming a right-handed helix upon opening.

  10. Voltage-Clamp Studies on Uterine Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nels C.

    1969-01-01

    These studies have developed and tested an experimental approach to the study of membrane ionic conductance mechanisms in strips of uterine smooth muscle. The experimental and theoretical basis for applying the double sucrose-gap technique is described along with the limitations of this system. Nonpropagating membrane action potentials were produced in response to depolarizing current pulses under current-clamp conditions. The stepwise change of membrane potential under voltage-clamp conditions resulted in a family of ionic currents with voltage- and time-dependent characteristics. In sodium-free solution the peak transient current decreased and its equilibrium potential shifted along the voltage axis toward a more negative internal potential. These studies indicate a sodium-dependent, regenerative excitation mechanism. PMID:5796366

  11. Patch-clamp experiments under micro-gravity.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Klaus; Hanke, Wolfgang

    2002-07-01

    For human based space research it is of high importance to understand the influence of gravity on the properties of single ion channels in biological membranes, as these are involved in about all biological processes. The patch clamp technique is the best established method to investigate electrophysiological properties of single ion channels in detail. Consequently, a patch clamp set-up was designed for the drop tower in Bremen, Germany. Using this set-up among others, successfully leech neurons have been patched under micro-gravity, delivering data about ion channel behaviour, which were compared to results from bilayer experiments in the drop tower and to results from lab controls under 1 g and under higher gravity.

  12. Patch Clamp Experiments under Conditions of Variable Graviy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, F. P. M.; Meissner, K.

    2013-02-01

    The cellular membrane is an intrinsic part of any cell. It has a complex composition of lipid molecules and proteins. The membrane is, among others, involved in excitation and signal transduction. Ion channels, as integral membrane proteins, play an important role. For the question of gravity sensitivity of biological systems, especially neuronal cells, ion channels are of high interest. Gravity might directly interact with the ion channel protein or it might change the thermodynamic membrane parameters, influencing the incorporated proteins indirectly. Detailed information about the effects of gravity on the function of single ion-channels can up to now only be acquired by electrophysiological approaches like the patch clamp technique. Today this technique is the preferentially used technique for single ion-channel studies. Consequently, experiments have been developed in recent years to investigate the interaction of gravity with single ion channel molecules utilizing the patch-clamp technology on different macro- and micro-gravity platforms.

  13. From Galvani to patch clamp: the development of electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Krishtal, O A; Petersen, Ole H

    2006-12-01

    The development of electrophysiology is traced from the early beginnings represented by the work of the Dutch microscopist, Jan Swammerdam, in the 17th century through the first notion of an aqueous transmembrane pore as a substrate of excitability made by Luigi Galvani in late 18th century to the invention late in the 20th century of the patch-clamp technique by Erwin Neher and Bert Sakmann.

  14. Mir environmental effects payload handrail clamp/pointing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Stephen J.

    1996-01-01

    The Mir Environmental Effects Payload (MEEP) consists of four International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) Risk mitigation experiments to be transported and deployed in a common carrier. This carrier is to be transported to the Mir Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle and deployed during a US Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on the handrails of the Mir Docking Module (DM). This paper describes the design of the handrail clamp/ pointing device used by the astronauts to attach the carrier to the station.

  15. From Galvani to patch clamp: the development of electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Krishtal, O A; Petersen, Ole H

    2006-12-01

    The development of electrophysiology is traced from the early beginnings represented by the work of the Dutch microscopist, Jan Swammerdam, in the 17th century through the first notion of an aqueous transmembrane pore as a substrate of excitability made by Luigi Galvani in late 18th century to the invention late in the 20th century of the patch-clamp technique by Erwin Neher and Bert Sakmann. PMID:17072639

  16. Force-clamp laser trapping of rapidly interacting molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Monico, Carina; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-06-01

    Forces play a fundamental role in a wide array of biological processes, regulating enzymatic activity, kinetics of molecular bonds, and molecular motors mechanics. Single molecule force spectroscopy techniques have enabled the investigation of such processes, but they are inadequate to probe short-lived (millisecond and sub-millisecond) molecular complexes. We developed an ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy technique that uses a dual trap configuration to apply constant loads to a single intermittently interacting biological polymer and a binding protein. Our system displays a delay of only ˜10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. The force-clamp configuration in which our assay operates allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds. Moreover, conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors can be recorded with sub-nanometer accuracy and few tens of microseconds of temporal resolution. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  17. Umbilical cord clamping. An analysis of a usual neonatological conduct.

    PubMed

    Papagno, L

    1998-01-01

    Here we described a critical analysis of the neonatological procedure of early cord clamping, meaning this, within 40 seconds after birth. Fifty three cases are here analysed, in which this practice was not performed, but instead a late umbilical cord clamping was done after birth or after the cord had stopped beating. Variations in hematocrito values within 24 to 36 hours after birth were studied. A transitory polycithemia, with a maximum peak 12 hours post-delivery was observed. These values returned to normal levels between 24 and 36 hours after birth. K vitamin was not administered to any of the newborns. No pathology appeared related to this transitory polycithemia. In can be concluded that the late umbilical cord clamping represents no risk to the new-born and that the pathological phenomena described under these circumstances may be attributed to the increase in K vitamin dependent coagulation factors that are induced by the routinary administration of phitonadione to all normal newborns. PMID:9914812

  18. Cleaning patch-clamp pipettes for immediate reuse

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, I.; Stoy, W. A.; Rousseau, E. B.; Moody, O. A.; Jenkins, A.; Forest, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Patch-clamp recording has enabled single-cell electrical, morphological and genetic studies at unparalleled resolution. Yet it remains a laborious and low-throughput technique, making it largely impractical for large-scale measurements such as cell type and connectivity characterization of neurons in the brain. Specifically, the technique is critically limited by the ubiquitous practice of manually replacing patch-clamp pipettes after each recording. To circumvent this limitation, we developed a simple, fast, and automated method for cleaning glass pipette electrodes that enables their reuse within one minute. By immersing pipette tips into Alconox, a commercially-available detergent, followed by rinsing, we were able to reuse pipettes 10 times with no degradation in signal fidelity, in experimental preparations ranging from human embryonic kidney cells to neurons in culture, slices, and in vivo. Undetectable trace amounts of Alconox remaining in the pipette after cleaning did not affect ion channel pharmacology. We demonstrate the utility of pipette cleaning by developing the first robot to perform sequential patch-clamp recordings in cell culture and in vivo without a human operator. PMID:27725751

  19. Towards Large Area Growth of 3C-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliauskas, Remigijus; Liljedahl, Rickard; Syvaejaervi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositza

    2010-11-01

    In this work we have analyzed the possibility of upscaling the growth of 3C-SiC. The growth was done at different temperatures to find limiting mechanisms of the growth rate and to examine the morphology of grown layers. Coverage by 3C-SiC increases when increasing temperature, however more twins appeared. Activation energy of the growth is 130 kcal/mol--showing that growth rate limiting mechanism is sublimation of the source. We discuss the influence of large area 6H-SiC wafers on the formation of 3C-SiC, in which the change in basal plane orientation could also influence the growth of 3C-SiC.

  20. Planar silicon patch-clamp electrodes integrated with polydimethylsiloxane microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarah, John Michael

    The patch-clamp technique allows one to probe single ion channels and macroscopic ion channel activity in their native environment and resolve their activity as their physical and chemical surroundings are varied. The traditional method of patch-clamping cells involves bringing a clean, flame-polished glass pipette tip with a 1-2 mum diameter pore into contact with a cell membrane to form a high electrical resistance seal. This technique is the gold standard for cellular electrophysiology investigations because it allows the observation of single ion channel protein dynamics as well as activity from an ensemble ion channels from a single cell. Furthermore, any drug approved by federal drug agencies must be screened against particular ion channels with the patch-clamp technique. However, this technique by its nature is serial, time consuming, difficult when exchanging pipette solutions, and difficult to integrate with other technologies. These reasons have prompted several investigators to explore alternative approaches to traditional pipette patch-clamping to increase the throughput of measurements. Herein, I describe the development of a silicon-wafer based device platform that enables the measurement of ion channel activities. The electrical nature of the cell/wafer seal is characterized for several pore design variations. The majority of gigaohm seals obtained falls in the range of 10-20GO. The cell-attached and whole cell configurations are demonstrated. Whole cell ion channel activity originating from various cell fines is consistent with the more traditional micropipette patch-clamp recordings. The silicon fabrication methods developed, although novel, utilize established semiconductor technologies, making them amenable to batch fabrication techniques. I integrate these silicon devices with PDMS microfluidics with monolithic valves, allowing ultra-fast solution exchange as low as tens of milliseconds for the extracellular solution. Furthermore, I developed a

  1. Timing of umbilical cord clamping: new thoughts on an old discussion.

    PubMed

    Arca, Gemma; Botet, Francesc; Palacio, Montse; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2010-11-01

    The optimal time to clamp the umbilical cord in preterm and full-term neonates after birth continues to be a matter of debate. A review of randomised controlled trials comparing the effects of early versus late cord clamping on maternal and infant outcomes was performed to assess data in favor of immediate or delayed clamping. Although there is no conclusive evidence, delayed cord clamping seems to be beneficial in preterm and full-term neonates without compromising the initial postpartum adaptation phase or affecting the mother in the short term. However, further randomised clinical studies are needed to confirm the benefits of delayed cord clamping.

  2. Self-tuning behavior of a clamped-clamped beam with sliding proof mass for broadband energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillatsch, P.; Miller, L. M.; Halvorsen, E.; Wright, P. K.; Yeatman, E. M.; Holmes, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    Real world systems rarely vibrate at a single resonance frequency and the frequencies drift over time. Tunable devices exist, but generally need additional energy to achieve frequency adaptation. This means that the benefits in power output from this tuning need to be large enough to power the mechanism itself. Passively self-tuning systems go into resonance without requiring active control. This paper focuses on a passively self-tuning system with a proof mass that can slide freely along a clamped-clamped beam. Under external vibration, the slider moves along the beam until the system goes into resonance. A proof-of-concept design is introduced using either a copper or a steel beam and a 3D-printed ABS thermoplastic proof mass. Successful self-tuning is demonstrated in both cases. The frequencies range from 80 - 140 Hz at accelerations as low as 0.007 g rms. Results show the resonance of the beam and the position of the slider along the beam with time. Furthermore, the dynamic magnification and the proof mass position at resonance are discussed, together with the inherent non-linearities of double-clamped beam resonators. The findings support the hypothesis that the effect of the ratio between proof mass and beam mass outweighs the Duffing spring stiffening effects.

  3. Fine Structure in 3C 120 and 3C 84. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., 24 Aug. 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, L. K.

    1976-01-01

    Seven epochs of very long baseline radio interferometric observations of the Seyfert galaxies 3C 120 and 3C 84, at 3.8-cm wave length using stations at Westford, Massachusetts, Goldstone, California, Green Bank, West Virginia, and Onsala, Sweden, have been analyzed for source structure. An algorithm for reconstructing the brightness distribution of a spatially confined source from fringe amplitude and so called closure phase data has been developed and successfully applied to artificially generated test data and to data on the above mentioned sources. Over the two year time period of observation, 3C 120 was observed to consist of a double source showing apparent super relativistic expansion and separation velocities. The total flux changes comprising one outburst can be attributed to one of these components. 3C 84 showed much slower changes, evidently involving flux density changes in individual stationary components rather than relative motion.

  4. RXTE, VLBA, Optical, and Radio Monitoring of the Quasars 3C 279, PKS 1510--089, and 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Aller, M. F.; McHardy, I. M.; Balonek, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    We are continuing our combined RXTE X-ray, VLBA imaging (at 43 GHz), optical (several observatories), and radio (University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory) monitoring of the quasars 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089, and have started similar monitoring of 3C 273. X-ray flares in 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089 are associated with ejections of superluminal components. In addition, there is a close connection between the optical and X-ray variability of 3C 279. There is a strong correlation between the 14.5 GHz and X-ray variability of PKS 1510-089 in 1997 and 1998 (with the radio leading the X-ray) that becomes weaker in subsequent years. X-ray fluctuations occur on a variety of timescales in 3C 273, with a major prolonged outburst in mid-2001. The lead author will discuss the correlations in terms of inverse Compton models for the X-ray emission coupled with synchrotron models for the lower-frequency radiation. Synchrotron self-Compton models can explain the "reverse" time lag in PKS 1510-089 is well as the variable correlation between the X-ray variations and those at lower frequencies in this object and in 3C 279.

  5. Polarization-maintaining amplifier based on 3C fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enokidani, Jun; Ito, Rumi; Sakurai, Tsutomu; Shin, Sumida; Tei, Kazuyoku

    2015-03-01

    Chirally-Coupled-Core (3C) fiber structure can preserve a single mode quality and even a linear polarization for a large core size. A principal advantage of fiber laser is its compatibility with monolithic integration and robust system. But so far, devices such as a combiner using the 3C fibers have not been reported. Here we report the first demonstration of such monolithic amplifier structure which contains an active fiber and a combiner based on 3C fibers. A single-stage amplifier is seeded by an EO Q-switched micro-laser and pumped by two high power fiber pigtailed 976-nm laser diodes via an in-house fabricated (2 + 1) × 1 pump signal combiner. The active fiber is based on a 3-m-long, 3C Yb-doped fiber (33 μm/250 μm core/cladding diameter with 0.06/0.46 NA). The amplifier demonstrates scaling up to 30W average power and 150 kW peak power in 0.3mJ, 2ns pulses. The beam profiles and beam qualities were characterized as its output power was varied up to 30W. The beam profile was maintained at a high beam quality of around M2=1.2. The spectral properties of the 3C fiber were also characterized as its output peak power was varied.

  6. Hyperinsulinemic clamp modulates milk fat globule lipid composition in goats.

    PubMed

    Argov-Argaman, N; Mbogori, T; Sabastian, C; Shamay, A; Mabjeesh, S J

    2012-10-01

    We determined the effect of insulin on milk fatty acid (FA) and lipid composition in goats. Four dairy goats, 150 d in milk, were subjected to hyperinsulinemic clamp (treatment) or saline (control) infusion for 4d in a crossover design study. Composition and concentration of plasma and milk FA, triglycerides, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and cholesterol were determined. Mammary gland biopsies were taken at the end of each experimental period and lipogenic gene expression was determined. Plasma insulin was elevated 3.5-fold, whereas plasma glucose remained constant during the treatment period. Feed intake decreased by 26% and fat yield decreased by 17% relative to controls. No change in nonesterified FA concentration was found between controls and treatment. Compared with controls, insulin decreased yield of long-chain saturated FA by 14%. Milk concentration of long-chain FA was reduced by 3%, whereas that of medium-chain FA increased by 5% during the treatment compared with controls. Hyperinsulinemic clamps increased the yields of milk phospholipids by 9% and cholesterol by 16%, whereas it only tended to decrease triglyceride yields (by 11%). Hyperinsulinemic treatment resulted in compositional changes in the milk fat globule membrane, as reflected by 15 and 9% decreases in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine concentrations, respectively. Lipogenic gene expression of acyl coenzyme A carboxylase, stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase, and FA synthase did not change, whereas lipoprotein lipase gene expression tended toward an increase in the treatment period compared with controls. Hyperinsulinemic clamps reduce the availability of long-chain FA, which are considered to originate from the diet and adipose lipolysis for milk lipid synthesis by the mammary gland of goats. Under these conditions, long-chain FA might be preferentially channeled to phospholipid rather than triglyceride synthesis, hence increasing phospholipid yields. Mechanisms determining FA

  7. Nonlinear vibrations of fluid-filled clamped circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiozis, K. N.; Amabili, M.; Païdoussis, M. P.; Misra, A. K.

    2005-12-01

    In this study, the nonlinear vibrations are investigated of circular cylindrical shells, empty or fluid-filled, clamped at both ends and subjected to a radial harmonic force excitation. Two different theoretical models are developed. In the first model, the standard form of the Donnell's nonlinear shallow-shell equations is used; in the second, the equations of motion are derived by a variational approach which permits the inclusion of constraining springs at the shell extremities and taking in-plane inertial terms into account. In both cases, the solution includes both driven and companion modes, thus allowing for a travelling wave in the circumferential direction; they also include axisymmetric modes to capture the nonlinear inward shell contraction and the correct type (softening) nonlinear behaviour observed in experiments. In the first model, the clamped beam eigenfunctions are used to describe the axial variations of the shell deformation, automatically satisfying the boundary conditions, leading to a 7 degree-of-freedom (dof) expansion for the solution. In the second model, rotational springs are used at the ends of the shell, which when large enough reproduce a clamped end; the solution involves a sine series for axial variations of the shell deformation, leading to a 54 dof expansion for the solution. In both cases the modal expansions satisfy the boundary conditions and the circumferential continuity condition exactly. The Galerkin method is used to discretize the equations of motion, and AUTO to integrate the discretized equations numerically. When the shells are fluid-filled, the fluid is assumed to be incompressible and inviscid, and the fluid structure interaction is described by linear potential flow theory. The results from the two theoretical models are compared with existing experimental data, and in all cases good qualitative and quantitative agreement is observed.

  8. Normal-Pressure Tests of Circular Plates with Clamped Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, Albert E; Ramberg, Walter; Levy, Samuel

    1942-01-01

    A fixture is described for making normal-pressure tests of flat plates 5 inches in diameter in which particular care was taken to obtain rigid clamping at the edges. Results are given for 19 plates, ranging in thickness form 0.015 to 0.072 inch. The center deflections and the extreme-fiber stresses at low pressures were found to agree with theoretical values; the center deflections at high pressures were 4 to 12 percent greater than the theoretical values. Empirical curves are derived of the pressure for the beginning of the permanent set as a function of the dimensions of the plate and the tensile properties of the material.

  9. Optical variability of PHL 1811 and 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Kurtanidze, O.; Liu, Y.; Yuan, Y. H.; Hao, J. M.; Cai, W.; Xiao, H. B.; Pei, Z. Y.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we reported the optical photometry monitoring results for two brightest nearby quasars, PHL 1811 and 3C 273 using the ST-6 camera at Abastumani Observatory, Georgia. For PHL 1811, we found 3 microvariability events with time scale of ΔT = 6.0 min. For 3C273, we found that the largest variations are ΔV = 0.369 +/- 0.028 mag, ΔR = 0.495 +/- 0.076 mag, and ΔI = 0.355 +/- 0.009 mag. When periodicity analysis methods are adopted to the available data, a period of p = 5.80 +/- 1.12 years is obtained for PHL 1811, and p = 21.10 +/- 0.14, 10.00 +/- 0.14, 7.30 +/- 0.09, 13.20 +/- 0.09, 2.10 +/- 0.06, and 0.68 +/- 0.05 years are obtained for 3C 273.

  10. Energetics and structural stability of Cs3C60

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Susumu; Umemoto, Koichiro; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, MarvinL.

    2003-12-15

    Using the ab initio pseudo potential total-energy method and the density-functional theory, we study the energetics of face-centered-cubic Cs3C60 which is a material of great interest as a possible high transition-temperature superconductor. At the optimized lattice constant the volume per C60 is found to be smaller than the most stable hexagon-coordination A15 phase, while the total energy of the fcc phase is about 0.9 eV higher than the A15 phase. These results indicate that a low-temperature and high-pressure synthesis method might be a possible way to produce the fcc Cs3C60 phase. In addition, it is also found that the A15 Cs3C60 should show a phase transformation from a hexagon-coordination phase to a pentagon-coordination phase under hydrostatic pressure.

  11. Graphene/3C-SiC Hybrid Nanolaminate.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Bing; Heuser, Steffen; Huang, Nan; Fu, Haiyuan; Jiang, Xin

    2015-12-30

    In this work, we demonstrate a one-step approach to create graphene/3C-SiC nanolaminate structure using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. Layer-by-layer arrangement of thin 3C-SiC layers and graphene sheets is obtained with the thicknesses of the individual 3C-SiC layers and graphene sheets being 5-10 nm and 2-5 nm, respectively. An intimate contact between 3C-SiC and the graphene sheets is achieved and the nanolaminate film shows a high room temperature conductivity of 96.1 S/cm. A dedicated structural analysis of the nanolaminates by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals that the growth of the nanolaminates follows an iterative process: preferential graphene nucleation around the planar defects at the central region of the SiC layer, leading to the "splitting" of the SiC layer; and the thickening of the SiC layer after being "split". A growth mechanism based on both kinetics and thermodynamics is proposed. Following the proposed mechanism, it is possible to control the layer thickness of the graphene/3C-SiC hybrid nanolaminate by manipulating the carbon concentration in the gas phase, which is further experimentally verified. The high electrical conductivity, large surface area porous structure, feasible integration on different substrates (metal, Mo; semiconductor, Si and 2H-SiC; insulator, diamond) of the graphene/3C-SiC hybrid nanolaminate as well as other unprecedented advantages of the nanolaminate structure make it very promising for applications in mechanical, energy, and sensor-related areas. PMID:26650041

  12. Development of downhole instruments for use in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia developed high temperature logging instruments for use in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project. These tools - Kuster mechanical tools for measuring temperature, pressure, and flow; a temperature and pressure tool built around an electronic memory; and a timing and control unit to power a downhole sampler - were all designed for slickline operation to temperatures up to 400/sup 0/C. The drilling of the scientific well and the application of these tools in it were successful. The technology advances made in the development of these tools have been transferred to industry. These advances should prove valuable in future scientific and commercial applications.

  13. Analysis of Data from a Downhole Oil/Water Separator Field Trial in East Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, John A.; Layne, Arthur Langhus

    2001-04-19

    Downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology is available to separate oil from produced water at the bottom of an oil well. Produced water can be injected directly to a disposal formation rather than lifting it to the surface, treating it there, and reinjecting it. Because of a lack of detailed performance data on DOWS systems, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided funding to secure DOWS performance data. A large U.S. oil and gas operator offered to share its data with Argonne National Laboratory. This report summarizes data from the DOWS installation in eastern Texas.

  14. ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY WITH DOWNHOLE VIBRATION STIMULATION IN OSAGE COUNTY OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Westermark; J. Ford Brett

    2003-11-01

    This Final Report covers the entire project from July 13, 2000 to June 30, 2003. The report summarizes the details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma'' under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-00BC15191. The project was divided into nine separate tasks. This report is written in an effort to document the lessons learned during the completion of each task. Therefore each task will be discussed as the work evolved for that task throughout the duration of the project. Most of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, but certain tasks were dependent on earlier tasks being completed. During the three years of project activities, twelve quarterly technical reports were submitted for the project. Many individual topic and task specific reports were included as appendices in the quarterly reports. Ten of these reports have been included as appendices to this final report. Two technical papers, which were written and accepted by the Society of Petroleum Engineers, have also been included as appendices. The three primary goals of the project were to build a downhole vibration tool (DHVT) to be installed in seven inch casing, conduct a field test of vibration stimulation in a mature waterflooded field and evaluate the effects of the vibration on both the produced fluid characteristics and injection well performance. The field test results are as follows: In Phase I of the field test the DHVT performed exceeding well, generating strong clean signals on command and as designed. During this phase Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory had installed downhole geophones and hydrophones to monitor the signal generated by the downhole vibrator. The signals recorded were strong and clear. Phase II was planned to be ninety-day reservoir stimulation field test. This portion of the field tests was abruptly ended after one week of operations, when the DHVT became stuck in the well during a routine

  15. Program for the improvement of downhole drilling motor bearings and seals. Phase V. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeLafosse, P.H.; Tibbitts, G.A.; Black, A.D.; DiBona, B.G.

    1983-08-01

    The work done during the fifth and final phase of a program to improve downhole drilling motor bearing and seals is described. The principal activities in this phase were: (a) testing seals with abrasive-laden mud on the low-pressure side; (b) test second and third generation designs of both elastomeric chevron seals and Teflon U-seals; and (c) testing a full-scale bearing/seal package. Several operating parameters which have a radical effect on seal life were identified, and some promising designs and materials were tested.

  16. Downhole tool for use with a ball and seat traveling valve for a fluid pump

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, H.L.

    1989-07-18

    This paper describes a downhole tool for use with a ball and seat travelling valve associated with a movable plunger, having upper and lower ends, for pumping well fluids. It comprises: an upper housing; a lower housing adapted to be associated with the upper end of the plunger; and means for causing relative movement between the upper and lower housings and abutment of the upper housing against the lower housing to impart a bumping force to the plunger during the downward movement of the plunger, whereby the ball is moved from its seat to permit the passage of well fluids through the travelling valve.

  17. The linear polarization of 3C 345 in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Wolinski, Karen G.; Smith, Paul S.; Impey, C. D.; Bless, Robert C.; Nelson, M. J.; Percival, J. W.; Taylor, M. J.; Elliot, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The linear polarization of 3C 345, a superluminal radio source and OVV quasar, was observed in two bandpasses in the ultraviolet (centered at 2160 A and 2770 A) in 1993 April using the High Speed Photometer on the Hubble Space Telescope. The quasar is significantly polarized in the UV (p greater than 5%). Ground-based polarimetry was obtained 11 days later, but a difference in the position angle between the observations in the visible and those in the UV indicate that the magnitude of the polarization of 3C 345 may have changed over that time. If the two observation sets represent the same state of spectral polarization, then the large UV flux implies that either the polarization of the synchrotron continuum must stop decreasing in the UV, or that there is an additional source of polarized flux in the ultraviolet. Only if the UV observations represent a spectral polarization state with the same position angle in the visible seen previously in 3C 345 can the polarized flux be represented by a single power law consistent with the three-component model of Smith et al. This model consists of a polarized synchrotron component, an unpolarized component from the broad-line region, and an unpolarized component attributed to thermal radiation from an optically thick accretion disk. Additional simultaneous polarimetry in the UV and visible will be required to further constrain models of the continuum emission processes in 3C 345 and determine if the UV polarized flux is synchrotron in origin.

  18. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  19. Revisiting correlations between broad-line and jet emission variations for AGNs: 3C 120 and 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. T.; Bai, J. M.; Feng, H. C.; Li, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We restudy the issue of cross-correlations between broad-line and jet emission variations, and aim to locate the position of a radio (and gamma-ray) emitting region in a jet of active galactic nuclei. Considering the radial profiles of the radius and number density of clouds in a spherical broad-line region (BLR), we derive new formulae connecting the jet-emitting position Rjet to the time lag τob between broad-line and jet emission variations, and the BLR radius. Also, formulae are derived for a disc-like BLR and a spherical shell BLR. The model-independent flux randomization/random subset selection method is used to estimate τob. For 3C 120, positive lags of about 0.3 yr are found between the 15 GHz emission and the Hβ, Hγ and He II λ4686 lines, including broad-line data in a newly published paper, indicating that the line variations lead the 15 GHz ones. Each of the broad-line light curves corresponds to a radio outburst. Rjet = 1.1-1.5 parsec (pc) is obtained for 3C 120. For 3C 273, a common feature of negative time lags is found in the cross-correlation functions between light curves of radio emission and the Balmer lines, as well as Lyα λ1216 and C IV λ1549 lines. Rjet = 1.0-2.6 pc is obtained for 3C 273. The estimated Rjet is comparable for 3C 120 and 3C 273, and the gamma-ray-emitting positions will be within ˜1-3 pc from the central engines. Comparisons show that the cloud number density and radius radial distributions and the BLR structures have only negligible effects on Rjet.

  20. Connection Between X-Ray Emission and Relativistic Jets in the Radio Galaxies 3C 111 and 3C 120

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Margo F.

    2005-01-01

    This work represents a part of a longterm study of the X-ray flux variability in radio galaxies and its relation to flux and structural changes in the associated radio jet. The work described here included: 1) continued study of the emission properties of the FR I radio galaxy 3C 120 known to exhibit a jet/disk connection from our past work; and 2) the commencement of monitoring of a second radio galaxy, the FR I1 object 3C 111 which was selected because of similar radio and X-ray properties to 3C 120, including the presence of Fe K a emission. The association between X-ray dips and new superluminal components, suggesting a picture in which the radio jet is fed by accretion events near the black hole, was identified in 3C 120 using combined RXTE and radio flux monitoring data and bi-monthly to monthly imaging data from the VLBA at 43 GHz. Such data were also obtained for both targets during the period described here. Specific goals were to more broadly investigate the X-ray dip/superluminal connection in 3C 120, thereby determining the epochs of X-ray minima and superluminal ejections more accurately (and hence more precisely determining the distance between the accretion disk and the core of the radio jet), and to determine whether a similar pattern is present in the data for a second radio galaxy. In 3C 111 a different time scale (longer time delays between X-ray dips and superluminal ejections) was expected due to the higher black hole mass implied by its higher radio luminosity: no black hole mass is published for this object but one can be determined from a PDS analysis of the RXTE data. The addition of the second source to the study would identify whether a similar connection was present in other sources and, if found, would provide important information on how time scale (and hence size scale) of accretion disk/jet systems depends on black hole mass. The grant included funding for the reduction and analysis of data obtained during the time period of Rossi

  1. Load-deflection characteristics of small-bore insulated-pipe clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Severud, L.K.; Clark, G.L.

    1981-12-01

    The special insulated clamps used on both FFTF and CRBR piping utilize a Belleville spring arrangement to compensate for pipe thermal expansion. Analysis indicates that this produces a non-linear, directionally sensitive clamp spring rate. Since these spring rates influence the seismic response of a supported piping system, it was deemed necessary to evaluate them further by test. This has been accomplished for the FFTF clamps. A more standard insulated pipe clamp, which does not incorporate Belleville springs to accommodate thermal expansion, was also tested. This type clamp is simple in design, and economically attractive. It may have wide application prospects for use in LMFBR small bore auxiliary piping operating at temperatures below 427/sup 0/C. Load deflection tests were conducted on 2.54 CM and 7.62 CM diameter samples of these commercial clamps.

  2. Microchip amplifier for in vitro, in vivo, and automated whole cell patch-clamp recording

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Ilya; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B.; Chubykin, Alexander A.; Yang, Aimei; Bear, Mark F.; Boyden, Edward S.; Forest, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Patch clamping is a gold-standard electrophysiology technique that has the temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio capable of reporting single ion channel currents, as well as electrical activity of excitable single cells. Despite its usefulness and decades of development, the amplifiers required for patch clamping are expensive and bulky. This has limited the scalability and throughput of patch clamping for single-ion channel and single-cell analyses. In this work, we have developed a custom patch-clamp amplifier microchip that can be fabricated using standard commercial silicon processes capable of performing both voltage- and current-clamp measurements. A key innovation is the use of nonlinear feedback elements in the voltage-clamp amplifier circuit to convert measured currents into logarithmically encoded voltages, thereby eliminating the need for large high-valued resistors, a factor that has limited previous attempts at integration. Benchtop characterization of the chip shows low levels of current noise [1.1 pA root mean square (rms) over 5 kHz] during voltage-clamp measurements and low levels of voltage noise (8.2 μV rms over 10 kHz) during current-clamp measurements. We demonstrate the ability of the chip to perform both current- and voltage-clamp measurement in vitro in HEK293FT cells and cultured neurons. We also demonstrate its ability to perform in vivo recordings as part of a robotic patch-clamping system. The performance of the patch-clamp amplifier microchip compares favorably with much larger commercial instrumentation, enabling benchtop commoditization, miniaturization, and scalable patch-clamp instrumentation. PMID:25429119

  3. Delaying cord clamping until ventilation onset improves cardiovascular function at birth in preterm lambs

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Sasmira; Alison, Beth J; Wallace, Euan M; Crossley, Kelly J; Gill, Andrew W; Kluckow, Martin; te Pas, Arjan B; Morley, Colin J; Polglase, Graeme R; Hooper, Stuart B

    2013-01-01

    Delayed cord clamping improves circulatory stability in preterm infants at birth, but the underlying physiology is unclear. We investigated the effects of umbilical cord clamping, before and after ventilation onset, on cardiovascular function at birth. Prenatal surgery was performed on lambs (123 days) to implant catheters into the pulmonary and carotid arteries and probes to measure pulmonary (PBF), carotid (CaBF) and ductus arteriosus blood flows. Lambs were delivered at 126 ± 1 days and: (1) the umbilical cord was clamped at delivery and ventilation was delayed for about 2 min (Clamp 1st; n = 6), and (2) umbilical cord clamping was delayed for 3–4 min, until after ventilation was established (Vent 1st; n = 6). All lambs were subsequently ventilated for 30 min. In Clamp 1st lambs, cord clamping rapidly (within four heartbeats), but transiently, increased pulmonary and carotid arterial pressures (by ∼30%) and CaBF (from 30.2 ± 5.6 to 40.1 ± 4.6 ml min−1 kg−1), which then decreased again within 30–60 s. Following ventilation onset, these parameters rapidly increased again. In Clamp 1st lambs, cord clamping reduced heart rate (by ∼40%) and right ventricular output (RVO; from 114.6 ± 14.4 to 38.8 ± 9.7 ml min−1 kg−1), which were restored by ventilation. In Vent 1st lambs, cord clamping reduced RVO from 153.5 ± 3.8 to 119.2 ± 10.6 ml min−1 kg−1, did not affect heart rates and resulted in stable blood flows and pressures during transition. Delaying cord clamping for 3–4 min until after ventilation is established improves cardiovascular function by increasing pulmonary blood flow before the cord is clamped. As a result, cardiac output remains stable, leading to a smoother cardiovascular transition throughout the early newborn period. PMID:23401615

  4. Microchip amplifier for in vitro, in vivo, and automated whole cell patch-clamp recording.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Reid R; Kolb, Ilya; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Chubykin, Alexander A; Yang, Aimei; Bear, Mark F; Boyden, Edward S; Forest, Craig R

    2015-02-15

    Patch clamping is a gold-standard electrophysiology technique that has the temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio capable of reporting single ion channel currents, as well as electrical activity of excitable single cells. Despite its usefulness and decades of development, the amplifiers required for patch clamping are expensive and bulky. This has limited the scalability and throughput of patch clamping for single-ion channel and single-cell analyses. In this work, we have developed a custom patch-clamp amplifier microchip that can be fabricated using standard commercial silicon processes capable of performing both voltage- and current-clamp measurements. A key innovation is the use of nonlinear feedback elements in the voltage-clamp amplifier circuit to convert measured currents into logarithmically encoded voltages, thereby eliminating the need for large high-valued resistors, a factor that has limited previous attempts at integration. Benchtop characterization of the chip shows low levels of current noise [1.1 pA root mean square (rms) over 5 kHz] during voltage-clamp measurements and low levels of voltage noise (8.2 μV rms over 10 kHz) during current-clamp measurements. We demonstrate the ability of the chip to perform both current- and voltage-clamp measurement in vitro in HEK293FT cells and cultured neurons. We also demonstrate its ability to perform in vivo recordings as part of a robotic patch-clamping system. The performance of the patch-clamp amplifier microchip compares favorably with much larger commercial instrumentation, enabling benchtop commoditization, miniaturization, and scalable patch-clamp instrumentation.

  5. Delaying cord clamping until ventilation onset improves cardiovascular function at birth in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Sasmira; Alison, Beth J; Wallace, Euan M; Crossley, Kelly J; Gill, Andrew W; Kluckow, Martin; te Pas, Arjan B; Morley, Colin J; Polglase, Graeme R; Hooper, Stuart B

    2013-04-15

    Delayed cord clamping improves circulatory stability in preterm infants at birth, but the underlying physiology is unclear. We investigated the effects of umbilical cord clamping, before and after ventilation onset, on cardiovascular function at birth. Prenatal surgery was performed on lambs (123 days) to implant catheters into the pulmonary and carotid arteries and probes to measure pulmonary (PBF), carotid (CaBF) and ductus arteriosus blood flows. Lambs were delivered at 126 ± 1 days and: (1) the umbilical cord was clamped at delivery and ventilation was delayed for about 2 min (Clamp 1st; n = 6), and (2) umbilical cord clamping was delayed for 3-4 min, until after ventilation was established (Vent 1st; n = 6). All lambs were subsequently ventilated for 30 min. In Clamp 1st lambs, cord clamping rapidly (within four heartbeats), but transiently, increased pulmonary and carotid arterial pressures (by ∼30%) and CaBF (from 30.2 ± 5.6 to 40.1 ± 4.6 ml min(-1) kg(-1)), which then decreased again within 30-60 s. Following ventilation onset, these parameters rapidly increased again. In Clamp 1st lambs, cord clamping reduced heart rate (by ∼40%) and right ventricular output (RVO; from 114.6 ± 14.4 to 38.8 ± 9.7 ml min(-1) kg(-1)), which were restored by ventilation. In Vent 1st lambs, cord clamping reduced RVO from 153.5 ± 3.8 to 119.2 ± 10.6 ml min(-1) kg(-1), did not affect heart rates and resulted in stable blood flows and pressures during transition. Delaying cord clamping for 3-4 min until after ventilation is established improves cardiovascular function by increasing pulmonary blood flow before the cord is clamped. As a result, cardiac output remains stable, leading to a smoother cardiovascular transition throughout the early newborn period.

  6. Reservoir characterization of marine and permafrost associated gas hydrate accumulations with downhole well logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.; Lee, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation depend on a number of reservoir parameters, one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well-logging devices. This study demonstrates that electrical resistivity and acoustic transit-time downhole log data can be used to quantify the amount of gas hydrate in a sedimentary section. Two unique forms of the Archie relation (standard and quick look relations) have been used in this study to calculate water saturations (S(w)) [gas-hydrate saturation (S(h)) is equal to (1.0 - S(w))] from the electrical resistivity log data in four gas hydrate accumulations. These accumulations are located on (1) the Blake Ridge along the Southeastern continental margin of the United States, (2) the Cascadia continental margin off the pacific coast of Canada, (3) the North Slope of Alaska, and (4) the Mackenzie River Delta of Canada. Compressional wave acoustic log data have also been used in conjunction with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate gas-hydrate saturations in all four areas assessed.

  7. Downhole measurements and fluid chemistry of a castle rock steam well, the Geysers, Lake County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Nathenson, M.; Frye, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Wellbore and reservoir processes in a steam well in the Castle Rock field of The Geysers have been studied by means of down-hole pressure and temperature measurements and analyses of ejected water and steam produced under bleed and full flow. Down-hole measurements show that below a vapor zone there is liquid water in the well in pressure equilibrium with reservoir steam at a depth of 2290 m. The progressive decreases, from 1973 to 1977, of pressure and temperature in the vapor zone indicate that wellbore heat loss is high enough to condense a large fraction of the steam inflow. The chemical composition of water ejected from the well is consistent with an origin from wellbore condensation of steam. Calculations using the differences in gas and isotopic compositions between bleed and full-flow steam show that about half of the full-flow steam originated as liquid water in the reservoir and that about 30% of the steam entering the well under bleed was condensed in the wellbore and drained downward. Heat loss calculations are also consistent with this amount of condensation. ?? 1981.

  8. Subsurface exploration using bucket auger borings and down-hole geologic inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Scullin, C.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The down-hole geologic inspection of 24 in. bucket auger borings has been a hands-on technique for collecting valuable geologic structural and lithologic detail in southern California investigations for over 35 yr. Although it has been used for all types of investigations for hillside urban development, it is of particular benefit in landslide investigations and evaluations. The benefits of down-hole geologic inspection during detailed mapping of large landslide complexes with multiple slide planes are discussed in this paper. Many of the geotechnical investigations of these massive landslide complexes have been very limited in their determinations of accurate landslide parameters and very deficient in proper engineering analysis while based upon this limited data. This has resulted in many cases where the geotechnical consultant erroneously concludes that ancient landslides don't move and it is all right to build upon them, even though they have neither justified the landslide parameters, nor the slope stability or safety. Because this author and the many consultants contacted during the preparation of this paper were not aware of other publications regarding this method of collecting detailed geologic data, this author included the safety considerations, safety equipment, the cost and the Cal OSHA requirements for entering exploration shafts.

  9. Downhole microseismic monitoring for low signal-to-noise ratio events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Microseismic monitoring plays an important role in the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas/oil production. The accuracy of event location is an essential issue in microseismic monitoring. The data obtained from downhole monitoring system usually show a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than the recorded data from the surface. For small microseismic events, however, P waves recorded in a downhole array may be very weak, while S waves are generally dominant and strong. Numerical experiments suggest that inverting S-wave arrival times alone is not sufficient to constrain event locations. In this study, we perform extensive location tests with various noise effects using a grid search method that matches the travel time data of the S wave across a recording array. We conclude that fitting S-wave travel time data along with at least one P-wave travel time of the same event can significantly improve location accuracy. In practice, picking S-wave arrival time data and at least one P-wave pick is possible for many small events. We demonstrate that fitting the combination of the travel time data is a robust approach, which can help increase the number of microseismic events to be located accurately during hydraulic fracturing.

  10. Element for use in an inductive coupler for downhole drilling components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2006-08-29

    The present invention includes an element for use in an inductive coupler in a downhole component. The element includes a plurality of ductile, generally U-shaped leaves that are electrically conductive. The leaves are less than about 0.0625" thick and are separated by an electrically insulating material. These leaves are aligned so as to form a generally circular trough. The invention also includes an inductive coupler for use in downhole components, the inductive coupler including an annular housing having a recess with a magnetically conductive, electrically insulating (MCEI) element disposed in the recess. The MCEI element includes a plurality of segments where each segment further includes a plurality of ductile, generally U-shaped electrically conductive leaves. Each leaf is less than about 0.0625" thick and separated from the otherwise adjacent leaves by electrically insulating material. The segments and leaves are aligned so as to form a generally circular trough. The inductive coupler further includes an insulated conductor disposed within the generally circular trough. A polymer fills spaces between otherwise adjacent segments, the annular housing, insulated conductor, and further fills the circular trough.

  11. Fabrication, assembly, bench and drilling tests of two prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, R.; Duettra, P.D.; Johnson, P.; Lyons, W.C.; Miska, S.

    1987-04-01

    The first and second prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors have been fabricated, assembled and tested. All bench tests showed that the motor will produce horsepower and bit speeds approximating the predicted values. Specifically, the downhole pneumatic turbine motor produced approximately 50 horsepower at 100 rpm, while being supplied with about 3600 SCFM of compressed air. The first prototype was used in a drilling test from a depth of 389 feet to a depth of 789 feet in the Kirtland formation. This first prototype motor drilled at a rate exceeding 180 ft/hr, utilizing only 3000 SCFM of compressed air. High temperature tests (at approximately 460/sup 0/F) were carried out on the thrust assembly and the gearboxes for the two prototypes. These components operated successfully at these temperatures. Although the bench and drilling tests were successful, the tests revealed design changes that should be made before drilling tests are carried out in geothermal boreholes at the Geysers area, near Santa Rosa, California.

  12. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2000-09-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

  13. Downhole measurements in the AND-1B borehole, ANDRILL McMurdo Ice Shelf Project, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.; Williams, T.; Henrys, S.; Crosby, T.; Hansaraj, D.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive set of downhole measurements was collected in the AND-1B drillhole as part of the on-ice scientific programme defined for the McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS) Project. Geophysical logs were recorded over two operation phases and consisted of calliper, temperature, fluid conductivity, induction resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma activity, acoustic televiewer, borehole deviation, and dipmeter. In addition, two standard vertical seismic profiles (VSP) and one walk-away VSP were obtained. Radioactive logs (porosity and density) were not run because of unstable borehole conditions. Although the total depth of the hole is 1285 metres below seafloor (mbsf), the depth range for in situ measurements was limited by the length of the wireline (1018 mbsf) and by the nullification of some geophysical logs due to the presence of steel casing. A depth correction was derived to account for systematic discrepancies in depth between downhole measurements and cores; consequently, log responses can be directly compared to core properties. The resulting data are amenable to studies of cyclicity and climate, heat flux and fluid flow, and stricture and stress. When integrated with physical properties and fractures measured on the core, this information should play a significant role in addressing many of the scientific objectives of the ANDRILL programme.

  14. Advanced Data Communications for Downhole Data Logging and Control Applications in the Oil Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spracklen, C. T.; Aslam, Tariq

    2013-12-01

    We present details of 'Mercury', a high-speed downhole communications system that utilizes the (metallic) wall of a gas or oil pipeline or a drill 'string' as the communications 'channel' to control or monitor equipment or sensors used in the oil industry. Conventional downhole communication systems typically use 'mud pulse' telemetry for 'Measurement While Drilling' (MWD) operations. Current mud pulse telemetry technology offers bandwidths of up to 40 bit/s. However the data rate drops with increasing length of the wellbore and is typically as low as 1.5 bit/s - 3.0 bit/s at a depth of 35,000 ft. - 40,000 ft. The system described, by contrast, offers data rates of several megabits per second over distances of many kilometres and uses Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) coupled with Wideband Frequency Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA). This paper presents details of our system; results of several trials undertaken on actual gas pipelines in the UK will be presented at the Conference.

  15. The Motion Decoupled Delivery System: A New Deployment System for Downhole Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemings, P. B.; Polito, P. J.; Brooks, D.; Itturino, G.; Pettigrew, T.; Germaine, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Motion Decoupled Hydraulic Delivery System (MDHDS) is a new downhole tool delivery system that is deployed by wireline and uses drill string pressure to advance a penetrometer (or other downhole tool) into the formation at the bottom of the borehole. After hydraulic deployment of the penetrometer, the bottom-hole assembly (BHA) is completely decoupled from the penetrometer; this eliminates the adverse effects of ship heave. We tested the MDHDS at Site U1402 (the location of Site 1073, ODP Leg 174A), offshore New Jersey, during two days of ship time during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 342. We emplaced a penetrometer successfully and documented that the penetrometer was decoupled from drill string movement. The pore pressure (7.5 MPa) was slightly overpressured. Based on this successful field test, the MDHDS has been certified by the USIO for shipboard use. The MDHDS is an IODP-funded engineering development led by The University of Texas at Austin, in conjunction with the USIO and Stress Engineering Services. This sea trial was the culmination of a 7 year development effort that included extensive engineering design, fabrication, and field testing.

  16. Discovery of the Eureka volcanogenic massive sulphide lens using downhole electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paggi, Jacob; Macklin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The Eureka volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) lens forms part of the Stockman Project in north-east Victoria. Eureka was discovered in early 2013, heralding the first new VMS mineralised zone to be discovered at the project since 1979. Key drivers to the detection of Eureka included the combination of downhole electromagnetics (EM) and a robust geological model. The lens is located 350 m to the north-east of the Currawong deposit, at a vertical depth of 360 m. Surface EM methods played a significant role in the discovery of the nearby Currawong and Wilga deposits during the late 1970s. Despite this, modern day airborne and fixed-loop transient EM (FLTEM) surveys failed to detect Eureka, most likely due to its depth, moderate conductance and loop-edge effects masking anomalies. The key component in discovering the lens was the interpretation of two subtle downhole transient electromagnetics (DHTEM) responses from 2012 exploration drillholes. These responses were further strengthened by structural and short wave infrared modelling, presenting a compelling multi-component drill target. The lens was discovered soon thereafter, with a discovery intercept of 22.65 m at 1.2% Cu, 0.7% Pb, 3.9% Zn, 43 g/t Ag and 1.3 g/t Au.

  17. Mechanism of ATP-driven PCNA clamp loading by S. cerevisiae RFC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siying; Levin, Mikhail K.; Sakato, Miho; Zhou, Yayan; Hingorani, Manju M.

    2009-01-01

    Circular clamps tether polymerases to DNA, serving as essential processivity factors in genome replication, and function in other critical cellular processes as well. Clamp loaders catalyze clamp assembly onto DNA, and the question of how these proteins construct a topological link between a clamp and DNA remains open, especially the mechanism by which ATP is utilized for the task. Here we describe pre-steady state analysis of ATP hydrolysis, PCNA clamp opening and DNA binding by S. cerevisiae RFC, and present the first kinetic model of a eukaryotic clamp loading reaction validated by global data analysis. ATP binding to multiple RFC subunits initiates a slow conformational change in the clamp loader, enabling it to bind and open PCNA, and bind DNA as well. PCNA opening locks RFC into an active state, and the resulting RFC•ATP•PCNA(open) intermediate is ready for entry of DNA into the clamp. DNA binding commits RFC to ATP hydrolysis, which is followed by PCNA closure and PCNA•DNA release. This model enables quantitative understanding of the multi-step mechanism of a eukaryotic clamp loader, and furthermore facilitates comparative analysis of loaders from diverse organisms. PMID:19285992

  18. Beliefs and practices of obstetric care providers regarding umbilical cord clamping.

    PubMed

    Hill, Allyson L; Fontenot, Holly B

    2014-01-01

    The optimal timing for umbilical cord clamping after birth has yet to be established, and controversy exists. There is evidence of potentially significant health benefits of delayed cord clamping for both full-term and preterm newborns, but this practice has not been widely adopted. This column takes a second look at two recent studies in which researchers examined the beliefs and practices of obstetric care providers regarding umbilical cord clamping in North America. Nurses who are aware of the latest science and who understand both existing practice patterns as well as practice barriers to delayed clamping can be leaders in and advocates for change.

  19. Electrically integrated SU-8 clamped graphene drum resonators for strain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunwoo; Chen, Changyao; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Lee, Ilkyu; Lekas, Michael; Gondarenko, Alexander; Yu, Young-Jun; Shepard, Kenneth; Kim, Philip; Hone, James

    2013-04-01

    Graphene mechanical resonators are the ultimate two-dimensional nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) with applications in sensing and signal processing. While initial devices have shown promising results, an ideal graphene NEMS resonator should be strain engineered, clamped at the edge without trapping gas underneath, and electrically integratable. In this Letter, we demonstrate fabrication and direct electrical measurement of circular SU-8 polymer-clamped chemical vapor deposition graphene drum resonators. The clamping increases device yield and responsivity, while providing a cleaner resonance spectrum from eliminated edge modes. Furthermore, the clamping induces a large strain in the resonator, increasing its resonant frequency.

  20. X-Ray Monitoring of 3C120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Hugh

    The goal of this program is to characterize the variability at both X- ray and optical wavelengths simultaneously for the high luminosity, radio-loud AGN(RLAGN), 3C 120. The key question that is most central to the study of the variability of both RLAGN and radio-quiet AGN(RQAGN) is to identify a ''characteristic timescale", e.g. breaks (''knees") or spikes in the power density spectrum. There are now several RQAGN (e.g., NGC 3516 and Akn 120) for which characteristic timescales (i.e., knee frequencies) have been detected. However there is no RLAGN for which a knee frequency has been observed. The Seyfert-like RLAGN, 3C 120 offers a special opportunity for a possible first detection of a knee frequency in RLAGN.

  1. Simple clamp pressure cell up to 30 kbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, H.; Kadomatsu, H.; Tohma, K.

    1980-10-01

    A design of simple clamp type pressure apparatus utilized for measurements of magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity at low temperatures is presented. The cell consists of a WC piston and Be-Cu cylinder which was autofrettage-processed, and the sample cavity consists of a teflon bucket and an electrode plug. In a temperature range from 300 to 77 K, pressure was determined by a manganin gage calibrated by Bi I-II transition pressure at room temperature; the temperature dependence of pressure coefficient of manganin resistance was taken into account. As a result, the cell was capable of generating hydrostatic pressures up to 30 kbar at room temperature and at least up to 25 kbar at 4.2 K.

  2. Anticoagulation management during cross-clamping and bypass.

    PubMed

    Lander, H; Zammert, M; FitzGerald, D

    2016-09-01

    Anticoagulation is required for successful implementation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), as well as for surgeries requiring temporary aortic occlusion. It is well established that both coagulation and fibrinolysis are activated during CPB (Teufelsbauer et al., 1992) [1]. Appropriate dosing, monitoring, and maintenance of anticoagulation are essential to prevent devastating thrombosis of the CPB circuit or the occluded aorta and to minimize the activation of the hemostatic system. Although numerous novel anticoagulants have been developed over the past decade, unfractionated heparin remains the primary anticoagulant utilized during these types of procedures, with monitoring systems primarily based upon the activated clotting time and/or heparin concentration. This article will review the current state of anticoagulation management during cross-clamp and CPB. PMID:27650345

  3. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  4. The double-lobed blazar 3C 371

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Lind, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    High dynamic range VLA imaging reveals, for the first time, that the blazar 3C 371 exhibits very low surface brightness twin radio lobes. These lobes straddle the dominant compact core and have a projected extent of about 42/h kpc. A weak component located in the western lobe shares the morphology, size, and inferred magnetic field configuration of radio source hot spots. A continuous wiggling jet connects this hot spot with the compact core. Double lobes, hot spots, and one-sided jets are traits of extended, edge-brightened radio sources. The discovery of corresponding components in 3C 371's extended emission suggests that this emission is an edge-brightened double, viewed at a large enough angle to the line of sight that the radio lobes do not overlap. A moderate viewing angle is consistent with 3C 371's low bolometric luminosity for a blazar. The diffuse radio halo that surrounds the twin lobes may be related to the fat bridges or bridge distortions shown by edge-brightened doubles with similar radio powers.

  5. Voltammetry of Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82}

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.R.; Dorn, H.C.; Stevenson, S.; Burbank, P.M.; Gibson, J.R.

    1997-01-15

    This paper describes the first electrochemical data for a polymetallic endohedral metallofullerene. The voltammetric behavior of Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82} resembles that for La@C{sub 82} and Y@C{sub 82}, indicating that the identity of the metal does not influence dramatically the energies of the metallofullerene molecular orbitals. The three Sc atoms, however, transfer more electrons from the encapsulated metals to the cage than the monometallic counterparts, accounting for the differences in the voltammetry for Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82}. The similarity of the voltammetry of Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82} with that of the monometallic fullerenes suggests that Sc{sub 3}{sup +4}@C{sub 82}{sup 4-} may describe the formal charges on the Sc trimer and the C{sub 82} cage of these species. Metallofullerene electronic structure and physical properties should be better understood as more metallofullerenes become available for investigation. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. AGN feedback on the ISM of 3C 236

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labiano, A.; García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Usero, A.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Tremblay, G.; Neri, R.; Fuente, A.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T.

    2013-03-01

    We have carried out 1mm/3mm continuum and 12CO(2-1) line high resolution observations to identify the footprints of AGN feedback on 3C 236. The CO emission comes from a spatially resolved disk characterized by a regular rotating pattern. Within the limits imposed by the sensitivity and velocity coverage of our data, we do not detect any outflow signatures in the cold molecular gas. Re-inspection of optical and IR spectra, shows the presence of a previously unknown ionized gas outflow. The star-formation efficiency in 3C 236, is consistent with the value measured in normal galaxies, which follow the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt law. This result, confirmed to hold in other young radio sources examined in this work, is in stark contrast with the factor of 10-50 lower SFE that has been claimed to characterize evolved powerful radio galaxies. The recent reactivation of the AGN in 3C 236 is a likely explanation for the early evolutionary status of its molecular disk.

  7. The milliarcsecond structure of 3C 273 at 22 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Zensus, J.A.; Biretta, J.A.; Unwin, S.C.; Cohen, M.H. Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-12-01

    The first VLBI images at 22 GHz of the jet in the quasar 3C 273 are presented. In addition to the compact core region, two emission regions can be identified with features seen at lower frequencies; they separate from the core with constant speeds of 0.65 + or - 0.09 and 0.92 + or - 0.11 mas/yr, corresponding to apparent superluminal motion of 4.3 + or - 0.3c and 6.1 + or - 0.3c (for Ho = 100 km/s Mpc, qo = 0.5). The core region brightened at about the estimated epoch of zero separation for the latest superluminal component, suggesting a causal relationship. The curved ridge line of the jet smoothly extends inward towards the core, although no pronounced bends in the range of core distance 0.5-2.5 mas are seen. No significant evidence is found against a common path of subsequent superluminal features. An apparent frequency dependence in the position of one superluminal feature tentatively suggests that opacity effects across the jet direction are present. The results are consistent with an interpretation of the superluminal features as shocks in an underlying relativistic flow, although alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. 43 refs.

  8. The Trails of Superluminal Jet Components in 3C 111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadler, M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Homan, D. C.; Agudo, I.; Kellermann, K. I.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Lister, M. L.; Zensus, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The parsec-scale radio jet of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111 has been monitored since 1995 as part of the 2cm Survey and MOJAVE monitoring observations conducted with the VLBA. Here, we present results from 18 epochs of VLBA observations of 3C 111 and from 18 years of radio flux density monitoring observations conducted at the University of Michigan. A major radio flux-density outburst of 3C 111 occurred in 1996 and was followed by a particularly bright plasma ejection associated with a superluminal jet component. This major event allows us to study a variety of processes associated with outbursts of radio-loud AGN in much greater detail than possible in other cases: the primary perturbation gives rise to the formation of a forward and a backward-shock, which both evolve in characteristically different ways and allow us to draw conclusions about the workflow of jet-production events; the expansion, acceleration and recollimation of the ejected jet plasma in an environment with steep pressure and density gradients are revealed; trailing components are formed in the wake of the primary perturbation as a result of Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities from the interaction of the jet with the external medium. The jet-medium interaction is further scrutinized by the linear-polarization signature of jet components traveling along the jet and passing a region of steep pressure/density gradients.

  9. Whole-cell Patch-clamp Recordings in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Segev, Amir; Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Kourrich, Saïd

    2016-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp recording is an electrophysiological technique that allows the study of the electrical properties of a substantial part of the neuron. In this configuration, the micropipette is in tight contact with the cell membrane, which prevents current leakage and thereby provides more accurate ionic current measurements than the previously used intracellular sharp electrode recording method. Classically, whole-cell recording can be performed on neurons in various types of preparations, including cell culture models, dissociated neurons, neurons in brain slices, and in intact anesthetized or awake animals. In summary, this technique has immensely contributed to the understanding of passive and active biophysical properties of excitable cells. A major advantage of this technique is that it provides information on how specific manipulations (e.g., pharmacological, experimenter-induced plasticity) may alter specific neuronal functions or channels in real-time. Additionally, significant opening of the plasma membrane allows the internal pipette solution to freely diffuse into the cytoplasm, providing means for introducing drugs, e.g., agonists or antagonists of specific intracellular proteins, and manipulating these targets without altering their functions in neighboring cells. This article will focus on whole-cell recording performed on neurons in brain slices, a preparation that has the advantage of recording neurons in relatively well preserved brain circuits, i.e., in a physiologically relevant context. In particular, when combined with appropriate pharmacology, this technique is a powerful tool allowing identification of specific neuroadaptations that occurred following any type of experiences, such as learning, exposure to drugs of abuse, and stress. In summary, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in brain slices provide means to measure in ex vivo preparation long-lasting changes in neuronal functions that have developed in intact awake animals

  10. The human dynamic clamp as a paradigm for social interaction

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Guillaume; de Guzman, Gonzalo C.; Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Kelso, J. A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Social neuroscience has called for new experimental paradigms aimed toward real-time interactions. A distinctive feature of interactions is mutual information exchange: One member of a pair changes in response to the other while simultaneously producing actions that alter the other. Combining mathematical and neurophysiological methods, we introduce a paradigm called the human dynamic clamp (HDC), to directly manipulate the interaction or coupling between a human and a surrogate constructed to behave like a human. Inspired by the dynamic clamp used so productively in cellular neuroscience, the HDC allows a person to interact in real time with a virtual partner itself driven by well-established models of coordination dynamics. People coordinate hand movements with the visually observed movements of a virtual hand, the parameters of which depend on input from the subject’s own movements. We demonstrate that HDC can be extended to cover a broad repertoire of human behavior, including rhythmic and discrete movements, adaptation to changes of pacing, and behavioral skill learning as specified by a virtual “teacher.” We propose HDC as a general paradigm, best implemented when empirically verified theoretical or mathematical models have been developed in a particular scientific field. The HDC paradigm is powerful because it provides an opportunity to explore parameter ranges and perturbations that are not easily accessible in ordinary human interactions. The HDC not only enables to test the veracity of theoretical models, it also illuminates features that are not always apparent in real-time human social interactions and the brain correlates thereof. PMID:25114256

  11. The timing of umbilical cord clamping at birth: physiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Stuart B; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Polglase, Graeme R; Gill, Andrew W; Kluckow, Martin; Wallace, Euan M; Blank, Douglas; Te Pas, Arjan B

    2016-01-01

    While it is now recognized that umbilical cord clamping (UCC) at birth is not necessarily an innocuous act, there is still much confusion concerning the potential benefits and harms of this common procedure. It is most commonly assumed that delaying UCC will automatically result in a time-dependent net placental-to-infant blood transfusion, irrespective of the infant's physiological state. Whether or not this occurs, will likely depend on the infant's physiological state and not on the amount of time that has elapsed between birth and umbilical cord clamping (UCC). However, we believe that this is an overly simplistic view of what can occur during delayed UCC and ignores the benefits associated with maintaining the infant's venous return and cardiac output during transition. Recent experimental evidence and observations in humans have provided compelling evidence to demonstrate that time is not a major factor influencing placental-to-infant blood transfusion after birth. Indeed, there are many factors that influence blood flow in the umbilical vessels after birth, which depending on the dominating factors could potentially result in infant-to-placental blood transfusion. The most dominant factors that influence umbilical artery and venous blood flows after birth are lung aeration, spontaneous inspirations, crying and uterine contractions. It is still not entirely clear whether gravity differentially alters umbilical artery and venous flows, although the available data suggests that its influence, if present, is minimal. While there is much support for delaying UCC at birth, much of the debate has focused on a time-based approach, which we believe is misguided. While a time-based approach is much easier and convenient for the caregiver, ignoring the infant's physiology during delayed UCC can potentially be counter-productive for the infant. PMID:27298730

  12. Analysis of impactor residues in tray clamps from the Long Duration Exposure Facility. Part 1: Clamps from Bay A of the satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Bernhard, Ronald P.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was placed in low Earth orbit (LEO) in 1984 and was recovered 5.7 years later. The LDEF was host to several individual experiments that were specifically designed to characterize critical aspects of meteoroid and debris environment in LEO. It was realized from the beginning, however, that the most efficient use of the satellite would be to examine the entire surface of the Earth for impact features. In this regard, particular interest has centered on common exposed materials that faced in all LDEF pointing directions. Among the most important of these materials is the tray clamps. Therefore, in an effort to understand the nature of particulates in LEO and their effects on spacecraft hardware better, we are analyzing residues found in impact features on LDEF tray clamp surfaces. This catalog presents all data from clamps from Bay A of the LDEF. Subsequent catalogs will include clamps from succeeding bays of the satellite.

  13. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2002-06-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period March 31, 2002 to June 30, 2002. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation Well 111-W-27 is located in section 8 T26N R6E of the North Burbank Unit (NBU), Osage County Oklahoma. It was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The rig moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed several core studies on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. In addition Phillips has prepared a Core Petrology Report, detailing the lithology, stratigraphy and sedimentology for Well 111-W27, NBU. Phillips has also conducted the sonic stimulation core tests, the final sonic stimulation report has not yet been released. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, began collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The original 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been thoroughly tested and it has been concluded that it needs to be redesigned. An engineering firm from Fayetteville AR has been retained to assist in developing a new design for the DHVT. The project participants requested from the DOE, a no-cost extension for the project through December 31, 2002. The no-cost extension amendment to the contract was signed during this reporting period. A technical paper SPE 75254 ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation, Osage County, Oklahoma'' was presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, April 17, 2002. A one-day short course was conducted at

  14. Preliminary analysis of downhole logging data from ICDP Lake Junin drilling Project, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierdominici, Simona; Kück, Jochem; Rodbell, Donald T.; Abbott, Mark B.

    2016-04-01

    The International Continental Drilling Programm (ICDP) has supported a scientific drilling campaign in Peru during the summer season 2015. The Lake Junin Drilling Project mainly aims at obtaining high-resolution paleoclimate records from lacustrine sediments to reconstruct the history of the continental records covering the glacial-interglacial cycles. Lake Junín is located at 4000 m a.s.l. in the tropical Andes of Peru, and is characterized by a thick (> 125 m) sediment package deposited at a high rate (0.2 to 1.0 mm yr-1). Lake Junín is one of the few lakes in the tropical Andes that predates the maximum extent of glaciation and is in a geomorphic position to record the waxing and waning of glaciers in nearby cordillera, hence making the lake a key site for the investigation of the Quaternary climate evolution in the inner-tropics of the Southern Hemisphere. Continous coring was performed at three sites in overall 11 boreholes on the lake with at least two overlapping boreholes per site to avoid core gaps. The depth of the boreholes varied between approx. 30 m and 110 m depending on the drill site. The core bit had a bit size of 122.6 mm and yielded a core diameter of 85 mm. Upon completion of coring operations downhole geophysical logging was performed in five of the 11 boreholes (1A, 1C, 1D, 2A and 3B) by the Operational Support Group of ICDP. The main objective was to record in-situ the physical properties of the lacustrine sediments of Lake Junin. Downhole logs provide a powerful tool to fill in information at intervals with core gaps and as depth reference for depth matching of the discontinous cores. Furthermore it will be used for the lithological reconstruction and interpretation. The OSG downhole logging comprised total and spectrum gamma ray, magnetic susceptibility, borehole geometry, temperature, and sonic P-wave velocity. Unstable and collapsing borehole walls made it neccessary to carry out logging in several sections instead of in one run. The

  15. Assimilatory Sulfate Reduction in C3, C3-C4, and C4 Species of Flaveria1

    PubMed Central

    Koprivova, Anna; Melzer, Michael; von Ballmoos, Peter; Mandel, Therese; Brunold, Christian; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    The activity of the enzymes catalyzing the first two steps of sulfate assimilation, ATP sulfurylase and adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), are confined to bundle sheath cells in several C4 monocot species. With the aim to analyze the molecular basis of this distribution and to determine whether it was a prerequisite or a consequence of the C4 photosynthetic mechanism, we compared the intercellular distribution of the activity and the mRNA of APR in C3, C3-C4, C4-like, and C4 species of the dicot genus Flaveria. Measurements of APR activity, mRNA level, and protein accumulation in six Flaveria species revealed that APR activity, cysteine, and glutathione levels were significantly higher in C4-like and C4 species than in C3 and C3-C4 species. ATP sulfurylase and APR mRNA were present at comparable levels in both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of C4 species Flaveria trinervia. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of APR protein in chloroplasts of both cell types. These findings, taken together with results from the literature, show that the localization of assimilatory sulfate reduction in the bundle sheath cells is not ubiquitous among C4 plants and therefore is neither a prerequisite nor a consequence of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:11598228

  16. Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1983-05-01

    As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

  17. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-08-08

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp.

  18. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp. PMID:27499105

  19. A comparison of the performance and application differences between manual and automated patch-clamp techniques.

    PubMed

    Yajuan, Xiao; Xin, Liang; Zhiyuan, Li

    2012-01-01

    The patch clamp technique is commonly used in electrophysiological experiments and offers direct insight into ion channel properties through the characterization of ion channel activity. This technique can be used to elucidate the interaction between a drug and a specific ion channel at different conformational states to understand the ion channel modulators' mechanisms. The patch clamp technique is regarded as a gold standard for ion channel research; however, it suffers from low throughput and high personnel costs. In the last decade, the development of several automated electrophysiology platforms has greatly increased the screen throughput of whole cell electrophysiological recordings. New advancements in the automated patch clamp systems have aimed to provide high data quality, high content, and high throughput. However, due to the limitations noted above, automated patch clamp systems are not capable of replacing manual patch clamp systems in ion channel research. While automated patch clamp systems are useful for screening large amounts of compounds in cell lines that stably express high levels of ion channels, the manual patch clamp technique is still necessary for studying ion channel properties in some research areas and for specific cell types, including primary cells that have mixed cell types and differentiated cells that derive from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Therefore, further improvements in flexibility with regard to cell types and data quality will broaden the applications of the automated patch clamp systems in both academia and industry. PMID:23346269

  20. Implementing dynamic clamp with synaptic and artificial conductances in mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin Y; Stiefel, Klaus M; Protti, Dario A

    2013-05-16

    Ganglion cells are the output neurons of the retina and their activity reflects the integration of multiple synaptic inputs arising from specific neural circuits. Patch clamp techniques, in voltage clamp and current clamp configurations, are commonly used to study the physiological properties of neurons and to characterize their synaptic inputs. Although the application of these techniques is highly informative, they pose various limitations. For example, it is difficult to quantify how the precise interactions of excitatory and inhibitory inputs determine response output. To address this issue, we used a modified current clamp technique, dynamic clamp, also called conductance clamp (1, 2, 3) and examined the impact of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs on neuronal excitability. This technique requires the injection of current into the cell and is dependent on the real-time feedback of its membrane potential at that time. The injected current is calculated from predetermined excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances, their reversal potentials and the cell's instantaneous membrane potential. Details on the experimental procedures, patch clamping cells to achieve a whole-cell configuration and employment of the dynamic clamp technique are illustrated in this video article. Here, we show the responses of mouse retinal ganglion cells to various conductance waveforms obtained from physiological experiments in control conditions or in the presence of drugs. Furthermore, we show the use of artificial excitatory and inhibitory conductances generated using alpha functions to investigate the responses of the cells.

  1. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp. PMID:27499105

  2. Using atomic force microscopy to investigate patch-clamped nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Danker, T; Mazzanti, M; Tonini, R; Rakowska, A; Oberleithner, H

    1997-11-01

    Nuclear patch clamp is an emerging research field that aims to disclose the electrical phenomena underlying macromolecular transport across the nuclear envelope (NE), its properties as an ion barrier and its function as an intracellular calcium store. The authors combined the patch clamp technique with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the structure-function relationship of NE. In principle, patch clamp currents, recorded from the NE can indicate the activity of the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and/or of ion channels in the two biomembranes that compose the NE. However, the role of the NPCs is still nuclear because the observed NE current in patch clamp experiments is lower than expected from the known density of the NPCs. Therefore, AFM was applied to link patch clamp currents to structure. The membrane patch was excised from the nuclear envelope and, after electrical evaluation, transferred from the patch pipette to a substrate. We could identify the native nuclear membrane patches with AFM at a lateral and a vertical resolution of 3 nm and 0.1 nm, respectively. It was shown that complete NE together with NPCs can be excised from the nucleus after their functional identification in patch clamp experiments. However, we also show that membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum can contaminate the tip of the patch pipette during nuclear patch clamp experiments. This possibility must be considered carefully in nuclear patch clamp experiments. PMID:9768473

  3. A Comparison of the Performance and Application Differences Between Manual and Automated Patch-Clamp Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yajuan, Xiao; Xin, Liang; Zhiyuan, Li

    2012-01-01

    The patch clamp technique is commonly used in electrophysiological experiments and offers direct insight into ion channel properties through the characterization of ion channel activity. This technique can be used to elucidate the interaction between a drug and a specific ion channel at different conformational states to understand the ion channel modulators’ mechanisms. The patch clamp technique is regarded as a gold standard for ion channel research; however, it suffers from low throughput and high personnel costs. In the last decade, the development of several automated electrophysiology platforms has greatly increased the screen throughput of whole cell electrophysiological recordings. New advancements in the automated patch clamp systems have aimed to provide high data quality, high content, and high throughput. However, due to the limitations noted above, automated patch clamp systems are not capable of replacing manual patch clamp systems in ion channel research. While automated patch clamp systems are useful for screening large amounts of compounds in cell lines that stably express high levels of ion channels, the manual patch clamp technique is still necessary for studying ion channel properties in some research areas and for specific cell types, including primary cells that have mixed cell types and differentiated cells that derive from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Therefore, further improvements in flexibility with regard to cell types and data quality will broaden the applications of the automated patch clamp systems in both academia and industry. PMID:23346269

  4. Superior vena cava clamping for brachiocephalic vein cannulation during heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Kuralay, Erkan

    2009-08-01

    A new central venous catheterization during open heart surgery is seldom required. Clamping of superior vena cava (SVC) causes adequate brachiocephalic vein distension which facilitates vein puncture. In our experience, approximately 20 s is enough for adequate brachiocephalic vein distension. I usually prefer subclavian vein puncture by supraclavicular approach. By this approach, average superior vein clamping time is about 45 s. PMID:19339273

  5. Application of active electrode compensation to perform continuous voltage-clamp recordings with sharp microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-González, J. F.; Destexhe, A.; Bal, T.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Electrophysiological recordings of single neurons in brain tissues are very common in neuroscience. Glass microelectrodes filled with an electrolyte are used to impale the cell membrane in order to record the membrane potential or to inject current. Their high resistance induces a high voltage drop when passing current and it is essential to correct the voltage measurements. In particular, for voltage clamping, the traditional alternatives are two-electrode voltage-clamp technique or discontinuous single electrode voltage-clamp (dSEVC). Nevertheless, it is generally difficult to impale two electrodes in a same neuron and the switching frequency is limited to low frequencies in the case of dSEVC. We present a novel fully computer-implemented alternative to perform continuous voltage-clamp recordings with a single sharp-electrode. Approach. To reach such voltage-clamp recordings, we combine an active electrode compensation algorithm (AEC) with a digital controller (AECVC). Main results. We applied two types of control-systems: a linear controller (proportional plus integrative controller) and a model-based controller (optimal control). We compared the performance of the two methods to dSEVC using a dynamic model cell and experiments in brain slices. Significance. The AECVC method provides an entirely digital method to perform continuous recording and smooth switching between voltage-clamp, current clamp or dynamic-clamp configurations without introducing artifacts.

  6. Note: High-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon

    2014-02-15

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g.

  7. Note: high-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g. PMID:24593401

  8. Note: high-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g.

  9. The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.; Vio, R.; Cappellaro, E; Turatto, M Padova Osservatorio Astronomico, Padua )

    1990-08-01

    The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446 is investigated using power spectrum and structure function analysis along with a new set of observations that extend the available data till 1989. No contradiction is found between the PS and SF analyses. The presence of the 1540-day periodicity is strengthened by the occurrence of the 1988 luminosity peak, suggesting that the next burst will occur in the northern spring of 1992. The time series of the quasar is nonstationary. The light variations are determined by a sequence of luminosity bursts, mostly regularly spaced in time and lasting up to 2 yr. 25 refs.

  10. SUZAKU OBSERVATION OF THE GIANT RADIO GALAXY 3C 326

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Seta, Hiromi; Gandhi, Poshak; Hayato, Asami; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hada, Kazuhiro; Matsuta, Keiko

    2009-11-20

    A Suzaku observation of a giant radio galaxy, 3C 326, which has a physical size of about 2 Mpc, was conducted on 2008 January 19-21. In addition to several X-ray sources, diffuse emission was significantly detected and associated with its west lobe, but the east lobe was contaminated by an unidentified X-ray source WARP J1552.4+2007. After careful evaluation of the X-ray and non-X-ray background, the 0.4-7 keV X-ray spectrum of the west lobe is described by a power-law model modified with the Galactic absorption. The photon index and 1 keV flux density were derived as GAMMA = 1.82{sup +0.26}{sub -0.24} +- 0.04 and S {sub X} = 19.4{sup +3.3}{sub -3.2} +- 3.0 nJy, respectively, where the first and second errors represent the statistical and systematic ones. The diffuse X-rays were attributed to be inverse Compton (IC) radiation by the synchrotron radio electrons scattering off the cosmic microwave background photons. This radio galaxy is the largest among those with lobes detected through IC X-ray emission. A comparison of the radio to X-ray fluxes yields the energy densities of electron and magnetic field as u{sub e} = (2.3 +- 0.3 +- 0.3) x 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -3} and u{sub m} = (1.2{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} +- 0.2) x 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -3}, respectively. The galaxy is suggested to host a low-luminosity nucleus with an absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminosity of <2 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}, together with a relatively weak radio core. The energetics in the west lobe of 3C 326 were compared with those of moderate radio galaxies with a size of approx100 kpc. The west lobe of 3C 326 is confirmed to agree with the correlations for the moderate radio galaxies, u{sub e} propor to D {sup -2.2+}-{sup 0.4} and u{sub m} propor to D {sup -2.4+}-{sup 0.4}, where D is their total physical size. This implies that the lobes of 3C 326 are still being energized by the jet, despite the current weakness of the nuclear activity.

  11. Stem drive oil recovery method utilizing a downhole steam generator and anti clay-swelling agent

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, D. N.; Snavely, E. S.

    1985-06-11

    Viscous oil is recovered from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation by a steam flooding technique wherein steam is generated in a downhole steam generator located in an injection well by spontaneous combustion of a pressurized mixture of a water-soluble fuel such as sugars and alcohols dissolved in water or a stable hydrocarbon fuel-in-water emulsion containing an anti clay-swelling agent and substantially pure oxygen. The generated mixture of steam and combustion gases pass through the formation, displacing oil and reducing the oil's viscosity and the mobilized oil is produced from the formation via a spaced-apart production well. Suitable anti clay-swelling agents include metal halide salts and diammonium phosphate.

  12. Harsh-Environment Solid-State Gamma Detector for Down-hole Gas and Oil Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Sandvik; Stanislav Soloviev; Emad Andarawis; Ho-Young Cha; Jim Rose; Kevin Durocher; Robert Lyons; Bob Pieciuk; Jim Williams; David O'Connor

    2007-08-10

    The goal of this program was to develop a revolutionary solid-state gamma-ray detector suitable for use in down-hole gas and oil exploration. This advanced detector would employ wide-bandgap semiconductor technology to extend the gamma sensor's temperature capability up to 200 C as well as extended reliability, which significantly exceeds current designs based on photomultiplier tubes. In Phase II, project tasks were focused on optimization of the final APD design, growing and characterizing the full scintillator crystals of the selected composition, arranging the APD device packaging, developing the needed optical coupling between scintillator and APD, and characterizing the combined elements as a full detector system preparing for commercialization. What follows is a summary report from the second 18-month phase of this program.

  13. Simultaneous modelling of the phase and amplitude components of downhole magnetometric resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purss, Matthew B. J.; Cull, James P.; Asten, Michael W.

    2003-11-01

    The downhole magnetometric resistivity (DHMMR) technique is an effective method for follow-up exploration of massive and disseminated sulphide deposits. The method comprises the "in-hole" measurement of low-amplitude, low-frequency magnetic fields associated with galvanic current flow between two current electrodes. This paper presents methods for the simultaneous modelling of both the magnetometric resistivity (MMR) amplitude and phase (or magnetic-induced polarisation [MIP]) response for DHMMR data. Analyses of the MIP response and the interactions between conductive and polarisable bodies and their host are calculated using variations of the Cole-Cole model for complex impedance. The inphase and quadrature components provide symmetric signatures at the target depth, but some results are counter-intuitive when expressed as the MIP (phase) response. These methods are used to provide an interpretation of DHMMR data obtained from the Flying Doctor Prospect near Broken Hill, New South Wales.

  14. DOE/GRI development and testing of a downhole pump for jet-assist drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to accelerate development and commercialization of a high pressure downhole pump (DHP{trademark}) to be used for ultra-high pressure, jet-assisted drilling. The purpose of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in the drilling of deeper gas and oil wells where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. As a means to accomplishing this objective, a second generation commercial prototype of a DHP is to be designed, fabricated, tested in the laboratory, and eventually tested in the field. The design of the DOE commercial prototype DHP is current in progress. The layout of the complete DHP is expected to be completed by mid-April. Fabrication and laboratory experimentation is expected to be completed in September. Pending successful completion of the laboratory testing phase, the DOE commercial DHP should be ready for testing in the field by the end of the calendar year.

  15. The application limits of alloyed 13%Cr tubular steels for downhole duties

    SciTech Connect

    Cooling, P.J.; Kennani, M.B.; Martin, J.W.; Nice, P.I.

    1998-12-31

    In the past few years, a new family of materials has entered the downhole tubular market, known as the ``alloyed 13%Cr steels.`` These are a development of the conventional API 5CT grade 13%Cr steels to which alloying elements of Ni, Mo and Cu have been added, hence offering a number of advantages. In the present paper, domains of application for the 95ksi grade alloyed 13%Cr steels with respect to sour service conditions have been defined on pH vs. H{sub 2}S partial pressure plots. Corrosion properties have also been determined for two other aspects; chloride stress corrosion cracking (ClSCC) and high temperature corrosion resistance. The results have reiterated the importance of solution chemistry, pH and H{sub 2}S partial pressure in defining the corrosion properties of steels.

  16. Downhole fluid injection systems, CO2 sequestration methods, and hydrocarbon material recovery methods

    DOEpatents

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-07-28

    Downhole fluid injection systems are provided that can include a first well extending into a geological formation, and a fluid injector assembly located within the well. The fluid injector assembly can be configured to inject a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion into the surrounding geological formation. CO2 sequestration methods are provided that can include exposing a geological formation to a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion to sequester at least a portion of the CO2 from the emulsion within the formation. Hydrocarbon material recovery methods are provided that can include exposing a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion to a geological formation having the hydrocarbon material therein. The methods can include recovering at least a portion of the hydrocarbon material from the formation.

  17. The early effects of delayed cord clamping in term infants born to Libyan mothers.

    PubMed

    Emhamed, Musbah Omar; van Rheenen, Patrick; Brabin, Bernard J

    2004-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the haematological effects of the timing of umbilical cord clamping in term infants 24 h after birth in Libya. Mother-infant pairs were randomly assigned to early cord clamping (within 10s after delivery) or delayed clamping (after the cord stopped pulsating). Maternal haematological status was assessed on admission in the delivery room. Infant haematological status was evaluated in cord blood and 24 h after birth. Bilirubin concentration was assessed at 24 h. 104 mother-infant pairs were randomized to delayed (n=58) or early cord clamping (n=46). At baseline the groups had similar demographic and biomedical characteristics, except for a difference in maternal haemoglobin, which was significantly higher in the early clamping group (11.7 g/dL, SD 1.3 g/dL versus 10.9 g/dL, SD 1.6 g/dL; P=0.0035). Twenty-four hours after delivery the mean infant haemoglobin level was significantly higher in the delayed clamping group (18.5 g/dL versus 17.1 g/dL; P=0.0005). No significant differences were found in clinical jaundice or plethora. Surprisingly, blood analysis showed that two babies in the early clamping group had total serum bilirubin levels (> 15 mg/dL) that necessitated phototherapy. There were no babies in the late clamping group who required phototherapy. Three infants in the delayed clamping group had polycythaemia without symptoms, for which no partial exchange transfusion was necessary. Delaying cord clamping until the pulsations stop increases the red cell mass in term infants. It is a safe, simple and low cost delivery procedure that should be incorporated in integrated programmes aimed at reducing iron deficiency anaemia in infants in developing countries.

  18. Fluid flow monitoring in hydrocarbon reservoirs using downhole measurements of streaming potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. D.; Saunders, J. H.; Vinogradov, J.; Jaafar, M. Z.; Pain, C. C.

    2009-04-01

    Downhole measurements of streaming potential, using permanently installed electrodes, are a promising new technology for hydrocarbon reservoir monitoring, and may also be used to characterize fluid flow in aquifers and during CO2 sequestration. We have used a combination of laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to investigate the behavior of the streaming potential during hydrocarbon production in a range of reservoir environments. We demonstrate that streaming potential signals originate at water-oil and water-gas fronts, and at geological boundaries, where water saturation changes. As water encroaches on a production well, the streaming potential signal associated with the waterfront reaches the well whilst the front is up to 100m away, so the potential measured at the well starts to change relative to a reference electrode. The encroaching water can therefore be detected at some distance from the well, which contrasts with most other downhole monitoring techniques. Variations in the geometry of the encroaching waterfront may be characterized using an array of electrodes positioned along the well, but an understanding of the local reservoir geology is required to distinguish signals caused by the moving front, from those caused by saturation changes at geological boundaries. To interpret streaming potential measurements requires knowledge of the streaming potential coupling coefficient during multiphase flow of oil and/or gas, and brine which may be highly saline. We have measured the coupling coefficient in sandstone cores saturated with high salinity brine and find that it decreases with increasing brine salinity, but less rapidly than predicted by extrapolating historical data obtained in the low salinity range. The coupling coefficient is small, but still measurable, even when the brine salinity approaches the saturated concentration limit. We have used a simple bundle-of-capillary-tubes model to predict the variation in streaming potential coupling

  19. A conceptual model for kappa (κ) based on downhole earthquake records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ktenidou, O. J.; Abrahamson, N. A.; Drouet, S.; Cotton, F.

    2015-12-01

    At high frequencies, the acceleration spectral amplitude decreases rapidly; this has been modeled with the spectral decay factor κ (Anderson and Hough, 1984). Its site-specific component, κ0, an index of site attenuation in the upper crust, is used widely today in ground motion prediction and simulation. Here we use accelerometric data from the EUROSEISTEST valley, a geologically complex and seismically active region in Greece. The strong motion array consists of 14 surface and 6 downhole stations. Site conditions across the stations vary greatly, ranging from soft sediments to hard rock (NEHRP class D to A). We use the results to improve our physical understanding of κ0 and propose a conceptual model of κ0 with Vs. This model comprises two new notions. On the one hand, and contrary to existing correlations, we observe that κ0 stabilizes for high Vs values. This may indicate the existence of regional κ0 values for hard rock. If so, we propose that borehole measurements (which have almost never been used up to now for κ0) may be useful in determining these values. On the other hand, we find that material damping in the soil column, as expressed through travel times, does not suffice to account for the total κ0 measured at the surface. We propose that, apart from material damping, additional site attenuation may be caused by scattering from small-scale variability in the profile. If this is so, then geotechnical damping measurements may not suffice to infer the overall attenuation underneath a site; but starting with a regional value (possibly measured from a downhole station) and adding damping, we might define a lower bound for site-specific κ0. More precise estimates would necessitate seismological site instrumentation.

  20. System to inject steam and produce oil from the same wellbore through downhole valve switching

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Various Downhole Equipment systems have been designed for typical applications in three California Oilfields,based on well data gathered from three different Operating Companies. The first system, applicable to a 2,000 ft deep reservoir (Monarch) a highly underpressured, unconsolidated sand of 200 ft net pay, located in the Midway-Sunset field, is based on the use of a new well. The second well configuration considered was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with a 7 inches casing and penetrating into two separate sandstone reservoirs, at normal pressures in the North Antelope Hills field. Only the bottom layer is presently in production through a gravel-packed 5.5 inch linear, while the upper zone is behind the cemented casing. The third case studied was the re-entry into an existing well equipped with an 8 5/8 inch casing, presently unperforated, into a thin under-pressured sand reservoir (Weber) in the Midway-Sunset field. All three California fields contain Heavy Oils of different but relatively high viscosities. A new class of potential applications of our new technology has also been considered: the recovery of Light Oil (> 20 API) by steam injection in under-pressured Carbonate reservoirs which lay at depths beyond the economic limit for conventional steam injection technology. The possibility of including this application in a Field Test proposal to the DOE, under the Class II Oil Program, is now under review by various Operators. A drilling contractor experienced in drilling multiple horizontal wells in Carbonate reservoirs and a team of reservoir engineers experienced in the recovery of Light Oil by steam in fractured reservoirs have expressed their interest in participating in such a joint Field Project. Laboratory tests on specific prototypes of Downhole Sealing Elements are underway.

  1. Behavior of a hollow core photonic crystal fiber under high radial pressure for downhole application

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J. Chenari, Z.; Ziaee, F.; Latifi, H.; Santos, J. L.

    2014-02-17

    Pressure fiber sensors play an important role in downhole high pressure measurements to withstand long term operation. The purpose of this paper is to present an application of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) as a high pressure sensor head for downhole application based on dispersion variation. We used a high pressure stainless steel unit to exert pressure on the sensor. The experimental results show that different wavelengths based on sagnac loop interferometer have additive sensitivities from 5 × 10{sup −5} nm/psi at 1480 nm to 1.3 × 10{sup −3} nm/psi at 1680 nm. We developed a simulation to understand the reason for difference in sensitivity of wavelengths and also the relationship between deformation of HC-PCF and dispersion variation under pressure. For this purpose, by using the finite element method, we investigated the effect of structural variation of HC-PCF on spectral transformation of two linear polarizations under 1000 psi pressure. The simulation and experimental results show exponential decay behavior of dispersion variation from −3.4 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.3 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi and from −5 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.8 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi, respectively, which were in a good accordance with each other.

  2. Downhole Microseismic Monitoring at a Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage Site, Farnsworth Unit, Ochiltree County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A.; Balch, R. S.; van Wijk, J.

    2015-12-01

    Farnsworth Oil Field in North Texas hosts an ongoing carbon capture, utilization, and storage project. This study is focused on passive seismic monitoring at the carbon injection site to measure, locate, and catalog any induced seismic events. A Geometrics Geode system is being utilized for continuous recording of the passive seismic downhole bore array in a monitoring well. The array consists of 3-component dual Geospace OMNI-2400 15Hz geophones with a vertical spacing of 30.5m. Downhole temperature and pressure are also monitored. Seismic data is recorded continuously and is produced at a rate of over 900GB per month, which must be archived and reviewed. A Short Term Average/Long Term Average (STA/LTA) algorithm was evaluated for its ability to search for events, including identification and quantification of any false positive events. It was determined that the algorithm was not appropriate for event detection with the background level of noise at the field site and for the recording equipment as configured. Alternatives are being investigated. The final intended outcome of the passive seismic monitoring is to mine the continuous database and develop a catalog of microseismic events/locations and to determine if there is any relationship to CO2 injection in the field. Identifying the location of any microseismic events will allow for correlation with carbon injection locations and previously characterized geological and structural features such as faults and paleoslopes. Additionally, the borehole array has recorded over 1200 active sources with three sweeps at each source location that were acquired during a nearby 3D VSP. These data were evaluated for their usability and location within an effective radius of the array and were stacked to improve signal-noise ratio and are used to calibrate a full field velocity model to enhance event location accuracy. Funding for this project is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42591.

  3. Gauging the feasibility of a downhole energy harvesting system through a proof-of-concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjolsing, Eric; Todd, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon well operators deploy downhole reservoir monitoring equipment in order to optimize the rate at which hydrocarbons are extracted. Alternative power sources are sought that could be deployed in these harsh environments to replace or supplement standard power sources currently in use. To this end, a three phase proof-of-concept study was performed to gauge the feasibility of such a device. In the first phase a parametric study was performed to understand how high uncertainty variables affect the natural frequency of a producing hydrocarbon well. In a follow up study, the relationship between boundary conditions and system damping was investigated. In the second phase a structural housing was designed to satisfy American Petroleum Institute load cases. Using finite element models and standard tube/casing geometries, design pressures were iterated until a permissible housing design was achieved. This preliminary design provided estimates of the radial width and volume in which energy harvesting and storage elements may be situated. In the last phase a software program was developed to estimate the energy that might be harvested from user specified harvester configurations. The program is dependent on user input production tube accelerations; this permits well operators to use well-specific vibrational data as inputs to generate well-specific energy output estimates. Results indicate that a downhole energy harvesting tool is structurally feasible under reasonable operating conditions but no conclusions can be made as to the sufficiency of generated power as no in-situ acceleration time histories are available. Future work is discussed. Approved for publication, LA-UR-16-21193.

  4. Multiwavelength variability analysis of the FSRQ 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.; León-Tavares, J.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Fernandes, S.; Schlegel, E. M.; López-Rodríguez, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present a multifrequency analysis of the variability in the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 from 2008 to 2014. Our multiwavelength dataset includes gamma-ray data from Fermi/LAT (Abdo et al. 2009), observations in 1mm from SMA (Gurwell et al. 2007), Near Infrared from OAGH (Carramiñana & Carrasco 2009) and SMARTS (Bonning et al. 2012); optical V band from the Steward Observatory (Smith et al. 2009) and SMARTS; optical spectra from OAGH (Patiño-Álvarez et al. 2013) and the Steward Observatory; and polarization spectra from the Steward Observatory. The light curves are shown in Fig. 1. Six out of seven optical activity periods identified within our dataset show clear counterparts in mm, NIR and gamma-rays, however, the late 2011 - early 2012 optical flare does not have a counterpart in the GeV regime. In this contribution, we discuss the flaring evolution of 3C 279 and speculate about the production of the anomalous activity period.

  5. Shocked Molecular Gas in the SNR 3C391

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, D. C.-J.; Wright, M. C. H.; Frail, D. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Wilner, D. J.

    1999-05-01

    The discovery of OH (1720 MHz) masers in supernova remnants (SNRs) provides us with a convenient method for identifying promising candidates for studies of SNR/molecular cloud interactions. One remnant which is an ideal subject is 3C391. Here, single dish observations reveal a myriad of molecular lines from a giant shocked cloud at the blast-wave of the remnant. We present recent millimeter-wave observations of 3C391 with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array. We have imaged the region towards the OH maser in HCN (J=1--0) and HCO+ (J=1--0) at a resolution of 4 arcsec. The morphology and brightness of the emission in HCO+ and HCN are similar; we resolve the shocked cloud seen by Frail and Mitchell (1998) into several clumps of characteristic size 10 arcsec. The maser is midway between two of these clumps, rather than being coincident with the peak column density. The clumps all have similar spectra with line-widths of ~ 30 km s(-1) , although there is evidence for a velocity gradient between the clumps. We examine the physical conditions of the shocked environment and discuss the relative abundances of the molecules. A companion study of the interaction between the SNR W51C and an associated molecular cloud is underway.

  6. Stochastic modal models of slender uncertain curved beams preloaded through clamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avalos, Javier; Richter, Lanae A.; Wang, X. Q.; Murthy, Raghavendra; Mignolet, Marc P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the stochastic modeling of the stiffness matrix of slender uncertain curved beams that are forced fit into a clamped-clamped fixture designed for straight beams. Because of the misfit with the clamps, the final shape of the clamped-clamped beams is not straight and they are subjected to an axial preload. Both of these features are uncertain given the uncertainty on the initial, undeformed shape of the beams and affect significantly the stiffness matrix associated with small motions around the clamped-clamped configuration. A modal model using linear modes of the straight clamped-clamped beam with a randomized stiffness matrix is employed to characterize the linear dynamic behavior of the uncertain beams. This stiffness matrix is modeled using a mixed nonparametric-parametric stochastic model in which the nonparametric (maximum entropy) component is used to model the uncertainty in final shape while the preload is explicitly, parametrically included in the stiffness matrix representation. Finally, a maximum likelihood framework is proposed for the identification of the parameters associated with the uncertainty level and the mean model, or part thereof, using either natural frequencies only or natural frequencies and mode shape information of the beams around their final clamped-clamped state. To validate these concepts, three simulated, computational experiments were conducted within Nastran to produce populations of natural frequencies and mode shapes of uncertain slender curved beams after clamping. The three experiments differed from each other by the nature of the clamping condition in the in-plane direction. One experiment assumed a no-slip condition (zero in-plane displacement), another a perfect slip (no in-plane force), while the third one invoked friction. The first two experiments gave distributions of frequencies with similar features while the latter one yielded a strong deterministic dependence of the frequencies on each other, a

  7. Calcium-activated conductance in skate electroreceptors: current clamp experiments

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    When current clamped, skate electroreceptor epithelium produces large action potentials in response to stimuli that depolarize the lumenal faces of the receptor cells. With increasing stimulus strength these action potentials become prolonged. When the peak voltage exceeds about 140 mV the repolarizing phase is blocked until the end of the stimulus. Perfusion experiments show that the rising phase of the action potential results from an increase in calcium permeability in the lumenal membranes. Perfusion of the lumen with cobalt or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA blocks the action potential. Perfusion of the lumen with a solution containing 10 mM Ca and 20 mM EGTA initially slows the repolarizing process at all voltages and lowers the potential at which it is blocked. With prolonged perfusion, repolarization is blocked at all voltages. When excitability is abolished by perfusion with cobalt, or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA, no delayed rectification occurs. We suggest that repolarization during the action potential depends on an influx of calcium into the cytoplasm, and that the rate of repolarization depends on the magnitude of the inward calcium current. Increasingly large stimuli reduce the rate of repolarization by reducing the driving force for calcium, and then block repolarization by causing the lumenal membrane potential to exceed ECa. Changes in extracellular calcium affect repolarization in a manner consistent with the resulting change in ECa. PMID:190338

  8. Dynamic Clamp Analysis of Synaptic Integration in Sympathetic Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Horn, J. P.; Kullmann, P. H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in modern neuroscience require the identification of principles that connect different levels of experimental analysis, from molecular mechanisms to explanations of cellular functions, then to circuits, and, ultimately, to systems and behavior. Here, we examine how synaptic organization of the sympathetic ganglia may enable them to function as use-dependent amplifiers of preganglionic activity and how the gain of this amplification may be modulated by metabotropic signaling mechanisms. The approach combines a general computational model of ganglionic integration together with experimental tests of the model using the dynamic clamp method. In these experiments, we recorded intracellularly from dissociated bullfrog sympathetic neurons and then mimicked physiological synapses with virtual computer-generated synapses. It thus became possible to analyze the synaptic gain by recording cellular responses to complex patterns of synaptic activity that normally arise in vivo from convergent nicotinic and muscarinic synapses. The results of these studies are significant because they illustrate how gain generated through ganglionic integration may contribute to the feedback control of important autonomic behaviors, in particular to the control of the blood pressure. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Professor Vladimir Skok, whose rich legacy in synaptic physiology helped establish the modern paradigm for connecting multiple levels of analysis in studies of the nervous system. PMID:19756262

  9. A Programmable Optical Angle Clamp for Rotary Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Pilizota, Teuta; Bilyard, Thomas; Bai, Fan; Futai, Masamitsu; Hosokawa, Hiroyuki; Berry, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Optical tweezers are widely used for experimental investigation of linear molecular motors. The rates and force dependence of steps in the mechanochemical cycle of linear motors have been probed giving detailed insight into motor mechanisms. With similar goals in mind for rotary molecular motors we present here an optical trapping system designed as an angle clamp to study the bacterial flagellar motor and F1-ATPase. The trap position was controlled by a digital signal processing board and a host computer via acousto-optic deflectors, the motor position via a three-dimensional piezoelectric stage and the motor angle using a pair of polystyrene beads as a handle for the optical trap. Bead-pair angles were detected using back focal plane interferometry with a resolution of up to 1°, and controlled using a feedback algorithm with a precision of up to 2° and a bandwidth of up to 1.6 kHz. Details of the optical trap, algorithm, and alignment procedures are given. Preliminary data showing angular control of F1-ATPase and angular and speed control of the bacterial flagellar motor are presented. PMID:17434937

  10. One-channel Cell-attached Patch-clamp Recording

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Bruce A.; Cummings, Kirstie A.; Paganelli, Meaghan A.; Murthy, Swetha E.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are universal devices for fast communication across biological membranes. The temporal signature of the ionic flux they generate depends on properties intrinsic to each channel protein as well as the mechanism by which it is generated and controlled and represents an important area of current research. Information about the operational dynamics of ion channel proteins can be obtained by observing long stretches of current produced by a single molecule. Described here is a protocol for obtaining one-channel cell-attached patch-clamp current recordings for a ligand gated ion channel, the NMDA receptor, expressed heterologously in HEK293 cells or natively in cortical neurons. Also provided are instructions on how to adapt the method to other ion channels of interest by presenting the example of the mechano-sensitive channel PIEZO1. This method can provide data regarding the channel’s conductance properties and the temporal sequence of open-closed conformations that make up the channel’s activation mechanism, thus helping to understand their functions in health and disease. PMID:24961614

  11. Generalization of the dynamic clamp concept in neurophysiology and behavior.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Pablo; Muñiz, Carlos; Levi, Rafael; Arroyo, David; Rodríguez, Francisco B; Varona, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The idea of closed-loop interaction in in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology has been successfully implemented in the dynamic clamp concept strongly impacting the research of membrane and synaptic properties of neurons. In this paper we show that this concept can be easily generalized to build other kinds of closed-loop protocols beyond (or in addition to) electrical stimulation and recording in neurophysiology and behavioral studies for neuroethology. In particular, we illustrate three different examples of goal-driven real-time closed-loop interactions with drug microinjectors, mechanical devices and video event driven stimulation. Modern activity-dependent stimulation protocols can be used to reveal dynamics (otherwise hidden under traditional stimulation techniques), achieve control of natural and pathological states, induce learning, bridge between disparate levels of analysis and for a further automation of experiments. We argue that closed-loop interaction calls for novel real time analysis, prediction and control tools and a new perspective for designing stimulus-response experiments, which can have a large impact in neuroscience research.

  12. Clamping the Mec1/ATR checkpoint kinase into action.

    PubMed

    Majka, Jerzy; Burgers, Peter M J

    2007-05-15

    The yeast checkpoint protein kinase Mec1, the ortholog of human ATR, is the essential upstream regulator of the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage and to stalling of DNA replication forks. The activity of Mec1/ATR is not directly regulated by the DNA substrates that signal checkpoint activation. Rather the signal appears to be transduced to Mec1 by factors that interact with the signaling DNA substrates. One of these factors, the DNA damage checkpoint clamp Rad17-Mec3-Ddc1 (human 9-1-1) is loaded onto gapped DNA resulting from the partial repair of DNA damage, and the Ddc1 subunit of this complex activates Mec1. In vertebrate cells, the TopBP1 protein (Cut5 in S. pombe and Dpb11 in S. cervisiae) that is also required for establishment of the replication fork, functions during replication fork dysfunction to activate ATR. Both mechanisms of activation generally upregulate the kinase activity towards all downstream targets. PMID:17495536

  13. 17 CFR 270.3c-4 - Definition of “common trust fund” as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of âcommon trust... 1940 § 270.3c-4 Definition of “common trust fund” as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act. The term common trust fund as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act (15 U.S.C. 80a-3(c)(3)) shall include a...

  14. 17 CFR 270.3c-3 - Definition of certain terms used in section 3(c)(1) of the Act with respect to certain debt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... investment companies. 270.3c-3 Section 270.3c-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.3c-3 Definition of certain... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of certain...

  15. Planar patch clamp for neuronal networks--considerations and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bosca, Alessandro; Martina, Marzia; Py, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique is generally accepted as the gold standard for studying ion channel activity allowing investigators to either "clamp" membrane voltage and directly measure transmembrane currents through ion channels, or to passively monitor spontaneously occurring intracellular voltage oscillations. However, this resulting high information content comes at a price. The technique is labor-intensive and requires highly trained personnel and expensive equipment. This seriously limits its application as an interrogation tool for drug development. Patch-clamp chips have been developed in the last decade to overcome the tedious manipulations associated with the use of glass pipettes in conventional patch-clamp experiments. In this chapter, we describe some of the main materials and fabrication protocols that have been developed to date for the production of patch-clamp chips. We also present the concept of a patch-clamp chip array providing high resolution patch-clamp recordings from individual cells at multiple sites in a network of communicating neurons. On this chip, the neurons are aligned with the aperture-probes using chemical patterning. In the discussion we review the potential use of this technology for pharmaceutical assays, neuronal physiology and synaptic plasticity studies. PMID:25023304

  16. Solutions for transients in arbitrarily branching cables: III. Voltage clamp problems.

    PubMed Central

    Major, G

    1993-01-01

    Branched cable voltage recording and voltage clamp analytical solutions derived in two previous papers are used to explore practical issues concerning voltage clamp. Single exponentials can be fitted reasonably well to the decay phase of clamped synaptic currents, although they contain many underlying components. The effective time constant depends on the fit interval. The smoothing effects on synaptic clamp currents of dendritic cables and series resistance are explored with a single cylinder + soma model, for inputs with different time courses. "Soma" and "cable" charging currents cannot be separated easily when the soma is much smaller than the dendrites. Subtractive soma capacitance compensation and series resistance compensation are discussed. In a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurone model, voltage control at most dendritic sites is extremely poor. Parameter dependencies are illustrated. The effects of series resistance compound those of dendritic cables and depend on the "effective capacitance" of the cell. Plausible combinations of parameters can cause order-of-magnitude distortions to clamp current waveform measures of simulated Schaeffer collateral inputs. These voltage clamp problems are unlikely to be solved by the use of switch clamp methods. PMID:8369450

  17. High throughput ion-channel pharmacology: planar-array-based voltage clamp.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Laszlo; Bennett, Paul B; Uebele, Victor N; Koblan, Kenneth S; Kane, Stefanie A; Neagle, Brad; Schroeder, Kirk

    2003-02-01

    Technological advances often drive major breakthroughs in biology. Examples include PCR, automated DNA sequencing, confocal/single photon microscopy, AFM, and voltage/patch-clamp methods. The patch-clamp method, first described nearly 30 years ago, was a major technical achievement that permitted voltage-clamp analysis (membrane potential control) of ion channels in most cells and revealed a role for channels in unimagined areas. Because of the high information content, voltage clamp is the best way to study ion-channel function; however, throughput is too low for drug screening. Here we describe a novel breakthrough planar-array-based HT patch-clamp technology developed by Essen Instruments capable of voltage-clamping thousands of cells per day. This technology provides greater than two orders of magnitude increase in throughput compared with the traditional voltage-clamp techniques. We have applied this method to study the hERG K(+) channel and to determine the pharmacological profile of QT prolonging drugs. PMID:15090139

  18. Committee Opinion No.543: Timing of umbilical cord clamping after birth.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    The optimal timing for clamping the umbilical cord after birth has been a subject of controversy and debate. Although many randomized controlled trials in term and preterm infants have evaluated the benefits of delayed umbilical cord clamping versus immediate umbilical cord clamping, the ideal timing for cord clamping has yet to be established. Several systematic reviews have suggested that clamping the umbilical cord in all births should be delayed for at least 30-60 seconds, with the infant maintained at or below the level of the placenta because of the associated neonatal benefits, including increased blood volume, reduced need for blood transfusion, decreased incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in preterm infants, and lower frequency of iron deficiency anemia in term infants. Evidence exists to support delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants, when feasible. The single most important clinical benefit for preterm infants is the possibility for a nearly 50% reduction in intraventricular hemorrhage. However, currently, evidence is insufficient to confirm or refute the potential for benefits from delayed umbilical cord clamping in term infants, especially in settings with rich resources.

  19. Development of potent inhibitors of the coxsackievirus 3C protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eui Seung; Lee, Won Gil; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Rho, Seong Hwan; Im, Isak; Yang, Sung Tae; Sellamuthu, Saravanan; Lee, Yong Jae; Kwon, Sun Jae; Park, Ohkmae K.; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Park, Woo Jin . E-mail: wjpark@gist.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Chul . E-mail: yongchul@gist.ac.kr

    2007-06-22

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3C protease (3CP) plays essential roles in the viral replication cycle, and therefore, provides an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of human diseases caused by CVB3 infection. CVB3 3CP and human rhinovirus (HRV) 3CP have a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity. Comparative modeling of these two 3CPs revealed one prominent distinction; an Asn residue delineating the S2' pocket in HRV 3CP is replaced by a Tyr residue in CVB3 3CP. AG7088, a potent inhibitor of HRV 3CP, was modified by substitution of the ethyl group at the P2' position with various hydrophobic aromatic rings that are predicted to interact preferentially with the Tyr residue in the S2' pocket of CVB3 3CP. The resulting derivatives showed dramatically increased inhibitory activities against CVB3 3CP. In addition, one of the derivatives effectively inhibited the CVB3 proliferation in vitro.

  20. Milliarcsecond polarization structure of the superluminal quasar 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David H.; Kollgaard, Ronald I.; Brown, Leslie F.; Gabuzda, Denise C.; Wardle, John F. C.

    1990-09-01

    A 2 x 10 marcsec-resolution determination is presented for the total intensity and linear polarization structures of the superluminal quasar 3C 273 at 5 GHz. Substantial polarized flux was detected from several superluminal components of the jet, whose fractional polarization increased symmetrically with distance from the core; the most distant component is highly polarized and exhibits a highly ordered magnetic field. Within a few marcsec of the core, the inferred magnetic field orientation varies rapidly with position along the jet. The primarily longitudinal magnetic field orientation is concluded to become established within 20 marcsec of the core. A highly disorganized magnetic field is the most plausible explanation for the low degree of polarization in the innermost regions of the jet.

  1. Trisodium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7)

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tris­odium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7), has been solved and refined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional theory (DFT). There are two independent five-coordinate Na+ and one six-coordinate Na+ cations in the asymmetric unit. The [NaO5] and [NaO6] polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework. There are channels parallel to the a and b axes in which the remainder of the citrate anions reside. The only hydrogen bonds are an intra­molecular one between the hy­droxy group and one of the terminal carboxyl­ate O atoms and an intermolecular one between a methylene group and the hydroxyl O atom. PMID:27308044

  2. Anisotropies in the HI gas distribution toward 3C 196

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The local Galactic Hi gas was found to contain cold neutral medium (CNM) filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission. These filaments appear to be dominated by the magnetic field and in this case turbulence is expected to show distinct anisotropies. Aims: We use the Galactic Effelsberg-Bonn Hi Survey (EBHIS) to derive 2D turbulence spectra for the Hi distribution in direction to 3C 196 and two more comparison fields. Methods: Prior to Fourier transform we apply a rotational symmetric 50% Tukey window to apodize the data. We derive average as well as position angle dependent power spectra. Anisotropies in the power distribution are defined as the ratio of the spectral power in orthogonal directions. Results: We find strong anisotropies. For a narrow range in position angle, in direction perpendicular to the filaments and the magnetic field, the spectral power is on average more than an order of magnitude larger than parallel. In the most extreme case the anisotropy reaches locally a factor of 130. Anisotropies increase on average with spatial frequency as predicted by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995, ApJ, 438, 763), at the same time the Kolmogorov spectral index remains almost unchanged. The strongest anisotropies are observable for a narrow range in velocity and decay with a power law index close to -8/3, almost identical to the average isotropic spectral index of -2.9 <γ< -2.6. Conclusions: Hi filaments, associated with linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations in direction to 3C 196, show turbulence spectra with marked anisotropies. Decaying anisotropies appear to indicate that we witness an ongoing shock passing the Hi and affecting the observed Faraday depth.

  3. [A data interface based on USB bus technology for full auto patch-clamp system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Youlin; Hu, Yang; Qu, Anlian

    2006-04-01

    A USB bus based data interface technology for full auto Patch-Clamp system is discussed in the article. The main controller is CY2131QC (Cypress) and the logic controller is EPM3256A (Altera). Optocouplers are used to get rid of the noise from the interface. It makes the installation of the Patch-Clamp system easier by using the USB bus, and is suitable for the new generation of the Patch-Clamp system with a high speed of 1M bytes/s.

  4. [A data interface based on USB bus technology for full auto patch-clamp system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Youlin; Hu, Yang; Qu, Anlian

    2006-04-01

    A USB bus based data interface technology for full auto Patch-Clamp system is discussed in the article. The main controller is CY2131QC (Cypress) and the logic controller is EPM3256A (Altera). Optocouplers are used to get rid of the noise from the interface. It makes the installation of the Patch-Clamp system easier by using the USB bus, and is suitable for the new generation of the Patch-Clamp system with a high speed of 1M bytes/s. PMID:16706338

  5. Voltage clamping single cells in intact malpighian tubules of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Masia, R; Aneshansley, D; Nagel, W; Nachman, R J; Beyenbach, K W

    2000-10-01

    Principal cells of the Malpighian tubule of the yellow fever mosquito were studied with the methods of two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). Intracellular voltage (V(pc)) was -86.7 mV, and input resistance (R(pc)) was 388.5 kOmega (n = 49 cells). In six cells, Ba(2+) (15 mM) had negligible effects on V(pc), but it increased R(pc) from 325.3 to 684.5 kOmega (P < 0.001). In the presence of Ba(2+), leucokinin-VIII (1 microM) increased V(pc) to -101.8 mV (P < 0.001) and reduced R(pc) to 340.2 kOmega (P < 0.002). Circuit analysis yields the following: basolateral membrane resistance, 652. 0 kOmega; apical membrane resistance, 340.2 kOmega; shunt resistance (R(sh)), 344.3 kOmega; transcellular resistance, 992.2 kOmega. The fractional resistance of the apical membrane (0.35) and the ratio of transcellular resistance and R(sh) (3.53) agree closely with values obtained by cable analysis in isolated perfused tubules and confirm the usefulness of TEVC methods in single principal cells of the intact Malpighian tubule. Dinitrophenol (0.1 mM) reversibly depolarized V(pc) from -94.3 to -10.7 mV (P < 0.001) and reversibly increased R(pc) from 412 to 2,879 kOmega (P < 0.001), effects that were duplicated by cyanide (0.3 mM). Significant effects of metabolic inhibition on voltage and resistance suggest a role of ATP in electrogenesis and the maintenance of conductive transport pathways. PMID:10997925

  6. Giant Liposome Preparation for Imaging and Patch-Clamp Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Marcus D.; Gordon, Sharona E.

    2013-01-01

    The reconstitution of ion channels into chemically defined lipid membranes for electrophysiological recording has been a powerful technique to identify and explore the function of these important proteins. However, classical preparations, such as planar bilayers, limit the manipulations and experiments that can be performed on the reconstituted channel and its membrane environment. The more cell-like structure of giant liposomes permits traditional patch-clamp experiments without sacrificing control of the lipid environment. Electroformation is an efficient mean to produce giant liposomes >10 μm in diameter which relies on the application of alternating voltage to a thin, ordered lipid film deposited on an electrode surface. However, since the classical protocol calls for the lipids to be deposited from organic solvents, it is not compatible with less robust membrane proteins like ion channels and must be modified. Recently, protocols have been developed to electroform giant liposomes from partially dehydrated small liposomes, which we have adapted to protein-containing liposomes in our laboratory. We present here the background, equipment, techniques, and pitfalls of electroformation of giant liposomes from small liposome dispersions. We begin with the classic protocol, which should be mastered first before attempting the more challenging protocols that follow. We demonstrate the process of controlled partial dehydration of small liposomes using vapor equilibrium with saturated salt solutions. Finally, we demonstrate the process of electroformation itself. We will describe simple, inexpensive equipment that can be made in-house to produce high-quality liposomes, and describe visual inspection of the preparation at each stage to ensure the best results. PMID:23851612

  7. The Aligned z~1 Radio Galaxy 3C 280

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Susan E.; Stockton, Alan; Lacy, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The z~1 radio galaxy 3C 280 has a particularly striking rest-frame UV morphology, with multiple line and continuum components precisely aligned with the radio structure, including an obvious semicircular arc. Here we explore the nature of these various components by bringing together Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based imaging, ground-based spectroscopy, and radio mapping. From plausible decompositions of the spectra, we show that the continuum of the nuclear component is likely dominated by a combination of nebular thermal continuum, quasar light, and light from old stars. A component that falls directly on the probable path of the radio jet shows mostly nebular thermal continuum and includes contributions from a relatively young stellar population with age around 100 Myr. The arc appears to be completely dominated by line emission and nebular thermal continuum, with no evidence for a significant stellar contribution. Although much of the aligned light is in UV components, the underlying old elliptical galaxy is also well aligned with the radio axis. The elliptical galaxy is well fitted by a de Vaucouleurs profile, probably has a moderately old stellar population (~3 Gyr), and is a massive system with a velocity dispersion of σ~270 km s-1 that implies that it contains a supermassive black hole. Although the arc and the extended emission surrounding the eastern lobe suggest that interactions between the radio lobe and jet must have been important in creating the UV morphology, the ionization and kinematic properties in these components are more consistent with photoionization than shock excitation. 3C 280 may be a transition object between the compact steep-spectrum radio galaxies, which seem to be shock-dominated, and the extended radio sources, which may have evolved past this phase and rarely show shock signatures. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  8. Three-dimensional site response at KiK-net downhole arrays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Eric M.; Tanaka, Yasuo; Baise, Laurie G.; Kayen, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Ground motions at two Kiban-Kyoshin Network (KiK-net) strong motion downhole array sites in Hokkaido, Japan (TKCH08 in Taiki and TKCH05 in Honbetsu) illustrate the importance of three-dimensional (3D) site effects. These sites recorded the M8.0 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquake, with recorded accelerations above 0.4 g at both sites as well as numerous ground motions from smaller events. Weak ground motions indicate that site TKCH08 is well modeled with the assumption of plane SH waves traveling through a 1D medium (SH1D), while TKCH05 is characteristic of a poor fit to the SH1D theoretical response. We hypothesized that the misfit at TKCH05results from the heterogeneity of the subsurface. To test this hypothesis, we measured four S-wave velocity profiles in the vicinity (< 300 m) of each site with the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method. This KiK-net site pair is ideal for assessing the relative importance of 3D site effects and nonlinear site effects. The linear ground motions at TKCH05 isolate the 3D site effects, as we hypothesized from the linear ground motions and confirmed with our subsequent SASW surveys. The Tokachi-Oki time history at TKCH08 isolates the effects of nonlinearity from spatial heterogeneity because the 3D effects are negligible. The Tokachi-Oki time history at TKCH05 includes both nonlinear and 3D site effects. Comparisons of the accuracy of the SH1D model predictions of these surface time histories from the downhole time histories indicates that the 3D site effects are at least as important as nonlinear effects in this case. The errors associated with the assumption of a 1D medium and 1D wave propagation will be carried into a nonlinear analysis that relies on these same assumptions. Thus, the presence of 3D effects should be ruled out prior to a 1D nonlinear analysis. The SH1D residuals show that 3D effects can be mistaken for nonlinear effects.

  9. Imaging Fracking Zones by Microseismic Reverse Time Migration for Downhole Microseismic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an engineering tool to create fractures in order to better recover oil and gas from low permeability reservoirs. Because microseismic events are generally associated with fracturing development, microseismic monitoring has been used to evaluate the fracking process. Microseismic monitoring generally relies on locating microseismic events to understand the spatial distribution of fractures. For the multi-stage fracturing treatment, fractures created in former stages are strong scatterers in the medium and can induce strong scattering waves on the waveforms for microseismic events induced during later stages. In this study, we propose to take advantage of microseismic scattering waves to image fracking zones by using seismic reverse time migration method. For downhole microseismic monitoring that involves installing a string of seismic sensors in a borehole near the injection well, the observation geometry is actually similar to the VSP (vertical seismic profile) system. For this reason, we adapt the VSP migration method for the common shot gather to the common event gather. Microseismic reverse-time migration method involves solving wave equation both forward and backward in time for each microseismic event. At current stage, the microseismic RTM is based on 2D acoustic wave equation (Zhang and Sun, 2008), solved by the finite-difference method with PML absorbing boundary condition applied to suppress the reflections of artificial boundaries. Additionally, we use local wavefield decomposition instead of cross-correlation imaging condition to suppress the imaging noise. For testing the method, we create a synthetic dataset for a downhole microseismic monitoring system with multiple fracking stages. It shows that microseismic migration using individual event is able to clearly reveal the fracture zone. The shorter distance between fractures and the microseismic event the clearer the migration image is. By summing migration images for many

  10. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-12-31

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period September 30, 2001 to December 31, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well was permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed standard core analysis on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. Phillips has begun the sonic stimulation core tests. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has been to collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and has been run in a shallow well for initial power source testing. This testing was done in a temporarily abandoned well, Wynona Waterflood Unit, Well No.20-12 operated by Calumet Oil Co both in October and December 2001. The data acquisition system, and rod rotating equipment performed as designed. However, the DHVT experienced two internal failures during vibration operations. The DHVT has been repaired with modifications to improve its functionality. A proposed technical paper abstract has been accepted by the SPE to be presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, 13-17 April 2002. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on

  11. Determination of Solute Distributions in the Vadose Zone Using Downhole Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, L. M.; Brainard, J. R.; Bowman, R. S.; Hendrickx, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    We used down-hole electromagnetic induction to determine the distribution of a salt pulse added to an unsaturated soil profile. Water was applied to the surface at a flux of 2.7 cm/d over a 3-m by 3-m area. After approximately 1100 days, a 6.9-g/L slug of NaCl was added to the infiltration water, increasing the irrigation water conductivity from 80 mS/m to 1300 mS/m. Electrical conductivity measurements were collected weekly with an EM39 probe (Geonics LTD., Mississauga, ON, Canada) in 13 12-m deep boreholes installed over a 16-m by 16-m area. Three-dimensional images based on these measurements showed salt distributions reflecting the site stratigraphy and the shape of the wetted bulb under the infiltrometer. The calculated mass of salt in the profile was compared to the known mass of salt infiltrated at the surface. Following models designed primarily for agricultural soils, the measured bulk soil conductivity (ECa) was converted to soil water conductivity (ECw) using estimates of the volumetric water content from monthly neutron probe measurements and the percent clay from lab analysis of continuous core samples. The calculations showed a close correspondence over time (r2 = 0.98) between the calculated total mass of salt in the soil water and the known mass of salt infiltrated at the surface. The low water content (<15% by volume) and low bulk soil conductivity (<100 mS/m) at the test site presented more resistive conditions than previous studies of this type and were sources of uncertainty in the calculated ECw values. Errors in the calculated mass of salt were particularly evident during the initial stages of the salt infiltration and following the salt pulse, when the average ECw was low. Sensitivity analyses showed that the calculated ECw was strongly dependent on the assumed cutoff between immobile and mobile water content. Calculations were relatively insensitive to soil temperature and percent clay. The results of this study indicate that downhole EM

  12. Acoustic plane waves incident on an oblique clamped panel in a rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unz, H.; Roskam, J.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of acoustic plane waves incident on an oblique clamped panel in a rectangular duct was developed from basic theoretical concepts. The coupling theory between the elastic vibrations of the panel (plate) and the oblique incident acoustic plane wave in infinite space was considered in detail, and was used for the oblique clamped panel in the rectangular duct. The partial differential equation which governs the vibrations of the clamped panel (plate) was modified by adding to it stiffness (spring) forces and damping forces. The Transmission Loss coefficient and the Noise Reduction coefficient for oblique incidence were defined and derived in detail. The resonance frequencies excited by the free vibrations of the oblique finite clamped panel (plate) were derived and calculated in detail for the present case.

  13. Stepwise unfolding of titin under force-clamp atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhauser, Andres F.; Hansma, Paul K.; Carrion-Vazquez, Mariano; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2001-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the implementation of a single-molecule force clamp adapted for use with an atomic force microscope. We show that under force-clamp conditions, an engineered titin protein elongates in steps because of the unfolding of its modules and that the waiting times to unfold are exponentially distributed. Force-clamp measurements directly measure the force dependence of the unfolding probability and readily captures the different mechanical stability of the I27 and I28 modules of human cardiac titin. Force-clamp spectroscopy promises to be a direct way to probe the mechanical stability of elastic proteins such as those found in muscle, the extracellular matrix, and cell adhesion.

  14. Substrate Clamping Effects on Irreversible Domain Wall Dynamics in Lead Zirconate Titanate Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Griggio, Flavio; Jesse, Stephen; Kumar, Amit; Ovchinnikov, Oleg S; Kim, H.; Jackson, T. N.; Damjanovic, Dragan; Kalinin, Sergei V; Trolier-Mckinstry, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    The role of long-range strain interactions on domain wall dynamics is explored through macroscopic and local measurements of nonlinear behavior in mechanically clamped and released polycrystalline lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) films. Released films show a dramatic change in the global dielectric nonlinearity and its frequency dependence as a function of mechanical clamping. Furthermore, we observe a transition from strong clustering of the nonlinear response for the clamped case to almost uniform nonlinearity for the released film. This behavior is ascribed to increased mobility of domain walls. These results suggest the dominant role of collective strain interactions mediated by the local and global mechanical boundary conditions on the domain wall dynamics. The work presented in this Letter demonstrates that measurements on clamped films may considerably underestimate the piezoelectric coefficients and coupling constants of released structures used in microelectromechanical systems, energy harvesting systems, and microrobots.

  15. Structure of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of a DNA Polymerase Sliding Clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Georgescu, R.; Yurieva, O; Kim, S; Kuriyan, J; Kong, X; O'Donnell, M

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerases attach to the DNA sliding clamp through a common overlapping binding site. We identify a small-molecule compound that binds the protein-binding site in the Escherichia coli ?-clamp and differentially affects the activity of DNA polymerases II, III, and IV. To understand the molecular basis of this discrimination, the cocrystal structure of the chemical inhibitor is solved in complex with ? and is compared with the structures of Pol II, Pol III, and Pol IV peptides bound to ?. The analysis reveals that the small molecule localizes in a region of the clamp to which the DNA polymerases attach in different ways. The results suggest that the small molecule may be useful in the future to probe polymerase function with ?, and that the ?-clamp may represent an antibiotic target.

  16. Shock Response of the Clamped Disk in Small Form Factor Hard Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bin; Shu, Dongwei; Shi, Baojun; Lu, Guoxing

    As small form factor (one-inch and smaller) hard disk drives are widely used in portable consumer appliances and gadgets, their mechanical robustness is of greater concern. In the previous work, it is found that when the disk is more tightly clamped, it helps to decrease the shock response of the disk and then avoid the head slap. In this paper, the real boundary condition of the disk for a small form factor hard disk drive from Seagate is investigated numerically. The disk is clamped between the clamp and the hub. The shock response of the disk under a half-sine acceleration pulse is simulated by using the finite element method. In the finite element model, both contact between disk and clamp and contact between disk and hub are considered. According to the simulation results, how to decrease the shock response of the disk is suggested.

  17. Design and testing of CRBRP insulated horizontal and vertical pipe clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Pollono, L.P.; Mello, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Primary Heat Transport system piping may be characterized as large-diameter, thin-wall piping which transports liquid sodium at high temperatures. The piping is arranged in accord with the elevated loop concept, consisting of large horizontal inplane, expansion loops and long, vertical runs of piping. These characteristics and the postulated thermal transient and seismic loads, which are imposed on the piping, dictate pipe clamp designs that are substantially different from standard off the shelf pipe clamp designs. The design features of the CRBRP horizontal and vertical pipe clamps for the large sodium piping, the various test programs used to verify the clamp designs, and the results of this testing are presented.

  18. An innovative method of cushioning metal clamp jaws during rubber dam isolation.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    1995-10-01

    Competent rubber dam use increases both operating speed and treatment quality. In many instances, however, the application of rubber dam clamps may cause immediate and/or postoperative discomfort, and some dentists continue to use this as a "justifiable" excuse for not employing rubber dam. This paper reviews the iatrogenic potential of metal rubber dam clamps, and introduces a new cushioning technique that makes use of light-cured provisional material.

  19. The TCF C-clamp DNA binding domain expands the Wnt transcriptome via alternative target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hoverter, Nate P.; Zeller, Michael D.; McQuade, Miriam M.; Garibaldi, Angela; Busch, Anke; Selwan, Elizabeth M.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Baldi, Pierre; Waterman, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    LEF/TCFs direct the final step in Wnt/β-catenin signalling by recruiting β-catenin to genes for activation of transcription. Ancient, non-vertebrate TCFs contain two DNA binding domains, a High Mobility Group box for recognition of the Wnt Response Element (WRE; 5′-CTTTGWWS-3′) and the C-clamp domain for recognition of the GC-rich Helper motif (5′-RCCGCC-3′). Two vertebrate TCFs (TCF-1/TCF7 and TCF-4/TCF7L2) use the C-clamp as an alternatively spliced domain to regulate cell-cycle progression, but how the C-clamp influences TCF binding and activity genome-wide is not known. Here, we used a doxycycline inducible system with ChIP-seq to assess how the C-clamp influences human TCF1 binding genome-wide. Metabolic pulse-labeling of nascent RNA with 4′Thiouridine was used with RNA-seq to connect binding to the Wnt transcriptome. We find that the C-clamp enables targeting to a greater number of gene loci for stronger occupancy and transcription regulation. The C-clamp uses Helper sites concurrently with WREs for gene targeting, but it also targets TCF1 to sites that do not have readily identifiable canonical WREs. The coupled ChIP-seq/4′Thiouridine-seq analysis identified new Wnt target genes, including additional regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, C-clamp containing isoforms of TCFs are potent transcriptional regulators with an expanded transcriptome directed by C-clamp-Helper site interactions. PMID:25414359

  20. The sliding clamp tethers the endonuclease domain of MutL to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Monica C.; Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Randall, Justin R.; Cai, Jiudou; Simmons, Lyle A.; Sutton, Mark D.; Guarné, Alba

    2015-01-01

    The sliding clamp enhances polymerase processivity and coordinates DNA replication with other critical DNA processing events including translesion synthesis, Okazaki fragment maturation and DNA repair. The relative binding affinity of the sliding clamp for its partners determines how these processes are orchestrated and is essential to ensure the correct processing of newly replicated DNA. However, while stable clamp interactions have been extensively studied; dynamic interactions mediated by the sliding clamp remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize the interaction between the bacterial sliding clamp (β-clamp) and one of its weak-binding partners, the DNA mismatch repair protein MutL. Disruption of this interaction causes a mild mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli, but completely abrogates mismatch repair activity in Bacillus subtilis. We stabilize the MutL-β interaction by engineering two cysteine residues at variable positions of the interface. Using disulfide bridge crosslinking, we have stabilized the E. coli and B. subtilis MutL-β complexes and have characterized their structures using small angle X-ray scattering. We find that the MutL-β interaction greatly stimulates the endonuclease activity of B. subtilis MutL and supports this activity even in the absence of the N-terminal region of the protein. PMID:26384423

  1. MEMS-based clamp with a passive hold function for precision position retaining of micro manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, D. M.; de Jong, B. R.; de Boer, M. J.; Jansen, H. V.; van Dijk, J.; Krijnen, G. J. M.; Soemers, H. M. J. R.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper the design, modeling and fabrication of a precision MEMS-based clamp with a relatively large clamping force are presented. The purpose of the clamp is to mechanically fix a six-degree-of-freedom (DOF) MEMS-based sample manipulator (Brouwer et al J. Int. Soc. Precis. Eng. Nanotechnol. submitted) once the sample has been positioned in all DOFs. The clamping force is generated by a rotational electrostatic comb-drive actuator and can be latched passively by a parallel plate type electrostatically driven locking device. The clamp design is based on the principles of exact constraint design, resulting in a high actuation compliance (flexibility) combined with a high suspension stiffness. Therefore, a relatively large blocking force of 1.4 mN in relation to the used area of 1.8 mm2 is obtained. The fabrication is based on silicon bulk micromachining technology and combines a high-aspect-ratio deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), conformal deposition of low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) silicon nitride and an anisotropic potassium hydroxide (KOH) backside etching technology. Special attention is given to void reduction of SixNy trench isolation and reduction of heating phenomena during front-side release etching. Guidelines are given for the applied process. Measurements showed that the clamp was able to fix, hold and release a test actuator. The dynamic behavior was in good agreement with the modal analysis.

  2. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A

    2016-08-23

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor-translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  3. The development of high quality seals for silicon patch-clamp chips.

    PubMed

    Sordel, Thomas; Kermarrec, Frédérique; Sinquin, Yann; Fonteille, Isabelle; Labeau, Michel; Sauter-Starace, Fabien; Pudda, Catherine; de Crécy, François; Chatelain, François; De Waard, Michel; Arnoult, Christophe; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie

    2010-10-01

    Planar patch-clamp is a two-dimensional variation of traditional patch-clamp. By contrast to classical glass micropipette, the seal quality of silicon patch-clamp chips (i.e. seal resistance and seal success rate) have remained poor due to the planar geometry and the nature of the substrate and thus partially obliterate the advantages related to planar patch-clamp. The characterization of physical parameters involved in seal formation is thus of major interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that the physical characterization of surfaces by a set of techniques (Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), surface energy (polar and dispersive contributions), drop angles, impedance spectroscopy, combined with a statistical design of experiments (DOE)) allowed us discriminating chips that provide relevant performances for planar patch-clamp analysis. Analyses of seal quality demonstrate that dispersive interactions and micropore size are the most crucial physical parameters of chip surfaces, by contrast to surface roughness and dielectric membrane thickness. This multi-scale study combined with electrophysiological validation of chips on a diverse set of cell-types expressing various ion channels (IRK1, hERG and hNa(v)1.5 channels) unveiled a suitable patch-clamp chip candidate. This original approach may inspire novel strategies for selecting appropriate surface parameters dedicated to biochips. PMID:20605047

  4. Early identification of hERG liability in drug discovery programs by automated patch clamp

    PubMed Central

    Danker, Timm; Möller, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Blockade of the cardiac ion channel coded by human ether-à-gogo-related gene (hERG) can lead to cardiac arrhythmia, which has become a major concern in drug discovery and development. Automated electrophysiological patch clamp allows assessment of hERG channel effects early in drug development to aid medicinal chemistry programs and has become routine in pharmaceutical companies. However, a number of potential sources of errors in setting up hERG channel assays by automated patch clamp can lead to misinterpretation of data or false effects being reported. This article describes protocols for automated electrophysiology screening of compound effects on the hERG channel current. Protocol details and the translation of criteria known from manual patch clamp experiments to automated patch clamp experiments to achieve good quality data are emphasized. Typical pitfalls and artifacts that may lead to misinterpretation of data are discussed. While this article focuses on hERG channel recordings using the QPatch (Sophion A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark) technology, many of the assay and protocol details given in this article can be transferred for setting up different ion channel assays by automated patch clamp and are similar on other planar patch clamp platforms. PMID:25228880

  5. A new technique for multiple re-use of planar patch clamp chips.

    PubMed

    Kao, Liyo; Abuladze, Natalia; Shao, Xuesi M; McKeegan, Kevin; Kurtz, Ira

    2012-07-15

    The patch clamp technique is widely used for recording the activity of ion channels in single cells and lipid bilayers. Most platforms utilize borosilicate glass configured as a pipette, however more recently planar patch clamp chips have been developed that require less technical expertise. Planar patch clamp chips in systems like the Nanion Port-a-Patch are useful in that they allow more rapid throughput in drug screening studies. This technique also has the ability to perform rapid solution changes from the intracellular side. A current drawback with the planar patch clamp chips is the need to utilize a separate chip for each experiment. This increases the cost of each experiment and is due to the fact that the ∼1μm aperture used for cell attachment is thought to retain cellular debris thereby preventing subsequent cell attachment and formation of GΩ seals. In the present study we have for the first time solved the technical problem of developing a simple protocol for re-use of Nanion planar patch clamp chips. The re-use methodology is demonstrated in whole cell patch clamp studies of HEK-293 cells expressing the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A in protocols involving external and internal solution changes, and CHO-K1 cells with incorporated gramicidin channels. PMID:22609774

  6. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins—protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor—translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  7. Mechanism of polymerase collision release from sliding clamps on the lagging strand

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Kurth, Isabel; Yao, Nina Y; Stewart, Jelena; Yurieva, Olga; O'Donnell, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Replicative polymerases are tethered to DNA by sliding clamps for processive DNA synthesis. Despite attachment to a sliding clamp, the polymerase on the lagging strand must cycle on and off DNA for each Okazaki fragment. In the ‘collision release' model, the lagging strand polymerase collides with the 5′ terminus of an earlier completed fragment, which triggers it to release from DNA and from the clamp. This report examines the mechanism of collision release by the Escherichia coli Pol III polymerase. We find that collision with a 5′ terminus does not trigger polymerase release. Instead, the loss of ssDNA on filling in a fragment triggers polymerase to release from the clamp and DNA. Two ssDNA-binding elements are involved, the τ subunit of the clamp loader complex and an OB domain within the DNA polymerase itself. The τ subunit acts as a switch to enhance polymerase binding at a primed site but not at a nick. The OB domain acts as a sensor that regulates the affinity of Pol III to the clamp in the presence of ssDNA. PMID:19696739

  8. Observations of Titan 3C-4 Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan 3C-4 Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper will present a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots will also be shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) believed to be associated with the Titan break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN# 25001, 33509, 33510) and the parent rocket body. Color index data will be used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In 2012, the SSN added 16 additional fragments to the catalogue. MODEST acquired magnitude data on ten Titan fragments in late 2012 and early 2013. The magnitude distribution of all the observed fragments are analyzed as a function of time. In order to better characterize the breakup fragments spectral measurements were acquired on the original rocket body and five Titan fragments using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., Aluminum and various paints) and categorized based on known absorption features for spacecraft materials.

  9. Multispectral Imaging of the Jet in 3C346

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. P.; Gardner, J. P.; Heap, S. R.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    1998-12-01

    Much progress has been made towards understanding the physics of extra-galactic jet flow in the past 10 years, through numerical modeling and detailed multi-frequency radio mapping. However, we still admit that basic parameters such as the magnetic field strength, the particle density, the bulk Lorentz factor and jet configuration (e.g., fast inner jet and slower outer sheath), and the nature and need for shocks remain unknown. However, by resolving the jets spectrally and spatially and pushing the observations to the higher energies with sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the cooling scale lengths, we can place unique constraints on the physical composition of, and acceleration mechanisms in, extra-galactic jets. The tightest constraints on the physics of jets come not from radio observations, but from observations in the optical, UV, and x-ray, where the lifetimes of the synchrotron emitting particles are measured in hundreds of years and the particles travel distances of hundreds of parsecs. To this end, we present radio through vacuum ultraviolet (STIS FUV-MAMA) spatially resolved images of the radio jet in 3C346 and use them examine the spatial variation of the spectral indices. Because the lifetime of the synchrotron radiating particles is inversely proportional to the observed frequency we can use the vastly different timescales (and therefore length scales) over which the radio (t ~ 10(5-7) yr.) and ultraviolet (t ~ 10(2-3) yr.) emitting particles cool to begin to place constraints on the magnetic field strengths. Also, the curvature of the spectrum as a function of position can be compared with aging models to constrain the magnetic field strength and to test the hypothesis that the magnetic field in radio jets may be substantially below equipartition (Heinz and Begelman 1997).

  10. Multiwavelength Observations of 3C66A in 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, M.; Joshi, M.; Fossati, G.; Smith, I. A.; Mukherjee, R.; Bramel, D.; Cui, W.; WEBT Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The radio-selected BL Lac object 3C66A was the target of an intensive multiwavelength observing campaign in the last quarter of 2003 and early 2004. It was monitored by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) collaboration of optical observers, in tandem with 20 X-ray monitoring observations by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), VHE gamma-ray observations by STACEE and VERITAS, and long-term monitoring at radio frequencies. In addition, 9 high-spatial-resolution observations using the VLA are being carried out during the campaign and throughout the year 2004 to follow possible structural changes of the source. A gradual brightening of the source over the course of the campaign was observed at all optical frequencies, culminating in a very bright flare at the end of January 2004. Optical light curves indicate intraday microvariability on time scales down to about 1.3 hours. No significant color-magnitude correlation for the entire data set was evident, but there is a slight indication of a hardness - intensity anti-correlation on intraday time scales. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon spectral index of ˜ 2.1, indicating that the RXTE energy band might be located right at the intersection of the synchrotron and the high-energy emission components of the broadband spectral energy distribution. No significant flux or spectral variability at X-ray energies was detected. We extracted snapshot spectral energy distributions at various times throughout the campaign, and present first spectral fits to those SEDs. This work was partially supported by NASA RXTE GO grant no. NNG 04GB13G.

  11. Downhole steam generator with improved preheating/cooling features. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Donaldson, A.B.; Hoke, D.E.; Mulac, A.J.

    1980-10-10

    An apparatus is described for downhole steam generation employing dual-stage preheaters for liquid fuel and for the water. A first heat exchange jacket for the fuel surrounds the fuel/oxidant mixing section of the combustor assembly downstream of the fuel nozzle and contacts the top of the combustor unit of the combustor assembly, thereby receiving heat directly from the combustion of the fuel/oxidant. A second stage heat exchange jacket surrounds an upper portion of the oxidant supply line adjacent the fuel nozzle receiving further heat from the compression heat which results from pressurization of the oxidant. The combustor unit includes an inner combustor sleeve whose inner wall defines the combustion zone. The inner combustor sleeve is surrounded by two concentric water channels, one defined by the space between the inner combustor sleeve and an intermediate sleeve, and the second defined by the space between the intermediate sleeve and an outer cylindrical housing. The channels are connected by an annular passage adjacent the top of the combustor assembly and the countercurrent nature of the water flow provides efficient cooling of the inner combustor sleeve. An annular water ejector with a plurality of nozzles is provided to direct water downwardly into the combustor unit at the boundary of the combustion zone and along the lower section of the intermediate sleeve.

  12. Casingless down-hole for sealing an ablation volume and obtaining a sample for analysis

    DOEpatents

    Noble, D.T.; Braymen, S.D.; Anderson, M.S.

    1996-10-01

    A casing-less down hole sampling system for acquiring a subsurface sample for analysis using an inductively coupled plasma system is disclosed. The system includes a probe which is pushed into the formation to be analyzed using a hydraulic ram system. The probe includes a detachable tip member which has a soil point and a barb, with the soil point aiding the penetration of the earth, and the barb causing the tip member to disengage from the probe and remain in the formation when the probe is pulled up. The probe is forced into the formation to be tested, and then pulled up slightly, to disengage the tip member and expose a column of the subsurface formation to be tested. An instrumentation tube mounted in the probe is then extended outward from the probe to longitudinally extend into the exposed column. A balloon seal mounted on the end of the instrumentation tube allows the bottom of the column to be sealed. A source of laser radiation is emitted from the instrumentation tube to ablate a sample from the exposed column. The instrumentation tube can be rotated in the probe to sweep the laser source across the surface of the exposed column. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated sample from the probe to the surface for testing in an inductively coupled plasma system. By testing at various levels in the down-hole as the probe is extracted from the soil, a profile of the subsurface formation may be obtained. 9 figs.

  13. Casingless down-hole for sealing an ablation volume and obtaining a sample for analysis

    DOEpatents

    Noble, Donald T.; Braymen, Steven D.; Anderson, Marvin S.

    1996-10-01

    A casing-less down hole sampling system for acquiring a subsurface sample for analysis using an inductively coupled plasma system is disclosed. The system includes a probe which is pushed into the formation to be analyzed using a hydraulic ram system. The probe includes a detachable tip member which has a soil point mad a barb, with the soil point aiding the penetration of the earth, and the barb causing the tip member to disengage from the probe and remain in the formation when the probe is pulled up. The probe is forced into the formation to be tested, and then pulled up slightly, to disengage the tip member and expose a column of the subsurface formation to be tested. An instrumentation tube mounted in the probe is then extended outward from the probe to longitudinally extend into the exposed column. A balloon seal mounted on the end of the instrumentation tube allows the bottom of the column to be sealed. A source of laser radiation is emitted from the instrumentation tube to ablate a sample from the exposed column. The instrumentation tube can be rotated in the probe to sweep the laser source across the surface of the exposed column. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated sample from the probe to the surface for testing in an inductively coupled plasma system. By testing at various levels in the down-hole as the probe is extracted from the soil, a profile of the subsurface formation may be obtained.

  14. Au-In-based Hermetic Sealing for MEMS Packaging for Down-Hole Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram, Vivek; Bangtao, Chen; Lip, Gan Chee; Rhee Min Woo, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Hermetic sealing of micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors for down-hole application requires high-quality void-free bonds, with metallic hermetic sealing being widely used for this purpose. As most of the MEMS sensors cannot withstand high temperatures, transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding is promising for metallic sealing applications, since the re-melting temperature of the bond is much higher than the bonding temperature. In this paper, major issues involving TLP bonding, including non-uniform diffusion kinetics across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compounds prior to bonding for fast reactive metallic systems like Au-In, have been addressed by using diffusion barriers. The performance of various diffusion barriers that include Ti, Ni, and Pt has been evaluated. Ni has been determined to be a prospective candidate, since it averts diffusion to a certain extent prior to TLP bonding. The mechanical strength and hermeticity of the Au-In joints have also been characterized after aging at 300 °C up to 500 h. No major changes in the thermo-mechanical properties of the AuIn and AuIn2 phases were observed and, hence, these phases are concluded to be thermally stable at this temperature regime. Improvements in hermeticity were confirmed when subjected to high-temperature thermal aging.

  15. Operating experience with ESP`s and permanent downhole flowmeters in Wytch Farm extended reach wells

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, A.; Allan, J.; Hill, G.

    1994-12-31

    One third of the recoverable reserves in BP`s UK onshore oilfield, Wytch Farm, lie in an offshore extension of the field. These reserves, which have until recently been undeveloped, are now being exploited using Electric Submersible Pump`s (ESP`s) in Extended Reach (ER) wells drilled from onshore wellsites. The relatively high productivities achieved, as a result of successful horizontal completions, have pushed ESP technology to the limits in terms of capacity and power requirements. This paper presents a case history of the unique set of problems encountered during and subsequent to start-up of the ESP`s in the first 3 of these wells. The problems, in particular, pump suction blockage problems, were directly attributable to the position of the ESP`s in the near horizontal section (82--85 degrees) of the wells. The paper also describes the innovative permanent downhole flowmeter system which was incorporated in the completion. The system measures and logs flow rate data, pump suction pressure, pump discharge pressure and temperature. Examples are presented which clearly demonstrate how these data have been invaluable in understanding the problems encountered in the initial ER wells and the role the system has played in extending ESP run lives. Finally, completion equipment modifications and operating procedure changes, which were successfully introduced to resolve the problems encountered in the first two wells, and avoid them in subsequent wells, are described.

  16. On using surface-source downhole-receiver logging to determine seismic slownesses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Thompson, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method to solve for slowness models from surface-source downhole-receiver seismic travel-times. The method estimates the slownesses in a single inversion of the travel-times from all receiver depths and accounts for refractions at layer boundaries. The number and location of layer interfaces in the model can be selected based on lithologic changes or linear trends in the travel-time data. The interfaces based on linear trends in the data can be picked manually or by an automated algorithm. We illustrate the method with example sites for which geologic descriptions of the subsurface materials and independent slowness measurements are available. At each site we present slowness models that result from different interpretations of the data. The examples were carefully selected to address the reliability of interface-selection and the ability of the inversion to identify thin layers, large slowness contrasts, and slowness gradients. Additionally, we compare the models in terms of ground-motion amplification. These plots illustrate the sensitivity of site amplifications to the uncertainties in the slowness model. We show that one-dimensional site amplifications are insensitive to thin layers in the slowness models; although slowness is variable over short ranges of depth, this variability has little affect on ground-motion amplification at frequencies up to 5 Hz.

  17. Tracer dye transport from a well fitted with a downhole heat exchanger, Klamath Falls, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstall, M.G.

    1990-02-01

    Low or medium temperature geothermal resources are often used for space and domestic hot water heating. If the resource is located at reasonably shallow depths and adjacent to a major population centre large amounts of relatively cheap, clean heat can be provided. Geothermal fluid is often brought to the surface, either under natural artesian pressure or by pumping, to be used in surface heat exchangers (SHEs). This method generally requires a second well for disposal of the cooled fluid and a substantial capital outlay for pumps and heat exchangers. Large amounts of heat can be extracted from just one or two wells using surface heat exchangers and the method can prove very cost effective in areas with a high density of energy intensive users. For smaller heat loads surface heat exchangers can become expensive and in many instances a downhole heat exchanger (DHE) installed directly in the well bore is capable of supplying cheap heat to a smaller number of users. This report first describes the methods used to carry out the series of dye tests, from well selection to injection of the dye samples. It then discusses the results of these tests in terms of how much dye was recovered, where it was recovered from and how long it took to arrive. The results of the concurrent temperature monitoring work and DHE heat output performance are also presented. Some recommendations are made for any future testing. 13 refs., 42 figs.

  18. Methods and computer executable instructions for marking a downhole elongate line and detecting same

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, Arthur D.

    2003-05-13

    Methods and computer executable instructions are provided for making an elongate line (22) with a plurality of marks (30) and detecting those marks (30) to determine a distance of the elongate line (22) in a downhole or a physical integrity thereof. In a preferred embodiment, each mark comprises a plurality of particles (44) having a substantially permanent magnetizing capability adhered to an exterior surface of the elongate line (22) at preselected intervals with an epoxy paint. The particles (44) are arranged at each interval as a plurality of bands (40). Thereafter, the particles are oriented into a magnetic signature for that interval by magnetizing the particles to create a magnetic field substantially normal to the exterior surface. This facilitates detection by a Hall effect probe. The magnetic signatures are stored in a computing configuration and, once a mark is detected, a correlation is made to a unique position on the elongate line by comparison with the stored magnetic signatures. Preferred particles include samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boride.

  19. Subsurface sediment contamination during borehole drilling with an air-actuated down-hole hammer.

    PubMed

    Malard, Florian; Datry, Thibault; Gibert, Janine

    2005-10-01

    Drilling methods can severely alter physical, chemical, and biological properties of aquifers, thereby influencing the reliability of water samples collected from groundwater monitoring wells. Because of their fast drilling rate, air-actuated hammers are increasingly used for the installation of groundwater monitoring wells in unconsolidated sediments. However, oil entrained in the air stream to lubricate the hammer-actuating device can contaminate subsurface sediments. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons, heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Cr, Zn, Pb, and Cd), and nutrients (particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) were measured in continuous sediment cores recovered during the completion of a 26-m deep borehole drilled with a down-hole hammer in glaciofluvial deposits. Total hydrocarbons, Cu, Ni, Cr and particulate organic carbon (POC) were all measured at concentrations far exceeding background levels in most sediment cores. Hydrocarbon concentration averaged 124 +/- 118 mg kg(-1) dry sediment (n = 78 samples) with peaks at depths of 8, 14, and 20 m below the soil surface (maximum concentration: 606 mg kg(-1)). The concentrations of hydrocarbons, Cu, Ni, Cr, and POC were positively correlated and exhibited a highly irregular vertical pattern, that probably reflected variations in air loss within glaciofluvial deposits during drilling. Because the penetration of contaminated air into the formation is unpreventable, the representativeness of groundwater samples collected may be questioned. It is concluded that air percussion drilling has strong limitations for well installation in groundwater quality monitoring surveys.

  20. System to inject steam and product oil from the same wellbore through downhole valve switching

    SciTech Connect

    Gondouin, M.

    1993-06-11

    The detailed design of a sliding sleeve valve operated by wireline has been completed. This Downhole Valve is obtained by modifications of two 2 7/8 in. commercial wireline-retrievable sleeve assemblies,which will be used to connect one of the upper branches of the patented Dual Whipstock to the 2 3/8 in. steam tubing,through a thermal expansion joint. Detailed engineering drawings and materials specifications have been completed. The design of the 30 ft-long joint comprising an H joint at the top a dual whipstock at the bottom and flow control devices for up to three drainholes equipped with 1.75 in. liners has been completed for a 7 in. cased well. This combination may be used in multi-layered reservoirs as well as in single layered reservoirs. It is also compatible with rod pump locations either above the kick-off pointsor near the base of the curved part of the drainhole liners. This design provides sufficient flexibility for most potential applications in the California market.

  1. Surface and downhole shear wave seismic methods for thick soil site investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, J.A.; Benjumea, B.; Harris, J.B.; Miller, R.D.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave velocity-depth information is required for predicting the ground motion response to earthquakes in areas where significant soil cover exists over firm bedrock. Rather than estimating this critical parameter, it can be reliably measured using a suite of surface (non-invasive) and downhole (invasive) seismic methods. Shear wave velocities from surface measurements can be obtained using SH refraction techniques. Array lengths as large as 1000 m and depth of penetration to 250 m have been achieved in some areas. High resolution shear wave reflection techniques utilizing the common midpoint method can delineate the overburden-bedrock surface as well as reflecting boundaries within the overburden. Reflection data can also be used to obtain direct estimates of fundamental site periods from shear wave reflections without the requirement of measuring average shear wave velocity and total thickness of unconsolidated overburden above the bedrock surface. Accurate measurements of vertical shear wave velocities can be obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer in soft sediments, or with a well-locked geophone array in a borehole. Examples from thick soil sites in Canada demonstrate the type of shear wave velocity information that can be obtained with these geophysical techniques, and show how these data can be used to provide a first look at predicted ground motion response for thick soil sites. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Analysis of impactor residues in tray clamps from the Long Duration Exposure Facility. Part 2: Clamps from Bay B of the satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was placed in low-Earth orbit (LEO) in 1984 and recovered 5.7 years later. The LDEF was host to several individual experiments specifically designed to characterize critical aspects of meteoroid and debris environment in LEO. However, it was realized from the beginning that the most efficient use of the satellite would be to examine the entire surface for impact features. In this regard, particular interest centered on common exposed materials that faced in all LDEF pointing directions. Among the most important of these materials was the tray clamps. Therefore, in an effort to better understand the nature of particulates in LEO and their effects on spacecraft hardware, residues found in impact features on LDEF tray clamp surfaces are being analyzed. This catalog presents all data from clamps from Bay B of the LDEF. NASA Technical Memorandum 104759 has cataloged impacts that occurred on Bay B (published March 1993). Subsequent catalogs will include clamps from succeeding bays of the satellite.

  3. Introduction of a modular automated voltage-clamp platform and its correlation with manual human Ether-à-go-go related gene voltage-clamp data.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Olaf; Himmel, Herbert; Rascher-Eggstein, Gesa; Knott, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    In investigating ion channel pharmacology, the manual patch clamp is still considered the gold standard for data quality, notwithstanding the major drawbacks of low throughput and the need for skilled operators. The automated patch clamp platform CytoPatch™ Instrument overcomes these restrictions. Its modular fully automated design makes it possible to obtain scalable throughput without the need for well-trained operators. Its chip design and perfusion system reproduces the manual patch technique, thus ensuring optimal data quality. Further, the use of stably transfected frozen cells, usable immediately after thawing, eliminates the cell quality impairment and low success rates associated with a running cell culture and renders screening costs accurately calculable. To demonstrate the applicability of this platform, 18 blinded compounds were assessed for their impact on the cardiac human Ether-à-go-go related gene K(+) channel. The IC(50) values obtained by the CytoPatch Instrument using the frozen human embryonic kidney 293 cells showed a high correlation (R(2)=0.928) with those obtained from manual patch clamp recordings with human embryonic kidney 293 cells from a running cell culture. Moreover, this correlation extended to sticky compounds such as terfenadine or astemizole. In conclusion, the CytoPatch Instrument operated with frozen cells ready to use directly after thawing provides the same high data quality known from the manual voltage clamp and has the added benefit of enhanced throughput for use in ion channel screening and safety assessment. PMID:21675869

  4. Development and Test of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson, Bjorn N.P.

    2015-02-28

    To address the critical site characterization and monitoring needs for CCS programs, US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Paulsson, Inc. in 2010 a contract to design, build and test a fiber optic based ultra-large bandwidth clamped borehole seismic vector array capable of deploying up to one thousand 3C sensor pods suitable for deployment into high temperature and high pressure boreholes. Paulsson, Inc. has completed a design or a unique borehole seismic system consisting of a novel drill pipe based deployment system that includes a hydraulic clamping mechanism for the sensor pods, a new sensor pod design and most important – a unique fiber optic seismic vector sensor with technical specifications and capabilities that far exceed the state of the art seismic sensor technologies. These novel technologies were all applied to the new borehole seismic system. In combination these technologies will allow for the deployment of up to 1,000 3C sensor pods in vertical, deviated or horizontal wells. Laboratory tests of the fiber optic seismic vector sensors developed during this project have shown that the new borehole seismic sensor technology is capable of generating outstanding high vector fidelity data with extremely large bandwidth: 0.01 – 6,000 Hz. Field tests have shown that the system can record events at magnitudes much smaller than M-2.3 at frequencies up to 2,000 Hz. The sensors have also proved to be about 100 times more sensitive than the regular coil geophones that are used in borehole seismic systems today. The fiber optic seismic sensors have furthermore been qualified to operate at temperatures over 300°C (572°F). The fibers used for the seismic sensors in the system are used to record Distributed Temperature Sensor (DTS) data allowing additional value added data to be recorded simultaneously with the seismic vector sensor data.

  5. Simultaneous Multiwavelength Monitoring of 3C66A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettcher, M.

    2004-01-01

    The radio-selected BL Lac object 3C66A was the target of an intensive multiwavelength campaign from Sept. 2003 through Feb. 2004. It was monitored by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) collaboration, in tandem with 20 X-ray monitoring observations by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), VHE gamma-ray observations by STACEE and VERITAS, and long-term monitoring at radio frequencies. In addition. 9 observations using the VLBA are being carried out during the campaign and throughout the year 2004 to follow possible structural changes of the source. 21 pointings with RXTE during the period Sept. 15 - Dec. 27, 2003. All collected data have been fully analyzed, and first results have already been published at the 8th HEAD Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in Sept. 2004, and will also be presented at the 205th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA, in Jan. 2005. A first Journal paper, to be submitted to the Astrophysical Journal, is currently in preparation, and we plan to have it ready for submission in January 2005. A gradual brightening of the source over the course of the campaign was observed at all optical frequencies, culminating in a very bright flare at the end of January 2004. Optical light curves indicate intraday microvariability on time scales down to about 1.3 hours. No significant color-magnitude correlation for the entire data set was evident, but there is a slight indication of a gradual spectral softening in the optical over the entire duration of multi-day outbursts (in both the rising and decaying phase). The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon spectral index of approx. 2.1, indicating that the RXTE energy band might be located right at the intersection of the synchrotron and the high-energy emission components. No significant flux or spectral variability at X-ray energies was detected, though there seems to be a trend of very modest brightening in tandem with the optical flux. The first 4 VLBA epochs indicate a rather smooth jet with

  6. Intermittent selective clamping improves rat liver regeneration by attenuating oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Ben Mosbah, I; Duval, H; Mbatchi, S-F; Ribault, C; Grandadam, S; Pajaud, J; Morel, F; Boudjema, K; Compagnon, P; Corlu, A

    2014-03-06

    Intermittent clamping of the portal trial is an effective method to avoid excessive blood loss during hepatic resection, but this procedure may cause ischemic damage to liver. Intermittent selective clamping of the lobes to be resected may represent a good alternative as it exposes the remnant liver only to the reperfusion stress. We compared the effect of intermittent total or selective clamping on hepatocellular injury and liver regeneration. Entire hepatic lobes or only lobes to be resected were subjected twice to 10 min of ischemia followed by 5 min of reperfusion before hepatectomy. We provided evidence that the effect of intermittent clamping can be damaging or beneficial depending to its mode of application. Although transaminase levels were similar in all groups, intermittent total clamping impaired liver regeneration and increased apoptosis. In contrast, intermittent selective clamping improved liver protein secretion and hepatocyte proliferation when compared with standard hepatectomy. This beneficial effect was linked to better adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) recovery, nitric oxide production, antioxidant activities and endoplasmic reticulum adaptation leading to limit mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Interestingly, transient and early chaperone inductions resulted in a controlled activation of the unfolded protein response concomitantly to endothelial nitric oxide synthase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 MAPK activation that favors liver regeneration. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a central target through which intermittent selective clamping exerts its cytoprotective effect and improves liver regeneration. This procedure could be applied as a powerful protective modality in the field of living donor liver transplantation and liver surgery.

  7. Improvement in cardioplegic perfusion technique in single aortic clamping - initial results

    PubMed Central

    Sobral, Marcelo Luiz Peixoto; dos Santos Júnior, Sérgio Francisco; de Sá, Juliano Cavalcante; Terrazas, Anderson da Silva; Trompieri, Daniel Francisco de Mendonça; de Sousa, Thierry Araújo Nunes; dos Santos, Gilmar Geraldo; Stolf, Noedir Antonio Groppo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The most common method used for myocardial protection is administering cardioplegic solution in the coronary circulation. Nevertheless, protection may be achieved by intermittent perfusion of the coronary system with patient's own blood. The intermittent perfusion may be performed by multiple sequences of clamping and opening of the aortic clamp or due single clamping and accessory cannulation of the aortic root as in the improved technique proposed in this study, reperfusion without the need for multiple clamping of the aorta. Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome and the occurrence of neurological events in in-hospital patients submitted to myocardial revascularization surgery with the "improved technique" of intermittent perfusion of the aortic root with single clamping. Methods This is a prospective, cross-sectional, observational study that describes a myocardial management technique that consists of intermittent perfusion of the aortic root with single clamping in which 50 patients (mean age 58.5±7.19 years old) have been submitted to the myocardial revasculrization surgery under the proposed technique. Clinical and laboratory variables, pre- and post-surgery, have been assessed. Results The mean peak level of post-surgery CKMB was 51.64±27.10 U/L in the second post-surgery and of troponin I was 3.35±4.39 ng/ml in the fourth post-surgery, within normal limits. No deaths have occurred and one patient presented mild neurological disorder. Hemodynamic monitoring has not indicated any changes. Conclusion The myocardial revascularization surgery by perfusion with the improved technique with intermittent aortic root with single clamping proved to be safe, enabling satisfactory clinical results. PMID:25140473

  8. Can selective arterial clamping with fluorescence imaging preserve kidney function during robotic partial nephrectomy?

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Tyler R.; Bjurlin, Marc A.; Wysock, James S.; Borofsky, Michael S.; Marien, Tracy P.; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Stifelman, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare renal functional outcomes in robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) with selective arterial clamping guided by near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging to a matched cohort of patients who underwent RPN without selective arterial clamping and NIRF imaging. Methods From April 2011 to December 2012, NIRF imaging-enhanced RPN with selective clamping was utilized in 42 cases. Functional outcomes of successful cases were compared with a cohort of patients, matched by tumor size, preoperative eGFR, functional kidney status, age, sex, body mass index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score, who underwent RPN without selective clamping and NIRF imaging. Results In matched-pair analysis, selective clamping with NIRF was associated with superior kidney function at discharge, as demonstrated by postoperative eGFR (78.2 vs 68.5 ml/min per 1.73m2; P=0.04), absolute reduction of eGFR (−2.5 vs −14.0 ml/min per 1.73m2; P<0.01) and percent change in eGFR (−1.9% vs −16.8%, P<0.01). Similar trends were noted at three month follow up but these differences became non-significant (P[eGFR]=0.07], P[absolute reduction of eGFR]=0.10, and P[percent change in eGFR]=0.07). In the selective clamping group, a total of four perioperative complications occurred in three patients, all of which were Clavien I-III. Conclusion Utilization of NIRF imaging was associated with improved short-term renal functional outcomes when compared to RPN without selective arterial clamping and NIRF imaging. With this effect attenuated at later follow-up, randomized prospective studies and long-term assessment of kidney-specific functional outcomes are needed to further assess the benefits of this technology. PMID:24909960

  9. Intermittent selective clamping improves rat liver regeneration by attenuating oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Ben Mosbah, I; Duval, H; Mbatchi, S-F; Ribault, C; Grandadam, S; Pajaud, J; Morel, F; Boudjema, K; Compagnon, P; Corlu, A

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent clamping of the portal trial is an effective method to avoid excessive blood loss during hepatic resection, but this procedure may cause ischemic damage to liver. Intermittent selective clamping of the lobes to be resected may represent a good alternative as it exposes the remnant liver only to the reperfusion stress. We compared the effect of intermittent total or selective clamping on hepatocellular injury and liver regeneration. Entire hepatic lobes or only lobes to be resected were subjected twice to 10 min of ischemia followed by 5 min of reperfusion before hepatectomy. We provided evidence that the effect of intermittent clamping can be damaging or beneficial depending to its mode of application. Although transaminase levels were similar in all groups, intermittent total clamping impaired liver regeneration and increased apoptosis. In contrast, intermittent selective clamping improved liver protein secretion and hepatocyte proliferation when compared with standard hepatectomy. This beneficial effect was linked to better adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) recovery, nitric oxide production, antioxidant activities and endoplasmic reticulum adaptation leading to limit mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Interestingly, transient and early chaperone inductions resulted in a controlled activation of the unfolded protein response concomitantly to endothelial nitric oxide synthase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 MAPK activation that favors liver regeneration. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a central target through which intermittent selective clamping exerts its cytoprotective effect and improves liver regeneration. This procedure could be applied as a powerful protective modality in the field of living donor liver transplantation and liver surgery. PMID:24603335

  10. Whole-Cell Electrical Activity Under Direct Mechanical Stimulus by AFM Cantilever Using Planar Patch Clamp Chip Approach.

    PubMed

    Upadhye, Kalpesh V; Candiello, Joseph E; Davidson, Lance A; Lin, Hai

    2011-06-01

    Patch clamp is a powerful tool for studying the properties of ion-channels and cellular membrane. In recent years, planar patch clamp chips have been fabricated from various materials including glass, quartz, silicon, silicon nitride, polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS), and silicon dioxide. Planar patch clamps have made automation of patch clamp recordings possible. However, most planar patch clamp chips have limitations when used in combination with other techniques. Furthermore, the fabrication methods used are often expensive and require specialized equipments. An improved design as well as fabrication and characterization of a silicon-based planar patch clamp chip are described in this report. Fabrication involves true batch fabrication processes that can be performed in most common microfabrication facilities using well established MEMS techniques. Our planar patch clamp chips can form giga-ohm seals with the cell plasma membrane with success rate comparable to existing patch clamp techniques. The chip permits whole-cell voltage clamp recordings on variety of cell types including Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, for times longer than most available patch clamp chips. When combined with a custom microfluidics chamber, we demonstrate that it is possible to perfuse the extra-cellular as well as intra-cellular buffers. The chamber design allows integration of planar patch clamp with atomic force microscope (AFM). Using our planar patch clamp chip and microfluidics chamber, we have recorded whole-cell mechanosensitive (MS) currents produced by directly stimulating human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells using an AFM cantilever. Our results reveal the spatial distribution of MS ion channels and temporal details of the responses from MS channels. The results show that planar patch clamp chips have great potential for multi-parametric high throughput studies of ion channel proteins. PMID:22174731

  11. Surface-downhole and crosshole geoelectrics for monitoring of brine injection at the Ketzin CO2 storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippe, Dennis; Bergmann, Peter; Labitzke, Tim; Wagner, Florian; Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia

    2016-04-01

    The Ketzin pilot site in Germany is the longest operating on-shore CO2 storage site in Europe. From June 2008 till August 2013, a total of ˜67,000 tonnes of CO2 were safely stored in a saline aquifer at depths of 630 m to 650 m. The storage site has now entered the abandonment phase, and continuation of the multi-disciplinary monitoring as part of the national project "CO2 post-injection monitoring and post-closure phase at the Ketzin pilot site" (COMPLETE) provides the unique chance to participate in the conclusion of the complete life cycle of a CO2 storage site. As part of the continuous evaluation of the functionality and integrity of the CO2 storage in Ketzin, from October 12, 2015 till January 6, 2015 a total of ˜2,900 tonnes of brine were successfully injected into the CO2 reservoir, hereby simulating in time-lapse the natural backflow of brine and the associated displacement of CO2. The main objectives of this brine injection experiment include investigation of how much of the CO2 in the pore space can be displaced by brine and if this displacement of CO2 during the brine injection differs from the displacement of formation fluid during the initial CO2 injection. Geophysical monitoring of the brine injection included continuous geoelectric measurements accompanied by monitoring of pressure and temperature conditions in the injection well and two adjacent observation wells. During the previous CO2 injection, the geoelectrical monitoring concept at the Ketzin pilot site consisted of permanent crosshole measurements and non-permanent large-scale surveys (Kiessling et al., 2010). Time-lapse geoelectrical tomographies derived from the weekly crosshole data at near-wellbore scale complemented by six surface-downhole surveys at a scale of 1.5 km showed a noticeable resistivity signature within the target storage zone, which was attributed to the CO2 plume (Schmidt-Hattenberger et al., 2011) and interpreted in terms of relative CO2 and brine saturations (Bergmann

  12. Surface-downhole and crosshole geoelectrics for monitoring of brine injection at the Ketzin CO2 storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippe, Dennis; Bergmann, Peter; Labitzke, Tim; Wagner, Florian; Schmidt-Hattenberger, Cornelia

    2016-04-01

    The Ketzin pilot site in Germany is the longest operating on-shore CO2 storage site in Europe. From June 2008 till August 2013, a total of ˜67,000 tonnes of CO2 were safely stored in a saline aquifer at depths of 630 m to 650 m. The storage site has now entered the abandonment phase, and continuation of the multi-disciplinary monitoring as part of the national project "CO2 post-injection monitoring and post-closure phase at the Ketzin pilot site" (COMPLETE) provides the unique chance to participate in the conclusion of the complete life cycle of a CO2 storage site. As part of the continuous evaluation of the functionality and integrity of the CO2 storage in Ketzin, from October 12, 2015 till January 6, 2015 a total of ˜2,900 tonnes of brine were successfully injected into the CO2 reservoir, hereby simulating in time-lapse the natural backflow of brine and the associated displacement of CO2. The main objectives of this brine injection experiment include investigation of how much of the CO2 in the pore space can be displaced by brine and if this displacement of CO2 during the brine injection differs from the displacement of formation fluid during the initial CO2 injection. Geophysical monitoring of the brine injection included continuous geoelectric measurements accompanied by monitoring of pressure and temperature conditions in the injection well and two adjacent observation wells. During the previous CO2 injection, the geoelectrical monitoring concept at the Ketzin pilot site consisted of permanent crosshole measurements and non-permanent large-scale surveys (Kiessling et al., 2010). Time-lapse geoelectrical tomographies derived from the weekly crosshole data at near-wellbore scale complemented by six surface-downhole surveys at a scale of 1.5 km showed a noticeable resistivity signature within the target storage zone, which was attributed to the CO2 plume (Schmidt-Hattenberger et al., 2011) and interpreted in terms of relative CO2 and brine saturations (Bergmann

  13. A Two-Dimensional Zirconium Carbide by Selective Etching of Al3C3 from Nanolaminated Zr3Al3C5.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zha, Xianhu; Chen, Fan Y; Ye, Qun; Eklund, Per; Du, Shiyu; Huang, Qing

    2016-04-11

    The room-temperature synthesis of a new two-dimensional (2D) zirconium-containing carbide, Zr3C2T(z) MXene is presented. In contrast to traditional preparation of MXene, the layered ternary Zr3Al3C5 material instead of MAX phases is used as source under hydrofluoric acid treatment. The structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of the synthesized 2D carbide are investigated, combined with first-principles density functional calculations. A comparative study on the structrual stability of our obtained 2D Zr3C2T(z) and Ti3C2T(z) MXenes at elevated temperatures is performed. The obtained 2D Zr3C2T(z) exhibits relatively better ability to maintain 2D nature and strucural integrity compared to Ti-based Mxene. The difference in structural stability under high temperature condition is explained by a theoretical investigation on binding energy.

  14. Clamping instability and van der Waals forces in carbon nanotube mechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Aykol, Mehmet; Hou, Bingya; Dhall, Rohan; Chang, Shun-Wen; Branham, William; Qiu, Jing; Cronin, Stephen B

    2014-05-14

    We investigate the role of weak clamping forces, typically assumed to be infinite, in carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Due to these forces, we observe a hysteretic clamping and unclamping of the nanotube device that results in a discrete drop in the mechanical resonance frequency on the order of 5-20 MHz, when the temperature is cycled between 340 and 375 K. This instability in the resonant frequency results from the nanotube unpinning from the electrode/trench sidewall where it is bound weakly by van der Waals forces. Interestingly, this unpinning does not affect the Q-factor of the resonance, since the clamping is still governed by van der Waals forces above and below the unpinning. For a 1 μm device, the drop observed in resonance frequency corresponds to a change in nanotube length of approximately 50-65 nm. On the basis of these findings, we introduce a new model, which includes a finite tension around zero gate voltage due to van der Waals forces and shows better agreement with the experimental data than the perfect clamping model. From the gate dependence of the mechanical resonance frequency, we extract the van der Waals clamping force to be 1.8 pN. The mechanical resonance frequency exhibits a striking temperature dependence below 200 K attributed to a temperature-dependent slack arising from the competition between the van der Waals force and the thermal fluctuations in the suspended nanotube. PMID:24758201

  15. Generation of high-performance binding proteins for peptide motifs by affinity clamping

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Shohei; Huang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    We describe concepts and methodologies for generating “Affinity Clamps”, a new class of recombinant binding proteins that achieve high affinity and high specificity toward short peptide motifs of biological importance, which is a major challenge in protein engineering. The Affinity Clamping concept exploits the potential of nonhomologous recombination of protein domains in generating large changes in protein function and the inherent binding affinity and specificity of the so-called modular interaction domains toward short peptide motifs. Affinity Clamping creates a clamshell architecture that clamps onto a target peptide. The design processes involve (i) choosing a starting modular interaction domain appropriate for the target and applying structure-guided modifications, (ii) attaching a second domain, termed “enhancer domain” and (iii) optimizing the peptide-binding site located between the domains by directed evolution. The two connected domains work synergistically to achieve high levels of affinity and specificity that are unattainable with either domain alone. Because of the simple and modular architecture, affinity clamps are particularly well suited as building blocks for designing more complex functionalities. Affinity Clamping represents a major advance in protein design that is broadly applicable to the recognition of peptide motifs. PMID:23422435

  16. Dynamics of beta and proliferating cell nuclear antigen sliding clamps in traversing DNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Yao, N; Hurwitz, J; O'Donnell, M

    2000-01-14

    Chromosomal replicases of cellular organisms utilize a ring shaped protein that encircles DNA as a mobile tether for high processivity in DNA synthesis. These "sliding clamps" have sufficiently large linear diameters to encircle duplex DNA and are perhaps even large enough to slide over certain DNA secondary structural elements. This report examines the Escherichia coli beta and human proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamps for their ability to slide over various DNA secondary structures. The results show that these clamps are capable of traversing a 13-nucleotide ssDNA loop, a 4-base pair stem-loop, a 4-nucleotide 5' tail, and a 15-mer bubble within the duplex. However, upon increasing the size of these structures (20-nucleotide loop, 12-base pair stem-loop, 28-nucleotide 5' tail, and 20-nucleotide bubble) the sliding motion of the beta and proliferating cell nuclear antigen over these elements is halted. Studies of the E. coli replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, in chain elongation with the beta clamp demonstrate that upon encounter with an oligonucleotide annealed in its path, it traverses the duplex and resumes synthesis on the 3' terminus of the oligonucleotide. This sliding and resumption of synthesis occurs even when the oligonucleotide contains a secondary structure element, provided the beta clamp can traverse the structure. However, upon encounter with a downstream oligonucleotide containing a large internal secondary structure, the holoenzyme clears the obstacle by strand displacing the oligonucleotide from the template. Implications of these protein dynamics to DNA transactions are discussed. PMID:10625694

  17. Novel Low Loss Active Voltage Clamp Circuit for Series Connection of RCGCT thyristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Iwata, Akihiko

    This paper describes novel low loss active voltage clamp circuits for the series connection of RCGCT thyristors. For high voltage converters the series connection of power semiconductor devices is an essential technique for direct switching of high voltages. Several protection circuits have been applied to the series connection of RCGCT thyristors such as CRD snubber circuits which suppress over-voltages across RCGCT thyristors, and voltage balancing resistors to equalize voltage sharing in steady states. However, significant losses in these protection circuits lower the converter’s efficiency. We propose novel low-loss protection circuits, which have active voltage clamp snubber circuits and static voltage balancing circuits. The clamp capacitor voltage of the active voltage clamp snubber circuits are designed to be higher than the equally divided DC-Link voltage. This method can reduce the loss of the clamp circuit to no more than 1/10 of that of the conventional CRD snubber. Also the static voltage balancing circuits compensate for the voltage imbalance generated by the difference in the leakage current between the series connection RCGCT thyristors.

  18. Ion channel drug discovery and research: the automated Nano-Patch-Clamp technology.

    PubMed

    Brueggemann, A; George, M; Klau, M; Beckler, M; Steindl, J; Behrends, J C; Fertig, N

    2004-01-01

    Unlike the genomics revolution, which was largely enabled by a single technological advance (high throughput sequencing), rapid advancement in proteomics will require a broader effort to increase the throughput of a number of key tools for functional analysis of different types of proteins. In the case of ion channels -a class of (membrane) proteins of great physiological importance and potential as drug targets- the lack of adequate assay technologies is felt particularly strongly. The available, indirect, high throughput screening methods for ion channels clearly generate insufficient information. The best technology to study ion channel function and screen for compound interaction is the patch clamp technique, but patch clamping suffers from low throughput, which is not acceptable for drug screening. A first step towards a solution is presented here. The nano patch clamp technology, which is based on a planar, microstructured glass chip, enables automatic whole cell patch clamp measurements. The Port-a-Patch is an automated electrophysiology workstation, which uses planar patch clamp chips. This approach enables high quality and high content ion channel and compound evaluation on a one-cell-at-a-time basis. The presented automation of the patch process and its scalability to an array format are the prerequisites for any higher throughput electrophysiology instruments. PMID:16472222

  19. Timing of cord clamping in very preterm infants: more evidence is needed.

    PubMed

    Tarnow-Mordi, William O; Duley, Lelia; Field, David; Marlow, Neil; Morris, Jonathan; Newnham, John; Paneth, Nigel; Soll, Roger F; Sweet, David

    2014-08-01

    In December 2012, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists published a Committee Opinion entitled "Timing of umbilical cord clamping after birth." It stated that "evidence exists to support delayed cord clamping in preterm infants, when feasible. The single most important benefit for preterm infants is the possibility for a nearly 50% reduction in IVH." However, the Committee Opinion added that the ideal timing of umbilical cord clamping has yet to be determined and recommended that large clinical trials be conducted in the most preterm infants. Published randomized controlled trials include <200 infants of <30 weeks' gestation, with assessments of neurodevelopmental outcome in less than one-half of the children. This is a major gap in the evidence. Without reliable data from randomized controlled trials that optimally include childhood follow-up evaluations, we will not know whether delayed cord clamping may do more overall harm than good. Ongoing trials of delayed cord clamping plan to report childhood outcomes in >2000 additional very preterm infants. Current recommendations may need to change when these results become available. Greater international collaboration could accelerate resolution of whether this promising intervention will improve disability-free survival in about 1 million infants who will be born very preterm globally each year.

  20. Delayed Umbilical Cord Blood Clamping: First Line of Defense Against Neonatal and Age-Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sanberg, Paul R; Divers, Ryan; Mehindru, Anuj; Mehindru, Ankur; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2014-06-01

    The aging body is unable to maintain homeostasis in cell genesis and function. Stem cell-based regenerative medicine may reverse aging and treat age-related disorders. This perspective article discusses the therapeutic effects of stem cell transplantation on neonatal diseases, which may have long-lasting benefits affecting even the aging process. In particular, the article highlights the potential of the earliest transfer of stem cells between a mother and fetus via the umbilical cord during child birth and how this process may modify the clinical practice of umbilical cord clamping. While such umbilical cord clamping is routinely performed in an expeditious manner after birth for stem cell banking, the present article advances the concept that a delay in clamping the umbilical cord may actually allow more stem cells to be delivered from the mother to the fetus. The authors' overarching hypothesis is that early umbilical cord clamping results in an artificial loss of stem cells at birth and increases the infant's susceptibility to both neonatal and age-related diseases, while delaying umbilical cord clamping is perhaps the most effective and non-invasive way to transplant stem cells in order to treat these diseases.

  1. Ion channel drug discovery and research: the automated Nano-Patch-Clamp technology.

    PubMed

    Brueggemann, A; George, M; Klau, M; Beckler, M; Steindl, J; Behrends, J C; Fertig, N

    2004-01-01

    Unlike the genomics revolution, which was largely enabled by a single technological advance (high throughput sequencing), rapid advancement in proteomics will require a broader effort to increase the throughput of a number of key tools for functional analysis of different types of proteins. In the case of ion channels -a class of (membrane) proteins of great physiological importance and potential as drug targets- the lack of adequate assay technologies is felt particularly strongly. The available, indirect, high throughput screening methods for ion channels clearly generate insufficient information. The best technology to study ion channel function and screen for compound interaction is the patch clamp technique, but patch clamping suffers from low throughput, which is not acceptable for drug screening. A first step towards a solution is presented here. The nano patch clamp technology, which is based on a planar, microstructured glass chip, enables automatic whole cell patch clamp measurements. The Port-a-Patch is an automated electrophysiology workstation, which uses planar patch clamp chips. This approach enables high quality and high content ion channel and compound evaluation on a one-cell-at-a-time basis. The presented automation of the patch process and its scalability to an array format are the prerequisites for any higher throughput electrophysiology instruments.

  2. Lessons Learned From the Analysis of the SAFOD Downhole Instrument Package.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Wade; Mencin, David; Mattioli, Glen

    2013-04-01

    In September of 2008 a downhole instrument package (DIP) consisting of a string of seismometers and tilt meters in isolated pressure vessels (PODs) was installed in the SAFOD main borehole. This package was designed to protect the sensors from the corrosive borehole environment and to operate for two years. The SAFOD borehole is not sealed at the bottom allowing borehole gasses and fluids infiltratration. Previous short-term installations of instruments in the SAFOD main borehole had also failed as a result of corrosion of the wireline cable head. The average failure time for these installations was two weeks. The use of stainless steel tubing connected to the pressure vessels through gas tight fittings was designed to block borehole fluid and gas infiltration of the individual instruments within the PODs. Unfortunately, the DIP completely failed within a month of its installation. In October of 2010, the DIP was removed from the borehole and a failure analysis was performed. This analysis involved to following steps: 1. Analysis of data to understand timeline of failure 2. Remove instrument safely, maintaining integrity of spliced section and documenting any external clues. Test instrument at surface 3. Open PODs in a way that allows for sampling and avoids damaging instruments. 4. Chemical analysis of fluids recovered from splices and PODs. 5. Instrument failure analysis by the instrument manufacturers. The analysis found that there were several design flaws in the DIP. This included the use of motor oil to take up air space in the individual PODs, use of a large number of gas tight seals, lack of internal seals, poorly done solder joints, use of non-temperature rated sensors, and lack of management oversight. The lessons learned from the attempts to instrument the SAFOD borehole are critical to the success of future deep borehole projects.

  3. IMPROVED DOWN-HOLE CPT TOOLS FOR THE DETECTION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Martin L. Gildea; Stephen P. Farrington, P.E.; Wesley L. Bratton, Ph.D., PE

    1998-09-01

    Conventional soil and groundwater sampling procedures present many opportunities for loss of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by exposing sample media to the atmosphere during transfers between sampling devices and containers, ultimately affecting the quality of the analytical results. Inaccurate characterization data often leads to improperly designed remedial systems that slow the clean-up process and increase the cost. For these reasons, in situ methods for sample extraction and real time analysis provide attractive alternatives to conventional sampling and analysis. Under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the investigators continued development of a system that combines High Speed Gas Chromatography techniques with Cone Penetration Testing to achieve near-real time analysis of soils and groundwater for chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbon contamination (PCE, TCE, BTEX) during site characterization. The system combines three new CPT tools with an up-hole analyzer. The Dynamic Thermal Desorption (DTD) probe provides the up-hole analyzer with continuously sampled soil gas, enhancing detection limits by heating the soil matrix during penetration to thermally desorb volatile organic contaminants. The CPT In Situ Purge Probe (CISP) purges a water sample in situ, transferring the purge gas up-hole for analysis. Alternatively, soil gas or purge gas from the DTD probe or the CISP can be diverted to a Downhole Trap Module (DTM), which traps contaminants on conventional trap media for later analysis in a fixed laboratory. While the effectiveness of the CISP was hampered by the tendency of fine grained materials to clog its sample inlet filter, the DTD probe and the DTM were demonstrated to perform their intended functions well.

  4. Supervised classification of down-hole physical properties measurements using neural network to predict the lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi, Omid; Smith, Richard S.; Tinkham, Douglas K.

    2016-01-01

    The reliability of rock-type prediction using down-hole density, gamma ray response, and magnetic susceptibility measurements was evaluated at the Victoria property, Sudbury, ON. A supervised neural network, trained using lithological information from drill hole FNX1168, yields a predictive accuracy of 83% for the training data. Applying the trained network on drill hole FNX1182 resulted in 64% of the rock types being correctly classified when compared with the classification produced by geologists during logging of the core. The homogenous rock types, like quartz diorite, had a high accuracy of classification; while the heterogeneous rock types such as diabase were poorly classified. Overlap between physical properties of rock types caused by heterogeneity or inherent similarity in physical properties of rock types, which were verified by observing the cores, accounts for most of the misclassification. To reduce the misclassification, the network was trained from physical log units in FNX1168 derived from clustering of physical properties measurements. Four physical log units mainly represented four groups of rocks: i) quartz diorite; ii) metabasalt and metagabbro; iii) metasediment and quartzite; and iv) sulfide and diabase. The predictive accuracy in the training process rose to 95%. The trained network then was applied to predicting the physical log units in FNX1182. Given the relationships between physical log units and rock types from FNX1168, the results of physical-log-unit classification in FNX1182 were interpreted from a geological point of view. Although in ideal cases we would like to be able to extract the same classification that a geologist provides, the extraction of physical log units is a more realistic goal. The interpretation of the lithological units from the physical log units can be compared with the geologist's classification and discrepancies or anomalies analyzed in greater detail.

  5. 18 CFR 3c.3 - Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF CONDUCT § 3c.3 Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. (a) Employees shall, in fulfilling the obligation of 5 CFR 2635.101(b)(11), report fraud, waste..., abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. 3c.3 Section 3c.3 Conservation of...

  6. 18 CFR 3c.3 - Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF CONDUCT § 3c.3 Reporting fraud, waste, abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. (a) Employees shall, in fulfilling the obligation of 5 CFR 2635.101(b)(11), report fraud, waste..., abuse, and corruption and cooperation with official inquiries. 3c.3 Section 3c.3 Conservation of...

  7. 40 CFR 152.112 - Approval of registration under FIFRA sec. 3(c)(5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sec. 3(c)(5). 152.112 Section 152.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Applications § 152.112 Approval of registration under FIFRA sec. 3(c)(5). EPA will approve an application under the criteria of FIFRA sec. 3(c)(5) only if: (a) The Agency has determined that the application...

  8. The interplay of primer-template DNA phosphorylation status and single-stranded DNA binding proteins in directing clamp loaders to the appropriate polarity of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hayner, Jaclyn N.; Douma, Lauren G.; Bloom, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    Sliding clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders to serve the critical role of coordinating various enzymes on DNA. Clamp loaders must quickly and efficiently load clamps at primer/template (p/t) junctions containing a duplex region with a free 3′OH (3′DNA), but it is unclear how clamp loaders target these sites. To measure the Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader specificity toward 3′DNA, fluorescent β and PCNA clamps were used to measure clamp closing triggered by DNA substrates of differing polarity, testing the role of both the 5′phosphate (5′P) and the presence of single-stranded binding proteins (SSBs). SSBs inhibit clamp loading by both clamp loaders on the incorrect polarity of DNA (5′DNA). The 5′P groups contribute selectivity to differing degrees for the two clamp loaders, suggesting variations in the mechanism by which clamp loaders target 3′DNA. Interestingly, the χ subunit of the E. coli clamp loader is not required for SSB to inhibit clamp loading on phosphorylated 5′DNA, showing that χ·SSB interactions are dispensable. These studies highlight a common role for SSBs in directing clamp loaders to 3′DNA, as well as uncover nuances in the mechanisms by which SSBs perform this vital role. PMID:25159615

  9. Promoting physiologic transition at birth: re-examining resuscitation and the timing of cord clamping.

    PubMed

    Niermeyer, Susan; Velaphi, Sithembiso

    2013-12-01

    Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord is recommended for term and preterm infants who do not require resuscitation. However, the approach to the newly born infant with signs of fetal compromise, prematurity and extremely low birthweight, or prolonged apnea is less clear. Human and experimental animal data show that delaying the clamping of the umbilical cord until after the onset of respirations promotes cardiovascular stability in the minutes immediately after birth. Rather than regarding delayed cord clamping as a fixed time period before resuscitation begins, a more physiologic concept of transition at birth should encompass the relative timing of onset of respirations and cord occlusion. Further research to explore the potential benefits of resuscitation with the cord intact is needed. PMID:24055300

  10. An improved double vaseline gap voltage clamp to study electroporated skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Lee, R C

    1994-01-01

    An improved voltage clamp with a double vaseline gap chamber was designed to study electroporated skeletal muscle fibers. The new clamp eliminated spike overshock of membrane potential when applying step stimulation occurring in the traditional configuration. It allowed greater consistency in membrane potential distribution. After the intracellular resistances of the fiber segment at the vaseline gap area were compensated, it was possible to change membrane potential more quickly. Using this technique, strong electrical pulses used to mimic the situation of electrical shock can be delivered to the cell membrane by voltage clamp. Transmembrane currents of skeletal muscle cell were simultaneously measured during a high pulsed shock and resolved into different components. Distinct transient changes of the transmembrane current, involving the time courses of the formation of electroporation and their recovery time constants, can be recorded. Because of more even membrane potential distribution and faster response to pulsed membrane potential change, this technique is also suitable for membrane study under physiological conditions. PMID:8011901

  11. The Role of the C-Clamp in Wnt-Related Colorectal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Aditi J; Cadigan, Ken M

    2016-01-01

    T-cell Factor/Lymphoid Enhancer Factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors are major regulators of Wnt targets, and the products of the TCF7 and TCF7L2 genes have both been implicated in the progression of colorectal cancer in animal models and humans. TCFs recognize specific DNA sequences through their high mobility group (HMG) domains, but invertebrate TCFs and some isoforms of vertebrate TCF7 and TCF7L2 contain a second DNA binding domain known as the C-clamp. This review will cover the basic properties of C-clamps and their importance in Wnt signaling, using data from Drosophila, C. elegans, and mammalian cell culture. The connection between C-clamp containing TCFs and colorectal cancer will also be discussed. PMID:27527215

  12. The Anion Paradox in Sodium Taste Reception: Resolution by Voltage-Clamp Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qing; Heck, Gerard L.; Desimone, John A.

    1991-11-01

    Sodium salts are potent taste stimuli, but their effectiveness is markedly dependent on the anion, with chloride yielding the greatest response. The cellular mechanisms that mediate this phenomenon are not known. This "anion paradox" has been resolved by considering the field potential that is generated by restricted electrodiffusion of the anion through paracellular shunts between taste-bud cells. Neural responses to sodium chloride, sodium acetate, and sodium gluconate were studied while the field potential was voltage-clamped. Clamping at electronegative values eliminated the anion effect, whereas clamping at electropositive potentials exaggerated it. Thus, field potentials across the lingual epithelium modulate taste reception, indicating that the functional unit of taste reception includes the taste cell and its paracellular microenvironment.

  13. Temporary clamping of branch pulmonary artery for pulmonary hemorrhage after endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Srinivasa; Rajanbabu, Balram Babu; Kumar, Nalkunda Kyathaplar Sunil; Rajani, Indira

    2013-10-01

    A 49-year-old man underwent pulmonary thromboendarterectomy for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. A massive pulmonary hemorrhage developed, which was identified to be from the right lower lobe, when weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was attempted. He was managed by temporary overnight clamping of the right pulmonary artery, after the upper lobe branch. The next morning the clamp was removed, the bleeding had stopped completely, and his chest was closed. The patient was discharged on the 21st day. At 14 months' follow-up, he is in New York Heart Association functional class I. In suitable patients, temporary clamping of branch pulmonary artery can be a useful salvage measure, as in this patient. PMID:24088460

  14. Enhancing endogenous stem cells in the newborn via delayed umbilical cord clamping.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Christopher; Acosta, Sandra; Watson, Nate; Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Diamandis, Theo; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-09-01

    There is currently no consensus among clinicians and scientists over the appropriate or optimal timing for umbilical cord clamping. However, many clinical studies have suggested that delayed cord clamping is associated with various neonatal benefits including increased blood volume, reduced need for blood transfusion, increased cerebral oxygenation in pre-term infants, and decreased frequency of iron deficiency anemia in term infants. Human umbilical cord blood contains significant amounts of stem and progenitor cells and is currently used in the treatment of several life-threatening diseases. We propose that delayed cord clamping be encouraged as it enhances blood flow from the placenta to the neonate, which is accompanied by an increase supply of valuable stem and progenitor cells, as well as may improve blood oxygenation and increase blood volume, altogether reducing the infant's susceptibility to both neonatal and age-related diseases.

  15. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization.

  16. The Role of the C-Clamp in Wnt-Related Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Aditi J.; Cadigan, Ken M.

    2016-01-01

    T-cell Factor/Lymphoid Enhancer Factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors are major regulators of Wnt targets, and the products of the TCF7 and TCF7L2 genes have both been implicated in the progression of colorectal cancer in animal models and humans. TCFs recognize specific DNA sequences through their high mobility group (HMG) domains, but invertebrate TCFs and some isoforms of vertebrate TCF7 and TCF7L2 contain a second DNA binding domain known as the C-clamp. This review will cover the basic properties of C-clamps and their importance in Wnt signaling, using data from Drosophila, C. elegans, and mammalian cell culture. The connection between C-clamp containing TCFs and colorectal cancer will also be discussed. PMID:27527215

  17. Additional efficient computation of branched nerve equations: adaptive time step and ideal voltage clamp.

    PubMed

    Borg-Graham, L J

    2000-01-01

    Various improvements are described for the simulation of biophysically and anatomically detailed compartmental models of single neurons and networks of neurons. These include adaptive time-step integration and a reordering of the circuit matrix to allow ideal voltage clamp of arbitrary nodes. We demonstrate how the adaptive time-step method can give equivalent accuracy as a fixed time-step method for typical current clamp simulation protocols, with about a 2.5 reduction in runtime. The ideal voltage clamp method is shown to be more stable than the nonideal case, in particular when used with the adaptive time-step method. Simulation results are presented using the Surf-Hippo Neuron Simulation System, a public domain object-oriented simulator written in Lisp. PMID:10809013

  18. Multifrequency VLBI follow up study of strong γ-ray flares in the blazars 3C273 and 3C279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisakov, Mikhail M.; Kovalev, Yuri Y.

    2015-03-01

    We present multifrequency VLBI observations of the blazars 3C273 and 3C279 after detecting strong γ-ray flares in both of them. 3C273 exhibited a prominent flare in γ-rays in September 2009 which was followed by a strong flare in the 7 mm VLBI core and emergence of a new feature in the parsec scale jet. We have used time delay between flares in different wavebands together with kinematic analysis to determine that the γ-ray emission zone in 3C273 is located 3.6-5.3 pc upstream from the apparent 7 mm core. We have also analyzed frequency dependent core position to measure a deprojected distance between 7 mm core and the true base of the jet: 1-6 pc for 3C273 and 1-3 pc for 3C279, depending on observing epoch. For 3C279 light curve analysis did not give a robust γ-radio delay because there were too many overlapping flares in this source during considered period.

  19. Design and fabrication of a planar patch-clamp substrate using a silicon-on-insulator wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenlong, Zhang; Xiangyang, Liu; Yanli, Mao

    2009-09-01

    The planar patch-clamp technique has been applied to high throughput screening in drug discovery. The key feature of this technique is the fabrication of a planar patch-clamp substrate using appropriate materials. In this study, a planar patch-clamp substrate was designed and fabricated using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The access resistance and capacitance of SOI-based planar patch-clamp substrates are smaller than those of bulk silicon-based planar substrates, which will reduce the distributed RC noise.

  20. Preliminary Results from Downhole Osmotic Samplers in a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M. T.; Clark, J. F.; Neira, N. M.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of hydrothermal circulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from a borehole observatory (CORK) installed in this hole and similar CORKs in three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. This array of holes is located on 3.5 My old seafloor, as an array oriented subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps. In addition to pumps at seafloor wellheads, downhole sampling pumps were installed in the perforated casing in the upper ocean crust. These downhole samplers were intended to produce a high-resolution continuous record of tracer concentrations, including records from the first year after tracer injection in Holes 1362A and 1362B. In contrast, wellhead samplers were not installed on these CORKs holes until 2011, and wellhead records from all CORKs have a record gap of up to one year, because of a delayed expedition in 2012. The downhole samples were recovered with the submersible Alvin in August 2014. SF6 concentrations in downhole samples recovered in 2014 are generally consistent with data obtained from wellhead samples. Of particular interest are the results from Hole 1362B, where a seafloor valve was opened and closed during various recovery expeditions. High resolution tracer curves produced from the 1362B downhole samples confirm that these operations produced an SF6 breakthrough curve corresponding to a classic push-pull test used to evaluate contaminant field locations in terrestrial setting. Complete analyses of downhole samples from these CORKs are expected to produce high-resolution breakthrough curves that will allow more precise analysis and modeling of hydrothermal flow in the study area.