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Sample records for 3c surface seismic

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2002-09-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2002-05-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-12-31

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-03-31

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-06-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2002-12-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-05-31

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2003-09-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS.

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2003-01-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2003-12-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2003-07-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-05-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  14. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-08-21

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  15. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2005-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  16. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2006-05-05

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  17. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2006-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400

  18. Organic functionalization of 3C-SiC surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schoell, Sebastian J; Sachsenhauser, Matthias; Oliveros, Alexandra; Howgate, John; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S; Frewin, Christopher L; Saddow, Stephen E; Sharp, Ian D

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate the functionalization of n-type (100) and (111) 3C-SiC surfaces with organosilanes. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of amino-propyldiethoxymethylsilane (APDEMS) and octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODTMS) are formed via wet chemical processing techniques. Their structural, chemical, and electrical properties are investigated using static water contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing that the organic layers are smooth and densely packed. Furthermore, combined contact potential difference and surface photovoltage measurements demonstrate that the heterostructure functionality and surface potential can be tuned by utilizing different organosilane precursor molecules. Molecular dipoles are observed to significantly affect the work functions of the modified surfaces. Furthermore, the magnitude of the surface band bending is reduced following reaction of the hydroxylated surfaces with organosilanes, indicating that partial passivation of electrically active surface states is achieved. Micropatterning of organic layers is demonstrated by lithographically defined oxidation of organosilane-derived monolayers in an oxygen plasma, followed by visualization of resulting changes of the local wettability, as well as fluorescence microscopy following immobilization of fluorescently labeled BSA protein. PMID:23357505

  19. Near-surface Fun with Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, M.

    2015-12-01

    What is happening in the near-surface often has a direct effect on human activity. Seismic exploration has routinely targeted geology at depths of kilometers to tens of kilometers. However, these techniques can be applied to answer questions about shallower targets. Several recent experiments demonstrate seismic applicability to near-surface problems. One example is passive seismic monitoring using ambient noise to identify shallow changes and potential hazards in a producing hydrocarbon field. Another example is the use of seismic reflection data from within the water column to determine layering caused by temperature and salinity differences in depth. A third example is identifying historical elevation changes along coast lines using seismic reflection data. These examples show that exploration seismic methods can be effectively used for a variety of near-surface applications.

  20. SHEAR WAVE SEISMIC STUDY COMPARING 9C3D SV AND SH IMAGES WITH 3C3D C-WAVE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    John Beecherl; Bob A. Hardage

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relative merits of shear-wave (S-wave) seismic data acquired with nine-component (9-C) technology and with three-component (3-C) technology. The original proposal was written as if the investigation would be restricted to a single 9-C seismic survey in southwest Kansas (the Ashland survey), on the basis of the assumption that both 9-C and 3-C S-wave images could be created from that one data set. The Ashland survey was designed as a 9-C seismic program. We found that although the acquisition geometry was adequate for 9-C data analysis, the source-receiver geometry did not allow 3-C data to be extracted on an equitable and competitive basis with 9-C data. To do a fair assessment of the relative value of 9-C and 3-C seismic S-wave data, we expanded the study beyond the Ashland survey and included multicomponent seismic data from surveys done in a variety of basins. These additional data were made available through the Bureau of Economic Geology, our research subcontractor. Bureau scientists have added theoretical analyses to this report that provide valuable insights into several key distinctions between 9-C and 3-C seismic data. These theoretical considerations about distinctions between 3-C and 9-C S-wave data are presented first, followed by a discussion of differences between processing 9-C common-midpoint data and 3-C common-conversion-point data. Examples of 9-C and 3-C data are illustrated and discussed in the last part of the report. The key findings of this study are that each S-wave mode (SH-SH, SV-SV, or PSV) involves a different subsurface illumination pattern and a different reflectivity behavior and that each mode senses a different Earth fabric along its propagation path because of the unique orientation of its particle-displacement vector. As a result of the distinct orientation of each mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical geologic condition in a more optimal way than do

  1. Surface acoustic wave devices on AlN/3C-SiC/Si multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chen, Yung-Yu; Felmetsger, Valery V.; Lien, Wei-Cheng; Riekkinen, Tommi; Senesky, Debbie G.; Pisano, Albert P.

    2013-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation characteristics in a multilayer structure including a piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) thin film and an epitaxial cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) layer on a silicon (Si) substrate are investigated by theoretical calculation in this work. Alternating current (ac) reactive magnetron sputtering was used to deposit highly c-axis-oriented AlN thin films, showing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the rocking curve of 1.36° on epitaxial 3C-SiC layers on Si substrates. In addition, conventional two-port SAW devices were fabricated on the AlN/3C-SiC/Si multilayer structure and SAW propagation properties in the multilayer structure were experimentally investigated. The surface wave in the AlN/3C-SiC/Si multilayer structure exhibits a phase velocity of 5528 m s-1 and an electromechanical coupling coefficient of 0.42%. The results demonstrate the potential of AlN thin films grown on epitaxial 3C-SiC layers to create layered SAW devices with higher phase velocities and larger electromechanical coupling coefficients than SAW devices on an AlN/Si multilayer structure. Moreover, the FWHM values of rocking curves of the AlN thin film and 3C-SiC layer remained constant after annealing for 500 h at 540 °C in air atmosphere. Accordingly, the layered SAW devices based on AlN thin films and 3C-SiC layers are applicable to timing and sensing applications in harsh environments.

  2. Martian seismicity through time from surface faulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Banerdt, W. B.; Tralli, D.

    1991-01-01

    An objective of future Mars missions involves emplacing a seismic network on Mars to determine the internal structure of the planet. An argument based on the relative geologic histories of the terrestrial planets suggests that Mars should be seismically more active than the Moon, but less active than the Earth. The seismicity is estimated which is expected on Mars through time from slip on faults visible on the planets surface. These estimates of martian seismicity must be considered a lower limit as only structures produced by shear faulting visible at the surface today are included (i.e., no provision is made for buried structures or non-shear structures); in addition, the estimate does not include seismic events that do not produce surface displacement (e.g., activity associated with hidden faults, deep lithospheric processes or volcanism) or events produced by tidal triggering or meteorite impacts. Calibration of these estimates suggests that Mars may be many times more seismically active than the Moon.

  3. Development and Test of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson, Bjorn N.P.

    2015-02-28

    To address the critical site characterization and monitoring needs for CCS programs, US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Paulsson, Inc. in 2010 a contract to design, build and test a fiber optic based ultra-large bandwidth clamped borehole seismic vector array capable of deploying up to one thousand 3C sensor pods suitable for deployment into high temperature and high pressure boreholes. Paulsson, Inc. has completed a design or a unique borehole seismic system consisting of a novel drill pipe based deployment system that includes a hydraulic clamping mechanism for the sensor pods, a new sensor pod design and most important – a unique fiber optic seismic vector sensor with technical specifications and capabilities that far exceed the state of the art seismic sensor technologies. These novel technologies were all applied to the new borehole seismic system. In combination these technologies will allow for the deployment of up to 1,000 3C sensor pods in vertical, deviated or horizontal wells. Laboratory tests of the fiber optic seismic vector sensors developed during this project have shown that the new borehole seismic sensor technology is capable of generating outstanding high vector fidelity data with extremely large bandwidth: 0.01 – 6,000 Hz. Field tests have shown that the system can record events at magnitudes much smaller than M-2.3 at frequencies up to 2,000 Hz. The sensors have also proved to be about 100 times more sensitive than the regular coil geophones that are used in borehole seismic systems today. The fiber optic seismic sensors have furthermore been qualified to operate at temperatures over 300°C (572°F). The fibers used for the seismic sensors in the system are used to record Distributed Temperature Sensor (DTS) data allowing additional value added data to be recorded simultaneously with the seismic vector sensor data.

  4. A prediction of mars seismicity from surface faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.P.; Banerdt, W.B.; Tanaka, K.L.; Tralli, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The shallow seismicity of Mars has been estimated by measurement of the total slip on faults visible on the surface of the planet throughout geologic time. Seismicity was calibrated with estimates based on surface structures on the moon and measured lunar seismicity that includes the entire seismogenic lithosphere. Results indicate that Mars is seismically active today, with a sufficient number of detectable marsquakes to allow seismic investigations of its interior.

  5. Global surface wave tomography using seismic hum.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    2009-10-01

    The development of global surface wave tomography using earthquakes has been crucial to exploration of the dynamic status of Earth's deep. It is naturally believed that only large earthquakes can generate long-period seismic waves that penetrate deep enough into Earth for such exploration. The discovery of seismic hum, Earth's background free oscillations, which are randomly generated by oceanic and/or atmospheric disturbances, now provides an alternative approach. We present results of global upper-mantle seismic tomography using seismic hum and without referring to earthquakes. At periods of 100 to 400 seconds, the phase-velocity anomalies of Rayleigh waves are measured by modeling the observed cross-correlation functions between every pair of stations from among 54 globally distributed seismic stations. The anomalies are then inverted to obtain the three-dimensional S-wave velocity structure in the upper mantle. Our technique provides a new means for exploring the three-dimensional structure of the interior of terrestrial planets with an atmosphere and/or oceans, particularly Mars. PMID:19797654

  6. Effect of surface functionalization on the electronic transport properties of Ti3C2 MXene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiyorov, G. R.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of surface functionalization on the electronic transport properties of the MXene compound Ti3C2 are studied using density-functional theory in combination with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Fluorinated, oxidized and hydroxylated surfaces are considered and the obtained results are compared with the ones for the pristine MXene. It is found that the surface termination has a considerable impact on the electronic transport in MXene. For example, the fluorinated sample shows the largest transmission, whereas surface oxidation results in a considerable reduction of the electronic transmission. The current in the former sample can be up to 4 times larger for a given bias voltage as compared to the case of bare MXene. The increased transmission originates from the extended electronic states and smaller variations of the electrostatic potential profile. Our findings can be useful in designing MXene-based anode materials for energy storage applications, where enhanced electronic transport will be an asset.

  7. Submarine seismic monitoring of El Hierro volcanic eruption with a 3C-geophone string: applying new acquisition and data processing techniques to volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Ripepe, Maurizio; Lopez, Carmen; Blanco, Maria Jose; Crespo, Jose

    2015-04-01

    A submarine volcanic eruption took place near the southernmost emerged land of the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain), from October 2011 to February 2012. The Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) seismic stations network evidenced seismic unrest since July 2011 and was a reference also to follow the evolution of the seismic activity associated with the volcanic eruption. Right after the eruption onset, in October 2011 a geophone string was deployed by the CSIC-IGN to monitor seismic activity. Monitoring with the seismic array continued till May 2012. The array was installed less than 2 km away from the new vol¬cano, next to La Restinga village shore in the harbor from 6 to 12m deep into the water. Our purpose was to record seismic activity related to the volcanic activity, continuously and with special interest on high frequency events. The seismic array was endowed with 8, high frequency, 3 component, 250 Hz, geophone cable string with a separation of 6 m between them. Each geophone consists on a 3-component module based on 3 orthogonal independent sensors that measures ground velocity. Some of the geophones were placed directly on the seabed, some were buried. Due to different factors, as the irregular characteristics of the seafloor. The data was recorded on the surface with a seismometer and stored on a laptop computer. We show how acoustic data collected underwater show a great correlation with the seismic data recorded on land. Finally we compare our data analysis results with the observed sea surface activity (ash and lava emission and degassing). This evidence is disclosing new and innovative tecniques on monitoring submarine volcanic activity. Reference Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN), "Serie El Hierro." Internet: http://www.ign.es/ign/resources /volcanologia/HIERRO.html [May, 17. 2013

  8. Kinetic surface roughening and wafer bow control in heteroepitaxial growth of 3C-SiC on Si(111) substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Walker, Glenn; Chai, Jessica; Iacopi, Alan; Fernandes, Alanna; Dimitrijev, Sima

    2015-01-01

    A thin, chemically inert 3C-SiC layer between GaN and Si helps not only to avoid the "melt-back" effect, but also to inhibit the crack generation in the grown GaN layers. The quality of GaN layer is heavily dependent on the unique properties of the available 3C-SiC/Si templates. In this paper, the parameters influencing the roughness, crystalline quality, and wafer bow are investigated and engineered to obtain high quality, low roughness 3C-SiC/Si templates suitable for subsequent GaN growth and device processing. Kinetic surface roughening and SiC growth mechanisms, which depend on both deposition temperature and off-cut angle, are reported for heteroepitaxial growth of 3C-SiC on Si substrates. The narrower terrace width on 4° off-axis Si enhances the step-flow growth at 1200 °C, with the roughness of 3C-SiC remaining constant with increasing thickness, corresponding to a scaling exponent of zero. Crack-free 3C-SiC grown on 150-mm Si substrate with a wafer bow of less than 20 μm was achieved. Both concave and convex wafer bow can be obtained by in situ tuning of the deposited SiC layer thicknesses. The 3C-SiC grown on off-axis Si, compared to that grown on on-axis Si, has lower surface roughness, better crystallinity, and smaller bow magnitude. PMID:26487465

  9. Kinetic surface roughening and wafer bow control in heteroepitaxial growth of 3C-SiC on Si(111) substrates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Walker, Glenn; Chai, Jessica; Iacopi, Alan; Fernandes, Alanna; Dimitrijev, Sima

    2015-01-01

    A thin, chemically inert 3C-SiC layer between GaN and Si helps not only to avoid the “melt-back” effect, but also to inhibit the crack generation in the grown GaN layers. The quality of GaN layer is heavily dependent on the unique properties of the available 3C-SiC/Si templates. In this paper, the parameters influencing the roughness, crystalline quality, and wafer bow are investigated and engineered to obtain high quality, low roughness 3C-SiC/Si templates suitable for subsequent GaN growth and device processing. Kinetic surface roughening and SiC growth mechanisms, which depend on both deposition temperature and off-cut angle, are reported for heteroepitaxial growth of 3C-SiC on Si substrates. The narrower terrace width on 4° off-axis Si enhances the step-flow growth at 1200 °C, with the roughness of 3C-SiC remaining constant with increasing thickness, corresponding to a scaling exponent of zero. Crack-free 3C-SiC grown on 150-mm Si substrate with a wafer bow of less than 20 μm was achieved. Both concave and convex wafer bow can be obtained by in situ tuning of the deposited SiC layer thicknesses. The 3C-SiC grown on off-axis Si, compared to that grown on on-axis Si, has lower surface roughness, better crystallinity, and smaller bow magnitude. PMID:26487465

  10. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

    2002-03-11

    The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

  11. Experiments on Seismic Metamaterials: Molding Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brûlé, S.; Javelaud, E. H.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.

    2014-04-01

    Materials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles' velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations.

  12. Experiments on seismic metamaterials: molding surface waves.

    PubMed

    Brûlé, S; Javelaud, E H; Enoch, S; Guenneau, S

    2014-04-01

    Materials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles' velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations. PMID:24745420

  13. Surface modification strategies for (100)3C-SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellina, J. J., Jr.; Ferrante, J.; Zeller, M. V.

    1986-01-01

    Several surface modificaation techniques were performed in situ in an ultrahigh vacuum as part of a program to develop electrical contacts on the (100) face of cubic SiC. The Auger electron spectroscopy line shapes and peak-to-peak heights of the Si LVV and CKLL transitions indicated changes in surface stoichiometry, bonding, and short range order. Changes in the low-energy electron diffraction pattern identified changes in the symmetry of long range ordering on the surface. Heating above 1050 C depleted the surface of Si with an activation energy of 120 kcal/mol, resulting eventually in a disordered graphitic layer which was several atomic layers thick. Bombardment by Ar ions of energies greater than 1000 eV enhanced the Si to C ratio on the surface and destroyed the LEED pattern. Long range order was recovered by simultaneous heating and ion bombardment. Finally, adsorption of Cr on the Ar ion damaged surface and subsequent desorption left a reconstructed, p(2 x 1)Si enriched surface. Similar treatments with Al did not produce a surface reconstruction.

  14. Surface Modification of Cr3C2-NiCr Cermet Coatings by Direct Diode Laser Remelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Nobuyuki; Morimoto, Junji; Fukuhra, Shinji; Yamada, Katsuhiro; Tsukamoto, Masahiro

    Thermal spraying technology has been used for the improvement of wear resistance, erosion resistance, heat resistance and corrosion resistance. Corrosion, wear and abrasion resistance of the substrate materials were significantly improved by the paint coatings. These organic paint coatings, however, did not endure high temperatures and did not adhere well. Modern high performance machinery parts subjected to the extremes of temperature and mechanical stress, needs surface protection against high temperature corrosive media, and mechanical wear and tear. Chromium carbide based materials are commonly used for high temperature wear applications. In this study, we treated Cr3C2-NiCr coatings by laser irradiation treatment and examined its hardness in comparison with that formed by HVOF process. Consequently, the average hardness of laser irradiated Cr3C2-NiCr coating was found out to be higher than that of HVOF coating. The laser-treated Cr3C2-35%NiCr coating further improved the solid particle erosion resistance by a factor of almost twice.

  15. Calving seismicity from iceberg-sea surface interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomaus, T.C.; Larsen, C.F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Iceberg calving is known to release substantial seismic energy, but little is known about the specific mechanisms that produce calving icequakes. At Yahtse Glacier, a tidewater glacier on the Gulf of Alaska, we draw upon a local network of seismometers and focus on 80 hours of concurrent, direct observation of the terminus to show that calving is the dominant source of seismicity. To elucidate seismogenic mechanisms, we synchronized video and seismograms to reveal that the majority of seismic energy is produced during iceberg interactions with the sea surface. Icequake peak amplitudes coincide with the emergence of high velocity jets of water and ice from the fjord after the complete submergence of falling icebergs below sea level. These icequakes have dominant frequencies between 1 and 3 Hz. Detachment of an iceberg from the terminus produces comparatively weak seismic waves at frequencies between 5 and 20 Hz. Our observations allow us to suggest that the most powerful sources of calving icequakes at Yahtse Glacier include iceberg-sea surface impact, deceleration under the influence of drag and buoyancy, and cavitation. Numerical simulations of seismogenesis during iceberg-sea surface interactions support our observational evidence. Our new understanding of iceberg-sea surface interactions allows us to reattribute the sources of calving seismicity identified in earlier studies and offer guidance for the future use of seismology in monitoring iceberg calving.

  16. Scattered surface wave energy in the seismic coda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, Y.

    2006-01-01

    One of the many important contributions that Aki has made to seismology pertains to the origin of coda waves (Aki, 1969; Aki and Chouet, 1975). In this paper, I revisit Aki's original idea of the role of scattered surface waves in the seismic coda. Based on the radiative transfer theory, I developed a new set of scattered wave energy equations by including scattered surface waves and body wave to surface wave scattering conversions. The work is an extended study of Zeng et al. (1991), Zeng (1993) and Sato (1994a) on multiple isotropic-scattering, and may shed new insight into the seismic coda wave interpretation. The scattering equations are solved numerically by first discretizing the model at regular grids and then solving the linear integral equations iteratively. The results show that scattered wave energy can be well approximated by body-wave to body wave scattering at earlier arrival times and short distances. At long distances from the source, scattered surface waves dominate scattered body waves at surface stations. Since surface waves are 2-D propagating waves, their scattered energies should in theory follow a common decay curve. The observed common decay trends on seismic coda of local earthquake recordings particular at long lapse times suggest that perhaps later seismic codas are dominated by scattered surface waves. When efficient body wave to surface wave conversion mechanisms are present in the shallow crustal layers, such as soft sediment layers, the scattered surface waves dominate the seismic coda at even early arrival times for shallow sources and at later arrival times for deeper events.

  17. A new passive seismic method based on seismic interferometry and multichannel analysis of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng; Xia, Jianghai; Xu, Yixian; Xu, Zongbo; Pan, Yudi

    2015-06-01

    We proposed a new passive seismic method (PSM) based on seismic interferometry and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) to meet the demand for increasing investigation depth by acquiring surface-wave data at a low-frequency range (1 Hz ≤ f ≤ 10 Hz). We utilize seismic interferometry to sort common virtual source gathers (CVSGs) from ambient noise and analyze obtained CVSGs to construct 2D shear-wave velocity (Vs) map using the MASW. Standard ambient noise processing procedures were applied to the computation of cross-correlations. To enhance signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the empirical Green's functions, a new weighted stacking method was implemented. In addition, we proposed a bidirectional shot mode based on the virtual source method to sort CVSGs repeatedly. The PSM was applied to two field data examples. For the test along Han River levee, the results of PSM were compared with the improved roadside passive MASW and spatial autocorrelation method (SPAC). For test in the Western Junggar Basin, PSM was applied to a 70 km long linear survey array with a prominent directional urban noise source and a 60 km-long Vs profile with 1.5 km in depth was mapped. Further, a comparison about the dispersion measurements was made between PSM and frequency-time analysis (FTAN) technique to assess the accuracy of PSM. These examples and comparisons demonstrated that this new method is efficient, flexible, and capable to study near-surface velocity structures based on seismic ambient noise.

  18. Growth of Defect-Free 3C-Sic on 4H- and 6H-SIC Mesas Using Step-Free Surface Heteroepitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Powell, J. Anthony; Trunek, Andrew J.; Huang, Xianrong R.; Dudley, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A new growth process, herein named step-free surface heteroepitaxy, has achieved 3C-SiC films completely free of double positioning boundaries and stacking faults on 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC substrate mesas. The process is based upon the initial 2-dimensional nucleation and lateral expansion of a single island of 3C-SiC on a 4H- or 6H-SiC mesa surface that is completely free of bilayer surface steps. Our experimental results indicate that substrate-epilayer in-plane lattice mismatch (Delta/a = 0.0854% for 3C/4H) is at least partially relieved parallel to the interface in the initial bilayers of the heterofilm, producing an at least partially relaxed 3C-SiC film without dislocations that undesirably thread through the thickness of the epilayer. This result should enable realization of improved 3C-SiC devices.

  19. Estimation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Using Marine Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Satish Kumar; Dewangan, Pawan; Sain, Kalachand

    2016-04-01

    Not much attention is given to direct wave arrivals in marine seismic data that are acquired for petroleum exploration and prospecting. These direct arrivals are usually muted out in routine seismic data processing. In the present study, we process these direct arrivals to accurately estimate soundspeed in near-surface seawater and invert for sea surface temperature. The established empirical equation describing the relationships among temperature, salinity, pressure and soundspeed is used for the inversion. We also discuss processing techniques, such as first-break picking and cross-correlation for the estimation of soundspeed, that are well known among petroleum-industry geophysicists. The accuracy of the methods is directly linked to the data quality and signal processing. The novelty in our approach is in the data conditioning, which consists essentially of spectral balancing based on a wavelet transform that compensates for spherical spreading and increases the signal-to-noise ( S/ N) ratio. The 2D seismic data used in this paper are from the offshore Krishna-Godavari Basin east of India. We observe a significantly higher soundspeed of 1545 m/s for near-surface water than the commonly used value of ~1500 m/s. The estimated temperature (from velocity) is about 30 °C. Interestingly, the estimated temperature matches well with the temperature recorded in the CTD profile acquired in the study area during the month of May, the month corresponding to the acquisition of seismic data. Furthermore, the estimated temperatures during different times of data acquisition correlate well with the expected diurnal variation in temperature.

  20. IMPACT OF DIELECTRIC PARAMETERS ON THE REFLECTIVITY OF 3C-SiC WAFERS WITH A ROUGH SURFACE MORPHOLOGY IN THE RESTSTRAHLEN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    J.A.A. Engelbrecht; E. Janzén; A. Henry; I.J. van Rooyen

    2014-04-01

    A layer-on-substrate model is used to obtain the infrared reflectance for 3C-SiC with a rough surface morphology. The effect of varying dielectric parameters of the “damaged layer” on the observed reflectivity of the 3C-SiC in the reststrahlen region is assessed. Different simulated reflectance spectra are obtained to those if the dielectric parameters of the “substrate” were varied. Most notable changes in the shape of the simulated reststrahlen peak are observed for changes in the high frequency dielectric constant, the phonon damping constant, the phonon frequencies and “thickness” of damaged surface layer.

  1. Seismic interferometry of scattered surface waves in attenuative media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Curtis, Andrew

    2009-07-01

    Seismic interferometry can be used to estimate interreceiver surface wave signals by cross-correlation of signals recorded at each receiver that are emitted from a surrounding boundary of impulsive or uncorrelated noise sources. We study seismic interferometry for scattered surface waves using a stationary-phase analysis and surface wave Green's functions for isotropic point scatterers embedded in laterally homogeneous media. Our analysis reveals key differences between the interferometric construction of reflected and point-scattered body or surface waves, since point scatterers radiate energy in all directions but a reflection from a finite flat reflector is specular. In the case of surface waves, we find that additional cancelling terms are introduced in the stationary-phase analysis for scattered waves related to the constraint imposed by the optical theorem for surface waves. The additional terms are of second order even for single-scattered waves, and we show that these can be highly significant in multiple-scattering cases. In attenuative media errors are introduced due to amplitude errors in these additional terms. Further, we find that as the distribution of scatterers in a medium becomes more complex the errors in correlation-type interferometry caused by attenuation in the background medium become larger. Convolution-type interferometry has been shown to be effective when considering electromagnetic wavefields in lossy media, and we show that this is also true for scattered surface waves in attenuating elastic media. By adapting our stationary-phase approach to this case, we reveal why convolution-type interferometry performs well in such media: the second-order cancelling terms that appear in the correlation-type approach do not appear in convolution-type interferometry. Finally, we find that when using both correlation- and convolution-type interferometry with realistic source geometries (illustrative of both industrial seismics and `passive noise

  2. Advantages of wet work for near-surface seismic reflection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Markiewicz, R.D.; Rademacker, T.R.; Hopkins, R.; Rawcliffe, R.J.; Paquin, J.

    2007-01-01

    Benefits of shallow water settings (0.1 to 0.5 m) are pronounced on shallow, high-resolution seismic reflection images and, for examples discussed here, range from an order of magnitude increased signal-to-noise ratio to resolution potential elevated by more than 8 times. Overall data quality of high-resolution seismic reflection data at three sites notorious for poor near-surface reflection returns was improved by coupling the source and/or receivers to a well sorted and fully saturated surface. Half-period trace-to-trace static offsets evident in reflections from receivers planted into a creek bank were eliminated by moving the geophones to the base of a shallow creek at the toe of the bank. Reflections from a dipping bedrock were recorded with a dominant frequency approaching 1 KHz from hydrophones in 0.5 m of water at the toe of a dam using a hammer impact source. A tamper impacted by a dead blow hammer in a shallow (10-20 cm) deep creek produced reflections with a dominant frequency over 400 Hz at depths as shallow as 6 ms. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  3. Shallow seismic surface waves analysis across a tectonic fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazdova, R.; Vilhelm, J.; Kolinsky, P.

    2011-12-01

    When performing a seismic survey of a shallow medium, we record wave motion which can be excited by a sledge hammer blow on the ground surface. The recorded wave motion is a complex combination of different types of waves, propagating directly from the source to the receiver, reflecting from velocity boundaries, passing through multiple layers or forming dispersive surface waves. We can use all of these wave types to identify the structure of the medium. In the presented contribution we deal with interpretation of surface waves. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave velocity is frequency-dependent. This property is called dispersion, and the dependence of the velocity on the frequency is known as the dispersion curve. The measured dispersion of the surface waves can be used to assess the structural velocity distribution in the layered medium, through which the waves propagate. We analyze surface waves recorded within the geophysical survey of the paleoseismological trench site over the Hluboka tectonic fault, Czech Republic, Central Europe. The surface waves in frequency range 15 - 70 Hz were recorded by the three component geophones with the active (sledge hammer) source. Group velocities are analyzed by the program SVAL which is based on the multiple filtering technique. It is a standard method of the Fourier transform-based frequency-time analysis. The spectrum of each record is multiplied by weighting functions centered at many discrete frequencies. Five local envelope maxima of all quasiharmonic components obtained by the inverse Fourier transform are found and their propagation times determined. These maxima are assigned to different modes of direct surface waves as well as to possible reflected, converted and multipathed modes. Filtered fundamental modes at pairs of geophones are correlated and phase velocities of surface waves are computed from the delays of propagation times of all quasiharmonic components. From the dispersion curves the shear wave

  4. Dust content of a hydrogen rich, low surface brightness galaxy and the luminosity history of 3C273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Thomas T.

    1993-01-01

    This project consists of a 30,000 second PSPC observation of the Giovanelli-Haynes Cloud in an attempt to detect light emitted by 3C273 which has been reflected by the cloud, and incidentally search the cloud for other sources of X-ray emission. The observation was carried out by ROSAT on Dec. 25, 1992 and the data was received by the P.I. in late March of 1993. We have examined the data and determined that the observation's background level, astrometry, etc. are acceptable. We have also detected diffuse emission from the direction of the Giovanelli-Haynes Cloud. Determination of the origin of this emission, by examining its morphology in relation to that of the radio map and the object's geometric relation with 3C273, requires software implementation of specialized algorithms. However, the most dramatic observation in the field is a potentially new population of discrete soft X-ray sources associated with dwarf galaxies.

  5. Near-Surface Site Characterization Using a Combination of Active and Passive Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. W.; Liu, L.; Chen, Y.; White, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    Seismic surveys with an active source are commonly used to characterize the subsurface. Increasingly, passive seismic surveys utilizing ambient seismic frequencies (microtremors) are being used to support geotechnical and hazards engineering studies. In this study, we use a combination of active and passive seismic methods to characterize a watershed site at Haddam Meadows State Park, Haddam, Connecticut. At Haddam Meadows, we employed a number of seismic arrays using both active and passive approaches to estimate the depth to rock and the seismic velocity structure of the unconsolidated sediments. The active seismic surveys included seismic refraction and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) using an accelerated weight-drop seismic source. The passive seismic surveys consisted of MASW techniques using both linear and circular geophone arrays, and a survey using a 3-component seismometer. The active seismic data were processed using conventional algorithms; the passive seismic data were processed using both the spatial autocorrelation method (SPAC) and the horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (H/V) method. The interpretations of subsurface structure from the active and passive surveys are generally in good agreement and compare favorably with ground truth information provided by adjacent boreholes. Our results suggest that a combination of active and passive seismic methods can be used to rapidly characterize the subsurface at the watershed scale.

  6. Retrieving surface waves from ambient seismic noise using seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalen, Karel N.; Mikesell, T. Dylan; Ruigrok, Elmer N.; Wapenaar, Kees

    2015-02-01

    Retrieving virtual source surface waves from ambient seismic noise by cross correlation assumes, among others, that the noise field is equipartitioned and the medium is lossless. Violation of these assumptions reduces the accuracy of the retrieved waves. A point-spread function computed from the same ambient noise quantifies the associated virtual source's spatial and temporal smearing. Multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) of the retrieved surface waves by this function has been shown to improve the virtual source's focusing and the accuracy of the retrieved waves using synthetic data. We tested MDD on data recorded during the Batholiths experiment, a passive deployment of broadband seismic sensors in British Columbia, Canada. The array consisted of two approximately linear station lines. Using 4 months of recordings, we retrieved fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves (0.05-0.27 Hz). We only used noise time windows dominated by waves that traverse the northern line before reaching the southern (2.5% of all data). Compared to the conventional cross-correlation result based on this subset, the MDD waveforms are better localized and have significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, MDD corrects the phase, and the spatial deconvolution fills in a spectral (f, k domain) gap between the single-frequency and double-frequency microseism bands. Frequency whitening of the noise also fills the gap in the cross-correlation result, but the signal-to-noise ratio of the MDD result remains higher. Comparison of the extracted phase velocities shows some differences between the methods, also when all data are included in the conventional cross correlation.

  7. Including Faults Detected By Near-Surface Seismic Methods in the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps - Some Restrictions Apply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. A.; Haller, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Every 6 years, the USGS updates the National Seismic Hazard Maps (new version released July 2014) that are intended to help society reduce risk from earthquakes. These maps affect hundreds of billions of dollars in construction costs each year as they are used to develop seismic-design criteria of buildings, bridges, highways, railroads, and provide data for risk assessment that help determine insurance rates. Seismic source characterization, an essential component of hazard model development, ranges from detailed trench excavations across faults at the ground surface to less detailed analysis of broad regions defined mainly on the basis of historical seismicity. Though it is a priority for the USGS to discover new Quaternary fault sources, the discovered faults only become a part of the hazard model if there are corresponding constraints on their geometry (length and depth extent) and slip-rate (or recurrence interval). When combined with fault geometry and slip-rate constraints, near-surface seismic studies that detect young (Quaternary) faults have become important parts of the hazard source model. Examples of seismic imaging studies with significant hazard impact include the Southern Whidbey Island fault, Washington; Santa Monica fault, San Andreas fault, and Palos Verdes fault zone, California; and Commerce fault, Missouri. There are many more faults in the hazard model in the western U.S. than in the expansive region east of the Rocky Mountains due to the higher rate of tectonic deformation, frequent surface-rupturing earthquakes and, in some cases, lower erosion rates. However, the recent increase in earthquakes in the central U.S. has revealed previously unknown faults for which we need additional constraints before we can include them in the seismic hazard maps. Some of these new faults may be opportunities for seismic imaging studies to provide basic data on location, dip, style of faulting, and recurrence.

  8. Near Surface Seismic Reflection Imaging: Great Potential Under Critical Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. D.; Peterie, S.; Judy, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic-reflection imaging has long been a mainstay in the oil and gas exploration community with mind boggling advancements in just the last decade, but its application to engineering, environmental, and groundwater problems has not seen the same level of utilization. A great deal of the problem lies in the many assumptions that are valid for deep exploration that are violated in the very complex near surface. Large channel systems with acquisition geometries conducive for both deep and shallow targets are many times assumed to be capable of extending the imaging depth window. In reality, constraints of the source and sensor/recording systems must be considered, where large powerful sources are needed to image exploration depths while low-energy, high-frequency sources are required for the shallow and thin targets in the near surface. Attempts to make one size fit all will result in artifacts that result in bogus images and characterizations in the shallow subsurface.Narrow optimum offsets, highly attenuative materials, extreme velocity variability, wavefield interference, and low signal-to-noise ratios provide an ideal breeding ground for the generation of artifacts on near-surface seismic-reflection data. With the cost of shallow reflection data being so high relative to other geophysical methods and invasive sampling, sometimes a single failure can hinder the growth in the use of the method. The method is extremely powerful and has the potential to provide vast quantities of information critical to understand the distributed hydrogeological and biogeochemical processes that elude borehole investigations. It is imperative that data be acquired in its rawest possible form and be processed with an eye to each operation. Cost savings sometimes result in one-size-fits-all acquisition and automated processing flows. Attention to detail and following signal from origination to characterization is essential.

  9. Feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to study seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to study the feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to investigate seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils. In the study, temporal variations of subsurface soil properties were measured and monitored by using a combination of a new seismic su...

  10. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  11. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E; Gamey, T Jeffrey; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-01-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies. PMID:15819938

  12. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E.; Gamey, Jeff; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-03-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies.

  13. Control system for inclined impact-type surface seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, G.M.

    1987-07-28

    A system is described for controlling the azimuths and inclinations of the respective shooting paths of separate vehicle-transported surface seismic sources. Each source has an impact mass, means for propelling the mass along the shooting path to strike an earth contacting base plate, and means for adjusting each shooting path by rotation thereof about two mutually perpendicular gimbal axes oriented in predetermined relation to the heading of the associated vehicle. The system consists of: (a) means for determining each such vehicle heading; (b) means dependent upon each vehicle heading for calculating the angular positions of each shooting path with respect to the gimbal axes which align the shooting path with desired values of azimuth and inclination; and (c) means responsive to the calculation means for actuating each shooting path adjustment means to effect such alignment.

  14. Military applications and examples of near-surface seismic surface wave methods (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    sloan, S.; Stevens, R.

    2013-12-01

    Although not always widely known or publicized, the military uses a variety of geophysical methods for a wide range of applications--some that are already common practice in the industry while others are truly novel. Some of those applications include unexploded ordnance detection, general site characterization, anomaly detection, countering improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and security monitoring, to name a few. Techniques used may include, but are not limited to, ground penetrating radar, seismic, electrical, gravity, and electromagnetic methods. Seismic methods employed include surface wave analysis, refraction tomography, and high-resolution reflection methods. Although the military employs geophysical methods, that does not necessarily mean that those methods enable or support combat operations--often times they are being used for humanitarian applications within the military's area of operations to support local populations. The work presented here will focus on the applied use of seismic surface wave methods, including multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and backscattered surface waves, often in conjunction with other methods such as refraction tomography or body-wave diffraction analysis. Multiple field examples will be shown, including explosives testing, tunnel detection, pre-construction site characterization, and cavity detection.

  15. Ti3C2 MXenes with Modified Surface for High-Performance Electromagnetic Absorption and Shielding in the X-Band.

    PubMed

    Han, Meikang; Yin, Xiaowei; Wu, Heng; Hou, Zexin; Song, Changqing; Li, Xinliang; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei

    2016-08-17

    Electromagnetic (EM) absorbing and shielding composites with tunable absorbing behaviors based on Ti3C2 MXenes are fabricated via HF etching and annealing treatment. Localized sandwich structure without sacrificing the original layered morphology is realized, which is responsible for the enhancement of EM absorbing capability in the X-band. The composite with 50 wt % annealed MXenes exhibits a minimum reflection loss of -48.4 dB at 11.6 GHz, because of the formation of TiO2 nanocrystals and amorphous carbon. Moreover, superior shielding effectiveness with high absorption effectiveness is achieved. The total and absorbing shielding effectiveness of Ti3C2 MXenes in a wax matrix with a thickness of only 1 mm reach values of 76.1 and 67.3 dB, while those of annealed Ti3C2 MXenes/wax composites are 32 and 24.2 dB, respectively. Considering the promising performance of Ti3C2 MXenes with the modified surface, this work is expected to open the door for the expanded applications of MXenes family in EM absorbing and shielding fields. PMID:27454148

  16. Seismic wave propagation through surface basalts - implications for coal seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Zhou, Binzhong; Hatherly, Peter; Fu, Li-Yun

    2010-02-01

    Seismic reflection surveying is one of the most widely used and effective techniques for coal seam structure delineation and risk mitigation for underground longwall mining. However, the ability of the method can be compromised by the presence of volcanic cover. This problem arises within parts of the Bowen and Sydney Basins of Australia and seismic surveying can be unsuccessful. As a consequence, such areas are less attractive for coal mining. Techniques to improve the success of seismic surveying over basalt flows are needed. In this paper, we use elastic wave-equation-based forward modelling techniques to investigate the effects and characteristics of seismic wave propagation under different settings involving changes in basalt properties, its thickness, lateral extent, relative position to the shot position and various forms of inhomogeneity. The modelling results suggests that: 1) basalts with high impedance contrasts and multiple flows generate strong multiples and weak reflectors; 2) thin basalts have less effect than thick basalts; 3) partial basalt cover has less effect than full basalt cover; 4) low frequency seismic waves (especially at large offsets) have better penetration through the basalt than high frequency waves; and 5) the deeper the coal seams are below basalts of limited extent, the less influence the basalts will have on the wave propagation. In addition to providing insights into the issues that arise when seismic surveying under basalts, these observations suggest that careful management of seismic noise and the acquisition of long-offset seismic data with low-frequency geophones have the potential to improve the seismic results.

  17. Development of near surface seismic methods for urban and mining applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Brodic, Bojan; Place, Joachim; Juhlin, Christopher; Bastani, Mehrdad

    2014-05-01

    There is a great need to improve our understanding of the geological conditions in the shallow subsurface. Direct observations of the subsurface are cumbersome and expensive, and sometimes impossible. Urban and mining areas are especially challenging due to various sources of noise such as from traffic, buildings, cars, city trains, trams, bridges and high-voltage power-lines. Access is also restricted both in time and space, which requires the equipment to be versatile, fast to set up and pack, and produces the least disruptions. However, if properly designed and implemented, geophysical methods are capable of imaging detailed subsurface structures and can successfully be used to provide crucial information for site characterizations, infrastructure planning, brown- and near-field exploration, and mine planning. To address some of these issues Uppsala University, in collaboration with a number of public authorities, research organizations and industry partners, has recently developed a prototype broadband (0-800 Hz based on digital sensors) multi-component seismic landstreamer system. The current configuration consists of three segments with twenty 3C-sensors each 2 m apart and an additional segment with twenty 3C-sensors each 4 m apart, giving a total streamer length of 200 m. These four segments can be towed in parallel or in series, which in combination with synchronized wireless and cabled sensors can address a variety of complex near surface problems. The system is especially geared for noisy environments and areas where high-resolution images of the subsurface are needed. The system has little sensitivity to electrical noise and measures sensor tilt, important in rough terrains, so it can immediately be corrected for during the acquisition. Thanks to the digital sensors, the system can also be used for waveform tomography and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW). Both these methods require low frequencies and these are often sacrificed in

  18. The fabrication of stable superhydrophobic surfaces using a thin Au/Pd coating over a hydrophilic 3C-SiC nanorod network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Afzal; Sohail, Shiraz; Jacob, Chacko

    2015-10-01

    In this work, it has been demonstrated that for hydrophilic materials, like SiC, etc., superhydrophobicity can be achieved by coating them with a material like Au/Pd with surface adsorbed organic contaminants, rather than modifying them by fluoropolymers as is usually done. Dense and randomly aligned 3C-SiC nanorods were grown in a cold-wall APCVD reactor using Ni as a catalyst which formed a network of micro/nano air pockets and exhibited superhydrophobic behavior when modified by an Au/Pd metal alloy coating by forming hierarchical nanostructures with surface adsorbed organic contaminants. A high water contact angle (160°), very low sliding angle (<5°), rebounding and a rubber ball-like behavior of a water droplet were observed on such a metal (Au/Pd) modified surface of 3C-SiC nanorods. The durability of the surface and reproducibility of the results was checked over a period of about 14 months under ambient atmosphere at room temperature, which demonstrates the long term stability of these superhydrophobic surfaces.

  19. High resolution seismic imaging of Rainier Mesa using surface reflection and surface to tunnel tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Johnson, L.R.; Karageorgi, E.K.; Peterson, J.E.

    1994-06-01

    In the interpretation of seismic data to infer properties of an explosion source, it is necessary to account for wave propagation effects. In order to understand and remove these propagation effects, it is necessary to have a model. An open question concerning this matter is the detail and accuracy which must be present in the velocity model in order to produce reliable estimates in the estimated source properties. While it would appear that the reliability of the results would be directly related to the accuracy of the velocity and density models used in the interpretation, it may be that certain deficiencies in these models can be compensated by the and amount of seismic data which is used in the inversion. The NPE provided an opportunity to test questions of this sort. In August 1993, two high resolution seismic experiments were performed in N-Tunnel and on the surface of Rainier Mesa above it. The first involved a surface-to-tunnel imaging experiment with sources on the surface and receivers in tunnel U12n.23 about 88 meters west of the NPE. It was possible to estimate the apparent average velocity between the tunnel and the surface. In a separate experiment, a high resolution reflection experiment was performed in order to image the lithology in Rainier Mesa. Good quality, broad band, reflections were obtained from depths extending into the Paleozoic basement. A high velocity layer near the surface is underlain by a thick section of low velocity material, providing a nonuniform but low average velocity between the depth of the NPE and the surface.

  20. Active seismic sources as a proxy for seismic surface processes: An example from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, A. D.; Lokmer, I.; Kennedy, B.; Keys, H. J. R.; Proctor, J.; Lyons, J. J.; Jolly, G. E.

    2014-10-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption pulses, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~ 7 × 105 m3) that propagated ~ 2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption timing must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the evolution of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the seismic sequence in a new cross correlation source location approach. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9 × 106 Nm producing observable seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four stations. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we obtain a best matched source position in the near vent region for the eruption period and significant down channel excitations during both the pre and post eruption periods. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~ 8 × 1011 Nm, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The new energy estimate may be more robust than those calculated from standard seismic radiation equations, which may include uncertainties about the path and site effects. The

  1. Impact-induced seismic activity on asteroid 433 Eros: a surface modification process.

    PubMed

    Richardson, James E; Melosh, H Jay; Greenberg, Richard

    2004-11-26

    High-resolution images of the surface of asteroid 433 Eros revealed evidence of downslope movement of a loose regolith layer, as well as the degradation and erasure of small impact craters (less than approximately 100 meters in diameter). One hypothesis to explain these observations is seismic reverberation after impact events. We used a combination of seismic and geomorphic modeling to analyze the response of regolith-covered topography, particularly craters, to impact-induced seismic shaking. Applying these results to a stochastic cratering model for the surface of Eros produced good agreement with the observed size-frequency distribution of craters, including the paucity of small craters. PMID:15567856

  2. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, Bob A.; DeAngelo, Michael V.; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A.; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-01

    applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

  3. Near-surface attenuation using traffic-induced seismic noise at a downhole array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmen, S. Umit; Pinar, Ali; Edincliler, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach is developed for estimating the near-surface attenuation using seismic noise recordings at a downhole array. The amplitude spectrum of the traffic-induced seismic noise at the engineering bedrock level exhibits a high-frequency decay between 10 and 40 Hz. Subsequently, it yields a Kappa value of 14 ± 3 ms and a quality factor of 45 ± 10 for the profile between the highway and the sensor. Likewise, using the earthquake recordings made at the surface and the engineering bedrock levels, the Kappa values are calculated as 60 and 45 ms, respectively. The difference was attributed to near-surface attenuation where the upgoing earthquake waves and the downgoing traffic-induced seismic waves traverse similar soil profiles resulting in similar Kappa values. Hence, the near-site geology attenuation properties can be derived using the seismic noise data induced by a known source at a close distance recorded at engineering bedrock level.

  4. Seismic signatures of carbonate caves affected by near-surface absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2015-12-01

    The near-surface absorption within a low-velocity zone generally has an exponential attenuation effect on seismic waves. But how does this absorption affect seismic signatures of karstic caves in deep carbonate reservoirs? Seismic simulation and analysis reveals that, although this near-surface absorption attenuates the wave energy of a continuous reflection, it does not alter the basic kinematic shape of bead-string reflections, a special seismic characteristic associated with carbonate caves in the Tarim Basin, China. Therefore, the bead-strings in seismic profiles can be utilized, with a great certainty, for interpreting the existence of caves within the deep carbonate reservoirs and for evaluating their pore spaces. Nevertheless, the difference between the central frequency and the peak frequency is increased along with the increment in the absorption. While the wave energy of bead-string reflections remains strong, due to the interference of seismic multiples generated by big impedance contrast between the infill materials of a cave and the surrounding carbonate rocks, the central frequency is shifted linearly with respect to the near-surface absorption. These two features can be exploited simultaneously, for a stable attenuation analysis of field seismic data.

  5. Step Free Surface Heteroepitaxy of 3C-SiC Layers on Patterned 4H/6H-SiC Mesas and Cantilevers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Powell, J. Anthony; Trunek, Andrew J.; Spry, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Most SiC devices are implemented in homoepitaxial films grown on 4H/6H-SiC wafers with surfaces 3 degrees to 8 degrees off-axis from the (0001) basal plane. This approach has not prevented many substrate crystal defects from propagating into SiC epilayers, and does not permit the realization of SiC heteropolytype devices. This presentation describes recent advances in SiC epitaxial growth that begun to overcome the above shortcomings for arrays of mesas patterned into on-axis 4H/6H-SiC wafers. First, we demonstrated that atomic-scale surface steps can be completely eliminated from 4H/6H-SiC mesas via on-axis homoepitaxial step-flow growth, forming (0001) basal plane surfaces (up to 0.4 mm x 0.4 mm) for larger than previously thought possible. Step-free surface areas were then extended by growth fo thin lateral cantilevers from the mesa tops. These lateral cantilevers enabled substrate defects to be reduced and relocated in homoepitaxial films in a manner not possible with off-axis SiC growth. Finally, growth of vastly improved 3C-SiC heterofilms was achieved on 4H/6H-SiC mesas using the recently develop step-free surface heteroepitaxy process. These epitaxial growth developments should enable improved homojunction and heterojunction silicon carbide prototype devices.

  6. Pembina Cardium CO2-EOR monitoring project: Integrated surface seismic and VSP time-lapse seismic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshuhail, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the Pembina field in west-central Alberta, Canada, approximately 40,000 tons of supercritical CO2 was injected into the 1650 m deep, 20 m thick upper-Cretaceous Cardium Fm. between March 2005 and 2007. A time-lapse seismic program was designed and incorporated into the overall measurement, monitoring and verification program. The objectives were to track the CO2 plume within the reservoir, and to evaluate the integrity of storage. Fluid replacement modeling predicts a decrease in the P-wave velocity and bulk density in the reservoir by about 4% and 1%, respectively. Synthetic seismograms show subtle reflectivity changes at the Cardium Fm. and a traveltime delay at the later high-amplitude Viking event of less than 1 ms. The time-lapse datasets, however, show no significant anomalies in the P-wave seismic data that can be attributed to supercritical CO2 injected into the Cardium Fm. (Figure 1). The converted-wave (P-S) data, on the other hand, showed small traveltime anomalies. The most coherent results were those obtained by the fixed-array VSP dataset (Figure 2) due to higher frequency bandwidth and high signal to noise ratio. The amplitude and traveltime changes observed in the VSP dataset are small but are consistent in magnitude with those predicted from rock physics modeling. The analysis suggests that the inability to clearly detect the CO2 plume in surface seismic data is likely due to the CO2 being contained in thin permeable sandstone members of the Cardium Formation. The seismic signature of the Cardium Fm. in this area may also be degraded by multiples and strong attenuation involving the shallow Ardley coals. However, the lack of a 4D seismic changes above the reservoir indicates that the injected CO2 is not migrating through the caprock into shallower formations.

  7. Microseismic Monitoring Using Surface and Borehole Seismic Stations in an Oil Field, North Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hussain, I.; Al-Hashmi, S.; Al-Shijbi, Y.; Al-Saifi, M.; Al-Toubi, K.; Al-Lazki, A.; Al-Kindy, F.

    2009-05-01

    Five shallow borehole seismic stations were installed to monitor microearthquake activities in a carbonate oil field in northern Oman since 1999. This shallow network of seismic station operated continuously until 2002 after which intermittent seismic recording took place due to lack of maintenance and failure of some stations. The objectives of the study are to determine the microseismic parameters in the oil field and to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of these events to evaluate possible triggering mechanism. Well over 400 microearthquakes per year were recorded in the first three years of operation and after that the level of seismic recording fell to less than 200 microearthquakes per year due to failure of some stations. In March 2008, temporary seismic experiment consisting of five near surface seismic stations were installed in the oil field to augment the shallow network station and to evaluate surface installment of seismic instrument to monitor microseismic activities. It has been recognized that microearthquakes data such as size, spatial, and temporal distribution provide information on the pressure waves initiated by either production of or injection of fluids into reservoirs. A total of 44 local microearthquake events were analyzed and located during the temporary seismic stations deployment using a non-linear location software that allows the use of variable accurate velocity model of the subsurface. The events location is confined to oil field reservoir boundary during the recording period and more events occurring at shallow depth. The correlation coefficient between gas production and number of events is the higher compared with the oil production or water injection. The focal plane solution for the largest event in the sequence indicates normal faulting with extensional stress consistent with the existing mapped normal faults in the oil field. Microseismic signal clearly detected by the collocated sensors of the near surface

  8. Near-surface velocity structure from borehole and refraction seismic surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, D.; Lawton, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    Seismic refraction and borehole reflection data have been used in conjunction with other geophysical tools to characterize the near-surface geology in the vicinity of a shallow well near Calgary, Alberta. The investigated section is comprised primarily of glacial tills and gravels. Seismic waves generated in the lower gravel units travel as compressional waves up to the till/gravel interface, where they are converted to shear waves upon transmission. Velocity structure from a reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) survey agrees closely with that from refraction surveying.

  9. Feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to study seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the paper is to study the temporal variations of the subsurface soil properties due to seasonal and weather effects using a combination of a new seismic surface method and an existing acoustic probe system. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based multi-channel analysis of surface wav...

  10. Seismic reading taken at MSC recording impact of Apollo 13 S-IVB with surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A seismic reading taken from instruments at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) recording impact of the Apollo 13 S-IVB/Instrument Unit with lunar surface. The expended Saturn third stage and instrument unit impacted the lunar surface at 7:09 p.m., April 14, 1970. The location of the impact was 2.4 degrees south latitude and 27.9 degrees west longitude, about 76 nautical miles west-northwest of the Apollo 12 Lunar Surface Experiment package deployment site. The S-IVB/IU impact was picked up by the Passive Seismic Experiment, a component of the package and transmitted to instruments at the Mission Control Center.

  11. Adhesion of water droplets by low voltage electrowetting on a superhydrophobic surface of a 3C-SiC nanorod network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Afzal; Sohail, Shiraz; Jacob, Chacko

    2015-12-01

    Adhesion state of a liquid droplet on the superhydrophobic surfaces can be tuned by electrowetting and can be exploited for various applications in microfluidics, lab on chip and biotechnology, etc. Silicon carbide (SiC) can be used for these kinds of studies due to its high chemical and mechanical stability in harsh environment conditions. In this work, a low dc voltage irreversible electrowetting using a deionized water droplet on superhydrophobic hierarchical Au/Pd nanostructures coated 3C-SiC nanorod surface is demonstrated. Strong adhesion of the water droplet to the surface was achieved by changing its adhesion state from low to high and then very high by electrowetting, thereby changing the contact angle from 160° to 75°. The first irreversible transition of water droplet from Cassie regime to Wenzel regime occurred at 16 V due to the drastic increase of the work of adhesion which was found to be 10 times that of the initial value. Finally, the work of adhesion was increased about 20 times its initial value by increasing the applied voltage up to 24 V.

  12. Characterization of a complex near-surface structure using well logging and passive seismic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjumea, Beatriz; Macau, Albert; Gabàs, Anna; Figueras, Sara

    2016-04-01

    We combine geophysical well logging and passive seismic measurements to characterize the near-surface geology of an area located in Hontomin, Burgos (Spain). This area has some near-surface challenges for a geophysical study. The irregular topography is characterized by limestone outcrops and unconsolidated sediments areas. Additionally, the near-surface geology includes an upper layer of pure limestones overlying marly limestones and marls (Upper Cretaceous). These materials lie on top of Low Cretaceous siliciclastic sediments (sandstones, clays, gravels). In any case, a layer with reduced velocity is expected. The geophysical data sets used in this study include sonic and gamma-ray logs at two boreholes and passive seismic measurements: three arrays and 224 seismic stations for applying the horizontal-to-vertical amplitude spectra ratio method (H/V). Well-logging data define two significant changes in the P-wave-velocity log within the Upper Cretaceous layer and one more at the Upper to Lower Cretaceous contact. This technique has also been used for refining the geological interpretation. The passive seismic measurements provide a map of sediment thickness with a maximum of around 40 m and shear-wave velocity profiles from the array technique. A comparison between seismic velocity coming from well logging and array measurements defines the resolution limits of the passive seismic techniques and helps it to be interpreted. This study shows how these low-cost techniques can provide useful information about near-surface complexity that could be used for designing a geophysical field survey or for seismic processing steps such as statics or imaging.

  13. A comprehensive approach for evaluating network performance in surface and borehole seismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, T. A.; Iannaccone, G.; Zollo, A.; Lomax, A.; Ferulano, M. F.; Vetri, M. L. V.; Barzaghi, L. P.

    2013-02-01

    The accurate determination of locations and magnitudes of seismic events in a monitored region is important for many scientific, industrial and military studies and applications; for these purposes a wide variety of seismic networks are deployed throughout the world. It is crucial to know the performance of these networks not only in detecting and locating seismic events of different sizes throughout a specified source region, but also by evaluating their location errors as a function of the magnitude and source location. In this framework, we have developed a method for evaluating network performance in surface and borehole seismic monitoring. For a specified network geometry, station characteristics and a target monitoring volume, the method determines the lowest magnitude of events that the seismic network is able to detect (Mwdetect), and locate (Mwloc) and estimates the expected location and origin time errors for a specified magnitude. Many of the features related to the seismic signal recorded at a single station are considered in this methodology, including characteristics of the seismic source, the instrument response, the ambient noise level, wave propagation in a layered, anelastic medium and uncertainties on waveform measures and the velocity model. We applied this method to two different network typologies: a local earthquake monitoring network, Irpinia Seismic Network (ISNet), installed along the Campania-Lucania Apennine chain in Southern Italy, and a hypothetic borehole network for monitoring microfractures induced during the hydrocarbon extraction process in an oil field. The method we present may be used to aid in enhancing existing networks and/or understanding their capabilities, such as for the ISNet case study, or to optimally design the network geometry in specific target regions, as for the borehole network example.

  14. Cable development for distributed geophysical sensing with a field trial in surface seismic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumens, Paul; Franzen, Andre; Hornman, Kees; Grandi Karam, Samantha; Hemink, Gijs; Kuvshinov, Boris; La Follett, Jon; Wyker, Brendan; Zwartjes, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Fibre-optic distributed sensing has the potential to revolutionize well and reservoir surveillance in the oil and gas industry. Benefits include the passive nature of optical fibre sensors, the potential for cost-effective installations, combined with the possibility of densely distributed measurements along the entire length of the fibre. Amongst a range of fibre-optic sensing technologies, Distributed Acoustic Sensing has the potential to provide a low cost alternative for conventional seismic technologies. To widen the geophysical application scope further, the fibre-optic sensing cable should be made more sensitive to incoming seismic waves that arrive at the cable perpendicular ("broadside") to its axial direction. We introduce the development of such cable concepts, and present results of a successful cable deployment in a surface seismic field trial. Efforts continue to realize cost-effective directionally-sensitive cables for geophysical use, for deployment down-hole and on surface.

  15. A new impulsive seismic shear wave source for near-surface (0-30 m) seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of elastic moduli and fluid content in shallow (0-30 m) natural soils below artificial flood containment structures can be particularly useful in levee monitoring as well as seismic hazard studies. Shear wave moduli may be estimated from horizontally polarized, shear wave experiments. However, long profiles (>10 km) with dense receiver and shot spacings (<1m) cannot be collected efficiently using currently available shear wave sources. We develop a new, inexpensive, shear wave source for collecting fast, shot gathers over large acquisition sites. In particular, gas-charged, organic-rich sediments comprising most lower-delta sedimentary facies, greatly attenuate compressional body-waves. On the other hand, SH waves are relatively insensitive to pore-fluid moduli and can improve resolution. We develop a recoil device (Jolly, 1956) into a single-user, light-weight (<20 kg), impulsive, ground-surface-coupled SH wave generator, which is capable of working at rates of several hundred shotpoints per day. Older impulsive methods rely on hammer blows to ground-planted stationary targets. Our source is coupled to the ground with steel spikes and the powder charge can be detonated mechanically or electronically. Electrical fuses show repeatability in start times of < 50 microseconds. The barrel and shell-holder exceed required thicknesses to ensure complete safety during use. The breach confines a black-powder, 12-gauge shotgun shell, loaded with inert, environmentally safe ballast. In urban settings, produced heat and sound are confined by a detached, exterior cover. A moderate 2.5 g black-powder charge generates seismic amplitudes equivalent to three 4-kg sledge-hammer blows. We test this device to elucidate near subsurface sediment properties at former levee breach sites in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Our radio-telemetric seismic acquisition system uses an in-house landstreamer, consisting of 14-Hz horizontal component geophones, coupled to steel plates

  16. Seismic surface wave tomography of waste sites. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.L.

    1997-10-14

    'The objective of the Seismic Surface Wave Tomography of Waste Sites is to develop a robust technique for field acquisition and analysis of surface wave data for the interpretation of shallow structures, such as those associated with the burial of wastes. The analysis technique is to be developed and tested on an existing set of seismic data covering the K-901 burial site at the East Tennessee Technology Park. Also, a portable prototype for a field acquisition system will be designed and developed to obtain additional data for analysis and testing of the technique. The K-901 data have been examined and a preliminary Single Valued Decomposition inversion has been obtained. The preliminary data indicates a need for additional seismic data to ground-truth the inversion. The originally proposed gravity data acquisition has been dropped because sufficient gravity data are now available for a preliminary analysis and because the seismic data are considered more critical to the interpretation. The proposed prototype for the portable acquisition and analysis system was developed during the first year and will be used in part of the acquisition of additional seismic data.'

  17. Passive monitoring for near surface void detection using traffic as a seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Kuzma, H. A.; Rector, J.; Nazari, S.

    2009-12-01

    In this poster we present preliminary results based on our several field experiments in which we study seismic detection of voids using a passive array of surface geophones. The source of seismic excitation is vehicle traffic on nearby roads, which we model as a continuous line source of seismic energy. Our passive seismic technique is based on cross-correlation of surface wave fields and studying the resulting power spectra, looking for "shadows" caused by the scattering effect of a void. High frequency noise masks this effect in the time domain, so it is difficult to see on conventional traces. Our technique does not rely on phase distortions caused by small voids because they are generally too tiny to measure. Unlike traditional impulsive seismic sources which generate highly coherent broadband signals, perfect for resolving phase but too weak for resolving amplitude, vehicle traffic affords a high power signal a frequency range which is optimal for finding shallow structures. Our technique results in clear detections of an abandoned railroad tunnel and a septic tank. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop a technology for the simultaneous imaging of shallow underground structures and traffic monitoring near these structures.

  18. High-resolution seismic reflection survey near SPR surface collapse feature at Weeks Island, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Harding, R.S. Jr.; Steeples, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    Shallow high resolution 2-D and 3-D seismic reflection techniques are assisting in the subsurface delineation of a surface collapse feature (sinkhole) at Weeks Island, Louisiana. Seismic reflection surveys were conducted in March 1994. Data from walkaway noise tests were used to assist selection of field recording parameters. The top of the salt dome is about 180 ft below ground surface at the sinkhole. The water table is an estimated 90 ft below the ground surface. A single coherent reflection was consistently recorded across the entire area of the survey, although stacking velocity and spectral content of the event varied. On the basis of observed travel times and stacking velocities, the coherent reflection event appears to originate above the top of the salt, possibly at or near the water table. Identification of this reflector will be made form borehole investigations currently planned for the sinkhole site. A depression or time sag in this reflection event is clearly evident in both the 2-D and 3-D seismic data in the immediate vicinity of the sinkhole. The time sag appears to be related to the subsurface structure of the reflector and not to near surface topography or velocity effects. Elsewhere in the survey area, observed changes in reflection travel times and wavelet character appear to be related to subsurface geologic structure. These seismic observations may assist in predicting where future sinkholes will develop after they have been tied to borehole data collected at the site.

  19. Shallow seismic source parameter determination using intermediate-period surface wave amplitude spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Benjamin D.; Selby, Neil D.; Heyburn, Ross; Woodhouse, John H.

    2012-09-01

    Estimating reliable depths for shallow seismic sources is important in both seismo-tectonic studies and in seismic discrimination studies. Surface wave excitation is sensitive to source depth, especially at intermediate and short-periods, owing to the approximate exponential decay of surface wave displacements with depth. A new method is presented here to retrieve earthquake source parameters from regional and teleseismic intermediate period (100-15 s) fundamental-mode surface wave recordings. This method makes use of advances in mapping global dispersion to allow higher frequency surface wave recordings at regional and teleseismic distances to be used with more confidence than in previous studies and hence improve the resolution of depth estimates. Synthetic amplitude spectra are generated using surface wave theory combined with a great circle path approximation, and a grid of double-couple sources are compared with the data. Source parameters producing the best-fitting amplitude spectra are identified by minimizing the least-squares misfit in logarithmic amplitude space. The F-test is used to search the solution space for statistically acceptable parameters and the ranges of these variables are used to place constraints on the best-fitting source. Estimates of focal mechanism, depth and scalar seismic moment are determined for 20 small to moderate sized (4.3 ≤Mw≤ 6.4) earthquakes. These earthquakes are situated across a wide range of geographic and tectonic locations and describe a range of faulting styles over the depth range 4-29 km. For the larger earthquakes, comparisons with other studies are favourable, however existing source determination procedures, such as the CMT technique, cannot be performed for the smaller events. By reducing the magnitude threshold at which robust source parameters can be determined, the accuracy, especially at shallow depths, of seismo-tectonic studies, seismic hazard assessments, and seismic discrimination investigations can

  20. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography using fat rays: application to near-surface seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Claudio; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-08-01

    Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography does not rely on the high frequency assumption made in classical ray-based tomography. By incorporating the effects of velocity structures in the first Fresnel volume around the central ray, it offers a more realistic and accurate representation of the actual physics of seismic wave propagation and thus, enhanced imaging of near-surface structures is expected. The objective of this work was to apply frequency-dependent first arrival traveltime tomography to surface seismic data that were acquired for exploration scale and near-surface seismic imaging. We adapted a fat ray tomography algorithm from global-earth seismology that calculates the Fresnel volumes based on source and receiver (adjoint source) traveltime fields. The fat ray tomography algorithm was tested on synthetic model data that mimics the dimensions of two field data sets. The field data sets are presented as two case studies where fat ray tomography was applied for near-surface seismic imaging. The data set of the first case study was recorded for high-resolution near-surface imaging of a Quaternary valley (profile length < 1 km); the second data set was acquired for hydrocarbon search (profile length > 10 km). All results of fat ray tomography are compared against the results of classical ray-based tomography. We show that fat ray tomography can provide enhanced tomograms and that it is possible to recover more information on the subsurface when compared to ray tomography. However, model assessment based on the column sum of the Jacobian matrix revealed that especially the deep parts of the structure in the fat ray tomograms might not be adequately covered by fat rays. Furthermore, the performance of the fat ray tomography depends on the chosen input frequency in relation to the scale of the seismic survey. Synthetic data testing revealed that the best results were obtained when the frequency was chosen to correspond to an approximate wavelength

  1. SEISMIC SURFACE-WAVE TOMOGRAPHY OF WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of the earth using surface waves are extensive. The early targets were crustal thickness and upper mantle structure because surface waves are well recorded on the early long period instrumentation and because the velocity contrast between the crust and mantle exhibits pro...

  2. Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1989-10-01

    For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs.

  3. Surface seismic measurements of near-surface P-and S-wave seismic velocities at earthquake recording stations, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Frankel, A.D.; Odum, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    We measured P-and S-wave seismic velocities to about 40-m depth using seismic-refraction/reflection data on the ground surface at 13 sites in the Seattle, Washington, urban area, where portable digital seismographs recently recorded earthquakes. Sites with the lowest measured Vs correlate with highest ground motion amplification. These sites, such as at Harbor Island and in the Duwamish River industrial area (DRIA) south of the Kingdome, have an average Vs in the upper 30 m (V??s30) of 150 to 170 m/s. These values of V??s30 place these sites in soil profile type E (V??s30 < 180 m/s). A "rock" site, located at Seward Park on Tertiary sedimentary deposits, has a V??S30 of 433 m/s, which is soil type C (V??s30: 360 to 760 m/s). The Seward Park site V??s30 is about equal to, or up to 200 m/s slower than sites that were located on till or glacial outwash. High-amplitude P-and S-wave seismic reflections at several locations appear to correspond to strong resonances observed in earthquake spectra. An S-wave reflector at the Kingdome at about 17 to 22 m depth probably causes strong 2-Hz resonance that is observed in the earthquake data near the Kingdome.

  4. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies.

  5. On the Use of Fractal Surfaces to Understand Seismic Wave Propagation in Layered Basalt Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Catherine E.; Hobbs, Richard W.; Rusch, Roxanne

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand how a layered basalt sequence affects the propagation of a seismic wave, which has implications for sub-basalt seismic imaging. This is achieved by the construction of detailed, realistic models of basalt sequences, using data derived directly from outcrop analogues. Field data on the surface roughness of basaltic lava flows were captured using terrestrial laser scanning and satellite remote sensing. The fractal properties of the surface roughness were derived, and it can be shown that the lava flow surface is fractal over length scales up to approximately 2 km. The fractal properties were then used to construct synthetic lava flow surfaces using a von Karman power spectrum, and the resulting surfaces were then stacked to create a synthetic lava flow sequence. P-wave velocity data were then added, and the resulting model was used to generate synthetic seismic data. The resulting stacked section shows that the ability to resolve the internal structure of the lava flows is quickly lost due to scattering and attenuation by the basalt pile. A further result from generating wide-angle data is that the appearance of a lower-velocity layer below the basalt sequence may be caused by destructive interference within the basalt itself.

  6. Fracture Detection in Alluvial Fan Deposits Using Near-Surface Seismic Reflection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, R. A.; Miller, B.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we document the observation of probable extensive shallow vertical fracture systems in unprocessed 2-D source gathers from near-surface seismic reflection surveys conducted over unconsolidated materials in alluvial fans environments. Mapping of fracture and fault systems within the sedimentary sections at hydrocarbon exploration scales has become common practice. This is due to the advent of post-stack attribute analysis of 3-D seismic images worldwide. However, examples of fracture detection and imaging in the near-surface are currently lacking in the literature. In addition, examples of fracture detection and mapping in the pre-stack domain are also lacking. In this study, unprocessed seismic source gathers from very high-resolution reflection surveys over alluvial fan deposits in tectonically active areas appear to display distinct patterns of amplitude drop off, geometrically similar to patterns expected for vertical fracture systems. The patterns can also be extracted by attribute analysis using techniques such as envelope and coherency analyses. Simple standard processing steps such as trace editing, muting, and bandpass filtering enhance interpretability. The patterns appear to be consistent and spatially fixed in the subsurface from source location to source location. These are observed in areas of obvious recent local large-scale fault movement. Examples are given from two areas, eastern Queen Valley in California and eastern Fish Lake Valley in Nevada. The stratigraphic and sedimentation patterns are quite complicated in both areas, and sediment characteristics vary considerably between sites. The surface sediments in the Queen Valley case are, in general, much coarser with many more boulder-sized clasts in the shallow subsurface. The seismic source consisted of a 30-06 rifle fired downhole at a depth of 0.5m. While the boulders interfered with seismic source operations, the record quality was excellent. The alluvial materials, especially

  7. Detection, location, and analysis of earthquakes using seismic surface waves (Beno Gutenberg Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Göran

    2015-04-01

    For shallow sources, Love and Rayleigh waves are the largest seismic phases recorded at teleseismic distances. The utility of these waves for earthquake characterization was traditionally limited to magnitude estimation, since geographically variable dispersion makes it difficult to determine useful travel-time information from the waveforms. Path delays due to heterogeneity of several tens of seconds are typical for waves at 50 sec period, and these delays must be accounted for with precision and accuracy in order to extract propagation-phase and source-phase information. Advances in tomographic mapping of global surface-wave phase velocities, and continuous growth and improvements of seismographic networks around the world, now make possible new applications of surface waves for earthquake monitoring and analysis. Through continuous back propagation of the long-period seismic wave field recorded by globally distributed stations, nearly all shallow earthquakes greater than M=5 can be detected and located with a precision of 25 km. Some of the detected events do not appear in standard earthquake catalogs and correspond to non-tectonic earthquakes, including landslides, glacier calving, and volcanic events. With the improved ability to predict complex propagation effects of surface waves across a heterogeneous Earth, moment-tensor and force representations of seismic sources can be routinely determined for all earthquakes greater than M=5 by waveform fitting of surface waves. A current area of progress in the use of surface waves for earthquake studies is the determination of precise relative locations of remote seismicity by systematic cross correlation and analysis of surface waves generated by neighboring sources. Preliminary results indicate that a location precision of 5 km may be achievable in many areas of the world.

  8. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  9. FINAL REPORT. SEISMIC SURFACE-WAVE TOMOGRAPHY OF WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to develop analysis programs for surface-wave group-velocity tomography and apply these to three test areas. We succeeded by obtaining data covering two square areas that were 30 meters on a side and one that was 16 meters on a side, in addition to...

  10. Inversion of the Chelyabinsk seismic surface waves and comparative constraints on the generation of seismic waves by atmospheric Impacts on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakostas, F. G.; Rakoto, V.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Meteor impacts are a very important seismic source for planetary seismology, since their locations and, in some cases, their occurence times can be accurately known from orbiters, tracking or optical observations. Their importance becomes greater in the case of a seismic experiment with one seismometer, as the SEIS (Seismic Experiment of Interior Structure) of the future Martian mission "InSight", as the known location allows a direct inversion of differential travel times and wave forms in terms of structure. Meteor impacts generate body and surface seismic waves when they reach the surface of a planet. But when they explode into the atmosphere, due to ablation, they generate shock waves, which are converted into linear, seismic waves in the solid part and acoustic waves in the atmosphere. This effect can be modeled when the amplitude of Rayleigh and other Spheroidal normal modes is made with the atmospheric/ground coupling effects. In this study, meteor impacts are modeled as seismic sources in a comparative analysis for the cases of Earth and Mars. Using the computed seismograms, calculated by the summation of the normal modes of the full planet (e.g. with atmosphere) the properties of the seismic source can be obtained. Its duration is typically associated to the radiation duration of shock waves until they reach the linear regime of propagation. These transition times are comparatively analyzed, for providing constraints on the seismic source duration on Earth and Mars. In the case of Earth, we test our approach with the Chelyabinsk superbolide. The computed seismograms are used in order to perform the inversion of the source, by comparison with the data of the Global Seismographic Network. The results are interpreted and compared with other observations. In the case of Mars, equivalent sources are similarly modeled in different atmospheric, impact size and lithospheric conditions.

  11. The influence of climatically-driven surface loading variations on continental strain and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Tim; Calais, Eric; Fleitout, Luce; Bollinger, Laurent; Scotti, Oona

    2016-04-01

    In slowly deforming regions of plate interiors, secondary sources of stress and strain can result in transient deformation rates comparable to, or greater than, the background tectonic rates. Highly variable in space and time, these transients have the potential to influence the spatio-temporal distribution of seismicity, interfering with any background tectonic effects to either promote or inhibit the failure of pre-existing faults, and potentially leading to a clustered, or 'pulse-like', seismic history. Here, we investigate the ways in which the large-scale deformation field resulting from climatically-controlled changes in surface ice mass over the Pleistocene and Holocene may have influenced not only the seismicity of glaciated regions, but also the wider seismicity around the ice periphery. We first use a set of geodynamic models to demonstrate that a major pulse of seismic activity occurring in Fennoscandia, coincident with the time of end-glaciation, occurred in a setting where the contemporaneous horizontal strain-rate resulting from the changing ice mass, was extensional - opposite to the reverse sense of coseismic displacement accommodated on these faults. Therefore, faulting did not release extensional elastic strain that was building up at the time of failure, but compressional elastic strain that had accumulated in the lithosphere on timescales longer than the glacial cycle, illustrating the potential for a non-tectonic trigger to tap in to the background tectonic stress-state. We then move on to investigate the more distal influence that changing ice (and ocean) volumes may have had on the evolving strain field across intraplate Europe, how this is reflected in the seismicity across intraplate Europe, and what impact this might have on the paleoseismic record.

  12. Effects of surface topography on ground shaking prediction: implications for seismic hazard analysis and recommendations for seismic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barani, Simone; Massa, Marco; Lovati, Sara; Spallarossa, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the role of topographic effects on the prediction of earthquake ground motion. Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) are mathematical models that estimate the shaking level induced by an earthquake as a function of several parameters, such as magnitude, source-to-site distance, style of faulting and ground type. However, little importance is given to the effects of topography, which, as known, may play a significant role on the level, duration and frequency content of ground motion. Ridges and crests are often lost inside the large number of sites considered in the definition of a GMPE. Hence, it is presumable that current GMPEs are unable to accurately predict the shaking level at the top of a relief. The present work, which follows the article of Massa et al. about topographic effects, aims at overcoming this limitation by amending an existing GMPE with an additional term to account for the effects of surface topography at a specific site. First, experimental ground motion values and ground motions predicted by the attenuation model of Bindi et al. for five case studies are compared and contrasted in order to quantify their discrepancy and to identify anomalous behaviours of the sites investigated. Secondly, for the site of Narni (Central Italy), amplification factors derived from experimental measurements and numerical analyses are compared and contrasted, pointing out their impact on probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and design norms. In particular, with reference to the Italian building code, our results have highlighted the inadequacy of the national provisions concerning the definition of the seismic load at top of ridges and crests, evidencing a significant underestimation of ground motion around the site resonance frequency.

  13. Surface uplift and time-dependent seismic hazard due to fluid-injection in eastern Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzaei, M.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    US states such as Texas and Oklahoma that produce high-volumes of unconventional oil and gas, are facing a sharp increase in seismicity. Observations of the associated surface deformation and accompanying physical models that unequivocally link the seismicity and waste water injection are scarce. Here, we find that the waste water injection in eastern Texas causes uplift, detectable using radar interferometric data. Combining the uplift and injection data through a poroelastic model allows for the resolution of a complex crustal distribution of hydraulic conductivity and pore pressure. We find that the ~5 years pore pressure increase is capable of triggering the 17 May 2012, Mw 4.8 earthquake, the largest event recorded in east Texas. This study shows that surface deformation data are vital in order to constrain the spatiotemporal variations of the stress field in the vicinity of injection sites.

  14. The Seismic Effect of Impacts on Asteroid Surface Morphology: Early Modeling Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. E.; Melosh, H. J.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, spacecraft observations of asteroids 951 Gaspra, 243 Ida, 253 Mathilde, and 433 Eros have shown the overriding dominance of impact processes with regard to the structure and appearance of these small, irregular bodies. One currently unanswered question is: to what degree does seismic shaking from impacts affect the surface morphology of these bodies? Through detailed modeling, we begin to address this question.

  15. High-Resolution Seismic Investigation of a Surface Collapse Feature at Weeks Island Salt Dome, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. D.; Xia, J.; Harding, R. S.; Steeples, D. W.

    2005-05-01

    Seismic imaging techniques delineated the subsurface expression of an active sinkhole above a former salt mine at Weeks Island, Louisiana, which was used at the time by the U.S. Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve. (The Weeks Island salt dome is no longer part of the Reserve.) The sinkhole, which at the time of the survey was approximately 12 m wide and 11 m deep, is directly over the edge of the upper storage chamber and approximately 60 m above the top of the salt dome. Surface seismic reflections imaged a dramatic bowl-shaped depression in a 28-m-deep reflector spatially consistent with the sinkhole. Two reflections (28 m and 60 m) on multichannel VSP data represent the only velocity and/or density contrasts detected above the top of the salt dome. The 28-m reflector identified on both VSP and surface seismic reflection data is at a depth consistent with the piezometric surface. Considering the high measured permeability and relative geometric severity of the reflection geometry, it is questionable whether this drape in the 28-m reflection is consistent with the water table. Localized velocity variations could account for some of the apparent geometry. The 60-m salt reflection, evident on VSP, can be interpreted on selected processed surface seismic shot gathers, but is difficult to confidently and consistently identify on stacked sections. The sinkhole lies along a northeast-trending acoustic lineament, possibly related to or associated with salt dissolution. The acoustic expression of the sinkhole suggests a localized, predominantly vertical feature. No evidence was discovered to confidently ascertain the mechanism responsible for exposing the salt to unsaturated meteoric water.

  16. Seismic Surface-Wave Tomography of Waste Sites - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Timothy L.

    2000-09-14

    The objective of this study was to develop analysis programs for surface-wave group-velocity tomography, and apply these to three test areas. We succeeded by obtaining data covering two square areas that were 30 meters on a side, and a third area that was 16 meters on a side, in addition to a collaborative effort wherein we processed data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory site. At all sites, usable group velocities were obtained for frequencies from 16 to 50 Hz using a sledgehammer source. The resulting tomographic images and velocity anomalies were sufficient to delineate suspected burial trenches (one 4-meters deep) and anomalous velocity structure related to rocks and disturbed soil. The success was not uniform because in portions of one area the inversion for shear-wave structure became unstable. More research is needed to establish a more robust inversion technique.

  17. Inherited structures impact on co-seismic surface deformation pattern during the 2013 Balochistan, Pakistan, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallage, Amaury; Klinger, Yann; Grandin, Raphael; Delorme, Arthur; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of earthquake processes and the interaction of earthquake rupture with Earth's free surface relies on the resolution of the observations. Recent and detailed post-earthquake measurements bring new insights on shallow mechanical behavior of rupture processes as it becomes possible to measure and locate surficial deformation distribution. The 2013 Mw 7.7 Balochistan earthquake, Pakistan, offers a nice opportunity to comprehend where and why surficial deformation might differs from at-depth localized slip. This earthquake ruptured the Hoshab fault over 200 km; the motion was mainly left lateral with a small and discontinuous vertical component in the southern part of the rupture. Using images with the finest resolution currently available, we measured the surface displacement amplitude and its orientation at the ground surface (including the numerous tensile cracks). We combined these measurements with the 1:500 scale ground rupture map to focus on the behavior of the frontal rupture in the area where deformation distributes. Comparison with orientations of inherited tectonic structures, visible in older rocks formation surrounding the actual 2013 rupture, shows the control exercised by such structures on co-seismic rupture distribution. Such observation raises the question on how pre-existing tectonic structures in a medium, mapped in several seismically active places around the globe; can control the co-seismic distribution of the deformation during earthquakes.

  18. Vertical directivities of seismic arrays on the ground surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, H.; Asanuma, H.

    2012-12-01

    Microtremor survey method (MSM) is a technique to estimate subsurface velocity structures by inverting phase velocities of the surface waves in the microtremors. We can explorer the S-wave velocity structures at significantly lower expenses by the MSM than the conventional geophysical techniques because of its passive nature. Coherent waves across an array are identified in the MSM, and, therefore, all the existing velocity inversion methods have been deduced under an implicit assumption of horizontal velocity structure. However, it is expected that the development of the 3D inversion theory would drastically enhance applicability and reliability of the MSM. We, hence, investigated the characteristics of vertical directivities of the arrays deployed on the ground surface as an initial step for deriving the 3D MSM. We have firstly examined the response of an elemental two sensor array to which plane waves propagates from the deep crust with a certain angle of incident, and then examined the characteristics of several types of arrays, including triangular and circular arrays to clarify the characteristics of practical arrays. Real part of the complex coherence function, which has been derived to evaluate coherence of the Rayleigh wave between sensors for plane waves (Shiraishi et al., 2006), has been applied for this investigation. Our results showed that the directivity varies according to a parameter kr ( k : wave number, r : separation of the sensors ). A vertical directivity of two sensor array at kr = π shows a rotationally-symmetrical shape (Figure (a)). In contrast, an equilateral triangle array has a conspicuous directivity toward the vertical direction (cf. Figure (b)). This divergence suggests that the shape of the vertical directivity significantly depend on the geometry, and a sharp directivity toward just beneath the array can be realized by designing the vertical directivity. We concluded from this study that 3D MSM is feasible and further study to

  19. Seismic Surface-Wave Tomography of Waste Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Leland Timothy Long

    2002-12-17

    Surface-wave group-velocity tomography is an efficient way to obtain images of the group velocity over a test area. Because Rayleigh-wave group velocity depends on frequency, there are separate images for each frequency. Thus, at each point in these images the group velocities define a dispersion curve, a curve that relates group velocity to frequency. The objective of this study has been to find an accurate and efficient way to find the shear-wave structure from these dispersion curves. The conventional inversion techniques match theoretical and observed dispersion curves to determine the structure. These conventional methods do not always succeed in correctly differentiating the fundamental and higher modes, and for some velocity structures can become unstable. In this research a perturbation technique was developed. The perturbation method allows the pre-computation of a global inversion matrix which improves efficiency in obtaining solutions for the structure. Perturbation methods are stable and mimic the averaging process in wave propagation; hence. leading to more accurate solutions. Finite difference techniques and synthetic trace generation techniques were developed to define the perturbations. A new differential trace technique was developed for slight variations in dispersion. The improvements in analysis speed and the accuracy of the solution could lead to real-time field analysis systems, making it possible to obtain immediate results or to monitor temporal change in structure, such as might develop in using fluids for soil remediation.

  20. Near-surface seismic surveys at Rifle, Colorado for shallow groundwater contamination risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Zelt, C. A.; Levander, A.

    2013-12-01

    In August 2012, we carried out a series of seismic surveys at a site located approximately 0.3 mile east of the city of Rifle in Garfield County, Colorado. The ground water beneath this site was contaminated by former vanadium and uranium ore-processing operations from 1924 through 1958. The site is on an alluvial terrace created by a flood-plain meander of the Colorado River. On the south side, the terrace is bounded by a steep descending slope to the Colorado River; on the other sides, it is bounded by ascending slopes of the more resistant sedimentary rocks of the Wasatch Formation. Although remedial actions have been taken to remove the contaminated surface materials, there are still potential risks from residual materials and redistribution of the contaminated water harming human health. This seismic project, funded by The U.S. Department of Energy, was designed to provide hydrogeologic information through sub-surface velocity model building and imaging of the water aquifer. A 3D compressional wave seismic survey covers an area that is 96 m in the N-S direction by 60 m in the E-W direction. An orthogonal, symmetric receiver and source template was used with 24 receiver lines, 96 channels per receiver line, and 2.5 m between lines. The inline shot and receiver spacing is 2 m and 1 m, respectively. The source was an accelerated weight drop striking a metal plate. The source has a dominant frequency at ~60 Hz, and is down by 20 db at 20 Hz and 150 Hz, providing data suitable for seismic tomography and seismic migration methods. Besides this 3D survey, three other seismic experiments were performed: (1) a 2D multi-component source and receiver survey, (2) a 3D surface wave experiment using 4.5 Hz geophones, and (3) an ambient noise experiment using 4.5 Hz geophones to record passing vehicles and trains. Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented.

  1. Lunar Surface Gravimeter as a lunar seismometer: Investigation of a new source of seismic information on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Taichi; Kobayashi, Naoki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Lognonné, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Lunar seismology has always suffered from the limited number of seismic stations and limited coverage of the seismic network. Additional seismic data are necessary to probe the lunar interior in depth. Instead of a costly new deployment of seismometers, the aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of using the Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Gravimeter (LSG) as a lunar seismometer. The LSG was designed to detect gravitational waves (associated to change in the curvature of spacetime) and tidal ground motion on the Moon, but the data were not investigated for seismic use partially because of a malfunction of the instrument. We first evaluated the influence of the malfunction through comparison with other Apollo seismic data and found that the effect of the malfunction is small, and the LSG detected seismic signals in a manner that was consistent with those of the other Apollo seismometers. Then we carried out source location with the additional station of the LSG. We relocated previously located deep moonquake nests to evaluate the influence of the LSG data, which are generally noisier than other Apollo seismic data. Then we located deep moonquake nests that were previously unlocatable. Forty deep moonquake nests were examined, and we located five new nests. One newly located nest, A284, was most likely to be located on the farside. This series of analyses indicates that the LSG functioned as a lunar seismometer, and that its data are useful for improving seismic analyses with the previous seismic data set of the Moon.

  2. Near-surface Seismic Anisotropy of Taiwan Revealed by Coda Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Wei; Chen, Ying-Nien; Gung, Yuancheng; Lee, Jian-Cheng; Liang, Wen-Tzong

    2016-04-01

    We report the near-surface (<400m) shear wave velocity (Vs) and Vs azimuthal anisotropy of Taiwan by applying seismic interferometry to 34 borehole-surface station pairs. We measure the Vs anisotropy by examining the azimuthal dependence of the empirical Green's functions of shear waves extracted from the coda waves of 398 local earthquakes with ML>4.0 during the time period from 2011 to 2014. We find the clear characteristic azimuthal dependence of Vs in all the measurements. Strengths of the obtained anisotropy are much stronger than those reported in seismic tomography and SWS measurements. Specifically, about half of the measured amplitudes of anisotropy are larger than 10%, and the strongest anisotropy is 34%. Patterns of the resulting anisotropy fall into two categories, and both are well correlated with the surface geology and ambient stress at the borehole sites. In general, the fast Vs polarization directions are parallel to sub-parallel to the mountain strikes in mountains belts, and to the directions of maximum compression stress in coastal plains and lowlands, suggesting that the anisotropy of shallow crust are dominated by orogeny-induced fabrics in mountain area and by stress-aligned cracks in places with sediments, respectively. From these new findings, together with results from our recent studies, we infer that the stress-aligned anisotropy are likely confined to the uppermost portion (< 3km) of the crust. These results represent direct robust measurements of the near-surface seismic structure. The characteristic patterns of observed azimuthal dependence of Vs and strong anisotropy suggest that anisotropy properties are fairly coherent in the near-surface structure. The strong near-surface anisotropy also implies that delay times contributed by the shallow crust might have been underestimated in studies of shear-wave splitting measurements using the direct arrivals of earthquake waves.

  3. High-resolution surface-wave tomography from ambient seismic noise.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nikolai M; Campillo, Michel; Stehly, Laurent; Ritzwoller, Michael H

    2005-03-11

    Cross-correlation of 1 month of ambient seismic noise recorded at USArray stations in California yields hundreds of short-period surface-wave group-speed measurements on interstation paths. We used these measurements to construct tomographic images of the principal geological units of California, with low-speed anomalies corresponding to the main sedimentary basins and high-speed anomalies corresponding to the igneous cores of the major mountain ranges. This method can improve the resolution and fidelity of crustal images obtained from surface-wave analyses. PMID:15761151

  4. Near-Surface Seismic Refraction Methods to Characterize Areas of Karst Geology near Carlsbad, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafferky, S.; Bonal, N. D.; Barnhart, K.

    2012-12-01

    Near-surface seismic refraction methods applied to karst geology can give some ideas as to the nature of the void spaces as well as the stratigraphy of the area. A seismic geophone array was laid out near Carlsbad, NM, an area known to contain karst features. Using an impact (sledge hammer), seismic data was collected along two intersecting lines of geophones as well as two gridded areas to get three-dimensional information. The data was picked for the first arrivals of the P-wave, which were graphed and examined for changes in slope and inconsistencies in shape. The data analyzed shows a two-layer model and some inconsistencies such as polarity reversals and delayed arrival times that may represent karst features. Additional processing is used to enhances these features and map them in three-dimensions. The mapped features are compared with known karst features in the area (e.g. sinkholes) for ground-truth information. These methods may be used in the future for detection and classification of other near-surface voids. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-18

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here, we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm.The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks ofmore » both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs datasets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.« less

  6. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-18

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here, we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm.The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks of both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs datasets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.

  7. Surface dynamic deformation estimates from local seismicity: the Itoiz reservoir, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoyo, Miguel A.; Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; García-Jerez, Antonio; Luzón, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the ground motion time histories due to the local seismicity near the Itoiz reservoir to estimate the near-source, surface 3D displacement gradients and dynamic deformations. The seismic data were obtained by a semipermanent broadband and accelerometric network located on surface and at underground sites. The dynamic deformation field was calculated by two different methodologies: first, by the seismo-geodetic method using the data from a three-station microarray located close to the dam, and second, by single station estimates of the displacement gradients. The dynamic deformations obtained from both methods were compared and analyzed in the context of the local free-field effects. The shallow 1D velocity structure was estimated from the seismic data by modeling the body wave travel times. Time histories obtained from both methods result quite similar in the time window of body wave arrivals. The strain misfits between methods vary from 1.4 to 35.0 % and rotational misfits vary from 2.5 to 36.0 %. Amplitudes of displacement gradients vary in the range of 10-8 to 10-7 strains. From these results, a new scaling analysis by numerical modeling is proposed in order to estimate the peak dynamic deformations for different magnitudes, up to the expected maximum M w in the region (M5.5). Peak dynamic deformations due to local M w5.5 earthquakes would reach amplitudes of 10-5 strain and 10-3 radians at the Itoiz dam. The single station method shows to be an adequate option for the analysis of local seismicity, where few three-component stations are available. The results obtained here could help to extend the applicability of these methodologies to other sites of engineering interest.

  8. Surface dynamic deformation estimates from local seismicity: the Itoiz reservoir, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoyo, Miguel A.; Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; García-Jerez, Antonio; Luzón, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the ground motion time histories due to the local seismicity near the Itoiz reservoir to estimate the near-source, surface 3D displacement gradients and dynamic deformations. The seismic data were obtained by a semipermanent broadband and accelerometric network located on surface and at underground sites. The dynamic deformation field was calculated by two different methodologies: first, by the seismo-geodetic method using the data from a three-station microarray located close to the dam, and second, by single station estimates of the displacement gradients. The dynamic deformations obtained from both methods were compared and analyzed in the context of the local free-field effects. The shallow 1D velocity structure was estimated from the seismic data by modeling the body wave travel times. Time histories obtained from both methods result quite similar in the time window of body wave arrivals. The strain misfits between methods vary from 1.4 to 35.0 % and rotational misfits vary from 2.5 to 36.0 %. Amplitudes of displacement gradients vary in the range of 10-8 to 10-7 strains. From these results, a new scaling analysis by numerical modeling is proposed in order to estimate the peak dynamic deformations for different magnitudes, up to the expected maximum M w in the region (M5.5). Peak dynamic deformations due to local M w5.5 earthquakes would reach amplitudes of 10-5 strain and 10-3 radians at the Itoiz dam. The single station method shows to be an adequate option for the analysis of local seismicity, where few three-component stations are available. The results obtained here could help to extend the applicability of these methodologies to other sites of engineering interest.

  9. Source estimation with surface-related multiples—fast ambiguity-resolved seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Ning; Aravkin, Aleksandr; van Leeuwen, Tristan; Lin, Tim; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2016-03-01

    We address the problem of obtaining a reliable seismic image without prior knowledge of the source wavelet, especially from data that contain strong surface-related multiples. Conventional reverse-time migration requires prior knowledge of the source wavelet, which is either technically or computationally challenging to accurately determine; inaccurate estimates of the source wavelet can result in seriously degraded reverse-time migrated images, and therefore wrong geological interpretations. To solve this problem, we present a "wavelet-free" imaging procedure that simultaneously inverts for the source wavelet and the seismic image, by tightly integrating source estimation into a fast least-squares imaging framework, namely compressive imaging, given a reasonably accurate background velocity model. However, this joint inversion problem is difficult to solve as it is plagued with local minima and the ambiguity with respect to amplitude scalings, because of the multiplicative, and therefore nonlinear, appearance of the source wavelet in the otherwise linear formalism. We have found a way to solve this nonlinear joint-inversion problem using a technique called variable projection, and a way to overcome the scaling ambiguity by including surface-related multiples in our imaging procedure following recent developments in surface-related multiple prediction by sparse inversion. As a result, we obtain without prior knowledge of the source wavelet high-resolution seismic images, comparable in quality to images obtained assuming the true source wavelet is known. By leveraging the computationally efficient compressive-imaging methodology, these results are obtained at affordable computational costs compared with conventional processing work flows that include surface-related multiple removal and reverse-time migration.

  10. Source estimation with surface-related multiples—fast ambiguity-resolved seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Ning; Aravkin, Aleksandr; van Leeuwen, Tristan; Lin, Tim; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of obtaining a reliable seismic image without prior knowledge of the source wavelet, especially from data that contain strong surface-related multiples. Conventional reverse-time migration requires prior knowledge of the source wavelet, which is either technically or computationally challenging to accurately determine; inaccurate estimates of the source wavelet can result in seriously degraded reverse-time migrated images, and therefore wrong geological interpretations. To solve this problem, we present a `wavelet-free' imaging procedure that simultaneously inverts for the source wavelet and the seismic image, by tightly integrating source estimation into a fast least-squares imaging framework, namely compressive imaging, given a reasonably accurate background velocity model. However, this joint inversion problem is difficult to solve as it is plagued with local minima and the ambiguity with respect to amplitude scalings because of the multiplicative, and therefore nonlinear, appearance of the source wavelet in the otherwise linear formalism. We have found a way to solve this nonlinear joint-inversion problem using a technique called variable projection, and a way to overcome the scaling ambiguity by including surface-related multiples in our imaging procedure following recent developments in surface-related multiple prediction by sparse inversion. As a result, we obtain without prior knowledge of the source wavelet high-resolution seismic images, comparable in quality to images obtained assuming the true source wavelet is known. By leveraging the computationally efficient compressive-imaging methodology, these results are obtained at affordable computational costs compared with conventional processing work flows that include surface-related multiple removal and reverse-time migration.

  11. Surface and downhole shear wave seismic methods for thick soil site investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, J.A.; Benjumea, B.; Harris, J.B.; Miller, R.D.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave velocity-depth information is required for predicting the ground motion response to earthquakes in areas where significant soil cover exists over firm bedrock. Rather than estimating this critical parameter, it can be reliably measured using a suite of surface (non-invasive) and downhole (invasive) seismic methods. Shear wave velocities from surface measurements can be obtained using SH refraction techniques. Array lengths as large as 1000 m and depth of penetration to 250 m have been achieved in some areas. High resolution shear wave reflection techniques utilizing the common midpoint method can delineate the overburden-bedrock surface as well as reflecting boundaries within the overburden. Reflection data can also be used to obtain direct estimates of fundamental site periods from shear wave reflections without the requirement of measuring average shear wave velocity and total thickness of unconsolidated overburden above the bedrock surface. Accurate measurements of vertical shear wave velocities can be obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer in soft sediments, or with a well-locked geophone array in a borehole. Examples from thick soil sites in Canada demonstrate the type of shear wave velocity information that can be obtained with these geophysical techniques, and show how these data can be used to provide a first look at predicted ground motion response for thick soil sites. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography for near-surface seismic refraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelt, Colin A.; Chen, Jianxiong

    2016-07-01

    Traveltime tomography is the main method by which the Earth's seismic velocity is determined on all scales, from the near-surface (< 100 m) to the core. Usually traveltime tomography uses ray theory, an infinite-frequency approximation of wave propagation. A theory developed in global seismology to account for the finite-frequency nature of seismic data, known as finite-frequency traveltime tomography (FFTT), can theoretically provide a more accurate estimation of velocity. But the FFTT theory is generally not applicable to near-surface data because there is no reference velocity model known in advance that is capable of yielding synthetic waveforms that are close enough to the recorded seismograms to yield a reliable delay time. Also, there is usually no reference model for which the unknown velocity model represents a small (linear) perturbation from the reference model. This paper presents a frequency dependent form of nonlinear traveltime tomography specifically designed for near-surface seismic data in which a starting model, iterative approach with recalculated travel paths at each iteration, and the calculation of a frequency-dependent total traveltime, as opposed to a delay time, are used. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography (FDTT) involves two modifications to conventional traveltime tomography: (1) the calculation of frequency-dependent traveltimes using wavelength-dependent velocity smoothing (WDVS), and (2) the corresponding sensitivity kernels that arise from using WDVS. Results show that the former modification is essential to achieve significant benefits from FDTT, whereas the latter is optional in that similar results can be achieved using infinite-frequency kernels. The long seismic wavelengths relative to the total path lengths and the size of subsurface heterogeneities of typical near-surface data means the improvements over ray theory tomography are significant. The benefits of FDTT are demonstrated using conventional minimum

  13. Modeling Three-Dimensional Upper Mantle Seismic Anisotropy with Higher Mode Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kaiqing

    This dissertation presents a new 3-D global upper mantle model of elastic anisotropy obtained from surface wave seismic tomography. This research contributes to our understanding of deep Earth structure. The two main results are the following: (1) Our work unravels the presence of azimuthal seismic anisotropy in the mantle transition zone, to greater depths than previously found, thereby challenging common views of mantle deformation mechanisms. It also reveals a striking correlation between changes in seismic anisotropy where upper mantle phase transitions occur, which provides new constraints on the style of mantle convection; (2) We confirm the dominantly thermal nature of the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), and show that the Gutenberg discontinuity associated with vertical changes in azimuthal anisotropy inside the lithosphere, implying that this interface is not equivalent to the LAB, contrary to what is commonly assumed. The origin of the Gutenberg discontinuity is a result of frozen-in lithospheric structures, regional compositional variations of the mantle, or dynamically perturbed LAB.

  14. Laser- and Radar-based Mission Concepts for Suborbital and Spaceborne Monitoring of Seismic Surface Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, W; Schultz, C A; Tralli, D M

    2004-09-21

    The development of a suborbital or spaceborne system to monitor seismic waves poses an intriguing prospect for advancing the state of seismology. This capability would enable an unprecedented global mapping of the velocity structure of the earth's crust, understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics and wave propagation effects, and event source location, characterization and discrimination that are critical for both fundamental earthquake research and nuclear non-proliferation applications. As part of an ongoing collaboration between LLNL and JPL, an advanced mission concept study assessed architectural considerations and operational and data delivery requirements, extending two prior studies by each organization--a radar-based satellite system (JPL) for earthquake hazard assessment and a feasibility study of space- or UAV-based laser seismometer systems (LLNL) for seismic event monitoring. Seismic wave measurement requirements include lower bounds on detectability of specific seismic sources of interest and wave amplitude accuracy for different levels of analysis, such as source characterization, discrimination and tomography, with a 100 {micro}m wave amplitude resolution for waves nominally traveling 5 km/s, an upper frequency bound based on explosion and earthquake surface displacement spectra, and minimum horizontal resolution (1-5 km) and areal coverage, in general and for targeted observations. For a radar system, corresponding engineering and operational factors include: Radar frequency (dictated by required wave amplitude measurement accuracy and maximizing ranging, Doppler or interferometric sensitivity), time sampling (maximum seismic wave frequency and velocity), and overall system considerations such as mass, power and data rate. Technical challenges include characterization of, and compensation for, phase distortion resulting from atmospheric and ionospheric perturbations and turbulence, and effects of ground scattering characteristics and seismic

  15. Global Seismic Event Detection Using Surface Waves: 15 Possible Antarctic Glacial Sliding Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Shearer, P. M.; Walker, K. T.; Fricker, H. A.

    2008-12-01

    To identify overlooked or anomalous seismic events not listed in standard catalogs, we have developed an algorithm to detect and locate global seismic events using intermediate-period (35-70s) surface waves. We apply our method to continuous vertical-component seismograms from the global seismic networks as archived in the IRIS UV FARM database from 1997 to 2007. We first bandpass filter the seismograms, apply automatic gain control, and compute envelope functions. We then examine 1654 target event locations defined at 5 degree intervals and stack the seismogram envelopes along the predicted Rayleigh-wave travel times. The resulting function has spatial and temporal peaks that indicate possible seismic events. We visually check these peaks using a graphical user interface to eliminate artifacts and assign an overall reliability grade (A, B or C) to the new events. We detect 78% of events in the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog. However, we also find 840 new events not listed in the PDE, ISC and REB catalogs. Many of these new events were previously identified by Ekstrom (2006) using a different Rayleigh-wave detection scheme. Most of these new events are located along oceanic ridges and transform faults. Some new events can be associated with volcanic eruptions such as the 2000 Miyakejima sequence near Japan and others with apparent glacial sliding events in Greenland (Ekstrom et al., 2003). We focus our attention on 15 events detected from near the Antarctic coastline and relocate them using a cross-correlation approach. The events occur in 3 groups which are well-separated from areas of cataloged earthquake activity. We speculate that these are iceberg calving and/or glacial sliding events, and hope to test this by inverting for their source mechanisms and examining remote sensing data from their source regions.

  16. Q AS A LITHOLOGICAL/HYDROCARBON INDICATOR: FROM FULL WAVEFORM SONIC TO 3D SURFACE SEISMIC

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge O. Parra; C.L. Hackert; L. Wilson; H.A. Collier; J. Todd Thomas

    2006-03-31

    The goal of this project was to develop a method to exploit viscoelastic rock and fluid properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic measurements to the presence of hydrocarbon saturation. To reach the objective, Southwest Research Institute scientists used well log, lithology, production, and 3D seismic data from an oil reservoir located on the Waggoner Ranch in north central Texas. The project was organized in three phases. In the first phase, we applied modeling techniques to investigate seismic- and acoustic-frequency wave attenuation and its effect on observable wave attributes. We also gathered existing data and acquired new data from the Waggoner Ranch field, so that all needed information was in place for the second phase. During the second phase, we developed methods to extract attenuation from borehole acoustic and surface seismic data. These methods were tested on synthetic data constructed from realistic models and real data. In the third and final phase of the project, we applied this technology to a full data set from the Waggoner site. The results presented in this Final Report show that geological conditions at the site did not allow us to obtain interpretable results from the Q processing algorithm for 3D seismic data. However, the Q-log processing algorithm was successfully applied to full waveform sonic data from the Waggoner site. A significant part of this project was technology transfer. We have published several papers and conducted presentations at professional conferences. In particular, we presented the Q-log algorithm and applications at the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Development and Production Forum in Austin, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest from the attendees and, at the request of the SEG delegates, it was placed on the Southwest Research Institute Internet site. The presentation can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys

  17. High-Precision Measurement of Surface Wave Phase and Amplitude Across a Dense Seismic Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G.; Gaherty, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    The accurate characterization of seismic surface wavefields across an array of seismic stations provides exceptional constraints on crustal and mantle shear velocities and anisotropic fabric directly beneath the array. By taking advantage of the similarity of the surface wavefield at nearby seismic stations, we have developed a new technique to automatically estimate the relative phase and amplitude of the wavefield with greater precision than in standard methodologies. We calculate the multi-channel cross-correlation of broadband (20-200 s) Rayleigh waveforms between the nearby stations. We then narrow-band filter the interstation correlation functions, and fit the filtered correlation waveforms with a five-parameter controlled wavelet to obtain frequency-dependent phase delay and amplitude variations between multiple station pairs. We reduce the manual interaction so that the measurement can be done more objectively and efficiently, establishing a set of standards to automatically evaluate each measurement and select the most robust ones. Because the correlation function is periodic, the phase delay measurement can cycle skip by one or more integral periods. We address this problem by evaluating each observations using three independent grades, based on the magnitude of the delay time relative to that predicted for a reference model, the continuity of the dispersion curve, and and the agreement between measurements taken at nearby stations, respectively. The weight between these grades is adjusted to get the most coherent set of delay times across the array. We applied this technique to surface waves recorded across EarthScope’s Transportable Array (TA) in 2006 and 2007. These data provide excellent coverage of the upper mantle beneath and along the San Andreas fault in California. The highly localized, precise interstation delay times evalulated at a variety of source-receiver azimuths provide a unique new constraint on upper-mantle anisotropy associated with

  18. Body and Surface-wave ambient noise seismic interferometry in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabey, L.; Hole, J. A.; Han, L.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data were acquired as a part of the Salton Seismic Imaging Project in March 2011. Alongside traditional explosive source recording, a dense array of 486 seismometers across the Salton Sea Geothermal Field and Brawley Seismic Zone recorded 135 hours of natural noise sources. The geothermal field is located within the Imperial Valley in Southern California and is bordered by the southern end of the Salton Sea. There is abundant microseismicity recorded in the area, including over 100-recorded earthquakes, wave action, geothermal pumping operations, a railroad, and two highways. Volcanism associated with rifting processes provides a prolific heat source to the system marking the Salton Sea Geothermal Field as one of the largest and hottest geothermal fields in California. Seismic interferometry is a technique that uses continuous recordings of natural noise to create a 'virtual source' by cross-correlation of receiver pairs followed by stacking. This method has been highly successful for surface waves and a few previous studies have shown evidence of body waves and reflections. As anticipated the abundant tectonic and induced noise sources within our study area produced visible surface and body waves. Inclusion of the earthquakes with normalized amplitudes improved overall data quality. The virtual shots from our data our compare well to our twelve explosive shots at near offsets. The highest quality virtual source gathers are produced near anthropogenic noise sources. In particular, one large geothermal plant acted as a sufficiently strong point source producing a gather similar to what we would see from an explosive source. Surface waves recorded on 4.5-Hz geophones were retrievable from 1-6Hz after cross-correlation and stacking. Up to 30km of body waves were also observed in the 25-30Hz range. Future studies will include surface wave dispersion analysis and attempt body wave reflection imaging. The 100-meter spacing of our

  19. Seismic interferometry of railroad induced ground motions: body and surface wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros, Diego A.; Brown, Larry D.; Kim, Doyeon

    2016-04-01

    Seismic interferometry applied to 120 hr of railroad traffic recorded by an array of vertical component seismographs along a railway within the Rio Grande rift has recovered surface and body waves characteristic of the geology beneath the railway. Linear and hyperbolic arrivals are retrieved that agree with surface (Rayleigh), direct and reflected P waves observed by nearby conventional seismic surveys. Train-generated Rayleigh waves span a range of frequencies significantly higher than those recovered from typical ambient noise interferometry studies. Direct P-wave arrivals have apparent velocities appropriate for the shallow geology of the survey area. Significant reflected P-wave energy is also present at relatively large offsets. A common midpoint stack produces a reflection image consistent with nearby conventional reflection data. We suggest that for sources at the free surface (e.g. trains) increasing the aperture of the array to record wide angle reflections, in addition to longer recording intervals, might allow the recovery of deeper geological structure from railroad traffic. Frequency-wavenumber analyses of these recordings indicate that the train source is symmetrical (i.e. approaching and receding) and that deeper refracted energy is present although not evident in the time-offset domain. These results confirm that train-generated vibrations represent a practical source of high-resolution subsurface information, with particular relevance to geotechnical and environmental applications.

  20. Mapping the Moho with seismic surface waves: Sensitivity, resolution, and recommended inversion strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Adam, Joanne; Meier, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Seismic surface waves have been used to study the Earth's crust since the early days of modern seismology. In the last decade, surface-wave crustal imaging has been rejuvenated by the emergence of new, array techniques (ambient-noise and teleseismic interferometry). The strong sensitivity of both Rayleigh and Love waves to the Moho is evident from a mere visual inspection of their dispersion curves or waveforms. Yet, strong trade-offs between the Moho depth and crustal and mantle structure in surface-wave inversions have prompted doubts regarding their capacity to resolve the Moho. Although the Moho depth has been an inversion parameter in numerous surface-wave studies, the resolution of Moho properties yielded by a surface-wave inversion is still somewhat uncertain and controversial. We use model-space mapping in order to elucidate surface waves' sensitivity to the Moho depth and the resolution of their inversion for it. If seismic wavespeeds within the crust and upper mantle are known, then Moho-depth variations of a few kilometres produce large (over 1 per cent) perturbations in phase velocities. However, in inversions of surface-wave data with no a priori information (wavespeeds not known), strong Moho-depth/shear-speed trade-offs will mask about 90 per cent of the Moho-depth signal, with remaining phase-velocity perturbations 0.1-0.2 per cent only. In order to resolve the Moho with surface waves alone, errors in the data must thus be small (up to 0.2 per cent for resolving continental Moho). If the errors are larger, Moho-depth resolution is not warranted and depends on error distribution with period, with errors that persist over broad period ranges particularly damaging. An effective strategy for the inversion of surface-wave data alone for the Moho depth is to, first, constrain the crustal and upper-mantle structure by inversion in a broad period range and then determine the Moho depth in inversion in a narrow period range most sensitive to it, with the

  1. Monitoring Hurricanes with a Dense Seismic Array: Joint Inversion of Seismic and Barometric Data for Surface-Pressure Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, A. P.; Al-Attar, D.; Trampert, J.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (hurricanes and typhoons) are mostly atmospheric phenomena but they also generate significant ground motions in the solid earth when they become strong. If a dense seismological array exists along the path of a hurricane, we can learn about some processes near the hurricane eye through seismic data. In this study, we report our analysis of Hurricane Arthur which passed near Earthscope's Transportable Array (TA), a network of seismometers located at the time along the east coast of the US. Hurricane Arthur mostly traveled along the eastern coast of the US from July 1 to July 5, 2014; however, it made landfall for a short time on the coast of North Carolina at 0315 UTC on July 4. The next few hours provided us with a short span of seismic and barometric data associated with the center of Hurricane Arthur. Our basic approach to analyze this data is the same as in a previous study we conducted of Hurricane Isaac (2012), where we analyzed the seismic amplitude-distance data and the pressure amplitude-distance data for each 6-hour location of the hurricane. Here, we performed a joint inversion of the seismic and barometric data while Hurricane Arthur was nearest the coast. Barometer data provides the information on pressure source, which is the source of seismic-wave excitation and seismic data provides the resultant wavefields. We confine our analysis to frequencies below 0.02 Hz because in higher frequency bands ocean waves created the dominant seismic waves. In a similar manner to our previous study on Hurricane Isaac, we invert for the pressure correlation length. The results were consistent with what was seen for Hurricane Isaac in that we observed a signal generated by Hurricane Arthur's eyewall. After landfall, there is a peak at about 70-80km from the center of the hurricane in both the seismic and the barometric data. We also found that the correlation length changes with distance from the hurricane center and also has a peak around 70-80km.

  2. Soil depth mapping using seismic surface waves for the assessment of soil vulnerability to erosion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samyn, K.; Cerdan, O.; Grandjean, G.; Bitri, A.; Bernardie, S.; Ouvry, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    The purposes of the multidisciplinary DIGISOIL project are the integration and improvement of in situ and proximal technologies for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators. Foreseen developments concern sensor technologies, data processing and their integration to applications of (digital) soil mapping (DSM). Among available techniques, the seismic one is, in this study, particularly tested for characterising soil vulnerability to erosion. The spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method is an in situ seismic technique used for evaluation of the stiffnesses (G) and associated depth in layered systems. The method is based on the propagation of mechanically induced Rayleigh waves. By striking the ground surface with a hammer, seismic waves are generated, including surface Rayleigh waves. During their propagation, they are recorded by seismic receivers (geophone sensors) regularly spaced along a profile to produce a seismogram. The particularity of Rayleigh waves lies in the dependence of their velocity with frequency, a phenomenon called dispersion. A profile of Rayleigh wave velocity versus frequency, i.e., the dispersion curve, is calculated from each recorded seismogram before to be inverted to obtain the vertical profile of shear waves velocity. Then, the soil stiffness can easily be calculated from the shear velocity if the material density is estimated, and the soil stiffness as a function of depth can be obtained. This last information can be a good indicator to identify the soil bedrock limit. From a geometrical point of view, a SASW system adapted to soil characterisation is proposed in the DIGISOIL project. This system was tested for the digital mapping of the depth of loamy material in a catchment of the European loess belt. Parametric penetrometric studies are also conducted for the purpose of verifying the accuracy of the procedure and evaluating its limitations. The depth to bedrock determined by this procedure can then be

  3. A seismic reference model for the crust and uppermost mantle beneath China from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weisen; Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Kang, Dou; Kim, Younghee; Lin, Fan-Chi; Ning, Jieyuan; Wang, Weitao; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Longquan

    2016-04-01

    Using data from more than 2000 seismic stations from multiple networks arrayed throughout China (CEArray, China Array, NECESS, PASSCAL, GSN) and surrounding regions (Korean Seismic Network, F-Net, KNET) we perform ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography across the entire region and earthquake tomography across parts of South China and Northeast China. We produce isotropic Rayleigh wave group and phase speed maps with uncertainty estimates from 8 to 50 sec period across the entire region of study, and extend them to 70 sec period where earthquake tomography is performed. Maps of azimuthal anisotropy are estimated simultaneously to minimize anisotropic bias in the isotropic maps, but are not discussed here. The 3D model is produced using a Bayesian Monte Carlo formalism covering all of China, extending eastward through the Korean Peninsula, into the marginal seas, to Japan. We define the final model as the mean and standard deviation of the posterior distribution at each location on a 0.5°x0.5° grid from the surface to 150 km depth. Surface wave dispersion data do not strongly constrain internal interfaces, but shear wave speeds between the discontinuities in the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle are well determined. We design the resulting model as a reference model, which is intended to be useful to other researchers as a starting model, to predict seismic wave fields and observables, and to predict other types of data (e.g., topography, gravity). The model and the data on which it is based are available for download. In addition, the model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle deserving of further focus and continued interpretation.

  4. Surface amplitude data: 3D-seismic for interpretation of sea floor geology (Louisiana Slope)

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.H.

    1996-09-01

    Proliferation of 3D-seismic in support of hydrocarbon exploration/production has created new data for improved interpretation of sea floor and shallow subsurface geology. Processing of digital seismic data to enhance amplitude anomalies produces information for improved assessment of geohazards and identification of sensitive benthic communities protected by environmental regulations. Coupled with high resolution acoustic data and direct observation/sampling using a manned research submersible, surface amplitude maps add critical interpretive information for identification of sea floor features. Non-reflective zones (acoustic wipeouts) are associated with many slope features. Mud diapirs, mud mounds, mud volcanoes, gas-changed sediments, gas hydrates, slump deposits, carbonate hardgrounds, and various types of carbonate mounds are all features that exhibit this common response on high resolution seismic profiles. Amplitude data help make specific identifications. Since 1988, submersible data from mid-to-upper slope features (Garden Banks, Green Canyon, and Mississippi Canyon lease block areas) have been analyzed with conventional high resolution acoustic data and 313-amplitude extraction maps. Areas of rapid venting of sediment and hydrocarbon-charged formation fluids are clearly distinguishable from mud diapirs and areas of carbonate mounds (slow seepage). Gas hydrates occur as mounds and mounded zones along faults; products of moderate flux rates below (approx.) 500 in water depths. Gas hydrates function as stored trophic resources that support sensitive chemosynthetic communities. Amplitude extraction maps clearly identify these features by a strong low impedance amplitude anomaly. Refinement and {open_quotes}field calibration{close_quotes} of the surface amplitude extraction method may eventually lead to a new standard for evaluating geohazards and sensitive benthic communities.

  5. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicitymore » in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.« less

  6. A seismic reference model for the crust and uppermost mantle beneath China from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weisen; Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Kang, Dou; Kim, YoungHee; Lin, Fan-Chi; Ning, Jieyuan; Wang, Weitao; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Longquan

    2016-08-01

    Using data from more than 2000 seismic stations from multiple networks arrayed throughout China (CEArray, China Array, NECESS, PASSCAL, GSN) and surrounding regions (Korean Seismic Network, F-Net, KNET), we perform ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography across the entire region and earthquake tomography across parts of South China and Northeast China. We produce isotropic Rayleigh wave group and phase speed maps with uncertainty estimates from 8 to 50 s period across the entire region of study, and extend them to 70 s period where earthquake tomography is performed. Maps of azimuthal anisotropy are estimated simultaneously to minimize anisotropic bias in the isotropic maps, but are not discussed here. The 3D model is produced using a Bayesian Monte Carlo formalism covering all of China, extending eastwards through the Korean Peninsula, into the marginal seas, to Japan. We define the final model as the mean and standard deviation of the posterior distribution at each location on a 0.5° × 0.5° grid from the surface to 150 km depth. Surface wave dispersion data do not strongly constrain internal interfaces, but shear wave speeds between the discontinuities in the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle are well determined. We design the resulting model as a reference model, which is intended to be useful to other researchers as a starting model, to predict seismic wave fields and observables and to predict other types of data (e.g. topography, gravity). The model and the data on which it is based are available for download. In addition, the model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle deserving of further focus and continued interpretation.

  7. Models of Crustal Thickness for South America from Seismic Refraction, Receiver Functions and Surface Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assumpcao, M.; Feng, M.; Tassara, A.; Julia, J.

    2013-05-01

    An extensive compilation of crustal thicknesses is used to develop crustal models in continental South America. We consider point crustal thicknesses from seismic seismic refraction experiments, receiver function analyses, and surface-wave dispersion. Estimates of crustal thickness derived from gravity anomalies were only included along the continental shelf and in some areas of the Andes to fill large gaps in seismic coverage. Two crustal models were developed: A) by simple interpolation of the ~1000 point estimates, and B) our preferred model, based on the same point estimates, interpolated with surface-wave tomography. Despite gaps in continental coverage, both models reveal interesting crustal thickness variations. In the Andean range, the crust reaches 75 km in Southern Peru and the Bolivian Altiplano, while crustal thicknesses seem to be close to the global continental average (~40 km) in Ecuador and southern Colombia (despite high elevations), and along the southern Andes of Chile-Argentina (elevation lower than 2000 m). In the stable continental platform the average thickness is 38 ± 5 km (1 std. deviation) and no systematic differences are observed among Archean-Paleoproterozoic cratons, NeoProterozoic fold belts, and low-altitude intracratonic sedimentary basins. An exception is the Borborema Province (NE Brazil) with crust ~30-35 km thick. Narrow belts surrounding the cratons are suggested in central Brazil, parallel to the eastern and southern border of the Amazon craton, and possibly along the Transbrasiliano Lineament continuing into the Chaco basin, where crust thinner than 35 km is observed. In the sub-Andean region, between the mid-plate cratons and the Andean cordillera, the crust tends to be thinner (~35 km) than the average crust in the stable platform, a feature possibly inherited from the old pre-Cambrian history of the continent. We expect these crustal models will be useful for studies of isostasy, dynamic topography, and crustal evolution

  8. Nanocrystalline mirror-slip surfaces in calcite gouge sheared at sub-seismic slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verberne, B. A.; Plümper, O.; de Winter, D.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Spiers, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    If seismic-aseismic transitions in fault rocks are to be recognized from microstructures preserved in natural fault rocks, an understanding of the microphysical mechanisms that produce such microstructures is needed. We report on microstructures recovered from dry direct shear experiments on (simulated) dry calcite gouge, performed at 50 MPa normal stress, 18-150°C and low sliding velocities (0.1-10 μm/s). The mechanical data show a transition from velocity strengthening below ~80°C to velocity weakening slip at higher temperatures. We investigated both loose gouge fragments and thin sections, characterizing the microstructures at the mm- to nm-scales. All deformed samples split along a shear band fabric defined by mainly R1- and boundary shears. Viewed normal to the shear plane, these bands commonly showed shiny, elongate patches aligned, and striated, parallel to the shear direction. These patches were especially common in samples tested below 80°C, though shear band splitting was less well-developed above 80°C so that even if the shiny patches formed at higher temperature they were less frequently exposed. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) applied to shiny patches formed in samples sheared at room temperature showed the presence of elongate, streaked out sub-micron-sized particles oriented parallel to the shear direction. Transmitted light optical microscopy of thin sections cut normal to the shear plane and parallel to the shear direction, combined with Focused Ion Beam (FIB) - SEM on loose gouge fragments, showed that the shiny surfaces correspond with shear bands characterized by extreme grain size reduction and sintered sub-micron-particles. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further revealed that the cores of the shear bands consist of nanocrystallites some 20 nm in size, with a Crystallographic Preferred Orientation (CPO). Our results demonstrate that mirror-like nanocrystalline slip zones can form in calcite gouge sheared at shallow crustal

  9. From the Surface Topography to the Upper Mantle, Seismic constraints on the Crustal structure Across Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Ramon; Díaz, Jordi; Gallart, Josep; Gil, Alba; Ayarza, Puy; Palomeras, Immaculada; Levander, Alan; Marti, David; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2015-04-01

    The most characteristic topographic features of Morocco are the Atlas Mountains and the Rif Coordillera. These two orogenic belts are the response of different geodynamic processes acting at lithospheric scale caused by a unique driver, the collision between two tectonic plates. Both are located within the diffuse plate boundary zone separating Africa and Europe. The boundary zone is characterized by a relatively broad zone of deformation that includes Mountain chains in southern Iberia, the Betics and the Rif cordillera in Morocco. The zone delineates the arcuate arc system of Gribraltar. Within the last decade a large international effort have been devoted to the area mostly leaded by Spanish groups with the collaboration of international research teams (including scientist form Europe and USA). Key multi-seismic projects have been developed that aim to constrain the structure, composition and tectonic scenario from south of the Atlas to the Betics, across the Rif cordillera and the Alboran basin. The multidisciplinary research program includes: natural source (earthquakes) recording with temporal deployments of broad band (BB) instrumentation and, controlled source seismic acquisition experiments where, spatially dense recording of wide-angle seismic reflection shot gathers were acquired. The passive experiments consisted on: a transect from Merzouga across the Gibraltar arc and into the Iberian peninsula (untill south of Toledo); a nearly regular grid of BB which was achieve by multiple deployments of a number of BB. The controlled source datasets were able to constrain the crustal structure and provide seismic P-wave propagation velocity models from the coast across the Rif and the Atlas. Travel-time inversion of the controlled source seismic data across the Atlas constraints a crustal root to the south of the High Atlas, and reveals mantle wedge. A limited crustal imbrication also appears in the Middle Atlas. The crustal thickness, does not exceeded 40 km in

  10. Present activity and seismogenic potential of a low-angle normal fault system (Città di Castello, Italy): Constraints from surface geology, seismic reflection data and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, Francesco; Boncio, Paolo; Lavecchia, Giusy; Pace, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    We present new constraints on an active low-angle normal fault system in the Città di Castello-Sansepolcro basin (CSB) of the northern Apennines of Italy. New field data from the geological survey of the Carta Geologica d' Italia (CARG project) define the surface geometry of the normal fault system and lead to an interpretation of the CROP 03 deep-crust seismic reflection profile (Castiglion Fiorentino-Urbania segment), with particular attention paid to the geometry of the Plio-Quaternary extensional structures. Surface and sub-surface geological data are integrated with instrumental and historical seismicity in order to define the seismotectonics of the area. Low-angle east-dipping reflectors are the seismic expression of the well-known Altotiberina Fault (AF), a regional extensional detachment on which both east- and west-dipping high-angle faults, bounding the CSB, sole out. The AF breakaway zone is located ˜ 10 km west of the CSB. Within the extensional allochthon, synthetic east-dipping planes prevail. Displacement along the AF is ˜ 4.5 km, which agrees with the cumulative offset due to its synthetic splays. The evolution of the CSB has mainly been controlled by the east-dipping fault system, at least since Early Pleistocene time; this system is still active and responsible for the seismicity of the area. A low level of seismic activity was recorded instrumentally within the CSB, but several damaging earthquakes have occurred in historical times. The instrumental seismicity and the intensity data points of the largest historical earthquakes (5 events with maximum MCS intensity of IX to IX-X) allow us to propose two main seismogenic structures: the Monte Santa Maria Tiberina (Mmax = 5.9) and Città di Castello (Mmax up to 6.5) normal faults. Both are synthetic splays of the AF detachment, dipping to the NE at moderate (45-50°) to low (25-30°) angles and cutting the upper crust up to the surface. This study suggests that low-angle normal faults (at least

  11. Joint inversion of Multi-frequency Electromagnetic Induction and Seismic Refraction Data For Improved Near Surface Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwaseif, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a joint inversion routine between multi-frequency Electromagnetic (EM) induction and seismic refraction data that is based on using both cross-gradients and disconnect constraints. The joint inverse problem was solved using an iterative nonlinear least-squares formulation. Following each iteration, the cross gradient constraint enforces structural similarities between the EM and seismic models, whereas the disconnect constraint enforces sharp boundaries between different strata within the EM model. The locations of boundaries within the EM model are assumed to be consistent with the locations of user-defined velocity contours in the seismic model. We tested our method on a challenging synthetic EM and seismic model scenario that contains water-bearing zones as well as positively and negatively correlated model parameter values. In addition, we applied our method to GEM-2 and seismic refraction field data sets acquired along a 28-m-long profile in Laramie (WY), and we precisely recorded the locations where ground surface resistivity and velocity likely changes along that line. Unlike the results of separate EM and seismic inversions and the results of joint inversion based only on a cross-gradient constraint, our method was able to detect the water-bearing zones. In addition, it better captured ground surface changes in the field data set.

  12. The surface termination effect on the quantum confinement and electron affinities of 3C-SiC quantum dots: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenkui; Dai, Ying; Yu, Lin; Guo, Meng; Huang, Baibiao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2012-02-01

    In light of the established differences between the quantum confinement effect and the electron affinities between hydrogen-passivated C and Si quantum dots, we carried out theoretical investigations on SiC quantum dots, with surfaces uniformly terminated by C-H or Si-H bonds, to explore the role of surface terminations on these two aspects. Surprisingly, it was found that the quantum confinement effect is present (or absent) in the highest occupied (or lowest unoccupied) molecular orbital of the SiC quantum dots regardless of their surface terminations. Thus, the quantum confinement effect related to the energy gap observed experimentally (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 94, 026102) is contributed to by the size-dependence of the highest occupied states; the absence of quantum confinement in the lowest unoccupied states is in contrary to the usual belief based on hydrogen-passivated C quantum dots. However, the cause of the absence of the quantum confinement in C nanodots is not transferable to SiC. We propose a model that provides a clear explanation for all findings on the basis of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interactions between the valence atomic p-orbital in the frontier occupied/unoccupied states. We also found that the electron affinities of the SiC quantum dots, which closely depend on the surface environments, are negative for the C-H termination and positive for the Si-H termination. The prediction of negative electron affinities in SiC quantum dots by simple C-H termination indicates a promising application for these materials in electron-emitter devices. Our model predicts that GeC quantum dots with hydrogen passivation exhibit similar features to SiC quantum dots and our study confirms the crucial role that the surface environment plays in these nanoscale systems.In light of the established differences between the quantum confinement effect and the electron affinities between hydrogen-passivated C and Si quantum dots, we carried out

  13. A combined surface and borehole seismic survey at the COSC-1 borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    The ICDP project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) focuses on the mid Paleozoic Caledonide Orogen in Scandinavia in order to better understand orogenic processes, from the past and in recent active mountain belts. The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision. Surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of the Caledonian structure, including the allochthon and the underlying autochthon, as well as the shallow W-dipping décollement surface that separates the two and consist of a thin skin of Cambrian black shales. During spring/summer 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was drilled to approx. 2.5 km depth near the town of Åre (western Jämtland/Sweden) with nearly 100 % of core recovery and cores in best quality. After the drilling was finished, a major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Besides a high resolution zero-offset VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) experiment also a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP survey took place. For the latter the source points were distributed along three profile lines centered radially around the borehole. For the central part up to 2.5 km away from the borehole, a hydraulic hammer source was used, which hits the ground for about 20 s with an linear increasing hit rate. For the far offset shots up to 5 km, explosive sources were used. The wavefield of both source types was recorded in the borehole using an array of 15 three-component receivers with a geophone spacing of 10 m. This array was deployed at 7 different depth levels during the survey. At the same time the wavefield was also recorded at the surface by 180 standalone three-component receivers placed along each of the three up to 10 km long lines, as well as with a 3D array of single-component receivers in the central part of the survey area around the borehole. Here

  14. Why graphene growth is very different on the C face than on the Si face of SiC: Insights from surface equilibria and the (3 ×3 )-3 C -SiC (1 ¯ ¯ ā) reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Lydia; Lazarevic, Florian; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Blum, Volker

    2015-04-01

    We address the stability of the surface phases that occur on the C side of 3 C -SiC (1 ¯1 ¯1 ¯) at the onset of graphene formation. In this growth range, experimental reports reveal a coexistence of several surface phases. This coexistence can be explained by a Si-rich model for the unknown (3 ×3 ) reconstruction, the known (2 ×2 )C adatom phase, and the graphene-covered (2 ×2)C phase. By constructing an ab initio surface phase diagram using a van der Waals corrected density functional, we show that the formation of a well defined interface structure like the "buffer layer" on the Si side is blocked by Si-rich surface reconstructions.

  15. INTEGRATED POLARIZATION PROPERTIES OF 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, AND 3C286

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the integrated polarization properties of the four compact radio sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, and 3C286, from 1 to 50 GHz, over a 30 yr time frame spanning 1982-2012. Using the polarized emission of Mars, we have determined that the position angle of the linearly polarized emission of 3C286 rises from 33 Degree-Sign at 8 GHz to 36 Degree-Sign at 45 GHz. There is no evidence for a change in the position angle over time. Using these values, the position angles of the integrated polarized emission from the other three sources are determined as a function of frequency and time. The fractional polarization of 3C286 is found to be slowly rising, at all frequencies, at a rate of {approx}0.015% yr{sup -1}. The fractional polarizations of 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 are all slowly variable, with the variations correlated with changes in the total flux densities of these sources.

  16. Variable-period surface-wave magnitudes: A rapid and robust estimator of seismic moments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonner, J.; Herrmann, R.; Benz, H.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface-wave magnitudes (Ms), measured at local, regional, and teleseismic distances, can be used as a rapid and robust estimator of seismic moment magnitude (Mw). We used the Russell (2006) variable-period surface-wave magnitude formula, henceforth called Ms(VMAX), to estimate the Ms for 165 North American events with 3.2 surface-wave observed at a local or near-regional distance seismic station after a preliminary epicentral location has been formed. Therefore, it may be used to make rapid measurements of Mw, which are needed by government agencies for early warning systems.

  17. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, Fred F.; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ˜200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  18. Properties of surface and interface structure of AlN/3C-SiC/Ge/Si (1 1 1) heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader, R.; Kazan, M.; Zgheib, Ch.; Pezoldt, J.; Masri, P.

    2009-12-01

    AlN thin films were grown at a temperature of 720 °C on (1 1 1) silicon carbide buffer layer deposited in turn on (1 1 1) silicon substrate by introducing Ge at the SiC/Si interface. The growth method used is the solid source molecular beam epitaxy (SSMBE). The morphological and structural properties of the AlN epilayers before and after Ge deposition were studied by atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It is found that the formation of oriented grain becomes more favorable by increasing Ge quantity at the interface. The surface roughness (RMS) values of the AlN thin films decreases as Ge amount increases at the substrate surface. XRD studies show that wurtzite-type AlN structure with (0 0 0 2) orientation becomes favorable with increase in Ge amount and the full width at half maximum of AlN (0 0 0 2) rocking curve reaches its minimum with 1 ML of Ge concentration.

  19. Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-09

    This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last know occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.

  20. Models of crustal thickness for South America from seismic refraction, receiver functions and surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assumpção, Marcelo; Feng, Mei; Tassara, Andrés; Julià, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    An extensive compilation of crustal thicknesses is used to develop crustal models in continental South America. We consider point crustal thicknesses from seismic refraction experiments, receiver function analyses, and surface-wave dispersion. Estimates of crustal thickness derived from gravity anomalies were only included along the continental shelf and in some areas of the Andes to fill large gaps in seismic coverage. Two crustal models were developed: A) by simple interpolation of the point estimates, and B) our preferred model, based on the same point estimates, interpolated with surface-wave tomography. Despite gaps in continental coverage, both models reveal interesting crustal thickness variations. In the Andean range, the crust reaches 75 km in Southern Peru and the Bolivian Altiplano, while crustal thicknesses seem to be close to the global continental average (~ 40 km) in Ecuador and southern Colombia (despite high elevations), and along the southern Andes of Chile-Argentina (elevation lower than 2000 m). In the stable continental platform the average thickness is 38 ± 5 km (1-st. deviation) and no systematic differences are observed among Archean-Paleoproterozoic cratons, NeoProterozoic fold belts, and low-altitude intracratonic sedimentary basins. An exception is the Borborema Province (NE Brazil) with crust ~ 30-35 km thick. Narrow belts surrounding the cratons are suggested in central Brazil, parallel to the eastern and southern border of the Amazon craton, and possibly along the TransBrasiliano Lineament continuing into the Chaco basin, where crust thinner than 35 km is observed. In the sub-Andean region, between the mid-plate cratons and the Andean cordillera, the crust tends to be thinner (~ 35 km) than the average crust in the stable platform, a feature possibly inherited from the old pre-Cambrian history of the continent. We expect that these crustal models will be useful for studies of isostasy, dynamic topography, and crustal evolution of the

  1. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  2. Dynamic weakening of serpentinite gouges and bare surfaces at seismic slip rates

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, B P; Mitchell, T M; Hirth, G; Goldsby, D; Zorzi, F; Platt, J D; Di Toro, G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate differences in the frictional behavior between initially bare rock surfaces of serpentinite and powdered serpentinite (“gouge”) at subseismic to seismic slip rates, we conducted single-velocity step and multiple-velocity step friction experiments on an antigorite-rich and lizardite-rich serpentinite at slip rates (V) from 0.003 m/s to 6.5 m/s, sliding displacements up to 1.6 m, and normal stresses (σn) up to 22 MPa for gouge and 97 MPa for bare surfaces. Nominal steady state friction values (μnss) in gouge at V = 1 m/s are larger than in bare surfaces for all σn tested and demonstrate a strong σn dependence; μnss decreased from 0.51 at 4.0 MPa to 0.39 at 22.4 MPa. Conversely, μnss values for bare surfaces remained ∼0.1 with increasing σn and V. Additionally, the velocity at the onset of frictional weakening and the amount of slip prior to weakening were orders of magnitude larger in gouge than in bare surfaces. Extrapolation of the normal stress dependence for μnss suggests that the behavior of antigorite gouge approaches that of bare surfaces at σn ≥ 60 MPa. X-ray diffraction revealed dehydration reaction products in samples that frictionally weakened. Microstructural analysis revealed highly localized slip zones with melt-like textures in some cases gouge experiments and in all bare surfaces experiments for V ≥ 1 m/s. One-dimensional thermal modeling indicates that flash heating causes frictional weakening in both bare surfaces and gouge. Friction values for gouge decrease at higher velocities and after longer displacements than bare surfaces because strain is more distributed. Key Points Gouge friction approaches that of bare surfaces at high normal stress Dehydration reactions and bulk melting in serpentinite in < 1 m of slip Flash heating causes dynamic frictional weakening in gouge and bare surfaces PMID:26167425

  3. Homogenization of seismic surface wave profiling in highly heterogeneous improved ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Chien, C.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic surface wave profiling is gaining popularity in engineering practice for determining shear-wave velocity profile since the two-station SASW (Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave) was introduced. Recent developments in the multi-station approach (Multi-station Analysis of Surface Wave, MASW) result in several convenient commercial tools. Unlike other geophysical tomography methods, the surface wave method is essentially a 1-D method assuming horizontally-layered medium. Nevertheless, MASW is increasingly used to map lateral variation of S-wave velocity by multiple surveys overlooking the effect of lateral heterogeneity. MASW typically requires long receiver spread in order to have enough depth coverage. The accuracy and lateral resolution of 2-D S-wave velocity imaging by surface wave is not clear. Many geotechnical applications involves lateral variation in a scale smaller than the geophone spread and wave length. For example, soft ground is often improved to increase strength and stiffness by methods such as jet grouting and stone column which result in heterogeneous ground with improved columns. Experimental methods (Standard Penetration Test, sampling and laboratory testing, etc.) used to assess such ground improvement are subjected to several limitations such as small sampling volume, time-consuming, and cost ineffectiveness. It's difficult to assess the average property of the improved ground and the actual replacement ratio of ground improvement. The use of seismic surface wave method for such a purpose seems to be a good alternative. But what MASW measures in such highly heterogeneous improved ground remains to be investigated. This study evaluated the feasibility of MASW in highly heterogeneous ground with improved columns and investigated the homogenization of shear wave velocity measured by MASW. Field experiments show that MASW testing in such a composite ground behaves similar to testing in horizontally layered medium. It seems to measure some sort

  4. Seismic surface-wave prospecting methods for sinkhole hazard assessment along the Dead Sea shoreline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezersky, M.; Bodet, L.; Al-Zoubi, A.; Camerlynck, C.; Dhemaied, A.; Galibert, P.-Y.; Keydar, S.

    2012-04-01

    waves generation and picking issues in shear-wave refraction seismic methods. As an alternative, indirect estimation of Vs can then be proposed thanks to surface-wave dispersion measurements and inversion, an emerging seismic prospecting method for near-surface engineering and environment applications. Surface-wave prospecting methods have thus been proposed to address the sinkholes development processes along the Dead Sea shorelines. Two approaches have been used: (1) Vs mapping has been performed to discriminate soft and hard zones within salt layers, after calibration of inverted Vs near boreholes. Preliminarily, soft zones, associated with karstified salt, were characterized by Vs values lower than 1000 m/s, whereas hard zones presented values greater than 1400 m/s (will be specified during following studies); (2) roll along acquisition and dispersion stacking has been performed to achieve multi-modal dispersion measurements along linear profiles. Inverted pseudo-2D Vs sections presented low Vs anomalies in the vicinity of existing sinkholes and made it possible to detect loose sediment associated with potential sinkholes occurrences. Acknowledgements This publication was made possible through support provided by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and MERC Program under terms of Award No M27-050.

  5. Mapping Deep Low Velocity Zones in Alaskan Arctic Coastal Permafrost using Seismic Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Dreger, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Permafrost degradation may be an important amplifier of climate change; Thawing of near-surface sediments holds the potential of increasing greenhouse gas emissions due to microbial decomposition of preserved organic carbon. Recently, the characterization of "deep" carbon pools (several meters below the surface) in circumpolar frozen ground has increased the estimated amount of soil carbon to three times higher than what was previously thought. It is therefore potentially important to include the characteristics and processes of deeper permafrost strata (on the orders of a few to tens of meters below surface) in climate models for improving future predictions of accessible carbon and climate feedbacks. This extension is particularly relevant if deeper formations are not completely frozen and may harbor on-going microbial activity despite sub-zero temperatures. Unfortunately, the characterization of deep permafrost systems is non-trivial; logistics and drilling constraints often limit direct characterization to relatively shallow units. Geophysical measurements, either surface or airborne, are often the most effective tools for evaluating these regions. Of the available geophysical techniques, the analysis of seismic surface waves (e.g. MASW) has several unique advantages, mainly the ability to provide field-scale information with good depth resolution as well as penetration (10s to 100s of m with small portable sources). Surface wave methods are also able to resolve low velocity regions, a class of features that is difficult to characterize using traditional P-wave refraction methods. As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project, we conducted a three-day seismic field survey (May 12 - 14, 2012) at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, which is located within the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain. Even though permafrost at the study site is continuous, ice-rich and thick (>= 350m), our Multichannel Analysis of

  6. Imaging Near-Surface Controls on Hot Spring Expression Using Shallow Seismic Refraction in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A. N.; Lindsey, C.; Fairley, J. P., Jr.; Larson, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    We used shallow seismic refraction to image near-surface materials in the vicinity of a small group of hot springs, located in the Morning Mist Springs area of Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Seismic velocities in the area surveyed range from a low of 0.3 km/s to a high of approximately 2.5 km/s. The survey results indicate an irregular surface topography overlain by silty sediments. The observed seismic velocities are consistent with a subsurface model in which sorted sands and gravels, probably outwash materials from the Pinedale glaciation, are overlain by silts and fine sands deposited in the flat-lying areas of the Morning Springs area. These findings are supported by published geologic maps of the area and well logs from a nearby borehole. The near-surface materials appear to be saturated with discharging hydrothermal fluids of varying temperature, and interbedded with semi-lithified geothermal deposits (sinter). We hypothesize that the relatively low-conductivity deposits of fines at the surface may serve to confine a shallow, relatively low-temperature (sub-boiling) hydrothermal aquifer, and that the distribution of sinter in the shallow subsurface plays an important role in determining the geometry of hydrothermal discharge (hot springs) at the land surface. Few studies of the shallow controls on hot spring expression exist for the Yellowstone caldera, and the present study therefore offers a unique glimpse into near-subsurface fluid flow controls.

  7. Complex source mechanisms of mining-induced seismic events - implications for surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, B.; Cesca, S.; Lasocki, S.; Rudzinski, L.; Lizurek, L.; Wiejacz, P.; Urban, P.; kozlowska, M.

    2012-04-01

    The seismicity of Legnica-Głogów Copper District (LGCD) is induced by mining activities in three mines: Lubin, Rudna and Polkowice-Sieroszowice. Ground motion caused by strong tremors might affect local infrastructure. "Żelazny Most" tailings pond, the biggest structure of this type in Europe, is here under special concern. Due to surface objects protection, Rudna Mine has been running ground motion monitoring for several years. From June 2010 to June 2011 unusually strong and extensive surface impact has been observed for 6 mining tremors induced in one of Rudna mining sections. The observed peak ground acceleration (PGA) for both horizontal and vertical component were in or even beyond 99% confidence interval for prediction. The aim of this paper is analyze the reason of such unusual ground motion. On the basis of registrations from Rudna Mine mining seismological network and records from Polish Seismological Network held by the Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences (IGF PAN), the source mechanisms of these 6 tremors were calculated using a time domain moment tensor inversion. Furthermore, a kinematic analysis of the seismic source was performed, in order to determine the rupture planes orientations and rupture directions. These results showed that in case of the investigated tremors, point source models and shear fault mechanisms, which are most often assumed in mining seismology, are invalid. All analyzed events indicate extended sources with non-shear mechanism. The rapture planes have small dip angles and the rupture starts at the tremors hypocenter and propagates in the direction opposite to the plane dip. The tensional component plays here also big role. These source mechanisms well explain such observed strong ground motion, and calculated synthetic PGA values well correlates with observed ones. The relationship between mining tremors were also under investigation. All subsequent tremors occurred in the area of increased stress due to

  8. Joint Body- and Surface-wave Inversion Applied to Geothermal Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, A. N.; Reiter, D. T.; Leidig, M.

    2011-12-01

    To successfully monitor geothermal reservoirs, scientists must accurately track time-varying subsurface heterogeneity and low-energy microseismicity. These quantities are important for monitoring fracture development and production changes in all types of shallow reservoirs. We are adapting advanced subsurface imaging techniques, originally developed for regional-scale nuclear monitoring purposes, to the geothermal reservoir scale. Our specific approach is to jointly invert body-wave travel times and surface-wave dispersion data for seismic P and S velocity structure and improved microseismic event locations. Our inversion technique has several features that are important to the reservoir-scale imaging problem, such as travel-time prediction methods that are not limited to layered structures or surface receivers, and 3-D nonlinear velocity tomography with geostatistical constraints. As an initial demonstration of the feasibility of our inversion methodology, we have inverted a data set of P-wave travel times from events observed in the Geysers geothermal area in northern California. The Geysers is the largest exploited geothermal reservoir in the world and represents an ideal test bed for more advanced passive imaging techniques. We are utilizing archived waveform data from the 22-station Geysers seismic network, which was initially deployed and operated by the Unocal Geothermal Division and is now provided through collaboration between the Calpine Corporation and the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC). The results from our initial inversion for a P-wave model reveal a ±10 percent velocity variation with respect to the starting 1D model and good resolution to 2.5 km depth across most of the model space. Most of the velocity heterogeneity occurs above 1.5 km depth. Following event relocation in the final velocity model, the hypocenters have a mean depth of 2.3 km ±1, with all events above 4.3 km depth. In this paper we will present on our initial

  9. 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquake: a review of seismicity, surface faulting and regional tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Richins, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    The October 28, 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquake (M/sub s/ = 7.3) occurred in an area of low historic seismicity within east-central Idaho along a segment of the Lost River fault active during the Holocene. A dense network of portable short period seismographs (up to 45 stations, station spacings of 2 to 10 km) was installed beginning several hours after the main shock and operated for 22 days. In addition to records from the portable instrumentation, data from permanent seismograph stations operating in Idaho, Utah, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming, provide a good regional data base. No foreshock activity above magnitude 2.0 (M/sub L/) was detected for the two month period preceding the main shock. The distribution of 421 aftershocks of M/sub L/ > 2 defines an epicentral pattern, 75 km x 15 km, trending north-northwest parallel to the surface rupture but displaced laterally southwest by 5 to 10 km. The epicenter of the main shock is approximately 14 km south-southwest of the end of surface faulting. This relationship suggests unilateral rupture propagating to the northwest. Aftershocks extend to depths of approximately 16 km and in the southeastern portion of the aftershock pattern define a zone, dipping approximately 45/sup 0/ SW, that intersects the surface near the fault scarp. The entire aftershock zone as observed during the first 3.5 weeks was active shortly after the main shock occurred. Fault plane solutions indicate predominantly normal faulting with varying components of strike slip. 17 refs., 8 figs. 1 tab.

  10. Using Resistivity and Seismic Refraction to Image Surface-Ground Water Interaction in the Snowy Range, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provart, M.; Holbrook, W.; Carr, B.; Miller, S. N.; Traver, E.; Hall, R.

    2013-12-01

    Closing the water balance in mountain watersheds is often difficult due to uncertainties about the role of surface/groundwater interactions. We have initiated a combined hydrological/geophysical study of a mountain watershed in the Snowy Range of Wyoming in order to test the efficacy of near-surface geophysical techniques in assessing the pathways that connect surface water to groundwater. Here we present initial results of subsurface structure inferred from electrical resistivity and seismic refraction data. The Snowy Range represents the northern extent of the Medicine Bow Mountains, a subset of the Rockies, that originated from the Laramide Orogeny. Bedrock varies from quartzite, to metasedimentary gneisses and schists, to igneous rock. Our data set consists of DC-resistivity and seismic refraction surveys in a valley containing a spring, as well as a saline tracer experiment in the No Name watershed consisting of time-lapse resistivity profiles along both banks of the stream. Our resistivity transects show highly conductive regions immediately below the spring with resistivities <100 Ω-m at depths ranging from 0 to 25 meters. We conclude these sections are saturated with highly ionized water that has filtered downwards through the ridgelines to the north and south of the valley. Seismic refraction surveys along the same profiles show P-velocities <1500 m/s (the seismic velocity of water) in the upper 10 meters. One possible explanation is that water occupies discrete fracture systems in an otherwise partially saturated subsurface. A saline tracer experiment also shows clear evidence for surface/groundwater interactions. We injected a salt water mixture into the stream and conducted time-lapse resistivity profiling on stream-parallel profiles downstream over five hours to test for hyporheic flow from the stream into the adjacent banks. We imaged increasing conductivity in sections of our profiles which we attribute to saline water infiltrating the subsurface

  11. Seismic structure of the southern Apennines as revealed by waveform modelling of regional surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ökeler, Ahmet; Gu, Yu Jeffrey; Lerner-Lam, Arthur; Steckler, Michael S.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the crust and upper-mantle structures beneath the southern Apennine mountain chain using three-component seismograms from the Calabria-Apennine-Tyrrhenian/Subduction-Collision-Accretion Network (CAT/SCAN) array. Surface wave waveforms from three moderate-sized (Mw > 5.0) regional earthquakes are modelled using multiple frequencies (0.03-0.06 and 0.05-0.2 Hz) and both forward and linearized-inversion algorithms. Our best-fitting shear velocity models clearly reflect the major tectonic units where, for example, the average seismic structure at depths above 50 km beneath Apulia is substantially faster than beneath the Apennine mountain chain. We identify a prominent low-velocity channel under the mountain belt at depths below ~25-30 km and a secondary low-velocity zone at 6-12 km depth near Mt Vulture (a once active volcano). Speed variations between Love and Rayleigh waves provide further constraints on the fabric and dynamic processes. Our analysis indicates that the crustal low-velocity zones are highly anisotropic (maximum 14 per cent) and allow transversely polarized shear waves to travel faster than vertically polarized shear waves. The upper crustal anomaly reveals a layer of highly deformed rocks caused by past collisions and by the active normal faults cutting across the thrust sheets, whereas hot mantle upwelling may be responsible for a high-temperature, partially molten lower crust beneath the southern Apennines.

  12. On using surface-source downhole-receiver logging to determine seismic slownesses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Thompson, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method to solve for slowness models from surface-source downhole-receiver seismic travel-times. The method estimates the slownesses in a single inversion of the travel-times from all receiver depths and accounts for refractions at layer boundaries. The number and location of layer interfaces in the model can be selected based on lithologic changes or linear trends in the travel-time data. The interfaces based on linear trends in the data can be picked manually or by an automated algorithm. We illustrate the method with example sites for which geologic descriptions of the subsurface materials and independent slowness measurements are available. At each site we present slowness models that result from different interpretations of the data. The examples were carefully selected to address the reliability of interface-selection and the ability of the inversion to identify thin layers, large slowness contrasts, and slowness gradients. Additionally, we compare the models in terms of ground-motion amplification. These plots illustrate the sensitivity of site amplifications to the uncertainties in the slowness model. We show that one-dimensional site amplifications are insensitive to thin layers in the slowness models; although slowness is variable over short ranges of depth, this variability has little affect on ground-motion amplification at frequencies up to 5 Hz.

  13. Combination of surface and borehole seismic data for robust target-oriented imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; van der Neut, Joost; Arntsen, Børge; Wapenaar, Kees

    2016-05-01

    A novel application of seismic interferometry (SI) and Marchenko imaging using both surface and borehole data is presented. A series of redatuming schemes is proposed to combine both data sets for robust deep local imaging in the presence of velocity uncertainties. The redatuming schemes create a virtual acquisition geometry where both sources and receivers lie at the horizontal borehole level, thus only a local velocity model near the borehole is needed for imaging, and erroneous velocities in the shallow area have no effect on imaging around the borehole level. By joining the advantages of SI and Marchenko imaging, a macrovelocity model is no longer required and the proposed schemes use only single-component data. Furthermore, the schemes result in a set of virtual data that have fewer spurious events and internal multiples than previous virtual source redatuming methods. Two numerical examples are shown to illustrate the workflow and to demonstrate the benefits of the method. One is a synthetic model and the other is a realistic model of a field in the North Sea. In both tests, improved local images near the boreholes are obtained using the redatumed data without accurate velocities, because the redatumed data are close to the target.

  14. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ∼200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  15. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  16. Conceptual Design and Architecture of Mars Exploration Rover (MER) for Seismic Experiments Over Martian Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akshay; Singh, Amit

    2012-07-01

    Keywords: MER, Mars, Rover, Seismometer Mars has been a subject of human interest for exploration missions for quite some time now. Both rover as well as orbiter missions have been employed to suit mission objectives. Rovers have been preferentially deployed for close range reconnaissance and detailed experimentation with highest accuracy. However, it is essential to strike a balance between the chosen science objectives and the rover operations as a whole. The objective of this proposed mechanism is to design a vehicle (MER) to carry out seismic studies over Martian surface. The conceptual design consists of three units i.e. Mother Rover as a Surrogate (Carrier) and Baby Rovers (two) as seeders for several MEMS-based accelerometer / seismometer units (Nodes). Mother Rover can carry these Baby Rovers, having individual power supply with solar cells and with individual data transmission capabilities, to suitable sites such as Chasma associated with Valles Marineris, Craters or Sand Dunes. Mother rover deploys these rovers in two opposite direction and these rovers follow a triangulation pattern to study shock waves generated through firing tungsten carbide shells into the ground. Till the time of active experiments Mother Rover would act as a guiding unit to control spatial spread of detection instruments. After active shock experimentation, the babies can still act as passive seismometer units to study and record passive shocks from thermal quakes, impact cratering & landslides. Further other experiments / payloads (XPS / GAP / APXS) can also be carried by Mother Rover. Secondary power system consisting of batteries can also be utilized for carrying out further experiments over shallow valley surfaces. The whole arrangement is conceptually expected to increase the accuracy of measurements (through concurrent readings) and prolong life cycle of overall experimentation. The proposed rover can be customised according to the associated scientific objectives and further

  17. High-resolution seismic imaging of near-surface fault structures in the Upper Rhine Graben, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musmann, Patrick; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte

    2010-05-01

    Faults systems are important targets in different fields of exploration geophysics. Recently, exploration is focussed on deep-seated faults systems for hydro-geothermal utilization, where fluid flow may be enhanced compared to the surrounding host rock (fracture dominated aquifers). In fault related exploration, special interest of geothermal research is given to size, shape and age of fault patterns as well as to the geological periods of fault activity, because fluid flow critically depends on those parameters. A well-established way to explore structural architecture of fault systems is the use of 3D reflection seismics. This technique, if applied to targets at several kilometers depth, inevitably leaves a gap in the near-surface domain due economic line spacing. To bridge the gap between target exploration at several kilometers depth (here 2-4 km) and the need to trace structures from the reservoir to the near surface, a study in the Upper Rhine Graben, Germany, was performed to supplement large-scale 3D seismic imaging of fault systems with high-resolution 2D reflection seismics. Here, we present results from three different high-resolution reflection seismic profiles, which were carried out across the projected outcrop of local fault structures. These structures appear in 3D seismic datasets recently acquired for hydro-geothermal exploration, but fade out towards surface. The new shallow seismic sections image Quaternary and Late Tertiary units between approximately 20 m and 1000 m depth. The sedimentary strata are resolved at high-resolution and different fault patterns can be identified therein. At one site, a 300 m wide normal fault zone was observed, while the other site shows a prominent horst structure with bounding faults branching into smaller ones at depth. From these fault images the last geological time of activity could be narrowed. Imaging limitations can be explained by an increasingly high-energy depositional system on one site, preventing

  18. Resistivity and Seismic Surface Wave Tomography Results for the Nevşehir Kale Region: Cappadocia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Nart; Çakır, Özcan; Erduran, Murat; Arif Kutlu, Yusuf

    2014-05-01

    The Nevşehir Kale region located in the middle of Cappadocia with approximately cone shape is investigated for existence of an underground city using the geophysical methods of electrical resistivity and seismic surface wave tomography together. Underground cities are generally known to exist in Cappadocia. The current study has obtained important clues that there may be another one under the Nevşehir Kale region. Two-dimensional resistivity and seismic profiles approximately 4-km long surrounding the Nevşehir Kale are measured to determine the distribution of electrical resistivities and seismic velocities under the profiles. Several high resistivity anomalies with a depth range 8-20 m are discovered to associate with a systematic void structure beneath the region. Because of the high resolution resistivity measurement system currently employed we were able to isolate the void structure from the embedding structure. Low seismic velocity zones associated with the high resistivity depths are also discovered. Using three-dimensional visualization techniques we show the extension of the void structure under the measured profiles.

  19. Sensor placement for the analysis of seismic surface waves: sources of error, design criterion and array design algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranò, Stefano; Fäh, Donat; Lu, Yue M.

    2014-06-01

    Seismic surface waves can be measured by deploying an array of seismometers on the surface of the earth. The goal of such measurement surveys is, usually, to estimate the velocity of propagation and the direction of arrival of the seismic waves. In this paper, we address the issue of sensor placement for the analysis of seismic surface waves from ambient vibration wavefields. First, we explain in detail how the array geometry affects the mean-squared estimation error of parameters of interest, such as the velocity and direction of propagation, both at low and high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Secondly, we propose a cost function suitable for the design of the array geometry with particular focus on the estimation of the wavenumber of both Love and Rayleigh waves. Thirdly, we present and compare several computational approaches to minimize the proposed cost function. Numerical experiments verify the effectiveness of our cost function and resulting array geometry designs, leading to greatly improved estimation performance in comparison to arbitrary array geometries, both at low and high SNR levels.

  20. New approach to detect seismic surface waves in 1Hz-sampled GPS time series

    PubMed Central

    Houlié, N.; Occhipinti, G.; Blanchard, T.; Shapiro, N.; Lognonné, P.; Murakami, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, co-seismic seismic source characterization based on GPS measurements has been completed in near- and far-field with remarkable results. However, the accuracy of the ground displacement measurement inferred from GPS phase residuals is still depending of the distribution of satellites in the sky. We test here a method, based on the double difference (DD) computations of Line of Sight (LOS), that allows detecting 3D co-seismic ground shaking. The DD method is a quasi-analytically free of most of intrinsic errors affecting GPS measurements. The seismic waves presented in this study produced DD amplitudes 4 and 7 times stronger than the background noise. The method is benchmarked using the GEONET GPS stations recording the Hokkaido Earthquake (2003 September 25th, Mw = 8.3). PMID:22355563

  1. New approach to detect seismic surface waves in 1Hz-sampled GPS time series.

    PubMed

    Houlié, N; Occhipinti, G; Blanchard, T; Shapiro, N; Lognonné, P; Murakami, M

    2011-01-01

    Recently, co-seismic seismic source characterization based on GPS measurements has been completed in near- and far-field with remarkable results. However, the accuracy of the ground displacement measurement inferred from GPS phase residuals is still depending of the distribution of satellites in the sky. We test here a method, based on the double difference (DD) computations of Line of Sight (LOS), that allows detecting 3D co-seismic ground shaking. The DD method is a quasi-analytically free of most of intrinsic errors affecting GPS measurements. The seismic waves presented in this study produced DD amplitudes 4 and 7 times stronger than the background noise. The method is benchmarked using the GEONET GPS stations recording the Hokkaido Earthquake (2003 September 25th, Mw = 8.3). PMID:22355563

  2. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Seismic imaging of the upper mantle beneath the northern Central Andean Plateau: Implications for surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extending over 1,800 km along the active South American Cordilleran margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) as defined by the 3 km elevation contour is second only to the Tibetan Plateau in geographic extent. The uplift history of the 4 km high Plateau remains uncertain with paleoelevation studies along the CAP suggesting a complex, non-uniform uplift history. As part of the Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project, we use surface waves measured from ambient noise and two-plane wave tomography to image the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle to investigate the upper mantle component of plateau uplift. We observe three main features in our S-wave velocity model including (1), a high velocity slab (2), a low velocity anomaly above the slab where the slab changes dip from near horizontal to a normal dip, and (3), a high-velocity feature in the mantle above the slab that extends along the length of the Altiplano from the base of the Moho to a depth of ~120 km with the highest velocities observed under Lake Titicaca. A strong spatial correlation exists between the lateral extent of this high-velocity feature beneath the Altiplano and the lower elevations of the Altiplano basin suggesting a potential relationship. Non-uniqueness in our seismic models preclude uniquely constraining this feature as an uppermost mantle feature bellow the Moho or as a connected eastward dipping feature extending up to 300 km in the mantle as seen in deeper mantle tomography studies. Determining if the high velocity feature represents a small lithospheric root or a delaminating lithospheric root extending ~300 km into the mantle requires more integration of observations, but either interpretation shows a strong geodynamic connection with the uppermost mantle and the current topography of the northern CAP.

  4. Numerical Calculation of Anelastic Seismic Pulse Propagation in a Hysteretic Elastic Material Along a Horizontal Surface Boundary of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosik, Dan

    2009-11-01

    The stress-strain relation for materials such as soil and sand exhibit hysteretic elastic behavior and are modeled using the Preisach-Mayergoyz method for a numerical calculation of a propagating seismic pulse. The source pulse is taken to be the result of pressure applied to the inner surface of a cylindrical cavity in order to simulate a two dimensional dynamite source. The anelastic differential equation of motion that is solved does not include traditional nonlinear elasticity terms appropriate to materials with atomic elasticity, but contains the dominant anelastic terms appropriate to consolidated materials that exhibit hysteretic elastic behavior. For parameters characteristic of sand at the Earth's surface, a comparison of anelastic to linear seismic pulse propagation gives an anelastic pulse with much slower propagation speed than a corresponding linear pulse with evidence of dispersion in the pulse. The simulated ground roll that results shows dramatic differences between the anelastic and linear cases. These results have important implications for the detailed behavior of strong seismic waves moving in soft sediments. Their dominant frequencies, amplitudes, and methods by which they may be attenuated will depend on getting the detailed pulse structure and its propagation correct.

  5. High-resolution shallow reflection seismic image and surface evidence of the Upper Tiber Basin active faults (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donne, D.D.; Plccardi, L.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow seismic reflection prospecting has been carried out in order to investigate the faults that bound to the southwest and northeast the Quaternary Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy). On the northeastern margin of the basin a ??? 1 km long reflection seismic profile images a fault segment and the associated up to 100 meters thick sediment wedge. Across the southwestern margin a 0.5 km-long seismic profile images a 50-55??-dipping extensional fault, that projects to the scarp at the base of the range-front, and against which a 100 m thick syn-tectonic sediment wedge has formed. The integration of surface and sub-surface data allows to estimate at least 190 meters of vertical displacement along the fault and a slip rate around 0.25 m/kyr. Southwestern fault might also be interpreted as the main splay structure of regional Alto Tiberina extensional fault. At last, the 1917 Monterchi earthquake (Imax=X, Boschi et alii, 2000) is correlable with an activation of the southwestern fault, and thus suggesting the seismogenic character of this latter.

  6. Faulting apparently related to the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake and possible co-seismic origin of surface cracks in Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Lee, W.H.K.; Rymer, M.J.; Ponti, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Apparent southward-dipping, reverse-fault zones are imaged to depths of about 1.5 km beneath Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California. Based on their orientation and projection to the surface, we suggest that the imaged fault zones are extensions of the Oak Ridge fault. Geologic mapping by others and correlations with seismicity studies suggest that the Oak Ridge fault is the causative fault of the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake (Northridge fault). Our seismically imaged faults may be among several faults that collectively comprise the Northridge thrust fault system. Unusually strong shaking in Potrero Canyon during the Northridge earthquake may have resulted from focusing of seismic energy or co-seismic movement along existing, related shallow-depth faults. The strong shaking produced ground-surface cracks and sand blows distributed along the length of the canyon. Seismic reflection and refraction images show that shallow-depth faults may underlie some of the observed surface cracks. The relationship between observed surface cracks and imaged faults indicates that some of the surface cracks may have developed from nontectonic alluvial movement, but others may be fault related. Immediately beneath the surface cracks, P-wave velocities are unusually low (<400 m/sec), and there are velocity anomalies consistent with a seismic reflection image of shallow faulting to depths of at least 100 m. On the basis of velocity data, we suggest that unconsolidated soils (<800 m/sec) extend to depths of about 15 to 20 m beneath our datum (<25 m below ground surface). The underlying rocks range in velocity from about 1000 to 5000 m/sec in the upper 100 m. This study illustrates the utility of high-resolution seismic imaging in assessing local and regional seismic hazards.

  7. Multicomponent Body and Surface Wave Seismic Analysis using an Urban Land Streamer System: An Integrative Earthquake Hazards Assessment Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribler, G.; Liberty, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present earthquake site response results from a 48-channel multicomponent seismic land streamer and large weight drop system. We acquired data along a grid of city streets in western Idaho at a rate of a few km per day where we derived shear wave velocity profiles to a depth of 40-50 m by incorporating vertical and radial geophone signals to capture the complete elliptical Rayleigh wave motion. We also obtained robust p-wave reflection and refraction results by capturing the returned signals that arrive at non-vertical incidence angles that result from the high-velocity road surface layer. By integrating the derived shear wave velocity profiles with p-wave reflection results, we include depositional and tectonic boundaries from the upper few hundred meters into our analysis to help assess whether ground motions may be amplified by shallow bedrock. By including p-wave refraction information into the analysis, we can identify zones of high liquefaction potential by comparing shear wave and p-wave velocity (Vp/Vs) measurements relative to refraction-derived water table depths. The utilization of multicomponent land streamer data improves signal-noise levels over single component data with no additional field effort. The added multicomponent data processing step can be as simple as calculating the magnitude of the vector for surface wave and refraction arrivals or rotating the reflected signals to the maximum emergence angle based on near surface p-wave velocity information. We show example data from a number of Idaho communities where historical earthquakes have been recorded. We also present numerical models and systematic field tests that show the effects of a high velocity road surface layer in surface and body wave measurements. We conclude that multicomponent seismic information derived from seismic land streamers can provide a significant improvement in earthquake hazard assessment over a standard single component approach with only a small addition in

  8. Characterization of the Vajont landslide (North-Eastern Italy) by means of reflection and surface wave seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronio, Lorenzo; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of the disastrous Vajont rockslide (North-Eastern Italy, October 9, 1963) have been studied in great detail over the past five decades. Nevertheless, the reconstruction of the rockslide dynamics still presents several uncertainties, including those related to the accurate estimation of the actual landslide mass. This work presents the results of a geophysical characterization of the Vajont landslide body in terms of material properties and buried geometry. Both aspects add new information to the existing dataset and will help a better understanding of the rockslide failure mechanisms and dynamics. In addition, some general considerations concerning the intricacies of landslide characterization can be drawn, with due attention to potential pitfalls. The employed techniques are: (i) high resolution P-wave reflection, (ii) high resolution SH-wave reflection, (iii) controlled source surface wave analysis. We adopted as a seismic source a vibrator both for P waves and SH waves, using vertical and horizontal geophones respectively. For the surface wave seismic survey we used a heavy drop-weight source and low frequency receivers. Despite the high noise level caused by the fractured conditions of the large rock body, a common situation in landslide studies, we managed to achieve a satisfying imaging quality of the landslide structure thanks to the large number of active channels, the short receiver interval and the test of appropriate seismic sources. The joint use of different seismic techniques help focus the investigation on the rock mass mechanical properties. Results are in good agreement with the available borehole data, the geological sections and the mechanical properties of the rockmass estimated by other studies. In general the proposed approach is likely to be applicable successfully to similar situations where scattering and other noise sources are a typical bottleneck to geophysical data acquisition on landslide bodies.

  9. Effect of the surface roughness on the seismic signal generated by a single rock impact: insight from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, Vincent; Mangeney, Anne; de Rosny, Julien; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The seismic signal generated by rockfalls, landslides or avalanches is a unique tool to detect, characterize and monitor gravitational flow activity, with strong implication in terms of natural hazard monitoring. Indeed, as natural flows travel down the slope, they apply stresses on the ground, generating seismic waves in a wide frequency band. Our ultimate objective is to relate the granular flow properties to the generated signals that result from the different physical processes involved. We investigate here the more simple process: the impact of a single bead on a rough surface. Farin et al. [2015] have already shown theoretically and experimentally the existence of a link between the properties of an impacting bead (mass and velocity) on smooth surfaces, and the emitted signal (radiated elastic energy and mean frequency). This demonstrates that the single impactor properties can be deduced from the form of the emitted signal. We extend this work here by investigating the impact of single beads and gravels on rough and erodible surfaces. Experimentally, we drop glass and steel beads of diameters from 2 mm to 10 mm on a PMMA plate. The roughness of this last is obtained by gluing 3mm-diameter glass beads on one of its face. Free beads have been also added to get erodible beds. We track the dropped impactor motion, times between impacts and the generated acoustic waves using two fast cameras and 8 accelerometers. Cameras are used in addition to estimate the impactor rotation. We investigate the energy balance during the impact process, especially how the energy restitution varies as a function of the energy lost through acoustic waves. From these experiments, we clearly observe that even if more dissipative processes are involved (friction, grain reorganization, etc.), the single bead scaling laws obtained on smooth surfaces remain valid. A main result of this work is to quantify the fluctuations of the characteristic quantities such as the bounce angle, the

  10. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    Naturally occurring geologic heterogeneity is an important, but often overlooked, aspect of seismic wave propagation. This dissertation presents a strategy for modeling the effects of heterogeneity using a combination of geostatistics and Finite Difference simulation. In the first chapter, I discuss my motivations for studying geologic heterogeneity and seis- mic wave propagation. Models based upon fractal statistics are powerful tools in geophysics for modeling heterogeneity. The important features of these fractal models are illustrated using borehole log data from an oil well and geomorphological observations from a site in Death Valley, California. A large part of the computational work presented in this disserta- tion was completed using the Finite Difference Code E3D. I discuss the Python-based user interface for E3D and the computational strategies for working with heterogeneous models developed over the course of this research. The second chapter explores a phenomenon observed for wave propagation in heteroge- neous media - the generation of unexpected shear wave phases in the near-source region. In spite of their popularity amongst seismic researchers, approximate methods for modeling wave propagation in these media, such as the Born and Rytov methods or Radiative Trans- fer Theory, are incapable of explaining these shear waves. This is primarily due to these method's assumptions regarding the coupling of near-source terms with the heterogeneities and mode conversion. To determine the source of these shear waves, I generate a suite of 3D synthetic heterogeneous fractal geologic models and use E3D to simulate the wave propaga- tion for a vertical point force on the surface of the models. I also present a methodology for calculating the effective source radiation patterns from the models. The numerical results show that, due to a combination of mode conversion and coupling with near-source hetero- geneity, shear wave energy on the order of 10% of the

  11. Near-Surface Seismic Reflection and GPR Imaging of the Active Emigrant Peak Fault, Fish Lake Valley, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, R. A.; Christie, M. W.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Stockli, D. F.

    2007-12-01

    Multifaceted near-surface geophysical studies of active faulting in the Eastern California Shear Zone are being conducted at the University of Kansas. During the summer of 2006 shallow seismic reflection and GPR data sets were acquired across the active Emigrant Peak fault on the east side of Fish Lake Valley, Nevada. This fault is a normal fault that aids in the transfer of regional right-lateral deformation associated with the Death Valley/Fish Lake Valley fault zone. Locally a 20 m high scarp marks the trace of the main fault across a large, active alluvial fan. The GPR experiment produced a pseudo-3D image approximately 500m by 115m in size with a bin size of 1m by 5m. Depth penetration was dependent on antenna frequency, but reached approximately 25m in the dry alluvial fan sediments. Two 2-D seismic lines were acquired with a depth penetration of approximately 200m using a 30.06 caliber rifle source. The main line was over 400m in length and the cross line over 150m in length. CMP bins were 0.25m in size. Both data types were processed to migrated images and imported into an industry-standard reflection interpretation package. Analysis of the GPR volume allowed the interpretation of numerous normal faults parallel to the main Emigrant fault both near the main scarp and as 'off-fault' deformation. Some are down-to-the-basin 'growth faults' and some are antithetic in nature. Faults were only mapped if they were continuous across many x-lines. The migrated seismic images contain numerous reflections, grouped in packages of short reflectors of different amplitudes and dip orientations. The GPR fault planes were transferred onto the seismic data and correlated with obvious breaks in dip and amplitude between the reflection packages. After basic interpretation of the faults the stratigraphic changes across the fault planes were analyzed on the seismic data to estimate offsets at different depths for each fault. Currently, we are working to estimate a quantitative

  12. A web-based platform for simulating seismic wave propagation in 3D shallow Earth models with DEM surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Cong; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Realistic shallow seismic wave propagation simulation is an important tool for studying induced seismicity (e.g., during geothermal energy development). However over a long time, there is a significant problem which constrains computational seismologists from performing a successful simulation conveniently: pre-processing. Conventional pre-processing has often turned out to be inefficient and unrobust because of the miscellaneous operations, considerable complexity and insufficiency of available tools. An integrated web-based platform for shallow seismic wave propagation simulation has been built. It is aiming at providing a user-friendly pre-processing solution, and cloud-based simulation abilities. The main features of the platform for the user include: revised digital elevation model (DEM) retrieving and processing mechanism; generation of multi-layered 3D shallow Earth model geometry (the computational domain) with user specified surface topography based on the DEM; visualization of the geometry before the simulation; a pipeline from geometry to fully customizable hexahedral element mesh generation; customization and running the simulation on our HPC; post-processing and retrieval of the results over cloud. Regarding the computational aspect, currently the widely accepted specfem3D is chosen as the computational package; packages using different types of elements can be integrated as well in the future. According to our trial simulation experiments, this web-based platform has produced accurate waveforms while significantly simplifying and enhancing the pre-processing and improving the simulation success rate.

  13. Near-surface, marine seismic-reflection data defines potential hydrogeologic confinement bypass in a tertiary carbonate aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Walker, Cameron; Westcott, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 210 km of near-surface, high-frequency, marine seismic-reflection data were acquired on the southeastern part of the Florida Platform between 2007 and 2011. Many high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles, interpretable to a depth of about 730 m, were collected on the shallow-marine shelf of southeastern Florida in water as shallow as 1 m. Landward of the present-day shelf-margin slope, these data image middle Eocene to Pleistocene strata and Paleocene to Pleistocene strata on the Miami Terrace. This high-resolution data set provides an opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that cut across confining units of the Paleocene to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that form the Floridan aquifer system.Seismic profiles image two structural systems, tectonic faults and karst collapse structures, which breach confining beds in the Floridan aquifer system. Both structural systems may serve as pathways for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability rocks in the Floridan aquifer system. The tectonic faults occur as normal and reverse faults, and collapse-related faults have normal throw. The most common fault occurrence delineated on the reflection profiles is associated with karst collapse structures. These high-frequency seismic data are providing high quality structural analogs to unprecedented depths on the southeastern Florida Platform. The analogs can be used for assessment of confinement of other carbonate aquifers and the sealing potential of deeper carbonate rocks associated with reservoirs around the world.

  14. Near-surface S-wave velocity measured with six-degree-of-freedom seismic sensor Rotaphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Jiri; Brokesova, Johana

    2015-04-01

    An essential parameter in seismic engineering is the near-surface S-wave velocity. Rotaphone, a six-degree-of-freedom seismic sensor can be used with advantage to retrieve it from collocated rotational and translational measurements. Rotaphone consists of highly sensitive geophones connected to a conjoint datalogger. The geophones are mounted in parallel pairs to a rigid (metal) ground-based frame. The instrument is designed to measure short-period translational ground motion (velocity) and, in addition, differential motion between the paired geophones. The records of those differential motions are used to obtain rotational components. In-situ calibration of individual geophones is performed simultaneously with each measurement, which enables to reach high sensitivity and accuracy of rotational measurements. In our method we utilize seismic waves produced by anthropogenic source - a generator of S waves and rotational ground motions. The generator contains a fixed part (anchored to the ground), a revolving part and a braking mechanism for immediate braking of the rotational part, in which rotational seismic motions are generated by immediately stopping the revolving part, whereby energy is transmitted into the rock massive. The generator produces repeatedly identical source pulses. Due to identity of the source pulses, we can suppress noise by means of stacking data from many generator actions and thus increase the depth range and resolution. The phase velocity retrieval is based on matching relevant acceleration and rotation rate components. Thanks to a near-source distance and high-frequency content of the source pulses, well-known equations for plane-wave approximation must be replaced by more adequate equations relating the individual rotation rate components to the translational ones. These equations are derived under an assumption of spherical wave. The resulting S-wave phase velocity is compared to the value obtained by standard profile measurements. The

  15. Seafloor surface processes and subsurface paleo-channel unconformities mapped using multi-channel seismic and multi-beam sonar data from the Galicia 3D seismic experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. C.; Shillington, D. J.; Sawyer, D. S.; Jordan, B.; Morgan, J. K.; Ranero, C.; Reston, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we use geophysical methods, stratigraphic relationships, and coring/drilling leg results to assess possible controls on deep-sea channel formation in order to further constrain paleo-channel (PC) and associated unconformity timing/source processes. A series of cut and fill PC are mapped in 3D multi-channel seismic (MCS) data and compared with multi-beam (MB) sonar bathymetry/backscatter data collected during the Galicia 3D survey with the R/V Marcus G. Langseth (2013). The MCS data were collected using four 6 km streamers spaced at 200 m resulting in 25 m x 25 m common mid-point bins within the ~67 km x 20 km 3D volume. The MB data were collected at an average depth of ~4900 m with a constrained swath width of 4.5 km resulting in 11.25x overlap while enabling 25-m bathymetry and 10-m backscatter grids. The PC lie below the mouth of a submarine canyon at the edge of the Galicia abyssal plain and cut pre/syn-rift sediments; they are bound by a rift block to the north and paleo-levees to the south (maximum height of ~180m). From drilling results, the most recent PC is late Miocene in age. In this study, four PC are traced into the basin as unconformities. Several of the PC/unconformities are tentatively correlated with previously interpreted Pyrenean orogeny/compressional Miocene/Oligocene tectonic events. However, one PC/unconformity within this interval has not been previously interpreted. In order test the hypothesis that the unconformities are the result of a significant change in base level indicated by a low shale/sand (SS) ratio, we use seismic surface attributes to calculate the SS ratio and trace the horizontal extent of the unconformities. Additionally, the MB/MCS seafloor morphology reveals sedimentary waves outboard of the canyon mouth. We use backscatter data to compare the extent of recent processes (e.g., Pleistocene glaciation/de-glaciation) with the unconformities by mapping the surface/shallow subsurface SS ratio (volume scattering).

  16. Integration of borehole geophysical properties into surface multichannel seismic data sets: First results from the SCOPSCO ICDP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindhorst, Katja; Krastel, Sebastian; Baumgarten, Henrike; Wonik, Thomas; Francke, Alexander; Wagner, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania), located on the Balkan Peninsula within the Dinaride-Hellenide-Albanide mountain belt is probably the oldest, continuously existing lake in Europe (2-5 Ma). Multidisciplinary studies at Lake Ohrid prove that it is an important archive to study the sedimentary and tectonic evolution of a graben system over a long time period. Within the frame of the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) a successful deep drilling campaign was carried out in spring 2013 with more than 2000 m of sediment cores at four sites. Downhole logging was realized at each site after coring, enabling us to integrate geophysical and sedimentological data into seismic cross sections in order to get a profound knowledge of climatic and environmental changes in the catchment area. The longest record (~569 m, site DEEP), recovered in the central part of lake Ohrid likely covers the entire lacustrine succession within Lake Ohrid Basin including several Interglacial and Glacial cycles. Sedimentological analyses are still ongoing; however, the upper 260 m of the DEEP reflecting the time period between Mid-Pleistocene Transition to present. An integration of borehole geophysical data into surface seismic lines shows that sediments, within the central part of Lake Ohrid, were deposited in a deep water environment over the last 600 ka. For the uppermost sediment cover, about 50 m of penetration, a very high resolution sediment echosounder data set allows us to identify major tephra layers and track them through the entire deep basin. Furthermore, a vertical seismic profile was carried out at site DEEP resulting in a conversion from two-way-travel-time into sediment depth. One major outcome is a corridor stack of the upgoing wave that clearly shows several reflectors linked to changes of sediment properties of cores and hence environmental and climate changes in the surrounding area of Lake Ohrid Basin. Several changes from Glacial to Interglacial, and vice versa

  17. Two-dimensional Co-Seismic Surface Displacements Field of the Chi-Chi Earthquake Inferred from SAR Image Matching

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Li, Zhi-Wei; Ding, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Jian-Jun

    2008-01-01

    The Mw=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan occurred in 1999 over the Chelungpu fault and caused a great surface rupture and severe damage. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) has been applied previously to study the co-seismic ground displacements. There have however been significant limitations in the studies. First, only one-dimensional displacements along the Line-of-Sight (LOS) direction have been measured. The large horizontal displacements along the Chelungpu fault are largely missing from the measurements as the fault is nearly perpendicular to the LOS direction. Second, due to severe signal decorrelation on the hangling wall of the fault, the displacements in that area are un-measurable by differential InSAR method. We estimate the co-seismic displacements in both the azimuth and range directions with the method of SAR amplitude image matching. GPS observations at the 10 GPS stations are used to correct for the orbital ramp in the amplitude matching and to create the two-dimensional (2D) co-seismic surface displacements field using the descending ERS-2 SAR image pair. The results show that the co-seismic displacements range from about -2.0 m to 0.7 m in the azimuth direction (with the positive direction pointing to the flight direction), with the footwall side of the fault moving mainly southwards and the hanging wall side northwards. The displacements in the LOS direction range from about -0.5 m to 1.0 m, with the largest displacement occuring in the northeastern part of the hanging wall (the positive direction points to the satellite from ground). Comparing the results from amplitude matching with those from DInSAR, we can see that while only a very small fraction of the LOS displacement has been recovered by the DInSAR mehtod, the azimuth displacements cannot be well detected with the DInSAR measurements as they are almost perpendicular to the LOS. Therefore, the amplitude matching method is obviously more advantageous than the DIn

  18. Near-surface mapping using SH-wave and P-wave seismic land-streamer data acquisition in Illinois, U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pugin, Andre J.M.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; McBride, J.H.; Bexfield, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    SH-wave and P-wave high-resolution seismic reflection combined with land-streamer technology provide 3D regional maps of geologic formations that can be associated with aquifers and aquitards. Examples for three study areas are considered to demonstrate this. In these areas, reflection profiling detected near-surface faulting and mapped a buried glacial valley and its aquifers in two settings. The resulting seismic data can be used directly to constrain hydrogeologic modeling of shallow aquifers.

  19. Body and surface wave reconstruction from seismic noise correlations between arrays at Piton de la Fournaise volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Nori; Boué, Pierre; Brenguier, Florent; Roux, Philippe; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Campillo, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Body wave reconstruction from ambient seismic noise correlations is an important step toward improving volcano imaging and monitoring. Here we extract body and surface waves that propagate in Piton de la Fournaise volcano on La Réunion island using ambient noise cross correlation and array-processing techniques. Ambient noise was continuously recorded at three dense arrays, each comprising 49 geophones. To identify and enhance the Green's function from the ambient noise correlation, we apply a double beamforming (DBF) technique between the array pairs. The DBF allows us to separate surface and body waves, direct and reflected waves, and multipathing waves. Based on their azimuths and slownesses, we successfully extract body waves between all the combinations of arrays, including the wave that propagates through the active magmatic system of the volcano. Additionally, we identify the effects of uneven noise source distribution and interpret the surface wave reflections.

  20. Combination of different seismic methods and geotechnical sounding for a rapid characterization of the near-surface ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, P.; Kretschmer, F.; Vienken, T.; Popp, S.

    2009-04-01

    For economical and feasible seismic exploration of the near-surface ground, an approach has been developed for the joint application of reflection and refraction seismics as well as multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW). The measuring concept was tested within the research project COMEXTECH, dealing with the exploration of construction ground. Besides the overall characterization of the subsurface by refraction and reflection seismics, the MASW can be used for the derivation of relevant soil parameters such as soil stiffness. The centre of the measuring concept represents a land streamer, pulled by a vehicle equipped with the seismic source. The 24-channel land streamer may be tipped with different geophones, according to the focus of investigation. We used three fully equipped land streamers with 72 channels at all at the test site Nauen close to Berlin, Germany. The first 24 positions of the land streamer nearby the seismic source were filled with 4.5 Hz geophones. The next two land streamers were tipped with 14 Hz geophones, respectively. The idea behind this arrangement is that the positions close to the shot point, which are not utilisable for reflection seismics, can be used for the interpretation of surface waves. The signal was given with an accelerated weight drop mounted on a cross-country vehicle. Shots were arranged every meter, and four shots per shot point were executed for an increased signal/noise ratio. Three registration units (GeodeTM by Geometrics) were connected in series for signal recording. At the site, a profile of 164 m length was investigated in bidirectional manner in combination with geotechnical exploration technique. The purpose of bidirectional recording is to check the reliability and sensitivity of the seismic array and to increase the resolution of the image of the subsurface. By using the same shot points forth and back, a multiple overlap rate for certain common depth points (CDP) can be achieved, which is thought to

  1. Remotely triggered seismic activity in Hakone volcano during and after the passage of surface waves from the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukutake, Yohei; Miyazawa, Masatoshi; Honda, Ryou; Harada, Masatake; Ito, Hiroshi; Sakaue, Minoru; Koketsu, Kazuki; Yoshida, Akio

    2013-07-01

    Immediately after the March 11, 2011, M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, seismic activity increased remarkably beneath Hakone volcano, central Japan, at an epicentral distance of 450 km. The heightened seismicity was initiated during the passage of the large-amplitude surface waves from the main shock and continued over the subsequent 2 months. We obtained hypocenters and focal mechanisms of the seismic sequence, with the aim of clarifying the physical mechanism responsible for the remotely triggered seismicity. We used data from a dense seismic network containing 56 online permanent and offline temporary stations in and around the Hakone volcano. We found that the earthquakes that occurred during the passage of the surface waves are located at the lower depth limit of ordinary seismicity in the caldera. These earthquakes have larger magnitudes than both the ordinary seismicity prior to the Tohoku-Oki earthquake and the seismicity triggered after the passage of the surface waves. The focal mechanism that we determined is a strike-slip fault type with the P-axis in the NW-SE direction, which is consistent with the focal mechanisms of earthquakes that occurred after the passage of the surface waves and the tectonic stress field in the region. We also tried to detect missing events that occurred immediately after the passage of the surface waves, by using a waveform correlation technique. The detected events are distributed near the hypocenters of the earthquakes that occurred during the passage of the surface waves. The origin times of the first four events after the arrival of surface waves are consistent with the phases of the decrease in normal stress generated by the surface waves. The results suggest that the changes in dynamic stress due to the surface waves from the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake contributed significantly to the initiation of the sequence of triggered seismic activity. Assuming that normal stress changes on the faults did play an important role in the

  2. Mining induced seismic event on an inactive fault in view of local surface and in mine underground networksS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Lukasz; Lizurek, Grzegorz; Plesiewicz, Beata

    2014-05-01

    On 19th March 2013 tremor shook the surface of Polkowice town were "Rudna" mine is located. This event of ML=4.2 was third most powerful seismic event recorded in Legnica Głogów Copper District (LGCD). Citizens of the area reported that felt tremors were bigger and last longer than any other ones felt in last couple years. The event was studied with use of two different networks: underground network of "Rudna" mine and surface local network run by IGF PAS (LUMINEOS network). The first one is composed of 32 vertical seismometers at mining level, except 5 sensors placed in elevator shafts, seismometers location depth varies from 300 down to 1000 meters below surface. The seismometers used in this network are vertical short period Willmore MkII and MkIII sensors, with the frequency band from 1Hz to 100Hz. At the beginning of 2013th the local surface network of the Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences (IGF PAS) with acronym LUMINEOS was installed under agreement with KGHM SA and "Rudna" mine officials. This network at the moment of the March 19th 2013 event was composed of 4 short-period one-second triaxial seismometers LE-3D/1s manufactured by Lenartz Electronics. Analysis of spectral parameters of the records from in mine seismic system and surface LUMINEOS network along with broadband station KSP record were carried out. Location of the event was close to the Rudna Główna fault zone, the nodal planes orientations determined with two different approaches were almost parallel to the strike of the fault. The mechanism solutions were also obtained in form of Full Moment Tensor inversion from P wave amplitude pulses of underground records and waveform inversion of surface network seismograms. Final results of the seismic analysis along with macroseismic survey and observed effects from the destroyed part of the mining panel indicate that the mechanism of the event was thrust faulting on inactive tectonic fault. The results confirm that the fault zones

  3. Passive seismic experiment - A summary of current status. [Apollo-initiated lunar surface station data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The data set obtained from the four-station Apollo seismic network including signals from approximately 11,800 events, is surveyed. Some refinement of the lunar model will result, but its gross features remain the same. Attention is given to the question of a small, molten lunar core, the answer to which remains dependent on analysis of signals from a far side impact. Seventy three sources of repeating, deep moonquakes have been identified, thirty nine of which have been accurately located. Concentrated at depths from 800 to 1000 km, the periodicities of these events have led to the hypothesis that they are generated by tidal stresses. Lunar seismic data has also indicated that the meteoroid population is ten times lower than originally determined from earth based observations. Lunar seismic activity is much lower and mountainous masses show no sign of sinking, in contrast to earth, as a result of the lunar crust being four times thicker. While much work remains to be done, significant correlation between terrestrial and lunar observations can be seen.

  4. Modified surface boundary conditions for elastic waveform inversion of low-frequency wide-angle active land seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessix, René-Édouard; Pérez Solano, Carlos A.

    2015-06-01

    In presence of large wavelength-scale shear-velocity variations in the Earth, acoustic waveform inversion may not be sufficient even when inverting long-offset data to retrieve the long-to-intermediate wavelengths of the compressional velocity. An acoustic modelling does not always correctly represent the compressional/primary waves when tuning effects and energy conversion between compressional and shear waves occur. Elastic waveform inversion with land data is challenging not only because of its computational cost but also due to the presence of the very energetic ground roll. To avoid inverting the ground roll and focus the inversion on the body waves recorded at long offsets, we propose to modify the surface boundary conditions in the elastic modelling. Zeroing the normal derivatives of the shear stress components parallel to the surface instead of the shear stress components themselves as with the free-surface boundary conditions leads to an elastic modelling that does not generate ground roll. These modified elastic surface conditions allow us to invert the seismic data that have been pre-processed to remove the ground roll as we do in acoustic waveform inversion. In this way, the inversion can focus on the retrieval of the long-to-intermediate wavelengths of the compressional velocity and we can apply the standard frequency continuation approach without having to process out the ground roll in the (elastic) synthetic data. An analysis of the modified surface conditions based on a plane wave decomposition shows that the reflection coefficients at the surface do not depend on incident angles and earth parameters. With a not too high shear-to-compressional (S-to-P) velocity ratio at the surface, the PP-reflection coefficients are close to the ones with the free-surface conditions, but with a high ratio they differ significantly. The approximation is then valid when the (S-to-P) velocity ratio is not too high at the surface in the actual Earth. Based on some

  5. Seismic imaging of crust and upper mantle structure in western North America via surface wave inversion and wavefield depropagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, Joshua C.

    Surface wave analysis of both earthquake and ambient noise seismic data from arrays of broadband seismic stations provides new high resolution images of shear wave velocity of the crust and upper mantle in western North America. In the Yellowstone Hotspot region, new constraints are shown on the high velocity midcrustal layer of the eastern Snake River Plain that represents approximately 10 km of magmatic thickening and subsequent forcing of lower crustal outflow. In the Coast Mountain Batholith area of western British Columbia, the lack of a significant region of high velocities in the lower crust indicates that the foundering of negatively buoyant eclogitic lower crust has been efficient. A high resolution shear velocity model of the Sierra Nevada batholith region finds crustal thickening beneath the batholith, sinking material beneath the central Sierras with adjacent upwelling asthenospheric mantle, and the new image suggests that the Isabella (San Joaquin Valley) anomaly has a quasi-planar NW-SE striking geometry perhaps more consistent with being a Monterey plate slab remnant than an eclogite dominated feature. In addition to the surface wave results, new constraints are found on the sharpness of the 410-km velocity discontinuity via the wave-field continuation approach applied to five regional earthquakes in western North America. The 410-km discontinuity gradient ranges from 7-25 km, indicating the presence of water atop the transition zone in the two regions with large 410 km discontinuity gradient widths.

  6. Determination of near-surface attenuation, with κ parameter, to obtain the seismic moment, stress drop, source dimension and seismic energy for microearthquakes in the Granada Basin (Southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García García, J. M.; Romacho, M. D.; Jiménez, A.

    2004-01-01

    A set of 43 microearthquakes of the Granada Basin with magnitude duration MD from 1.4 to 3.5, have been spectrally analysed. The digital data used in this study was recorded by two short-period digital seismic network, five permanent stations using Andalusian Seismic Network (Red Sı´smica de Andalucı´a, RSA) and three stations of a portable digital seismic network (Red Sı´smica Portátil, RSP). The displacement spectra for P- and S-waves were analysed with Brune's [J. Geophys. Res. 75 (1970) 4997; J. Geophys. Res. 76 (1971) 5002] source model and the spectra parameters were determined by Snoke's model. To correct spectra from path attenuation coda- Q was used. For the spectra correction from near-surface attenuation κ parameter was calculated, obtaining it from acceleration spectra. The values of κ parameter range from 0.01 to 0.04 s for P-waves and from 0.006 to 0.04 s to S-waves. Once the spectra of these attenuation effects was corrected, we obtained the seismic moments that range from 5.45×10 17 dyne cm to 1.53×10 20 dyne cm. The source radii are between 0.13 and 0.39 km. The seismic energy ranges from 7.17×10 3 J to 1.13×10 8 J. The stress drop values were below 4 bars. The scaling relations between seismic moment and stress drop indicated decreasing stress drop with decreasing seismic moment.

  7. System and method for generating 3D images of non-linear properties of rock formation using surface seismic or surface to borehole seismic or both

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt Toshimi; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert A.; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2016-06-07

    A system and method of characterizing properties of a medium from a non-linear interaction are include generating, by first and second acoustic sources disposed on a surface of the medium on a first line, first and second acoustic waves. The first and second acoustic sources are controllable such that trajectories of the first and second acoustic waves intersect in a mixing zone within the medium. The method further includes receiving, by a receiver positioned in a plane containing the first and second acoustic sources, a third acoustic wave generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic waves in the mixing zone; and creating a first two-dimensional image of non-linear properties or a first ratio of compressional velocity and shear velocity, or both, of the medium in a first plane generally perpendicular to the surface and containing the first line, based on the received third acoustic wave.

  8. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at

  9. Detecting Low-Frequency Seismic Signals From Surface Microseismic Monitoring of Hydraulic Fracturing of a Tight-Sand Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Zhang, H.; Zeng, X.

    2013-12-01

    For both surface and downhole microseismic monitoring, generally geophones with resonance frequency greater than 4.5 Hz are used. Therefore, useful information below 4.5 Hz may not be detected. In a recent experiment, we installed14 3-component broadband seismic sensors on the surface to monitor the process of hydraulic fracturing of tight sand gas reservoirs. The sensor has a broad frequency range of 30 s to 100 Hz with a very high sensitivity of 2400 m/v/s. The reservoirs are located around 1.5 km depth. There are two fracturing stages along a vertical well, lasting for about 2 hours. We recorded the data continuously during the fracturing process at a sampling rate of 50 Hz. From time-frequency analysis of continuous data, we found some high-energy signals at resonance frequencies between 10 and 20 Hz and a relatively weaker signal at a resonance frequency of ~27 Hz during the hydraulic fracturing. These signals with various resonance frequencies are likely caused by vibrations of high-pressure pipes. In addition to the resonance frequencies, the time-frequency analysis also showed consistent low frequency signals between 3 and 4 Hz at different time. The move-out analysis showed that these signals traveled at shear-wave speeds. We have detected 77 effective low frequency events during the 2-hour hydraulic fracturing process, among which 42 were located by a grid-search location method. The horizontal distribution of the events aligns with the maximum horizontal compressive stress direction. Because of the uncertainty in the velocity model, the low-frequency seismic events are not located in the fracturing depths. Recently, long-period, long-duration seismic events in the frequency band of 10 to 80 Hz were detected during hydraulic fracture stimulation of a shale gas reservoir, which may be caused by slow slip along faults/fractures (Das and Zoback, 2011). In the active volcanic areas, monochromatic events that are related to circulation of hydrothermal fluids

  10. Investigating seismic anisotropy beneath the Reykjanes Ridge using models of mantle flow, crystallographic evolution, and surface wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A.; Ito, G.; Dunn, R. A.

    2013-08-01

    Surface wave studies of the Reykjanes Ridge (RR) and the Iceland hotspot have imaged an unusual and enigmatic pattern of two zones of negative radial anisotropy on each side of the RR. We test previously posed and new hypotheses for the origin of this anisotropy, by considering lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of olivine A-type fabric in simple models with 1-D, layered structures, as well as in 2-D and 3-D geodynamic models with mantle flow and LPO evolution. Synthetic phase velocities of Love and Rayleigh waves traveling parallel to the ridge axis are produced and then inverted to mimic the previous seismic studies. Results of 1-D models show that strong negative radial anisotropy can be produced when olivine a axes are preferentially aligned not only vertically but also subhorizontally in the plane of wave propagation. Geodynamic models show that negative anisotropy on the sides of the RR can occur when plate spreading impels a corner flow, and in turn a subvertical alignment of olivine a axes, on the sides of the ridge axis. Mantle dehydration must be invoked to form a viscous upper layer that minimizes the disturbance of the corner flow by the Iceland mantle plume. While the results are promising, important discrepancies still exist between the observed seismic structure and the predictions of this model, as well as models of a variety of types of mantle flow associated with plume-ridge interaction. Thus, other factors that influence seismic anisotropy, but not considered in this study, such as power-law rheology, water, melt, or time-dependent mantle flow, are probably important beneath the Reykjanes Ridge.

  11. Investigation of Seismic Waves from Non-Natural Sources: A Case Study for Building Collapse and Surface Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houng, S.; Hong, T.

    2013-12-01

    The nature and excitation mechanism of incidents or non-natural events have been widely investigated using seismological techniques. With introduction of dense seismic networks, small-sized non-natural events such as building collapse and chemical explosions are well recorded. Two representative non-natural seismic sources are investigated. A 5-story building in South Korea, Sampoong department store, was collapsed in June 25, 1995, causing casualty of 1445. This accident is known to be the second deadliest non-terror-related building collapse in the world. The event was well recorded by a local station in ~ 9 km away. P and S waves were recorded weak, while monotonic Rayleigh waves were observed well. The origin time is determined using surface-wave arrival time. The magnitude of event is determined to be 1.2, which coincides with a theoretical estimate based on the mass and volume of building. Synthetic waveforms are modeled for various combinations of velocity structures and source time functions, which allow us to constrain the process of building collapse. It appears that the building was collapsed once within a couple of seconds. We also investigate a M2.1 chemical explosion at a fertilizer plant in Texas on April 18, 2013. It was reported that more than one hundred people were dead or injured by the explosion. Seismic waveforms for nearby stations are collected from Incorporated Research Institution of Seismology (IRIS). The event was well recorded at stations in ~500 km away from the source. Strong acoustic signals were observed at stations in a certain great-circle direction. This observation suggests preferential propagation of acoustic waves depending on atmospheric environment. Waveform cross-correlation, spectral analysis and waveform modeling are applied to understand the source physics. We discuss the nature of source and source excitation mechanism.

  12. Inversion for rheological parameters from post-seismic surface deformation associated with the 1960 Valdivia earthquake, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo-Martín, Francisco; Roth, Frank; Wang, Rongjiang

    2006-01-01

    Data collected during two Global Positioning System campaigns in 1994 and 1996 across Chile and western Argentina (22 stations), in the area where the Mw= 9.5 1960 May 22 Valdivia earthquake took place, shows ground motion velocities that cannot be fully explained by the elastic strain accumulation during the interseismic phase of an earthquake deformation cycle. We use dislocation models to reproduce the observed velocities, with a 3-D source in a medium with one elastic layer overlying a Maxwell viscoelastic half-space, and a planar rupture surface with uniform coseismic slip. The reason for avoiding a more detailed and elaborated model is that knowledge about the Valdivia earthquake source parameters and the area where the event took place is poorly constrained. We focus, therefore, on examining the first-order post-seismic deformation, and ignore finer details about the heterogeneity of the Earth. By means of a grid search inversion over more than a million different models, we derived the most likely values for some of the medium and source parameters involved in the deformation process, namely viscosity (η), thickness of the elastic layer (D), average slip on the rupture surface (U0) and the seismic coupling coefficient (χ). According to our study, the optimum values are: η= 1020Pa . s, D= 46 km, U0= 15 m and χ= 96. A clear difference is seen between the surface deformation caused by silent-slip on the rupture surface and the one caused by post-seismic relaxation processes, two possibilities proposed to explain the anomalous velocities. We find that the deformation associated with the 1960 Valdivia event can still be observed after several decades and it is the most likely explanation for the velocity component that cannot be explained by plate convergence. Our model also predicts that this deformation will still be measurable for several more decades. Our model reproduces the first-order pattern of the measured GPS velocities, showing good agreement with

  13. Analysis of dispersion and attenuation of surface waves in poroelastic media in the exploration-seismic frequency band

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Xia, J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse dispersion and attenuation of surface waves at free surfaces of possible vacuum/poroelastic media: permeable-'open pore', impermeable-'closed pore' and partially permeable boundaries, which have not been previously reported in detail by researchers, under different surface-permeable, viscous-damping, elastic and fluid-flowing conditions. Our discussion is focused on their characteristics in the exploration-seismic frequency band (a few through 200 Hz) for near-surface applications. We find two surface-wave modes exist, R1 waves for all conditions, and R2 waves for closed-pore and partially permeable conditions. For R1 waves, velocities disperse most under partially permeable conditions and least under the open-pore condition. High-coupling damping coefficients move the main dispersion frequency range to high frequencies. There is an f1 frequency dependence as a constant-Q model for attenuation at high frequencies. R1 waves for the open pore are most sensitive to elastic modulus variation, but least sensitive to tortuosities variation. R1 waves for partially permeable surface radiate as non-physical waves (Im(k) < 0) at low frequencies. For R2 waves, velocities are slightly lower than the bulk slow P2 waves. At low frequencies, both velocity and attenuation are diffusive of f1/2 frequency dependence, as P2 waves. It is found that for partially permeable surfaces, the attenuation displays -f1 frequency dependence as frequency increasing. High surface permeability, low-coupling damping coefficients, low Poisson's ratios, and low tortuosities increase the slope of the -f1 dependence. When the attenuation coefficients reach 0, R2 waves for partially permeable surface begin to radiate as non-physical waves. ?? 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  14. Attenuation of near-surface diffracted energy in deep seismic data by DMO correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkby, Lone; Pedersen, Morten Wendell

    1998-03-01

    Seismic data are often contaminated by scattered waves from shallow diffractors such as offshore installations and structural irregularities. As the waves travel in the water layer and shallow sub-bottom they are damped considerably less than near-vertical reflected waves. Far from the diffractors the stacking velocity of the noise will be nearly identical to the stacking velocities of the primary reflections. This implies that CMP stacking of normal-moveout corrected data does not suppress the noise, and the necessary attenuation will typically be done separately by prestack 2D velocity-filtering or array simulation in the shot and receiver domains. However, by changing the moveout of the diffraction curves through DMO correction, the stacking velocity of the noise will be close to the true velocity of the diffracted waves, and suppression through CMP stacking is possible. As DMO is related to CDP smearing, which is a marginal problem for deep seismic data, it is normally not used as a part of the standard processing schemes. The noise suppression features of the DMO processor are demonstrated with a data example from the North Sea.

  15. Characterization of recent Lake Tahoe fault activity: Combining Sub-Meter Resolution Seismic Imagery with AMS C-14 Dated Submerged Paleo-Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingler, J. A.; Kent, G. M.; Babcock, J. A.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Gayes, P. T.; Karlin, B.; Morgan, C. W.; Heyvaert, A.; Richards, B. C.

    2002-12-01

    Deformational strain within the Lake Tahoe Basin was mapped during previous campaigns using a combination of high resolution seismic CHIRP, multi-beam swath bathymetry, and airborne laser altimetry. These previous campaigns identified submerged paleo-shorelines of Pleistocene to early Holocene age, which act as a tectonic strain marker due to fault related disruptions of this once flat surface, as well as significantly offset fault scarps. Building upon this previous work, specific sites were selected for additional investigation with seismic CHIRP and AMS C-14 dated vibra and piston cores. The combination of these three techniques is ideally suited for quantifying recent fault activity through the correlation of paleo-surfaces and accurate age determinations. Initial analysis of seismic CHIRP and piston coring conducted in Emerald Bay shows a complex normal fault system with a sedimentation rate much higher than other parts of the lake. Seismic CHIRP conducted near Zephyr Cove was able to image multiple paleo-shorelines. Vibra coring of these same surfaces recovered sands of the same consistency as beach sand. Additional piston cores were collected at various lake locations below 400 m depth, including two cores taken across the Stateline Fault. Core analysis and AMS C-14 dating combined with site-specific seismic CHIRP, and previous mapping, will improve chronological control on the fault activity within the Lake Tahoe Basin.

  16. Using Three-Dimensional Passive Seismic Imaging to Capture Near-Surface Weathering and Its Influence on Overlying Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. J.; Dueker, K. G.; Riebe, C. S.; Chen, P.; Flinchum, B. A.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    In mountain landscapes, vegetation is tightly coupled to elevation through orographic effects on temperature and precipitation. However, at any given elevation, vegetation can vary markedly due to non-climatic factors such as lithology. For example, tree-canopy cover correlates strongly with bedrock composition in the Sierra Nevada, California, via mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We are exploring the hypothesis that vegetation varies across bedrock types in the Sierra Nevada due to differences in near-surface fracture density that influence the availability of water for plants. Our approach uses data collected from autonomous seismic nodes that record seismic energy generated by ambient sources such as wind, rivers, and road traffic. By deploying the nodes across the landscape in arrays spanning 200 m on a side, we can obtain a three-dimensional image of spatial variations in near-surface weathering. Data presented here will be derived from arrays deployed for 3 days each spanning an area of 0.04 km2 at each of three sites underlain by Sierra Nevada granites and granodiorites. To isolate the effects of lithology on vegetation, we chose sites that span a range of forest cover and mafic-mineral content but have similar microclimate (i.e., with similar aspect and elevation). Our data will provide a three-dimensional model of P- and S-wave velocity structure, which we can invert using a Hertz-Mindlin porosity model to constrain the thickness and degree of fracturing and thus the subsurface water-holding potential for plants. We will explore the hypothesis that the densest vegetation occurs within bedrock with the densest fracturing, due to enhanced availability of water in the near surface. We will present a comparison of our results from the Sierra Nevada and results from similar experiments at the Snowy Range and Blair Wallis field sites of the Wyoming Center for Environmental Hydrology and Geophysics.

  17. Seismic ambient noise around the South China Sea: seasonal and spatial variations, and implications for its climate and surface circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Da; Yang, Ting

    2013-12-01

    With its strong seasonal variation in wave climate and various bathymetric features due to the complex tectonics, the South China Sea (SCS) provides a natural laboratory to study the microseism. We collected data from seismic stations around the SCS and calculated their noise spectra, through which seasonal and spatial variations of microseism, as well as the general feature of seismic ambient noise in this marginal sea were revealed. Microseism seasonal variations in general reflect influences of the East Asian monsoon in winter and the Indian monsoon in summer, respectively. The two microseism components, the single frequency microseism (SFM) and the double frequency microseism (DFM), show striking alternating variation patterns both seasonally and spatially. These variation patterns, along with the bathymetric feature near the stations, indicate SFM and DFM are generated through different physical mechanisms. More interestingly, seasonal and spatial variations of DFM appear to be consistent with the basin-scale surface circulation model of the SCS, in which the upper SCS experiences cyclonic in winter and anti-cyclonic in summer. These consistencies provide observational evidence for the hypothesis that the cyclonic depression is a favorable condition to generate DFM.

  18. Surface breakthrough of a basement fault by repeated seismic slip episodes: The Ostler Fault, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisetti, Francesca C.; Gorman, Andrew R.; Sibson, Richard H.

    2007-12-01

    The Ostler Fault is one of the major active reverse faults in the piedmont of the Southern Alps, SE of the Alpine Fault. We present a new geological and morphotectonic map of the southern Ostler Fault, integrated with two seismic reflection profiles across the active central segments of the fault. Segmented, subparallel scarps define a N-S belt (˜40 km long and 2-3 km wide) of pure reverse faults, which upthrow and back-tilt a panel of Plio-Pleistocene terrestrial units (2.4-1.0 Ma) plus the overlying glacial outwash (<200 ka). Uplift gradients, the chronology of newly faulted markers, and tectonically controlled diversion of paleodrainages, all indicate progressive S to N breakthrough of the surface trace of the Ostler Fault in the last 2.4 Ma. The new seismic data define a main fault segment dipping 50°-60°W to depths of ˜1.5 km, with a vertical throw of 800 m, and a shortening of ˜30%. The fault geometry and kinematics and the subsurface data favor the interpretation that the Ostler Fault propagated updip across the Plio-Quaternary terrestrial sequence as the emerging, high-angle splay of an inherited Late Cretaceous-Paleocene normal fault, that underwent repeated cycles of compressional reactivation in the last 2.4 Ma.

  19. Correlations between seismic wave velocities and physical properties of near-surface geologic materials in the southern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, Thomas E.

    1978-01-01

    To identify geologic units with distinctly different seismic responses for the purposes of seismic zonation, compressional and shear wave velocities have been measured in boreholes at 59 sites in the San Francisco Bay region in a wide range of near-surface (0-30m) geologic materials. Several physical parameters, which can be readily determined in the field, were found to correlate with the shear wave velocities and were used to define seismically distinct groups. For the unconsolidated to semiconsolidated sediments, texture, standard penetration resistance and depth were used to define eight seismically distinct groups. For the bedrock materials, fracture spacing and hardness were used to differentiate ten distinct categories. The correlation obtained between shear wave velocity and the physical parameters were used to regroup the map units defined for the San Francisco Bay region into seismically distinct units. The map units for the younger unconsolidated sediments can be really differentiated seismically. In contrast, the older semiconsolidated sedimentary deposits and bedrock units, which have experienced significant variations in post-depositial changes, show wider and overlapping velocity ranges. The map units for the sedimentary deposits have been regrouped into eight seismically distinct geotechnical units. The bedrock map units have been broadly regrouped into five distinct categories. Compressional wave velocities were not found to be well correlated with the physical parameters dependent on the soil or rock structure. For materials above the water table, the wide velocity variations found for each geotechnical group can be attributed to differences in degree of saturation. The strong correlations observed between shear wave velocity and other readily determine physical properties suggest that geologic maps which incorporate these parameters are most useful for seismic zonation.

  20. Frictional behavior and BET surface-area changes of SAFOD gouge at intermediate to seismic slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Michiyo; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Mitchell, Thomas; Kitajima, Hiroko; Hirose, Takehiro

    2013-04-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) Drilling site is located near the southern end of the creeping section of the San Andreas fault. Experimental studies on the frictional properties of fault gouge from SAFOD drill cores may provide valuable information on the cause of diverse fault motion. We conducted friction experiments on gouge from the southwest deformation zone (SDZ, Phase III core; Hole G-Run 2-Section 8) where creep is confirmed by ongoing borehole casing deformation, at intermediate to high slip rates (10-5 to 1.3 m/s), at a normal stress of about 1 MPa, and under both dry (room humidity) and wet (25 wt% of H2O added, drained tests) conditions. Experiments were performed with two rotary-shear friction apparatuses. One gram of gouge was placed between specimens of Belfast gabbro 25 mm in diameter surrounded by a Teflon sleeve to confine the gouge. Slip rate was first decreased and then increased in a step-wise manner to obtain the steady-state friction at intermediate slip rates. The friction coefficient increases from about 0.13 to 0.37 as the slip rate increases from 0.8 x 10-5 to 9.7 x 10-3 m/s. Our results agree with frictional strength measured at higher effective normal stress (100 MPa) by the Brown University group in the same material. Data shows pronounced velocity strengthening at intermediate slip rates, which is unfavorable for rupture nucleation and may be a reason for having creep behavior. On the other hand, the steady-state friction markedly decreases at high velocity, and such weakening may allow earthquake rupture to propagate into the creeping section, once the intermediate strength barrier is overcome. Gouge temperature, measured at the edge of the stationary sample during seismic fault motion, increased to around 175oC under dry conditions, but increased up to 100oC under wet conditions. We measured BET surface area of gouge before and after deformation to determine the energy used for grain crushing. The initial

  1. Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions from seismic surface waves: Compliance with the Threshold Test Ban Treaty

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynn R.; Cifuentes, Inés L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnitudes of the larger Soviet underground nuclear weapons tests from the start of the Threshold Test Ban Treaty in 1976 through 1982 are determined for short- and long-period seismic waves. Yields are calculated from the surface wave magnitude for those explosions at the eastern Kazakh test site that triggered a small-to-negligible component of tectonic stress and are used to calibrate body wave magnitude-yield relationship that can be used to determine the sizes of other explosions at that test site. The results confirm that a large bias, related to differential attenuation of P waves, exists between Nevada and Central Asia. The yields of the seven largest Soviet explosions are nearly identical and are close to 150 kilotons, the limit set by the Threshold Treaty. PMID:16593440

  2. Seismic Images of Near-Surface Faulting Along the Northern Projection of the Silver Creek Fault, Eastern and Southern San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M. R.; Gandhok, G.; Sickler, R. R.

    2008-12-01

    We acquired high-resolution shallow-depth and lower-resolution crustal-scale images across the northern projection of the Silver Creek in the Eastern San Francisco Bay, California. On a regional seismic profile from the Pacific Ocean to the Livermore Valley, the Silver Creek fault approximately marks the boundary between high velocities beneath the San Francisco Bay and lower velocities to the east, suggesting that the Silver Creek fault represents a major structural boundary between the San Andreas and Hayward faults. Locally, we acquired a series of high-resolution seismic profiles across the alluvial-covered northern projection of the Silver Creek fault, as inferred from vertical offsets in the groundwater table and from InSAR images. In San Jose, we found evidence for near-surface faulting across the Silver Creek fault as reported in a companion abstract by Goldman et al. (this volume). Along the Fremont/Union City Border at Alameda Creek, we acquired an approximately 2-km-long high-resolution seismic reflection/refraction profile that shows vertical offsets of near-surface strata and the underlying bedrock, and farther north in San Lorenzo, we acquired an approximately 8-km-long high-resolution seismic reflection/refraction profile that also shows vertical offsets of near-surface strata and the underlying bedrock. Both profiles show the apparent faulting along the northward projection of the Silver Creek fault. Although the vast majority of seismic events recorded in the area can be attributed to the slip on the Hayward fault, the northern California seismic catalog shows that some events occur beneath the near-surface trace of the Silver Creek fault. Collectively, the available data indicate that the Silver Creek fault may be more than 80 km long and may be currently or recently active. Because of its proximity to high-population centers, more careful examination of this fault is warranted.

  3. Estimation of seismic wave velocity at seafloor surface and sound source localization based on transmitted wave observation with an ocean bottom seismometer offshore of Kamaishi, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Ryoichi

    2016-07-01

    An in situ method of estimating the seismic wave velocity at the seafloor surface by observing the particle motion of a wave transmitted into the sediment is presented; this method uses a sound source whose location is known. Conversely, a sound source localization method using the obtained seismic velocities and involving particle motion observation is also presented. Although this method is applicable only when the sound source exists within the critical incidence angle range, it is expected to contribute to the tracing of vocalizing baleen whales, which are unknown around Japanese waters.

  4. Surface wave derived shear velocity structure of the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, Transantarctic Mountains, and west Antarctica and shallow seismicity of the Mariana and Tonga subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeszel, David Scott

    Recent advances in seismic instrumentation have allowed researchers to undertake focused investigations of regions previously inaccessible. From the bottom of the sea to the coldest, driest places on earth, we are now able to deploy seismometers to remote locations and be certain of collecting large amounts of useable data. By focusing regionally scaled seismic arrays in locations of tectonic and geodynamic interest we are able to better image the structure of these regions and place them in a global framework. This is particularly important in regions such as Antarctica and the ocean bottom where more traditional tools such as geologic mapping and sampling are difficult, if not currently impossible. This volume utilizes information garnered from several temporary deployments to such locations. In chapter 2 we use data collected from ocean bottom seismometers in the Mariana Islands to investigate the implications of along-arc extension. Small earthquakes that go undetected by the large global seismic network are detected by a temporary ocean bottom seismic array. The locations and timing of this seismicity place constraints on along-arc extension, an important arc process. In chapter 3 we use data collected by a short-term seismic array designed to detect and locate aftershocks associated with the May 3, 2006 MW8.0 Tonga earthquake. The fault mechanism of this earthquake is unusual and has important implications for tsunami hazard associated with the Tonga subduction zone. Through high precision location of aftershocks, we are able to determine the updip and downdip limits of seismicity associated with the mainshock. We are also able to relocate the mainshock location to a high degree of precision. In chapters 4 and 5 we utilize data from seismic arrays in Antarctica to image the crust and upper mantle structure of specific regions of interest using teleseismic surface waves. We focus our efforts on the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains in Chapter 4. This mountain

  5. Use of Seismic Reflection Data and Traveltime Tomography to Image the Near Surface Velocity Structure in the Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Magnani, M.; Waldron, B.; Powell, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Memphis aquifer represents one of the highest quality reservoirs of drinking water in the nation and it is separated from the shallow unconfined aquifer by the Upper Claiborne clay. Recent studies show that the confining unit might be discontinuous over the greater Memphis area exposing the Memphis aquifer to potential contamination. We present the results of a seismic reflection profile collected near Memphis, TN with the goal of imaging the structures and potential breaches in the Upper Claiborne confining clay. The imaged area is characterized by a highly heterogeneous shallow velocity structure and low P wave velocities in the ultrashallow unconsolidated materials. The data were collected using a shotgun source and a 1 m source spacing, 0.25 m receiver spacing and a 168-geophone spread for a max offset of 42 m. Raw seismic data show several reflected arrivals in the first 200ms, widespread ground roll, and air wave energy as well as consistent refracted phases across the 1 km - long profile. In addition to the reflection profile we present the preliminary results of first arrival travel time tomography performed along the profile to constrain the velocity field in the shallow portion of the profile. The velocity was then used to remove the effect of the near surface velocity variations. The main data processing steps included elevation statics and frequency and FK filtering. First arrival travel time modeling started with an initial estimate of the 2-layer velocity model using the slope/intercept method. We then modeled first-arrival picks on 1095 shot gathers using the Geo TOMO+ package. The algorithm computes travel times by tracing turning rays and is also able to handle raypaths through low-velocity zones (blind zones). The final resolution is estimated through a ray-information density map, which shows the cumulative contribution of the ray segments traversing different areas of the model. Synthetic models were generated and tested for the tomography

  6. Dynamic modeling of seismicity triggered by underground CO2 injection and impact on surface structures and human perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutqvist, J.; Cappa, F.; Rinaldi, A.; Godano, M.

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted coupled fluid flow and geomechanical analysis of fault reactivation induced by underground CO2 injection, including dynamic analysis of fault slip, wave propagation and ground motions. We analyze the ground-motion results in terms of the potential for damage to ground surface structures and nuisance to the local population. Our modeling approach is to join coupled fluid flow and geomechanical numerical codes and theories from seismology to assess the magnitude of the seismic events generated by the simulated fault reactivation. We used a strain-softening fault constitutive model to simulate sudden, dynamic fault rupture, and to provide a source for wave-propagation and ground-motion calculations. We simulated an injection-induced small magnitude (Mw = 3) event at a hypocenter depth of about 1000 m. We then used the resulting ground-motion wave train at several monitoring stations in an inverse analysis to estimate source parameters (moment magnitude, rupture dimensions and stress drop), achieving good agreement and verification of our modeling approach. We then analyzed the results in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV) and frequency content, with comparison to U.S. Geological Survey's instrumental intensity scales for earthquakes and the U.S. Bureau of Mines' vibration criteria for cosmetic damage to buildings, as well as human-perception vibration limits. Our results confirm the appropriateness of using PGV (rather than PGA) and frequency for the evaluation of potential ground-vibration effects on structures and humans from shallow injection-induced seismic events.

  7. Anisotropic Seismic Structure Beneath Cratons From Interstation Surface-Wave Dispersion Measurements on GSN and Geofon Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonen, J.; Lebedev, S.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic structure of stable continental lithosphere offers insight into the origin and evolution of the tectosphere. The structure is still poorly known, especially its anisotropic components. Measurements of interstation dispersion of Rayleigh and Love surface waves can produce accurate, radially anisotropic S-velocity profiles that average between pairs of stations. A recently proposed (Lebedev and Meier, 2005) combination of station-station cross-correlation and event-station multimode waveform inversion allows to maximize the frequency band of the measured dispersion curves and yields improved structural constraints. With a view to applying the new method to large global data sets, here we make the measurements using all pairs of GSN and Geofon stations that are situated on stable continents and separated by sufficiently short interstation distances. If the distance between the two stations exceeds about 1000 km then it is difficult to make measurements at shorter periods---below 20 s or so---and trade-offs between the crustal and mantle structure cannot be resolved: in particular, nothing can be concluded on the nature or even the presence of radial anisotropy in the mantle. Limiting the scope of the study to station pairs separated by a few hundred kilometers, we make dispersion measurements using all suitably situated events and select a few pairs---all within stable tectonic blocks in Eurasia---for which broad-band dispersion curves are constrained with large amounts of data. Inverting the curves for S-velocity profiles, we find that the magnitudes of both the isotropic high-velocity anomaly and radial anisotropy in the mantle lithosphere vary strongly from one location to another. When radial anisotropy is present, it is with SH waves being faster than SV waves. We shall discuss the anisotropic seismic structures in the context of regional tectonic settings.

  8. Surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and radon transform forward multiple modeling methods applied to 2D multi-channel seismic profiles from the Chukchi Shelf, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, I.; Coakley, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Chukchi Edges project was designed to establish the relationship between the Chukchi Shelf and Borderland and indirectly test theories of opening for the Canada Basin. During this cruise, ~5300 km of 2D multi-channel reflection seismic profiles and other geophysical data (swath bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, sonobuoy refraction seismic) were collected from the RV Marcus G. Langseth across the transition between the Chukchi Shelf and Chukchi Borderland, where the water depths vary from 30 m to over 3 km. Multiples occur when seismic energy is trapped in a layer and reflected from an acoustic interface more than once. Various kinds of multiples occur during seismic data acquisition. These depend on the ray-path the seismic energy follows through the layers. One of the most common multiples is the surface related multiple, which occurs due to strong acoustic impedance contrast between the air and water. The reflected seismic energy from the water surface is trapped within the water column, thus reflects from the seafloor multiple times. Multiples overprint the primary reflections and complicate data interpretation. Both surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and forward parabolic radon transform multiple modeling methods were necessary to attenuate the multiples. SRME is applied to shot gathers starting with the near offset interpolation, multiple estimation using water depths, and subtracting the model multiple from the shot gathers. This method attenuated surface related multiple energy, however, peg-leg multiples remained in the data. The parabolic radon transform method minimized the effect of these multiples. This method is applied to normal moveout (NMO) corrected common mid-point gathers (CMP). The CMP gathers are fitted or modeled with curves estimated from the reference offset, moveout range, moveout increment parameters. Then, the modeled multiples are subtracted from the data. Preliminary outputs of these two methods show that the surface related

  9. 300-km-long co-seismic surface rupture produced by the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake along the active Longmen Shan Thrust Belt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, A.; Rao, G.; Yan, B.

    2012-12-01

    The magnitude (Mw) 7.9 (Ms 8.1) Wenchuan earthquake occurred on 12 May 2008 and ruptured active faults of the Longmen Shan Thrust Belt (LSTB), which marks the boundary between the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and the Sichuan Basin. Although many studies of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake have described the ground deformation features, rupture mechanism, and structural features of the seismogenic fault zone associated with this event, debate remains concerning the total length of the co-seismic surface rupture zone and whether the earthquake ruptured the Qingchuan Fault in the northeastern segment of the Longmen Shan Thrust Belt (LSTB), China. Based on our initial fieldwork carried out 2 days after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, we reported that the earthquake produced a ~285-km-long surface rupture zone along the LSTB, at the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, dominated by thrust slip and right-lateral displacement along the central and northeastern segments of the zone, and by left-lateral displacement along the southeastern segment (Lin et al., 2009, 2010). However, other field-based studies have reported that the total length of the co-seismic surface rupture zone is 200-240 km and that the Qingchuan Fault was not ruptured by the Wenchuan earthquake (e.g., Liu-Zeng et al., 2009; Xu et al., 2009; Yin, 2010; Zhang et al., 2010). The length of surface rupture produced by large, individual earthquakes is a key parameter in assessing the seismic moment, the rupture mechanism, the degree of seismic hazard, and the activity of a seismogenic fault, including the recurrence interval of large earthquakes and the long-term slip rate. Therefore, additional work is needed to constrain the length of the co-seismic surface rupture and the location of rupture termination at the northeastern segment of the LSTB, in order to accurately assess the nature of the seismic hazard in the densely populated Sichuan region of China. In this study, we present new field

  10. Application of seismic surface-waves in concrete bridge-deck evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetrat, Farhad

    Accurate and timely condition assessment of bridge decks is essential for economic management of aging highway bridges. The ability to evaluate concrete modulus profile in a bridge deck can help the detection of early signs of deterioration and optimize the bridge maintenance procedures. This study presents a new method for modulus profiling of concrete bridge decks. The stiffness matrix method is used to simulate wave propagation in a layered media. The results are compared to numerical finite element models. Dispersion analysis is done using the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and phase-shift methods. The characteristics of dispersion surface are analyzed and the effects of model parameters on dispersion surface are examined through a series of parametric studies. An inversion technique is proposed for a fast inversion of surface-wave data collected on bridge decks. This technique utilizes a database of pre-calculated dispersion surfaces and takes advantage of the observed patterns in the parametric study as a priori information for the inversion process.

  11. Phase-velocity measurement of surface waves beneath the Philippine Sea from the ambient seismic noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Nishida, K.; Kawakatsu, H.; Isse, T.; Shiobara, H.; Kanazawa, T.; Sugioka, H.

    2010-12-01

    The radial anisotropy within the oceanic lithosphere appears weaker than that in the asthenosphere, and various origins for this difference are proposed, such as high shear (Nettles and Dziewonski, 2008) or thin melt layers (Kawakatsu et al., 2009) in the asthenosphere. Tomography studies using surface waves, however, usually analyze periods longer than 35-40 sec, and have limited resolution for the lithosphere. To measure phase velocities of Love and Rayleigh waves at shorter periods, we apply the ambient seismic noise interferometry to continuous data of three-component broadband ocean bottom seismometers operated for 2-3 years at 11 stations in the Philippine Sea. We first calculate time-averaged cross-correlation functions between all pairs of stations, and plot them against the separation distances between pairs of stations. As a result, three types of surface waves are identified from three combinations of components: (1) the fundamental mode of Love wave from transverse component pairs, (2) the first higher mode of Rayleigh wave from radial component pairs, and (3) the fundamental mode of Rayleigh wave from vertical component pairs. We then select seven stations in Shikoku Basin, Philippine Sea, and search for an optimum phase velocity by fitting the Bessel function to cross-spectra for each frequency (Aki, 1957; Nishida et al., 2008). The period of resultant phase velocities ranges 8-25 sec for the Love wave, 7-11 sec for the first higher mode Rayleigh wave, and 12-50 sec for the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave. For example, the phase velocities of Love wave vary from 4.3 km/s (at 8 sec) to 4.6 km/s (at 25 sec). These values are 0.2-0.3 km/s higher than those predicted by one-dimensional model of Philippine Sea, PHB3 (Kato and Jordan, 1998), indicating an additional constraint on the shallow structure. Combining these data with long-period phase velocities derived from seismic event analysis, we will present a one-dimensional model of the radial anisotropy

  12. Analysis and models of pre-injection surface seismic array noise recorded at the Aquistore carbon storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnie, Claire; Chambers, Kit; Angus, Doug; Stork, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Noise is a persistent feature in seismic data and so poses challenges in extracting increased accuracy in seismic images and physical interpretation of the subsurface. In this paper, we analyse passive seismic data from the Aquistore carbon capture and storage pilot project permanent seismic array to characterise, classify and model seismic noise. We perform noise analysis for a three month subset of passive seismic data from the array and provide conclusive evidence that the noise field is not white, stationary, or Gaussian; characteristics commonly yet erroneously assumed in most conventional noise models. We introduce a novel noise modelling method that provides a significantly more accurate characterisation of real seismic noise compared to conventional methods, which is quantified using the Mann-Whitney-White statistical test. This method is based on a statistical covariance modelling approach created through the modelling of individual noise signals. The identification of individual noise signals, broadly classified as stationary, pseudo-stationary and non-stationary, provides a basis on which to build an appropriate spatial and temporal noise field model. Furthermore, we have developed a workflow to incorporate realistic noise models within synthetic seismic datasets providing an opportunity to test and analyse detection and imaging algorithms under realistic noise conditions.

  13. Analysis and models of pre-injection surface seismic array noise recorded at the Aquistore carbon storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnie, Claire; Chambers, Kit; Angus, Doug; Stork, Anna L.

    2016-08-01

    Noise is a persistent feature in seismic data and so poses challenges in extracting increased accuracy in seismic images and physical interpretation of the subsurface. In this paper, we analyse passive seismic data from the Aquistore carbon capture and storage pilot project permanent seismic array to characterise, classify and model seismic noise. We perform noise analysis for a three-month subset of passive seismic data from the array and provide conclusive evidence that the noise field is not white, stationary, or Gaussian; characteristics commonly yet erroneously assumed in most conventional noise models. We introduce a novel noise modelling method that provides a significantly more accurate characterisation of real seismic noise compared to conventional methods, which is quantified using the Mann-Whitney-White statistical test. This method is based on a statistical covariance modelling approach created through the modelling of individual noise signals. The identification of individual noise signals, broadly classified as stationary, pseudo-stationary and non-stationary, provides a basis on which to build an appropriate spatial and temporal noise field model. Furthermore, we have developed a workflow to incorporate realistic noise models within synthetic seismic data sets providing an opportunity to test and analyse detection and imaging algorithms under realistic noise conditions.

  14. SUBSEQUENT FINAL REPORT. SEISMIC SURFACE-WAVE TOMOGRAPHY OF WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface-wave group-velocity tomography is an efficient way to obtain images of the group velocity over a test area. Because Rayleigh-wave group velocity depends on frequency, there are separate images for each frequency. Thus, at each point in these images the group velocities de...

  15. Blind test of methods for obtaining 2-D near-surface seismic velocity models from first-arrival traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Colin A.; Haines, Seth; Powers, Michael H.; Sheehan, Jacob; Rohdewald, Siegfried; Link, Curtis; Hayashi, Koichi; Zhao, Don; Zhou, Hua-wei; Burton, Bethany L.; Petersen, Uni K.; Bonal, Nedra D.; Doll, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic refraction methods are used in environmental and engineering studies to image the shallow subsurface. We present a blind test of inversion and tomographic refraction analysis methods using a synthetic first-arrival-time dataset that was made available to the community in 2010. The data are realistic in terms of the near-surface velocity model, shot-receiver geometry and the data's frequency and added noise. Fourteen estimated models were determined by ten participants using eight different inversion algorithms, with the true model unknown to the participants until it was revealed at a session at the 2011 SAGEEP meeting. The estimated models are generally consistent in terms of their large-scale features, demonstrating the robustness of refraction data inversion in general, and the eight inversion algorithms in particular. When compared to the true model, all of the estimated models contain a smooth expression of its two main features: a large offset in the bedrock and the top of a steeply dipping low-velocity fault zone. The estimated models do not contain a subtle low-velocity zone and other fine-scale features, in accord with conventional wisdom. Together, the results support confidence in the reliability and robustness of modern refraction inversion and tomographic methods.

  16. Near-Surface Seasonal Creeping and Subsurface Repeated Seismicity on the Plate-Suture Thrust Fault in Chihshang, Eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Chu, H.; Angelier, J.; Hu, J.; Rau, R.

    2002-12-01

    The Chihshang fault is one of the most active segments of the Longitudinal Valley Fault, the plate suture between the converging Philippine and Eurasian plates. A destructive earthquake of M 6.2 with substantial surface scarps resulted from rupturing of the Chihshang fault in 1951. From that on, no big earthquake greater than M 6 occurred in this area. Instead, the Chihshang fault reveals a creeping behavior at least during the past 18 observation years. The creepmeter data of daily basis at Chihshang since 1998 revealed different behaviors of surface fault motion at two sites but similar annual shortening rates, 16.2 mm at Tapo site and 15.0 mm at Chinyuan site. Four of five creepmeters showed a seasonal variation, in which the fault only moved, as steadily rapid creeping, during the rainy season, generally from April to October, and remained quite during the rest of year. The only exception is due to the creepmeter located on the mélange-composed slope, where local gravitational landslide played a significant role combined with the tectonic faulting. Comparing to the precipitation data, we inferred that the relatively moderate rainfall is seemingly enough for triggering or facilitating slippages on the surface fault, one or two months before the heavy rains dropped in the wet season. During this observation period from 1998 to 2001, the subsurface seismicity exhibited clusters of micro-earthquakes occurred on the Chihshang fault at the depth of 15-25 km. The repeated earthquakes continuously occurred regardless the wet or the dry seasons, indicating the stress on the Chihshang fault in the shallow crust level of less than 10 km released only by creeping during the wet season. Combination of the near-surface creeping and the subsurface repeated earthquakes provided insights on the mechanical behaviors of the Chihshang fault, which are likely related to the geological materials of the converging island-arc: week mélange in the near-surface fault zone and strong

  17. Seismic Tomography of the Continental United States from a Joint Inversion of Surface Waves and Body Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golos, E. M.; Yao, H.; Zhang, H.; Fang, H.; Burdick, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Vernon, F.; Lebedev, S.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present a model of seismic velocity anomalies for the entire continental United States—coast to coast, surface to lower mantle—using a joint body wave-surface wave inversion. This technique (Zhang et al., 2014), performed on a global adaptively-spaced grid, exploits the good vertical resolution at shallow depths of surface wave data, and the sampling of the deep mantle by teleseismic body (P and S) waves. The resultant model has better resolution at all depths than either method alone, enabling evaluation of interactions between lithospheric and mantle processes. We utilize the depth-dependence of surface wave sensitivity kernels to express surface wave phase velocity data directly in terms of spatial velocity structure (Fang et al., 2015). The data used are Rayleigh wave phase velocities from earthquakes and ambient noise (Schaeffer and Lebedev, 2013; Ekström, 2014) and S phase travel times from USArray, measured at the Array National Facility (ANF). We include a suite of synthetic tests to verify the performance of the inversion and compare it to results from traditional tomographic methods. We also use P arrivals and the influence of Vp on Rayleigh wave propagation speed to generate a preliminary model of Vp variations, independent from but consistent with the Vs model. Our model corroborates the well-established pattern of slow anomalies in the western US, especially in the Basin and Range and Rio Grande Rift regions. New details emerge in the eastern US, thanks to increasing data from the region. A distinction is observed between widespread fast lithospheric anomalies, associated with stable cratonic material, and deeper fast features, associated with the remnants of the Farallon Plate. It has been proposed that these fragments, near the mantle transition zones, still affect mantle dynamics (Forte et al., 2007), so better resolution of these anomalies is an important advancement. In addition, slower velocities are observed beneath the Appalachians and

  18. Determining Engineering Properties of the Shallow Lunar Subsurface using Seismic Surface Wave Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeluru, P. M.; Baker, G. S.

    2008-12-01

    The geology of Earth's moon has previously been examined via telescopic observations, orbiting spacecraft readings, lunar sample analysis, and also from some geophysical data. Previous researchers have examined layering of the moon and models exist explaining the velocity variations in the mantle and core. However, no studies (or datasets) currently exist regarding the engineering properties of the shallow (<30 m) lunar subsurface. Engineering properties--like shear modulus and Poisson's ratio--are key parameters for civil engineering works, as they characterize the mechanical behavior of geotechnical materials under various types of loading. Therefore, understanding the physical and engineering properties within the upper 30 m of the lunar subsurface will be critical for lunar exploration if deployment of large structures, large-scale excavation, and/or landing of large spacecraft on the surface is desired. Advances in near-surface geophysical techniques, such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Wave (MASW), has greatly increased our ability to map subsurface variations in physical properties. The MASW method involves deployment of multiple seismometers to acquire 1-D or 2-D shear wave velocity profiles that can be directly related to various engineering properties. The advantage of this technique over drilling boreholes or any other geophysical technique is that it is less intensive, non-invasive, more cost- effective, and more robust because strong surface-wave records are almost guaranteed. In addition, data processing and analysis is fairly straightforward, and the MASW method allows for analysis of a large area of interest as compared to drilling boreholes. A new scheme using randomly distributed geophones (likely deployed from a mortar-type device) instead of a conventional linear array will be presented. A random array is necessary for lunar exploration because of the logistical constraints involved in deploying a linear or circular array robotically or by

  19. Toward Improved Methods of Estimating Attenuation, Phase and Group velocity of surface waves observed on Shallow Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, M. S.; Holschneider, M.; Kulesh, M.; Scherbaum, F.; Ohrnberger, M.; Lück, E.

    2004-05-01

    This contribution is concerned with the estimate of attenuation and dispersion characteristics of surface waves observed on a shallow seismic record. The analysis is based on a initial parameterization of the phase and attenuation functions which are then estimated by minimizing a properly defined merit function. To minimize the effect of random noise on the estimates of dispersion and attenuation we use cross-correlations (in Fourier domain) of preselected traces from some region of interest along the survey line. These cross-correlations are then expressed in terms of the parameterized attenuation and phase functions and the auto-correlation of the so-called source trace or reference trace. Cross-corelation that enter the optimization are selected so as to provide an average estimate of both the attenuation function and the phase (group) velocity of the area under investigation. The advantage of the method over the standard two stations method using Fourier technique is that uncertainties related to the phase unwrapping and the estimate of the number of 2π cycle skip in the phase phase are eliminated. However when mutliple modes arrival are observed, its become merely impossible to obtain reliable estimate the dipsersion curves for the different modes using optimization method alone. To circumvent this limitations we using the presented approach in conjunction with the wavelet propagation operator (Kulesh et al., 2003) which allows the application of band pass filtering in (ω -t) domain, to select a particular mode for the minimization. Also by expressing the cost function in the wavelet domain the optimization can be performed either with respect to the phase, the modulus of the transform or a combination of both. This flexibility in the design of the cost function provides an additional mean of constraining the optimization results. Results from the application of this dispersion and attenuation analysis method are shown for both synthetic and real 2D shallow

  20. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  1. Shallow structure and surface wave propagation characteristics of the Juan de Fuca plate from seismic ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shen, W.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Ambient noise cross-correlation analysis has been widely used to investigate the continental lithosphere, but the method has been applied much less to study the oceanic lithosphere due to the relative shortage of continuous ocean bottom seismic measurements. The Cascadia Initiative experiment possesses a total of 62 ocean bottom seismometers that spans much of the Juan de Fuca plate and provides data to investigate both the structure and evolution of the oceanic lithosphere near the Juan De Fuca ridge and the characteristics of surface waves and overtones propagating within the oceanic lithosphere. We produce ambient noise cross correlations for the first year of Cascadia OBS data for both the vertical and the horizontal components. The observed empirical Green's functions are first used to test the hypothesis that the near-ridge phase speeds can be described by a simple age-dependent formula, which we invert for an age-dependent shear wave speed model (Figure 1a). A shallow low shear velocity zone with a velocity minimum at about 20km depth is observed in Vsv and the lithosphere thickens with age faster than predicted by a half-space conductive cooling model (Figure 1b). To further understand the oceanic surface waves, we analyze the first higher mode Rayleigh waves that propagate within the Juan De Fuca plate and emerge on the North American continent and investigate the existence of radial anisotropy beneath the ridge by exploring the Rayleigh and Love wave Green's functions. The results of the study are summarized with the age-dependent shear velocity model along with some preliminary observations of both Love wave and higher mode Rayleigh waves.

  2. Seismic Anisotropy of the Mexican Subduction Zone Based on the Surface Waves, Shear Wave Splitting, and Higher Modes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubailo, I.; Davis, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexico subduction zone is characterized by both steep and flat subduction, and a volcanic arc that appears to be oblique to the trench. It has excellent seismic data coverage due to the 2005-2007 Middle America Subduction Experiment (MASE) and the permanent Mexican stations. Here, we study the anisotropy of the region using Surface waves, shear-wave splitting measurements, and higher modes. Our goal is to verify and complement the three-dimensional model of shear-wave velocity and anisotropy in the region constructed using Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion measurements (Stubailo et al., JGR, 2012) and constrain the depth of the shear-wave splitting anisotropy with the help of the n1-3 overtones. The 3D model contains lateral variations in shear wave velocity consistent with the presence of flat and steep subduction, as well as variations in azimuthal anisotropy, that suggest a tear between the flat and steep portions of the slab. Shear-wave splitting is effective for studying mantle anisotropy beneath the receivers and has a better lateral resolution than the Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion measurements, although it suffers from a poor depth resolution. To better resolve the anisotropy at depth, we also calculate the anisotropy based on the higher mode surface waves of different overtones for Mexican stations using least-squares fitting of the synthetic higher mode seismograms to the data collected from the deep earthquakes. The three methods allow us to separate the anisotropy and its strength at different depths. We will report on our shear-wave splitting and higher mode results, and their comparison, and present evidence that anisotropy under Mexico is of deep origin.

  3. Passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Ewing, M.; Press, F.; Sutton, G.; Dorman, J.; Nakamura, Y.; Toksoz, N.; Lammlein, D.; Duennebier, F.

    1972-01-01

    The establishment of a network of seismic stations on the lunar surface as a result of equipment installed by Apollo 12, 14, and 15 flights is described. Four major discoveries obtained by analyzing seismic data from the network are discussed. The use of the system to detect vibrations of the lunar surface and the use of the data to determine the internal structure, physical state, and tectonic activity of the moon are examined.

  4. Estimating the near-surface site response to mitigate earthquake disasters at the October 6th city, Egypt, using HVSR and seismic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Adel M. E.; Abdel Hafiez, H. E.; Taha, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    The damage caused by earthquake occurrences in different localities necessitates the evaluation of the subsurface structure. A priori estimation of the site effects became a major challenge for an efficient mitigation of the seismic risk. In the case of moderate to large earthquakes, at some distances from large events, severe damage often occurred at zones of unfavorable geotechnical conditions that give rise to significant site effects. The damage distribution in the near-source area is also significantly affected by fault geometry and rupture history. The microtremor (background noises) and shallow seismic surveys (through both the seismic refraction and Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW)) were carried out in a specific area (The club of October 6 city and its adjacent space area). The natural periods derived from the HVSR (Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio) analysis vary from 0.37 to 0.56 s. The shallow seismic refraction data, which were conducted at the area, are used to determine the attenuation of P-waves (Qp) in different layers, using the pulse-width technique. The evaluation of the site response at the studied area yields amplification factor of the ground motion, ranging between 2.4 and 4.4.

  5. NATO-3C/Delta launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NATO-3C, the third in a series of NATO defense-related communication satellites, is scheduled to be launched on a delta vehicle from the Eastern Test Range no earlier than November 15, 1978. NATO-3A and -3B were successfully launched by Delta vehicles in April 1976 and January 1977, respectively. The NATO-3C spacecraft will be capable of transmitting voice, data, facsimile, and telex messages among military ground stations. The launch vehicle for the NATO-3C mission will be the Delta 2914 configuration. The launch vehicle is to place the spacecraft in a synchronous transfer orbit. The spacecraft Apogee Kick motor is to be fired at fifth transfer orbit apogee to circularize its orbit at geosynchronous altitude of 35,900 km(22,260 miles) above the equator over the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between 45 and 50 degrees W longitude.

  6. High-precision geologic mapping to evaluate the potential for seismic surface rupture at TA-55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.N.; Lavine, A.; Vaniman, D.; WoldeGabriel, G.

    1998-06-01

    In this report the authors document results of high-precision geologic mapping in the vicinity of TA-55 that has been done to identify parts of the southern portion of the Rendija Canyon Fault, or any other faults, with the potential for seismic surface rupture. To assess the potential for surface rupture at TA-55, an area of approximately 3 square miles that includes the Los Alamos County Landfill and Twomile, Mortandad, and Sandia Canyons has been mapped in detail. Map units are mostly cooling or flow units within the Tshirege Member (1.2 Ma) of the Bandelier Tuff. Stratigraphic markers that are useful for determining offsets in the map area include a distinct welding break at or near the cooling Unit 2-Unit 3 contact, and the Unit 3-Unit 4 contact. At the County Landfill the contact between the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff and overlying Quaternary alluvium has also been mapped. The mapping indicates that there is no faulting in the near-surface directly below TA-55, and that the closest fault is about 1500 feet west of the Plutonium Facility. Faulting is more abundant on the western edge of the map area, west of TA-48 in uppermost Mortandad Canyon, upper Sandia Canyon, and at the County Landfill. Measured vertical offsets on the faults range from 1 to 8 feet on mapped Bandelier Tuff contacts. Faulting exposed at the Los Alamos County Landfill has deformed a zone over 1000 feet wide, and has a net vertical down-to-the-west displacement of at least 15 feet in the Bandelier Tuff. Individual faults at the landfill have from less than 1 foot to greater than 15 feet of vertical offset on the Bandelier Tuff. Most faults in the landfill trend N-S, N20W, or N45E. Results of the mapping indicate that the Rendija Canyon Fault does not continue directly south to TA-55. At present, the authors have insufficient data to connect faulting they have mapped to areas of known faulting to the north or south of the study area.

  7. An investigation of lithospheric structure and evolution in convergent orogenic systems using seismic receiver functions and surface wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Joshua A.

    Whether by accretion, magmatic addition, or refinement of more mafic lithologies, continental arcs are likely zones for the creation of "average" continental crust with intermediate silica content. This dissertation contains the results of broadband seismic studies carried out in two field areas, an active subduction zone and the remnants of an extinct arc, with the aim of understanding lithospheric evolution at convergent margins. The analytical techniques of receiver function calculation and surface wave tomography are applied to data sets collected above the Andean subduction zone in Chile and western Argentina and in the Coast Mountains Batholith of central British Columbia. We present the first in-depth comparison of receiver functions calculated using the high frequencies available in records of intermediate-depth local earthquakes with those calculated from the lower frequency data in records of larger teleseismic events. The comparison reveals that the lower crust beneath the Western Sierras Pampeanas contains a gradational velocity increase over ˜20km above a small velocity step at the Moho. Surface wave tomography confirms the existence of an unusually high velocity anomaly in the mantle above the slab and yields estimates of slab thickness on the order of 50 km. To the south of the flat slab region, we see evidence of active mantle wedge convection above the steep slab, but no evidence of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the subducting Nazca plate. In the Coast Mountains Batholith (CMB), receiver functions image a bright, continuous Moho throughout the study region. Combined with petrologic modeling, the receiver function data point toward convective removal of any ultramafic root that formed beneath the CMB. Low absolute shear wave velocities in the upper mantle resolved via surface wave analysis strengthen the case for root removal beneath the eastern section of the CMB. On the far western edge of the CMB, we find evidence of a partially

  8. Graphene/3C-SiC Hybrid Nanolaminate.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Bing; Heuser, Steffen; Huang, Nan; Fu, Haiyuan; Jiang, Xin

    2015-12-30

    In this work, we demonstrate a one-step approach to create graphene/3C-SiC nanolaminate structure using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. Layer-by-layer arrangement of thin 3C-SiC layers and graphene sheets is obtained with the thicknesses of the individual 3C-SiC layers and graphene sheets being 5-10 nm and 2-5 nm, respectively. An intimate contact between 3C-SiC and the graphene sheets is achieved and the nanolaminate film shows a high room temperature conductivity of 96.1 S/cm. A dedicated structural analysis of the nanolaminates by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals that the growth of the nanolaminates follows an iterative process: preferential graphene nucleation around the planar defects at the central region of the SiC layer, leading to the "splitting" of the SiC layer; and the thickening of the SiC layer after being "split". A growth mechanism based on both kinetics and thermodynamics is proposed. Following the proposed mechanism, it is possible to control the layer thickness of the graphene/3C-SiC hybrid nanolaminate by manipulating the carbon concentration in the gas phase, which is further experimentally verified. The high electrical conductivity, large surface area porous structure, feasible integration on different substrates (metal, Mo; semiconductor, Si and 2H-SiC; insulator, diamond) of the graphene/3C-SiC hybrid nanolaminate as well as other unprecedented advantages of the nanolaminate structure make it very promising for applications in mechanical, energy, and sensor-related areas. PMID:26650041

  9. Effects of charge design features on parameters of acoustic and seismic waves and cratering, for SMR chemical surface explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.

    2012-04-01

    A series of experimental on-surface shots was designed and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR) in Negev desert, including two large calibration explosions: about 82 tons of strong IMI explosives in August 2009, and about 100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. It was a collaborative effort between Israel, CTBTO, USA and several European countries, with the main goal to provide fully controlled ground truth (GT0) infrasound sources in different weather/wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. Strong boosters and the upward charge detonation scheme were applied to provide a reduced energy release to the ground and an enlarged energy radiation to the atmosphere, producing enhanced infrasound signals, for better observation at far-regional stations. The following observations and results indicate on the required explosives energy partition for this charge design: 1) crater size and local seismic (duration) magnitudes were found smaller than expected for these large surface explosions; 2) small test shots of the same charge (1 ton) conducted at SMR with different detonation directions showed clearly lower seismic amplitudes/energy and smaller crater size for the upward detonation; 3) many infrasound stations at local and regional distances showed higher than expected peak amplitudes, even after application of a wind-correction procedure. For the large-scale explosions, high-pressure gauges were deployed at 100-600 m to record air-blast properties, evaluate the efficiency of the charge design and energy generation, and provide a reliable estimation of the charge yield. Empirical relations for air-blast parameters - peak pressure, impulse and the Secondary Shock (SS) time delay - depending on distance, were developed and analyzed. The parameters, scaled by the cubic root of estimated TNT equivalent charges, were found consistent for all analyzed explosions, except of SS

  10. Lithospheric structure below seismic stations in Cuba from the joint inversion of Rayleigh surface waves dispersion and receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, O'Leary; Moreno, Bladimir; Romanelli, Fabio; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2012-05-01

    The joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion and receiver functions has been used to study the crust and upper mantle structure at eight seismic stations in Cuba. Receiver functions have been computed from teleseismic recordings of earthquakes at epicentral (angular) distances in the range from 30° to 90° and Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion relations have been taken from earlier surface wave tomographic studies in the Caribbean area. The thickest crust (˜30 km) below Cuban stations is found at Cascorro (CCC) and Maisí (MAS) whereas the thinnest crust (˜18 km) is found at stations Río Carpintero (RCC) and Guantánamo Bay (GTBY), in the southeastern part of Cuba; this result is in agreement with the southward gradual thinning of the crust revealed by previous studies. In the crystalline crust, the S-wave velocity varies between ˜2.8 and ˜3.9 km s-1 and, at the crust-mantle transition zone, the shear wave velocity varies from ˜4.0 and ˜4.3 km s-1. The lithospheric thickness varies from ˜65 km, in the youngest lithosphere, to ˜150 km in the northeastern part of the Cuban island, below Maisí (MAS) and Moa (MOA) stations. Evidence of a subducted slab possibly belonging to the Caribbean plate is present below the stations Las Mercedes (LMG), RCC and GTBY whereas earlier subducted slabs could explain the results obtained below the Soroa (SOR), Manicaragua (MGV) and Cascorro (CCC) station.

  11. Seismic structure of the North American lithosphere and upper mantle imaged using Surface and S waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2010-12-01

    The evolution, stability, and dynamics of continental lithosphere remain a central focus of Earth Science research. The continued deployment of the US Array is producing a massive new dataset that samples North America at scales from tectonic units to continent-wide domains and enables resolution of structure and deformation of the lithosphere previously possible only at regional scales. With this resolving power come new challenges relating to efficient management and processing of such large data volumes. In this study, we have assembled a dataset comprising over 3.5 million three-component broadband seismic waveforms from more than 3000 stations. We augment available US Array stations with ~600 additional North American stations of the GSN and affiliates, Canadian National Seismograph Network, regional arrays, past PASSCAL experiments, and other stations from Iceland, Greenland, Central and South America, the Caribbean, and several Mid-Atlantic Islands. We exploit the resolving power of this unprecedentedly large dataset using the Automated Multimode Inversion of surface- and S-wave forms. The waveforms are inverted for path-averaged linear constraints on elastic structure along the source-receiver paths. The linear equations are then simultaneously solved for a high-resolution 3D upper mantle shear velocity model of the continent. We present a model of the North American continent's and the surrounding Ocean's (Pacific, Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico) upper mantle structure down to the 660 km discontinuity. Clearly identifiable boundaries between different tectonic features such as basins and relic mountain ranges are readily observable. For example, a strong correlation between the Hudson Bay geoid anomaly can be identified with an underlying domain of particularily cold cratonic lithosphere. Our model also includes the 3D distribution of azimuthal anisotropy within these structures, which provides new insight into past and present dynamics of the lithosphere and

  12. Periodicity Analysis of the Spectral Index in 3c 273 and 3c 446

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yu-Hai; Fan, Jun-Hui

    In this work, we used the preliminary data of University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) for the spectral index calculation for two blazars, 3C 273 (1226+023) and 3C 446 (2223-052), and found that the spectral indices are variable. Therefore, we used three methods (Jurkevich method (J), the discrete correlation analysis (D), and the Periodogram method (P)) to investigate the period in the spectral index variation curves. The results show that 3C 273 has a quasi-period of 8.8 ± 1.3 yr, and 3C 446 has a period of 5.8 ± 1.2 yr.

  13. Measurement of near-surface seismic compressional wave velocities using refraction tomography at a proposed construction site on the Presidio of Monterey, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is determining the feasibility of constructing a new barracks building on the U.S. Army Presidio of Monterey in Monterey, California. Due to the presence of an endangered orchid in the proposed area, invasive techniques such as exploratory drill holes are prohibited. To aid in determining the feasibility, budget, and design of this building, a compressional-wave seismic refraction survey was proposed by the U.S. Geological Survey as an alternative means of investigating the depth to competent bedrock. Two sub-parallel profiles were acquired along an existing foot path and a fence line to minimize impacts on the endangered flora. The compressional-wave seismic refraction tomography data for both profiles indicate that no competent rock classified as non-rippable or marginally rippable exists within the top 30 feet beneath the ground surface.

  14. Search for hydraulic connectivity between surface reservoirs and surrounding aquifers in the reservoir-triggered seismic environment (Koyna region, India) using hydrochemical and isotopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. V.; Nagabhushanam, P.

    2016-01-01

    Triggered seismicity is an accepted hypothesis in the present days. However, detailed hydrogeological investigations are lacking in the well-known reservoir-triggered seismic (RTS) zones. Here, we made an attempt to understand the direct linkage between the well-known Koyna-Warna reservoirs believed to be under the RTS zone (situated in the Deccan volcanic province (DVP), India) and the surrounding groundwater system up to 250 m deep from the ground surface. Seismic activity in the region started soon after the impoundment of water in the Koyna reservoir and being continued over the last four and a half decades. Though researchers have carried out numerous studies on the Koyna seismicity, no hydrogeological investigations were attempted. Hence, hydrogeological, hydrochemical, and isotopic investigations were carried out for 7 years on groundwaters from 15 deep bore wells (up to 250 m) and two surface reservoir waters to elucidate the direct hydraulic connectivity between them. No appreciable seasonal change was observed in piezometric heads of the artesian wells, but the semi-artesian wells did show fluctuation of ~2 to 12 m during different years, which did not have any relation with the reservoir water levels. No considerable seasonal change in hydrochemistry was observed in individual wells due to the confined nature of the aquifers. The hydrochemical and δ18O data of the studied deep groundwaters and reservoir waters, being different from each other, rule out the possibility of direct hydraulic connectivity between them and surrounding groundwater (up to 250 m), even though favorable topographic conditions exist for linkage. The radiocarbon ages, being incomparable between different well waters, support the inference drawn from hydrochemistry and stable isotope data.

  15. Looking for surface faulting ancestors of the L’Aquila April 6, 2009 event: preliminary paleoseismological data and seismic hazard implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinti, F. R.; Civico, R.; Cucci, L.; de Martini, P.; Pantosti, D.; Pierdominici, S.; Pucci, S.; Brunori, C.; Fracassi, U.; Villani, F.

    2009-12-01

    The occurrence of the Mw 6.3, April 6, 2009 earthquake has highlighted how critical is the knowledge of the location and of the characteristics of the active faults in a seismic region. This is true not only as a contribution to the seismic hazard assessment but also for the local planning of residential areas, plants and infrastructures. The 2009 earthquake occurred on the Paganica normal fault (PF hereinafter) and produced 3 km-long, maximum 0.1 m-high surface rupture along its central section, and secondary slip along nearby tectonic structures. The PF consists of a prominent morphologic scarp formed by the tectonic juxtaposition of Pliocene-middle Pleistocene and late Pleistocene alluvial deposits, and by lower scarps in late Pleistocene-Holocene deposits. The fault, NW-SE striking and SW dipping, runs for a total length of about 20 km along the NE side of the Aterno River valley, a graben-type basin bounded by marked antithetic faults. The limited extent and the small throw of the 2009 surface ruptures, when compared to the size of the Paganica long-term fault scarp, suggest that the PF probably experienced larger Magnitude earthquakes than the 2009 seismic event. Thus, although the April 6, 2009 earthquake and associated surface faulting caused loss of lives and major damage, we believe that this event does not fully characterize the seismic hazard of the area. Therefore, a campaign of paleoseismological investigations is underway with the aim of defining the Max Magnitude, the average rate of displacement and the frequency of seismic events on the PF and on the nearby faults. An amazing “coseismic” trench, caved by the overpressure produced by the broken pipe of an aqueduct, provided the exposure of a 30-m wide fault zone of the PF. We show the preliminary results from the analysis of this site, as well as from other sites along the PF. In addition, we also present preliminary paleoseismological data from the antithetic Fossa fault. A major finding at

  16. The optical variability of 3C 345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, M. R.

    1989-12-01

    The behavior of the light curve of 3C 345 is analyzed using all B magnitudes available in the literature, thus extending the number of points in the compiled light curve of this object by a factor of more than 50 percent and the coverage by about 7 yrs, in comparison with the light curve compiled by Kidger and Beckman (1986). In addition, a new and better m(B) - m(pg) correction is applied to all the data. Results of the analysis demonstrate that the light curve of 3C 345 is effectively aperiodic and that the power spectrum is not continuous, in the sense that even overlapping sections of light curve have very distinct power spectra. This behavior indicates that the curve variations are random. This conclusion is supported by the use of the Jurkevich (1971) V(m)-sq statistic.

  17. The Optical Variability of 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Rui-Guang

    2001-06-01

    B-band measurements of 3C273 over some 110 years are compiled and used in a search for periodicities using the Jurkevich method. Periods of 2.0, 13.65±0.20 and 22.5±0.2 yr are found. If the long-term periodicity is from the instability of a slim disk, then the periodicity (~ 13-yr or ~ 22-yr) suggests masses of 107 Msun for the central black holes.

  18. Optimal High-TC Superconductivity in Cs3C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshman, Dale; Fiory, Anthony

    The highest superconducting transition temperatures in the (A1-xBx)3C60 superconducting family are seen in the A15 and FCC structural phases of Cs3C60 (optimized under hydrostatic pressure), exhibiting measured values for near-stoichiometric samples of TC0 meas . = 37.8 K and 35.7 K, respectively. It is argued these two Cs-intercalated C60 compounds represent the optimal materials of their respective structures, with superconductivity originating from Coulombic e- h interactions between the C60 molecules, which host the n-type superconductivity, and mediating holes associated with the Cs cations. A variation of the interlayer Coulombic pairing model [Harshman and Fiory, J. Supercond. Nov. Magn. 28 ̲, 2967 (2015), and references therein] is introduced in which TC0 calc . ~ 1 / lζ , where l relates to the mean spacing between interacting charges on surfaces of the C60 molecules, and ζ is the average radial distance between the surface of the C60 molecules and the neighboring Cs cations. For stoichiometric Cs3C60, TC0 calc . = 38.08 K and 35.67 K for the A15 and FCC macrostructures, respectively; the dichotomy is attributable to differences in ζ.

  19. One year after the Abruzzo 2009 earthquake: pre-, co- and post-seismic surface deformation investigation through advanced InSAR analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    On 6 April 2009, at 01:33 UTC, a magnitude (Mw) 6.3 earthquake struck central Italy, partially destroying L'Aquila, several surrounding villages, and causing hundreds of casualties. Immediately, the Italian Civil Protection and the scientific community started the work to mitigate the effects and analyze the causes of the natural catastrophe. At the same time almost all the existing spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems imaged the L'Aquila area revealing, through InSAR analyses, the undeniable scar produced by the seismic event on the Earth's surface. Moreover, some of these sensors continued to image the area affected by the seismic displacements, including the advanced SAR sensors of the COSMO/Skymed constellation of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). We present in this study the results achieved by the InSAR group of the IREA-CNR institute, through an extended InSAR-based analysis carried out on the displacements of the area affected by the seismic event. We show first the results achieved by applying the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002) to analyze the temporal evolution of the detected displacements retrieved through the data acquired, from ascending and descending orbits, by the C-band ENVISAT sensor of the European Space Agency (ESA) starting from 2002. This permitted us to investigate possible long term pre-seismic phenomena and provided several co-seismic deformation maps; the latter have been combined with the homologous co-seismic deformation maps retrieved by processing InSAR data pairs acquired by X-band (COSMO/Skymed and TERRASAR-X) and L-band (ALOS-PALSAR) SAR sensors. These co-seismic displacements have been jointly inverted in order to provide insights on the deformation source. The final results are focused on the exploitation of COSMO/SkyMed data acquired on both right ascending and descending orbits. The ascending dataset is composed by 32

  20. 3D modelling of the active normal fault network in the Apulian Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean Sea): Integration of seismic and bathymetric data with implicit surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Pellegrini, Caludio; Savini, Alessandra; Marchese, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Apulian ridge (North-eastern Ionian Sea, Mediterranean), interposed between the facing Apennines and Hellenides subduction zones (to the west and east respectively), is characterized by thick cretaceous carbonatic sequences and discontinuous tertiary deposits crosscut by a penetrative network of NNW-SSE normal faults. These are exposed onshore in Puglia, and are well represented offshore in a dataset composed of 2D seismics and wells collected by oil companies from the '60s to the '80s, more recent seismics collected during research projects in the '90s, recent very high resolution seismics (VHRS - Sparker and Chirp-sonar data), multibeam echosounder bathymetry, and sedimentological and geo-chronological analyses of sediment samples collected on the seabed. Faults are evident in 2D seismics at all scales, and their along-strike geometry and continuity can be characterized with multibeam bathymetric data, which show continuous fault scarps on the seabed (only partly reworked by currents and covered by landslides). Fault scarps also reveal the finite displacement accumulated in the Holocene-Pleistocene. We reconstructed a 3D model of the fault network and suitable geological boundaries (mainly unconformities due to the discontinuous distribution of quaternary and tertiary sediments) with implicit surface methods implemented in SKUA/GOCAD. This approach can be considered very effective and allowed reconstructing in details complex structures, like the frequent relay zones that are particularly well imaged by seafloor geomorphology. Mutual cross-cutting relationships have been recognized between fault scarps and submarine mass-wasting deposits (Holocene-Pleistocene), indicating that, at least in places, these features are coeval, hence the fault network should be considered active. At the regional scale, the 3D model allowed measuring the horizontal WSW-ENE stretching, which can be associated to the bending moment applied to the Apulian Plate by the combined effect

  1. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  2. Integration of Well & Core Data of Carbonate Reservoirs with Surface Seismic in Garraf Oil Field, Southern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhuder, J. J.; Muhlhl, A. A.; Basra Geologiests

    2013-05-01

    The Garraf Field is situated in Southern Iraq in Nasiriya area, is located in Mesopotamian basin. The carbonate facies are dominant in main reservoirs in Garraf field (Mishrif and Yammama Formations) which is Cretaceous in age. The structure of the reservoir in this field are low relief gentle anticlinal structure aligned in NW to SE direction, and No fault were observed and interpreted in 3D seismic section. 3D seismic survey by Iraqi Oil Exploration Company No 2 was successfully conducted on the Garraf field at 2008-2009 using recording system SERCEL 408UL and Vibrators Nomad 65. Bin size: 25*25, Fold: 36, SP Interval: 50m, Lines Interval: 300m, 3 wells were drilled Ga (1, 2, 3) and it used for seismic to well tie in Petrel. Data analysis was conducted for each reservoirs for Lithological and sedimentological studies were based on core and well data .The study showed That the Mishrif Formation deposited in a broad carbonate platform with shallowing upward regressive succession and The depositional environment is extending from outer marine to shallow middle-inner shelf settings with restricted lagoons as supported by the present of Miliolid fossils. The fragmented rudist biostromes accumulated in the middle shelf. No rudist reef is presence in the studied cores. While the Major sequences are micritic limestone of lagoonal and oolitic/peloidal grainstone sandy shoal separated by mudstone of Yamama formation. Sedimentation feature are seen on seismic attributes and it is help for understanding of sedimentation environment and suitable structure interpretation. There is good relationship between Acustic Impedance and porosity, Acustic Impedance reflects porosity or facies change of carbonate rather than fluid content. Data input used for 3D Modeling include 3D seismic and AI data, petrophysical analysis, core and thin section description. 3D structure modeling were created base on the geophysical data interpretation and Al analysis. Data analysis for Al data were

  3. Surface wave attenuation in the shallow subsurface from multichannel-multishot seismic data: a new approach for detecting fractures and lithological discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tatsunori; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Surface wave analysis generally neglects amplitude information, instead using phase information to delineate near-surface S-wave velocity structures. To effectively characterize subsurface heterogeneities from amplitude information, we propose a method of estimating lateral variation of attenuation coefficients of surface waves from multichannel-multishot (multifold) seismic data. We extend the concept of the common midpoint cross-correlation method, used for phase velocity estimation, to the analysis of attenuation coefficients. Our numerical experiments demonstrated that when used together, attenuation coefficients and phase velocities could characterize a lithological boundary as well as fracture zone. We applied the proposed method to multifold seismic reflection data acquired in Shikoku Island, Japan. We clearly observed abrupt changes in lateral variation of estimated attenuation coefficients around fault locations associated with a lithological boundary and with well-developed fractures, whereas phase velocity results could detect only the lithological boundary. Our study demonstrated that simultaneous interpretation of attenuation coefficients and phase velocities has the potential to distinguish localized fractures from lithological boundaries.

  4. Seismic attenuation in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, J.J.; Bartolini, T.J.; Lord, K.M.; Smith, D.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Seismic signals recorded by the expanded distribution of earthquake seismograph stations throughout Florida and data from a comprehensive review of record archives from stations GAI contribute to an initial seismic attenuation model for the Florida Plateau. Based on calculations of surface particle velocity, a pattern of attenuation exists that appears to deviate from that established for the remainder of the southeastern US. Most values suggest greater seismic attenuation within the Florida Plateau. However, a separate pattern may exist for those signals arising from the Gulf of Mexico. These results have important implications for seismic hazard assessments in Florida and may be indicative of the unique lithospheric identity of the Florida basement as an exotic terrane.

  5. The peculiar radio galaxy 3C 433

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Breugel, W.; Helfand, D.; Balick, B.; Heckman, T.; Miley, G.

    1983-01-01

    Radio, optical and X-ray observations are presented of the peculiar radio galaxy 3C 433, a Seyfert 2 object with luminosity an order of magnitude greater than that expected from its complex, shell-type morphology. Observations conducted at 6 and 12 cm with the VLA and at 21 cm with the Westerbork telescope show a striking asymmetry between the northern and southern radio emissions, and an overall X-shaped morphology. Optical observations using the Video Camera and High Gain Video Spectrometer on the 4-m telescope and the Intensified Image Dissector Scanner on the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak confirm the identification of the source with a pair of bright galaxies. Observations in the X-ray from the Einstein Observatory IPC reveal an unresolved source at the position of 3C 433, as well as two serendipitous X-ray sources. The observations may be used to explain the overall structure of the source either in terms of tidal torquing or precessing models of double galaxies; however, it is argued that the tidal torquing model requires fewer assumptions to account for the brightness asymmetry.

  6. CVD Growth of 3C-SiC on 4H/6H Mesas

    SciTech Connect

    Neudeck,P.; Trunek, A.; Spry, D.; Powell, J.; Du, H.; Skowronski, M.; Huang, X.; Dudley, M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes growth and characterization of the highest quality reproducible 3C-SiC heteroepitaxial films ever reported. By properly nucleating 3C-SiC growth on top of perfectly on-axis (0001) 4H-SiC mesa surfaces completely free of atomic scale steps and extended defects, growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms completely free of extended crystal defects can be achieved. In contrast, nucleation and growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms on top of 4H-SiC mesas with atomic-scale steps always results in numerous observable dislocations threading through the 3C-SiC epilayer. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and high resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HRXTEM) measurements indicate non-trivial, in-plane, lattice mismatch between the 3C and 4H layers. This mismatch is somewhat relieved in the step-free mesa case via misfit dislocations confined to the 3C/4H interfacial region without dislocations threading into the overlying 3C-SiC layer. These results indicate that the presence or absence of steps at the 3C/4H heteroepitaxial interface critically impacts the quality, defect structure, and relaxation mechanisms of single-crystal heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films.

  7. CFD Growth of 3C-SiC on 4H/6H Mesas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Spry, David J.; Powell, J. Anthony; Du, Hui; Skowronski, Marek; Huang, XianRong; Dudley, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article describes growth and characterization of the highest quality reproducible 3C-SiC heteroepitaxial films ever reported. By properly nucleating 3C-SiC growth on top of perfectly on-axis (0001) 4H-SiC mesa surfaces completely free of atomic scale steps and extended defects, growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms completely free of extended crystal defects can be achieved. In contrast, nucleation and growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms on top of 4H-SiC mesas with atomic-scale steps always results in numerous observable dislocations threading through the 3C-SiC epilayer. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements indicate non-trivial in-plane lattice mismatch between the 3C and 4H layers. This mismatch is somewhat relieved in the step-free mesa case via misfit dislocations confined to the 3C/4H interfacial region without dislocations threading into the overlying 3C-SiC layer. These results indicate that the presence or absence of steps at the 3C/4H heteroepitaxial interface critically impacts the quality, defect structure, and relaxation mechanisms of single-crystal heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films.

  8. AUTOMATING SHALLOW SEISMIC IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.

    2003-09-14

    The current project is a continuation of an effort to develop ultrashallow seismic imaging as a cost-effective method potentially applicable to DOE facilities. The objective of the present research is to develop and demonstrate the use of a cost-effective, automated method of conducting shallow seismic surveys, an approach that represents a significant departure from conventional seismic-survey field procedures. Initial testing of a mechanical geophone-planting device suggests that large numbers of geophones can be placed both quickly and automatically. The development of such a device could make the application of SSR considerably more efficient and less expensive. The imaging results obtained using automated seismic methods will be compared with results obtained using classical seismic techniques. Although this research falls primarily into the field of seismology, for comparison and quality-control purposes, some GPR data will be collected as well. In the final year of th e research, demonstration surveys at one or more DOE facilities will be performed. An automated geophone-planting device of the type under development would not necessarily be limited to the use of shallow seismic reflection methods; it also would be capable of collecting data for seismic-refraction and possibly for surface-wave studies. Another element of our research plan involves monitoring the cone of depression of a pumping well that is being used as a proxy site for fluid-flow at a contaminated site. Our next data set will be collected at a well site where drawdown equilibrium has been reached. Noninvasive, in-situ methods such as placing geophones automatically and using near-surface seismic methods to identify and characterize the hydrologic flow regimes at contaminated sites support the prospect of developing effective, cost-conscious cleanup strategies for DOE and others.

  9. Refinements to the method of epicentral location based on surface waves from ambient seismic noise: introducing Love waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levshin, Anatoli L.; Barmin, Mikhail P.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Mendoza, Carlos; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and test a modification to a previous method of regional seismic event location based on Empirical Green’s Functions (EGFs) produced from ambient seismic noise. Elastic EGFs between pairs of seismic stations are determined by cross-correlating long ambient noise time-series recorded at the two stations. The EGFs principally contain Rayleigh- and Love-wave energy on the vertical and transverse components, respectively, and we utilize these signals between about 5 and 12 s period. The previous method, based exclusively on Rayleigh waves, may yield biased epicentral locations for certain event types with hypocentral depths between 2 and 5 km. Here we present theoretical arguments that show how Love waves can be introduced to reduce or potentially eliminate the bias. We also present applications of Rayleigh- and Love-wave EGFs to locate 10 reference events in the western United States. The separate Rayleigh and Love epicentral locations and the joint locations using a combination of the two waves agree to within 1 km distance, on average, but confidence ellipses are smallest when both types of waves are used.

  10. Seismic Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Soloviev, V. M.; Emanov, A. F.

    The paper is devoted to researches of influence of seismic actions for industrial and civil buildings and people. The seismic actions bring influence directly on the people (vibration actions, force shocks at earthquakes) or indirectly through various build- ings and the constructions and can be strong (be felt by people) and weak (be fixed by sensing devices). The great number of work is devoted to influence of violent seismic actions (first of all of earthquakes) on people and various constructions. This work is devoted to study weak, but long seismic actions on various buildings and people. There is a need to take into account seismic oscillations, acting on the territory, at construction of various buildings on urbanized territories. Essential influence, except for violent earthquakes, man-caused seismic actions: the explosions, seismic noise, emitted by plant facilities and moving transport, radiation from high-rise buildings and constructions under action of a wind, etc. can exert. Materials on increase of man- caused seismicity in a number of regions in Russia, which earlier were not seismic, are presented in the paper. Along with maps of seismic microzoning maps to be built indicating a variation of amplitude spectra of seismic noise within day, months, years. The presence of an information about amplitudes and frequencies of oscillations from possible earthquakes and man-caused oscillations in concrete regions allows carry- ing out soundly designing and construction of industrial and civil housing projects. The construction of buildings even in not seismically dangerous regions, which have one from resonance frequencies coincident on magnitude to frequency of oscillations, emitted in this place by man-caused objects, can end in failure of these buildings and heaviest consequences for the people. The practical examples of detail of engineering- seismological investigation of large industrial and civil housing projects of Siberia territory (hydro power

  11. Fault zones ruptured during the early 2014 Cephalonia Island (Ionian Sea, Western Greece) earthquakes (January 26 and February 3, Mw 6.0) based on the associated co-seismic surface ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekkas, Efthymios L.; Mavroulis, Spyridon D.

    2016-01-01

    The early 2014 Cephalonia Island (Ionian Sea, Western Greece) earthquake sequence comprised two main shocks with almost the same magnitude (moment magnitude (Mw) 6.0) occurring successively within a short time (January 26 and February 3) and space (Paliki peninsula in Western Cephalonia) interval. Εach earthquake was induced by the rupture of a different pre-existing onshore active fault zone and produced different co-seismic surface rupture zones. Co-seismic surface rupture structures were predominantly strike-slip-related structures including V-shaped conjugate surface ruptures, dextral and sinistral strike-slip surface ruptures, restraining and releasing bends, Riedel structures ( R, R', P, T), small-scale bookshelf faulting, and flower structures. An extensional component was present across surface rupture zones resulting in ground openings (sinkholes), small-scale grabens, and co-seismic dip-slip (normal) displacements. A compressional component was also present across surface rupture zones resulting in co-seismic dip-slip (reverse) displacements. From the comparison of our field geological observations with already published surface deformation measurements by DInSAR Interferometry, it is concluded that there is a strong correlation among the surface rupture zones, the ruptured active fault zones, and the detected displacement discontinuities in Paliki peninsula.

  12. Near Surface Structure of the Frijoles Strand of the San Gregorio Fault, Point Año Nuevo, San Mateo County, California, from Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, L.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Weber, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    The San Gregorio Fault Zone (SGFZ) is one of the major faults of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system in the San Francisco Bay region of California. The SGFZ is nearly 200 km long, trends subparallel to the SAF, and is located primarily offshore with two exceptions- between Point Año Nuevo and San Gregorio Beach and between Pillar Point and Moss Beach. It has a total width of 2 to 3 km and is comprised of seven known fault strands with Quaternary activity, five of which also demonstrate late Holocene activity. The fault is clearly a potential source of significant earthquakes and has been assigned a maximum likely magnitude of 7.3. To better understand the structure, geometry, and shallow-depth P-wave velocities associated with the SGFZ, we acquired a 585-m-long, high-resolution, combined seismic reflection and refraction profile across the Frijoles strand of the SGFZ at Point Año Nuevo State Park. Both P- and S-wave data were acquired, but here we present only the P-wave data. We used two 60-channel Geometrics RX60 seismographs and 120 40-Hz single-element geophones connected via cable to record Betsy Seisgun seismic sources (shots). Both shots and geophones were approximately co-located and spaced at 5-m intervals along the profile, with the shots offset laterally from the geophones by 1 m. We measured first-arrival refractions from all shots and geophones to develop a seismic refraction tomography velocity model of the upper 70 m. P-wave velocities range from about 600 m/s near the surface to more than 2400 m/s at 70 m depth. We used the refraction tomography image to infer the depth to the top of the groundwater table on the basis of the 1500 m/s velocity contour. The image suggests that the depth, along the profile, to the top of groundwater varies by about 18 m, with greater depth on the west side of the fault. At about 46 m depth, a 60- to 80-m-wide, low-velocity zone, which is consistent with faulting, is observed southwest of the Frijoles strand of the

  13. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  14. Comparison of seismic sources for shallow seismic: sledgehammer and pyrotechnics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brom, Aleksander; Stan-Kłeczek, Iwona

    2015-10-01

    The pyrotechnic materials are one of the types of the explosives materials which produce thermal, luminous or sound effects, gas, smoke and their combination as a result of a self-sustaining chemical reaction. Therefore, pyrotechnics can be used as a seismic source that is designed to release accumulated energy in a form of seismic wave recorded by tremor sensors (geophones) after its passage through the rock mass. The aim of this paper was to determine the utility of pyrotechnics for shallow seismic engineering. The work presented comparing the conventional method of seismic wave excitation for seismic refraction method like plate and hammer and activating of firecrackers on the surface. The energy released by various sources and frequency spectra was compared for the two types of sources. The obtained results did not determine which sources gave the better results but showed very interesting aspects of using pyrotechnics in seismic measurements for example the use of pyrotechnic materials in MASW.

  15. Two Active Nuclei in 3C 294

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Alan; Canalizo, Gabriela; Nelan, E. P.; Ridgway, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    The z=1.786 radio galaxy 3C 294 lies < 10" from a 12 mag star and has been the target of at least three previous investigations using adaptive optics (AO) imaging. A major problem in interpreting these results is the uncertainty in the precise alignment of the radio structure with the H- or K-band AO imaging. Here we report observations of the position of the AO guide star with the Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor, which, together with positions from the second United States Naval Observatory's CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC2), allow us to register the infrared and radio frames to an accuracy of better than 0.1". The result is that the nuclear compact radio source is not coincident with the brightest discrete object in the AO image, an essentially unresolved source on the eastern side of the light distribution, as Quirrenbach and coworkers had suggested. Instead, the radio source is centered about 0.9" to the west of this object, on one of the two apparently real peaks in a region of diffuse emission. Nevertheless, the conclusion of Quirrenbach and coworkers that 3C 294 involves an ongoing merger appears to be correct: analysis of a recent deep Chandra image of 3C 294 obtained from the archive shows that the nucleus comprises two X-ray sources, which are coincident with the radio nucleus and the eastern stellar object. The X-ray/optical flux ratio of the latter makes it extremely unlikely that it is a foreground Galactic star. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with proposal 08315. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a

  16. Double Faraday rotation toward 3C 27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, S. J., Jr.; Reed, J. A.

    1984-08-01

    From observations of the integrated flux of 3C 27 with the NRAO 140 foot (43 m) telescope at 40 frequencies between 1250 and 1445 MHz, the authors deduce rotation measures of 165±15 and -104±4 rad m-2. Since the source (assumed to be a radio galaxy) has components 45arcsec apart, it is concluded that the net magnetic field reverses between these directions. One explanation is that a large magnetic field surrounding the central galaxy of the distant source covers one component but not the other. Another explanation is that our Galaxy contains a dipole field with a scale of order 1 pc. One component of the distant source is seen inside the current loop associated with the dipole field, while the other is seen outside the loop.

  17. Calculation of zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi-Ping, Liu

    1990-01-01

    Impulse responses including near-field terms have been obtained in closed form for the zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space. The method is based on the correspondence principle. Through transformation of variables, the Fourier transform of the elastic impulse response is put in a form such that the Fourier transform of the corresponding anelastic impulse response can be expressed as elementary functions and their definite integrals involving distance angular frequency, phase velocities, and attenuation factors. These results are used for accurate calculation of shear-wave arrival rise times of synthetic seismograms needed for data interpretation of anelastic-attenuation measurements in near-surface sediment. -Author

  18. DOBRE-2000: Deep Reflection Seismic, Gravimetric and Surface Structural Controls Across a Devonian Failed Rift in the Southeastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Chowdhury, K.; Bayer, U.; Gajewski, D.; Huebscher, C.; Rabbel, W.; Saintot, A.; Starostenko, V. I.; Stephenson, R.; Stovba, S. M.; Tolkunov, A.; Thybo, H.

    2001-12-01

    Situated between the Ukrainian Shield and the Voronezh Masif, the Pripyat-Dniepr-Donets Basin (PDD) is a crustal-scale geodynamic feature associated with the Late Devonian rifting of the East European Craton. The Donbas Foldbelt (DF), comprising the eastern part of the PDD, includes pre- & syn-rift deposits below a large thickness of post-rift successions. Later, DF has been inverted (elevated, eroded, deformed). With 20+ km of sediments, it has a large economic potential, but its tectonic history - and the cause for its isolated evolution - is not well understood. Recently, 130+ km multi-channel reflection seismic profiling data has been acquired across the southern part of the DF in the framework of an international industry-academic collaboration. Coincident gravity data has been collected along the profile too, and extensive structural studies have been carried out to understand the spatio-temporal distribution of the stress-regime in the area. The high-resolution seismic images reveal an extensive stair-step like fragmentation of the basement including faults with upto 2km offset. The typical size of these "steps" are influenced by the ambient conditions at the time of their formation. Combined use of the different datasets is expected to shed light on several intriguing features associated with DF. The presence/extent of salt, causing localization and/or partition of strain both laterally and vertically, may be studied by using its seismic and gravitational reponses simultaneously. The interaction between the lower crust and the upper mantle may also be studied in the same manner, which should result in a lithological interpretation at depth favoring in turn one of the causative mechanisms.

  19. Multiwavelength observations of giant radio galaxy 3C 35 and 3C 284

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We report multi wavelength observations of large radio galaxy 3C35 and 3C284. The low frequency observations were done with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) starting from 150 MHz. The high frequency observations were done with Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). Our main motivation for these observations is to estimate the spectral ages of these galaxies and to examine any proof of extended emission at low radio frequencies due to an earlier cycle of activity. The spectral age is measured by fitting the spectra with different spectral ageing models e.g. Kardashev-Pacholczyk (KP), Jaffe-Perola (JP) and Continuous Injection (CI).

  20. Joint inversion of P-waveforms from teleseismic events and surface waves group velocities from ambient seismic noise in Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzek, Bohuslav

    2010-05-01

    Joint inversion of P-waveforms from distant earthquakes recorded by 41 broadband seismic stations located on the territory of Bohemian Massif and Rayleigh/Love group velocities gained by using cross-correlation technique applied to seismic noise recorded by the same set of broadband stations has been performed. Together with joint inversion also individual inversions using single data sets have been carried out. All computations were arranged inside isotropic, locally 1D layered models. Remarkable result is indication of horizons just above MOHO in the lower crust below some stations where low-velocity S-wave channel is needed in order to ensure correct modeling of measured events. This indication follows both from individual and joint inversions. P-waveform inversion is based on using a set of 271 well-recorded teleseismic events from epicentral distances 3000-10000 km. The inversion was originally based on the popular 'receiver function' methodology, but due to the instability of needed deconvolution it was modified. We search for optimum layered velocity model, which correctly projects radial to vertical components (and vice versa, deconvolution is no more needed). Regarding second source of data, both Rayleigh and Love surface waves were extracted from seismic noise by using cross-correlation. Long time series covering the period 2001-2009 were processed. Such measurements provide group velocities between arbitrary pairs of stations. Local group velocity dispersion curves were computed by using 2D tomography-like approach for periods 4-20 s. The subject of inversion (both individual and joint) were just group velocity dispersion curves. Inversion required exhaustive computations. We used HPC cluster nemo.ig.cas.cz and ANNI inversion software, capable to run in parallel regime.

  1. Application of Surface Time-Lapse Seismic Refraction Tomography (TLSRT) to Quantifying Changes in Saturation Within the Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, D. P.; Baker, G. S.; Hubbard, S. S.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.

    2009-05-01

    Seismic p-wave propagation velocity of a medium is a function of the effective elastic constants of the material, and has been previously demonstrated to be related to hydrologic parameters according to the Gassmann equation. Above the water table (i.e., in the vadose zone), seismic p-wave velocity is expected to vary linearly as a function of density. Similarly, bulk density is expected to vary linearly as a function of the porosity and the pore-fluid density, where the pore-fluid density is described as the weighted mean of the pore-fluid density and density of air, dependent upon the saturation. Thus, the equations for calculating a change in saturation given two successive seismic p-wave propagation velocity measurements at a coincident point in the vadose zone are straightforward, given a priori values for bulk density or porosity for the medium. In the absence of in situ information for a given medium, subsurface variations in density can be derived using the multi-channel analysis of shear waves (MASW) technique that yields estimates of s-wave propagation velocity (Vs). As Vs is a function of the shear modulus and density, and shear modulus is invariant due to saturation according the Gassmann equation, a direct estimate of density can be derived via MASW. Thus, using MASW to establish initial conditions, a direct measure of changes in vadose zone saturation can be estimated using time-lapse seismic refraction tomography (TLSRT). In order to validate the above approach to quantifying saturation in the vadose zone, an ephemeral perched water table at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee was monitored using TLSRT and correlated with traditional point hydrologic measurements. From October 2007 through February 2009, 35 coincident datasets were acquired along a 100-m profile. The hydrologic measurements provide a binary measure of the existence of an elevated water table, and the TLSRT data

  2. Downhole seismic array system

    SciTech Connect

    Petermann, S.G.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes an apparatus of receiving seismic signals from an earth formation at least at one or more points in a wellbore penetrating the formation. It comprises a sonde including extensible and retractable support means thereon for supporting seismic signal receiver means, hydraulic actuator means for extending and reacting the support means, body means for supporting the actuator means and the support means and signal transmitting means for transmitting electrical signals related to seismic signals received by the receiver means; tubing means connected to the sonde for deploying the sonde in the wellbore, the tubing means including electrical conductor means disposed therein for conducting electrical signals between means on the surface of the formation and the sonde and the tubing means comprising means for conducting hydraulic fluid to the sonde for operation of the actuator means; and means for supplying hydraulic fluid from the surface of the formation through the tubing means to the sonde for operating the actuator means.

  3. Controllable seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrell, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2015-09-29

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  4. Controllable seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrel, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2014-08-19

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  5. Seismic monitoring of geomorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, A.; Hovius, N.; Turowski, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    In seismology, the signal is usually analysed for earthquake data, but these represent less than 1% of continuous recording. The remaining data are considered as seismic noise and were for a long time ignored. Over the past decades, the analysis of seismic noise has constantly increased in popularity, and this has led to develop new approaches and applications in geophysics. The study of continuous seismic records is now open to other disciplines, like geomorphology. The motion of mass at the Earth's surface generates seismic waves that are recorded by nearby seismometers and can be used to monitor its transfer through the landscape. Surface processes vary in nature, mechanism, magnitude and space and time, and this variability can be observed in the seismic signals. This contribution aims to give an overview of the development and current opportunities for the seismic monitoring of geomorphic processes. We first describe the common principles of seismic signal monitoring and introduce time-frequency analysis for the purpose of identification and differentiation of surface processes. Second, we present techniques to detect, locate and quantify geomorphic events. Third, we review the diverse layout of seismic arrays and highlight their advantages and limitations for specific processes, like slope or channel activity. Finally, we illustrate all these characteristics with the analysis of seismic data acquired in a small debris-flow catchment where geomorphic events show interactions and feedbacks. Further developments must aim to fully understand the richness of the continuous seismic signals, to better quantify the geomorphic activity and improve the performance of warning systems. Seismic monitoring may ultimately allow the continuous survey of erosion and transfer of sediments in the landscape on the scales of external forcing.

  6. THE SUZAKU VIEW OF 3C 382

    SciTech Connect

    Sambruna, R. M.; Gliozzi, M.; Tombesi, F.; Braito, V.; Ballo, L.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2011-06-20

    We present a long (116 ks) Suzaku observation of the broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG) 3C 382 acquired in 2007 April. A Swift BAT spectrum in 15-200 keV from the 58 month survey is also analyzed, together with an archival XMM-Newton EPIC exposure of 20 ks obtained one year after Suzaku. Our main result is the finding with Suzaku of a broad Fe K line with a relativistic profile consistent with emission from an accretion disk at tens of gravitational radii from the central black hole. The XIS data indicate emission from highly ionized iron and allow us to set tight, albeit model-dependent, constraints on the inner and outer radii of the disk reflecting region, r{sub in} {approx_equal} 10 r{sub g} and r{sub out} {approx_equal} 20 r{sub g} , respectively, and on the disk inclination, i {approx_equal} 30{sup 0}. Two ionized reflection components are possibly observed, with similar contributions of {approx}10% to the total continuum-a highly ionized one, with log{xi} {approx_equal} 3 erg s{sup -1} cm, which successfully models the relativistic line, and a mildly ionized one, with log{xi} {approx_equal} 1.5 erg s{sup -1} cm, which models the narrow Fe K{alpha} and high energy hump. When both these components are included, there is no further requirement for an additional blackbody soft excess below 2 keV. The Suzaku data confirm the presence of a warm absorber previously known from grating studies. After accounting for all the spectral features, the intrinsic photon index of the X-ray continuum is {Gamma}{sub x} {approx_equal} 1.8 with a cutoff energy at {approx}200 keV, consistent with Comptonization models and excluding jet-related emission up to these energies. Comparison of the X-ray properties of 3C 382 and other BLRGs to Seyferts recently observed with Suzaku and BAT confirms the idea that the distinction between radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nucleus at X-rays is blurred. The two classes form a continuum distribution in terms of X-ray photon index

  7. Near-surface seismic velocity changes in a salt-dominated environment due to shaking and thermal stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Kind, Rainer; Asch, Günter

    2014-05-01

    We report on results from a seismic station of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) showing a superior sensitivity of seismic velocity changes in the surrounding medium to shaking and temperature. 5 years of daily autocorrelations of the IPOC network are analyzed with passive image interferometry. Due to the particular geological conditions we observe a high sensitivity of the medium around the station near Patache (PATCX) resulting in annual periodic velocity variations and temporary velocity reductions induced by ground shaking. We observe a linear relationship between the amplitude of the velocity reductions and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) of nearby earthquakes at station PATCX. Although velocity reductions are also observed at other stations of the IPOC array for the Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake a clear relationship between the PGA of this earthquake and the induced velocity reductions at the different stations is not visible. Furthermore, we observe velocity variations with an annual and daily period. We present different arguments that these periodic changes are caused by variations of the atmospheric temperature. In this context we construct a model that starts at observed temperature variations and evaluates thermal stresses induced by the temperature gradients. Using radiative transfer based sensitivity kernels and third order elastic constants we relate the distribution of thermal stress in the subsurface to observable time shifts of coda waves. The model is able to reproduce the major features confirming that stress changes in the subsurface can be detected with noise based monitoring.

  8. Multifrequency Monitoring of 3C 120, 3C 279, and PKS 1510--089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Aller, M. F.; Balonek, T. J.; Gomez, J.-L.; McHardy, I. M.; Terasranta, H.; Raiteri, C.; Tosti, G.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze contemporaneous X-ray, optical, and radio light curves of 3C 120, ABC 279, and PKS 1510-089 on timescales from a few to hundreds of days over a 3-5 year period. The results show the diverse connections between variability properties at different frequencies for different blazers.

  9. Delineation of an old coal mine in an urban environment with surface wave seismics using a landstreamer and laterally constrained inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Wisen; Mattias Linden; Mats Svensson

    2007-01-15

    Prior to the site investigation for a tunnel below Helsingborg, southern Sweden, a surface wave seismic investigation was made to delineate an old coal mine. The mine as described in old literature has an area of about 6 acres and each layer of coal has a height of less than one 1 m; however, the exact location and status is unclear. The sedimentary geological setting consists of fill, quaternary deposits, shale, coal and sandstone. The mine, or alternatively the coal, is found at 10 m depth between a layer of shale and a layer of soft sandstone. The seismic measurements were made along two crossing profiles, located on the walkways covered with gravel, in the area where the mine is expected. The measurement system was a landstreamer with 244.5 Hz geophones, a Geometrics Geode and a shotgun. The v{sub s} models clearly show increasing velocities with depth with a low velocity layer at 10 m depth. The results correlate well with the expected geology and results from geotechnical drillings that indicate an open mine in parts of the area; however, the low velocity layer is mainly due to the soft sandstone and does not seem to be strongly affected by the presence of the open mine.

  10. Post-seismic slip on the 6th April 2009 L'Aquila earthquake surface rupture, measured using a terrestrial laser scanner (tripod-mounted lidar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, K. J.; Wilkinson, M.; Roberts, G.; Cowie, P. A.; Phillips, R.; Walters, R. J.; Barba, S.; La Rocca, L.; Vittori, E.; Blumetti, A.; Guerrieri, L.; Guzzetti, F.; Lollino, G.; Porfido, S.; Esposito, E.; Piccardi, L.; Campedel, P.; Cocco, S.; Sileo, G.; Michetti, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanner (lidar) systems have the capability to very accurately build 3D topographic models and detect millimetric-scale changes caused by tectonic movements. We have measured post-seismic deformation at 5 locations along the 6th April L’Aquila earthquake surface rupture. Our first survey was undertaken 8 days after the earthquake, and the sites were subsequently re-occupied in May and August. Our survey has detected post-seismic motions at rates of millimetres per day, declining in the months after the mainshock, with significant lateral variation along strike. The data have been compared to robotic surveying total station data available from a site where a water pipe ruptured coseismically, and with strain meter data collected nearby. Our near-field deformation measurements are compared to InSAR results for equivalent time periods, allowing us to differentiate short- and long-wavelength deformation. Such comparative analysis allows us to examine whether deformation was driven by fluid and poro-elastic effects, visco-elastic creep in the underlying crust and mantle, afterslip on fault zones within the shallow crust, or a combination of the above. Our work may help discriminate between the relative contributions of coseismic and postseismic slip for historic/palaeoseismic earthquake ruptures where measurements of offset are made many years later.

  11. The resolved outflow from 3C 48

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, the mass is ∼6 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow.

  12. Elastic Wavespeed Images of Northern Chile Subduction Zone from the Joint Inversion of Body and Surface Waves: Structure of the Andean Forearc and the Double Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, D.; Carrizo, D.; Roecker, S. W.; Peyrat, S.; Arriaza, R.; Chi, R. K.; Baeza, S.

    2015-12-01

    Partly in anticipation of an imminent megathrust earthquake, a significant amount of seismic data has been collected over the past several years in northern Chile by local deployments of seismometers. In this study we generate elastic wavespeed images of the crust and upper mantle using a combination of body wave arrival times and surface wave dispersion curves. The body wave data set consists of 130000 P and 108000 S wave arrival times generated by 12000 earthquakes recorded locally over a period of 25 years by networks comprising about 360 stations. The surface wave data set consists of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves determined from ambient noise recorded by 60 broad band stations from three different networks over a period of three years. Transit time biases due to an uneven distribution of noise were estimated using a technique based on that of Yao and van der Hilst (2009) and found to be as high as 5% for some station pairs. We jointly invert the body and surface wave observations to both improve the overall resolution of the crustal images and reduce the trade-off between shallow and deep structures in the images of the subducted slab. Of particular interest in these images are three regions of anomalous Vp/Vs: (1) An extensive zone of low Vp/Vs (1.68) correlates with trench-parallel magmatic belts emplaced in the upper continental crust. In the region of the coast and continental slope, low Vp/Vs corresponds to batholithic structures in the Jurassic-Cretaceous magmatic arc. Between the central depression and Domeyko Cordillera, low Vp/Vs correlates with the distribution of magmatic arcs of Paleocene-Oligocene and Eocene-Oligocene age. Low Vp/Vs also correlates with the location of the Mejillones Peninsula. (2) A region of high Vp/Vs occurs in what is most likely the serpentinized wedge of the subduction zone. (3) An additional zone of low Vp/Vs is located in the middle of the double seismic zone at depths of 90-110 km. This region may exist all along the

  13. Rock mass response to strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events and blasting observed at the surface of the excavations in deep level gold mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, Alexander; Durrheim, Ray; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to extreme ground motion and derive the attenuation factors in near field. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of the ground motion was found to be proportional to the distance from the source following R^-1.1 & R^-1.7 for compact rock and R^-3.1 & R^-3.4 for more fractured rock close to the surface of the tunnel. In addition the ground motion was compared to the quasi-static deformations taking place around the underground excavations. The quasi-static deformations were measured by means of strain, tilt and closure. A good correspondence

  14. Photosynthesis of C3, C3-C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E; Tissue, David T; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-07-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared in eight C4 grasses with NAD-ME, PCK, and NADP-ME subtypes, one C3 grass, and one C3-C4 grass grown under ambient (400 μl l(-1)) and glacial (180 μl l(-1)) CO2. Glacial CO2 caused a smaller reduction of photosynthesis and a greater increase of stomatal conductance in C4 relative to C3 and C3-C4 species. Panicum bisulcatum (C3) acclimated to glacial [CO2] by doubling Rubisco activity, while Rubisco was unchanged in Panicum milioides (C3-C4), possibly due to its high leaf N and Rubisco contents. Glacial CO2 up-regulated Rubisco and PEPC activities in concert for several C4 grasses, while NADP-ME and PEP-CK activities were unchanged, reflecting the high control exerted by the carboxylases relative to the decarboxylases on the efficiency of C4 metabolism. Despite having larger stomatal conductance at glacial CO2, C4 species maintained greater PWUE and PNUE relative to C3-C4 and C3 species due to higher photosynthetic rates. Relative to other C4 subtypes, NAD-ME and PEP-CK grasses had the highest PWUE and PNUE, respectively; relative to C3, the C3-C4 grass had higher PWUE and similar PNUE at glacial CO2. Biomass accumulation was reduced by glacial CO2 in the C3 grass relative to the C3-C4 grass, while biomass was less reduced in NAD-ME grasses compared with NADP-ME and PCK grasses. Under glacial CO2, high resource use efficiency offers a key evolutionary advantage for the transition from C3 to C4 photosynthesis in water- and nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24723409

  15. Long-term expression of the Paganica Fault vs. 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake surface ruptures: looking for a better understanding of its seismic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civico, Riccardo; Pucci, Stefano; de Martini, Paolo Marco; Pantosti, Daniela; Romana Cinti, Francesca; Pierdominici, Simona; Cucci, Luigi; Del Carlo, Paola; Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Patera, Antonio; Pinzi, Stefania

    2010-05-01

    The Mw6.3, April 6, 2009 earthquake occurred on the previously identified Paganica normal fault and produced a 3 km-long co-seismic surface rupture along its northern section, with few centimeters of vertical displacement. Extensive 1:10,000-scale geological and geomorphological mapping has been carried out, focusing on the characterization of the long-term expression of the Paganica Fault at the surface. The field mapping was integrated by observations, made on 1:33,000 scale aerial photographs (GAI), 5-m-resolution Digital Elevation Model and standard morphometric derivatives (hill-shaded and slope angle maps, Spatial Analyst™). Particular attention was devoted to the study of the continental deposits and landforms affected by cumulative offset with the aim to reconstruct the Quaternary deformational history of the fault. The fault runs for a total length of 20 km and, along with antithetic faults on its hanging-wall, forms the graben of the Middle Aterno River Valley. The whole fault system and the variable setting of deformation affecting the continental deposits at the surface were identified. The Paganica long-term morphologic signature is represented by a set of prominent scarps formed by the tectonic juxtaposition of late Pliocene-middle Pleistocene and late Pleistocene alluvial deposits, and by lower scarps in late Pleistocene-Holocene deposits. In addition, evident Quaternary erosional and depositional paleosurfaces were recognized and sampled for 14C and OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) and tephra chronology dating for long-term slip-rate calculations. This study resulted helpful to locate four paleoseismological investigations (see Pantosti et al. talk) and to provide the appropriate context for correctly interpret the depositional bodies outcropping on the trench walls. These paleoseismological investigations evidenced the presence of repeated late Pleistocene-Holocene activity and allowed for slip-rate estimation at a shorter time-scale. Such

  16. 2D Dynamic Models of Subduction: Links between Surface Plate Motion and Deformation in the Transition Zone from Observations of Deep Slab Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of seismicity and seismic tomography provide constraints on the geometry of slabs within mantle, while compression/tension axis derived from moment tensor solutions provide constraints on the internal deformation of slabs. However, since these observations provide only a somewhat blurred or incomplete snapshot of the slab in time, it is difficult to directly relate these observations to the evolution of the slab geometry and the forces acting on and within the slab. In contrast, plate tectonic reconstructions provide time-dependent constraints on the surface motion of plates and the trench at subduction zones, which are related to the dynamical evolution of the slab. We use 2D geodynamical simulations of subduction to explore the relationship between dynamical process within the deforming slab and the observations of surface plate motion and the state-of-stress in slabs. Specifically we utilize models that include the extended Boussinesq approximation (shear heating and latent heat terms in the energy equation), a layered lithosphere with pyrolite, harzburgite and basalt/eclogite, compositionally-dependent phase transitions, and a composite rheology with yielding. The models employ a weak crustal layer that decouples the overriding and subducting plates and allows for dynamically determined trench motion. Here we show that, 1) multiple phase transitions increase slab folding, 2) ridge push significantly increases trench retreat, and 3) strength of the weak crustal layer influences slab detachment. Compared to past studies a more realistic treatment of the phase transitions makes trench retreat more difficult to generate: a weaker plate may encourage slab retreat but detaches once the slab tip crosses into the transition zone due to the rapid increase in slab density. As suggested by previous studies, slab folding within the transition zone changes the direction of forces on the slab and causes periodic changes from trench retreat to trench advance. We

  17. Preliminary Results of Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Models and Seismic Site Conditions in Gangneung, Korea Using Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Kim, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    To determine the near-surface shear wave velocities (Vs) and seismic site characteristics in densely populated areas in Gangneung on the eastern coast of Korea, passive and active surface waves were recorded at 117 sites of low altitude using twelve or twenty four 4.5-Hz geophones and a 24-channel engineering seismograph during this year. An 8-kg wooden hammer was used as an active source. The seismic waves were recorded for 8 to 30 s and digitized at 125 to 500 Hz sample rates. Dispersion images of the Rayleigh waves were obtained by the extended spatial autocorrelation (ESPAC) method. At 46 recording sites, the overburden layer was too thick to investigate bedrock with this shallow geophysical method. Shear-wave velocity models were derived from the estimated dispersion curves using the damped least-squares inversion scheme. From these 1-D velocity models, estimated mean values of Vs at the top of bedrock, depth to the bedrock, average Vs of the overburden layer, and average Vs of the top 30-m depth (Vs30) are 672±37 m/s, 17±0.5 m, 253±9 m/s, and 343±15 m/s, respectively, in the 95% confidence range. The estimated values from the inverted profiles were interpolated to yield maps for the entire low altitude area. Most of the investigated areas in Gangneung belong to NEHRP site class D (58%), C (34%), E (4%), and B (4%). In downtown area, both the lower estimates of Vs30 and thick overburden layer make it more prone to significant ground amplifications. The computed correlation coefficients (r) of Vs30 with elevation and topographic gradient, on linear scales, are 0.7 and 0.6, respectively.

  18. Development of an Adaptive Multi-Method Algorithm for Automatic Picking of First Arrival Times: Application to Near Surface Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, A.; Camerlynck, C. M.; Schneider, A. C.; Florsch, N.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate picking of first arrival times plays an important role in many seismic studies, particularly in seismic tomography and reservoirs or aquifers monitoring. Many techniques have been developed for picking first arrivals automatically or semi-automatically, but most of them were developed for seismological purposes which does not attain the accuracy objectives due to the complexity of near surface structures, and to usual low signal-to-noise ratio. We propose a new adaptive algorithm for near surface data based on three picking methods, combining multi-nested windows (MNW), Higher Order Statistics (HOS), and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). They exploit the benefits of integrating many properties, which reveal the presence of first arrivals, to provide an efficient and robust first arrivals picking. This strategy mimics the human first-break picking, where at the beginning the global trend is defined. Then the exact first-breaks are searched in the vicinity of the now defined trend. In a multistage algorithm, three successive phases are launched, where each of them characterize a specific signal property. Within each phase, the potential picks and their error range are automatically estimated, and then used sequentially as leader in the following phase picking. The accuracy and robustness of the implemented algorithm are successfully validated on synthetic and real data which have special challenges for automatic pickers. The comparison of resulting P-wave arrival times with those picked manually, and other algorithms of automatic picking, demonstrated the reliable performance of the new scheme under different noisy conditions. All parameters of our multi-method algorithm are auto-adaptive thanks to the integration in series of each sub-algorithm results in the flow. Hence, it is nearly a parameter-free algorithm, which is straightforward to implement and demands low computational resources.

  19. The Resolved Outflow from 3C 48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 103-104 cm-3, the mass is ~6 × 106 M ⊙, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11574. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Some of the

  20. THE ACCELERATING JET OF 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, S. D.; Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the proper motions of the subparsec scale jet of the quasar 3C 279 at 15 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array shows significant accelerations in four of nine superluminal features. Analysis of these motions is combined with the analysis of flux density light curves to constrain values of Lorentz factor and viewing angle (and their derivatives) for each component. The data for each of these components are consistent with significant changes to the Lorentz factor, viewing angle, and azimuthal angle, suggesting jet bending with changes in speed. We see that for these observed components Lorentz factors are in the range {Gamma} = 10-41, viewing angles are in the range thetav = 0. Degree-Sign 1-5. Degree-Sign 0, and intrinsic (source frame) flux density is in the range, F{sub {nu},int} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Jy. Considering individual components, the Lorentz factors vary from {Gamma} = 11-16 for C1, {Gamma} = 31-41 for C5, {Gamma} = 29-41 for C6, and {Gamma} = 9-12 for C8, indicating that there is no single underlying flow speed to the jet and likely we are seeing pattern speeds from shocks in the jet. The viewing angles vary in time from 0. Degree-Sign 6 to 1. Degree-Sign 5 in the case of C1 (the least extreme example), from 0. Degree-Sign 5 to 5. Degree-Sign 0 in the case of C8, and from 0. Degree-Sign 1 to 0. Degree-Sign 9 for C5 (the last two being the most extreme examples). The intrinsic flux density varies by factors from 1.4 for C8 and 430 for C5. Theoretical analysis of the accelerations also indicates potential jet bending. In addition, for one component, C5, polarization measurements also set limits to the trajectory of the jet.

  1. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the Canadian Seismic Agreement'' between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The Canadian Seismic Agreement'' supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

  2. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-07-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  3. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-10-01

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

  4. Application of surface wave travel times and amplitude ratios interpreted through a 3D crustal model to locate and characterize regional seismic events in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Shen, W.; Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The error in the epicentral location of crustal earthquakes across the contiguous US is on the order of 10 km due to the inability of 1D seismic velocity models to capture regional body wave travel time variations. New high resolution 3D models of the crust and uppermost mantle have been constructed recently across the US by inverting surface wave dispersion from ambient noise and earthquakes, receiver functions, and Rayleigh wave H/V ratios using USArray data [e.g., Shen et al., 2013]. These are mostly S-wave models of the lithosphere, however, which are not optimal for predicting regional P-wave travel times. We explore the use of observations of surface waves to improve regional event characterization because the new 3D models are constructed explicitly to model their behavior. In particular, we use measurements of group and phase time delays and the amplitude ratio between different periods of surface waves to estimate the moment tensor, the epicentral location and the earthquake depth. Preliminary estimates of these variables are determined through a simulated annealing algorithm. Afterward, a Bayesian Monte Carlo method is applied to estimate the posterior distribution of all variables in order to assess uncertainties in source characteristics. The reliability and limitations of the location method are tested by systematic relocation of earthquakes across the contiguous US.

  5. Behavior of inversion layers in 3C silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, R. E.; Kopanski, J. J.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    A study on the field-induced surface-charge region in 3C silicon carbide (SiC) using 1 MHz capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements at room temperature is here reported. A double column mercury probe was used on oxidized SiC substrates to form metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures. These structures were characterized in terms of the substrate doping profile, effective fixed oxide charge, and interface trap density. A distinctive feature of the MOS C-V curves from accumulation to inversion is that after going into deep depletion the capacitance rises to its equilibrium inversion level during the voltage sweep. Capacitance transient measurements indicate that the minority-carrier generation occurs at the SiO2/SiC interface.

  6. Behavior of inversion layers in 3C silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, R. E.; Kopanski, J. J.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-08-01

    A study on the field-induced surface-charge region in 3C silicon carbide (SiC) using 1 MHz capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements at room temperature is here reported. A double column mercury probe was used on oxidized SiC substrates to form metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures. These structures were characterized in terms of the substrate doping profile, effective fixed oxide charge, and interface trap density. A distinctive feature of the MOS C-V curves from accumulation to inversion is that after going into deep depletion the capacitance rises to its equilibrium inversion level during the voltage sweep. Capacitance transient measurements indicate that the minority-carrier generation occurs at the SiO2/SiC interface.

  7. Seismic imaging a carbonate reservoir: The Paris Basin Dogger

    SciTech Connect

    Mougenot, D.

    1995-08-01

    Within the Dogger project, seven partners joined forces (CGG, DHYCA, EAP, ESSO-REP, IFP, TOTAL, TRITON France) to develop an appropriate seismic acquisition, processing and interpretation methodology in order to improve the description of the main oil reservoir (30 m) lying at the top of the Dogger carbonates in the Paris Basin, at a depth of 1900 m. High-resolution 2D Vibroseismic is used to record high frequencies (up to 100 Hz) at the level of the target, and provides sufficiently adequate vertical resolution for the reflections at the top and at the base of the reservoir not to interfere. The upper frequency content of the 3D seismic (70 Hz) is more difficult to enhance. Yet the essential contribution made by the 3D is to evidence, via horizon attributes, sub-meridian lineaments corresponding to faults with throw of several meters which is too weak to be detected on vertical sections. The distribution of these faults, via which water tends to invade the reservoir, and the organization of the amplitudes at the top reservoir reflector, which seems to suggest lateral variations in porosity, are a valuable guide for setting up wells. Three-component seismic (2D-3c) and S-wave emissions did not produce any reflections beyond 30 Hz at the level of the target which is a poor reflector (PS & SS). Only borehole seismic (VSP, offset VSP), where high frequencies are much less attenuated than with surface seismic, provides detailed imaging of the reservoir in converted mode (up to 110 Hz in PP and in PS). The combination of a continuous spatial sampling, such as that obtained in 3D, and of a Vibroseis emission adapted to frequency attenuation, such as that used in 2D, can supply useful information about the thin and discontinuous Dogger reservoir which cannot he provided by mere correlation of the borehole data.

  8. Downhole seismic logging for high-resolution reflection surveying in unconsolidated overburden

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.A.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.; Harris, J.B.; Pugin, A.; Skvortsov, A.; Goriainov, N.N.

    1998-07-01

    Downhole seismic velocity logging techniques have been developed and applied in support of high-resolution reflection seismic surveys. Data obtained from downhole seismic logging can provide accurate velocity-depth functions and directly correlate seismic reflections to depth. The methodologies described in this paper are designed for slimhole applications in plastic-cased boreholes (minimum ID of 50 mm) and with source and detector arrays that yield similar frequency ranges and vertical depth resolutions as the surface reflection surveys. Compressional- (P-) wave logging uses a multichannel hydrophone array with 0.5-m detector spacings in a fluid-filled borehole and a high-frequency, in-hole shotgun source at the surface. Overlapping array positions downhole results in redundant first-arrival data which can be processed to provide accurate interval velocities. The data also can be displayed as a record suite, showing reflections and directly correlating reflection events with depths. Example applications include identification of gas zones, lithological boundaries within unconsolidated sediments, and the overburden-bedrock interface. Shear- (S-) wave logging uses a slimhole, well-locked, three-component (3-C) geophone pod and a horizontally polarized, hammer-and-loaded-plate source at ground surface. In unconsolidated sediments, shear-wave velocity contrasts can be associated with changes in material density or dynamic shear modulus, which in turn can be related to consolidation. Example applications include identification of a lithological boundary for earthquake hazard applications and mapping massive ice within permafrost materials.

  9. Seismic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Dennis

    2009-05-01

    Textron Systems (Textron) has been using geophones for target detection for many years. This sensing capability was utilized for detection and classification purposes only. Recently Textron has been evaluating multiaxis geophones to calculate bearings and track targets more specifically personnel. This capability will not only aid the system in locating personnel in bearing space or cartesian space but also enhance detection and reduce false alarms. Textron has been involved in the testing and evaluation of several sensors at multiple sites. One of the challenges of calculating seismic bearing is an adequate signal to noise ratio. The sensor signal to noise ratio is a function of sensor coupling to the ground, seismic propagation and range to target. The goals of testing at multiple sites are to gain a good understanding of the maximum and minimum ranges for bearing and detection and to exploit that information to tailor sensor system emplacement to achieve desired performance. Test sites include 10A Site Devens, MA, McKenna Airfield Ft. Benning, GA and Yuma Proving Ground Yuma, AZ. Geophone sensors evaluated include a 28 Hz triax spike, a 15 Hz triax spike and a hybrid triax spike consisting of a 10 Hz vertical geophone and two 28 Hz horizontal geophones. The algorithm uses raw seismic data to calculate the bearings. All evaluated sensors have triaxial geophone configuration mounted to a spike housing/fixture. The suite of sensors also compares various types of geophones to evaluate benefits in lower bandwidth. The data products of these tests include raw geophone signals, seismic features, seismic bearings, seismic detection and GPS position truth data. The analyses produce Probability of Detection vs range, bearing accuracy vs range, and seismic feature level vs range. These analysis products are compared across test sites and sensor types.

  10. Tribological properties of rare earth oxide added Cr 3C 2-NiCr coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Lu, Xinchun; Luo, Jianbin

    2007-02-01

    A novel supersonic plasma spraying was used to prepare rare earth oxide added Cr 3C 2-NiCr coatings. X-ray diffractometer, contact surface profiler, hardness tester, micro-friction and -wear tester, environmental scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy were employed to investigate the phase structure, surface morphology, microhardness, and friction properties of deposited coatings, respectively. The results show that surface roughness, microhardness, brittle fracture, friction extent and wear resistance of rare earth oxide added Cr 3C 2-NiCr coatings are effectively improved compared with that of unadded one. The friction and friction mechanism are also discussed.

  11. Distribution of seismic intensities of the November 6, 1988, Lancang-Gengma earthquakes and their surface ruptures in Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Qiang, Zuji; Yuan, Zhuzhong; Wang, Yanglong; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Xiang; Gu, Yishan

    1992-05-01

    On November 6, 1988, two earthquakes with magnitude>7 occurred on the Lancang-Gengma fault zone in south-west China. The extensive destruction and loss of lives resulted mainly from widespread collapse of unreinforced masonry and mud brick structures; the maximum preliminary intensity of the Lancang earthquakes was IX on the Chinese scale, which is similar to the Modified Mercall scale, and the highest preliminary intensity of the Gengma earthquake was probably X. The surface manifestation of tectonic activity of the Lancang earthquake was the occurrence of the earthquake-related extensional ground cracks and small fault scarps in the epicentral region. The cracks with small fault scarps occurred mainly in four relatively continuous north-northwest-trending linear zones that ranged from a few hundred meters to 6 km in length. The area within which the cracks and small scarps occurred is 35 km long by 3 km wide. The maximum net throw and the dextral horizontal offset were 1.5m and 1.4m, respectively. Clear evidence of new surface faulting caused by the Gengma earthquake includes a series of relatively continuous north-northwest-trending linear ground crack zones and a 5 km long section of fault scarps. The total length of the surface rupture zones of the Gengma earthquakes is about 24 km, with 3.5m maximum net throw and 3m maximum right-lateral slip. Both earthquakes were associated with surface faulting showing a combination of normal and right lateral motion. The distribution of seismic intensities and surface rupture characteristics of these two earthquakes are discussed in this paper.

  12. CVD growth and properties of boron phosphide on 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padavala, Balabalaji; Frye, C. D.; Wang, Xuejing; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Edgar, J. H.

    2016-09-01

    Improving the crystalline quality of boron phosphide (BP) is essential for realizing its full potential in semiconductor device applications. In this study, 3C-SiC was tested as a substrate for BP epitaxy. BP films were grown on 3C-SiC(100)/Si, 3C-SiC(111)/Si, and 3C-SiC(111)/4H-SiC(0001) substrates in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Films were produced with good crystalline orientation and morphological features in the temperature range of 1000-1200 °C using a PH3+B2H6+H2 mixture. Rotational twinning was absent in the BP due to the crystal symmetry-matching with 3C-SiC. Confocal 3D Raman imaging of BP films revealed primarily uniform peak shift and peak widths across the scanned area, except at defects on the surface. Synchrotron white beam X-ray topography showed the epitaxial relationship between BP and 3C-SiC was (100) < 011 > BP||(100) < 011 > 3C-SiC and (111) < 11 2 ̅ > BP||(111) < 11 2 ̅ > 3C-SiC. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis indicated residual tensile strain in the films and improved crystalline quality at temperatures below 1200 °C. These results indicated that BP properties could be further enhanced by employing high quality bulk 3C-SiC or 3C-SiC epilayers on 4H-SiC substrates.

  13. Seismic site characterization of an urban dedimentary basin, Livermore Valley, California: Site tesponse, basin-edge-induced surface waves, and 3D simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, Stephen; Leeds, Alena L.; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo; Allen, James P.; Schmitt, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Thirty‐two accelerometers were deployed in the Livermore Valley, California, for approximately one year to study sedimentary basin effects. Many local and near‐regional earthquakes were recorded, including the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa, California, earthquake. The resulting ground‐motion data set is used to quantify the seismic response of the Livermore basin, a major structural depression in the California Coast Range Province bounded by active faults. Site response is calculated by two methods: the reference‐site spectral ratio method and a source‐site spectral inversion method. Longer‐period (≥1  s) amplification factors follow the same general pattern as Bouguer gravity anomaly contours. Site response spectra are inverted for shallow shear‐wave velocity profiles, which are consistent with independent information. Frequency–wavenumber analysis is used to analyze plane‐wave propagation across the Livermore Valley and to identify basin‐edge‐induced surface waves with back azimuths different from the source back azimuth. Finite‐element simulations in a 3D velocity model of the region illustrate the generation of basin‐edge‐induced surface waves and point out strips of elevated ground velocities along the margins of the basin.

  14. Tilt and seismicity changes in the Shumagin seismic gap

    SciTech Connect

    Beavan, J.; Hauksson, E.; McNutt, S.R.; Bilham, R.; Jacob, K.H.

    1983-10-21

    Changes in the ground surface tilt and in the rate of seismicity indicate that an aseismic deformation event may have occurred between 1978 and 1980 along the plate boundary in the eastern Aleutians, Alaska, within the Shumagin seismic gap. Pavlof Volcano was unusually quiescent during this period. The proposed event would cause an increase of stress on the shallow locked portion of the plate boundary, bringing it closer to rupture in a great earthquake.

  15. Influence of near-surface volcanic structure on long-period seismic signals and on moment tensor inversions: Simulated examples from Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Christopher; Lokmer, Ivan; O'Brien, Gareth

    2008-08-01

    Long-period (LP) seismicity on volcanoes is thought to be associated with moving fluids or resonating fluid-filled conduits, hence LP moment tensor (MT) source inversions might have a direct bearing on our understanding of the plumbing system. Using 3-D full wavefield simulations and 2-D sensitivity kernels in a digital elevation model of Mount Etna, we investigate the influence of near-surface volcanic structure on LP signals and on moment tensor inversions. Contrary to common wisdom in crustal seismology we find that, despite their relatively long wavelengths, LPs are severely distorted by near-surface structures including layering and topographic features. In particular near-surface low-velocity structures which are commonly observed on volcanoes play a critical role in controlling the nature of LP signals. If not accounted for, these path effects leak into the source solution, leading to the emergence of erroneous source geometries, spurious forces and incorrect source time functions. This is particularly problematic if one adopts an "unconstrained" solution space for the source, with many free parameters. Hence there is a fine balance in the trade-off between the velocity model and the source. In the absence of high-resolution near-surface velocity control we demonstrate the importance of employing a priori source information from other fields (e.g., structural geology), for shallow LPs, constraining the number of free parameters in the inversion. A probabilistic approach should then be taken, as the model with the "best fit" is not necessarily the "true" solution.

  16. Elastic-Wavefield Seismic Stratigraphy: A New Seismic Imaging Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bob A. Hardage; Milo M. Backus; Michael V. DeAngelo; Sergey Fomel; Khaled Fouad; Robert J. Graebner; Paul E. Murray; Randy Remington; Diana Sava

    2006-07-31

    The purpose of our research has been to develop and demonstrate a seismic technology that will provide the oil and gas industry a better methodology for understanding reservoir and seal architectures and for improving interpretations of hydrocarbon systems. Our research goal was to expand the valuable science of seismic stratigraphy beyond the constraints of compressional (P-P) seismic data by using all modes (P-P, P-SV, SH-SH, SV-SV, SV-P) of a seismic elastic wavefield to define depositional sequences and facies. Our objective was to demonstrate that one or more modes of an elastic wavefield may image stratal surfaces across some stratigraphic intervals that are not seen by companion wave modes and thus provide different, but equally valid, information regarding depositional sequences and sedimentary facies within that interval. We use the term elastic wavefield stratigraphy to describe the methodology we use to integrate seismic sequences and seismic facies from all modes of an elastic wavefield into a seismic interpretation. We interpreted both onshore and marine multicomponent seismic surveys to select the data examples that we use to document the principles of elastic wavefield stratigraphy. We have also used examples from published papers that illustrate some concepts better than did the multicomponent seismic data that were available for our analysis. In each interpretation study, we used rock physics modeling to explain how and why certain geological conditions caused differences in P and S reflectivities that resulted in P-wave seismic sequences and facies being different from depth-equivalent S-wave sequences and facies across the targets we studied.

  17. Processing of high resolution seismic reflection data of Outokumpu, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, S. E.; Schijns, H.; Schmitt, D. R.; Heikkinen, P. J.; Kukkonen, I.; Duo, X.

    2008-12-01

    The Outokumpu area, located in eastern Finland, is well known for its unconventional Precambrian sulphide deposits. In 2004-2005 a 2,5 km deep research borehole of ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) was drilled on the south-east side of the main ore belt. The main lithologies observed in Outokumpu deep drill hole were mica schist with biotite-gneiss layers (upper 2 km) underlain by pegmatic granite. The ophiolite-related Outokumpu-assemblage rocks were observed at depth range of 1,3-1,5 km. In May 2006 high resolution seismic soundings were done near the drill hole in two crooked lines to further refine the geological model of the area. Vibrator source with linear upsweep from 15 to 250 Hz was used in 20 m interval. In reflection/refraction survey 14 Hz geophones were spaced in 4 m apart. During VSP measurements 3C downhole receiver was positioned at depths of 1000, 1750 and 2500 m. Processing of Outokumpu high resolution seismic reflection data included amplitude and gain corrections, band-bass filtering, careful velocity analysis and static corrections. In Outokumpu substantial topographical variation and significant velocity contrast between the glacially deposited overburden and the bedrock caused a severe travel time variations in near surface. Static corrections were done by using standard refraction method and tomographic approach. Tomographic model of near surface layers was done using traveltime inversions of critically refracted P-wave arrivals of refraction data collected in May 2006. Quality of unmigrated stack was clearly better when tomographic model was used for static corrections. In Outokumpu both sonic log data and velocity model derived from VSP-measurements were used to improve the quality of velocity analysis. Processing of the reflection seismic data revealed a good correlation between the seismic section and the lithologies observed in deep drill hole. Sonic and density logs were used to calculate acoustic impedances

  18. Optical investigation of bulk electron mobility in 3C-SiC films on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piluso, N.; Severino, A.; Camarda, M.; Canino, A.; La Magna, A.; La Via, F.

    2010-10-01

    The dependence between the carrier concentration and electrical mobility has been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy in n-doped 3C-SiC films grown on (111) and (100) Silicon oriented substrates. Bulk mobility varies between 10 and 510 cm2 V-1 s-1 for a carrier concentration ranging between 1.6×1016 and 5.4×1018 cm-3. Local stacking variations observed on the (111) 3C-SiC surface lead to a worse crystal morphology compared to (100) 3C-SiC films resulting in a decrease in the average bulk mobility. Defects are thus accountable for the dependence between mobility and carrier concentration for different 3C-SiC orientations.

  19. Using shallow seismic tomography to characterize patterns of near-surface weathering and the mobile-immobile regolith transition: Implications for the erodibility and morphology of hillslopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, B. A.; Kirby, E.; Burbank, D. W.; West, N.

    2014-12-01

    We use 2D tomography of P- and S-wave velocities (Vp, Vs), based on seismic refraction and surface wave analyses, to characterize subsurface architecture and erodibility of hillslopes. Calibrating the seismic imagery with direct field observations allows us to quantify mechanical properties, image depth-dependent variations in weathering intensity, and identify the mobile-immobile regolith transition and differences in transport efficiency of mobile layers. We conducted a cross-CZO comparison of N- and S-facing slopes at Boulder Creek and Shale Hills CZOs (BcCZO and SSHCZO) to investigate how near-surface weathering and hillslope morphology are influenced by differences in regional geology and climatic as well as local variations in aspect-controlled microclimate. Niwot Ridge (BcCZO) is a high alpine site with minimal soil/veg cover, characterized by steeper S-facing hillslopes; whereas, SSHCZO is a temperate, densely-forested, soil-mantled site with steeper N-facing slopes. On Niwot Ridge, the depth of the weathering front and thickness of mobile regolith are substantially greater on shallower N-facing slopes; however, velocity-based estimates of transport efficiency are higher on S-facing slopes. Although, thin mobile regolith on S-facing slopes may be weaker (slower V), the lower gradient of N-facing slopes and southward asymmetry of the ridge divide, suggests greater transport efficiency on N-facing aspects. This can be explained by the dominance of frost/freeze process on N-facing slopes, which can efficiently develop and transport the thick mobile regolith. At SSHCZO, depths of weathering fronts are invariant with slope aspect, suggesting that aspect control is not a predominant mechanism driving regolith production. Mobile regolith thickness, however, is more than 2-fold greater on N-facing slopes. Additionally, mobile regolith on both slope aspects is primarily composed of well-developed soils. N-facing soils are thicker with greater cohesion, moisture, and

  20. Glycine decarboxylase in C3, C4 and C3-C4 intermediate species.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Stefanie; Westhoff, Peter; Gowik, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) plays a central role in photorespiration. GDC is localized in the mitochondria and together with serine hydroxymethyltransferase it converts two molecules of glycine to one molecule of serine, CO2 and NH3. Overexpression of GDC subunits in the C3 species Arabidopsis thaliana can increase the metabolic flux through the photorespiratory pathway leading to enhanced photosynthetic efficiency and consequently to an enhanced biomass production of the transgenic plants. Changing the spatial expression patterns of GDC subunits was an important step during the evolution of C3-C4 intermediate and likely also C4 plants. Restriction of the GDC activity to the bundle sheath cells led to the establishment of a photorespiratory CO2 pump. PMID:27038285

  1. On the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c classification.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina

    2012-10-01

    As there are ambiguities in classification of the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c, relatively frequent in populations of Northern Asia, we analyzed all three haplogroup-defining markers M48, M77 and M86 in C3-M217-individuals from Siberia, Eastern Asia and Eastern Europe. We have found that haplogroup C3c is characterized by the derived state at M48, whereas mutations at both M77 and M86 define subhaplogroup C3c1. The branch defined by M48 alone would belong to subhaplogroup C3c*, characteristic for some populations of Central and Eastern Siberia, such as Koryaks, Evens, Evenks and Yukaghirs. Subhaplogroup C3c* individuals could be considered as remnants of the Neolithic population of Siberia, based on the age of C3c*-short tandem repeat variation amounting to 4.5 ± 2.4 thousand years. PMID:22810113

  2. Compressional wave character in gassy, near-surface sediments in southern Louisiana determined from variable frequency cross-well, borehole logging, and surface seismic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, L.D.; Wilkey, P.L.; Fasnacht, T.

    1995-06-01

    Velocity and attenuation data were used to test theoretical equations describing the frequency dependence of compressional wave velocity and attenuation through gas-rich sediments in coastal Louisiana. The cross-well data were augmented with velocities derived from a nearby seismic refraction station using a low-frequency source. Energy at 1 and 3 kHz was successfully transmitted over distances from 3.69 to 30 m; the 5 and 7-kHz data were obtained only at distances up to 20 m. Velocity tomograms were constructed for one borehole pair and covered a depth interval of 10--50 m. Results from the tomographic modeling indicate that gas-induced low velocities are present to depths of greater than 40 m. Analysis of the velocity dispersion suggests that gas-bubble resonance must be greater than 7 kHz, which is above the range of frequencies used in the experiment. Washout of the boreholes at depths above 15 m resulted in a degassed zone containing velocities higher than those indicated in both nearby refraction and reflection surveys. Velocity and attenuation information were obtained for a low-velocity zone centered at a depth of approximately 18 m. Measured attenuations of 1.57, 2.95, and 3.24 dB/m for the 3-, 5-, and 7-kHz signals, respectively, were modeled along with the velocity data using a silt-clay sediment type. Density and porosity data for the model were obtained from the geophysical logs; the bulk and shear moduli were estimated from published relationships. Modeling results indicate that gas bubbles measuring 1 mm in diameter occupy at least 25% to 35% of the pore space.

  3. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  4. Lunar seismic data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The scientific data transmitted continuously from all ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package) stations on the Moon and recorded on instrumentation tapes at receiving stations distributed around the Earth were processed. The processing produced sets of computer-compatible digital tapes, from which various other data sets convenient for analysis were generated. The seismograms were read, various types of seismic events were classified; the detected events were cataloged.

  5. Seismic Symphonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    The project started in 2008 as a sound installation, a collaboration between an artist, a barrel organ builder and a seismologist. The work differs from other attempts of sound transposition of seismic records. In this case seismic frequencies are not converted automatically into the "sound of the earthquake." However, it has been studied a musical translation system that, based on the organ tonal scale, generates a totally unexpected sequence of sounds which is intended to evoke the emotions aroused by the earthquake. The symphonies proposed in the project have somewhat peculiar origins: they in fact come to life from the translation of graphic tracks into a sound track. The graphic tracks in question are made up by copies of seismograms recorded during some earthquakes that have taken place around the world. Seismograms are translated into music by a sculpture-instrument, half a seismograph and half a barrel organ. The organ plays through holes practiced on paper. Adapting the documents to the instrument score, holes have been drilled on the waves' peaks. The organ covers about three tonal scales, starting from heavy and deep sounds it reaches up to high and jarring notes. The translation of the seismic records is based on a criterion that does match the highest sounds to larger amplitudes with lower ones to minors. Translating the seismogram in the organ score, the larger the amplitude of recorded waves, the more the seismogram covers the full tonal scale played by the barrel organ and the notes arouse an intense emotional response in the listener. Elisa Strinna's Seismic Symphonies installation becomes an unprecedented tool for emotional involvement, through which can be revived the memory of the greatest disasters of over a century of seismic history of the Earth. A bridge between art and science. Seismic Symphonies is also a symbolic inversion: the instrument of the organ is most commonly used in churches, and its sounds are derived from the heavens and

  6. Heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC on Si with Various Carbonization Process Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeung C.; Coy, John; Kim, Sangho; Capano, Michael A.

    2009-04-01

    The surface morphology and crystallinity of cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films are the most important factors to affect performance of 3C-SiC-based electronic devices. This article presents the effect of carbonization condition, such as the process temperature and the source gas flow rate, on the surface roughness and crystalline quality of heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films grown on Si(001) substrates. Morphological analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that decreasing the carbon-based precursor gas-on temperature from 1100°C to 700°C after in situ cleaning significantly improves the surface morphology of subsequent 3C-SiC films. Also, decreasing the carbonization temperature from 1250°C to 1150°C reduces the protrusion defect density from >400/mm2 to <30/mm2. Comparison of crystalline quality of 3C-SiC with two different propane gas flow rates of 3 sccm and 15 sccm during carbonization, using x-ray diffractometry and scanning probe microscopy, indicates little influence on crystalline quality as flow rate changes.

  7. Atomic probe microscopy of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckl, A. J.; Roth, M. D.; Powell, J. A.; Larkin, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The surface of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates has been studied by atomic probe microscopy in air. Atomic-scale images of the 3C SiC surface have been obtained by STM which confirm the 111 line type orientation of the cubic 3C layer grown on the 0001 plane type surface of the hexagonal 6H substrate. The nearest-neighbor atomic spacing for the 3C layer has been measured to be 3.29 +/- 0.2 A, which is within 7 percent of the bulk value. Shallow terraces in the 3C layer have been observed by STM to separate regions of very smooth growth in the vicinity of the 3C nucleation point from considerably rougher 3C surface regions. These terraces are oriented at right angles to the growth direction. Atomic force microscopy has been used to study etch pits present on the 6H substrate due to high temperature HCl cleaning prior to CVD growth of the 3C layer. The etch pits have hexagonal symmetry and vary in depth from 50 nm to 1 micron.

  8. Sound velocities of iron carbides (Fe3C and Fe7C3) under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Zhang, D.; Liu, J.; Bi, W.; Zhao, J.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    For a carbon-rich core, iron carbides might be the major phase crystallizing to form the Earth's solid inner core. On basis of high-pressure experiments and theoretical calculations, Fe3C, Fe7C3 and more recently Fe2C have been considered as the most stable carbide phase under the inner core conditions. The identity of the stable carbide phase in a carbon-containing inner core is still a topic under active debate. It is crucial to determine the elastic and acoustic properties of the relevant carbide phases to core conditions, in order to test the carbon-rich core composition model. In this study, we have performed nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) measurements of both Fe7C3 and Fe3C up to core pressures at 300 K and determined their shear-wave (VS) and compressional-wave (VP) velocities for comparison with seismic observations of the inner core. The high-pressure magnetic properties of both phases have also been investigated by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and Synchrotron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (SMS). Our results show that the magnetic transitions from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic and then to nonmagnetic in Fe7C3 and Fe3C significantly affects their VS and VP at high pressures. Extrapolating the sound velocities of the nonmagnetic phases to the inner core conditions, we found that sound velocities, particularly VS, of the iron carbides are markedly low comparing with iron and other iron-rich alloys, making them compelling candidates to explain the seismic observations of the inner core. Our hypothesis of a carbon-rich core may also be consistent with geochemical and petrological evidence on deep carbon inventory in Earth's interior.

  9. Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Arrival Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Data for Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Structure Around SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.; Maceira, M.; Roux, P.

    2013-12-01

    The crust around the San Andreas Fault Observatory at depth (SAFOD) has been the subject of many geophysical studies aimed at characterizing in detail the fault zone structure and elucidating the lithologies and physical properties of the surrounding rocks. Seismic methods in particular have revealed the complex two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the crustal volume around SAFOD and the strong velocity reduction in the fault damage zone. In this study we conduct a joint inversion using body-wave arrival times and surface-wave dispersion data to image the P-and S-wave velocity structure of the upper crust surrounding SAFOD. The two data types have complementary strengths - the body-wave data have good resolution at depth, albeit only where there are crossing rays between sources and receivers, whereas the surface waves have very good near-surface resolution and are not dependent on the earthquake source distribution because they are derived from ambient noise. The body-wave data are from local earthquakes and explosions, comprising the dataset analyzed by Zhang et al. (2009). The surface-wave data are for Love waves from ambient noise correlations, and are from Roux et al. (2011). The joint inversion code is based on the regional-scale version of the double-difference (DD) tomography algorithm tomoDD. The surface-wave inversion code that is integrated into the joint inversion algorithm is from Maceira and Ammon (2009). The propagator matrix solver in the algorithm DISPER80 (Saito, 1988) is used for the forward calculation of dispersion curves from layered velocity models. We examined how the structural models vary as we vary the relative weighting of the fit to the two data sets and in comparison to the previous separate inversion results. The joint inversion with the 'optimal' weighting shows more clearly the U-shaped local structure from the Buzzard Canyon Fault on the west side of SAF to the Gold Hill Fault on the east side.

  10. Seismic sensitivity to sub-surface solar activity from 18 yr of GOLF/SoHO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Turck-Chièze, S.

    2015-06-01

    Solar activity has significantly changed over the last two Schwabe cycles. After a long and deep minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the weaker activity of Cycle 24 contrasts with the previous cycles. In this work, the response of the solar acoustic oscillations to solar activity is used in order to provide insights into the structural and magnetic changes in the sub-surface layers of the Sun during this on-going unusual period of low activity. We analyze 18 yr of continuous observations of the solar acoustic oscillations collected by the Sun-as-a-star GOLF instrument on board the SoHO spacecraft. From the fitted mode frequencies, the temporal variability of the frequency shifts of the radial, dipolar, and quadrupolar modes are studied for different frequency ranges that are sensitive to different layers in the solar sub-surface interior. The low-frequency modes show nearly unchanged frequency shifts between Cycles 23 and 24, with a time evolving signature of the quasi-biennial oscillation, which is particularly visible for the quadrupole component revealing the presence of a complex magnetic structure. The modes at higher frequencies show frequency shifts that are 30% smaller during Cycle 24, which is in agreement with the decrease observed in the surface activity between Cycles 23 and 24. The analysis of 18 yr of GOLF oscillations indicates that the structural and magnetic changes responsible for the frequency shifts remained comparable between Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 in the deeper sub-surface layers below 1400 km as revealed by the low-frequency modes. The frequency shifts of the higher-frequency modes, sensitive to shallower regions, show that Cycle 24 is magnetically weaker in the upper layers of Sun. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe following 68 GOLF frequency tables are available and Table A.1 is also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  11. S-wave velocities down to 1 km below the Peteroa volcano, Argentina, obtained from surface waves retrieved by means of ambient-noise seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepore, Simone; Gomez, Martin; Draganov, Deyan

    2015-04-01

    The main force driving the tectonics in South America is the subduction of the Nazca Plate below the South American plate. The subduction process generated numerous volcanoes in both Chile and Argentina, of which the majority is concentrated along the Chilean Argentine border. The recent explosive eruptions of some volcanoescaused concern of the population in both countries. At the beginning of 2012, a large temporary array was installed in the Malargüe region, Mendoza, Argentina, with the purpose of imaging the subsurface and monitoring the tectonic activity. The array was deployed until the end of 2012 to record continuously ambient noise and the local, regional, and global seismicity. It consisted of 38 seismic stations divided in two sub arrays, namely the PV array of six stations located on the east flank of the Peteroa volcano, and the T array of thirty two stations spread out on a plateau just north east of the town of Malargüe. Here,the focus will be on the PV array, which has a patch-like shape. Due to the intra-station distances, we chose to use for surface-wave retrieval the bands 0.8 Hz ÷ 4.0 Hz, 10 Hz ÷ 25 Hz. At the investigated area, most of the year there is little anthropogenic noise, which normally dominates frequencies above 1 Hz, meaning that the selected frequency bands can be used for surface-wave retrieval from noise. Using beamforming, we showed that for these bands, the noise is illuminating the stations from the west. This means that a correct surface-wave arrivals can be retrieved for station pairs oriented in that direction. Because of this, we used for retrieval only such station pairs. We cross-correlated the recordings on the vertical components and retrieved Rayleigh waves. By manual picking, we estimated for both bands velocity dispersion curves from the retrieved surface-wave arrivals. The curves were then inverted to obtain the velocity structure under the stations. The obtained S wave velocity depth profiles for the 10 Hz

  12. Exploring Critical Assumptions of Petrophysical Models in Fractured Aquifers by Comparing Estimated Porosity Values Obtained from Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Shallow Seismic Refraction Surveys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinchum, B. A.; Holbrook, W. S.; Grana, D.; Parsekian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating subsurface porosity from most near-surface geophysical techniques relies on petrophysical relationships. Using petrophysical relationships are challenging because they require many assumptions and oftentimes require site-specific constants. Despite complexities and challenges, the petrophysical relationships are critical to convert the measurable physical properties into hydrologic properties such as porosity, water content and ultimately hydraulic conductivity. In this study we compare porosities derived from shallow seismic refraction (SSR) and surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) in a fractured granite aquifer in the Laramie Range, Wyoming. To estimate porosity from the SSR data we use a Bayesian inversion based on Hertz-Mindlin contact theory and Hashin- Strickman boundaries. This type of petrophysical model requires us to make assumptions about the grain structure, mineralogy and water content. Using water table measurements from a borehole we assume that all pores are fully saturated below 10 meters, thus the SNMR measurement provides an estimate of porosity. If the petrophysical model and the assumptions that are required to use it were correct and the SNMR measurements were perfect, the estimates of porosities derived from two distinct physical measurements should provide the same porosity. Interestingly, we observe a large discrepancy in the porosities derived from this unique combination of measurements. At depths of 10 to 20 meters, the area that we interpret as fractured bedrock and where the assumption of fully saturated pores holds, the SSR predicted porosities are 15 to 20 % higher than those predicted by SNMR. Previous comparisons of the Bayesian inversion have shown it does well to predict porosity within the saprolite. The large discrepancy illustrates the need to use separate petrophysical models in the weathered and fractured zones of granite aquifers. More research is needed to figure out how to combine different petrophysical

  13. Benchmarking Passive Seismic Methods of Imaging Surface Wave Velocity Interfaces Down to 300 m — Mapping Murray Basin Thickness in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatov, A.; Czarnota, K.

    2015-12-01

    In shallow passive seismology it is generally thought that the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method is more robust than the horizontal over vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method at resolving the depth to surface-wave velocity (Vs) interfaces. Here we present results of a field test of these two methods over ten drill sites in Victoria, Australia. The target interface is the base of Cenozoic unconsolidated to semi-consolidated clastic and/or carbonate sediments of the Murray Basin, which overlie Paleozoic crystalline rocks. Drilled depths of this interface are between 27 and 300 m. A three-arm spiral array, with a radius of 250 m, consisting of 13 Trillium compact broadband seismometers was deployed at each site for 7-21 hours. The Vs architecture beneath each site was determined through nonlinear inversion of HVSR and SPAC data using the neighborhood algorithm of Sambridge (1999) implemented in geopsy by Wathelet et al (2005). The HVSR technique yielded depth estimates, of the target interface (Vs > 1000 m/s), generally within 20% error. Successful estimates were even obtained at a site with an inverted velocity profile, where Quaternary basalts overlie Neogene sediments. Half of the SPAC estimates showed significantly higher errors than obtained using HVSR. Joint inversion provided the most reliable estimates but was unstable at three sites. We attribute the surprising success of HVSR over SPAC to a low content of transient signals within the seismic record caused by low degrees of anthropogenic noise at the benchmark sites. At a few sites SPAC curves showed clear overtones suggesting that more reliable SPAC estimates maybe obtained utilizing a multi modal inversion. Nevertheless, our study seems to indicate that reliable basin thickness estimates in remote Australia can be obtained utilizing HVSR data from a single seismometer, without a priori knowledge of the surface-wave velocity of the basin material, thereby negating the need to deploy cumbersome arrays.

  14. Effluent sampling of Titan 3 C vehicle exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Storey, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Downwind in situ ground-level measurements of the exhaust from a Titan 3 C launch vehicle were made during a normal launch. The measurement activity was conducted as part of an overall program to obtain field data for comparison with the multilayer dispersion model currently being used to predict the behavior of rocket vehicle exhaust clouds. All measurements were confined to land, ranging from the launch pad to approximately 2 kilometers downwind from the pad. Measurement systems included detectors for hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon dioxide (CO2), and particulates (Al2O3). Airborne and ground-based optical systems were employed to monitor exhaust cloud rise, growth, and movement. These measurement systems, located along the ground track (45 deg azimuth from the launch pad) of the exhaust cloud, showed no effluents attributable to the launch. Some hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide were detected in the surface wind direction (15 deg azimuth) from the pad. Comparisons with the model were made in three areas: (1) assumption of cloud geometry at stabilization; (2) prediction of cloud stabilization altitude; and (3) prediction of the path of cloud travel. In addition, the importance of elemental analyses of the particulate samples is illustrated.

  15. Structural Geology of the Northwestern Portion of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico: Implications for Seismic Surface Rupture Potential from TA-3 to TA-55

    SciTech Connect

    Jamie N. Gardner: Alexis Lavine; Giday WoldeGabriel; Donathon Krier; David Vaniman; Florie Caporuscio; Claudia Lewis; Peggy Reneau; Emily Kluk; M. J. Snow

    1999-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory lies at the western boundary of the Rio Grande rift, a major tectonic feature of the North American Continent. Three major faults locally constitute the modem rift boundary, and each of these is potentially seismogenic. In this study we have gathered structural geologic data for the northwestern portion of Los Alamos National Laboratory through high-precision geologic mapping, conventional geologic mapping, stratigraphic studies, drilling, petrologic studies, and stereographic aerial photograph analyses. Our study area encompasses TA-55 and TA-3, where potential for seismic surface rupture is of interest, and is bounded on the north and south by the townsite of Los Alamos and Twomile Canyon, respectively. The study area includes parts of two of the potentially active rift boundary faults--the Pajarito and Rendija Canyon faults-that form a large graben that we name the Diamond Drive graben. The graben embraces the western part of the townsite of Los Alamos, and its southern end is in the TA-3 area where it is defined by east-southeast-trending cross faults. The cross faults are small, but they accommodate interactions between the two major fault zones and gentle tilting of structural blocks to the north into the graben. North of Los Alamos townsite, the Rendija Canyon fault is a large normal fault with about 120 feet of down-to-the-west displacement over the last 1.22 million years. South from Los Alamos townsite, the Rendija Canyon fault splays to the southwest into a broad zone of deformation. The zone of deformation is about 2,000 feet wide where it crosses Los Alamos Canyon and cuts through the Los Alamos County Landfill. Farther southwest, the fault zone is about 3,000 feet wide at the southeastern corner of TA-3 in upper Mortandad Canyon and about 5,000 feet wide in Twomile Canyon. Net down-to-the-west displacement across the entire fault zone over the last 1.22 million years decreases to the south as the fault zone broadens as

  16. Surface deformation and seismic signatures associated with the eruption cycle of Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, F. G.; Johnson, H. E., III; LeWinter, A. L.; Finnegan, D. C.; Sandvol, E. A.; Nayak, A.; Hurwitz, S.

    2014-12-01

    Geysers are important subjects for studying processes involved with multi-phase eruptions. As part of a larger field effort, this study applies imaging geodesy and seismology to study eruptive cycles of the Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park. Lone Star Geyser is an ideal candidate for such study, as it erupts with a nearly regular period of approximately 3 hours. The geyser includes a 5 m diameter cone that rises 2 meters above the sinter terrace, and the entire system can be viewed from a nearby hillside. Fieldwork was accomplished during April 2014. Ground-based interferometric radar (GBIR) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) were used to image possible surface deformations associated with Lone Star Geyer's eruption cycles. Additional observations were provided by global positioning system (GPS) measurements and six broad-band seismometers deployed in the immediate vicinity of the geyser. The GBIR and TLS were deployed approximately 65 meters from the sinter cone of the geyser. The GBIR involves a ku-band radar (1.7 cm wavelength) that is sensitive to approximately half-millimeter changes in the line-of-sight distance. Radar images were acquired every minute for 3 or more eruptions per day. Temporally redundant, overlapping interferograms were used to improve the sensitivity and interpolate a minute-wise time series of line-of-sight displacement, and efforts were made to account for possible path-delay effects resulting from water vapor around the geyser cone. Repeat (every minute) high-speed TLS scans were acquired for multiple eruption cycles over the course of two-days. Resulting measurement point spacing on the sinter cone was ~3cm. The TLS point-clouds were geo-referenced using static surveyed reflectors and scanner positions. In addition to measuring ground deformation, filtering and classification of the TLS point cloud was used to construct a mask that allows radar interferometry to exclude non-ground areas (vegetation, snow, sensors

  17. A university-developed seismic source for shallow seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordkayhun, Sawasdee; Na Suwan, Jumras

    2012-07-01

    The main objectives of this study were to (1) design and develop a low cost seismic source for shallow seismic surveys and (2) test the performance of the developed source at a test site. The surface seismic source, referred to here as a university-developed seismic source is based upon the principle of an accelerated weight drop. A 30 kg activated mass is lifted by a mechanical rack and pinion gear and is accelerated by a mounted spring. When the mass is released from 0.5 m above the surface, it hits a 30 kg base plate and energy is transferred to the ground, generating a seismic wave. The developed source is portable, environmentally friendly, easy to operate and maintain, and is a highly repeatable impact source. To compare the developed source with a sledgehammer source, a source test was performed at a test site, a study site for mapping a major fault zone in southern Thailand. The sledgehammer and the developed sources were shot along a 300 m long seismic reflection profile with the same parameters. Data were recorded using 12 channels off-end geometry with source and receiver spacing of 5 m, resulting in CDP stacked sections with 2.5 m between traces. Source performances were evaluated based on analyses of signal penetration, frequency content and repeatability, as well as the comparison of stacked sections. The results show that both surface sources are suitable for seismic studies down to a depth of about 200 m at the site. The hammer data are characterized by relatively higher frequency signals than the developed source data, whereas the developed source generates signals with overall higher signal energy transmission and greater signal penetration. In addition, the repeatability of the developed source is considerably higher than the hammer source.

  18. Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynn R.; Wiggins, Graham C.

    1986-01-01

    Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (mb) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 ± 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest U.S. underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in mb for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada. PMID:16593645

  19. Multichannel analysis of surface-waves and integration of downhole acoustic televiewer imaging, ultrasonic Vs and Vp, and vertical seismic profiling in an NEHRP-standard classification, South of Concordia, Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raef, Abdelmoneam; Gad, Sabreen; Tucker-Kulesza, Stacey

    2015-10-01

    Seismic site characteristics, as pertaining to earthquake hazard reduction, are a function of the subsurface elastic moduli and the geologic structures. This study explores how multiscale (surface, downhole, and laboratory) datasets can be utilized to improve "constrained" average Vs30 (shear-wave velocity to a 30-meter depth). We integrate borehole, surface and laboratory measurements for a seismic site classification based on the standards of the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). The seismic shear-wave velocity (Vs30) was derived from a geophysical inversion workflow that utilized multichannel analysis of surface-waves (MASW) and downhole acoustic televiewer imaging (DATI). P-wave and S-wave velocities, based on laboratory measurements of arrival times of ultrasonic-frequency signals, supported the workflow by enabling us to calculate Poisson's ratio, which was incorporated in building an initial model for the geophysical inversion of MASW. Extraction of core samples from two boreholes provided lithology and thickness calibration of the amplitudes of the acoustic televiewer imaging for each layer. The MASW inversion, for calculating Vs sections, was constrained with both ultrasonic laboratory measurements (from first arrivals of Vs and Vp waveforms at simulated in situ overburden stress conditions) and the downhole acoustic televiewer (DATV) amplitude logs. The Vs30 calculations enabled categorizing the studied site as NEHRP-class "C" - very dense soil and soft rock. Unlike shallow fractured carbonates in the studied area, S-wave and P-wave velocities at ultrasonic frequency for the deeper intact shale core-samples from two boreholes were in better agreement with the corresponding velocities from both a zero-offset vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and inversion of Rayleigh-wave velocity dispersion curves.

  20. Very High Resolution Optical Images for Detecting Co-seismic Surface Effects: the Cases of the 2005 Kashmir (Pakistan) and the 2003 Bam (Iran) Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, M.; Cinti, F. R.; Stramondo, S.

    2008-12-01

    Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite panchromatic image has revealed to be a reliable tool to detect surface effects of natural disasters. This is particularly true whereas the hit territory is a remote land and/or with logistic and security problems. Data from this kind of sensor have a potential for more exhaustive and accurate mapping of the environment with details of sub-meter ground resolution. We show two large earthquake case studies, the 2005 Mw 7.6 Kashmir and the 2003 Mw 6.6 Bam events, both producing significant surface effects as ruptures, landslides and building damages. In order to test the capability of VHR images to recognize and evaluate such features we used panchromatic QuickBird imagery (0.6 m spatial resolution) acquired before and after the events (kindly provided by DigitalGlobe). Concerning the Pakistan we focus on the Muzaffarabad and Balakot areas, both crossed by the earthquake fault and experiencing edifice collapses. Same sort of analysis is performed for the ancient town of Bam. We proceed with: 1. identification on the images of the main rupture trace and of major landslides; 2. generation of a detailed spatial distribution of damage and collapses through a single building automatic classification approach; 3. cross-comparison of the different surface effects. The QuickBird panchromatic images provide a view of the co-seismic features at large scale, revealing complex geometric pattern of the cracks and compressional deformation features. It is possible to detect the lateral sense of movement, and based on the sun shade projection in the images, we infer the facing of the scarp, thus the uplifted side. Regarding point two, if in one hand the use of QuickBird images leads to detect very small details, on the other hand buildings become rather complex structures. Furthermore they may be surrounded by scattering objects making less evident the contrast between the roofs and the ground, thus increasing the difficulties in the

  1. A shear-wave velocity model of the European upper mantle from automated inversion of seismic shear and surface waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, C.; Meier, T.; Lebedev, S.; Friederich, W.; Viereck-Götte, L.

    2012-04-01

    Broadband waveforms recorded at stations in Europe and surrounding regions were inverted for shear-wave velocity of the European upper mantle. For events between 1995 and 2007 seismograms were collected from all permanent stations for which data are available via the data centers ORFEUS, GEOFON, ReNaSs and IRIS. In addition, we incorporated data from temporary experiments, including SVEKALAPKO, TOR, Eifel Plume, EGELADOS and other projects. Automated Multimode Inversion of surface and S-wave forms was applied to extract structural information from the seismograms, in the form of linear equations with uncorrelated uncertainties. Successful waveform fits for about 70,000 seismograms yielded over 300,000 independent linear equations that were solved together for a three-dimensional tomographic model. Resolution of the imaging is particularly high in the mantle lithosphere and asthenosphere. The highest velocities in the mantle lithosphere of the East European Craton are found at about 150 km depth. There are no indications for a large scale deep cratonic root below about 330 km depth. Lateral variations within the cratonic mantle lithosphere are resolved by our model as well. The locations of diamond bearing kimberlites correlate with reduced S-wave velocities in the cratonic mantle lithosphere. This anomaly is present in regions of both Proterozoic and Archean crust, pointing to an alteration of the mantle lithosphere after the formation of the craton. Strong lateral changes in S-wave velocity are found at the western margin of the East European Craton and hint to erosion of cratonic mantle lithosphere beneath the Scandes by hot asthenosphere. The mantle lithosphere beneath Western Europe and between the Tornquist-Teyissere Zone and the Elbe Line shows moderately high velocities and is of an intermediate character, between cratonic lithosphere and the thin lithosphere of central Europe. In central Europe, Caledonian and Variscian sutures are not associated with

  2. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, "weight-drop" source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  3. A precessing relativistic jet model for 3C 449

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gower, A. C.; Hutchings, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the radio structure of 3C 449 can be matched with a model in which the jets are precessing and have relativistic (beta greater-than or equal to 0.4) velocities. The best-fit model implies a precession period of about 100,000 yr and a cone angle which increases with time. A similar model may be relevant for the radio structure of 3C 31. A brief discussion of the implications for 3C 449 is given.

  4. Surface seismic refraction/reflection measurement determinations of potential site resonances and the areal uniformity of NEHRP site class D in Memphis, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Wood, S.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Meremonte, M.E.; Street, R.; Worley, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    We determined S-wave velocities (Vs) to about 40-m depth at 65 locations in the Memphis-Shelby County, Tennessee, area. The Vs measurements were made using high-resolution seismic refraction and reflection methods on the ground surface. We find a clear difference in the Vs profiles between sites located on the Mississippi River flood plain and those located to the east, mostly covered by loess, in the urban areas of Memphis. The average Vs to 30-m depth at 19 sites on the modern Mississippi River floodplain averages 197 m/s (?? 15 m/s) and places 17 of these sites at the low end of NEHRP soil profile category type D (average Vs 180-360 m/s). The two remaining sites are type E. Vs to 30-m depth at 46 sites in the urban areas east of the modern floodplain are more variable and generally higher than the floodplain sites, averaging about 262 m/s (??45 m/s), still within category D. We often observed the base of the loess as a prominent S-wave reflection and as an increase in Vs to about 500 m/s. Based on the two-way travel time of this reflection, during an earthquake the impedance boundary at the loess base may generate resonances in the 3- to 6-Hz range over many areas of Memphis. Amplitude spectra from four local earthquakes recorded at one site located on loess indicate consistent resonance peaks in the 4.5- to 6.5-Hz range.

  5. Estimating primaries from passive seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hao; Wang, De-Li; Feng, Fei; Zhu, Heng

    2015-12-01

    Passive seismic sources can generally be divided into transient sources and noise sources. Noise sources are particularly the continuous, random small bursts, like background noise. The virtual-shot gathers obtained by the traditional cross-correlation algorithm from passive seismic data not only contain primaries, but also include surface-related multiples. Through estimating primaries by sparse inversion, we can directly obtain primaries from passive seismic data activated by transient sources, which are free of surface-related multiples. The problem of estimating primaries from passive seismic data activated by noise sources has not been discussed to date. First, by introducing the optimisation problem via the L1-norm constraint, this paper makes the traditional method of estimating primaries by sparse inversion from passive seismic data activated by transient sources improved, which overcomes the time-window problem. During the sparse inversion, the sparsifying transform, S = C2⊗W, is introduced. In the sparsifying-transform domain, the transformed data is more sparse, so the solution becomes more accurate. Second, this paper proposes estimating primaries from passive seismic data activated by noise sources. In the case of the sparse assumption not holding, we use the least-squares method based on the principle of minimum energy to estimate primaries from passive seismic data using the noise sources. Finally, we compare the primaries estimated from passive seismic data using transient sources and noise sources and analyse the characteristics of the estimated primaries obtained from two passive seismic data.

  6. Seismic Imager Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Coste, Keith; Cunningham, J.; Sievers,Michael W.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Polanco, Otto R.; Green, Joseph J.; Cameron, Bruce A.; Redding, David C.; Avouac, Jean Philippe; Ampuero, Jean Paul; Leprince, Sebastien; Michel, Remi

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a geostationary seismic imager (GSI), a space telescope in geostationary orbit above the Pacific coast of the Americas that would provide movies of many large earthquakes occurring in the area from Southern Chile to Southern Alaska. The GSI movies would cover a field of view as long as 300 km, at a spatial resolution of 3 to 15 m and a temporal resolution of 1 to 2 Hz, which is sufficient for accurate measurement of surface displacements and photometric changes induced by seismic waves. Computer processing of the movie images would exploit these dynamic changes to accurately measure the rapidly evolving surface waves and surface ruptures as they happen. These measurements would provide key information to advance the understanding of the mechanisms governing earthquake ruptures, and the propagation and arrest of damaging seismic waves. GSI operational strategy is to react to earthquakes detected by ground seismometers, slewing the satellite to point at the epicenters of earthquakes above a certain magnitude. Some of these earthquakes will be foreshocks of larger earthquakes; these will be observed, as the spacecraft would have been pointed in the right direction. This strategy was tested against the historical record for the Pacific coast of the Americas, from 1973 until the present. Based on the seismicity recorded during this time period, a GSI mission with a lifetime of 10 years could have been in position to observe at least 13 (22 on average) earthquakes of magnitude larger than 6, and at least one (2 on average) earthquake of magnitude larger than 7. A GSI would provide data unprecedented in its extent and temporal and spatial resolution. It would provide this data for some of the world's most seismically active regions, and do so better and at a lower cost than could be done with ground-based instrumentation. A GSI would revolutionize the understanding of earthquake dynamics, perhaps leading ultimately to effective warning

  7. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01

    One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now

  8. Seismic tracking of Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Wen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Very weak, narrow band seismic signals excited by Hurricane Sandy are detected in cross-correlations of continuous waveforms recorded by stations in eastern United States, at the end of October 2012. We analyze propagational properties of the signal and track the source locations using travel-time difference residual projection, from 26 October to 1 November 2012. We find that (1) the seismic signals driven by Hurricane Sandy are azimuthal dependent. Signals are correlated only within close azimuths from the source, (2) seismic signals propagate as Rayleigh surface wave with an average velocity of about 3.3 km/s, and (3) the inferred seismic source locations follow the path of Sandy before UTC 2012.10.30 12:00:00(about half a day after its landfall in New Jersey), but then deviate from the hurricane center and stay in the coastal area near New England for another 12 hours after the hurricane dissipated. Our research discovers the properties of seismic source excited by Hurricane Sandy and demonstrates the capability of using seismic data to real-time track a hurricane and estimate its direct impacts and the subsequent disasters after it dissipates.

  9. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    . An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified

  10. Induced Seismicity Monitoring at the Decatur, IL, CO2 Sequestration Demonstration Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaven, J. O.; Hickman, S. H.; McGarr, A.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    Industrial-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) will likely require the injection of large volumes of CO2 into extensive undisturbed brine aquifers. Large-volume injection has the potential to induce earthquake activity (Zoback and Gorelick, 2012). To assess the seismic hazard posed by one such operation, the USGS has been monitoring seismic activity at a CCS demonstration site in Decatur, IL, where supercritical carbon dioxide is injected at 2.1 km depth into the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a basal brine formation over granitic basement. Injection began in November 2011 at a rate of about 1000 metric tons/day, which, pending permit approval will increase to about 3000 metric tons/day in 2015. Our seismic network, about 8 km in aperture, consists of 12 stations, three equipped with boreholes. The nine surface stations have three-component (3C) broadband seismometers and 3C force-balance accelerometers. The borehole stations have 2 Hz 3C geophones at 150 m depth and accelerometers at the surface. We derived a one-dimensional velocity model from a VSP survey and well logs and have used this model to locate seismic events. We identify phase arrivals using standard waveform inspection, spectral analysis and waveform cross-correlation. We calculated seismic moments by integrating the pulses of P- and S-wave ground displacement, a procedure that yielded moment-magnitudes MW ranging from -0.8 to 1.1. These events locate in two distinct clusters: 0.4 to 1.0 km NE and 1.8 to 2.6 km WNW from the injection well. Double-difference relocations reveal that the cluster closest to the injection well forms a lineament trending N-NE to S-SW. A preliminary strike-slip focal mechanism for an Mw 0.54 event within this cluster is consistent with the orientation of the lineament and regional horizontal principal stress orientations, suggesting reactivation of a pre-existing basement fault. Even with nearly a million tonnes of CO2 injected, no felt events have been detected so far.

  11. Thin crystalline 3C-SiC layer growth through carbonization of differently oriented Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, A.; D'Arrigo, G.; Bongiorno, C.; Scalese, S.; La Via, F.; Foti, G.

    2007-07-01

    The growth of thin cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) buffer layers in an horizontal hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor, through the carbonization of differently oriented Si surfaces, is presented. A qualitative and quantitative study has been performed on statistical parameters related to voids due to the buffer layer growth on the different substrate orientations emphasizing shape, size, and density as a function of the substrate orientation. Variation in the void parameters can be attributed to the atomic packing density related to the substrate orientations, which were (100) Si, (111) Si, and (110) Si in this study. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were performed to analyze the surface and the crystalline quality of the 3C-SiC films grown and, eventually, an empirical model for the carbonization of Si surfaces formulated. Large platens characterize the 3C-SiC films with shapes related to the orientations of the substrate. These platens derive from the two-dimensional growth of different SiC islands which enlarge during the process due to the continuous reaction between Si and C atoms. The interior part of platens was characterized by the presence of a pure crystalline material with the presence of small tilts affecting some grains in the 3C-SiC layer in order to relief the stress generated with the substrate.

  12. 27 CFR 21.37 - Formula No. 3-C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formula No. 3-C. 21.37 Section 21.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.37 Formula No. 3-C....

  13. 27 CFR 21.37 - Formula No. 3-C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Formula No. 3-C. 21.37 Section 21.37 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specially Denatured Spirits Formulas and Authorized Uses § 21.37 Formula No. 3-C....

  14. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Texas-Gulf of Mexico margin from joint inversion of Ps and Sp receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, M.; Pulliam, J.; Sen, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    The seismic structure beneath Texas Gulf Coast Plain (GCP) is determined via velocity analysis of stacked common conversion point (CCP) Ps and Sp receiver functions and surface wave dispersion. The GCP is a portion of a ocean-continental transition zone, or 'passive margin', where seismic imaging of lithospheric Earth structure via passive seismic techniques has been rare. Seismic data from a temporary array of 22 broadband stations, spaced 16-20 km apart, on a ~380-km-long profile from Matagorda Island, a barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico, to Johnson City, Texas were employed to construct a coherent image of the crust and uppermost mantle. CCP stacking was applied to data from teleseismic earthquakes to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios of converted phases, such as Ps phases. An inaccurate velocity model, used for time-to-depth conversion in CCP stacking, may produce higher errors, especially in a region of substantial lateral velocity variations. An accurate velocity model is therefore essential to constructing high quality depth-domain images. To find accurate velocity P- and S-wave models, we applied a joint modeling approach that searches for best-fitting models via simulated annealing. This joint inversion approach, which we call 'multi objective optimization in seismology' (MOOS), simultaneously models Ps receiver functions, Sp receiver functions and group velocity surface wave dispersion curves after assigning relative weights for each objective function. Weights are computed from the standard deviations of the data. Statistical tools such as the posterior parameter correlation matrix and posterior probability density (PPD) function are used to evaluate the constraints that each data type places on model parameters. They allow us to identify portions of the model that are well or poorly constrained.

  15. Seismic monitoring of torrential and fluvial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, Arnaud; Hovius, Niels; Turowski, Jens M.

    2016-04-01

    In seismology, the signal is usually analysed for earthquake data, but earthquakes represent less than 1 % of continuous recording. The remaining data are considered as seismic noise and were for a long time ignored. Over the past decades, the analysis of seismic noise has constantly increased in popularity, and this has led to the development of new approaches and applications in geophysics. The study of continuous seismic records is now open to other disciplines, like geomorphology. The motion of mass at the Earth's surface generates seismic waves that are recorded by nearby seismometers and can be used to monitor mass transfer throughout the landscape. Surface processes vary in nature, mechanism, magnitude, space and time, and this variability can be observed in the seismic signals. This contribution gives an overview of the development and current opportunities for the seismic monitoring of geomorphic processes. We first describe the common principles of seismic signal monitoring and introduce time-frequency analysis for the purpose of identification and differentiation of surface processes. Second, we present techniques to detect, locate and quantify geomorphic events. Third, we review the diverse layout of seismic arrays and highlight their advantages and limitations for specific processes, like slope or channel activity. Finally, we illustrate all these characteristics with the analysis of seismic data acquired in a small debris-flow catchment where geomorphic events show interactions and feedbacks. Further developments must aim to fully understand the richness of the continuous seismic signals, to better quantify the geomorphic activity and to improve the performance of warning systems. Seismic monitoring may ultimately allow the continuous survey of erosion and transfer of sediments in the landscape on the scales of external forcing.

  16. Capacitance of Ti3C2Tx MXene in ionic liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zifeng; Barbara, Daffos; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Van Aken, Katherine L.; Anasori, Babak; Gogotsi, Yury; Simon, Patrice

    2016-09-01

    Ti3C2Tx MXene, a two-dimensional (2D) early transition metal carbide, has shown an extremely high volumetric capacitance in aqueous electrolytes, but in a narrow voltage window (less than 1.23 V). The utilization of MXene materials in ionic liquid electrolytes with a large voltage window has never been addressed. Here, we report the preparation of the Ti3C2Tx MXene ionogel film by vacuum filtration for use as supercapacitor electrodes operating in 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI) neat ionic liquid electrolyte. Due to the disordered structure of the Ti3C2Tx hydrogel film and a stable spacing after vacuum drying, achieved through ionic liquid electrolyte immersion of the Ti3C2Tx hydrogel film, the Ti3C2Tx surface became accessible to EMI+ and TFSI- ions. A capacitance of 70 F g-1 together with a large voltage window of 3 V was obtained at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in neat EMI-TFSI electrolyte. The electrochemical signature indicates a capacitive behavior even at a high scan rate (500 mV s-1) and a high power performance. This work opens up the possibilities of using MXene materials with various ionic liquid electrolytes.

  17. How Forgetful are Seismic Waves ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkereit, B.

    2005-05-01

    3D surface seismic and vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques can be employed to image crustal structures in complex geological settings. The effects of heterogeneities on seismic wave propagation can be described in terms of different propagation regimes (Wu, 1989): quasi-homogeneous for heterogeneities too small to be seen by seismic waves, Rayleigh scattering, Mie scattering and small-angle scattering. These scattering regimes cause characteristic amplitude, phase and travel time fluctuation, which can be used to obtain estimates of scale length. Horizontal resolution of exploration seismic data is often discussed in terms of Fresnel zone. For surface and VSP data, the Fresnel radius increases with increasing depth of investigation. In addition, the lateral resolution is limited by the effective frequency content of the seismic signal. Based on strong contrast in petrophysical data, crustal exploration targets (such as gas-hydrates, permafrost or massive sulfide ores) should make strong P-wave, S-wave and converted wave reflectors against most background velocity models. In the context of realistic geological models, 3D numerical simulations are required to better assess elastic wave interactions with high acoustic impedance targets. In addition, it is important to study the influence of composition and shape of high acoustic impedance targets on the full scattered wavefield through a series of numerical modeling experiments based on the 3D elastic finite-difference (FD) method. Massive sulfide ores consisting of the end-member sulfide minerals pyrite, sphalerite, and galena, which span the full range of observed P- and S- wave velocities and densities in ore rocks, as well as gabbro inclusions, are investigated for different shapes which represent the complex morphologies often observed for ore deposits. 3D FD modeling reveals that large ore deposits lead to a strong and complex scattering response that is often dominated by shear-wave events (Bohlen et al

  18. Fine Structure in 3C 120 and 3C 84. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., 24 Aug. 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, L. K.

    1976-01-01

    Seven epochs of very long baseline radio interferometric observations of the Seyfert galaxies 3C 120 and 3C 84, at 3.8-cm wave length using stations at Westford, Massachusetts, Goldstone, California, Green Bank, West Virginia, and Onsala, Sweden, have been analyzed for source structure. An algorithm for reconstructing the brightness distribution of a spatially confined source from fringe amplitude and so called closure phase data has been developed and successfully applied to artificially generated test data and to data on the above mentioned sources. Over the two year time period of observation, 3C 120 was observed to consist of a double source showing apparent super relativistic expansion and separation velocities. The total flux changes comprising one outburst can be attributed to one of these components. 3C 84 showed much slower changes, evidently involving flux density changes in individual stationary components rather than relative motion.

  19. The use of a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) as a seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, Ingrid; Chwatal, Werner; Radinger, Alexander; Brückl, Ewald

    2014-05-01

    The Tunnel Seismic While Drilling (TSWD) method uses the Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) as the seismic source. The method has been developed to predict the geological situation from reflections ahead of the tunnel face without disturbing the tunneling. The vibrations of the TBM are continuously monitored near the drilling head (pilot signal) as well as the direct and reflected seismic wave field at borehole geophones (geophone signal) situated in the tunnel wall behind the TBM. During the processing these signals are correlated and result in excellent seismic traces comparable to conventional seismic methods. The interpretation of the reflections leads to a nearly daily prognosis about 100 m ahead of the TBM. This system was successfully implemented at three different construction sites in Austria and is currently operating at one further. The cutters on front of the TBM head are pressed against the tunnel face and split the rock during rotating which is called the chipping process. This cutting process generates seismic waves radiated into the rock mass and results also in vibrations of the TBM itself. On the one hand it is important to know the source mechanism of the TBM and the radiation pattern of the seismic waves in all directions. Until now this is not well understood. To investigate this 3C-geophones were installed at the surface above the tunnel axis at different construction sites. The obtained seismograms show the forward and backward radiated seismic wave field of the TBM, for the present without consideration of the influence of the free surface. We compare this data with modelled seismograms in which we use different possible source mechanism, like single force or force due to tensile cracks. First results are shown in the scope of this work. On the other hand it is essential to know how good the recorded pilot signal represents the entire chipping process. Due to technically reasons the pilot signal has been registered so far on the non-rotating part

  20. Kvn Source-Frequency Phase-Referencing Observation of 3c 66A and 3c 66B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guang-Yao; Jung, Taehyun; Dodson, Richard; Rioja, Maria; Sohn, Bong Won

    2015-09-01

    In this proceedings, preliminary results of the KVN Source-Frequency Phase-Referencing (SFPR) observation of 3C 66A and 3C 66B are presented. The motivation of this work is to measure the core-shift of these 2 sources and study the temporal evolution of the jet opacity. Two more sources were observed as secondary reference calibrators and each source was observed at 22, 43, and 86 GHz simultaneously. Our preliminary results show that after using the observations at the lower frequency to calibrate those at the higher frequency of the same source, the residual visibility phases for each source at the higher frequencies became more aligned, and the coherence time became much longer; also, the residual phases for different sources, within 10 degrees angular separations, follow similar trends. After reference to the nearby calibrator, the SFPRed maps were obtained as well as the astrometric measurements, i.e. the combined coreshift. The measurements were found to be affected by structural blending effects because of the large beamsize of KVN, but this can be corrected with higher resolution maps (e.g. KAVA maps). *%K Astrometry, radio continuum: galaxies, galaxies: active, galaxy: individual(3C 66A, 3C 66B), techniques: interferometric *%O 3C 66A, 3C 66B

  1. RXTE, VLBA, Optical, and Radio Monitoring of the Quasars 3C 279, PKS 1510--089, and 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Aller, M. F.; McHardy, I. M.; Balonek, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    We are continuing our combined RXTE X-ray, VLBA imaging (at 43 GHz), optical (several observatories), and radio (University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory) monitoring of the quasars 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089, and have started similar monitoring of 3C 273. X-ray flares in 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089 are associated with ejections of superluminal components. In addition, there is a close connection between the optical and X-ray variability of 3C 279. There is a strong correlation between the 14.5 GHz and X-ray variability of PKS 1510-089 in 1997 and 1998 (with the radio leading the X-ray) that becomes weaker in subsequent years. X-ray fluctuations occur on a variety of timescales in 3C 273, with a major prolonged outburst in mid-2001. The lead author will discuss the correlations in terms of inverse Compton models for the X-ray emission coupled with synchrotron models for the lower-frequency radiation. Synchrotron self-Compton models can explain the "reverse" time lag in PKS 1510-089 is well as the variable correlation between the X-ray variations and those at lower frequencies in this object and in 3C 279.

  2. Improved visible light driven photoelectrochemical properties of 3C-SiC semiconductor with Pt nanoparticles for hydrogen generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tae Song, Jun; Kamiya, Masayuki; Iwasaki, Takayuki; Hatano, Mutsuko; Mashiko, Hisanori; Ohtomo, Akira; Nakamine, Yoshifumi

    2013-11-18

    We propose the n-type 3C-SiC with Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as photo-anode for photoelectrochemical hydrogen (H{sub 2}) generation. We found that band-edge structure of 3C-SiC is suitable for H{sub 2} generation, and the property can be optimized by dopant (nitrogen) concentration in 3C-SiC. We also confirmed that Pt NPs enhance photoelectrochemical properties showing 0.2%–0.8% higher Incident Photon-to-Current Efficiency than bare 3C-SiC in visible wavelength despite diminished light absorption. Solar-conversion efficiency increases approximately 6.3 times, and H{sub 2} production is improved by 6.5 times with 33% of Faradaic efficiency. Lastly, 3C-SiC surface corrosion is effectively inhibited.

  3. Method for determining source and receiver statics in marine seismic exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Zachariadis, R.G.

    1986-04-08

    A method for seismic exploration at a marine exploration site, is described which consists of the steps of: a. fixing a seismic energy source and a seismic energy detector on the water bottom at a point offset from a marine exploration line, b. traversing the marine vessel towing a seismic energy source and a seismic marine cable employing a plurality of spaced-apart hydrophones, c. generating seismic energy from the towed seismic energy source to produce a seismic reflection signal that is detected by the plurality of hydrophones on the seismic marine cable and a first seismic refraction signal that is detected by the fixed seismic energy detector, the first seismic refraction signal including a source statics attributable to time delay in the near surface earth formation directly below the towed seismic energy source, d. generating seismic energy from the fixed seismic energy source to produce a second seismic refraction signal that is detected by each of the plurality of hydrophones on the seismic marine cable, the second seismic refraction signal including a receiver statics attributable to time delay in the near surface earth formation directly below each of the pluarlity of hydrophones.

  4. Hydrocarbon Induced Seismicity in Northern Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dost, B.; Spetzler, J.; Kraaijpoel, D.; Caccavale, M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Netherlands has been regarded aseismic until the first earthquakes started in 1986, after more than 25 years of gas production from the one of the largest on-shore gas-fields in the World, the Groningen field, and accompanying smaller gas fields. Due to the shallow sources, at approximately 3 km depth, even small magnitude events cause considerable damage to buildings in the region. Since the largest recorded event in the Groningen field in 2012 with ML= 3,6, more than 30.000 damage claims were received by the mining company. Since 1995 a seismic monitoring network is operational in the region, consisting of 8 200m deep boreholes with 4 levels of 3C 4,5 Hz geophones. The network was designed for a location threshold of ML=1,5 over a 40x 80 km region. Average station separation was 20 km. At the end of 2014, 245 events have been recorded with ML ≥ 1,5, out of a total of 1100. Since 2003 a new mining law is in place in the Netherlands, which requires for each gas field in production a seismic risk analysis. Initially, due to the small number of events for specific fields, a general hazard (PSHA) was calculated for all gas-fields and a maximum magnitude was estimated at ML = 3,9. Since 2003 an increase in the activity rate is observed for the Groningen field, leading to the development of new models and a re-assessment of parameters like the maximum magnitude. More recently these models are extended to seismic risk, where also the fragility of the regional buildings is taken into account. Understanding the earthquake process is essential in taking mitigation measures. Continued research is focused on reducing the uncertainties in the hazard and risk models and is accompanied by an upgrade of the monitoring network. In 2014 a new dense network was designed to monitor the Groningen gas field in this region (30*40 km) with an average separation of 4 km. This allows an improved location threshold (M>0,5) and location accuracy (50-100m). A detailed P- and S

  5. Erosion Performance of HVOF-Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Gang-Chang; Li, Chang-Jiu; Wang, Yu-Yue; Li, Wen-Ya

    2007-12-01

    Cr3C2-NiCr coatings were deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying process under spray conditions of different flows of oxygen and propane gases, and spray distances. The orthogonal regression experimental design method was used for systematic investigation of the influence of spray parameters on the erosion performance of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings. Erosion tests were performed at different jet angles of abrasive particles. The erosion mechanism of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings was examined through the surface morphology and cross-sectional microstructure of the eroded coatings. The correlations of the carbide particle size and carbide content with the erosion rate were examined. It was found that the erosion occurred dominantly by spalling of splats from the lamellar interfaces. The spalling resulted from the propagation of cracks parallel to the interfaces between the lamellae exposed to the surface and underlying coating. The carbide particle size and content in the coating influenced significantly the erosion performance of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings.

  6. Polarization-maintaining amplifier based on 3C fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enokidani, Jun; Ito, Rumi; Sakurai, Tsutomu; Shin, Sumida; Tei, Kazuyoku

    2015-03-01

    Chirally-Coupled-Core (3C) fiber structure can preserve a single mode quality and even a linear polarization for a large core size. A principal advantage of fiber laser is its compatibility with monolithic integration and robust system. But so far, devices such as a combiner using the 3C fibers have not been reported. Here we report the first demonstration of such monolithic amplifier structure which contains an active fiber and a combiner based on 3C fibers. A single-stage amplifier is seeded by an EO Q-switched micro-laser and pumped by two high power fiber pigtailed 976-nm laser diodes via an in-house fabricated (2 + 1) × 1 pump signal combiner. The active fiber is based on a 3-m-long, 3C Yb-doped fiber (33 μm/250 μm core/cladding diameter with 0.06/0.46 NA). The amplifier demonstrates scaling up to 30W average power and 150 kW peak power in 0.3mJ, 2ns pulses. The beam profiles and beam qualities were characterized as its output power was varied up to 30W. The beam profile was maintained at a high beam quality of around M2=1.2. The spectral properties of the 3C fiber were also characterized as its output peak power was varied.

  7. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  8. Stochastic excitation of seismic waves by a hurricane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Valovcin, Anne

    2015-11-01

    We investigate how a tropical cyclone (Hurricane Isaac in 2012) generated seismic ground motions using seismic and barometric data from the Earthscope network. In the frequency band 0.01-0.02 Hz, seismic and surface pressure amplitudes show a systematic decreasing trend with distance from the center of the hurricane. However, the decreasing rate is much higher for seismic waves than for pressure. We develop a stochastic theory of seismic wave excitation by surface pressure that connects these two observed data sets; surface pressure is the excitation source, and seismic data are the resulting seismic wave field. This theory contains two parameters: (i) the pressure power spectral density (Sp) and (ii) the correlation length in the pressure field (L). Using the formula, we solve for the spatial variation of correlation lengths. The solution shows that longer correlation lengths in pressure are near the hurricane center. Because seismic wave excitation is proportional to L2Sp, the excitation for seismic waves becomes effectively more localized closer to the center. Also, the scaling relation between L and Sp leads to an excitation source which is approximately proportional to the third power of surface pressure. This centralized source for seismic wave excitation explains why the decreasing rate with distance is higher for seismic data than for barometric data. However, this spatial coherence mechanism may not be the only process, as strong turbulence near the center may cause transient bursts of pressure and also induce higher temporal correlation. These alternative mechanisms need to be carefully analyzed in the future.

  9. Seismic Holography of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The basic goal of the project was to extend holographic seismic imaging techniques developed under a previous NASA contract, and to incorporate phase diagnostics. Phase-sensitive imaging gives us a powerful probe of local thermal and Doppler perturbations in active region subphotospheres, allowing us to map thermal structure and flows associated with "acoustic moats" and "acoustic glories". These remarkable features were discovered during our work, by applying simple acoustic power holography to active regions. Included in the original project statement was an effort to obtain the first seismic images of active regions on the Sun's far surface.

  10. Energetics and structural stability of Cs3C60

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Susumu; Umemoto, Koichiro; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, MarvinL.

    2003-12-15

    Using the ab initio pseudo potential total-energy method and the density-functional theory, we study the energetics of face-centered-cubic Cs3C60 which is a material of great interest as a possible high transition-temperature superconductor. At the optimized lattice constant the volume per C60 is found to be smaller than the most stable hexagon-coordination A15 phase, while the total energy of the fcc phase is about 0.9 eV higher than the A15 phase. These results indicate that a low-temperature and high-pressure synthesis method might be a possible way to produce the fcc Cs3C60 phase. In addition, it is also found that the A15 Cs3C60 should show a phase transformation from a hexagon-coordination phase to a pentagon-coordination phase under hydrostatic pressure.

  11. Seismic refraction exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehle, W.H.

    1980-12-30

    In seismic exploration, refracted seismic energy is detected by seismic receivers to produce seismograms of subsurface formations. The seismograms are produced by directing seismic energy from an array of sources at an angle to be refracted by the subsurface formations and detected by the receivers. The directivity of the array is obtained by delaying the seismic pulses produced by each source in the source array.

  12. Romanian Educational Seismic Network Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataru, Dragos; Ionescu, Constantin; Zaharia, Bogdan; Grecu, Bogdan; Tibu, Speranta; Popa, Mihaela; Borleanu, Felix; Toma, Dragos; Brisan, Nicoleta; Georgescu, Emil-Sever; Dobre, Daniela; Dragomir, Claudiu-Sorin

    2013-04-01

    Romania is one of the most active seismic countries in Europe, with more than 500 earthquakes occurring every year. The seismic hazard of Romania is relatively high and thus understanding the earthquake phenomena and their effects at the earth surface represents an important step toward the education of population in earthquake affected regions of the country and aims to raise the awareness about the earthquake risk and possible mitigation actions. In this direction, the first national educational project in the field of seismology has recently started in Romania: the ROmanian EDUcational SEISmic NETwork (ROEDUSEIS-NET) project. It involves four partners: the National Institute for Earth Physics as coordinator, the National Institute for Research and Development in Construction, Urban Planning and Sustainable Spatial Development " URBAN - INCERC" Bucharest, the Babeş-Bolyai University (Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Engineering) and the software firm "BETA Software". The project has many educational, scientific and social goals. The main educational objectives are: training students and teachers in the analysis and interpretation of seismological data, preparing of several comprehensive educational materials, designing and testing didactic activities using informatics and web-oriented tools. The scientific objective is to introduce into schools the use of advanced instruments and experimental methods that are usually restricted to research laboratories, with the main product being the creation of an earthquake waveform archive. Thus a large amount of such data will be used by students and teachers for educational purposes. For the social objectives, the project represents an effective instrument for informing and creating an awareness of the seismic risk, for experimentation into the efficacy of scientific communication, and for an increase in the direct involvement of schools and the general public. A network of nine seismic stations with SEP seismometers

  13. Antibacterial Activity of Ti3C2Tx MXene.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Helal, Mohamed; Ali, Adnan; Ren, Chang E; Gogotsi, Yury; Mahmoud, Khaled A

    2016-03-22

    MXenes are a family of atomically thin, two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and carbonitrides with many attractive properties. Two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx (MXene) has been recently explored for applications in water desalination/purification membranes. A major success indicator for any water treatment membrane is the resistance to biofouling. To validate this and to understand better the health and environmental impacts of the new 2D carbides, we investigated the antibacterial properties of single- and few-layer Ti3C2Tx MXene flakes in colloidal solution. The antibacterial properties of Ti3C2Tx were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) by using bacterial growth curves based on optical densities (OD) and colonies growth on agar nutritive plates. Ti3C2Tx shows a higher antibacterial efficiency toward both Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive B. subtilis compared with graphene oxide (GO), which has been widely reported as an antibacterial agent. Concentration dependent antibacterial activity was observed and more than 98% bacterial cell viability loss was found at 200 μg/mL Ti3C2Tx for both bacterial cells within 4 h of exposure, as confirmed by colony forming unit (CFU) and regrowth curve. Antibacterial mechanism investigation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay indicated the damage to the cell membrane, which resulted in release of cytoplasmic materials from the bacterial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent and independent stress induction by Ti3C2Tx was investigated in two separate abiotic assays. MXenes are expected to be resistant to biofouling and offer bactericidal properties. PMID:26909865

  14. Seismic imaging through volcanic rocks of the Snake River Plain, Idaho for the ICDP Project Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Schmitt, D. R.; Shervais, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    New high-resolution downhole and surface seismic reflection data tied to drill holes related to the Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project (ICDP Project Hotspot) provide insights into seismic imaging in volcanic terranes. The downhole data at the Kimberly and Kimama drill sites in southern Idaho show low seismic attenuation and large seismic velocity contrasts at volcanic flow boundaries. These lithologic and seismic boundaries tie to reflections in both borehole and surface seismic images. The Kimberly site drilled through 1,958 m of mostly rhyolite, with thin sedimentary interbeds throughout the section. Sedimentary interbeds at depth correspond with slow velocity zones that relate to reflections on surface seismic profiles. The reflection observed on 360-channel vibroseis seismic profiles that relates to a flow boundary at 300-400 m depth increases in depth with increasing elevation away from the Kimberly drill site, suggesting flow volumes may be estimated with surface seismic methods. The Kimama site drilled through 1,912 m of mostly basalt with sedimentary interbeds at depth. Downhole and surface vibroseis seismic results here also suggest seismic reflection methods are useful to image flow boundaries. Ongoing drilling at a third site in Mountain Home, Idaho will tie lithologies and measured physical properties to surface seismic data. These seismic data show key lithologic boundaries related to Quaternary basalts, lake sediments related to paleo Lake Idaho, and underlying Tertiary basalts. Ongoing analysis should help clarify the limits and capabilities of surface seismic imaging in volcanic terranes.

  15. 3C-SiC nanocrystals/TiO{sub 2} nanotube heterostructures with enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Liu, L. Z.; Yang, L.; Gan, Z. X.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-06-09

    p-type ultrathin 3C-SiC nanocrystals are coated on heat-treated n-type TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays formed by electrochemical etching of Ti sheets to produce heterostructured photocatalysts. Depending on the amounts of 3C-SiC nanocrystals on the TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, photocatalytic degradation of organic species can be enhanced. The intrinsic electric field induced by the heterojunction promotes separation of the photoexcited electrons-holes in both the TiO{sub 2} nanotubes and 3C-SiC nanocrystals. Hence, holes can more effectively travel to the surface of 3C-SiC nanocrystals and there are more electrons on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes consequently forming more {sup •}O{sub 2}{sup −} and {sup •}OH species to degrade organic molecules.

  16. Biglycan is a novel binding partner of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3c (FGFR3c) in the human testis.

    PubMed

    Winge, S B; Nielsen, J; Jørgensen, A; Owczarek, S; Ewen, K A; Nielsen, J E; Juul, A; Berezin, V; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of spermatogonial maintenance in the human testis is currently not well understood. One pathway suggested to be involved is activated by fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), which is expressed in a subset of spermatogonia. FGFR3-activating mutations have been identified in spermatocytic seminoma, thought to originate from clonal expansion of spermatogonia. In this study we aimed to characterize potential binding partners of FGFR3, and specifically its mesenchymal "c" splice isoform, in human spermatogonia. Based on expression patterns and homology to the binding site, we identified FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 as the best candidates for natural ligands of FGFR3c in the testis. In addition, we screened non-FGF proteins and found that a proteoglycan biglycan (BGN) contains a sequence homologous to the FGFR3c binding site on FGF1, and is expressed in peritubular cells adjacent to FGFR3-expressing spermatogonia. Experiments in a cell-free system confirmed that BGN binds to FGFR3c and FGF1. In conclusion, our findings further clarify the complex regulation of FGFR3c in the human testis. We postulate that BGN is a factor secreted by peritubular cells to modulate FGFR3c signaling and thus contributes to the regulation of spermatogonial maintenance. PMID:25260943

  17. Seismic interferometry for temporal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Norimitsu

    repeatability than crosscorrelation-based interferometry. Also, I can estimate attenuation of media with deconvolution interferometry using the amplitude decay of deconvolved waveforms. In higher-dimensional elastic cases, deconvolution interferometry allows me to obtain PP, PS, SP, and SS reflected waves without any unwanted crosstalk of P and S waves. Higher-dimensional data are more challenging for seismic interferometry, and I employ techniques such as wavefield decomposition, multi-dimensional analysis, time windowing, and time reversal to improve deconvolved waveforms obtained from earthquakes. The main discoveries in the seismological applications in addition to the techniques are that I successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities and azimuthal anisotropy all over Japan with deconvolution interferometry using earthquake data, that the velocities in the near surface decrease when large earthquakes occur, and that S-wave velocities at the soft-rock sites negatively correlate with precipitation. Using interferometry, I find that the 2011 MW 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake significantly changed near-surface S-wave velocities and S-wave splitting in Japan. In the applications of structural engineering, the velocities of traveling waves in a building estimated from earthquakes vary grater than those in the near surface because the response of the building often includes nonlinearity caused by the shaking of the building itself. I can estimate linear responses of the building with ambient-noise data, and nonlinear and linear mixed responses from earthquake data.

  18. Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.

    2004-12-09

    This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could

  19. Revisiting correlations between broad-line and jet emission variations for AGNs: 3C 120 and 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. T.; Bai, J. M.; Feng, H. C.; Li, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We restudy the issue of cross-correlations between broad-line and jet emission variations, and aim to locate the position of a radio (and gamma-ray) emitting region in a jet of active galactic nuclei. Considering the radial profiles of the radius and number density of clouds in a spherical broad-line region (BLR), we derive new formulae connecting the jet-emitting position Rjet to the time lag τob between broad-line and jet emission variations, and the BLR radius. Also, formulae are derived for a disc-like BLR and a spherical shell BLR. The model-independent flux randomization/random subset selection method is used to estimate τob. For 3C 120, positive lags of about 0.3 yr are found between the 15 GHz emission and the Hβ, Hγ and He II λ4686 lines, including broad-line data in a newly published paper, indicating that the line variations lead the 15 GHz ones. Each of the broad-line light curves corresponds to a radio outburst. Rjet = 1.1-1.5 parsec (pc) is obtained for 3C 120. For 3C 273, a common feature of negative time lags is found in the cross-correlation functions between light curves of radio emission and the Balmer lines, as well as Lyα λ1216 and C IV λ1549 lines. Rjet = 1.0-2.6 pc is obtained for 3C 273. The estimated Rjet is comparable for 3C 120 and 3C 273, and the gamma-ray-emitting positions will be within ˜1-3 pc from the central engines. Comparisons show that the cloud number density and radius radial distributions and the BLR structures have only negligible effects on Rjet.

  20. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  1. The 3C support: A survivable alternative to wood cribbing

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, J.

    1995-10-01

    Wood cribbing has historically been a somewhat dependable and low cost method of providing mine roof support. In high stress conditions, such as longwall tailgates, the wood crib does not always survive. Failure of tailgate cribs can block travelways, restrict ventilation and force costly time-consuming rehabilitation. At least in the Western United States, wood cribbing is no longer the answer to many roof support problems. Western mines are being forced to find alternatives to wood cribbing. This is due to the escalating cost, questionable availability and dubious quality of available wood supplies. The Corrugated Confined Core mine roof Support (3C Support) was developed to survive the extreme ground control conditions of a longwall tailgate. The 3C Support testing has shown ultimate strengths exceeding 2,000,000 lbs and a yield range over 48-inches. Standard wood cribs, constructed from Western United States softwood, were also tested. The wood cribs had ultimate strengths up to 237,000 lbs and a yield range up to 27-inches. Underground testing of the 3C Support in longwall tailgates at Southern Utah Fuel Company (SUFCO) was also conducted. This testing and installation of over 5000 3C Supports have demonstrated the following advantages: (1) lower installed cost; (2) 55 percent reduction in cribbing manpower requirements; (3) improved yield and ultimate strength characteristics; (4) much improved tailgate roof support survivability; (5) virtually eliminates blocked tailgates; (6) improved safety; (7) reduced flammable material; (8) improved ventilation; and (9) environmentally friendly.

  2. Low Frequency Radio Observations of 3C 129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, W. M.; Harris, D. E.; Ensslin, T. A.; Kassim, N. E.; Perley, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    We present a wide-field map of the radio galaxy 3C 129 and its companion galaxy 3C 129.1 at λ = 90 cm. Both galaxies are part of an X-ray identified cluster at z=0.021, which has been excluded from most optical studies because it lies in the galactic plane. 3C 129 is a narrow-angle-tail (NAT) source with a plume-like double-tail extending nearly 30' at a wavelength of 90cm. We see a distinct steep-spectrum feature near its head, extending in a direction perpendicular to the radio tails. We propose is that this `crosspiece' might consist of fossil radio plasma, which has been re-energized by the compression of the bow shock wave of the supersonically moving galaxy 3C 129. One possible origin of the fossil radio plasma could be the tail of a nearby head-tail radio galaxy, and we discuss the implications of this scenario. WML is a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow. Basic research in astronomy at the Naval Research Laboratory is funded by the Office of Naval Research. DEH acknowledges support from NASA grant GO1-2135A.

  3. The linear polarization of 3C 345 in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Wolinski, Karen G.; Smith, Paul S.; Impey, C. D.; Bless, Robert C.; Nelson, M. J.; Percival, J. W.; Taylor, M. J.; Elliot, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The linear polarization of 3C 345, a superluminal radio source and OVV quasar, was observed in two bandpasses in the ultraviolet (centered at 2160 A and 2770 A) in 1993 April using the High Speed Photometer on the Hubble Space Telescope. The quasar is significantly polarized in the UV (p greater than 5%). Ground-based polarimetry was obtained 11 days later, but a difference in the position angle between the observations in the visible and those in the UV indicate that the magnitude of the polarization of 3C 345 may have changed over that time. If the two observation sets represent the same state of spectral polarization, then the large UV flux implies that either the polarization of the synchrotron continuum must stop decreasing in the UV, or that there is an additional source of polarized flux in the ultraviolet. Only if the UV observations represent a spectral polarization state with the same position angle in the visible seen previously in 3C 345 can the polarized flux be represented by a single power law consistent with the three-component model of Smith et al. This model consists of a polarized synchrotron component, an unpolarized component from the broad-line region, and an unpolarized component attributed to thermal radiation from an optically thick accretion disk. Additional simultaneous polarimetry in the UV and visible will be required to further constrain models of the continuum emission processes in 3C 345 and determine if the UV polarized flux is synchrotron in origin.

  4. Natural fracture characterization using passive seismic illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.

    2003-01-08

    The presence of natural fractures in reservoir rock can significantly enhance gas production, especially in tight gas formations. Any general knowledge of the existence, location, orientation, spatial density, and connectivity of natural fractures, as well as general reservoir structure, that can be obtained prior to active seismic acquisition and drilling can be exploited to identify key areas for subsequent higher resolution active seismic imaging. Current practices for estimating fracture properties before the acquisition of surface seismic data are usually based on the assumed geology and tectonics of the region, and empirical or fracture mechanics-based relationships between stratigraphic curvature and fracturing. The objective of this research is to investigate the potential of multicomponent surface sensor arrays, and passive seismic sources in the form of local earthquakes to identify and characterize potential fractured gas reservoirs located near seismically active regions. To assess the feasibility of passive seismic fracture detection and characterization, we have developed numerical codes for modeling elastic wave propagation in reservoir structures containing multiple, finite-length fractures. This article describes our efforts to determine the conditions for favorable excitation of fracture converted waves, and to develop an imaging method that can be used to locate and characterize fractures using multicomponent, passive seismic data recorded on a surface array.

  5. Testing the USGS 3D San Francisco Bay Area Seismic Velocity Model using Observations of 0.5 to 2 s Surface Waves from Local and Regional Earthquakes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, T. M.; Frankel, A. D.; Oppenheimer, D. H.; Fletcher, J. B.; Luetgert, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    We summarize recent observations of long-period (0.5 - 2 s) seismic waves from seven local and regional earthquakes in the magnitude range 3.5 - 6.5, made using accelerograph arrays in the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, in the San Leandro basin, and in the Livermore Valley. The observations were made on both isolated accelerometers (both NetQuakes and traditional instruments) and on arrays consisting of clusters of 3 instruments with an aperture of 200-300 meters. These recordings demonstrate that large-amplitude, long-period surface wave arrivals are commonly observed in the urbanized low-lying areas in the East Bay. In the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, late arriving Rayleigh waves observed on the vertical component have apparent velocities of about 610 m/s although they range from 300 to 1000 m/s for waves having a period of about 2 s. The azimuth of the arrivals is within 20 degrees of that expected for direct propagation from the epicenters indicating that they are related to the low seismic velocity of the shallow sediments in the Great Valley. Strong basin surface waves produced by the September 6, 2008 M4.1 Alamo earthquake observed throughout San Leandro and Oakland substantially increase the duration of shaking at periods of 1 sec and longer. These basin surface waves exhibit dispersion with group velocities as low as about 300 m/s and are apparent at frequencies from 0.8 - 2 s. These observations indicate that relatively shallow sedimentary basins, such as the San Leandro basin with a sediment thickness of about 1 km, support sizeable basin surface waves that amplify and prolong ground shaking. The M4.1 Alamo earthquake also produced a strong basin surface wave in the Livermore Valley, observed by our array in Pleasanton, that strongly amplifies periods of 0.5 s and longer. Array analysis indicates that late arrivals represent surface waves from an azimuth more westerly than that of the hypocenter. These surface waves are currently not well modeled by the

  6. A Handbook for the Application of Seismic Methods for Quantifying Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, Ernest; Queen, John; Daley, Tom; Fortuna, Mark; Cox, Dale; D'Onfro, Peter; Goetz, Rusty; Coates, Richard; Nihei, Kurt; Nakagawa, Seiji; Myer, Larry; Murphy, Jim; Emmons, Charles; Lynn, Heloise; Lorenz, John; LaClair, David; Imhoff, Mathias; Harris, Jerry; Wu, Chunling; Urban, Jame; Maultzsch, Sonja; Liu, Enru; Chapman, Mark; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2004-09-28

    A four year (2000-2004) comprehensive joint industry, University and National Lab project was carried out in a 20 square mile area in a producing gas field in the Northwest part of the San Juan Basin in New Mexico to develop and apply multi-scale seismic methods for detecting and quantifying fractures in a naturally fractured gas reservoirs. 3-D surface seismic, multi-offset 9-C VSP, 3-C single well seismic, and well logging data were complemented by geologic/core studies to model, process and interpret the data. The overall objective was to determine the seismic methods most useful in mapping productive gas zones. Data from nearby outcrops, cores, and well bore image logs suggest that natural fractures are probably numerous in the subsurface reservoirs at the site selected and trend north-northeast/south-southwest despite the apparent dearth of fracturing observed in the wells logged at the site (Newberry and Moore wells). Estimated fracture spacing is on the order of one to five meters in Mesaverde sandstones, less in Dakota sandstones. Fractures are also more frequent along fault zones, which in nearby areas trend between north-northeast/south-southwest and northeast-southwest and are probably spaced a mile or two apart. The maximum, in situ, horizontal, compressive stress in the vicinity of the seismic test site trends approximately north-northeast/south-southwest. The data are few but they are consistent. The seismic data present a much more complicated picture of the subsurface structure. Faulting inferred from surface seismic had a general trend of SW - NE but with varying dip, strike and spacing. Studies of P-wave anisotropy from surface seismic showed some evidence that the data did have indications of anisotropy in time and amplitude, however, compared to the production patterns there is little correlation with P-wave anisotropy. One conclusion is that the surface seismic reflection data are not detecting the complexity of fracturing controlling the

  7. A description of seismic amplitude techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadlow, James

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of seismic data is a non-invasive technique used for determining the sub surface geology. Changes in lithology and fluid fill affect the seismic wavelet. Analysing seismic data for direct hydrocarbon indicators (DHIs), such as full stack amplitude anomalies, or amplitude variation with offset (AVO), can help a seismic interpreter relate the geophysical response to real geology and, more importantly, to distinguish the presence of hydrocarbons. Inversion is another commonly used technique that attempts to tie the seismic data back to the geology. Much has been written about these techniques, and attempting to gain an understanding on the theory and application of them by reading through various journals can be quite daunting. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline DHI analysis, including full stack amplitude anomalies, AVO and inversion and show the relationship between all three. The equations presented have been included for completeness, but the reader can pass over the mathematical detail.

  8. Synchrotron-radiation photoemission study of the ultrathin Ba/3C-SiC(111) interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Benemanskaya, G. V.; Dementev, P. A.; Timoshnev, S. N.; Senkovskiy, B.

    2016-03-01

    Electronic structure of the Ba/3C-SiC(111) interface has been detailed studied in situ in an ultrahigh vacuum using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy with photon energies in the range of 100-450 eV. The 3C-SiC(111) samples were grown by a new method of epitaxy of low-defect unstressed nanoscaled silicon carbide films on silicon substrates. Valence band photoemission and both the Si 2p, C 1s core level spectra have been investigated as a function of Ba submonolayer coverage. Under Ba adsorption two induced surface bands are found at binding energies of 2 eV and 6 eV. It is obtained that Ba/3C-SiC(111) interface can be characterized as metallic-like. Modification of both the Si 2p and C 1s surface-related components were ascertained and shown to be provided by redistribution effect of electron density between Ba adatoms and both the Si surface and C interface atoms.

  9. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, Michael A.; Cook, Neville G. W.; McEvilly, Thomas V.; Majer, Ernest L.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  10. Ti3C2Tx Filler Effect on the Proton Conduction Property of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahua; Zhang, Jiakui; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Yifan; Wang, Jingtao

    2016-08-10

    Conductive polymer electrolyte membranes are increasingly attractive for a wide range of applications in hydrogen-relevant devices, for instance hydrogen fuel cells. In this study, two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx, a typical representative of the recently developed MXene family, is synthesized and employed as a universal filler for its features of large specific surface area, high aspect ratio, and sufficient terminated -OH groups. The Ti3C2Tx is incorporated into polymer matrix to explore its function on membrane microstructure and proton conduction property. Both phase-separated (acidic Nafion and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)) and non-phase-separated (basic chitosan) polymers are utilized as membrane matrixes. The microstructures, physicochemical properties, and proton conduction properties of the membranes are extensively investigated. It is demonstrated that Ti3C2Tx generates significant promotion effect on proton conduction of the composite membrane by facilitating both vehicle-type and Grotthuss-type proton transfer, yielding several times increased proton conductivity for every polymer-based composite membrane under various conditions, and the composite membrane achieves elevated hydrogen fuel cell performance. The stable Ti3C2Tx also reinforces the thermal and mechanical stabilities of these composite membranes. Since the MXene family includes more than 70 members, this exploration is expected to open up new perspectives for expanding their applications, especially as membrane modifiers and proton conductors. PMID:27430190

  11. Near-Surface Structure and Velocities of the Northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and the Western Santa Clara Valley, California, From Seismic Imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Gandhok, G.; Goldman, M.R.; Steedman, Clare

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Santa Clara Valley (SCV) is located in the southern San Francisco Bay area of California and is bounded by the Santa Cruz Mountains to the southwest, the Diablo Ranges to the northeast, and the San Francisco Bay to the north (Fig. 1). The SCV, which includes the City of San Jose, numerous smaller cities, and much of the high-technology manufacturing and research area commonly referred to as the Silicon Valley, has a population in excess of 1.7 million people (2000 U. S. Census;http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06085.html The SCV is situated between major active faults of the San Andreas Fault system, including the San Andreas Fault to the southwest and the Hayward and Calaveras faults to the northeast, and other faults inferred to lie beneath the alluvium of the SCV (CWDR, 1967; Bortugno et al., 1991). The importance of the SCV as a major industrial center, its large population, and its proximity to major earthquake faults are important considerations with respect to earthquake hazards and water-resource management. The fault-bounded alluvial aquifer system beneath the valley is the source of about one-third of the water supply for the metropolitan area (Hanson et al., 2004). To better address the earthquake hazards of the SCV, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has undertaken a program to evaluate potential seismic sources, the effects of strong ground shaking, and stratigraphy associated with the regional aquifer system. As part of that program and to better understand water resources of the valley, the USGS and the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) began joint studies to characterize the faults, stratigraphy, and structures beneath the SCV in the year 2000. Such features are important to both agencies because they directly influence the availability and management of groundwater resources in the valley, and they affect the severity and distribution of strong shaking from local and regional earthquakes sources that may affect

  12. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  13. Seismic slip deficit along Nepal Himalayas: implications for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, Laurent; Tapponnier, Paul; Nath Sapkota, Soma; Klinger, Yann

    2016-04-01

    In 1255, 1344 and 1408 AD, then again in 1833, 1934 and 2015, large earthquakes, devastated Kathmandu. The 1255 and 1934 surface ruptures have been identified east of the city, along comparable segments of the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT). Whether the other two pairs of events were similar, is unclear. Taking into account charcoal's "Inbuilt-ages", we revisit the timing of terrace offsets at key sites, to compare them with the seismic record since 1200 AD. The location, extent, and seismic moment of the 1833 and 2015 events imply that they released only a small part of the regional slip deficit, on a deep thrust segment that stopped north of the Siwaliks. By contrast, the 1344 or 1408 AD earthquake may have ruptured the MFT up to the surface in central Nepal between Kathmandu and Pokhara, East of the surface trace of the great 1505 AD earthquake which affected Western Nepal. If so, the whole megathrust system in Nepal ruptured during a sequence of earthquakes that lasted less than three centuries and propagated the rupture up to the surface from East to West. Today's situation in the himalayan seismic sequence might be close to that of the 14th century.

  14. Erosion influences the seismicity of active thrust faults.

    PubMed

    Steer, Philippe; Simoes, Martine; Cattin, Rodolphe; Shyu, J Bruce H

    2014-01-01

    Assessing seismic hazards remains one of the most challenging scientific issues in Earth sciences. Deep tectonic processes are classically considered as the only persistent mechanism driving the stress loading of active faults over a seismic cycle. Here we show via a mechanical model that erosion also significantly influences the stress loading of thrust faults at the timescale of a seismic cycle. Indeed, erosion rates of about ~0.1-20 mm yr(-1), as documented in Taiwan and in other active compressional orogens, can raise the Coulomb stress by ~0.1-10 bar on the nearby thrust faults over the inter-seismic phase. Mass transfers induced by surface processes in general, during continuous or short-lived and intense events, represent a prominent mechanism for inter-seismic stress loading of faults near the surface. Such stresses are probably sufficient to trigger shallow seismicity or promote the rupture of deep continental earthquakes up to the surface. PMID:25412707

  15. Cross well seismic reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, H.E.

    1995-08-01

    A striking example of how Cross Well Seismic reflection data can help characterize a reservoir, has resulted from an ongoing Multi-Discipline study of the carbonate Mishrif reservoir offshore Dubai, U.A.E. Because the study objectives include a more detailed description of intra reservoir structure and layering, Dubai Petroleum Company (DPC) analyzed the feasibility of Cross Well Seismic (CWS) and decided to acquire two surveys between three wells 337 to 523 feet apart. DPC has concluded that CWS can be cost effectively acquired offshore, in a Carbonate reservoir; as well as processed and interpreted. However, generally it is not often easy to acquire cross well seismic when and where it will be most useful. A CWS survey can provide multiple images such as a velocity Tomogram, P-wave reflections, and S-wave reflections. To date, Tomograms and P-wave reflections have been produced, and the reflection data has proven to be the most useful for reservoir characterization. Cross Well Seismic Reflection data have provided a level of vertical seismic reflection resolution of around 2 feet, which is more than 10 times better than surface seismic data (2D or 3D). The increase in vertical resolution has provided important detailed information about the reservoir, it`s continuity/heterogeneity; it`s detailed structure, stratigraphy and layering; and definition of any faults with more than 2 feet of offset. The CWS has shown detailed intra Mishrif reflectors. These reflectors have verified or changed detailed correlations between well bores, and show significant intra Mishrif thinning. These reflectors imply time stratigraphic layering which is consistent with tracer study results and regional sequence stratigraphy. This new data will be used to improve the reservoir model description.

  16. Seismic augmentation of acoustic monitoring of mortar fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas S.

    2007-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Center participated in a joint ARL-NATO TG-53 field experiment and data collect at Yuma Proving Ground, AZ in early November 2005. Seismic and acoustic signatures from both muzzle blasts and impacts of small arms fire and artillery were recorded using 7 seismic arrays and 3 acoustic arrays. Arrays comprised of 12 seismic and 12 acoustic sensors each were located from 700 m to 18 km from gun positions. Preliminary analysis of signatures attributed to 60mm, 81mm, 120 mm mortars recorded at a seismic-acoustic array 1.1 km from gun position are presented. Seismic and acoustic array f-k analysis is performed to detect and characterize the source signature. Horizontal seismic data are analyzed to determine efficacy of a seismic discriminant for mortar and artillery sources. Rotation of North and East seismic components to radial and transverse components relative to the source-receiver path provide maximum surface wave amplitude on the transverse component. Angles of rotation agree well with f-k analysis of both seismic and acoustic signals. The spectral energy of the rotated transverse surface wave is observable on the all caliber of mortars at a distance of 1.1 km and is a reliable source discriminant for mortar sources at this distance. In a step towards automation, travel time stencils using local seismic and acoustic velocities are applied to seismic data for analysis and determination of source characteristics.

  17. The Trails of Superluminal Jet Components in 3C 111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadler, M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Homan, D. C.; Agudo, I.; Kellermann, K. I.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Lister, M. L.; Zensus, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The parsec-scale radio jet of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111 has been monitored since 1995 as part of the 2cm Survey and MOJAVE monitoring observations conducted with the VLBA. Here, we present results from 18 epochs of VLBA observations of 3C 111 and from 18 years of radio flux density monitoring observations conducted at the University of Michigan. A major radio flux-density outburst of 3C 111 occurred in 1996 and was followed by a particularly bright plasma ejection associated with a superluminal jet component. This major event allows us to study a variety of processes associated with outbursts of radio-loud AGN in much greater detail than possible in other cases: the primary perturbation gives rise to the formation of a forward and a backward-shock, which both evolve in characteristically different ways and allow us to draw conclusions about the workflow of jet-production events; the expansion, acceleration and recollimation of the ejected jet plasma in an environment with steep pressure and density gradients are revealed; trailing components are formed in the wake of the primary perturbation as a result of Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities from the interaction of the jet with the external medium. The jet-medium interaction is further scrutinized by the linear-polarization signature of jet components traveling along the jet and passing a region of steep pressure/density gradients.

  18. Comparative study of 3C-SiC layers sublimation-grown on a 6H-SiC substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, D. B.; Lebedev, A. A. Lebedev, S. P.; Nelson, D. K.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.

    2013-09-15

    n-3C-SiC/n-6H-SiC heterostructures grown by vacuum sublimation on CREE commercial 6H-SiC substrates are studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that a transitional layer of varying thickness, composed of a mixture of 3C- and 6H-SiC polytypes, is formed on the substrate. A 3C polytype layer was obtained on the interlayer. Cathodoluminescence study of the surface of the film demonstrated that defects in the form of inclusions of another phase (6H-polytype), stacking faults, and twin boundaries (separating domains of cubic modification, grown in various orientations) are found on the surface and in the surface layer with a thickness on the order of 100 {mu}m. Varying the growth conditions changes the concentration of various types of defects.

  19. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  20. Seismic intrusion detector system

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Hervey L.; Hawley, James G.; Portlock, John M.; Scheibner, James E.

    1976-01-01

    A system for monitoring man-associated seismic movements within a control area including a geophone for generating an electrical signal in response to seismic movement, a bandpass amplifier and threshold detector for eliminating unwanted signals, pulse counting system for counting and storing the number of seismic movements within the area, and a monitoring system operable on command having a variable frequency oscillator generating an audio frequency signal proportional to the number of said seismic movements.

  1. Exploring hydrocarbon-bearing shale formations with multi-component seismic technology and evaluating direct shear modes produced by vertical-force sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Engin

    It is essential to understand natural fracture systems embedded in shale-gas reservoirs and the stress fields that influence how induced fractures form in targeted shale units. Multicomponent seismic technology and elastic seismic stratigraphy allow geologic formations to be better images through analysis of different S-wave modes as well as the P-wave mode. Significant amounts of energy produced by P-wave sources radiate through the Earth as downgoing SV-wave energy. A vertical-force source is an effective source for direct SV radiation and provides a pure shear-wave mode (SV-SV) that should reveal crucial information about geologic surfaces located in anisotropic media. SV-SV shear wave modes should carry important information about petrophysical characteristics of hydrocarbon systems that cannot be obtained using other elastic-wave modes. Regardless of the difficulties of extracting good-quality SV-SV signal, direct shear waves as well as direct P and converted S energy should be accounted for in 3C seismic studies. Acquisition of full-azimuth seismic data and sampling data at small intervals over long offsets are required for detailed anisotropy analysis. If 3C3D data can be acquired with improved signal-to-noise ratio, more uniform illumination of targets, increased lateral resolution, more accurate amplitude attributes, and better multiple attenuation, such data will have strong interest by the industry. The objectives of this research are: (1) determine the feasibility of extracting direct SV-SV common-mid-point sections from 3-C seismic surveys, (2) improve the exploration for stratigraphic traps by developing systematic relationship between petrophysical properties and combinations of P and S wave modes, (3) create compelling examples illustrating how hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs in low-permeable rocks (particularly anisotropic shale formations) can be better characterized using different Swave modes (P-SV, SV-SV) in addition to the conventional P

  2. Determining the microseismic event source parameters from the surface seismic array data with strong correlated noise and complex focal mechanisms of the source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, A. F.; Varypaev, A. V.; Rozhkov, M. V.; Epiphansky, A. G.; Dricker, I.

    2014-05-01

    The world experience shows that hydraulic fracturing (fracking) is an efficient tool for increasing oil and gas production of low-permeable reservoirs in hydrocarbon fields. The fracking-induced fractures in the rock, which are hydrodynamically connected with the wells, significantly enhance the volumes of extracted hydrocarbons. Controlling the processes of fracture formation and propagation is a vital question in the oil and gas reservoir management. A key means to implement this control is provided by microseismic monitoring of fracking, which makes it possible to promptly reconstruct the geometry of the fractures from the data on seismic waves from the microearthquakes induced by the formation and propagation of fractures.

  3. 3D seismic image processing for interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinming

    Extracting fault, unconformity, and horizon surfaces from a seismic image is useful for interpretation of geologic structures and stratigraphic features. Although interpretation of these surfaces has been automated to some extent by others, significant manual effort is still required for extracting each type of these geologic surfaces. I propose methods to automatically extract all the fault, unconformity, and horizon surfaces from a 3D seismic image. To a large degree, these methods just involve image processing or array processing which is achieved by efficiently solving partial differential equations. For fault interpretation, I propose a linked data structure, which is simpler than triangle or quad meshes, to represent a fault surface. In this simple data structure, each sample of a fault corresponds to exactly one image sample. Using this linked data structure, I extract complete and intersecting fault surfaces without holes from 3D seismic images. I use the same structure in subsequent processing to estimate fault slip vectors. I further propose two methods, using precomputed fault surfaces and slips, to undo faulting in seismic images by simultaneously moving fault blocks and faults themselves. For unconformity interpretation, I first propose a new method to compute a unconformity likelihood image that highlights both the termination areas and the corresponding parallel unconformities and correlative conformities. I then extract unconformity surfaces from the likelihood image and use these surfaces as constraints to more accurately estimate seismic normal vectors that are discontinuous near the unconformities. Finally, I use the estimated normal vectors and use the unconformities as constraints to compute a flattened image, in which seismic reflectors are all flat and vertical gaps correspond to the unconformities. Horizon extraction is straightforward after computing a map of image flattening; we can first extract horizontal slices in the flattened space

  4. Assimilatory Sulfate Reduction in C3, C3-C4, and C4 Species of Flaveria1

    PubMed Central

    Koprivova, Anna; Melzer, Michael; von Ballmoos, Peter; Mandel, Therese; Brunold, Christian; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    The activity of the enzymes catalyzing the first two steps of sulfate assimilation, ATP sulfurylase and adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), are confined to bundle sheath cells in several C4 monocot species. With the aim to analyze the molecular basis of this distribution and to determine whether it was a prerequisite or a consequence of the C4 photosynthetic mechanism, we compared the intercellular distribution of the activity and the mRNA of APR in C3, C3-C4, C4-like, and C4 species of the dicot genus Flaveria. Measurements of APR activity, mRNA level, and protein accumulation in six Flaveria species revealed that APR activity, cysteine, and glutathione levels were significantly higher in C4-like and C4 species than in C3 and C3-C4 species. ATP sulfurylase and APR mRNA were present at comparable levels in both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of C4 species Flaveria trinervia. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of APR protein in chloroplasts of both cell types. These findings, taken together with results from the literature, show that the localization of assimilatory sulfate reduction in the bundle sheath cells is not ubiquitous among C4 plants and therefore is neither a prerequisite nor a consequence of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:11598228

  5. A probabilistic method for evaluation of seismic amplification at a regional scale - A case study in some high seismic risk areas of the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Donne, Dario; Ripepe, Maurizio; Lacanna, Giorgio; Marchetti, Emanuele; Fabbroni, Pierangelo; Baglione, Massimo; D'Intinosante, Vittorio

    2014-05-01

    Seismic amplification caused by local geological conditions has an important role in seismic risk assessment. The main parameters controlling seismic amplification are the shear wave velocities of shallow sub-surface (Vs) and the thickness of soft sediments (h). However, the knowledge of shear wave velocity profile is usually sparse and can not be measured over large areas. In this study we propose a method that integrates data from surface geological maps with data from subsurface seismo-stratigraphic well-logs, and is aimed to estimate seismic amplification over large areas (~100 km2) through a probabilistic approach. The methodology we developed is characterized by the following steps: 1. Analysis of the geological framework and definition of Seismic Units; 2. 1-D seismic modeling of each Seismic Unit; 3. Probability analysis of Seismic Amplification. Probability function of seismic amplification for each Seismic Unit is calculated for all the possible combinations of the expected values of Vs and thickness (h). We apply this approach to seismic areas in the Northern Apennines (Italy). Finally, the results of this analysis have been validated by seismic amplification measurements using local and regional earthquakes and with macro-seismic data. The comparison between the predicted amplification using this probabilistic approach and the measured seismic amplification shows a general agreement. This work is not intended as an alternative to the standard methodologies to calculate site effect, but offers a new approach to identify areas potentially more vulnerable.

  6. Comparative Characterization of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in C3, C4, and C3-C4 Intermediate Panicum Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Holaday, A. Scott; Black, Clanton C.

    1981-01-01

    Various properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases were compared in leaf preparations from C3-C4 intermediate, C3, and C4Panicum species. Values of Vmax in micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour at pH 8.3 were 57 to 75 for the enzyme from Panicum milioides, Panicum schenckii, and Panicum decipiens (all C3-C4). The values for Panicum laxum (C3) and Panicum prionitis (C4) were 20 to 40 and 952 to 1374, respectively. The Vmax values did not change at pH 7.3 except for the C4 value, which increased about 24%. At pH 8.3, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from C3 and C3-C4 species had slightly higher Km HCO3− and lower K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values than did the C4 enzyme. With each species at pH 7.3, all K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values were 2- to 4-fold greater. The enzyme from all species was inhibited 85 to 90% by 1 millimolar malate at rate-limiting phosphoenolpyruvate and Mg2+ levels. With low levels of malate, 0.2 millimolar, the rate curve with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate was distinctly sigmoidal, and the inhibition was not eliminated at 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate. Malate at 10 millimolar protected all phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from inactivation at 55 C at pH 5.5, but not at pH 8.3. Aspartate did not protect well. When incubated at 37 C at pH 8.3 without phosphoenolpyruvate, but with HCO3−, the enzyme from several C4 grasses lost 92 to 98% of the initial activity after 4 minutes, whereas the enzymes from C3 and C3-C4Panicum species retained 60 to 70% of their activities. In contrast, 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate stabilized the enzyme at 37 C in all plant extracts. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from C3-C4 intermediate Panicum species has properties most similar to the enzyme from C3Panicum species. The higher leaf activity of the enzyme from the intermediate plants than from C3 species is not due to any unusual property assayed other than a higher Vmax. PMID:16661669

  7. Tornado Detection Based on Seismic Signal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatom, Frank B.; Knupp, Kevin R.; Vitton, Stanley J.

    1995-02-01

    At the present time the only generally accepted method for detecting when a tornado is on the ground is human observation. Based on theoretical considerations combined with eyewitness testimony, there is strong reason to believe that a tornado in contact with the ground transfers a significant amount of energy into the ground. The amount of energy transferred depends upon the intensity of the tornado and the characteristics of the surface. Some portion of this energy takes the form of seismic waves, both body and surface waves. Surface waves (Rayleigh and possibly Love) represent the most likely type of seismic signal to be detected. Based on the existence of such a signal, a seismic tornado detector appears conceptually possible. The major concerns for designing such a detector are range of detection and discrimination between the tornadic signal and other types of surface waves generated by ground transportation equipment, high winds, or other nontornadic sources.

  8. Micromachined silicon seismic accelerometer development

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S.

    1996-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of seismic monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily deployable sensor arrays. Our ultimate goal is to fabricate seismic sensors with sensitivity and noise performance comparable to short-period seismometers in common use. We expect several phases of development will be required to accomplish that level of performance. Traditional silicon micromachining techniques are not ideally suited to the simultaneous fabrication of a large proof mass and soft suspension, such as one needs to achieve the extreme sensitivities required for seismic measurements. We have therefore developed a novel {open_quotes}mold{close_quotes} micromachining technology that promises to make larger proof masses (in the 1-10 mg range) possible. We have successfully integrated this micromolding capability with our surface-micromachining process, which enables the formation of soft suspension springs. Our calculations indicate that devices made in this new integrated technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach the 10{sup -10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  9. Seismic performance of underground facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Marine, I W

    1982-01-01

    A workshop was held in Augusta, GA, February 11-13, 1981 to review and assess the state-of-the-art for determining and predicting earthquake damage to underground facilities. The papers presented related to data collection and analysis, modeling, and repository design. Discussion groups addressed seismology, rock mechanics and hydrology, modeling, design, and licensing, siting, and tectonics. Most scientists in attendance believed that enough was known to proceed with site selection, design, and licensing of a waste repository. However, there was recognition of several items of research that would enhance understanding of the subsurface effects of seismicity. In general, the subsurface effects of earthquakes are substantially less than their surface effects. This conclusion is supported by both observation and by modeling studies. The absence of wave reflections, the absence of high flexural stresses, and the absence of poor soil conditions contribute to the improved seismic performance of subsurface facilities. Seismic considerations for geologic disposal of nuclear waste vary with the phase of operation. During construction and waste loading, the primary concern is for the safety of onsite personnel. However, during long-term waste storage, the principal interest is in the migration of contaminants due to seismic cracking and enhancement of permeability. Backfilling the storage facility will mitigate this effect.

  10. Sealevel, global seismicity and tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melini, D.; Piersanti, A.

    2004-12-01

    Current estimates of secular relative sealevel variations give a uniform rise in the range 1.5-2.0 mm/yr over the last century. The main climatological contributions come from water volume increase due to thermal expansion and water mass increase due to ice melting. The volume increase accounts for a rise of about 0.5 mm/yr while the mass increase is thought to be even smaller. Since earthquakes produce vertical crust displacements and geoid height variations, they change also the relative sea level. On a global scale the combined effect of world seismicity is responsible for a mean relative sealevel variation of 0.1 mm/yr, with a large regional variability. This value is of the same order of magnitude of the climatological contributions and, in sites with strong seismotectonical activity, may represent the dominant contribution of relative sealevel variations measured by tide gauges. The recent measures of sealevel obtained by satellite altimetry show a wide regional variation of sealevel trends over the oceanic surfaces. These measurements, when compared with the global seismic driven signal, show a strong correlation of the geographical distribution of trend signs, while the absolute values of seismic RSL trends are much smaller in magnitude. The physical processes underlying the observed correlation need a deeper analysis to be understood, but we have a strong indication that seismic and tectonic processes plays an important role in the variation of global sealevel.

  11. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  12. X-rays from the SNR 3C 391

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, F. D.; Wang, Z. R.

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray map and spectral information were obtained from a short Einstein observation of 3C 391 (G31.9 + 0.0). Both X-ray and radio emission appear to come from an irregular shell 5 arcmin in diameter. For a distance of 11 kpc the X-ray luminosity is at least 10 to the 35th ergs/sec. The luminosity, the radius, and the temperature are about as expected from a middle-aged SNR expanding into a medium with density a few tenths of an atom per cu cm.

  13. Discovery of an optical synchrotron jet in 3C 264

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, P.; Peletier, R.; Baxter, D.; Sparks, W. B.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Observations with the Faint Object Camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed a new optical jet in the core of the elliptical galaxy NGC 3862 (3C 264). Morphologically, this jet is similar to the synchrotron jets seen in other galaxies, as it shows knots and bifurcations. The optical spectral index is also similar to that found in other jets. Thus, the nucleus of NGC 3862 appears to contain the fifth known example of an optical synchrotron jet. Since NGC 3862 is a typical radio-loud elliptical galaxy, it seems likely that many nonthermal jets found in the radio continuum may also have optical counterparts.

  14. The optical variability periodicity analysis of 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Romero, G. E.; Lin, R. G.

    2001-02-01

    The authors have compiled measurements of ~ 110 years in the B-band of the quasar 3C273 and used this database to search for periodicity signals in the optical light curve. Two different methods were applied: the Jurkevich technique and the discrete correlation function (DCF) method. They revealed the existence of periods of 2.0, (13.65+/-0.20) and (22.50+/-0.20) years in the source variability. The possible origin of such a behavior is also discussed.

  15. Infrared variability properties of the blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.

    1999-10-01

    The long-term (about 27 years) near-infrared K light curve is constructed from the published literature for the blazar 3C 279. The Jurkevich method is adopted to analyse the periodicity, and a strong 7.1+/-0.44yr period is found, suggesting that the next near-infrared outburst will occur in 2002/03. The correlation between colour index (spectral index) and magnitude is discussed, and a significant correlation between (J-H) and K is found with a correlation coefficient r=0.72 (p=2.0x10^-10), which is consistent with Brown et al.'s proposal.

  16. Photopolarimetry of Blazar 3C454.3 from MIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliyan, Ks; Ganesh, S.; Chandra, Sunil; Joshi, Uc

    2009-12-01

    The Blazar 3C 454.3 has been active in Gamma-rays, optical and X- rays since Sept. 2009 ( Atel #2181, #2200, #2201). Very recently, it has been reported to be flaring up in the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray energy regimes(ATel #2322; #2325; #2326; #2328; #2329; #2330; #2332). In Atel #2333, Sasada et al report optical behaviour of this source on Dec 1.9 with brightness (V=14.06+/-0.02 and degree of polarization 6.0+/-0.1% on the same epoch.

  17. The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, C.; Vio, R.; Cappellaro, E; Turatto, M Padova Osservatorio Astronomico, Padua )

    1990-08-01

    The optical variability of the quasar 3C 446 is investigated using power spectrum and structure function analysis along with a new set of observations that extend the available data till 1989. No contradiction is found between the PS and SF analyses. The presence of the 1540-day periodicity is strengthened by the occurrence of the 1988 luminosity peak, suggesting that the next burst will occur in the northern spring of 1992. The time series of the quasar is nonstationary. The light variations are determined by a sequence of luminosity bursts, mostly regularly spaced in time and lasting up to 2 yr. 25 refs.

  18. Analysis of the ambient seismic noise at Bulgarian seismic stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Liliya; Nikolova, Svetlana

    2010-05-01

    Modernization of Bulgarian National Seismological Network has been performed during a month in 2005. Broadband seismometers and 24-bits digital acquisition systems with dynamic range more than 132dB type DAS130-01 produced by RefTek Inc. were installed at the seismic stations from the existing analog network. In the present study the ambient seismic noise at Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network (BNDSN) stations is evaluated. In order to compare the performance of the network against international standards the detail analysis of the seismic noise was performed using software and models that are applied in the international practice. The method of McNamara and Bulland was applied and the software code PDFSA was used to determine power spectral density function (PSD) of the background noise and to evaluate the probability density function (PDF). The levels of the ambient seismic noise were determined and the full range of the factors influencing the quality of the data and the performance of a seismic station was analyzed. The estimated PSD functions were compared against two models for high (NHNM) and low (NLNM) noise that are widely used in seismological practice for seismic station monitoring qualities assessment. The mode PDF are used to prepare annual, seasonal, diurnal and frequency analyses of the noise levels at BNDSN stations. The annual analysis shows that the noise levels at the Northern Bulgarian stations are higher than the ones at Central and Southern stations for the microseisms' periods (1sec -7sec). It is well observable at SS PRV and PSN located near Black sea. This is due to the different geological conditions of the seismic stations as well. For the periods of "cultural" noise the power distribution depends on the type of noise sources and as a rule is related to human activities at or near the Earth surface. Seismic stations MPE, VTS and MMB have least mode noise levels and the noisiest stations are PGB, PVL и JMB. The seasonal

  19. Seismic Noise Analysis and Reduction through Utilization of Collocated Seismic and Atmospheric Sensors at the GRO Chile Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, M. E.; Russo, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The installation of Earthscope Transportable Array-style geophysical observatories in Chile expands open data seismic recording capabilities in the southern hemisphere by nearly 30%, and has nearly tripled the number of seismic stations providing freely-available data in southern South America. Through the use of collocated seismic and atmospheric sensors at these stations we are able to analyze how local atmospheric conditions generate seismic noise, which can degrade data in seismic frequency bands at stations in the ';roaring forties' (S latitudes). Seismic vaults that are climate-controlled and insulated from the local environment are now employed throughout the world in an attempt to isolate seismometers from as many noise sources as possible. However, this is an expensive solution that is neither practical nor possible for all seismic deployments; and also, the increasing number and scope of temporary seismic deployments has resulted in the collection and archiving of terabytes of seismic data that is affected to some degree by natural seismic noise sources such as wind and atmospheric pressure changes. Changing air pressure can result in a depression and subsequent rebound of Earth's surface - which generates low frequency noise in seismic frequency bands - and even moderate winds can apply enough force to ground-coupled structures or to the surface above the seismometers themselves, resulting in significant noise. The 10 stations of the permanent Geophysical Reporting Observatories (GRO Chile), jointly installed during 2011-12 by IRIS and the Chilean Servicio Sismológico, include instrumentation in addition to the standard three seismic components. These stations, spaced approximately 300 km apart along the length of the country, continuously record a variety of atmospheric data including infrasound, air pressure, wind speed, and wind direction. The collocated seismic and atmospheric sensors at each station allow us to analyze both datasets together, to

  20. Engineering Seismic Base Layer for Defining Design Earthquake Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Nozomu

    2008-07-08

    Engineer's common sense that incident wave is common in a widespread area at the engineering seismic base layer is shown not to be correct. An exhibiting example is first shown, which indicates that earthquake motion at the ground surface evaluated by the analysis considering the ground from a seismic bedrock to a ground surface simultaneously (continuous analysis) is different from the one by the analysis in which the ground is separated at the engineering seismic base layer and analyzed separately (separate analysis). The reason is investigated by several approaches. Investigation based on eigen value problem indicates that the first predominant period in the continuous analysis cannot be found in the separate analysis, and predominant period at higher order does not match in the upper and lower ground in the separate analysis. The earthquake response analysis indicates that reflected wave at the engineering seismic base layer is not zero, which indicates that conventional engineering seismic base layer does not work as expected by the term 'base'. All these results indicate that wave that goes down to the deep depths after reflecting in the surface layer and again reflects at the seismic bedrock cannot be neglected in evaluating the response at the ground surface. In other words, interaction between the surface layer and/or layers between seismic bedrock and engineering seismic base layer cannot be neglected in evaluating the earthquake motion at the ground surface.

  1. The Seismic Effect of Impacts on Asteroids: Early Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. E.; Melosh, H. J.; Greenberg, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Crater counts made from the NEAR spacecraft images of the asteroid 433 Eros have revealed a paucity of small craters on this small body. Seismic shaking from impacts has been cited as a potential means of small crater erasure, and we present early results from mathematical, hydrocode, and seismic waveform modeling used to investigate this hypothesis. The seismic effects of an impact on a small body can be divided into two categories: (1) surface shaking due to the passage of discrete seismic pulses shortly after impact, and (2) surface shaking due to reverberations following the dispersion of seismic energy throughout the body. Seismic pulse effects are magnified due to the very low surface gravity of these bodies, with relatively small impacts having global seismic effects. An impact producing a 1 km diameter crater on a 20 km diameter asteroid will generate surface accelerations of over 10 g (where g is the asteroid's surface gravitational acceleration) out to an angular radius of 50 deg from the impact site, more than 2 g accelerations over the remaining surface of the asteroid, with a secondary peak of 2-10 g accelerations near the antipode of the impact. In addition, due to their small size and potentially high seismic quality factors (Q > 3000, based upon the lunar seismic data), asteroids can experience seismic reverberations lasting for several minutes following an impact. These reverberations will cause additional surface shaking, primarily at the peak frequencies injected by the impact (1-200 Hz). Impacts which produce craters in the 0.1-1 km diameter range on a 20 km diameter asteroid are able to generate reverberations of better than 1 g vertical acceleration over the entire surface. This secondary shaking may thus contribute strongly to modification of the surface topography.

  2. Moon meteoritic seismic hum: Steady state prediction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lognonne, P.; Feuvre, M.L.; Johnson, C.L.; Weber, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    We use three different statistical models describing the frequency of meteoroid impacts on Earth to estimate the seismic background noise due to impacts on the lunar surface. Because of diffraction, seismic events on the Moon are typically characterized by long codas, lasting 1 h or more. We find that the small but frequent impacts generate seismic signals whose codas overlap in time, resulting in a permanent seismic noise that we term the "lunar hum" by analogy with the Earth's continuous seismic background seismic hum. We find that the Apollo era impact detection rates and amplitudes are well explained by a model that parameterizes (1) the net seismic impulse due to the impactor and resulting ejecta and (2) the effects of diffraction and attenuation. The formulation permits the calculation of a composite waveform at any point on the Moon due to simulated impacts at any epicentral distance. The root-mean-square amplitude of this waveform yields a background noise level that is about 100 times lower than the resolution of the Apollo long-period seismometers. At 2 s periods, this noise level is more than 1000 times lower than the low noise model prediction for Earth's microseismic noise. Sufficiently sensitive seismometers will allow the future detection of several impacts per day at body wave frequencies. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Geological mounds and their seismic expression

    SciTech Connect

    Swarbrick, R.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Mound geometry (convex upward structure developed above a subhorizontal surface) is common in many geological environments and frequently observed in 2-dimensions on seismic sections. Seismic mounds are typically associated with deep-water clastic sediments, e.g. submarine fans and slumps, and with a variety of carbonate depositional settings, e.g., reefs and banks, but also exist in other depositional settings. Recognition will be dependent on mound dimension, velocity contrast, amplitude strength, and the resolution of the seismic data. Since mounds can represent an important exploration target and recognition of porous, hydrocarbon-bearing section is all-important, careful restitution of the original depositional morphology from the seismic data is required. Details of present velocity distribution are critical, along with a realistic concept of any post-depositional modification, such as compaction, which may have taken place during burial. Where differential compaction is taking place, for example between sand and shale, seismic expression of morphology will be continually modified during progressive burial. Analysis of structure at the top and base of the mound can provide support for lithological interpretation based on other criteria, such as seismic facies analysis based on internal and external reflections. Modeling, using parameters from mounds in a variety of known depositional settings, illustrates many of the interpretational problems associated with seismic mounds and provides some objective criteria for analysis of mound morphology. Comparison is made with real data, principally from northwest Europe and North America.

  4. Photonic Crystal Cavities in Cubic (3C) Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulaski, Marina; Babinec, Thomas; Buckley, Sonia; Rundquist, Armand; Provine, J.; Alassaad, Kassem; Ferro, Gabriel; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2014-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) combines many of the outstanding material properties of other well-known optical and quantum optical materials, including strong optical nonlinearity, high Young's modulus, and a host of optically-active crystalline defects, in a single CMOS-compatible platform. For many applications in classical and quantum information processing, the material properties of the cubic silicon carbide polytype (3C-SiC) in particular are advantageous. We therefore present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities in cubic 3C-SiC thin films (200 nm). We demonstrate cavity resonances across the infrared telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1.25 - 1.6 μm. Finally, we highlight our progress developing higher Q/V nanobeam cavities, as well as extending this optical cavity platform towards integration with SiC color centers. PECASE Grant ECCS-10 25811, NSF Grant ECS-9731293, Stanford Graduate Fellowship, National Science Graduate Fellowship.

  5. Dependence of seismic energy on higher wavenumber components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, S.; Yagi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic Energy ESE_S gives a minimum of strain energy drop defined as an inner product of spacial distribution of coseismic slip and stress change on a fault surface (Andrews 1978 JGR). Traditionally, ESE_S has been obtained by multiplying mean stress drop and seismic moment divided by the rigidity by assuming the distribution of stress drop is constant in space, which yields an elliptic slip distribution. It has, however, been pointed out that slip distributions are approximated not as the elliptic distribution but as the kk-squared model (Herrero & Bernard 1994 BSSA), so that the product of mean stress drop and seismic moment does not give proper estimation of ESE_S. For the case of heterogeneous stress drop, the inner product requires shorter wavelength components of slip distribution (Andrews 1980 JGR). Mai & Beroza (2002 JGR) revealed that observed slip distributions in the wavenumber domain are well modeled with the von Karman power spectrum density parameterized by a corner wavenumber kck_c and the Hurst exponent HH, and quantified these two parameters for some inversion results. Although they discussed a condition of convergence of the inner product, they did not consider dependence of ESE_S on kck_c, HH, and a maximum wavenumber kmaxk_{max}. In this study, we analytically obtain the dependence and suggest how we should consider higher wavenumber components of slip distribution for estimation of ESE_S. We show that the relationship ES∝C(kmax/kc,H)μP2k3cE_S propto C(k_{max}/k_c, H) mu P^2 k_c^3 holds, where μmu is the rigidity, and PP is the seismic potency. An analytical solution of C(kmax/kc,H)C(k_{max}/k_c, H) tells us that even components of kmax/kc˜10k_{max}/k_c sim 10 or 100100 are not negligible for ESE_S under kk-squared model while such components do not contribute to ESE_S for the elliptic slip distribution. We discuss this feature quantitatively and show some examples of estimation of ESE_S based on results of slip inversions.

  6. Crystalline Ni3C as both carbon source and catalyst for graphene nucleation: a QM/MD study

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Menggai; Li, Kai; Guan, Wei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Page, Alister; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nucleation from crystalline Ni3C has been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulations based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. It was observed that the lattice of Ni3C was quickly relaxed upon thermal annealing at high temperature, resulting in an amorphous Ni3C catalyst structure. With the aid of the mobile nickel atoms, inner layer carbon atoms precipitated rapidly out of the surface and then formed polyyne chains and Y-junctions. The frequent sinusoidal-like vibration of the branched carbon configurations led to the formation of nascent graphene precursors. In light of the rapid decomposition of the crystalline Ni3C, it is proposed that the crystalline Ni3C is unlikely to be a reaction intermediate in the CVD-growth of graphene at high temperatures. However, results present here indicate that Ni3C films can be employed as precursors in the synthesis of graphene with exciting possibility. PMID:26169042

  7. Crystalline Ni3C as both carbon source and catalyst for graphene nucleation: a QM/MD study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Menggai; Li, Kai; Guan, Wei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Page, Alister; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-07-01

    Graphene nucleation from crystalline Ni3C has been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulations based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. It was observed that the lattice of Ni3C was quickly relaxed upon thermal annealing at high temperature, resulting in an amorphous Ni3C catalyst structure. With the aid of the mobile nickel atoms, inner layer carbon atoms precipitated rapidly out of the surface and then formed polyyne chains and Y-junctions. The frequent sinusoidal-like vibration of the branched carbon configurations led to the formation of nascent graphene precursors. In light of the rapid decomposition of the crystalline Ni3C, it is proposed that the crystalline Ni3C is unlikely to be a reaction intermediate in the CVD-growth of graphene at high temperatures. However, results present here indicate that Ni3C films can be employed as precursors in the synthesis of graphene with exciting possibility.

  8. Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Innocent Aluka

    2008-08-31

    Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more

  9. Characterization of a n+3C/n-4H SiC heterojunction diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisawa, R. A.; Mihaila, A.; Farkas, I.; Teodorescu, V. S.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Hsu, C.-W.; Janzén, E.; Rahimo, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the fabrication of n + 3C/n-4H SiC heterojunction diodes (HJDs) potentially promising the ultimate thermal stability of the junction. The diodes were systematically analyzed by TEM, X-ray diffraction, AFM, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy, indicating the formation of epitaxial 3C-SiC crystal on top of 4H-SiC substrate with continuous interface, low surface roughness, and up to ˜7 × 1017 cm-3 dopant impurity concentration. The conduction band off-set is about 1 V as extracted from CV measurements, while the valence bands of both SiC polytypes are aligned. The HJDs feature opening voltage of 1.65 V, consistent with the barrier height of about 1.5 eV extracted from CV measurement. We finally compare the electrical results of the n + 3C/n-4H SiC heterojunction diodes with those featuring Si and Ge doped anodes in order to evaluate current challenges involved in the fabrication of such devices.

  10. Heteroepitaxy of 3C-SiC on different on-axis oriented silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzalone, R.; Severino, A.; D'Arrigo, G.; Bongiorno, C.; Abbondanza, G.; Foti, G.; Saddow, S.; La Via, F.

    2009-04-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of 3C-SiC films on on-axis (100), (110), and (111) Si oriented substrates has been investigated. A multistep growth process using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition with trichlorosilane as the silicon precursor was conducted at a growth temperature of 1350 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis (θ-2θ and polar figure) and numerical simulation have been shown to be a suitable method to investigate and understand the SiC film structural properties for each substrate orientation. Epitaxial SiC films with first order twins, at least for growth on (100) and (111) Si, were obtained. SiC growth on (110) Si, on the other hand, showed a change in the growth direction by the observation of first and second order twins from the ⟨110⟩ to ⟨111⟩ direction. This is due to the high growth rate of (110) 3C-SiC/(110) Si heteroepitaxial system which encourages the SiC film to grow in a direction with a higher packing density. It was observed that the 3C-SiC surface morphology and average residual stress depends strongly on the silicon substrate orientation, as confirmed by atomic force microscopy analysis and radius of curvature measurements.

  11. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical modelling of African geodynamics: A reconciliation of deep-mantle convection with surface geophysical constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Quere, S; Moucha, R; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P; Mitrovica, J X; Rowley, D B

    2008-08-22

    Recent progress in seismic tomography provides the first complete 3-D images of the combined thermal and chemical anomalies that characterise the unique deep mantle structure below the African continent. With these latest tomography results we predict flow patterns under Africa that reveal a large-scale, active hot upwelling, or superplume, below the western margin of Africa under the Cape Verde Islands. The scale and dynamical intensity of this West African superplume (WASP) is comparable to that of the south African superplume (SASP) that has long been assumed to dominate the flow dynamics under Africa. On the basis of this new tomography model, we find the dynamics of the SASP is strongly controlled by chemical contributions to deep mantle buoyancy that significantly compensate its thermal buoyancy. In contrast, the WASP appears to be entirely dominated by thermal buoyancy. New calculations of mantle convection incorporating these two superplumes reveal that the plate-driving forces due to the flow generated by the WASP is as strong as that due to the SASP. We find that the chemical buoyancy of the SASP exerts a strong stabilising control on the pattern and amplitude of shallow mantle flow in the asthenosphere below the southern half of the African plate. The asthenospheric flow predictions provide the first high resolution maps of focussed upwellings that lie below the major centres of Late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Kenya domes and Hoggar massif that lies above a remnant plume head in the upper mantle. Inferences of sublithospheric deformation from seismic anisotropy data are shown to be sensitive to the contributions of chemical buoyancy in the SASP.

  12. Refined seismic stratigraphy in prograding carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomar, L. )

    1991-03-01

    Complete exposure of the upper Miocene Reef Complex in the sea cliffs of Mallorca (Spain) allows for a more refined interpretation of seismic lines with similar progradational patterns. A 6 km long high-resolution cross section in the direction of reef progradation displays four hierarchical orders of accretional units. Although all these units are of higher order, they all exhibit similar characteristics as a third order depositional sequence and can likewise be interpreted as the result of high order sea-level cycles. The accretional units are composed of lagoonal horizontal beds, reefal sigmoids and gently dipping slope deposits. They are bounded by erosion surfaces at the top and basinwards by their correlative conformities. These architectural patterns are similar to progradational sequences seen on seismic lines. On seismic lines, the progradational pattern often shows the following geometrical details: (1) discontinuous climbing high-energy reflectors, (2) truncation of clinoforms by these high-energy reflectors with seaward dips, (3) transparent areas intercalated between clinoforms. Based on facies distribution in the outcrops of Mallorca the high-energy reflectors are interpreted as sectors where the erosion surfaces truncated the reef wall and are overlain by lagoonal sediments deposited during the following sealevel rise. The more transparent zones seem to correspond with areas of superposition of undifferentiated lagoonal beds. Offlapping geometries can also be detected in highest quality seismic lines. The comparison between seismic and outcrop data provides a more accurate prediction of lithologies, facies distribution, and reservoir properties on seismic profiles.

  13. Field site evaluation for seismic mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James S.; Larson, Gregg D.; Rogers, Peter H.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.; McCall, George S., II

    2002-11-01

    A system has been developed that uses audio-frequency surface seismic waves for the detection and imaging of buried landmines. The system is based on the measurement of seismic displacements immediately above buried mines using noncontacting vibrometers that interrogate the surface motion with either radar or ultrasonic signals. In laboratory tests and limited field tests the system has demonstrated the ability to detect a variety of inert antipersonnel and antitank mines with background contrast in excess of 20 dB. Current work on the system is focused on the transition from the laboratory into the field. To facilitate this, a series of experiments has been undertaken to measure the characteristics of several field test sites. The tradeoff between image contrast and scanning speed is of primary concern in evaluating the features of these sites. The field experiments have investigated the nature of ambient seismic noise, input impedance at the seismic source (a ground contacting shaker), modal content of the seismic interrogation signal, and the nature of the nonlinearities in the soil. Observed nonlinear phenomena have included harmonic generation, phase speed slowing, dispersion and spall. Although interesting, the differences between the field sites and the laboratory model do not appear to pose problems for seismic mine detection.

  14. Angola Seismicity MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  15. Q analysis on reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanghua

    2004-09-01

    Q analysis refers to the procedure for estimating Q directly from a reflection seismic trace. Conventional Q analysis method compares two seismic wavelets selected from different depth (or time) levels, but picking ``clean'' wavelets without interferences from other wavelet and noise from a reflection seismic trace is really a problem. Therefore, instead of analysing individual wavelets, I perform Q analysis using the Gabor transform spectrum which reveals the frequency content changing with time in a seismic trace. I propose two Q analysis methods based on the attenuation function and compensation function, respectively, each of which may produce a series of average values of Q-1 (inverse Q), averaging between the recording surface (or the water bottom) and the subsurface time samples. But the latter is much more stable than the former one. I then calculate the interval or layered values of Q-1 by a constrained linear inversion, which produces a stable estimation of the interval-Q series.

  16. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge

    PubMed Central

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-01-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a “seismic rainbow” effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context. PMID:27283587

  17. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V

    2016-01-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a "seismic rainbow" effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context. PMID:27283587

  18. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-06-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a “seismic rainbow” effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context.

  19. Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

    1999-10-17

    A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

  20. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  1. Substitutional Ge in 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, C.; Kolodzey, J.

    1999-02-01

    The incorporation of substitutional Ge into 3C-SiC alloys is studied theoretically with an anharmonic Keating model specifically adapted to the computation of the structural properties and the lattice dynamics of Si1-x-yGexCy alloys. Basic energy calculations show that the substitution of Si by Ge is more probable than the substitution of C by Ge in the zinc-blende silicon carbide crystal. If Ge replaces only Si, then the lattice parameter equals (0.43593±0.00002)+(0.000337±0.000002)y, where y stands for the Ge content. Hence, Vegard's law is not applicable. The alloy is characterized by a distinct phonon spectrum whose maximum peak position in cm-1 is best described by the exponential decay (243±1)+(27±2)exp[-y/(7.5±1.2)] up to the zinc-blende GeC compound.

  2. Structural Variability of 3C 111 on Parsec Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossberger, C.; Kadler, M.; Wilms, J.; Muller, C.; Beuchert, T.; Ros, E.; Ojha, R.; Aller, M.; Aller, H.; Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Nestoras, I.; Schmidt, R.; Zensus, J. A.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.; Riquelme, D.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the parsec-scale structural variability of the extragalactic jet 3C 111 related to a major radio flux density outburst in 2007, The data analyzed were taken within the scope of the MOJAVE, UMRAO, and F-GAMMA programs, which monitor a large sample of the radio brightest compact extragalactic jets with the VLBA, the University of Michigan 26 m, the Effelsberg 100 m, and the IRAM 30 m radio telescopes. The analysis of the VLBA data is performed by fitting Gaussian model components in the visibility domain, We associate the ejection of bright features in the radio jet with a major flux-density outburst in 2007, The evolution of these features suggests the formation of a leading component and multiple trailing components

  3. Trisodium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7)

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tris­odium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7), has been solved and refined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional theory (DFT). There are two independent five-coordinate Na+ and one six-coordinate Na+ cations in the asymmetric unit. The [NaO5] and [NaO6] polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework. There are channels parallel to the a and b axes in which the remainder of the citrate anions reside. The only hydrogen bonds are an intra­molecular one between the hy­droxy group and one of the terminal carboxyl­ate O atoms and an intermolecular one between a methylene group and the hydroxyl O atom. PMID:27308044

  4. Milliarcsecond polarization structure of the superluminal quasar 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David H.; Kollgaard, Ronald I.; Brown, Leslie F.; Gabuzda, Denise C.; Wardle, John F. C.

    1990-09-01

    A 2 x 10 marcsec-resolution determination is presented for the total intensity and linear polarization structures of the superluminal quasar 3C 273 at 5 GHz. Substantial polarized flux was detected from several superluminal components of the jet, whose fractional polarization increased symmetrically with distance from the core; the most distant component is highly polarized and exhibits a highly ordered magnetic field. Within a few marcsec of the core, the inferred magnetic field orientation varies rapidly with position along the jet. The primarily longitudinal magnetic field orientation is concluded to become established within 20 marcsec of the core. A highly disorganized magnetic field is the most plausible explanation for the low degree of polarization in the innermost regions of the jet.

  5. The Parsec-Scale Jet of Quasar 3C345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zensus, J. A.; Rabaca, C. R.

    1993-12-01

    We discuss the parsec-scale structure of the superluminal quasar 3C345. Monitoring of the structure with VLBI at cm and mm wavelengths has shown apparent superluminal motion of at least four distinct emission features, over a distance of more than 40 pc from the stationary core (Zensus, Cohen, and Unwin, submitted to APJ). Near the core, the projected trajectories are curved and different for individual components, indicative of more complicated flow patterns than previously suspected, and consistent with motion along helical paths. The motion accelerates with increasing separation from the core, as the jet curves towards the extended kiloparsec structure. The flux evolution of individual components can be described using a generalized shock model. We apply this to component C4 and discuss the impact of orientation effects and implications for specific shock models.

  6. Extended Ly-alpha emission associated with 3C 294

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.; Spinrad, Hyron; Dickinson, Mark; Van Breugel, Wil; Liebert, James; Djorgovski, S.; Eisenhardt, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Optical, IR, and radio observations of the powerful radio source 3C 294, which is surrounded by a large cloud of ionized gas, are presented. The galaxy is faint in the rest-frame UV, yet has a near-IR luminosity that is typical of radio galaxies at redshifts of order two. In contrast to the large extent of the ionized gas, the K-band image is quite compact. The emission-line cloud is closely aligned with the radio source axis and has an ionization state indicative of ionization by a nonstellar source. The velocity field of the gas has both large ordered motions and large turbulent components. The total mass required to keep the gas bound to the system is comparable to present-day massive galaxies and their halos. The velocity fields of the high-ionization lines are systematically different from Ly-alpha in a manner that is not easily understood.

  7. NIR Flaring of the Quasar 3C454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Carramiñana, A.; Recillas, E.; Escobedo, G.; Porras, A.; Mayya, Y. D.; Valdes, J. R.

    2010-10-01

    We report the ongoing NIR flare of the quasar 3C454.3, also known as [HB89]2251+158. It is likely associated with a gamma ray source CGRaBSJ2253+1608 and the radio source WMAP055. It is an intermediate redshift FRSQSO Z=0.859 (RA=22:53:57.75, Dec=+16:08:53.6(J2000). On October 31th,2010 (JD 2455500.781451), we determined the NIR flux from this object to correspond to H = 11.190 +/- 0.03, 0.63mag brighter than it was two days earlier(JD 2455498.821166) when we determined it to have H = 11.820 +/- 0.03.

  8. Development of potent inhibitors of the coxsackievirus 3C protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eui Seung; Lee, Won Gil; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Rho, Seong Hwan; Im, Isak; Yang, Sung Tae; Sellamuthu, Saravanan; Lee, Yong Jae; Kwon, Sun Jae; Park, Ohkmae K.; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Park, Woo Jin . E-mail: wjpark@gist.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Chul . E-mail: yongchul@gist.ac.kr

    2007-06-22

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3C protease (3CP) plays essential roles in the viral replication cycle, and therefore, provides an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of human diseases caused by CVB3 infection. CVB3 3CP and human rhinovirus (HRV) 3CP have a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity. Comparative modeling of these two 3CPs revealed one prominent distinction; an Asn residue delineating the S2' pocket in HRV 3CP is replaced by a Tyr residue in CVB3 3CP. AG7088, a potent inhibitor of HRV 3CP, was modified by substitution of the ethyl group at the P2' position with various hydrophobic aromatic rings that are predicted to interact preferentially with the Tyr residue in the S2' pocket of CVB3 3CP. The resulting derivatives showed dramatically increased inhibitory activities against CVB3 3CP. In addition, one of the derivatives effectively inhibited the CVB3 proliferation in vitro.

  9. Seismic signal of avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, Damiano; Ravanat, Xavier; Thibert, Emmanuel

    2010-05-01

    The characterization of avalanches with seismic signals is an important task. For risk mitigation, estimating remotely avalanche activity by means of seismic signals is a good alternative to direct observations that are often limited by visual conditions and observer's availability. In seismology, the main challenge is to discriminate avalanche signals within the natural earth seismic activity and background noise. Some anthropogenic low frequency (infra-sound) sources like helicopters also generate seismic signals. In order to characterize an avalanche seismic signal, a 3-axis broad band seismometer (Guralp 3T) has been set-up on a real scale avalanche test site in Lautaret (France). The sensor is located in proximity of 2 avalanche paths where avalanches can be artificially released. Preliminary results of seismic records are presented, correlated with avalanche physical parameters (volume released, velocity, energy).

  10. Mapping Europe's Seismic Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardini, Domenico; Wössner, Jochen; Danciu, Laurentiu

    2014-07-01

    From the rift that cuts through the heart of Iceland to the complex tectonic convergence that causes frequent and often deadly earthquakes in Italy, Greece, and Turkey to the volcanic tremors that rattle the Mediterranean, seismic activity is a prevalent and often life-threatening reality across Europe. Any attempt to mitigate the seismic risk faced by society requires an accurate estimate of the seismic hazard.

  11. 50 CFR Table 3c to Part 680 - Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports 3c Table 3c to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3c Table 3c to Part 680—Crab Product Codes for...

  12. 50 CFR Table 3c to Part 680 - Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports 3c Table 3c to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3c Table 3c to Part 680—Crab Product Codes for...

  13. 50 CFR Table 3c to Part 680 - Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Product Codes for Economic Data Reports 3c Table 3c to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3c Table 3c to Part 680—Crab Product Codes for...

  14. Jet-Intracluster Medium Interactions of the Head Tail Radio Galaxy 3C 129

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczynski, Henric S. W.

    2005-01-01

    The 50 ksec XMM observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129 were taken as scheduled, and the data are of good quality. We analyzed the data in the following way. After standard cleaning, we flat-fielded the XMM surface brightness maps. Combining the data from the EPIC MOS and PN Camera CCDs, we performed a cross-correlation analysis of the X-ray surface brightness distribution with the 1.4 GHz VLA radio map. We found evidence for cavities in the X-ray emitting Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) associated with the radio tail of the head-tail radio galaxy 3C 129. This discovery is very interesting as it excludes the presence of a large fraction of thermal plasma in the radio tail. Together with the observation of an apparent pressure mismatch between the radio plasma and the ICM, and an upper limit on the magnetic field inside the radio tail (from the radio spectral indices map) the observation implies that the tail pressure is dominated either by low-energy electrons/positrons, or, by relativistic protons. Furthermore, we studied the energy spectrum of an X-ray "hot-spot" associated with the head of the radio galaxy 3C 129. It seems likely that the X-ray hot-spot originates from shocked gas in front of the radio galaxy. , The analysis turned out to be much more difficult than anticipated. The main reason is the lack of a comprehensive, publicly available background model that is key for the analysis of extended sources. Small groups like our do not have the man-power to come up with a background model themselves. We used the model from Read & Ponman (A&A 409, 395, 2003). However, the background subtracted X-ray surface brightness maps show a bright ring in the outer 20% of the camera. We tried to get rid of this ring and contacted the XMM helpdesk and Read & Ponman, the authors of the background paper. However, up to this day, we did not entirely succeed to remove the brightness enhancement at the outer parts of the camera. Unfortunately, our results are somewhat sensitive

  15. Volcano seismicity in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurman, Helena

    I examine the many facets of volcano seismicity in Alaska: from the short-lived eruption seismicity that is limited to only the few weeks during which a volcano is active, to the seismicity that occurs in the months following an eruption, and finally to the long-term volcano seismicity that occurs in the years in which volcanoes are dormant. I use the rich seismic dataset that was recorded during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano to examine eruptive volcano seismicity. I show that the progression of magma through the conduit system at Redoubt could be readily tracked by the seismicity. Many of my interpretations benefited greatly from the numerous other datasets collected during the eruption. Rarely was there volcanic activity that did not manifest itself in some way seismically, however, resulting in a remarkably complete chronology within the seismic record of the 2009 eruption. I also use the Redoubt seismic dataset to study post-eruptive seismicity. During the year following the eruption there were a number of unexplained bursts of shallow seismicity that did not culminate in eruptive activity despite closely mirroring seismic signals that had preceded explosions less than a year prior. I show that these episodes of shallow seismicity were in fact related to volcanic processes much deeper in the volcanic edifice by demonstrating that earthquakes that were related to magmatic activity during the eruption were also present during the renewed shallow unrest. These results show that magmatic processes can continue for many months after eruptions end, suggesting that volcanoes can stay active for much longer than previously thought. In the final chapter I characterize volcanic earthquakes on a much broader scale by analyzing a decade of continuous seismic data across 46 volcanoes in the Aleutian arc to search for regional-scale trends in volcano seismicity. I find that volcanic earthquakes below 20 km depth are much more common in the central region of the arc

  16. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  17. Man-caused seismicity of Kuzbass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, Alexandr; Emanov, Alexey; Leskova, Ekaterina; Fateyev, Alexandr

    2010-05-01

    A natural seismicity of Kuznetsk Basin is confined in the main to mountain frame of Kuznetsk hollow. In this paper materials of experimental work with local station networks within sediment basin are presented. Two types of seismicity display within Kuznetsk hollow have been understood: first, man-caused seismic processes, confined to mine working and concentrated on depths up to one and a half of km; secondly, seismic activations on depths of 2-56 km, not coordinated in plan with coal mines. Every of studied seismic activations consists of large quantity of earthquakes of small powers (Ms=1-3). From one to first tens of earthquakes were recorded in a day. The earthquakes near mine working shift in space along with mine working, and seismic process become stronger at the instant a coal-plough machine is operated, and slacken at the instant the preventive works are executed. The seismic processes near three lavas in Kuznetsk Basin have been studied in detail. Uplift is the most typical focal mechanism. Activated zone near mine working reach in diameter 1-1,5 km. Seismic activations not linked with mine working testify that the subsoil of Kuznetsk hollow remain in stress state in whole. The most probable causes of man-caused action on hollow are processes, coupled with change of physical state of rocks at loss of methane from large volume or change by mine working of rock watering in large volume. In this case condensed rocks, lost gas and water, can press out upwards, realizing the reverse fault mechanism of earthquakes. A combination of stress state of hollow with man-caused action at deep mining may account for incipient activations in Kuznetsk Basin. Today earthquakes happen mainly under mine workings, though damages of workings themselves do not happen, but intensive shaking on surface calls for intent study of so dangerous phenomena. In 2009 replicates of the experiment on research of seismic activations in area of before investigated lavas have been conducted

  18. The critical angle in seismic interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Wijk, K.; Calvert, A.; Haney, M.; Mikesell, D.; Snieder, R.

    2008-01-01

    Limitations with respect to the characteristics and distribution of sources are inherent to any field seismic experiment, but in seismic interferometry these lead to spurious waves. Instead of trying to eliminate, filter or otherwise suppress spurious waves, crosscorrelation of receivers in a refraction experiment indicate we can take advantage of spurious events for near-surface parameter extraction for static corrections or near-surface imaging. We illustrate this with numerical examples and a field experiment from the CSM/Boise State University Geophysics Field Camp.

  19. Mass Wasting in Planetary Environments: Implications for Seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee; Nahm, Amanda; Schmerr, Nick

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, mass wasting events such as rock falls and landslides are well known consequences of seismic activity. Here we investigate the regional effects of seismicity in planetary environments with the goal of determining whether such surface features on the Moon, Mars, and Mercury could be triggered by fault motion.

  20. Mass Wasting on the Moon: Implications for Seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. C.; Nahm, A. L.; Yanites, B.; Schmerr, N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Seismicity estimates play an important role in creating regional geological characterizations, which are useful for understanding a planet's formation and evolution, and of key importance to site selection for landed missions. Here we investigate the regional effects of lunar seismicity with the goal of determining whether surface features such as landslides and boulder trails on the Moon are triggered by fault motion.

  1. Mass Wasting on the Moon: Implications for Seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee; Nahm, Amanda; Schmerr, Nick; Yanites, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Seismicity estimates play an important role in creating regional geological characterizations, which are useful for understanding a planet's formation and evolution, and are of key importance to site selection for landed missions. Here we investigate the regional effects of seismicity in planetary environments with the goal of determining whether such surface features on the Moon, could be triggered by fault motion.

  2. Seismo-volcano source localization with triaxial broad-band seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inza, L. A.; Mars, J. I.; Métaxian, J. P.; O'Brien, G. S.; Macedo, O.

    2011-10-01

    Seismo-volcano source localization is essential to improve our understanding of eruptive dynamics and of magmatic systems. The lack of clear seismic wave phases prohibits the use of classical location methods. Seismic antennas composed of one-component (1C) seismometers provide a good estimate of the backazimuth of the wavefield. The depth estimation, on the other hand, is difficult or impossible to determine. As in classical seismology, the use of three-component (3C) seismometers is now common in volcano studies. To determine the source location parameters (backazimuth and depth), we extend the 1C seismic antenna approach to 3Cs. This paper discusses a high-resolution location method using a 3C array survey (3C-MUSIC algorithm) with data from two seismic antennas installed on an andesitic volcano in Peru (Ubinas volcano). One of the main scientific questions related to the eruptive process of Ubinas volcano is the relationship between the magmatic explosions and long-period (LP) swarms. After introducing the 3C array theory, we evaluate the robustness of the location method on a full wavefield 3-D synthetic data set generated using a digital elevation model of Ubinas volcano and an homogeneous velocity model. Results show that the backazimuth determined using the 3C array has a smaller error than a 1C array. Only the 3C method allows the recovery of the source depths. Finally, we applied the 3C approach to two seismic events recorded in 2009. Crossing the estimated backazimuth and incidence angles, we find sources located 1000 ± 660 m and 3000 ± 730 m below the bottom of the active crater for the explosion and the LP event, respectively. Therefore, extending 1C arrays to 3C arrays in volcano monitoring allows a more accurate determination of the source epicentre and now an estimate for the depth.

  3. A Spectacular Bow Shock in the 11 keV Galaxy Cluster Around 3C 438

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Deanna Lily; Bogdan, Akos; Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Santos, Felipe A.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of deep 153 ks Chandra observations of the hot, 11 keV, galaxy cluster associated with the radio galaxy 3C 438. By mapping the morphology of the hot gas and analyzing its surface brightness and temperature distribution, we argue that the cluster is undergoing a major merger between two massive sub-clusters. To the southeast of 3C 438, we detect two jumps in surface brightness, at 90” (400 kpc) and at 180” (800 kpc). The inner jump corresponds to an increase in density by a factor of two, while the outer jump implies a decrease in density by a factor of almost four. Combining these density jumps with the temperature distribution within the cluster, we establish that the pressure of the hot gas is continuous at the inner jump, while there is a significant pressure increase at the outer jump. From the magnitude of the outer pressure jump, we determine that one sub-cluster is moving with a relative velocity of approximately 2300 km/s with respect to the intracluster medium of the second sub-cluster, creating a bow shock. Based on these findings, we conc