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Sample records for 3c surface seismic

  1. How 3-D, 3-C seismic characterized a carbonate reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Arestad, J.F.; Mattocks, B.W.; Davis, T.L.; Benson, R.D.

    1995-04-01

    The Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) at the Colorado School of Mines has pioneered research into 3-D, 3-C (multicomponent) reflection seismology for nearly a decade utilizing both P-wave and S-wave sources. Multicomponent-seismic surveys provide significantly more information about petroleum reservoirs than compressional-wave surveys. Initial 3-D, 3-C surveys acquired by RCP were targeted at characterizing naturally fractured reservoirs. The current phase of the project is oriented towards utilizing shear waves to discriminate lithologic and diagenetic changes within stratigraphic reservoirs where compressional-seismic data has not be effective. The Joffre field, Nisku reservoir, is the site of RCP`s ongoing multidisciplinary research effort in Western Canada. The research team is directed by Colorado School of Mines faculty with graduate team members from geology, geophysics and petroleum engineering departments. While this study is still in progress, some key findings and directions of this research are reported here. The following topics will be discussed: Joffre field 3-D, 3-C survey; compressional wave 3-D technique; shear-wave 3-D technique; converted-wave 3-D technique; reservoir characterization, and future directions.

  2. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-08-21

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  3. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2005-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  4. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2006-05-05

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-05-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the

  6. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2006-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400

  7. Converted-Wave Processing of a 3D-3C Refection Seismic Survey of Soda Lake Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Kent, T.; Echols, J.

    2012-12-01

    This 3D-3C seismic survey greatly improves the structural model of the Soda Lake, Nevada geothermal system. The picked top of a mudstone interval above reservoir levels reveals a detailed fault map. The geothermal reservoir is within a complex of nested grabens. Determining a "geothermal indicator" for the deeper reservoir in the seismic signal, and processing of the 3D converted-wave data, have been unsuccessful to date. Due to a high near-surface Vp/Vs ratio the shear-wave energy is under-sampled with 220 ft receiver spacing and 550 ft (168 m) line spacing. The 2D converted-wave data that we can image shows encouraging similarity to the deep structural features in the P-wave sections, but have little resolution of shallow structures. Higher-density receivers and a better shallow shear-wave model are needed in conjunction with this deep reflection study to effectively image the 3D converted waves.

  8. Near-surface Fun with Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, M.

    2015-12-01

    What is happening in the near-surface often has a direct effect on human activity. Seismic exploration has routinely targeted geology at depths of kilometers to tens of kilometers. However, these techniques can be applied to answer questions about shallower targets. Several recent experiments demonstrate seismic applicability to near-surface problems. One example is passive seismic monitoring using ambient noise to identify shallow changes and potential hazards in a producing hydrocarbon field. Another example is the use of seismic reflection data from within the water column to determine layering caused by temperature and salinity differences in depth. A third example is identifying historical elevation changes along coast lines using seismic reflection data. These examples show that exploration seismic methods can be effectively used for a variety of near-surface applications.

  9. Martian seismicity through time from surface faulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Banerdt, W. B.; Tralli, D.

    1991-01-01

    An objective of future Mars missions involves emplacing a seismic network on Mars to determine the internal structure of the planet. An argument based on the relative geologic histories of the terrestrial planets suggests that Mars should be seismically more active than the Moon, but less active than the Earth. The seismicity is estimated which is expected on Mars through time from slip on faults visible on the planets surface. These estimates of martian seismicity must be considered a lower limit as only structures produced by shear faulting visible at the surface today are included (i.e., no provision is made for buried structures or non-shear structures); in addition, the estimate does not include seismic events that do not produce surface displacement (e.g., activity associated with hidden faults, deep lithospheric processes or volcanism) or events produced by tidal triggering or meteorite impacts. Calibration of these estimates suggests that Mars may be many times more seismically active than the Moon.

  10. SHEAR WAVE SEISMIC STUDY COMPARING 9C3D SV AND SH IMAGES WITH 3C3D C-WAVE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    John Beecherl; Bob A. Hardage

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relative merits of shear-wave (S-wave) seismic data acquired with nine-component (9-C) technology and with three-component (3-C) technology. The original proposal was written as if the investigation would be restricted to a single 9-C seismic survey in southwest Kansas (the Ashland survey), on the basis of the assumption that both 9-C and 3-C S-wave images could be created from that one data set. The Ashland survey was designed as a 9-C seismic program. We found that although the acquisition geometry was adequate for 9-C data analysis, the source-receiver geometry did not allow 3-C data to be extracted on an equitable and competitive basis with 9-C data. To do a fair assessment of the relative value of 9-C and 3-C seismic S-wave data, we expanded the study beyond the Ashland survey and included multicomponent seismic data from surveys done in a variety of basins. These additional data were made available through the Bureau of Economic Geology, our research subcontractor. Bureau scientists have added theoretical analyses to this report that provide valuable insights into several key distinctions between 9-C and 3-C seismic data. These theoretical considerations about distinctions between 3-C and 9-C S-wave data are presented first, followed by a discussion of differences between processing 9-C common-midpoint data and 3-C common-conversion-point data. Examples of 9-C and 3-C data are illustrated and discussed in the last part of the report. The key findings of this study are that each S-wave mode (SH-SH, SV-SV, or PSV) involves a different subsurface illumination pattern and a different reflectivity behavior and that each mode senses a different Earth fabric along its propagation path because of the unique orientation of its particle-displacement vector. As a result of the distinct orientation of each mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical geologic condition in a more optimal way than do

  11. Development and Test of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson, Bjorn N.P.

    2015-02-28

    To address the critical site characterization and monitoring needs for CCS programs, US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Paulsson, Inc. in 2010 a contract to design, build and test a fiber optic based ultra-large bandwidth clamped borehole seismic vector array capable of deploying up to one thousand 3C sensor pods suitable for deployment into high temperature and high pressure boreholes. Paulsson, Inc. has completed a design or a unique borehole seismic system consisting of a novel drill pipe based deployment system that includes a hydraulic clamping mechanism for the sensor pods, a new sensor pod design and most important – a unique fiber optic seismic vector sensor with technical specifications and capabilities that far exceed the state of the art seismic sensor technologies. These novel technologies were all applied to the new borehole seismic system. In combination these technologies will allow for the deployment of up to 1,000 3C sensor pods in vertical, deviated or horizontal wells. Laboratory tests of the fiber optic seismic vector sensors developed during this project have shown that the new borehole seismic sensor technology is capable of generating outstanding high vector fidelity data with extremely large bandwidth: 0.01 – 6,000 Hz. Field tests have shown that the system can record events at magnitudes much smaller than M-2.3 at frequencies up to 2,000 Hz. The sensors have also proved to be about 100 times more sensitive than the regular coil geophones that are used in borehole seismic systems today. The fiber optic seismic sensors have furthermore been qualified to operate at temperatures over 300°C (572°F). The fibers used for the seismic sensors in the system are used to record Distributed Temperature Sensor (DTS) data allowing additional value added data to be recorded simultaneously with the seismic vector sensor data.

  12. Atomic-scale recognition of surface structure and intercalation mechanism of Ti3C2X.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shen, Xi; Gao, Yurui; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Yu, Richeng; Chen, Liquan

    2015-02-25

    MXenes represent a large family of functionalized two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal carbides and carbonitrides. However, most of the understanding on their unique structures and applications stops at the theoretical suggestion and lack of experimental support. Herein, the surface structure and intercalation chemistry of Ti3C2X are clarified at the atomic scale by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The STEM studies show that the functional groups (e.g., OH(-), F(-), O(-)) and the intercalated sodium (Na) ions prefer to stay on the top sites of the centro-Ti atoms and the C atoms of the Ti3C2 monolayer, respectively. Double Na-atomic layers are found within the Ti3C2X interlayer upon extensive Na intercalation via two-phase transition and solid-solution reactions. In addition, aluminum (Al)-ion intercalation leads to horizontal sliding of the Ti3C2X monolayer. On the basis of these observations, the previous monolayer surface model of Ti3C2X is modified. DFT calculations using the new modeling help to understand more about their physical and chemical properties. These findings enrich the understanding of the MXenes and shed light on future material design and applications. Moreover, the Ti3C2X exhibits prominent rate performance and long-term cycling stability as an anode material for Na-ion batteries.

  13. A prediction of mars seismicity from surface faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.P.; Banerdt, W.B.; Tanaka, K.L.; Tralli, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The shallow seismicity of Mars has been estimated by measurement of the total slip on faults visible on the surface of the planet throughout geologic time. Seismicity was calibrated with estimates based on surface structures on the moon and measured lunar seismicity that includes the entire seismogenic lithosphere. Results indicate that Mars is seismically active today, with a sufficient number of detectable marsquakes to allow seismic investigations of its interior.

  14. NMR reveals the surface functionalisation of Ti3C2 MXene.

    PubMed

    Hope, Michael A; Forse, Alexander C; Griffith, Kent J; Lukatskaya, Maria R; Ghidiu, Michael; Gogotsi, Yury; Grey, Clare P

    2016-02-21

    (1)H and (19)F NMR experiments have identified and quantified the internal surface terminations of Ti3C2Tx MXene. -F and -OH terminations are shown to be intimately mixed and there are found to be significantly fewer -OH terminations than -F and -O, with the proportions highly dependent on the synthesis method.

  15. Global surface wave tomography using seismic hum.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    2009-10-02

    The development of global surface wave tomography using earthquakes has been crucial to exploration of the dynamic status of Earth's deep. It is naturally believed that only large earthquakes can generate long-period seismic waves that penetrate deep enough into Earth for such exploration. The discovery of seismic hum, Earth's background free oscillations, which are randomly generated by oceanic and/or atmospheric disturbances, now provides an alternative approach. We present results of global upper-mantle seismic tomography using seismic hum and without referring to earthquakes. At periods of 100 to 400 seconds, the phase-velocity anomalies of Rayleigh waves are measured by modeling the observed cross-correlation functions between every pair of stations from among 54 globally distributed seismic stations. The anomalies are then inverted to obtain the three-dimensional S-wave velocity structure in the upper mantle. Our technique provides a new means for exploring the three-dimensional structure of the interior of terrestrial planets with an atmosphere and/or oceans, particularly Mars.

  16. Modelling seismic noise surface and body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Farra, V.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.; Mangeney, A.; Morelli, A.

    2013-12-01

    A proper knowledge of seismic noise sources is important to correctly extract properties of the Earth from seismic noise records. We present the theory for modeling both surface and body waves in the secondary microseism period band 3-10 s. We consider noise sources as vertical single forces at the ocean surface and we derive their amplitude from a realistic ocean wave model. We compute the site effect due to the bathymetry for both Rayleigh and body waves by using normal modes and ray theory. We show that it varies strongly with frequency and seismic wave type. We compute the amplitude of noise spectra by using normal mode summation and we show that the fundamental mode of Rayleigh wave is the dominant signal on noise spectra amplitude. For computing Rayleigh wave seismic spectra, we derive an attenuation model that enables to fit well the amplitudes of the noise vertical component whatever the station location in the secondary microseismic period band. Moreover, we estimate the energy amount of Love waves by modelling horizontal components with vertical force sources. The discrepancy between real and synthetic spectra on the horizontal components enables to estimate the amount of Love waves for which a different source mechanism is needed. The same theory is applied to study long period noise (T=20-500 s), considering noise sources as single forces generated by the interaction of ocean infragravity waves. We compute the Rayleigh wave site effect by using normal modes and we show that it is not frequency dependent.

  17. Seismic noise on Rarotonga: Surface versus downhole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, Rhett; Hutt, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Seismic noise data are presented from the new Global Seismographic Network station, RAR, on the Island of Rarotonga in the South Pacific. Data from the first new borehole site in the GSN are compared with a surface vault installation. Initial indications from the data show that borehole siting on a small island significantly reduces long-period (>20 s) horizontal seismic noise levels during the daytime, but little or no improvement is evident at periods shorter than 20 s or on the vertical component.The goal of the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) GSN program is broad, uniform coverage of the Earth with a 128-station network. To achieve this goal and provide coverage in oceanic areas, many stations will be sited on islands. A major siting consideration for these new stations is whether to build a surface vault or drill a borehole. Neither option is inexpensive. The costs for drilling a cased hole and a borehole sensor are large, but the benefit of a borehole site is that seismic noise is reduced during certain periods when a surface installation may be subject to wind, weather, and thermal effects. This benefit translates into recording greater numbers of smaller earthquakes and higher signal-to-noise ratio.

  18. Structures and energies of Cu clusters on Fe and Fe3C surfaces from density functional theory computation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinxin; Wang, Tao; Yang, Yong; Li, Yong-Wang; Wang, Jianguo; Jiao, Haijun

    2014-12-28

    Spin-polarized density functional theory computations have been carried out to study the stable adsorption configurations of Cun (n = 1-7, 13) on Fe and Fe3C surfaces for understanding the initial stages of copper promotion in catalysis. At low coverage, two-dimensional aggregation is more preferred over dispersion and three-dimensional aggregation on the Fe(110) and Fe(100) surfaces as well as the metallic Fe3C(010) surfaces, while dispersion is more favorable over aggregation on the Fe(111) surface. On the Fe3C(001) and Fe3C(100) surfaces with exposed iron and carbon atoms, the adsorbed Cu atoms prefer dispersion at low coverage, while aggregation along the iron regions at high coverage. On the iron surfaces, the adsorption energies of Cun (n = 2-7) are highest on Fe(111), medium on Fe(100) and lowest on Fe(110). On the Fe3C surfaces, the adsorption energies of Cun (n = 1-3) are highest on Fe3C(100), medium on Fe3C(010) and lowest on Fe3C(001), while, for n = 4-7 and 13, Fe3C(010) has stronger adsorption than Fe3C(100). On the basis of their differences in electronegativity, the adsorbed Cu atoms can oxidize the metallic Fe(110), Fe(100) and Fe3C(010) surfaces and become negatively charged. On the Fe3C(001) and Fe3C(100) surfaces with exposed iron and carbon atoms, the adsorbed Cu atoms interacting with surface carbon atoms are oxidized and positively charged. Unlike the most stable Fe(110) and Fe3C(001) surfaces, where the Fe(110) surface has stronger Cu affinity than the Fe3C(001) surface, which is in agreement with the experimental finding, the less and least stable Fe3C(010) and Fe3C(100) surfaces have stronger Cu affinities than the Fe(110) and Fe(100) surfaces. Since less stable facets are not preferably formed thermodynamically, it is crucial to prepare such surfaces to explore Cu adsorption and promotion, and this provides challenges to surface sciences.

  19. Effect of surface functionalization on the electronic transport properties of Ti3C2 MXene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiyorov, G. R.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of surface functionalization on the electronic transport properties of the MXene compound Ti3C2 are studied using density-functional theory in combination with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Fluorinated, oxidized and hydroxylated surfaces are considered and the obtained results are compared with the ones for the pristine MXene. It is found that the surface termination has a considerable impact on the electronic transport in MXene. For example, the fluorinated sample shows the largest transmission, whereas surface oxidation results in a considerable reduction of the electronic transmission. The current in the former sample can be up to 4 times larger for a given bias voltage as compared to the case of bare MXene. The increased transmission originates from the extended electronic states and smaller variations of the electrostatic potential profile. Our findings can be useful in designing MXene-based anode materials for energy storage applications, where enhanced electronic transport will be an asset.

  20. Surface Characterization of 3C-SiC Mesa Heterofilms: Evidence for Growth by Edge/Corner Nucleation Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Powell, J. Anothny

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the first detailed observations of unique surface morphologies of 3C-Sic films grown on 4W6H-SIC mesas by the step-free surface heteroepitaxy technique. The top surfaces of 3C-Sic films were extensively studied by optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as both film thickness (i.e,, growth time) and growth temperature (i.e., terrace nucleation rate) were varied following complete coverage of each 4W6H mesa by an initial 3C-Sic film. Almost all surface steps observed by AFM were 0.25 nm, the height of a single Si-C bilayer. However, strikingly different step patterns were observed, suggesting that radically different processes dominate the nucleation of new 3C-Sic bilayers on top of existing 3C-Sic film surfaces.

  1. Submarine seismic monitoring of El Hierro volcanic eruption with a 3C-geophone string: applying new acquisition and data processing techniques to volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Ripepe, Maurizio; Lopez, Carmen; Blanco, Maria Jose; Crespo, Jose

    2015-04-01

    A submarine volcanic eruption took place near the southernmost emerged land of the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain), from October 2011 to February 2012. The Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) seismic stations network evidenced seismic unrest since July 2011 and was a reference also to follow the evolution of the seismic activity associated with the volcanic eruption. Right after the eruption onset, in October 2011 a geophone string was deployed by the CSIC-IGN to monitor seismic activity. Monitoring with the seismic array continued till May 2012. The array was installed less than 2 km away from the new vol¬cano, next to La Restinga village shore in the harbor from 6 to 12m deep into the water. Our purpose was to record seismic activity related to the volcanic activity, continuously and with special interest on high frequency events. The seismic array was endowed with 8, high frequency, 3 component, 250 Hz, geophone cable string with a separation of 6 m between them. Each geophone consists on a 3-component module based on 3 orthogonal independent sensors that measures ground velocity. Some of the geophones were placed directly on the seabed, some were buried. Due to different factors, as the irregular characteristics of the seafloor. The data was recorded on the surface with a seismometer and stored on a laptop computer. We show how acoustic data collected underwater show a great correlation with the seismic data recorded on land. Finally we compare our data analysis results with the observed sea surface activity (ash and lava emission and degassing). This evidence is disclosing new and innovative tecniques on monitoring submarine volcanic activity. Reference Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN), "Serie El Hierro." Internet: http://www.ign.es/ign/resources /volcanologia/HIERRO.html [May, 17. 2013

  2. Application of high-resolution 2D-3C seismic for characterization of the perspective Jurassic shale play in Central Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyz, M.; Malinowski, M.; Krzywiec, P.; Mulińska, M.; Słonka, Ł.

    2016-10-01

    Here we show the application of broadband (4-120 Hz) 2D-3C seismic for characterization of the perspective Jurassic shale play in Central Poland. Data were acquired along a network of 250 km 2D profiles using single-point, densely spaced receivers (digital 3C sensors) and acquisition was focused on providing both high-resolution and broadband seismic that would enable structural imaging and quantitative interpretation of the key stratigraphic horizons in the Mesozoic sedimentary cover. Such acquisition parameters resulted in good quality data and allowed for more flexibility during processing, e.g., unaliased F-K filtering or digital group forming for ground-roll removal. Processing was oriented to preserve relative amplitudes and the broadband character of the dataset as the input for future quantitative interpretation. We obtained a high-resolution stratigraphic image of the target Upper Jurassic (Upper Kimmeridgian-Tithonian) sequence as well as overall structural portrait of this part of Mid-Polish Trough characterized by strong imprint of the salt tectonics. Lateral continuity of particular stratigraphic sequences has been determined and a more precise structural context for deposition and present-day structure of the Upper Kimmeridgian-Tithonian has been established.

  3. Surface modified MXene Ti3C2 multilayers by aryl diazonium salts leading to large-scale delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongbing; Zhang, Jianfeng; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Huajie; Li, Gaiye; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhuyin

    2016-10-01

    Herein we report a simple and facile method to delaminate MXene Ti3C2 multilayers by the assistance of surface modification using aryl diazonium salts. The basic strategy involved the preparation of layered MAX Ti3AlC2 and the exfoliation of Ti3AlC2 into Ti3C2 multilayers, followed by Na+ intercalation and surface modification using sulfanilic acid diazonium salts. The resulting chemically grafted Ti3C2 flakes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the presence of the surface organic species. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy revealed that surface-modified MXene Ti3C2 sheets disperse well in water and the solutions obey Lambert-Beer's law. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to demonstrate the morphology and structure of delaminating MXene Ti3C2 flakes. The results indicated that chemical modification for MXene multilayers by aryl diazonium salts induced swelling that conversely weakened the bonds between MX layers, hence leading to large-scale delamination of multilayered MXene Ti3C2via mild sonication. Advantages of the present approach rely not only on the simplicity and efficiency of the delamination procedure but also on the grafting of aryl groups to MXene surfaces, highly suitable for further applications of the newly discovered two-dimensional materials.

  4. Experiments on seismic metamaterials: molding surface waves.

    PubMed

    Brûlé, S; Javelaud, E H; Enoch, S; Guenneau, S

    2014-04-04

    Materials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles' velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations.

  5. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

    2002-03-11

    The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

  6. Critical Temperature Programs for Surface Carbonization of Si(111) and Their Effects on 3C-SiC Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang Nguyen, Nam; Liu, Chie-Sheng; Hu, Ming-Shien; Hong, Lu-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    We have studies of the changes in the surface states of carbonized Si(111) substrates treated under various temperature programs prior to high-temperature 3C-SiC film growth in a low pressure chemical vapor deposition system using SiH4, C2H2, and H2 as reactant gases. The carbonized Si surface underwent a change in bonding from SiC to disordered graphite, together with the formation of etch pits, when heated directly from the carbonization temperature of 1343 K to the growth temperature of 1523 K under a H2 flow over a period of 5 min; this transformation deteriorated the quality of the subsequent 3C-SiC growth. In contrast, a void-free stoichiometric SiC surface was preserved when we inserted a rapid cooling step, to near room temperature, under a H2 flow of 352 sccm within a period of 15 min after shutting off the C2H2 gas flow at the end of the surface carbonization process. The sharp temperature decrease in this program sealed off the carbonized substrate surface and, thus, led to a high film quality for subsequent 3C-SiC(111) growth.

  7. Engineered metabarrier as shield from seismic surface waves.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Antonio; Krödel, Sebastian; Marzani, Alessandro; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-12-20

    Resonant metamaterials have been proposed to reflect or redirect elastic waves at different length scales, ranging from thermal vibrations to seismic excitation. However, for seismic excitation, where energy is mostly carried by surface waves, energy reflection and redirection might lead to harming surrounding regions. Here, we propose a seismic metabarrier able to convert seismic Rayleigh waves into shear bulk waves that propagate away from the soil surface. The metabarrier is realized by burying sub-wavelength resonant structures under the soil surface. Each resonant structure consists of a cylindrical mass suspended by elastomeric springs within a concrete case and can be tuned to the resonance frequency of interest. The design allows controlling seismic waves with wavelengths from 10-to-100 m with meter-sized resonant structures. We develop an analytical model based on effective medium theory able to capture the mode conversion mechanism. The model is used to guide the design of metabarriers for varying soil conditions and validated using finite-element simulations. We investigate the shielding performance of a metabarrier in a scaled experimental model and demonstrate that surface ground motion can be reduced up to 50% in frequency regions below 10 Hz, relevant for the protection of buildings and civil infrastructures.

  8. Calving seismicity from iceberg-sea surface interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomaus, T.C.; Larsen, C.F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Iceberg calving is known to release substantial seismic energy, but little is known about the specific mechanisms that produce calving icequakes. At Yahtse Glacier, a tidewater glacier on the Gulf of Alaska, we draw upon a local network of seismometers and focus on 80 hours of concurrent, direct observation of the terminus to show that calving is the dominant source of seismicity. To elucidate seismogenic mechanisms, we synchronized video and seismograms to reveal that the majority of seismic energy is produced during iceberg interactions with the sea surface. Icequake peak amplitudes coincide with the emergence of high velocity jets of water and ice from the fjord after the complete submergence of falling icebergs below sea level. These icequakes have dominant frequencies between 1 and 3 Hz. Detachment of an iceberg from the terminus produces comparatively weak seismic waves at frequencies between 5 and 20 Hz. Our observations allow us to suggest that the most powerful sources of calving icequakes at Yahtse Glacier include iceberg-sea surface impact, deceleration under the influence of drag and buoyancy, and cavitation. Numerical simulations of seismogenesis during iceberg-sea surface interactions support our observational evidence. Our new understanding of iceberg-sea surface interactions allows us to reattribute the sources of calving seismicity identified in earlier studies and offer guidance for the future use of seismology in monitoring iceberg calving.

  9. Engineered metabarrier as shield from seismic surface waves

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Antonio; Krödel, Sebastian; Marzani, Alessandro; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Resonant metamaterials have been proposed to reflect or redirect elastic waves at different length scales, ranging from thermal vibrations to seismic excitation. However, for seismic excitation, where energy is mostly carried by surface waves, energy reflection and redirection might lead to harming surrounding regions. Here, we propose a seismic metabarrier able to convert seismic Rayleigh waves into shear bulk waves that propagate away from the soil surface. The metabarrier is realized by burying sub-wavelength resonant structures under the soil surface. Each resonant structure consists of a cylindrical mass suspended by elastomeric springs within a concrete case and can be tuned to the resonance frequency of interest. The design allows controlling seismic waves with wavelengths from 10-to-100 m with meter-sized resonant structures. We develop an analytical model based on effective medium theory able to capture the mode conversion mechanism. The model is used to guide the design of metabarriers for varying soil conditions and validated using finite-element simulations. We investigate the shielding performance of a metabarrier in a scaled experimental model and demonstrate that surface ground motion can be reduced up to 50% in frequency regions below 10 Hz, relevant for the protection of buildings and civil infrastructures. PMID:27996051

  10. Engineered metabarrier as shield from seismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, Antonio; Krödel, Sebastian; Marzani, Alessandro; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-12-01

    Resonant metamaterials have been proposed to reflect or redirect elastic waves at different length scales, ranging from thermal vibrations to seismic excitation. However, for seismic excitation, where energy is mostly carried by surface waves, energy reflection and redirection might lead to harming surrounding regions. Here, we propose a seismic metabarrier able to convert seismic Rayleigh waves into shear bulk waves that propagate away from the soil surface. The metabarrier is realized by burying sub-wavelength resonant structures under the soil surface. Each resonant structure consists of a cylindrical mass suspended by elastomeric springs within a concrete case and can be tuned to the resonance frequency of interest. The design allows controlling seismic waves with wavelengths from 10-to-100 m with meter-sized resonant structures. We develop an analytical model based on effective medium theory able to capture the mode conversion mechanism. The model is used to guide the design of metabarriers for varying soil conditions and validated using finite-element simulations. We investigate the shielding performance of a metabarrier in a scaled experimental model and demonstrate that surface ground motion can be reduced up to 50% in frequency regions below 10 Hz, relevant for the protection of buildings and civil infrastructures.

  11. Scattered surface wave energy in the seismic coda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, Y.

    2006-01-01

    One of the many important contributions that Aki has made to seismology pertains to the origin of coda waves (Aki, 1969; Aki and Chouet, 1975). In this paper, I revisit Aki's original idea of the role of scattered surface waves in the seismic coda. Based on the radiative transfer theory, I developed a new set of scattered wave energy equations by including scattered surface waves and body wave to surface wave scattering conversions. The work is an extended study of Zeng et al. (1991), Zeng (1993) and Sato (1994a) on multiple isotropic-scattering, and may shed new insight into the seismic coda wave interpretation. The scattering equations are solved numerically by first discretizing the model at regular grids and then solving the linear integral equations iteratively. The results show that scattered wave energy can be well approximated by body-wave to body wave scattering at earlier arrival times and short distances. At long distances from the source, scattered surface waves dominate scattered body waves at surface stations. Since surface waves are 2-D propagating waves, their scattered energies should in theory follow a common decay curve. The observed common decay trends on seismic coda of local earthquake recordings particular at long lapse times suggest that perhaps later seismic codas are dominated by scattered surface waves. When efficient body wave to surface wave conversion mechanisms are present in the shallow crustal layers, such as soft sediment layers, the scattered surface waves dominate the seismic coda at even early arrival times for shallow sources and at later arrival times for deeper events.

  12. Single crystalline 3C-SiC nanowires grown on the diamond surface with the assistance of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, W.; Yu, J. H.; Wang, Y.; Song, Y. Z.; Bai, H.; Jiang, N.

    2015-06-01

    Single crystalline 3C-SiC nanowires were grown directly on the surface of bulk diamond in a catalyst-participated heating treatment process at 1300 °C. The iron powder was used as catalyst and graphene was served as the second carbon source during the reaction. The sample was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy-dispersed X-ray (EDX). The results showed that the nanowires consisted of a crystalline 3C-SiC core that had a diameter of 40-60 nm and wrapped with about 10 nm amorphous SiO2 shell. Their lengths were up to several micrometers. The axes of nanowires lay along the [111] direction with a high density of stacking fault. Accordingly, we proposed graphene-assisted growth model to interpret the growth process of SiC nanowires on the diamond surface.

  13. Body and Surface Wave Modeling of Observed Seismic Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-31

    COVERED Body and Surface Wave Modeling of Observed Seismic Events 1’ 6. PERFOkMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) David...Short Title of Work: Body and Surface Wave Modeling of Observed Seismic Events The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the...synthetics generated with the Cogniard do-Hoop technique, P-SV modes, and DWFE codes. For a ten layered crust upper mantle model with a V bandwidth of 0-10

  14. The seismic effect of impacts on asteroid surface morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, James Edward, Jr.

    Impact-induced seismic vibrations have long been suspected of being an important surface modification process on small satellites and asteroids. In this study, I use a series of linked seismic and geomorphic models to investigate the process in detail. I begin by developing a basic theory for the propagation of seismic energy in a highly fractured asteroid, and I use this theory to model the global vibrations experienced on the surface of an asteroid following an impact. These synthetic seismograms are then applied to a model of regolith resting on a slope, and the resulting downslope motion is computed for a full range of impactor sizes. Next, this computed downslope regolith flow is used in a morphological model of impact crater degradation and erasure, showing how topographic erosion accumulates as a function of time and the number of impacts. Finally, these results are applied in a stochastic cratering model for the surface of an Eros-like body (same volume and surface area as the asteroid), with craters formed by impacts and then erased by the effects of superposing craters, ejecta coverage, and seismic shakedown. This simulation shows good agreement with the observed 433 Eros cratering record at a Main Belt exposure age of 400 +/- 200 Myr, including the observed paucity of small craters. The lowered equilibrium numbers floss rate = production rate) for craters less than ~100 m in diameter is a direct result of seismic erasure, which requires less than a meter of mobilized regolith to reproduce the NEAR observations. This study also points to an upper limit on asteroid size for experiencing global, surface-modifying, seismic effects from individual impacts of about 70- 100 km (depending upon asteroid seismic properties). Larger asteroids will experience only local seismic effects from individual impacts. In addition to the study of global seismic effects on asteroids, a chapter is also included which details the impact ejecta plume modeling I have done for the

  15. A new passive seismic method based on seismic interferometry and multichannel analysis of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng; Xia, Jianghai; Xu, Yixian; Xu, Zongbo; Pan, Yudi

    2015-06-01

    We proposed a new passive seismic method (PSM) based on seismic interferometry and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) to meet the demand for increasing investigation depth by acquiring surface-wave data at a low-frequency range (1 Hz ≤ f ≤ 10 Hz). We utilize seismic interferometry to sort common virtual source gathers (CVSGs) from ambient noise and analyze obtained CVSGs to construct 2D shear-wave velocity (Vs) map using the MASW. Standard ambient noise processing procedures were applied to the computation of cross-correlations. To enhance signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the empirical Green's functions, a new weighted stacking method was implemented. In addition, we proposed a bidirectional shot mode based on the virtual source method to sort CVSGs repeatedly. The PSM was applied to two field data examples. For the test along Han River levee, the results of PSM were compared with the improved roadside passive MASW and spatial autocorrelation method (SPAC). For test in the Western Junggar Basin, PSM was applied to a 70 km long linear survey array with a prominent directional urban noise source and a 60 km-long Vs profile with 1.5 km in depth was mapped. Further, a comparison about the dispersion measurements was made between PSM and frequency-time analysis (FTAN) technique to assess the accuracy of PSM. These examples and comparisons demonstrated that this new method is efficient, flexible, and capable to study near-surface velocity structures based on seismic ambient noise.

  16. Towards a more comprehensive usage of reflection seismic in near-surface characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouin, M.; Gloaguen, E.; Bellefleur, G.; Pugin, A.

    2014-12-01

    For more than a decade, research groups such as the Geological Survey of Canada built the interest for near-surface reflection seismic by proposing small vibrating sources and three components (3C) landstreamers. Developments in the instrumentation combined with extensive use of shear-wave profiling to image stratigraphy of unconsolidated environments at high resolution got this geophysical method more versatile, more accurate, increased cost effectiveness and allowed to cover greater distance per day. With those major upgrades as a starting point and in a context of regional aquifer characterization in St-Lawrence Lowlands in the province of Quebec, Canada, the present study propose a workflow to further enhance reflection seismic usage for near-surface characterization. First, as high resolution near surface surveys require small shot intervals and multiple channels on three axis, a lot of the acquisition information is received under a raw form yielding to unproductive quality control (QC). Hence, a tool was developed to process data "on the fly" and allow adequate real-time QC and on-site decision making. The algorithm was constructed in a Python environment and is accessible through a graphical user interface where the user is prompted for geometry parameters inputs and desired processing flow steps. Second, at the scale of seismic wavelengths, fine grain and poorly consolidated sediments such as marine clay of the St-Lawrence Lowlands can be viewed as a homogeneous medium presenting anisotropy. This section of the study showed that such geological settings yield to significant seismic velocity variations with angle of propagation that should not be ignore for normal move-out correction, migration or time to depth conversion. Finally, accurate delineation of stratigraphic horizons is an important task of any environmental or hydrogeological characterization study. A methodology was put forward to help integrate geophysical measurements with geological

  17. Enhanced and tunable surface plasmons in two-dimensional Ti3C2 stacks: Electronic structure versus boundary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauchamp, Vincent; Bugnet, Matthieu; Bellido, Edson P.; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Moreau, Philippe; Magne, Damien; Naguib, Michael; Cabioc'h, Thierry; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2014-06-01

    The dielectric response of two-dimensional (2D) Ti3C2 stacked sheets was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron energy-loss spectroscopy and ab initio calculations in the 0.2-30-eV energy range. Intense surface plasmons (SPs), evidenced at the nanometer scale at energies as low as 0.3 eV, are shown to be the dominant screening process up to at least 45-nm-thick stacks. This domination results from a combination of efficient free-electron dynamics, begrenzungs effect, and reduced interband damping. It is shown that, in principle, the SPs energies can be tuned in the mid-infrared, from 0.2 to 0.7 eV, by controlling the sheets' functionalization and/or thickness. This point evidences a new attribute of this new class of 2D materials.

  18. Atomic structure determination of the 3C -SiC(001) c(4×2) surface reconstruction: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejeda, A.; Wimmer, E.; Soukiassian, P.; Dunham, D.; Rotenberg, E.; Denlinger, J. D.; Michel, E. G.

    2007-05-01

    The structure of the Si-terminated 3C-SiC(001)-c(4×2) surface reconstruction is determined using synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray photoelectron diffraction from the Si2p and C1s core levels. Only the alternating up-and-down dimer (AUDD) model reproduces satisfactorily the experimental results. The refinement of the AUDD model leads to a height difference of (0.4±0.1)Å between the up and down Si-Si dimers. Also, the top and bottom dimers have alternating bond lengths at (2.5±0.2)Å and (2.2±0.2)Å , respectively. These results are in excellent agreement with ab initio density-functional calculations, which also further support the high sensitivity of this reconstruction on lateral strain and on the presence of defects. Finally, beyond well-established synchrotron-radiation-based core-level photoemission spectroscopy, an assignment is made on the structural origin of each Si2p surface and subsurface shifted component, based on their different photoelectron diffraction patterns.

  19. Two birds, one stone: dual targeting of the cancer cell surface and subcellular mitochondria by the galectin-3-binding peptide G3-C12.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Lian; Yang, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Huang, Yuan

    2017-01-09

    Active tumor-targeting approaches using specific ligands have drawn considerable attention over the years. However, a single ligand often fails to simultaneously target the cancer cell surface and subcellular organelles, which limits the maximum therapeutic efficacy of delivered drugs. We describe a polymeric delivery system modified with the G3-C12 peptide for sequential dual targeting. In this study, galectin-3-targeted G3-C12 peptide was conjugated onto the N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer for the delivery of D(KLAKLAK)2 (KLA) peptide. G3-C12-HPMA-KLA exhibited increased receptor-mediated internalization into galectin-3-overexpressing PC-3 cells. Furthermore, G3-C12 peptide also directed HPMA-KLA conjugates to mitochondria. This occurred because the apoptosis signal triggered the accumulation of galectin-3 in mitochondria, and the G3-C12 peptide that specifically bound to galectin-3 was trafficked along with its receptor intracellularly. As a result, G3-C12-HPMA-KLA disrupted the mitochondrial membrane, increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced cytochrome c release, which ultimately resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity. An in vivo study revealed that the G3-C12 peptide significantly enhanced the tumor accumulation of the KLA conjugate. In addition, G3-C12-HPMA-KLA exhibited the best therapeutic efficacy and greatly improved the animal survival rate. Our work demonstrates that G3-C12 is a promising ligand with dual-targeting functionality.

  20. Spectrum analysis of seismic surface waves and its applications in seismic landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mubashir; McClellan, James H; Scott, Waymond R

    2007-03-01

    In geophysics, spectrum analysis of surface waves (SASW) refers to a noninvasive method for soil characterization. However, the term spectrum analysis can be used in a wider sense to mean a method for determining and identifying various modes of seismic surface waves and their properties such as velocity, polarization, etc. Surface waves travel along the free boundary of a medium and can be easily detected with a transducer placed on the free surface of the boundary. A new method based on vector processing of space-time data obtained from an array of triaxial sensors is proposed to produce high-resolution, multimodal spectra from surface waves. Then individual modes can be identified in the spectrum and reconstructed in the space-time domain; also, reflected waves can be separated easily from forward waves in the spectrum domain. This new SASW method can be used for detecting and locating landmines by analyzing the reflected waves for resonance. Processing examples are presented for numerically generated data, experimental data collected in a laboratory setting, and field data.

  1. Advantages of wet work for near-surface seismic reflection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Markiewicz, R.D.; Rademacker, T.R.; Hopkins, R.; Rawcliffe, R.J.; Paquin, J.

    2007-01-01

    Benefits of shallow water settings (0.1 to 0.5 m) are pronounced on shallow, high-resolution seismic reflection images and, for examples discussed here, range from an order of magnitude increased signal-to-noise ratio to resolution potential elevated by more than 8 times. Overall data quality of high-resolution seismic reflection data at three sites notorious for poor near-surface reflection returns was improved by coupling the source and/or receivers to a well sorted and fully saturated surface. Half-period trace-to-trace static offsets evident in reflections from receivers planted into a creek bank were eliminated by moving the geophones to the base of a shallow creek at the toe of the bank. Reflections from a dipping bedrock were recorded with a dominant frequency approaching 1 KHz from hydrophones in 0.5 m of water at the toe of a dam using a hammer impact source. A tamper impacted by a dead blow hammer in a shallow (10-20 cm) deep creek produced reflections with a dominant frequency over 400 Hz at depths as shallow as 6 ms. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  2. Including Faults Detected By Near-Surface Seismic Methods in the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps - Some Restrictions Apply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. A.; Haller, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Every 6 years, the USGS updates the National Seismic Hazard Maps (new version released July 2014) that are intended to help society reduce risk from earthquakes. These maps affect hundreds of billions of dollars in construction costs each year as they are used to develop seismic-design criteria of buildings, bridges, highways, railroads, and provide data for risk assessment that help determine insurance rates. Seismic source characterization, an essential component of hazard model development, ranges from detailed trench excavations across faults at the ground surface to less detailed analysis of broad regions defined mainly on the basis of historical seismicity. Though it is a priority for the USGS to discover new Quaternary fault sources, the discovered faults only become a part of the hazard model if there are corresponding constraints on their geometry (length and depth extent) and slip-rate (or recurrence interval). When combined with fault geometry and slip-rate constraints, near-surface seismic studies that detect young (Quaternary) faults have become important parts of the hazard source model. Examples of seismic imaging studies with significant hazard impact include the Southern Whidbey Island fault, Washington; Santa Monica fault, San Andreas fault, and Palos Verdes fault zone, California; and Commerce fault, Missouri. There are many more faults in the hazard model in the western U.S. than in the expansive region east of the Rocky Mountains due to the higher rate of tectonic deformation, frequent surface-rupturing earthquakes and, in some cases, lower erosion rates. However, the recent increase in earthquakes in the central U.S. has revealed previously unknown faults for which we need additional constraints before we can include them in the seismic hazard maps. Some of these new faults may be opportunities for seismic imaging studies to provide basic data on location, dip, style of faulting, and recurrence.

  3. Surface-Source Downhole Seismic Analysis in R

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Eric M.

    2007-01-01

    This report discusses a method for interpreting a layered slowness or velocity model from surface-source downhole seismic data originally presented by Boore (2003). I have implemented this method in the statistical computing language R (R Development Core Team, 2007), so that it is freely and easily available to researchers and practitioners that may find it useful. I originally applied an early version of these routines to seismic cone penetration test data (SCPT) to analyze the horizontal variability of shear-wave velocity within the sediments in the San Francisco Bay area (Thompson et al., 2006). A more recent version of these codes was used to analyze the influence of interface-selection and model assumptions on velocity/slowness estimates and the resulting differences in site amplification (Boore and Thompson, 2007). The R environment has many benefits for scientific and statistical computation; I have chosen R to disseminate these routines because it is versatile enough to program specialized routines, is highly interactive which aids in the analysis of data, and is freely and conveniently available to install on a wide variety of computer platforms. These scripts are useful for the interpretation of layered velocity models from surface-source downhole seismic data such as deep boreholes and SCPT data. The inputs are the travel-time data and the offset of the source at the surface. The travel-time arrivals for the P- and S-waves must already be picked from the original data. An option in the inversion is to include estimates of the standard deviation of the travel-time picks for a weighted inversion of the velocity profile. The standard deviation of each travel-time pick is defined relative to the standard deviation of the best pick in a profile and is based on the accuracy with which the travel-time measurement could be determined from the seismogram. The analysis of the travel-time data consists of two parts: the identification of layer-interfaces, and the

  4. Feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to study seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to study the feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to investigate seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils. In the study, temporal variations of subsurface soil properties were measured and monitored by using a combination of a new seismic su...

  5. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E; Gamey, T Jeffrey; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-01-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies.

  6. Control system for inclined impact-type surface seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, G.M.

    1987-07-28

    A system is described for controlling the azimuths and inclinations of the respective shooting paths of separate vehicle-transported surface seismic sources. Each source has an impact mass, means for propelling the mass along the shooting path to strike an earth contacting base plate, and means for adjusting each shooting path by rotation thereof about two mutually perpendicular gimbal axes oriented in predetermined relation to the heading of the associated vehicle. The system consists of: (a) means for determining each such vehicle heading; (b) means dependent upon each vehicle heading for calculating the angular positions of each shooting path with respect to the gimbal axes which align the shooting path with desired values of azimuth and inclination; and (c) means responsive to the calculation means for actuating each shooting path adjustment means to effect such alignment.

  7. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  8. Surface-contacting vibrometers for seismic landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James S.; Larson, Gregg D.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.

    2005-06-01

    A technique has been developed that exploits remote seismic sources and local measurement of the surface displacement of the ground for the detection of buried landmines. Most of the previously reported investigation of this technique has focused on non-contact displacement sensors in order to ensure the safety of the operators of both handheld and vehicle-based systems. This is not inherently a constraint that requires a non-contact sensor, but rather one requiring a sensor that is non-intrusive (i.e. its presence does not alter the measured quantity). Current research is directed toward the development of autonomous and semi-autonomous robotic systems based on this technique. Here both unit cost and power consumption are issues of comparable importance to the survival of the sensor platform. Non-intrusive surface-contacting vibrometers are therefore a reasonable alternative. Several configurations have been studied for suitable vibrometers. The configuration that has shown the most promise is based on a commercial accelerometer coupled to the ground with a small normal force and isolated from the backing structure that is used to reposition it between measurements. It is a relatively simple matter to detect seismic motion with an accelerometer. The major issue in an effective implementation of the technique is to combine reproducibility with fidelity in the measurement. These are competing goals in that reproducibility is easily achieved with large normal forces, but fidelity requires that these be small. Sufficient reproducibility for imaging purposes has been achieved with normal forces that pose no danger of landmine detonation. Unlike reproducibility, fidelity is linked to both the nature of the imposed force and to its magnitude through the nonlinearity of the soil"s elasticity. Both continuous and incremental motions of the sensor platform have been studied, although incremental movement shows the most promise for the intended application.

  9. Elastic lattice modelling of seismic waves including a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O`Brien, Gareth S.

    2014-06-01

    Elastic lattice methods (ELMs) have been shown to accurately model seismic wave propagation in a heterogeneous medium. These methods represent an elastic solid as a series of interconnected springs arranged on a lattice and recover a continuum wave equation in the long wavelength limit. However, in the case of a regular lattice, the recovery of the continuum equation depends on the symmetry of the lattice. By removing particles above a free surface this symmetry is broken. Therefore, this free surface implementation leads to errors when compared with a traction free boundary condition. The error between a traction free boundary condition and the ELMs grows as the Poisson's ratio deviates from 0.25. By modifying the interaction constants with a scalar, the error can be reduced while keeping the flexibility of the nearest neighbour interaction rule. We present results of simulations where modified spring constants reduce the misfit with a traction free boundary solution and hence increase the accuracy of the elastic lattice method solution on the free surface.

  10. Approximations in seismic interferometry and their effects on surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimman, W. P.; Trampert, J.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate common approximations and assumptions in seismic interferometry. The interferometric equation, valid for the full elastic wavefield, gives the Green's function between two arbitrary points by cross-correlating signals recorded at each point. The relation is exact, even for complicated lossless media, provided the signals are generated on a closed surface surrounding the two points and are from both unidirectional point-forces and deformation-rate-tensor sources. A necessary approximation to the exact interferometric equation is the use of signals from point-force sources only. Even in simple layered media, the Green's function retrieval can then be imperfect, especially for waves other than fundamental mode surface waves. We show that this is due to cross terms between different modes that occur even if a full source boundary is present. When sources are located at the free surface only, a realistic scenario for ambient noise, the cross terms can overwhelm the higher mode surface waves. Sources then need to be very far away, or organized in a band rather than a surrounding surface to overcome this cross-term problem. If sources are correlated, convergence of higher modes is very hard to achieve. In our examples of simultaneously acting sources, the phase of the higher modes only converges correctly towards the true solution if sources are acting in the stationary phase regions. This offers an explanation for some recent body wave observations, where only interstation paths in-line with the prevailing source direction were considered. The phase error resulting from incomplete distributions around the stationary phase region generally leads to an error smaller than 1 per cent for realistic applications.

  11. Active seismic sources as a proxy for seismic surface processes: An example from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, A. D.; Lokmer, I.; Kennedy, B.; Keys, H. J. R.; Proctor, J.; Lyons, J. J.; Jolly, G. E.

    2014-10-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption pulses, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~ 7 × 105 m3) that propagated ~ 2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption timing must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the evolution of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the seismic sequence in a new cross correlation source location approach. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9 × 106 Nm producing observable seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four stations. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we obtain a best matched source position in the near vent region for the eruption period and significant down channel excitations during both the pre and post eruption periods. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~ 8 × 1011 Nm, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The new energy estimate may be more robust than those calculated from standard seismic radiation equations, which may include uncertainties about the path and site effects. The

  12. Development of near surface seismic methods for urban and mining applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Brodic, Bojan; Place, Joachim; Juhlin, Christopher; Bastani, Mehrdad

    2014-05-01

    There is a great need to improve our understanding of the geological conditions in the shallow subsurface. Direct observations of the subsurface are cumbersome and expensive, and sometimes impossible. Urban and mining areas are especially challenging due to various sources of noise such as from traffic, buildings, cars, city trains, trams, bridges and high-voltage power-lines. Access is also restricted both in time and space, which requires the equipment to be versatile, fast to set up and pack, and produces the least disruptions. However, if properly designed and implemented, geophysical methods are capable of imaging detailed subsurface structures and can successfully be used to provide crucial information for site characterizations, infrastructure planning, brown- and near-field exploration, and mine planning. To address some of these issues Uppsala University, in collaboration with a number of public authorities, research organizations and industry partners, has recently developed a prototype broadband (0-800 Hz based on digital sensors) multi-component seismic landstreamer system. The current configuration consists of three segments with twenty 3C-sensors each 2 m apart and an additional segment with twenty 3C-sensors each 4 m apart, giving a total streamer length of 200 m. These four segments can be towed in parallel or in series, which in combination with synchronized wireless and cabled sensors can address a variety of complex near surface problems. The system is especially geared for noisy environments and areas where high-resolution images of the subsurface are needed. The system has little sensitivity to electrical noise and measures sensor tilt, important in rough terrains, so it can immediately be corrected for during the acquisition. Thanks to the digital sensors, the system can also be used for waveform tomography and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW). Both these methods require low frequencies and these are often sacrificed in

  13. A Rock Physics Based Seismic Interpretation for a Deltaic Shaly Sand Reservoir from Surface Seismic and Wireline Log Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, S. M.; Ullah, A. S.; Jahan, I.; Rahman, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present an integrated quantitative seismic interpretation method based on conventional wireline log data and 2D surface seismic data for a deltaic shaly sand reservoir where frequent shaling out of the sand-shale laminated sequence resulted in dry holes in some previous drilling cases. Nineteen 2D post-stack seismic sections tied with seven well controls from the Rashidpur gas field of Bangladesh were used in this study. The study comprises petrophysical analysis from the conventional geophysical well logs (i.e. gamma ray, density, neutron and resistivity logs) to quantitative seismic interpretation using sonic log and 2D seismic data. The petrophysical analysis contributed sand/shale ratio, porosity and fluid saturation at a well location. A major portion of the work was focused on a rock physics analysis for linking interpreted petrophysical data with sonic observations. A set of seismic velocity profiles were established using varied P-wave velocities obtained from Hashin-Strikman-Walpole data fitting method for varying reservoir parameters such as porosity, clay content, pore fluid and fluid saturation. We found that each of the reservoir parameters has a strong control on elastic properties (i.e. seismic velocities) of the rock, for example a 10 percent increase in porosity causes an 8% drop of P-wave velocity. Seismic amplitudes on 19 seismic sections were picked aided by the synthetic seismograms generated from the established velocity profiles. The resulting isopach, sand/shale ratio, porosity and fluid saturation map shows improved scenarios of reservoir structure and stratigraphy as well as better reservoir characterization. P-wave velocities (Vp) are plotted as a function of porosities. The observed sonic data are color coded by clay content values. The Hashin-Strikman-Walpole upper and lower bounding lines are plotted for a two phase composite of matrix and fluid (brine).The matrix phase contains 60,70, 80 and 90 percents of quartz with clay mixture

  14. Impact-induced seismic activity on asteroid 433 Eros: a surface modification process.

    PubMed

    Richardson, James E; Melosh, H Jay; Greenberg, Richard

    2004-11-26

    High-resolution images of the surface of asteroid 433 Eros revealed evidence of downslope movement of a loose regolith layer, as well as the degradation and erasure of small impact craters (less than approximately 100 meters in diameter). One hypothesis to explain these observations is seismic reverberation after impact events. We used a combination of seismic and geomorphic modeling to analyze the response of regolith-covered topography, particularly craters, to impact-induced seismic shaking. Applying these results to a stochastic cratering model for the surface of Eros produced good agreement with the observed size-frequency distribution of craters, including the paucity of small craters.

  15. Ti3C2 MXenes with Modified Surface for High-Performance Electromagnetic Absorption and Shielding in the X-Band.

    PubMed

    Han, Meikang; Yin, Xiaowei; Wu, Heng; Hou, Zexin; Song, Changqing; Li, Xinliang; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei

    2016-08-17

    Electromagnetic (EM) absorbing and shielding composites with tunable absorbing behaviors based on Ti3C2 MXenes are fabricated via HF etching and annealing treatment. Localized sandwich structure without sacrificing the original layered morphology is realized, which is responsible for the enhancement of EM absorbing capability in the X-band. The composite with 50 wt % annealed MXenes exhibits a minimum reflection loss of -48.4 dB at 11.6 GHz, because of the formation of TiO2 nanocrystals and amorphous carbon. Moreover, superior shielding effectiveness with high absorption effectiveness is achieved. The total and absorbing shielding effectiveness of Ti3C2 MXenes in a wax matrix with a thickness of only 1 mm reach values of 76.1 and 67.3 dB, while those of annealed Ti3C2 MXenes/wax composites are 32 and 24.2 dB, respectively. Considering the promising performance of Ti3C2 MXenes with the modified surface, this work is expected to open the door for the expanded applications of MXenes family in EM absorbing and shielding fields.

  16. Stream networks and long-term surface uplift in the new madrid seismic zone.

    PubMed

    Merritts, D; Hesterberg, T

    1994-08-19

    Stream networks are sensitive to low rates of surface uplift and can be used to decipher the history of large earthquakes even where faults do not rupture the surface, as in intraplate seismic zones. Statistical analysis of alluvial network data from topographic maps in the New Madrid seismic zone, in the central United States, shows that stream-segment gradients deviate the most from an estimated natural stream profile where surface uplift is greatest. Evidence of cumulative deformation distilled from stream network patterns represents at least several meters of differential surface uplift during Holocene time, which suggests that more than one cycle of surface deformation occurred.

  17. Near-surface attenuation using traffic-induced seismic noise at a downhole array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmen, S. Umit; Pinar, Ali; Edincliler, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach is developed for estimating the near-surface attenuation using seismic noise recordings at a downhole array. The amplitude spectrum of the traffic-induced seismic noise at the engineering bedrock level exhibits a high-frequency decay between 10 and 40 Hz. Subsequently, it yields a Kappa value of 14 ± 3 ms and a quality factor of 45 ± 10 for the profile between the highway and the sensor. Likewise, using the earthquake recordings made at the surface and the engineering bedrock levels, the Kappa values are calculated as 60 and 45 ms, respectively. The difference was attributed to near-surface attenuation where the upgoing earthquake waves and the downgoing traffic-induced seismic waves traverse similar soil profiles resulting in similar Kappa values. Hence, the near-site geology attenuation properties can be derived using the seismic noise data induced by a known source at a close distance recorded at engineering bedrock level.

  18. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, Bob A.; DeAngelo, Michael V.; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A.; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-01

    applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

  19. The fabrication of stable superhydrophobic surfaces using a thin Au/Pd coating over a hydrophilic 3C-SiC nanorod network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Afzal; Sohail, Shiraz; Jacob, Chacko

    2015-10-01

    In this work, it has been demonstrated that for hydrophilic materials, like SiC, etc., superhydrophobicity can be achieved by coating them with a material like Au/Pd with surface adsorbed organic contaminants, rather than modifying them by fluoropolymers as is usually done. Dense and randomly aligned 3C-SiC nanorods were grown in a cold-wall APCVD reactor using Ni as a catalyst which formed a network of micro/nano air pockets and exhibited superhydrophobic behavior when modified by an Au/Pd metal alloy coating by forming hierarchical nanostructures with surface adsorbed organic contaminants. A high water contact angle (160°), very low sliding angle (<5°), rebounding and a rubber ball-like behavior of a water droplet were observed on such a metal (Au/Pd) modified surface of 3C-SiC nanorods. The durability of the surface and reproducibility of the results was checked over a period of about 14 months under ambient atmosphere at room temperature, which demonstrates the long term stability of these superhydrophobic surfaces.

  20. Pembina Cardium CO2-EOR monitoring project: Integrated surface seismic and VSP time-lapse seismic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshuhail, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the Pembina field in west-central Alberta, Canada, approximately 40,000 tons of supercritical CO2 was injected into the 1650 m deep, 20 m thick upper-Cretaceous Cardium Fm. between March 2005 and 2007. A time-lapse seismic program was designed and incorporated into the overall measurement, monitoring and verification program. The objectives were to track the CO2 plume within the reservoir, and to evaluate the integrity of storage. Fluid replacement modeling predicts a decrease in the P-wave velocity and bulk density in the reservoir by about 4% and 1%, respectively. Synthetic seismograms show subtle reflectivity changes at the Cardium Fm. and a traveltime delay at the later high-amplitude Viking event of less than 1 ms. The time-lapse datasets, however, show no significant anomalies in the P-wave seismic data that can be attributed to supercritical CO2 injected into the Cardium Fm. (Figure 1). The converted-wave (P-S) data, on the other hand, showed small traveltime anomalies. The most coherent results were those obtained by the fixed-array VSP dataset (Figure 2) due to higher frequency bandwidth and high signal to noise ratio. The amplitude and traveltime changes observed in the VSP dataset are small but are consistent in magnitude with those predicted from rock physics modeling. The analysis suggests that the inability to clearly detect the CO2 plume in surface seismic data is likely due to the CO2 being contained in thin permeable sandstone members of the Cardium Formation. The seismic signature of the Cardium Fm. in this area may also be degraded by multiples and strong attenuation involving the shallow Ardley coals. However, the lack of a 4D seismic changes above the reservoir indicates that the injected CO2 is not migrating through the caprock into shallower formations.

  1. Spectroscopic evidence in the visible-ultraviolet energy range of surface functionalization sites in the multilayer Ti3C2 MXene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, Damien; Mauchamp, Vincent; Célérier, Stéphane; Chartier, Patrick; Cabioc'h, Thierry

    2015-05-01

    Valence electron energy-loss (VEEL) spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope is combined to ab initio calculations to investigate the dielectric properties of multilayer (ML) two-dimensional Ti3C2T2 (T ≡OH or F) MXene. Besides evidencing important similarities between the ML-Ti 3C2T2 and TiC valence electron gas behaviors, a clear interband transition characteristic of the most stable site of the T functionalization groups is identified in the VEEL spectrum. This signature, highly dependent on the T -group localization on the surface, has a prominent effect on the optical properties of the ML, leading to 40 % variations in the optical conductivity in the middle of the visible spectrum. Such a dependence could be of crucial interest for optical transparent thin films or sensing applications.

  2. Microseismic Monitoring Using Surface and Borehole Seismic Stations in an Oil Field, North Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hussain, I.; Al-Hashmi, S.; Al-Shijbi, Y.; Al-Saifi, M.; Al-Toubi, K.; Al-Lazki, A.; Al-Kindy, F.

    2009-05-01

    Five shallow borehole seismic stations were installed to monitor microearthquake activities in a carbonate oil field in northern Oman since 1999. This shallow network of seismic station operated continuously until 2002 after which intermittent seismic recording took place due to lack of maintenance and failure of some stations. The objectives of the study are to determine the microseismic parameters in the oil field and to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of these events to evaluate possible triggering mechanism. Well over 400 microearthquakes per year were recorded in the first three years of operation and after that the level of seismic recording fell to less than 200 microearthquakes per year due to failure of some stations. In March 2008, temporary seismic experiment consisting of five near surface seismic stations were installed in the oil field to augment the shallow network station and to evaluate surface installment of seismic instrument to monitor microseismic activities. It has been recognized that microearthquakes data such as size, spatial, and temporal distribution provide information on the pressure waves initiated by either production of or injection of fluids into reservoirs. A total of 44 local microearthquake events were analyzed and located during the temporary seismic stations deployment using a non-linear location software that allows the use of variable accurate velocity model of the subsurface. The events location is confined to oil field reservoir boundary during the recording period and more events occurring at shallow depth. The correlation coefficient between gas production and number of events is the higher compared with the oil production or water injection. The focal plane solution for the largest event in the sequence indicates normal faulting with extensional stress consistent with the existing mapped normal faults in the oil field. Microseismic signal clearly detected by the collocated sensors of the near surface

  3. Near-surface velocity structure from borehole and refraction seismic surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, D.; Lawton, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    Seismic refraction and borehole reflection data have been used in conjunction with other geophysical tools to characterize the near-surface geology in the vicinity of a shallow well near Calgary, Alberta. The investigated section is comprised primarily of glacial tills and gravels. Seismic waves generated in the lower gravel units travel as compressional waves up to the till/gravel interface, where they are converted to shear waves upon transmission. Velocity structure from a reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) survey agrees closely with that from refraction surveying.

  4. Seismic reading taken at MSC recording impact of Apollo 13 S-IVB with surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A seismic reading taken from instruments at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) recording impact of the Apollo 13 S-IVB/Instrument Unit with lunar surface. The expended Saturn third stage and instrument unit impacted the lunar surface at 7:09 p.m., April 14, 1970. The location of the impact was 2.4 degrees south latitude and 27.9 degrees west longitude, about 76 nautical miles west-northwest of the Apollo 12 Lunar Surface Experiment package deployment site. The S-IVB/IU impact was picked up by the Passive Seismic Experiment, a component of the package and transmitted to instruments at the Mission Control Center.

  5. Feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to study seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the paper is to study the temporal variations of the subsurface soil properties due to seasonal and weather effects using a combination of a new seismic surface method and an existing acoustic probe system. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based multi-channel analysis of surface wav...

  6. Site-projected electronic structure of two-dimensional Ti3C2 MXene: the role of the surface functionalization groups.

    PubMed

    Magne, Damien; Mauchamp, Vincent; Célérier, Stéphane; Chartier, Patrick; Cabioc'h, Thierry

    2016-11-16

    The role of the surface groups T (T = OH, O or F) in the chemical bonding in two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx MXene is directly evidenced combining electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope and simulations based on density functional theory. By focusing on the 1s core electrons excitations of the C and (F, O) atoms, the site projected electronic structure is resolved. The Electron Energy-Loss Near Edge Structures (ELNES) at the C-K edge are shown to be sensitive to the chemical nature and the location of the T-groups on the MXene's surface and thereby allow for the characterization of the MXene's functionalization on the nanometre scale. In addition, the ELNES at the C and F-K edges are shown to be determined by the hybridizations of these atoms with the Ti d bands: these edges are thus relevant probes of the Ti d density of states close to the Fermi level which is of particular interest since it drives most of the Ti3C2Tx electronic properties. Finally, the crucial role in the MXene's functionalization of the etchant used for its synthesis is evidenced by locally determining the [O]/[F] concentration ratio using the corresponding K edges. This ratio is shown to be drastically increased from 1.4 to 3.5 when using HF or LiF/HCl respectively.

  7. A new impulsive seismic shear wave source for near-surface (0-30 m) seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of elastic moduli and fluid content in shallow (0-30 m) natural soils below artificial flood containment structures can be particularly useful in levee monitoring as well as seismic hazard studies. Shear wave moduli may be estimated from horizontally polarized, shear wave experiments. However, long profiles (>10 km) with dense receiver and shot spacings (<1m) cannot be collected efficiently using currently available shear wave sources. We develop a new, inexpensive, shear wave source for collecting fast, shot gathers over large acquisition sites. In particular, gas-charged, organic-rich sediments comprising most lower-delta sedimentary facies, greatly attenuate compressional body-waves. On the other hand, SH waves are relatively insensitive to pore-fluid moduli and can improve resolution. We develop a recoil device (Jolly, 1956) into a single-user, light-weight (<20 kg), impulsive, ground-surface-coupled SH wave generator, which is capable of working at rates of several hundred shotpoints per day. Older impulsive methods rely on hammer blows to ground-planted stationary targets. Our source is coupled to the ground with steel spikes and the powder charge can be detonated mechanically or electronically. Electrical fuses show repeatability in start times of < 50 microseconds. The barrel and shell-holder exceed required thicknesses to ensure complete safety during use. The breach confines a black-powder, 12-gauge shotgun shell, loaded with inert, environmentally safe ballast. In urban settings, produced heat and sound are confined by a detached, exterior cover. A moderate 2.5 g black-powder charge generates seismic amplitudes equivalent to three 4-kg sledge-hammer blows. We test this device to elucidate near subsurface sediment properties at former levee breach sites in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Our radio-telemetric seismic acquisition system uses an in-house landstreamer, consisting of 14-Hz horizontal component geophones, coupled to steel plates

  8. Seismic surface wave tomography of waste sites. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.L.

    1997-10-14

    'The objective of the Seismic Surface Wave Tomography of Waste Sites is to develop a robust technique for field acquisition and analysis of surface wave data for the interpretation of shallow structures, such as those associated with the burial of wastes. The analysis technique is to be developed and tested on an existing set of seismic data covering the K-901 burial site at the East Tennessee Technology Park. Also, a portable prototype for a field acquisition system will be designed and developed to obtain additional data for analysis and testing of the technique. The K-901 data have been examined and a preliminary Single Valued Decomposition inversion has been obtained. The preliminary data indicates a need for additional seismic data to ground-truth the inversion. The originally proposed gravity data acquisition has been dropped because sufficient gravity data are now available for a preliminary analysis and because the seismic data are considered more critical to the interpretation. The proposed prototype for the portable acquisition and analysis system was developed during the first year and will be used in part of the acquisition of additional seismic data.'

  9. Passive monitoring for near surface void detection using traffic as a seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Kuzma, H. A.; Rector, J.; Nazari, S.

    2009-12-01

    In this poster we present preliminary results based on our several field experiments in which we study seismic detection of voids using a passive array of surface geophones. The source of seismic excitation is vehicle traffic on nearby roads, which we model as a continuous line source of seismic energy. Our passive seismic technique is based on cross-correlation of surface wave fields and studying the resulting power spectra, looking for "shadows" caused by the scattering effect of a void. High frequency noise masks this effect in the time domain, so it is difficult to see on conventional traces. Our technique does not rely on phase distortions caused by small voids because they are generally too tiny to measure. Unlike traditional impulsive seismic sources which generate highly coherent broadband signals, perfect for resolving phase but too weak for resolving amplitude, vehicle traffic affords a high power signal a frequency range which is optimal for finding shallow structures. Our technique results in clear detections of an abandoned railroad tunnel and a septic tank. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop a technology for the simultaneous imaging of shallow underground structures and traffic monitoring near these structures.

  10. The surface waves-based seismic exploration of soil and ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyukov, AS; Yablokov, AV; Chernyshov, GS; Azarov, AV

    2017-02-01

    We consider the method to study physical properties of soils. The new seismic exploration approach, based on new modification of refracted wave plus-minus method and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), is proposed. We present the field data processing example. The ground water level and zones of erosion are detected.

  11. Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1989-10-01

    For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs.

  12. Surface seismic measurements of near-surface P-and S-wave seismic velocities at earthquake recording stations, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Frankel, A.D.; Odum, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    We measured P-and S-wave seismic velocities to about 40-m depth using seismic-refraction/reflection data on the ground surface at 13 sites in the Seattle, Washington, urban area, where portable digital seismographs recently recorded earthquakes. Sites with the lowest measured Vs correlate with highest ground motion amplification. These sites, such as at Harbor Island and in the Duwamish River industrial area (DRIA) south of the Kingdome, have an average Vs in the upper 30 m (V??s30) of 150 to 170 m/s. These values of V??s30 place these sites in soil profile type E (V??s30 < 180 m/s). A "rock" site, located at Seward Park on Tertiary sedimentary deposits, has a V??S30 of 433 m/s, which is soil type C (V??s30: 360 to 760 m/s). The Seward Park site V??s30 is about equal to, or up to 200 m/s slower than sites that were located on till or glacial outwash. High-amplitude P-and S-wave seismic reflections at several locations appear to correspond to strong resonances observed in earthquake spectra. An S-wave reflector at the Kingdome at about 17 to 22 m depth probably causes strong 2-Hz resonance that is observed in the earthquake data near the Kingdome.

  13. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies.

  14. Body and Surface Wave Modeling of Observed Seismic Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-30

    HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA So far we have considered only laterally homogenous media for which ./ 1 9 the RT method is exact. However, since the forcing functions...laterally heterogenous media given in the literature. We have dubbed this modified approach the Approximate Representation Theorem (ART) method. The...and medium response (surface source and surface receiver) for the propagation path. We shall refer to this second method as the Unit Transmision

  15. Seismic tomography in areas associated with complex near-surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rufaii, Khalid

    The energy demand of the world is increasing every day, forcing the oil industry to explore for oil hydrocarbon traps in locations where the problem complexity requires special imaging techniques. Dealing with complex near-surface structures is the most challenging problem for land seismic exploration. The seismic waves are often distorted and dispersed by extremely low and rapidly varying velocities, as well as poor or inconsistent coupling amongst shots and receivers. It is not uncommon when the near-surface problem degrades the surface reflection data to a useless level. To treat the problem, I employ a first-arrival seismic tomography to model the near-surface velocity structures. The removal of the induced near-surface distortions on seismic data is based on two principles: layer stripping and surface consistency. Though this approach has been taken by previous workers, our method has several unique features. First, the subsurface is parameterized by a grid of irregularly shaped blocks that mimic the topography and help to reduce the number of model variables. Second, a multi-scale inversion is employed that has been shown to give superior results than the conventional single-scale tomography. Third, the initial reference model is established based on the actual travel-time data, hence greatly reduces the concern for picking a wrong initial model. The accuracy of the first-arrival tomography is verified using various synthetic models simulating the complexity of real near-surface conditions. The method is applied to three field 2-D data sets in very different regions: a land data set from a mountainous thrust area in South America, a marine data set from the Gulf of Mexico, and a long-offset data set from the Tarim Basin in China. In addition, I attempt to implement reflection tomography as an alternative to conventional velocity analysis. Using reflection seismic tomography, we invert for velocity-depth models, which can be used for imaging or time processing

  16. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  17. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  18. Inversion of the Chelyabinsk seismic surface waves and comparative constraints on the generation of seismic waves by atmospheric Impacts on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakostas, F. G.; Rakoto, V.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Meteor impacts are a very important seismic source for planetary seismology, since their locations and, in some cases, their occurence times can be accurately known from orbiters, tracking or optical observations. Their importance becomes greater in the case of a seismic experiment with one seismometer, as the SEIS (Seismic Experiment of Interior Structure) of the future Martian mission "InSight", as the known location allows a direct inversion of differential travel times and wave forms in terms of structure. Meteor impacts generate body and surface seismic waves when they reach the surface of a planet. But when they explode into the atmosphere, due to ablation, they generate shock waves, which are converted into linear, seismic waves in the solid part and acoustic waves in the atmosphere. This effect can be modeled when the amplitude of Rayleigh and other Spheroidal normal modes is made with the atmospheric/ground coupling effects. In this study, meteor impacts are modeled as seismic sources in a comparative analysis for the cases of Earth and Mars. Using the computed seismograms, calculated by the summation of the normal modes of the full planet (e.g. with atmosphere) the properties of the seismic source can be obtained. Its duration is typically associated to the radiation duration of shock waves until they reach the linear regime of propagation. These transition times are comparatively analyzed, for providing constraints on the seismic source duration on Earth and Mars. In the case of Earth, we test our approach with the Chelyabinsk superbolide. The computed seismograms are used in order to perform the inversion of the source, by comparison with the data of the Global Seismographic Network. The results are interpreted and compared with other observations. In the case of Mars, equivalent sources are similarly modeled in different atmospheric, impact size and lithospheric conditions.

  19. Detection, location, and analysis of earthquakes using seismic surface waves (Beno Gutenberg Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Göran

    2015-04-01

    For shallow sources, Love and Rayleigh waves are the largest seismic phases recorded at teleseismic distances. The utility of these waves for earthquake characterization was traditionally limited to magnitude estimation, since geographically variable dispersion makes it difficult to determine useful travel-time information from the waveforms. Path delays due to heterogeneity of several tens of seconds are typical for waves at 50 sec period, and these delays must be accounted for with precision and accuracy in order to extract propagation-phase and source-phase information. Advances in tomographic mapping of global surface-wave phase velocities, and continuous growth and improvements of seismographic networks around the world, now make possible new applications of surface waves for earthquake monitoring and analysis. Through continuous back propagation of the long-period seismic wave field recorded by globally distributed stations, nearly all shallow earthquakes greater than M=5 can be detected and located with a precision of 25 km. Some of the detected events do not appear in standard earthquake catalogs and correspond to non-tectonic earthquakes, including landslides, glacier calving, and volcanic events. With the improved ability to predict complex propagation effects of surface waves across a heterogeneous Earth, moment-tensor and force representations of seismic sources can be routinely determined for all earthquakes greater than M=5 by waveform fitting of surface waves. A current area of progress in the use of surface waves for earthquake studies is the determination of precise relative locations of remote seismicity by systematic cross correlation and analysis of surface waves generated by neighboring sources. Preliminary results indicate that a location precision of 5 km may be achievable in many areas of the world.

  20. Effects of surface topography on ground shaking prediction: implications for seismic hazard analysis and recommendations for seismic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barani, Simone; Massa, Marco; Lovati, Sara; Spallarossa, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the role of topographic effects on the prediction of earthquake ground motion. Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) are mathematical models that estimate the shaking level induced by an earthquake as a function of several parameters, such as magnitude, source-to-site distance, style of faulting and ground type. However, little importance is given to the effects of topography, which, as known, may play a significant role on the level, duration and frequency content of ground motion. Ridges and crests are often lost inside the large number of sites considered in the definition of a GMPE. Hence, it is presumable that current GMPEs are unable to accurately predict the shaking level at the top of a relief. The present work, which follows the article of Massa et al. about topographic effects, aims at overcoming this limitation by amending an existing GMPE with an additional term to account for the effects of surface topography at a specific site. First, experimental ground motion values and ground motions predicted by the attenuation model of Bindi et al. for five case studies are compared and contrasted in order to quantify their discrepancy and to identify anomalous behaviours of the sites investigated. Secondly, for the site of Narni (Central Italy), amplification factors derived from experimental measurements and numerical analyses are compared and contrasted, pointing out their impact on probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and design norms. In particular, with reference to the Italian building code, our results have highlighted the inadequacy of the national provisions concerning the definition of the seismic load at top of ridges and crests, evidencing a significant underestimation of ground motion around the site resonance frequency.

  1. The influence of climatically-driven surface loading variations on continental strain and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Tim; Calais, Eric; Fleitout, Luce; Bollinger, Laurent; Scotti, Oona

    2016-04-01

    In slowly deforming regions of plate interiors, secondary sources of stress and strain can result in transient deformation rates comparable to, or greater than, the background tectonic rates. Highly variable in space and time, these transients have the potential to influence the spatio-temporal distribution of seismicity, interfering with any background tectonic effects to either promote or inhibit the failure of pre-existing faults, and potentially leading to a clustered, or 'pulse-like', seismic history. Here, we investigate the ways in which the large-scale deformation field resulting from climatically-controlled changes in surface ice mass over the Pleistocene and Holocene may have influenced not only the seismicity of glaciated regions, but also the wider seismicity around the ice periphery. We first use a set of geodynamic models to demonstrate that a major pulse of seismic activity occurring in Fennoscandia, coincident with the time of end-glaciation, occurred in a setting where the contemporaneous horizontal strain-rate resulting from the changing ice mass, was extensional - opposite to the reverse sense of coseismic displacement accommodated on these faults. Therefore, faulting did not release extensional elastic strain that was building up at the time of failure, but compressional elastic strain that had accumulated in the lithosphere on timescales longer than the glacial cycle, illustrating the potential for a non-tectonic trigger to tap in to the background tectonic stress-state. We then move on to investigate the more distal influence that changing ice (and ocean) volumes may have had on the evolving strain field across intraplate Europe, how this is reflected in the seismicity across intraplate Europe, and what impact this might have on the paleoseismic record.

  2. Near surface characterisation with passive seismic data - a case study from the La Barge basin (Wyoming)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, M.; Snieder, R.; Tomic, J.

    2012-12-01

    In regions where active source seismic data are inadequate for imaging purposes due to energy penetration and recovery, cost and logistical concerns, or regulatory restrictions, analysis of natural source and ambient seismic data may provide an alternative. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using locally-generated seismic noise and teleseismic events in the 2-10 Hz band to obtain a subsurface model. We apply different techniques to 3-component data recorded during the LaBarge Passive Seismic Experiment, a local deployment in southwestern Wyoming in a producing hydrocarbon basin. Fifty-five broadband instruments with an inter-station distance of 250 m recorded continuous seismic data between November 2008 and June 2009. The consistency and high quality of the data set make it an ideal test ground to determine the value of passive seismology techniques for exploration purposes. The near surface is targeted by interferometric analysis of ambient noise. Our results indicate that traffic noise from a state highway generates coherent Rayleigh and Love waves that can then be inverted for laterally varying velocities. The results correlate well with surface geology, and are thought to represent the average of the few upper hundred meters. The autocorrelation functions (ACF) of teleseismic body waves provide information on the uppermost part (1 to 5 km depth) of the crust. ACFs from P-waves correlate with the shallow structure as known from active source studies. The analysis of S-waves exhibits a pronounced azimuthal dependency, which might be used to gain insights on anisotropy.

  3. Surface uplift and time-dependent seismic hazard due to fluid-injection in eastern Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzaei, M.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    US states such as Texas and Oklahoma that produce high-volumes of unconventional oil and gas, are facing a sharp increase in seismicity. Observations of the associated surface deformation and accompanying physical models that unequivocally link the seismicity and waste water injection are scarce. Here, we find that the waste water injection in eastern Texas causes uplift, detectable using radar interferometric data. Combining the uplift and injection data through a poroelastic model allows for the resolution of a complex crustal distribution of hydraulic conductivity and pore pressure. We find that the ~5 years pore pressure increase is capable of triggering the 17 May 2012, Mw 4.8 earthquake, the largest event recorded in east Texas. This study shows that surface deformation data are vital in order to constrain the spatiotemporal variations of the stress field in the vicinity of injection sites.

  4. The Seismic Effect of Impacts on Asteroid Surface Morphology: Early Modeling Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. E.; Melosh, H. J.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, spacecraft observations of asteroids 951 Gaspra, 243 Ida, 253 Mathilde, and 433 Eros have shown the overriding dominance of impact processes with regard to the structure and appearance of these small, irregular bodies. One currently unanswered question is: to what degree does seismic shaking from impacts affect the surface morphology of these bodies? Through detailed modeling, we begin to address this question.

  5. Surface Wave Dispersion Measurements and Tomography from Ambient Seismic Noise Correlation in China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    30 Sep 2008 REPRINT 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER SURFACE WAVE DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS AND TOMOGRAPHY FROM FA8718-07-C-0006 C AMIBIENT...25 September 2008, Portsmouth, VA, Volume I pp 268 - 278. 14. ABSTRACT We perform ambient noise tomography of China using the data from the China...National Seismic Network and global and PASSCAL stations. The results so far are summarized below. (I) Dispersion measurements and tomography . For most of

  6. Seismic Surface-Wave Tomography of Waste Sites - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Timothy L.

    2000-09-14

    The objective of this study was to develop analysis programs for surface-wave group-velocity tomography, and apply these to three test areas. We succeeded by obtaining data covering two square areas that were 30 meters on a side, and a third area that was 16 meters on a side, in addition to a collaborative effort wherein we processed data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory site. At all sites, usable group velocities were obtained for frequencies from 16 to 50 Hz using a sledgehammer source. The resulting tomographic images and velocity anomalies were sufficient to delineate suspected burial trenches (one 4-meters deep) and anomalous velocity structure related to rocks and disturbed soil. The success was not uniform because in portions of one area the inversion for shear-wave structure became unstable. More research is needed to establish a more robust inversion technique.

  7. Inherited structures impact on co-seismic surface deformation pattern during the 2013 Balochistan, Pakistan, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallage, Amaury; Klinger, Yann; Grandin, Raphael; Delorme, Arthur; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of earthquake processes and the interaction of earthquake rupture with Earth's free surface relies on the resolution of the observations. Recent and detailed post-earthquake measurements bring new insights on shallow mechanical behavior of rupture processes as it becomes possible to measure and locate surficial deformation distribution. The 2013 Mw 7.7 Balochistan earthquake, Pakistan, offers a nice opportunity to comprehend where and why surficial deformation might differs from at-depth localized slip. This earthquake ruptured the Hoshab fault over 200 km; the motion was mainly left lateral with a small and discontinuous vertical component in the southern part of the rupture. Using images with the finest resolution currently available, we measured the surface displacement amplitude and its orientation at the ground surface (including the numerous tensile cracks). We combined these measurements with the 1:500 scale ground rupture map to focus on the behavior of the frontal rupture in the area where deformation distributes. Comparison with orientations of inherited tectonic structures, visible in older rocks formation surrounding the actual 2013 rupture, shows the control exercised by such structures on co-seismic rupture distribution. Such observation raises the question on how pre-existing tectonic structures in a medium, mapped in several seismically active places around the globe; can control the co-seismic distribution of the deformation during earthquakes.

  8. Mirror-like slip surfaces in dolostone: natural and experimental constraints on a potential seismic marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondriest, M.; Smith, S. A.; Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2012-12-01

    The lack of clear geological markers of seismic faulting represents a major limitation in our current comprehension of earthquake physics. At present pseudotachylytes (i.e. friction-induced melts) are the only unambiguously identified indicator of ancient seismicity in exhumed fault zones, but pseudotachylytes are not found in many rock types, including carbonates. We report the occurrence of small-displacement, mirror-like slip surfaces from a fault zone cutting dolostones. A combination of field observations and rotary shear friction experiments suggests that such slip surfaces: 1) are formed only at seismic slip rates, and 2) could potentially be used to estimate power dissipation during individual slip events. The Foiana Line (FL) is a major NNE-SSW-trending sinistral transpressive fault in the Italian Southern Alps. The outcropping fault zone consists of a <300 m wide zone of heavily fractured ("pulverized") dolostones cut by a network of mirror-like slip surfaces. The slip surfaces have displacements ranging between 0.04 m and 0.5 m and their mirror-like appearance indicates that the wavelength of surface roughness is <1 μm. The slip surfaces have mainly dip-slip reverse kinematics and were exhumed from ~2 km depth. Resolved normal stress on the slip surfaces is estimated in the range 30-50 MPa. To understand how the mirror-like slip surfaces may have developed, slow- to high-velocity rotary-shear experiments using SHIVA (INGV, Rome) were performed on 3 mm thick layers of dolomite gouge (grain size <250 μm) collected from the FL. Tests were conducted using a purpose-built gouge sample holder at slip rates of 0.0001-1.13 m/s, normal stresses up to 26 MPa and displacements in the range 0.02-3.5 m. At seismic slip rates of 1.13 m/s the dolomite gouge shows a dramatic reduction of the friction coefficient (μ) from a peak value of ~0.7 to a steady-state value of ~0.25. The gouge starts to weaken above a threshold velocity in the range 0.19-0.49 m/s following a

  9. A Vs30-derived Near-surface Seismic Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow material properties, S-wave velocity in particular, strongly influence ground motions, so must be accurately characterized for ground-motion simulations. Available near-surface velocity information generally exceeds that which is accommodated by crustal velocity models, such as current versions of the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-S4) or the Harvard model (CVM-H6). The elevation-referenced CVM-H voxel model introduces rasterization artifacts in the near-surface due to course sample spacing, and sample depth dependence on local topographic elevation. To address these issues, we propose a method to supplement crustal velocity models, in the upper few hundred meters, with a model derived from available maps of Vs30 (the average S-wave velocity down to 30 meters). The method is universally applicable to regions without direct measures of Vs30 by using Vs30 estimates from topographic slope (Wald, et al. 2007). In our current implementation for Southern California, the geology-based Vs30 map of Wills and Clahan (2006) is used within California, and topography-estimated Vs30 is used outside of California. Various formulations for S-wave velocity depth dependence, such as linear spline and polynomial interpolation, are evaluated against the following priorities: (a) capability to represent a wide range of soil and rock velocity profile types; (b) smooth transition to the crustal velocity model; (c) ability to reasonably handle poor spatial correlation of Vs30 and crustal velocity data; (d) simplicity and minimal parameterization; and (e) computational efficiency. The favored model includes cubic and square-root depth dependence, with the model extending to a depth of 350 meters. Model parameters are fit to Boore and Joyner's (1997) generic rock profile as well as CVM-4 soil profiles for the NEHRP soil classification types. P-wave velocity and density are derived from S-wave velocity by the scaling laws of Brocher (2005). Preliminary assessment of the new model

  10. Seismic Surface-Wave Tomography of Waste Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Leland Timothy Long

    2002-12-17

    Surface-wave group-velocity tomography is an efficient way to obtain images of the group velocity over a test area. Because Rayleigh-wave group velocity depends on frequency, there are separate images for each frequency. Thus, at each point in these images the group velocities define a dispersion curve, a curve that relates group velocity to frequency. The objective of this study has been to find an accurate and efficient way to find the shear-wave structure from these dispersion curves. The conventional inversion techniques match theoretical and observed dispersion curves to determine the structure. These conventional methods do not always succeed in correctly differentiating the fundamental and higher modes, and for some velocity structures can become unstable. In this research a perturbation technique was developed. The perturbation method allows the pre-computation of a global inversion matrix which improves efficiency in obtaining solutions for the structure. Perturbation methods are stable and mimic the averaging process in wave propagation; hence. leading to more accurate solutions. Finite difference techniques and synthetic trace generation techniques were developed to define the perturbations. A new differential trace technique was developed for slight variations in dispersion. The improvements in analysis speed and the accuracy of the solution could lead to real-time field analysis systems, making it possible to obtain immediate results or to monitor temporal change in structure, such as might develop in using fluids for soil remediation.

  11. New methods for engineering site characterization using reflection and surface wave seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiprakaikeow, Susit

    This study presents two new seismic testing methods for engineering application, a new shallow seismic reflection method and Time Filtered Analysis of Surface Waves (TFASW). Both methods are described in this dissertation. The new shallow seismic reflection was developed to measure reflection at a single point using two to four receivers, assuming homogeneous, horizontal layering. It uses one or more shakers driven by a swept sine function as a source, and the cross-correlation technique to identify wave arrivals. The phase difference between the source forcing function and the ground motion due to the dynamic response of the shaker-ground interface was corrected by using a reference geophone. Attenuated high frequency energy was also recovered using the whitening in frequency domain. The new shallow seismic reflection testing was performed at the crest of Porcupine Dam in Paradise, Utah. The testing used two horizontal Vibroseis sources and four receivers for spacings between 6 and 300 ft. Unfortunately, the results showed no clear evidence of the reflectors despite correction of the magnitude and phase of the signals. However, an improvement in the shape of the cross-correlations was noticed after the corrections. The results showed distinct primary lobes in the corrected cross-correlated signals up to 150 ft offset. More consistent maximum peaks were observed in the corrected waveforms. TFASW is a new surface (Rayleigh) wave method to determine the shear wave velocity profile at a site. It is a time domain method as opposed to the Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method, which is a frequency domain method. This method uses digital filtering to optimize bandwidth used to determine the dispersion curve. Results from testings at three different sites in Utah indicated good agreement with the dispersion curves measured using both TFASW and SASW methods. The advantage of TFASW method is that the dispersion curves had less scatter at long wavelengths as a

  12. Small-scale seismic inversion using surface waves extracted from noise cross correlation.

    PubMed

    Gouédard, Pierre; Roux, Philippe; Campillo, Michel

    2008-03-01

    Green's functions can be retrieved between receivers from the correlation of ambient seismic noise or with an appropriate set of randomly distributed sources. This principle is demonstrated in small-scale geophysics using noise sources generated by human steps during a 10-min walk in the alignment of a 14-m-long accelerometer line array. The time-domain correlation of the records yields two surface wave modes extracted from the Green's function between each pair of accelerometers. A frequency-wave-number Fourier analysis yields each mode contribution and their dispersion curve. These dispersion curves are then inverted to provide the one-dimensional shear velocity of the near surface.

  13. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; ...

    2015-02-18

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here, we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm.The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks ofmore » both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs datasets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.« less

  14. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-18

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here, we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm.The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks of both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs datasets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.

  15. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-01

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm. The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks of both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs data sets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.

  16. Comparing Regional Seismic Location Results Using Kriged Travel Time Correction Surfaces and Double-Difference Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begnaud, M. L.; Velasco, A. A.; Steck, L. K.

    2001-12-01

    The use of kriged two-dimensional travel time correction surfaces improves the location of regional seismic events using a sparse network. For more closely-spaced regional events (approximately 150 km), using travel time correction surfaces does not always demonstrate a distinct improvement in relative locations. A new location program HYPODD [Waldhauser and Ellsworth, 2000] uses a double-difference location algorithm with events correlated based on travel times. While this algorithm has been tested on local events with a fairly dense seismic network, it has not been tested with regional networks that have large station-event distances. We will compare locations defined using two-dimensional travel time correction surfaces with those from the double-difference method [Flores et al., this issue]. We will utilize a data set of approximately 142 events for a region around the Mw=7.5 Tibet event of 08NOV1997, with manually-picked P and S arrivals as well as global catalog arrivals having a station-event distance ranging from 5.5 to over 30 degrees. The Tibet event provides a unique ground truth test due to the presence of a related surface rupture identified by Inferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) [Peltzer et al., 1999] and the determination of the Tibet event as associated with a vertical strike/slip fault [Velasco et al., 2000]. We will test which method produces relocations that better align with this surface rupture. In addition, a small (5 km) secondary rupture was identified with the main rupture, but with no associated seismic event. We will also test whether each method relocates any events near to this secondary rupture.

  17. Surface dynamic deformation estimates from local seismicity: the Itoiz reservoir, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoyo, Miguel A.; Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; García-Jerez, Antonio; Luzón, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the ground motion time histories due to the local seismicity near the Itoiz reservoir to estimate the near-source, surface 3D displacement gradients and dynamic deformations. The seismic data were obtained by a semipermanent broadband and accelerometric network located on surface and at underground sites. The dynamic deformation field was calculated by two different methodologies: first, by the seismo-geodetic method using the data from a three-station microarray located close to the dam, and second, by single station estimates of the displacement gradients. The dynamic deformations obtained from both methods were compared and analyzed in the context of the local free-field effects. The shallow 1D velocity structure was estimated from the seismic data by modeling the body wave travel times. Time histories obtained from both methods result quite similar in the time window of body wave arrivals. The strain misfits between methods vary from 1.4 to 35.0 % and rotational misfits vary from 2.5 to 36.0 %. Amplitudes of displacement gradients vary in the range of 10-8 to 10-7 strains. From these results, a new scaling analysis by numerical modeling is proposed in order to estimate the peak dynamic deformations for different magnitudes, up to the expected maximum M w in the region (M5.5). Peak dynamic deformations due to local M w5.5 earthquakes would reach amplitudes of 10-5 strain and 10-3 radians at the Itoiz dam. The single station method shows to be an adequate option for the analysis of local seismicity, where few three-component stations are available. The results obtained here could help to extend the applicability of these methodologies to other sites of engineering interest.

  18. Source estimation with surface-related multiples—fast ambiguity-resolved seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Ning; Aravkin, Aleksandr; van Leeuwen, Tristan; Lin, Tim; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of obtaining a reliable seismic image without prior knowledge of the source wavelet, especially from data that contain strong surface-related multiples. Conventional reverse-time migration requires prior knowledge of the source wavelet, which is either technically or computationally challenging to accurately determine; inaccurate estimates of the source wavelet can result in seriously degraded reverse-time migrated images, and therefore wrong geological interpretations. To solve this problem, we present a `wavelet-free' imaging procedure that simultaneously inverts for the source wavelet and the seismic image, by tightly integrating source estimation into a fast least-squares imaging framework, namely compressive imaging, given a reasonably accurate background velocity model. However, this joint inversion problem is difficult to solve as it is plagued with local minima and the ambiguity with respect to amplitude scalings because of the multiplicative, and therefore nonlinear, appearance of the source wavelet in the otherwise linear formalism. We have found a way to solve this nonlinear joint-inversion problem using a technique called variable projection, and a way to overcome the scaling ambiguity by including surface-related multiples in our imaging procedure following recent developments in surface-related multiple prediction by sparse inversion. As a result, we obtain without prior knowledge of the source wavelet high-resolution seismic images, comparable in quality to images obtained assuming the true source wavelet is known. By leveraging the computationally efficient compressive-imaging methodology, these results are obtained at affordable computational costs compared with conventional processing work flows that include surface-related multiple removal and reverse-time migration.

  19. Surface and downhole shear wave seismic methods for thick soil site investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, J.A.; Benjumea, B.; Harris, J.B.; Miller, R.D.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave velocity-depth information is required for predicting the ground motion response to earthquakes in areas where significant soil cover exists over firm bedrock. Rather than estimating this critical parameter, it can be reliably measured using a suite of surface (non-invasive) and downhole (invasive) seismic methods. Shear wave velocities from surface measurements can be obtained using SH refraction techniques. Array lengths as large as 1000 m and depth of penetration to 250 m have been achieved in some areas. High resolution shear wave reflection techniques utilizing the common midpoint method can delineate the overburden-bedrock surface as well as reflecting boundaries within the overburden. Reflection data can also be used to obtain direct estimates of fundamental site periods from shear wave reflections without the requirement of measuring average shear wave velocity and total thickness of unconsolidated overburden above the bedrock surface. Accurate measurements of vertical shear wave velocities can be obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer in soft sediments, or with a well-locked geophone array in a borehole. Examples from thick soil sites in Canada demonstrate the type of shear wave velocity information that can be obtained with these geophysical techniques, and show how these data can be used to provide a first look at predicted ground motion response for thick soil sites. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  20. Permeability and porosity images based on P-wave surface seismic data: Application to a south Florida aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Bennett, Michael W.

    2006-02-01

    P-wave surface seismic reflection data, acquired from a carbonate aquifer in southeastern Florida, are used to delineate flow units in a proposed aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) horizon. The impedance image determined by inversion from P-wave reflection data captures most of the boundaries between hydraulic facies. The hydraulic facies properties are based on integration of the well logs and the lithology, which consists of vuggy carbonate units and sandstones. Within the proposed ASR horizon, located in the upper Floridan aquifer, low-permeability zones consist of sandstones and highly permeable zones are carbonates with interconnected vuggy porosity. High-resolution porosity, permeability, and impedance images based on cross-well reflection and well logs help us evaluate the P-wave seismic reflection results. We use well logs and cross-well seismic data to support whether two-dimensional seismic reflection measurements detect important flow units delineated by cross-well high-resolution seismic data. The data analysis demonstrates that major flow units are resolved and imaged with two-dimensional seismic reflection techniques, although not as clearly as in the high-resolution cross-well data. The results suggest that the surface seismic reflection method, integrated with well logs and geology, provides the tools to assess water resources in this south Florida carbonate aquifer. However, we recommend conducting a cross-well survey in areas where an understanding of the petrophysics is imperative to relating the seismic attributes to rock and fluid properties. This can be a critical step for planning purposes when considering a large surface-oriented seismic survey.

  1. Preliminary Ambient Seismic Noise Surface Wave Tomography of The Colima Volcanic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, C. R.; Pacecho, H. P.

    2013-05-01

    The Colima Volcanic Complex (CVC) located in the western sector of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt is the most active Mexican volcano. The CVC is part of the active Colima Rift, a regional north south striking extensional structure. We use ambient seismic noise recorded by the Mapping the Riviera Subduction Zone (MARS) and the Colima Volcano Deep Seismic Experiment (CODEX) deployed in western Mexico. We compute the cross-correlations of vertical-component continuous records ambient noise data to extracted empirical Green' s functions. These functions provide detailed images of Rayleigh wave group velocity by measuring the Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves using the multiple-filter analysis method. We then pick the arrival times of these waves for a given period to estimated lateral variations in velocity for a given period using 2D tomography. To sampling different depths we perform the inversions for different periods that together provide information on velocity variations with depth. The study aim to better understand the geometry, and the seismic surface wave velocity structure of the CVC and relate it with the volcano structure, the geology setting of the region.

  2. Laser- and Radar-based Mission Concepts for Suborbital and Spaceborne Monitoring of Seismic Surface Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Foxall, W; Schultz, C A; Tralli, D M

    2004-09-21

    The development of a suborbital or spaceborne system to monitor seismic waves poses an intriguing prospect for advancing the state of seismology. This capability would enable an unprecedented global mapping of the velocity structure of the earth's crust, understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics and wave propagation effects, and event source location, characterization and discrimination that are critical for both fundamental earthquake research and nuclear non-proliferation applications. As part of an ongoing collaboration between LLNL and JPL, an advanced mission concept study assessed architectural considerations and operational and data delivery requirements, extending two prior studies by each organization--a radar-based satellite system (JPL) for earthquake hazard assessment and a feasibility study of space- or UAV-based laser seismometer systems (LLNL) for seismic event monitoring. Seismic wave measurement requirements include lower bounds on detectability of specific seismic sources of interest and wave amplitude accuracy for different levels of analysis, such as source characterization, discrimination and tomography, with a 100 {micro}m wave amplitude resolution for waves nominally traveling 5 km/s, an upper frequency bound based on explosion and earthquake surface displacement spectra, and minimum horizontal resolution (1-5 km) and areal coverage, in general and for targeted observations. For a radar system, corresponding engineering and operational factors include: Radar frequency (dictated by required wave amplitude measurement accuracy and maximizing ranging, Doppler or interferometric sensitivity), time sampling (maximum seismic wave frequency and velocity), and overall system considerations such as mass, power and data rate. Technical challenges include characterization of, and compensation for, phase distortion resulting from atmospheric and ionospheric perturbations and turbulence, and effects of ground scattering characteristics and seismic

  3. Global Seismic Event Detection Using Surface Waves: 15 Possible Antarctic Glacial Sliding Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Shearer, P. M.; Walker, K. T.; Fricker, H. A.

    2008-12-01

    To identify overlooked or anomalous seismic events not listed in standard catalogs, we have developed an algorithm to detect and locate global seismic events using intermediate-period (35-70s) surface waves. We apply our method to continuous vertical-component seismograms from the global seismic networks as archived in the IRIS UV FARM database from 1997 to 2007. We first bandpass filter the seismograms, apply automatic gain control, and compute envelope functions. We then examine 1654 target event locations defined at 5 degree intervals and stack the seismogram envelopes along the predicted Rayleigh-wave travel times. The resulting function has spatial and temporal peaks that indicate possible seismic events. We visually check these peaks using a graphical user interface to eliminate artifacts and assign an overall reliability grade (A, B or C) to the new events. We detect 78% of events in the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog. However, we also find 840 new events not listed in the PDE, ISC and REB catalogs. Many of these new events were previously identified by Ekstrom (2006) using a different Rayleigh-wave detection scheme. Most of these new events are located along oceanic ridges and transform faults. Some new events can be associated with volcanic eruptions such as the 2000 Miyakejima sequence near Japan and others with apparent glacial sliding events in Greenland (Ekstrom et al., 2003). We focus our attention on 15 events detected from near the Antarctic coastline and relocate them using a cross-correlation approach. The events occur in 3 groups which are well-separated from areas of cataloged earthquake activity. We speculate that these are iceberg calving and/or glacial sliding events, and hope to test this by inverting for their source mechanisms and examining remote sensing data from their source regions.

  4. Q AS A LITHOLOGICAL/HYDROCARBON INDICATOR: FROM FULL WAVEFORM SONIC TO 3D SURFACE SEISMIC

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge O. Parra; C.L. Hackert; L. Wilson; H.A. Collier; J. Todd Thomas

    2006-03-31

    The goal of this project was to develop a method to exploit viscoelastic rock and fluid properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic measurements to the presence of hydrocarbon saturation. To reach the objective, Southwest Research Institute scientists used well log, lithology, production, and 3D seismic data from an oil reservoir located on the Waggoner Ranch in north central Texas. The project was organized in three phases. In the first phase, we applied modeling techniques to investigate seismic- and acoustic-frequency wave attenuation and its effect on observable wave attributes. We also gathered existing data and acquired new data from the Waggoner Ranch field, so that all needed information was in place for the second phase. During the second phase, we developed methods to extract attenuation from borehole acoustic and surface seismic data. These methods were tested on synthetic data constructed from realistic models and real data. In the third and final phase of the project, we applied this technology to a full data set from the Waggoner site. The results presented in this Final Report show that geological conditions at the site did not allow us to obtain interpretable results from the Q processing algorithm for 3D seismic data. However, the Q-log processing algorithm was successfully applied to full waveform sonic data from the Waggoner site. A significant part of this project was technology transfer. We have published several papers and conducted presentations at professional conferences. In particular, we presented the Q-log algorithm and applications at the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Development and Production Forum in Austin, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest from the attendees and, at the request of the SEG delegates, it was placed on the Southwest Research Institute Internet site. The presentation can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys

  5. Seismic interferometry of railroad induced ground motions: body and surface wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros, Diego A.; Brown, Larry D.; Kim, Doyeon

    2016-04-01

    Seismic interferometry applied to 120 hr of railroad traffic recorded by an array of vertical component seismographs along a railway within the Rio Grande rift has recovered surface and body waves characteristic of the geology beneath the railway. Linear and hyperbolic arrivals are retrieved that agree with surface (Rayleigh), direct and reflected P waves observed by nearby conventional seismic surveys. Train-generated Rayleigh waves span a range of frequencies significantly higher than those recovered from typical ambient noise interferometry studies. Direct P-wave arrivals have apparent velocities appropriate for the shallow geology of the survey area. Significant reflected P-wave energy is also present at relatively large offsets. A common midpoint stack produces a reflection image consistent with nearby conventional reflection data. We suggest that for sources at the free surface (e.g. trains) increasing the aperture of the array to record wide angle reflections, in addition to longer recording intervals, might allow the recovery of deeper geological structure from railroad traffic. Frequency-wavenumber analyses of these recordings indicate that the train source is symmetrical (i.e. approaching and receding) and that deeper refracted energy is present although not evident in the time-offset domain. These results confirm that train-generated vibrations represent a practical source of high-resolution subsurface information, with particular relevance to geotechnical and environmental applications.

  6. Insights into bedrock surface morphology using low-cost passive seismic surveys and integrated geostatistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Trevisani, S; Boaga, J; Agostini, L; Galgaro, A

    2017-02-01

    The HVSR (Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio) technique is very popular in the context of seismic microzonation and for the mapping of shallow seismic reflectors, such as the sediment/bedrock transition surface. This easy-to-deploy single station passive seismic technique permits the collection of a considerable amount of HVSR data in a cost-effective way. It is not surprising that some recent studies have adopted single station micro-tremor analyses in order to retrieve information on geological structures in 1D, 2D or even 3D reconstructions. However, the interpolation approaches followed in these studies for extending the punctual HVSR data spatially are not supported by a detailed spatial statistical analysis. Conversely, in order to exploit the informative content and quantify the related uncertainty of HVSR data it is necessary to utilize a deep spatial statistical analysis and objective interpolation approaches. Moreover, the interpolation approach should make it possible to use expert knowledge and auxiliary information. Accordingly, we present an integrated geostatistical approach applied to HVSR data, collected for retrieving information on the morphology of a buried bedrock surface. The geostatistical study is conducted on an experimental dataset of 116 HVSR data collected in a small thermal basin located in the Venetian Plain (Caldiero Basin, N-E Italy). The explorative geostatistical analysis of the data coupled with the use of interpolation kriging techniques permit the extraction of relevant information on the resonance properties of the subsoil. The utilized approach, based on kriging with external drift (or its extension, i.e. regression kriging), permits the researcher to take into account auxiliary information, evaluate the related prediction uncertainty, and highlight abrupt variations in subsoil resonance frequencies. The results of the analysis are discussed, also with reflections pertaining to the geo-engineering and geo

  7. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    DOE PAGES

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; ...

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicitymore » in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.« less

  8. Identification of surface wave higher modes using a methodology based on seismic noise and coda waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, Diane; Campillo, Michel; Sanchez-Sesma, Francisco; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.; Singh, Shri Krishna

    2015-11-01

    Dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves is performed to assess the velocity of complex structures such as sedimentary basins. At short periods several modes of the Rayleigh waves are often exited. To perform a reliable inversion of the velocity structure an identification of these modes is thus required. We propose a novel method to identify the modes of surface waves. We use the spectral ratio of the ground velocity for the horizontal components over the vertical component (H/V) measured on seismic coda. We then compare the observed values with the theoretical H/V ratio for velocity models deduced from surface wave dispersion when assuming a particular mode. We first invert the Rayleigh wave measurements retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation with the assumptions that (1) the fundamental mode and (2) the first overtone are excited. Then we use these different velocity models to predict theoretical spectral ratios of the ground velocity for the horizontal components over the vertical component (H/V). These H/V ratios are computed under the hypothesis of equipartition of a diffuse field in a layered medium. Finally we discriminate between fundamental and higher modes by comparing the theoretical H/V ratio with the H/V ratio measured on seismic coda. In an application, we reconstruct Rayleigh waves from cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at seven broad-band stations in the Valley of Mexico. For paths within the soft quaternary sediments basin, the maximum energy is observed at velocities higher than expected for the fundamental mode. We identify that the dominant mode is the first higher mode, which suggests the importance of higher modes as the main vectors of energy in such complex structures.

  9. Surface amplitude data: 3D-seismic for interpretation of sea floor geology (Louisiana Slope)

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.H.

    1996-09-01

    Proliferation of 3D-seismic in support of hydrocarbon exploration/production has created new data for improved interpretation of sea floor and shallow subsurface geology. Processing of digital seismic data to enhance amplitude anomalies produces information for improved assessment of geohazards and identification of sensitive benthic communities protected by environmental regulations. Coupled with high resolution acoustic data and direct observation/sampling using a manned research submersible, surface amplitude maps add critical interpretive information for identification of sea floor features. Non-reflective zones (acoustic wipeouts) are associated with many slope features. Mud diapirs, mud mounds, mud volcanoes, gas-changed sediments, gas hydrates, slump deposits, carbonate hardgrounds, and various types of carbonate mounds are all features that exhibit this common response on high resolution seismic profiles. Amplitude data help make specific identifications. Since 1988, submersible data from mid-to-upper slope features (Garden Banks, Green Canyon, and Mississippi Canyon lease block areas) have been analyzed with conventional high resolution acoustic data and 313-amplitude extraction maps. Areas of rapid venting of sediment and hydrocarbon-charged formation fluids are clearly distinguishable from mud diapirs and areas of carbonate mounds (slow seepage). Gas hydrates occur as mounds and mounded zones along faults; products of moderate flux rates below (approx.) 500 in water depths. Gas hydrates function as stored trophic resources that support sensitive chemosynthetic communities. Amplitude extraction maps clearly identify these features by a strong low impedance amplitude anomaly. Refinement and {open_quotes}field calibration{close_quotes} of the surface amplitude extraction method may eventually lead to a new standard for evaluating geohazards and sensitive benthic communities.

  10. A seismic reference model for the crust and uppermost mantle beneath China from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weisen; Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Kang, Dou; Kim, YoungHee; Lin, Fan-Chi; Ning, Jieyuan; Wang, Weitao; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Longquan

    2016-08-01

    Using data from more than 2000 seismic stations from multiple networks arrayed throughout China (CEArray, China Array, NECESS, PASSCAL, GSN) and surrounding regions (Korean Seismic Network, F-Net, KNET), we perform ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography across the entire region and earthquake tomography across parts of South China and Northeast China. We produce isotropic Rayleigh wave group and phase speed maps with uncertainty estimates from 8 to 50 s period across the entire region of study, and extend them to 70 s period where earthquake tomography is performed. Maps of azimuthal anisotropy are estimated simultaneously to minimize anisotropic bias in the isotropic maps, but are not discussed here. The 3D model is produced using a Bayesian Monte Carlo formalism covering all of China, extending eastwards through the Korean Peninsula, into the marginal seas, to Japan. We define the final model as the mean and standard deviation of the posterior distribution at each location on a 0.5° × 0.5° grid from the surface to 150 km depth. Surface wave dispersion data do not strongly constrain internal interfaces, but shear wave speeds between the discontinuities in the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle are well determined. We design the resulting model as a reference model, which is intended to be useful to other researchers as a starting model, to predict seismic wave fields and observables and to predict other types of data (e.g. topography, gravity). The model and the data on which it is based are available for download. In addition, the model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle deserving of further focus and continued interpretation.

  11. Regional velocity structure in northern California from inversion of scattered seismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, Fred F.

    1999-07-01

    Seismic surface waves recorded by the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network have been analyzed in order to constrain three-dimensional lateral heterogeneity of the upper mantle under northern California. A total of 2164 seismograms from 173 teleseismic events were windowed for the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave, followed by estimation of complex amplitude spectra over the period range 16 to 100 s using a multiple-taper method. Since Rayleigh waves at shorter periods, particularly below 35 s, suffer from serious multipathing or "non-plane" wave arrivals, these amplitude spectra have been interpreted as the product of wavefront distortion along the teleseismic propagation path and seismic structure beneath the network. The amplitude spectra are first modeled in terms of non-plane incoming wavefields and structural phase velocity perturbations period by period. After corrections for Moho and surface topography, the phase velocity maps are inverted for three-dimensional shear velocity perturbations δνs down to a depth of 200 km. The δνs maps are in good agreement with the results of body studies over a broad spatial scale. The dominant signals are associated with the thermal effects of the active Gorda and fossil Farallon subducted slab stretching from Mount Shasta through the western Sierran foothills to the southern Great Valley and asthenospheric upwelling beneath the northern Coast Ranges. The southern Sierra Nevada Range is characterized by fast δνs down to ˜50 km and slow velocities between ˜60 and 120 km depth, in agreement with independent inferences of a cold crust and warm upper mantle, which may provide the buoyancy forces necessary to support the elevation of the range.

  12. From the Surface Topography to the Upper Mantle, Seismic constraints on the Crustal structure Across Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Ramon; Díaz, Jordi; Gallart, Josep; Gil, Alba; Ayarza, Puy; Palomeras, Immaculada; Levander, Alan; Marti, David; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2015-04-01

    The most characteristic topographic features of Morocco are the Atlas Mountains and the Rif Coordillera. These two orogenic belts are the response of different geodynamic processes acting at lithospheric scale caused by a unique driver, the collision between two tectonic plates. Both are located within the diffuse plate boundary zone separating Africa and Europe. The boundary zone is characterized by a relatively broad zone of deformation that includes Mountain chains in southern Iberia, the Betics and the Rif cordillera in Morocco. The zone delineates the arcuate arc system of Gribraltar. Within the last decade a large international effort have been devoted to the area mostly leaded by Spanish groups with the collaboration of international research teams (including scientist form Europe and USA). Key multi-seismic projects have been developed that aim to constrain the structure, composition and tectonic scenario from south of the Atlas to the Betics, across the Rif cordillera and the Alboran basin. The multidisciplinary research program includes: natural source (earthquakes) recording with temporal deployments of broad band (BB) instrumentation and, controlled source seismic acquisition experiments where, spatially dense recording of wide-angle seismic reflection shot gathers were acquired. The passive experiments consisted on: a transect from Merzouga across the Gibraltar arc and into the Iberian peninsula (untill south of Toledo); a nearly regular grid of BB which was achieve by multiple deployments of a number of BB. The controlled source datasets were able to constrain the crustal structure and provide seismic P-wave propagation velocity models from the coast across the Rif and the Atlas. Travel-time inversion of the controlled source seismic data across the Atlas constraints a crustal root to the south of the High Atlas, and reveals mantle wedge. A limited crustal imbrication also appears in the Middle Atlas. The crustal thickness, does not exceeded 40 km in

  13. Influence of the allochthonous Pirital Block on the well and surface seismic in the Northern Monagas area, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dos Santos, D. )

    1993-02-01

    The Casupal-Bosque area in Northern Monagas is a province characterized by thrust faults due to the post-middle Miocene compressive regime. The most important tectonic element of the area is the Pirital thrust. The presence of this block at the surface, the high velocities (Cretaceous) rocks, the strong fracturing and the high dips cause the poor resolution of the seismic data. This effect occurs across in a north-south zone of approximately four (4) kilometers in the East-West strike direction of the block. In this paper results are presented of experimental seismic lines recorded to improve the seismic image beneath the block. Well seismic data of the area has also been studied. The results obtained from the experimental seismic lines show that, the quality of the data in the prospective level (Naricual Formation) beneath the allochthonous block did not improve substantially, even though a pre-stack time migration technique has been applied. The results on the well seismic data have been more successful after some modeling of the real and synthetic data was done. These results indicate that in complexed structures the well seismic data can not be used as a predictive tool, rather than a complement and definition of the structural interpretation.

  14. Contrasts between deformation accommodated by induced seismic and aseismic processes revealed by combined monitoring of seismicity and surface deformations: Brady Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davatzes, N. C.; Ali, S. T.; Mellors, R. J.; Foxall, W.; Wang, H. F.; Feigl, K. L.; Drakos, P. S.; Zemach, E.

    2013-12-01

    Fluid pressure change accompanying pumping in the Brady Geothermal Field is associated with two easily measureable deformation responses: (1) surface deformations and 2) seismic slip. Surface deformation can be imaged by InSAR and appears to correspond to volume change at depth. Seismic slip on fractures is likely induced by either changes in effective normal stress or solid stress with minimal impact to volume. Both responses have potential impact on permeability structure due to dilation or compaction along natural fractures. We present an integrated data set that compares pumping records with these deformation responses to investigate their coupling and to constrain the geometry and rheology of the reservoir and surrounding crust. We also seek to clarify the relationship between induced seismicity and pumping. Currently, the dominant pumping signal is pressure reduction resulting from on-going production since 1992. Surface subsidence extends over a region of approximately 5 km by 2 km with the long axis along the strike of the major normal faults associated with the reservoir. Smaller approximately 1 km length-scale regions of intense subsidence are associated bends or intersections among individual normal fault segments. Modeling of the deformation source indicates that the broader subsidence pattern is consistent with the majority of fluid extraction from a reservoir at a depth of approximately 1 km and extending along the entire length of the mapped Brady normal fault. The more intense subsidence is consistent with fluid extraction along steep conduits from shallower depths that extend to the main reservoir. These results indicate a reservoir much larger than would be expected from the footprint of the production wells. In contrast, seismicity is primarily concentrated along a narrow path between injecting and producing wells, but outside the regions of most intense subsidence. Overall, seismicity represents only a small fraction of the strain energy

  15. Present activity and seismogenic potential of a low-angle normal fault system (Città di Castello, Italy): Constraints from surface geology, seismic reflection data and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, Francesco; Boncio, Paolo; Lavecchia, Giusy; Pace, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    We present new constraints on an active low-angle normal fault system in the Città di Castello-Sansepolcro basin (CSB) of the northern Apennines of Italy. New field data from the geological survey of the Carta Geologica d' Italia (CARG project) define the surface geometry of the normal fault system and lead to an interpretation of the CROP 03 deep-crust seismic reflection profile (Castiglion Fiorentino-Urbania segment), with particular attention paid to the geometry of the Plio-Quaternary extensional structures. Surface and sub-surface geological data are integrated with instrumental and historical seismicity in order to define the seismotectonics of the area. Low-angle east-dipping reflectors are the seismic expression of the well-known Altotiberina Fault (AF), a regional extensional detachment on which both east- and west-dipping high-angle faults, bounding the CSB, sole out. The AF breakaway zone is located ˜ 10 km west of the CSB. Within the extensional allochthon, synthetic east-dipping planes prevail. Displacement along the AF is ˜ 4.5 km, which agrees with the cumulative offset due to its synthetic splays. The evolution of the CSB has mainly been controlled by the east-dipping fault system, at least since Early Pleistocene time; this system is still active and responsible for the seismicity of the area. A low level of seismic activity was recorded instrumentally within the CSB, but several damaging earthquakes have occurred in historical times. The instrumental seismicity and the intensity data points of the largest historical earthquakes (5 events with maximum MCS intensity of IX to IX-X) allow us to propose two main seismogenic structures: the Monte Santa Maria Tiberina (Mmax = 5.9) and Città di Castello (Mmax up to 6.5) normal faults. Both are synthetic splays of the AF detachment, dipping to the NE at moderate (45-50°) to low (25-30°) angles and cutting the upper crust up to the surface. This study suggests that low-angle normal faults (at least

  16. Near-surface faulting on the Tiptonville Domes as documented by shear-wave seismic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, T.; Woolery, E.; Wang, Z.; Street, R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Harris, J. . Kentucky Geological Survey)

    1992-01-01

    Over a kilometer of high resolution refraction and reflection profiles have been performed in the northwestern corner of Tennessee, approximately 8 km north of Tiptonville, TN, to establish the existence of neo-tectonic, near-surface faulting. This area was chosen because of the access it provided to the Tiptonville dome province of the Lake County Uplift (a Holocene flexure) and the trend of contemporary seismicity within the New Madrid Seismic Zone, where the likelihood of faulting would be maximized. Velocity boundaries derived from expanding spread refraction profiles correlated well with the accepted location of the structural high of the Tiptonville Dome. The refraction lines defined up to four velocity boundaries, with depths ranging from less than 4 m to over 100 m. Moreover, some of these boundaries showed faulting with vertical component displacements from approximately 3 m to 30 m. Six-fold, shear-wave, CDP profiles support the refraction data, indicating near vertical displacement across two horizons. The horizons are at .3 s (ca 25 m) and .6 s (ca 80 m), with each reflector displaying approximately 10 m of throw. These reflectors are thought to correlate to a lower Quaternary gravel unit and the base of the Jackson formation (late Eocene) respectively. The faulting, because of its extension to depth, is interpreted to be tectonic in origin and not due to near-surface aseismic structural phenomena such as slumping, compaction, or other soft-sediment deformation.

  17. Surface-seismic imaging for nehrp soil profile classifications and earthquake hazards in urban areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    We acquired high-resolution seismic-refraction data on the ground surface in selected areas of the San Fernando Valley (SFV) to help explain the earthquake damage patterns and the variation in ground motion caused by the 17 January 1994 magnitude 6.7 Northridge earthquake. We used these data to determine the compressional- and shear-wave velocities (Vp and Vs) at 20 aftershock recording sites to 30-m depth ( V??s30, and V??p30). Two other sites, located next to boreholes with downhole Vp and Vs data, show that we imaged very similar seismic-vefocity structures in the upper 40 m. Overall, high site response appears to be associated with tow Vs in the near surface, but there can be a wide rangepf site amplifications for a given NEHRP soil type. The data suggest that for the SFV, if the V??s30 is known, we can determine whether the earthquake ground motion will be amplified above a factor of 2 relative to a local rock site.

  18. Shear wave velocity estimation of the near-surface materials of Chittagong City, Bangladesh for seismic site characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Zillur; Siddiqua, Sumi; Kamal, A. S. M. Maksud

    2016-11-01

    The average shear wave velocity of the near-surface materials down to a depth of 30 m (Vs30) is essential for seismic site characterization to estimate the local amplification factor of the seismic waves during an earthquake. Chittagong City is one of the highest risk cities of Bangladesh for its seismic vulnerability. In the present study, the Vs30 is estimated for Chittagong City using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), small scale microtremor measurement (SSMM), downhole seismic (DS), and correlation between the shear wave velocity (Vs) and standard penetration test blow count (SPT-N). The Vs30 of the near-surface materials of the city varies from 123 m/s to 420 m/s. A Vs30 map is prepared from the Vs30 of each 30 m grid using the relationship between the Holocene soil thickness and the Vs30. Based on the Vs30, the near-surface materials of Chittagong City are classified as site classes C, D, and E according to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), USA and as site classes B, C, and D according to the Eurocode 8. The Vs30 map can be used for seismic microzonation, future planning, and development of the city to improve the earthquake resiliency of the city.

  19. A combined surface and borehole seismic survey at the COSC-1 borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    The ICDP project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) focuses on the mid Paleozoic Caledonide Orogen in Scandinavia in order to better understand orogenic processes, from the past and in recent active mountain belts. The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision. Surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of the Caledonian structure, including the allochthon and the underlying autochthon, as well as the shallow W-dipping décollement surface that separates the two and consist of a thin skin of Cambrian black shales. During spring/summer 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was drilled to approx. 2.5 km depth near the town of Åre (western Jämtland/Sweden) with nearly 100 % of core recovery and cores in best quality. After the drilling was finished, a major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Besides a high resolution zero-offset VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) experiment also a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP survey took place. For the latter the source points were distributed along three profile lines centered radially around the borehole. For the central part up to 2.5 km away from the borehole, a hydraulic hammer source was used, which hits the ground for about 20 s with an linear increasing hit rate. For the far offset shots up to 5 km, explosive sources were used. The wavefield of both source types was recorded in the borehole using an array of 15 three-component receivers with a geophone spacing of 10 m. This array was deployed at 7 different depth levels during the survey. At the same time the wavefield was also recorded at the surface by 180 standalone three-component receivers placed along each of the three up to 10 km long lines, as well as with a 3D array of single-component receivers in the central part of the survey area around the borehole. Here

  20. Quaternary deformation and fault structure in the Northern Mississippi Embayment as imaged by near-surface seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Magnani, Maria Beatrice; McIntosh, Kirk; Waldron, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Seismicity in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in the central United States constrains the location of present deformation at depth along four main distinct arms, while the surface expression of the ongoing deformation is still unclear. To better constrain the surface deformation in the NMSZ, we integrate existing seismic reflection data with a new ~300 km-long high-resolution seismic reflection profile acquired along the Mississippi River from Cape Girardeau, MO, to Caruthersville, MO. Based on the data, we interpret the Reelfoot Thrust and the New Markham Fault as upward splays of a blind master fault defined by the seismicity and extending at depth farther north. To the south, two faults, the Axial Fault and the Cottonwood Grove Fault, are imaged above the southern arm of the NMSZ. Both fault display deformation of the Paleozoic through the Tertiary sediments, and a relief of ~20-25 m at the base of the Quaternary alluvium, which we interpret as the result of strike-slip motion along a complex fault plane geometry. We propose two alternative interpretations for the relationship between the shallow faults and the seismicity in this area: (1) the faults merge at depth and are presently both active and (2) the faults are distinct at depth and were active during the Quaternary and only the Axial Fault is presently deforming. Geological structures mapped at the surface as part of this study show that Quaternary deformation is accommodated along a fault network that is more complex than the simple four-arm system illuminated by the seismicity, a behavior predicted by analog and computer models.

  1. Dynamic weakening of serpentinite gouges and bare surfaces at seismic slip rates.

    PubMed

    Proctor, B P; Mitchell, T M; Hirth, G; Goldsby, D; Zorzi, F; Platt, J D; Di Toro, G

    2014-11-01

    To investigate differences in the frictional behavior between initially bare rock surfaces of serpentinite and powdered serpentinite ("gouge") at subseismic to seismic slip rates, we conducted single-velocity step and multiple-velocity step friction experiments on an antigorite-rich and lizardite-rich serpentinite at slip rates (V) from 0.003 m/s to 6.5 m/s, sliding displacements up to 1.6 m, and normal stresses (σn ) up to 22 MPa for gouge and 97 MPa for bare surfaces. Nominal steady state friction values (μnss) in gouge at V = 1 m/s are larger than in bare surfaces for all σn tested and demonstrate a strong σn dependence; μnss decreased from 0.51 at 4.0 MPa to 0.39 at 22.4 MPa. Conversely, μnss values for bare surfaces remained ∼0.1 with increasing σn and V. Additionally, the velocity at the onset of frictional weakening and the amount of slip prior to weakening were orders of magnitude larger in gouge than in bare surfaces. Extrapolation of the normal stress dependence for μnss suggests that the behavior of antigorite gouge approaches that of bare surfaces at σn ≥ 60 MPa. X-ray diffraction revealed dehydration reaction products in samples that frictionally weakened. Microstructural analysis revealed highly localized slip zones with melt-like textures in some cases gouge experiments and in all bare surfaces experiments for V ≥ 1 m/s. One-dimensional thermal modeling indicates that flash heating causes frictional weakening in both bare surfaces and gouge. Friction values for gouge decrease at higher velocities and after longer displacements than bare surfaces because strain is more distributed.

  2. Soil depth mapping using seismic surface waves: Evaluation on eroded loess covered hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardie, Severine; Samyn, Kevin; Cerdan, Olivier; Grandjean, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    The purposes of the multidisciplinary DIGISOIL project are the integration and improvement of in situ and proximal technologies for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators. Foreseen developments concern sensor technologies, data processing and their integration to applications of (digital) soil mapping (DSM). Among available techniques, the seismic one is, in this study, particularly tested for characterising soil vulnerability to erosion. The spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method is an in situ seismic technique used for evaluation of the stiffnesses (G) and associated depth in layered systems. A profile of Rayleigh wave velocity versus frequency, i.e., the dispersion curve, is calculated from each recorded seismogram before to be inverted to obtain the vertical profile of shear wave velocity Vs. Then, the soil stiffness can easily be calculated from the shear velocity if the material density is estimated, and the soil stiffness as a function of depth can be obtained. This last information can be a good indicator to identify the soil bedrock limit. SASW measurements adapted to soil characterisation is proposed in the DIGISOIL project, as it produces in an easy and quick way a 2D map of the soil. This system was tested for the digital mapping of the depth of loamy material in a catchment of the European loess belt. The validation of this methodology has been performed with the realisation of several acquisitions along the seismic profiles: - Several boreholes were drilled until the bedrock, permitting to get the geological features of the soil and the depth of the bedrock; - Several laboratory measurements of various parameters were done on samples taken from the boreholes at various depths, such as dry density, solid density, and water content; - Dynamic penetration tests were also conducted along the seismic profile, until the bedrock is attained. Some empirical correlations between the parameters measured with laboratory tests

  3. Variable-period surface-wave magnitudes: A rapid and robust estimator of seismic moments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonner, J.; Herrmann, R.; Benz, H.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface-wave magnitudes (Ms), measured at local, regional, and teleseismic distances, can be used as a rapid and robust estimator of seismic moment magnitude (Mw). We used the Russell (2006) variable-period surface-wave magnitude formula, henceforth called Ms(VMAX), to estimate the Ms for 165 North American events with 3.2 surface-wave observed at a local or near-regional distance seismic station after a preliminary epicentral location has been formed. Therefore, it may be used to make rapid measurements of Mw, which are needed by government agencies for early warning systems.

  4. Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-09

    This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last know occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.

  5. Mapping the Moho with seismic surface waves: A review, resolution analysis, and recommended inversion strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Adam, Joanne M.-C.; Meier, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The strong sensitivity of seismic surface waves to the Moho is evident from a mere visual inspection of their dispersion curves or waveforms. Rayleigh and Love waves have been used to study the Earth's crust since the early days of modern seismology. Yet, strong trade-offs between the Moho depth and crustal and mantle structure in surface-wave inversions prompted doubts regarding their capacity to resolve the Moho. Here, we review surface-wave studies of the Moho, with a focus on early work, and then use model-space mapping to establish the waves' sensitivity to the Moho depth and the resolution of their inversion for it. If seismic wavespeeds within the crust and upper mantle are known, then Moho-depth variations of a few kilometres produce large (> 1%) perturbations in phase velocities. However, in inversions of surface-wave data with no a priori information (wavespeeds not known), strong Moho-depth/shear-speed trade-offs will mask ~ 90% of the Moho-depth signal, with remaining phase-velocity perturbations ~ 0.1% only. In order to resolve the Moho with surface waves alone, errors in the data must thus be small (up to ~ 0.2% for resolving continental Moho). With larger errors, Moho-depth resolution is not warranted and depends on error distribution with period. An effective strategy for the inversion of surface-wave data alone for the Moho depth is to, first, constrain the crustal and upper-mantle structure by inversion in a broad period range and then determine the Moho depth in inversion in a narrow period range most sensitive to it, with the first-step results used as reference. Prior information on crustal and mantle structure reduces the trade-offs and thus enables resolving the Moho depth with noisier data; such information should be used whenever available. Joint analysis or inversion of surface-wave and other data (receiver functions, topography, gravity) can reduce uncertainties further and facilitate Moho mapping.

  6. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  7. Dynamic weakening of serpentinite gouges and bare surfaces at seismic slip rates

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, B P; Mitchell, T M; Hirth, G; Goldsby, D; Zorzi, F; Platt, J D; Di Toro, G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate differences in the frictional behavior between initially bare rock surfaces of serpentinite and powdered serpentinite (“gouge”) at subseismic to seismic slip rates, we conducted single-velocity step and multiple-velocity step friction experiments on an antigorite-rich and lizardite-rich serpentinite at slip rates (V) from 0.003 m/s to 6.5 m/s, sliding displacements up to 1.6 m, and normal stresses (σn) up to 22 MPa for gouge and 97 MPa for bare surfaces. Nominal steady state friction values (μnss) in gouge at V = 1 m/s are larger than in bare surfaces for all σn tested and demonstrate a strong σn dependence; μnss decreased from 0.51 at 4.0 MPa to 0.39 at 22.4 MPa. Conversely, μnss values for bare surfaces remained ∼0.1 with increasing σn and V. Additionally, the velocity at the onset of frictional weakening and the amount of slip prior to weakening were orders of magnitude larger in gouge than in bare surfaces. Extrapolation of the normal stress dependence for μnss suggests that the behavior of antigorite gouge approaches that of bare surfaces at σn ≥ 60 MPa. X-ray diffraction revealed dehydration reaction products in samples that frictionally weakened. Microstructural analysis revealed highly localized slip zones with melt-like textures in some cases gouge experiments and in all bare surfaces experiments for V ≥ 1 m/s. One-dimensional thermal modeling indicates that flash heating causes frictional weakening in both bare surfaces and gouge. Friction values for gouge decrease at higher velocities and after longer displacements than bare surfaces because strain is more distributed. Key Points Gouge friction approaches that of bare surfaces at high normal stress Dehydration reactions and bulk melting in serpentinite in < 1 m of slip Flash heating causes dynamic frictional weakening in gouge and bare surfaces PMID:26167425

  8. Dense surface seismic data confirm non-double-couple source mechanisms induced by hydraulic fracturing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pesicek, Jeremy; Cieślik, Konrad; Lambert, Marc-André; Carrillo, Pedro; Birkelo, Brad

    2016-01-01

    We have determined source mechanisms for nine high-quality microseismic events induced during hydraulic fracturing of the Montney Shale in Canada. Seismic data were recorded using a dense regularly spaced grid of sensors at the surface. The design and geometry of the survey are such that the recorded P-wave amplitudes essentially map the upper focal hemisphere, allowing the source mechanism to be interpreted directly from the data. Given the inherent difficulties of computing reliable moment tensors (MTs) from high-frequency microseismic data, the surface amplitude and polarity maps provide important additional confirmation of the source mechanisms. This is especially critical when interpreting non-shear source processes, which are notoriously susceptible to artifacts due to incomplete or inaccurate source modeling. We have found that most of the nine events contain significant non-double-couple (DC) components, as evident in the surface amplitude data and the resulting MT models. Furthermore, we found that source models that are constrained to be purely shear do not explain the data for most events. Thus, even though non-DC components of MTs can often be attributed to modeling artifacts, we argue that they are required by the data in some cases, and can be reliably computed and confidently interpreted under favorable conditions.

  9. The surface termination effect on the quantum confinement and electron affinities of 3C-SiC quantum dots: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenkui; Dai, Ying; Yu, Lin; Guo, Meng; Huang, Baibiao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2012-03-07

    In light of the established differences between the quantum confinement effect and the electron affinities between hydrogen-passivated C and Si quantum dots, we carried out theoretical investigations on SiC quantum dots, with surfaces uniformly terminated by C-H or Si-H bonds, to explore the role of surface terminations on these two aspects. Surprisingly, it was found that the quantum confinement effect is present (or absent) in the highest occupied (or lowest unoccupied) molecular orbital of the SiC quantum dots regardless of their surface terminations. Thus, the quantum confinement effect related to the energy gap observed experimentally (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 94, 026102) is contributed to by the size-dependence of the highest occupied states; the absence of quantum confinement in the lowest unoccupied states is in contrary to the usual belief based on hydrogen-passivated C quantum dots. However, the cause of the absence of the quantum confinement in C nanodots is not transferable to SiC. We propose a model that provides a clear explanation for all findings on the basis of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interactions between the valence atomic p-orbital in the frontier occupied/unoccupied states. We also found that the electron affinities of the SiC quantum dots, which closely depend on the surface environments, are negative for the C-H termination and positive for the Si-H termination. The prediction of negative electron affinities in SiC quantum dots by simple C-H termination indicates a promising application for these materials in electron-emitter devices. Our model predicts that GeC quantum dots with hydrogen passivation exhibit similar features to SiC quantum dots and our study confirms the crucial role that the surface environment plays in these nanoscale systems.

  10. Seismic data enhancement and regularization using finite offset Common Diffraction Surface (CDS) stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garabito, German; Cruz, João Carlos Ribeiro; Oliva, Pedro Andrés Chira; Söllner, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The Common Reflection Surface stack is a robust method for simulating zero-offset and common-offset sections with high accuracy from multi-coverage seismic data. For simulating common-offset sections, the Common-Reflection-Surface stack method uses a hyperbolic traveltime approximation that depends on five kinematic parameters for each selected sample point of the common-offset section to be simulated. The main challenge of this method is to find a computationally efficient data-driven optimization strategy for accurately determining the five kinematic stacking parameters on which each sample of the stacked common-offset section depends. Several authors have applied multi-step strategies to obtain the optimal parameters by combining different pre-stack data configurations. Recently, other authors used one-step data-driven strategies based on a global optimization for estimating simultaneously the five parameters from multi-midpoint and multi-offset gathers. In order to increase the computational efficiency of the global optimization process, we use in this paper a reduced form of the Common-Reflection-Surface traveltime approximation that depends on only four parameters, the so-called Common Diffraction Surface traveltime approximation. By analyzing the convergence of both objective functions and the data enhancement effect after applying the two traveltime approximations to the Marmousi synthetic dataset and a real land dataset, we conclude that the Common-Diffraction-Surface approximation is more efficient within certain aperture limits and preserves at the same time a high image accuracy. The preserved image quality is also observed in a direct comparison after applying both approximations for simulating common-offset sections on noisy pre-stack data.

  11. 3D time-lapse seismic traveltime tomography for detecting near surface velocity variations: a case study from the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Juhlin, Christopher; Huang, Fei; Lüth, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Time-lapse seismic methods are an important tool for monitoring CO2 migration and storage in geological formations. Near surface variations are one of the major problems which may introduce time-lapse noise in the application of land based seismic monitoring. Conventional reflection seismic methods have difficulties in imaging near surface structures (10-30 m depth) due to the limitation of the methods themselves. Traveltime tomography is a commonly used method to reconstruct the subsurface velocity model. It can often provide extra information on near surface structures which is difficult to obtain by the conventional reflection seismic method. In this study, we apply traveltime tomography to 3D time-lapse seismic data sets acquired from at the Ketzin CO2 storage site. We also test different inversion strategies for traveltime tomography to investigate which one is more suitable for this case study. The results show good correlation with near surface variations obtained by other studies.

  12. INTEGRATED POLARIZATION PROPERTIES OF 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, AND 3C286

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the integrated polarization properties of the four compact radio sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, and 3C286, from 1 to 50 GHz, over a 30 yr time frame spanning 1982-2012. Using the polarized emission of Mars, we have determined that the position angle of the linearly polarized emission of 3C286 rises from 33 Degree-Sign at 8 GHz to 36 Degree-Sign at 45 GHz. There is no evidence for a change in the position angle over time. Using these values, the position angles of the integrated polarized emission from the other three sources are determined as a function of frequency and time. The fractional polarization of 3C286 is found to be slowly rising, at all frequencies, at a rate of {approx}0.015% yr{sup -1}. The fractional polarizations of 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 are all slowly variable, with the variations correlated with changes in the total flux densities of these sources.

  13. Mapping Deep Low Velocity Zones in Alaskan Arctic Coastal Permafrost using Seismic Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Dreger, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Permafrost degradation may be an important amplifier of climate change; Thawing of near-surface sediments holds the potential of increasing greenhouse gas emissions due to microbial decomposition of preserved organic carbon. Recently, the characterization of "deep" carbon pools (several meters below the surface) in circumpolar frozen ground has increased the estimated amount of soil carbon to three times higher than what was previously thought. It is therefore potentially important to include the characteristics and processes of deeper permafrost strata (on the orders of a few to tens of meters below surface) in climate models for improving future predictions of accessible carbon and climate feedbacks. This extension is particularly relevant if deeper formations are not completely frozen and may harbor on-going microbial activity despite sub-zero temperatures. Unfortunately, the characterization of deep permafrost systems is non-trivial; logistics and drilling constraints often limit direct characterization to relatively shallow units. Geophysical measurements, either surface or airborne, are often the most effective tools for evaluating these regions. Of the available geophysical techniques, the analysis of seismic surface waves (e.g. MASW) has several unique advantages, mainly the ability to provide field-scale information with good depth resolution as well as penetration (10s to 100s of m with small portable sources). Surface wave methods are also able to resolve low velocity regions, a class of features that is difficult to characterize using traditional P-wave refraction methods. As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project, we conducted a three-day seismic field survey (May 12 - 14, 2012) at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, which is located within the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain. Even though permafrost at the study site is continuous, ice-rich and thick (>= 350m), our Multichannel Analysis of

  14. Imaging Near-Surface Controls on Hot Spring Expression Using Shallow Seismic Refraction in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A. N.; Lindsey, C.; Fairley, J. P., Jr.; Larson, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    We used shallow seismic refraction to image near-surface materials in the vicinity of a small group of hot springs, located in the Morning Mist Springs area of Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Seismic velocities in the area surveyed range from a low of 0.3 km/s to a high of approximately 2.5 km/s. The survey results indicate an irregular surface topography overlain by silty sediments. The observed seismic velocities are consistent with a subsurface model in which sorted sands and gravels, probably outwash materials from the Pinedale glaciation, are overlain by silts and fine sands deposited in the flat-lying areas of the Morning Springs area. These findings are supported by published geologic maps of the area and well logs from a nearby borehole. The near-surface materials appear to be saturated with discharging hydrothermal fluids of varying temperature, and interbedded with semi-lithified geothermal deposits (sinter). We hypothesize that the relatively low-conductivity deposits of fines at the surface may serve to confine a shallow, relatively low-temperature (sub-boiling) hydrothermal aquifer, and that the distribution of sinter in the shallow subsurface plays an important role in determining the geometry of hydrothermal discharge (hot springs) at the land surface. Few studies of the shallow controls on hot spring expression exist for the Yellowstone caldera, and the present study therefore offers a unique glimpse into near-subsurface fluid flow controls.

  15. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  16. 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquake: a review of seismicity, surface faulting and regional tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Richins, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    The October 28, 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho earthquake (M/sub s/ = 7.3) occurred in an area of low historic seismicity within east-central Idaho along a segment of the Lost River fault active during the Holocene. A dense network of portable short period seismographs (up to 45 stations, station spacings of 2 to 10 km) was installed beginning several hours after the main shock and operated for 22 days. In addition to records from the portable instrumentation, data from permanent seismograph stations operating in Idaho, Utah, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming, provide a good regional data base. No foreshock activity above magnitude 2.0 (M/sub L/) was detected for the two month period preceding the main shock. The distribution of 421 aftershocks of M/sub L/ > 2 defines an epicentral pattern, 75 km x 15 km, trending north-northwest parallel to the surface rupture but displaced laterally southwest by 5 to 10 km. The epicenter of the main shock is approximately 14 km south-southwest of the end of surface faulting. This relationship suggests unilateral rupture propagating to the northwest. Aftershocks extend to depths of approximately 16 km and in the southeastern portion of the aftershock pattern define a zone, dipping approximately 45/sup 0/ SW, that intersects the surface near the fault scarp. The entire aftershock zone as observed during the first 3.5 weeks was active shortly after the main shock occurred. Fault plane solutions indicate predominantly normal faulting with varying components of strike slip. 17 refs., 8 figs. 1 tab.

  17. High Resolution Near Surface 3D Seismic Experiments: A Carbonate Platform vs. a Siliciclastic Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidou, N.; Drijkoningen, G.; Braaksma, H.; Verwer, K.; Kenter, J.

    2005-05-01

    Interest in high-resolution 3D seismic experiments for imaging shallow targets has increased over the past years. Many case studies presented, show that producing clear seismic images with this non-evasive method, is still a challenge. We use two test-sites where nearby outcrops are present so that an accurate geological model can be built and the seismic result validated. The first so-called natural field laboratory is located in Boulonnais (N. France). It is an upper Jurassic siliciclastic sequence; age equivalent of the source rock of N. Sea. The second one is located in Cap Blanc,to the southwest of the Mallorca island(Spain); depicting an excellent example of Miocene prograding reef platform (Llucmajor Platform); it is a textbook analog for carbonate reservoirs. In both cases, the multidisciplinary experiment included the use of multicomponent and quasi- or 3D seismic recordings. The target depth does not exceed 120m. Vertical and shear portable vibrators were used as source. In the center of the setups, boreholes were drilled and Vertical Seismic Profiles were shot, along with core and borehole measurements both in situ and in the laboratory. These two geologically different sites, with different seismic stratigraphy have provided us with exceptionally high resolution seismic images. In general seismic data was processed more or less following standard procedures, a few innovative techniques on the Mallorca data, as rotation of horizontal components, 3D F-K filter and addition of parallel profiles, have improved the seismic image. In this paper we discuss the basic differences as seen on the seismic sections. The Boulonnais data present highly continuous reflection patterns of extremenly high resolution. This facilitated a high resolution stratigraphic description. Results from the VSP showed substantial wave energy attenuation. However, the high-fold (330 traces ) Mallorca seismic experiment returned a rather discontinuous pattern of possible reflectors

  18. Seismic structure of the southern Apennines as revealed by waveform modelling of regional surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ökeler, Ahmet; Gu, Yu Jeffrey; Lerner-Lam, Arthur; Steckler, Michael S.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the crust and upper-mantle structures beneath the southern Apennine mountain chain using three-component seismograms from the Calabria-Apennine-Tyrrhenian/Subduction-Collision-Accretion Network (CAT/SCAN) array. Surface wave waveforms from three moderate-sized (Mw > 5.0) regional earthquakes are modelled using multiple frequencies (0.03-0.06 and 0.05-0.2 Hz) and both forward and linearized-inversion algorithms. Our best-fitting shear velocity models clearly reflect the major tectonic units where, for example, the average seismic structure at depths above 50 km beneath Apulia is substantially faster than beneath the Apennine mountain chain. We identify a prominent low-velocity channel under the mountain belt at depths below ~25-30 km and a secondary low-velocity zone at 6-12 km depth near Mt Vulture (a once active volcano). Speed variations between Love and Rayleigh waves provide further constraints on the fabric and dynamic processes. Our analysis indicates that the crustal low-velocity zones are highly anisotropic (maximum 14 per cent) and allow transversely polarized shear waves to travel faster than vertically polarized shear waves. The upper crustal anomaly reveals a layer of highly deformed rocks caused by past collisions and by the active normal faults cutting across the thrust sheets, whereas hot mantle upwelling may be responsible for a high-temperature, partially molten lower crust beneath the southern Apennines.

  19. On using surface-source downhole-receiver logging to determine seismic slownesses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Thompson, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method to solve for slowness models from surface-source downhole-receiver seismic travel-times. The method estimates the slownesses in a single inversion of the travel-times from all receiver depths and accounts for refractions at layer boundaries. The number and location of layer interfaces in the model can be selected based on lithologic changes or linear trends in the travel-time data. The interfaces based on linear trends in the data can be picked manually or by an automated algorithm. We illustrate the method with example sites for which geologic descriptions of the subsurface materials and independent slowness measurements are available. At each site we present slowness models that result from different interpretations of the data. The examples were carefully selected to address the reliability of interface-selection and the ability of the inversion to identify thin layers, large slowness contrasts, and slowness gradients. Additionally, we compare the models in terms of ground-motion amplification. These plots illustrate the sensitivity of site amplifications to the uncertainties in the slowness model. We show that one-dimensional site amplifications are insensitive to thin layers in the slowness models; although slowness is variable over short ranges of depth, this variability has little affect on ground-motion amplification at frequencies up to 5 Hz.

  20. Combination of surface and borehole seismic data for robust target-oriented imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; van der Neut, Joost; Arntsen, Børge; Wapenaar, Kees

    2016-05-01

    A novel application of seismic interferometry (SI) and Marchenko imaging using both surface and borehole data is presented. A series of redatuming schemes is proposed to combine both data sets for robust deep local imaging in the presence of velocity uncertainties. The redatuming schemes create a virtual acquisition geometry where both sources and receivers lie at the horizontal borehole level, thus only a local velocity model near the borehole is needed for imaging, and erroneous velocities in the shallow area have no effect on imaging around the borehole level. By joining the advantages of SI and Marchenko imaging, a macrovelocity model is no longer required and the proposed schemes use only single-component data. Furthermore, the schemes result in a set of virtual data that have fewer spurious events and internal multiples than previous virtual source redatuming methods. Two numerical examples are shown to illustrate the workflow and to demonstrate the benefits of the method. One is a synthetic model and the other is a realistic model of a field in the North Sea. In both tests, improved local images near the boreholes are obtained using the redatumed data without accurate velocities, because the redatumed data are close to the target.

  1. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the Central and Eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred; Mooney, Walter D.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic surface waves from the Transportable Array of EarthScope's USArray are used to estimate phase velocity structure of 18 to 125 s Rayleigh waves, then inverted to obtain three-dimensional crust and upper mantle structure of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) down to ∼200 km. The obtained lithosphere structure confirms previously imaged CEUS features, e.g., the low seismic-velocity signature of the Cambrian Reelfoot Rift and the very low velocity at >150 km depth below an Eocene volcanic center in northwestern Virginia. New features include high-velocity mantle stretching from the Archean Superior Craton well into the Proterozoic terranes and deep low-velocity zones in central Texas (associated with the late Cretaceous Travis and Uvalde volcanic fields) and beneath the South Georgia Rift (which contains Jurassic basalts). Hot spot tracks may be associated with several imaged low-velocity zones, particularly those close to the former rifted Laurentia margin.

  2. Cyclic spattering, seismic tremor, and surface fluctuation within a perched lava channel, Kīlauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, M.R.; Orr, T.; Wilson, D.; Dow, D.; Freeman, R.

    2011-01-01

    In late 2007, a perched lava channel, built up to 45 m above the preexisting surface, developed during the ongoing eruption near Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone on Kīlauea Volcano’s east rift zone. The lava channel was segmented into four pools extending over a total of 1.4 km. From late October to mid-December, a cyclic behavior, consisting of steady lava level rise terminated by vigorous spattering and an abrupt drop in lava level, was commonly observed in pool 1. We use geologic observations, video, time-lapse camera images, and seismicity to characterize and understand this cyclic behavior. Spattering episodes occurred at intervals of 40–100 min during peak activity and involved small (5–10-m-high) fountains limited to the margins of the pool. Most spattering episodes had fountains which migrated downchannel. Each spattering episode was associated with a rapid lava level drop of about 1 m, which was concurrent with a conspicuous cigar-shaped tremor burst with peak frequencies of 4–5 Hz. We interpret this cyclic behavior to be gas pistoning, and this is the first documented instance of gas pistoning in lava well away from the deeper conduit. Our observations and data indicate that the gas pistoning was driven by gas accumulation beneath the visco-elastic component of the surface crust, contrary to other studies which attribute similar behavior to the periodic rise of gas slugs. The gas piston events typically had a gas mass of about 2,500 kg (similar to the explosions at Stromboli), with gas accumulation and release rates of about 1.1 and 5.7 kg s−1, respectively. The time-averaged gas output rate of the gas pistoning events accounted for about 1–2% of the total gas output rate of the east rift zone eruption.

  3. Conceptual Design and Architecture of Mars Exploration Rover (MER) for Seismic Experiments Over Martian Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akshay; Singh, Amit

    2012-07-01

    Keywords: MER, Mars, Rover, Seismometer Mars has been a subject of human interest for exploration missions for quite some time now. Both rover as well as orbiter missions have been employed to suit mission objectives. Rovers have been preferentially deployed for close range reconnaissance and detailed experimentation with highest accuracy. However, it is essential to strike a balance between the chosen science objectives and the rover operations as a whole. The objective of this proposed mechanism is to design a vehicle (MER) to carry out seismic studies over Martian surface. The conceptual design consists of three units i.e. Mother Rover as a Surrogate (Carrier) and Baby Rovers (two) as seeders for several MEMS-based accelerometer / seismometer units (Nodes). Mother Rover can carry these Baby Rovers, having individual power supply with solar cells and with individual data transmission capabilities, to suitable sites such as Chasma associated with Valles Marineris, Craters or Sand Dunes. Mother rover deploys these rovers in two opposite direction and these rovers follow a triangulation pattern to study shock waves generated through firing tungsten carbide shells into the ground. Till the time of active experiments Mother Rover would act as a guiding unit to control spatial spread of detection instruments. After active shock experimentation, the babies can still act as passive seismometer units to study and record passive shocks from thermal quakes, impact cratering & landslides. Further other experiments / payloads (XPS / GAP / APXS) can also be carried by Mother Rover. Secondary power system consisting of batteries can also be utilized for carrying out further experiments over shallow valley surfaces. The whole arrangement is conceptually expected to increase the accuracy of measurements (through concurrent readings) and prolong life cycle of overall experimentation. The proposed rover can be customised according to the associated scientific objectives and further

  4. Resistivity and Seismic Surface Wave Tomography Results for the Nevşehir Kale Region: Cappadocia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Nart; Çakır, Özcan; Erduran, Murat; Arif Kutlu, Yusuf

    2014-05-01

    The Nevşehir Kale region located in the middle of Cappadocia with approximately cone shape is investigated for existence of an underground city using the geophysical methods of electrical resistivity and seismic surface wave tomography together. Underground cities are generally known to exist in Cappadocia. The current study has obtained important clues that there may be another one under the Nevşehir Kale region. Two-dimensional resistivity and seismic profiles approximately 4-km long surrounding the Nevşehir Kale are measured to determine the distribution of electrical resistivities and seismic velocities under the profiles. Several high resistivity anomalies with a depth range 8-20 m are discovered to associate with a systematic void structure beneath the region. Because of the high resolution resistivity measurement system currently employed we were able to isolate the void structure from the embedding structure. Low seismic velocity zones associated with the high resistivity depths are also discovered. Using three-dimensional visualization techniques we show the extension of the void structure under the measured profiles.

  5. New approach to detect seismic surface waves in 1Hz-sampled GPS time series.

    PubMed

    Houlié, N; Occhipinti, G; Blanchard, T; Shapiro, N; Lognonné, P; Murakami, M

    2011-01-01

    Recently, co-seismic seismic source characterization based on GPS measurements has been completed in near- and far-field with remarkable results. However, the accuracy of the ground displacement measurement inferred from GPS phase residuals is still depending of the distribution of satellites in the sky. We test here a method, based on the double difference (DD) computations of Line of Sight (LOS), that allows detecting 3D co-seismic ground shaking. The DD method is a quasi-analytically free of most of intrinsic errors affecting GPS measurements. The seismic waves presented in this study produced DD amplitudes 4 and 7 times stronger than the background noise. The method is benchmarked using the GEONET GPS stations recording the Hokkaido Earthquake (2003 September 25th, Mw = 8.3).

  6. New approach to detect seismic surface waves in 1Hz-sampled GPS time series

    PubMed Central

    Houlié, N.; Occhipinti, G.; Blanchard, T.; Shapiro, N.; Lognonné, P.; Murakami, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, co-seismic seismic source characterization based on GPS measurements has been completed in near- and far-field with remarkable results. However, the accuracy of the ground displacement measurement inferred from GPS phase residuals is still depending of the distribution of satellites in the sky. We test here a method, based on the double difference (DD) computations of Line of Sight (LOS), that allows detecting 3D co-seismic ground shaking. The DD method is a quasi-analytically free of most of intrinsic errors affecting GPS measurements. The seismic waves presented in this study produced DD amplitudes 4 and 7 times stronger than the background noise. The method is benchmarked using the GEONET GPS stations recording the Hokkaido Earthquake (2003 September 25th, Mw = 8.3). PMID:22355563

  7. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. High-resolution shallow reflection seismic image and surface evidence of the Upper Tiber Basin active faults (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donne, D.D.; Plccardi, L.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow seismic reflection prospecting has been carried out in order to investigate the faults that bound to the southwest and northeast the Quaternary Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy). On the northeastern margin of the basin a ??? 1 km long reflection seismic profile images a fault segment and the associated up to 100 meters thick sediment wedge. Across the southwestern margin a 0.5 km-long seismic profile images a 50-55??-dipping extensional fault, that projects to the scarp at the base of the range-front, and against which a 100 m thick syn-tectonic sediment wedge has formed. The integration of surface and sub-surface data allows to estimate at least 190 meters of vertical displacement along the fault and a slip rate around 0.25 m/kyr. Southwestern fault might also be interpreted as the main splay structure of regional Alto Tiberina extensional fault. At last, the 1917 Monterchi earthquake (Imax=X, Boschi et alii, 2000) is correlable with an activation of the southwestern fault, and thus suggesting the seismogenic character of this latter.

  9. Faulting apparently related to the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake and possible co-seismic origin of surface cracks in Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Lee, W.H.K.; Rymer, M.J.; Ponti, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Apparent southward-dipping, reverse-fault zones are imaged to depths of about 1.5 km beneath Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California. Based on their orientation and projection to the surface, we suggest that the imaged fault zones are extensions of the Oak Ridge fault. Geologic mapping by others and correlations with seismicity studies suggest that the Oak Ridge fault is the causative fault of the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake (Northridge fault). Our seismically imaged faults may be among several faults that collectively comprise the Northridge thrust fault system. Unusually strong shaking in Potrero Canyon during the Northridge earthquake may have resulted from focusing of seismic energy or co-seismic movement along existing, related shallow-depth faults. The strong shaking produced ground-surface cracks and sand blows distributed along the length of the canyon. Seismic reflection and refraction images show that shallow-depth faults may underlie some of the observed surface cracks. The relationship between observed surface cracks and imaged faults indicates that some of the surface cracks may have developed from nontectonic alluvial movement, but others may be fault related. Immediately beneath the surface cracks, P-wave velocities are unusually low (<400 m/sec), and there are velocity anomalies consistent with a seismic reflection image of shallow faulting to depths of at least 100 m. On the basis of velocity data, we suggest that unconsolidated soils (<800 m/sec) extend to depths of about 15 to 20 m beneath our datum (<25 m below ground surface). The underlying rocks range in velocity from about 1000 to 5000 m/sec in the upper 100 m. This study illustrates the utility of high-resolution seismic imaging in assessing local and regional seismic hazards.

  10. Multicomponent Body and Surface Wave Seismic Analysis using an Urban Land Streamer System: An Integrative Earthquake Hazards Assessment Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribler, G.; Liberty, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present earthquake site response results from a 48-channel multicomponent seismic land streamer and large weight drop system. We acquired data along a grid of city streets in western Idaho at a rate of a few km per day where we derived shear wave velocity profiles to a depth of 40-50 m by incorporating vertical and radial geophone signals to capture the complete elliptical Rayleigh wave motion. We also obtained robust p-wave reflection and refraction results by capturing the returned signals that arrive at non-vertical incidence angles that result from the high-velocity road surface layer. By integrating the derived shear wave velocity profiles with p-wave reflection results, we include depositional and tectonic boundaries from the upper few hundred meters into our analysis to help assess whether ground motions may be amplified by shallow bedrock. By including p-wave refraction information into the analysis, we can identify zones of high liquefaction potential by comparing shear wave and p-wave velocity (Vp/Vs) measurements relative to refraction-derived water table depths. The utilization of multicomponent land streamer data improves signal-noise levels over single component data with no additional field effort. The added multicomponent data processing step can be as simple as calculating the magnitude of the vector for surface wave and refraction arrivals or rotating the reflected signals to the maximum emergence angle based on near surface p-wave velocity information. We show example data from a number of Idaho communities where historical earthquakes have been recorded. We also present numerical models and systematic field tests that show the effects of a high velocity road surface layer in surface and body wave measurements. We conclude that multicomponent seismic information derived from seismic land streamers can provide a significant improvement in earthquake hazard assessment over a standard single component approach with only a small addition in

  11. Characterization of the Vajont landslide (North-Eastern Italy) by means of reflection and surface wave seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronio, Lorenzo; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of the disastrous Vajont rockslide (North-Eastern Italy, October 9, 1963) have been studied in great detail over the past five decades. Nevertheless, the reconstruction of the rockslide dynamics still presents several uncertainties, including those related to the accurate estimation of the actual landslide mass. This work presents the results of a geophysical characterization of the Vajont landslide body in terms of material properties and buried geometry. Both aspects add new information to the existing dataset and will help a better understanding of the rockslide failure mechanisms and dynamics. In addition, some general considerations concerning the intricacies of landslide characterization can be drawn, with due attention to potential pitfalls. The employed techniques are: (i) high resolution P-wave reflection, (ii) high resolution SH-wave reflection, (iii) controlled source surface wave analysis. We adopted as a seismic source a vibrator both for P waves and SH waves, using vertical and horizontal geophones respectively. For the surface wave seismic survey we used a heavy drop-weight source and low frequency receivers. Despite the high noise level caused by the fractured conditions of the large rock body, a common situation in landslide studies, we managed to achieve a satisfying imaging quality of the landslide structure thanks to the large number of active channels, the short receiver interval and the test of appropriate seismic sources. The joint use of different seismic techniques help focus the investigation on the rock mass mechanical properties. Results are in good agreement with the available borehole data, the geological sections and the mechanical properties of the rockmass estimated by other studies. In general the proposed approach is likely to be applicable successfully to similar situations where scattering and other noise sources are a typical bottleneck to geophysical data acquisition on landslide bodies.

  12. Geophysical imaging of near-surface structure using electromagnetic and seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongping

    This thesis includes three different studies of geophysical imaging: (1) inference of plume moments from tomograms with cross-hole radar; (2) simulated annealing inversion for near-surface shear-wave velocity structure with microtremor measurements; and (3) time-lapse GPR imaging of water movement in the vadose zone. Although these studies involve different geophysical approaches, they are linked by a common theme---using geophysical imaging to understand hydrologic phenomena or subsurface structure. My first study in this thesis is concerned with the identification of plume moments from geophysical tomograms. Previously geophysical imaging has been applied to characterize contaminant plume migration in groundwater, and to determine plume mass, extent, velocity, and shape. Although tomograms have been used for quantitative inference of plume moments, the reliability of these inferred moments is poorly understood. In general, tomograms represent blurry and blunted images of subsurface properties, as a consequence of limited data acquisition geometry, measurement error, and the effects of regularization. In this thesis, I investigated the effect of tomographic resolution on the inference of plume moments from tomograms. I presented a new approach to quantify the resolution of inferred moments, drawing on concepts from conventional geophysical image appraisal, and also image reconstruction from orthogonal moments. This new approach is demonstrated by synthetic examples in radar tomography. My results indicated that moments calculated from tomograms are subject to substantial error and bias. For example, for many practical survey geometries, crosshole radar tomography (1) is incapable of resolving the lateral center of mass, and (2) severely underpredicts total mass. The degree of bias and error varies spatially over the tomogram, in a complicated manner, as a result of spatially variable resolution. These findings have important implications for the quantitative use

  13. Effect of the surface roughness on the seismic signal generated by a single rock impact: insight from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, Vincent; Mangeney, Anne; de Rosny, Julien; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The seismic signal generated by rockfalls, landslides or avalanches is a unique tool to detect, characterize and monitor gravitational flow activity, with strong implication in terms of natural hazard monitoring. Indeed, as natural flows travel down the slope, they apply stresses on the ground, generating seismic waves in a wide frequency band. Our ultimate objective is to relate the granular flow properties to the generated signals that result from the different physical processes involved. We investigate here the more simple process: the impact of a single bead on a rough surface. Farin et al. [2015] have already shown theoretically and experimentally the existence of a link between the properties of an impacting bead (mass and velocity) on smooth surfaces, and the emitted signal (radiated elastic energy and mean frequency). This demonstrates that the single impactor properties can be deduced from the form of the emitted signal. We extend this work here by investigating the impact of single beads and gravels on rough and erodible surfaces. Experimentally, we drop glass and steel beads of diameters from 2 mm to 10 mm on a PMMA plate. The roughness of this last is obtained by gluing 3mm-diameter glass beads on one of its face. Free beads have been also added to get erodible beds. We track the dropped impactor motion, times between impacts and the generated acoustic waves using two fast cameras and 8 accelerometers. Cameras are used in addition to estimate the impactor rotation. We investigate the energy balance during the impact process, especially how the energy restitution varies as a function of the energy lost through acoustic waves. From these experiments, we clearly observe that even if more dissipative processes are involved (friction, grain reorganization, etc.), the single bead scaling laws obtained on smooth surfaces remain valid. A main result of this work is to quantify the fluctuations of the characteristic quantities such as the bounce angle, the

  14. Detection of fault structure under a near-surface low velocity layer by seismic tomography: synthetics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanny, Teuku A.; Sassa, Koichi

    1996-09-01

    We have developed a new method to detect a fault structure under a near-surface low velocity layer (LVL) by seismic tomography. The field study showed that the tomography image reconstructed using borehole-surface configuration had a different result from that of using a crosshole configuration. The image reconstructed by using a borehole-surface configuration showed a decrease in seismic velocities along boreholes, and also the tomogram result using both configurations can not detect the subsurface fault structure. These phenomena are caused by the low velocity layer (LVL) at the top of investigation area. The basic idea hard is based on a downward continuation principle. By knowing the thickness of the LVL and the top of bedrock enables us to place 'virtual receiver' and/or 'virtual source' below the LVL. In this way, we can reconstruct the image by various tomographic methodologies. As an advantage, this method is easy to be use with the aid of ray tracing methodology. It can also reduce the effect of the near-surface LVL and can maximize the reconstructed image. The final result of our synthetic images by ILST, SIRT, and modified SIRT shows high accuracy and resolution for detection of fault structure under the low velocity layer.

  15. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    Naturally occurring geologic heterogeneity is an important, but often overlooked, aspect of seismic wave propagation. This dissertation presents a strategy for modeling the effects of heterogeneity using a combination of geostatistics and Finite Difference simulation. In the first chapter, I discuss my motivations for studying geologic heterogeneity and seis- mic wave propagation. Models based upon fractal statistics are powerful tools in geophysics for modeling heterogeneity. The important features of these fractal models are illustrated using borehole log data from an oil well and geomorphological observations from a site in Death Valley, California. A large part of the computational work presented in this disserta- tion was completed using the Finite Difference Code E3D. I discuss the Python-based user interface for E3D and the computational strategies for working with heterogeneous models developed over the course of this research. The second chapter explores a phenomenon observed for wave propagation in heteroge- neous media - the generation of unexpected shear wave phases in the near-source region. In spite of their popularity amongst seismic researchers, approximate methods for modeling wave propagation in these media, such as the Born and Rytov methods or Radiative Trans- fer Theory, are incapable of explaining these shear waves. This is primarily due to these method's assumptions regarding the coupling of near-source terms with the heterogeneities and mode conversion. To determine the source of these shear waves, I generate a suite of 3D synthetic heterogeneous fractal geologic models and use E3D to simulate the wave propaga- tion for a vertical point force on the surface of the models. I also present a methodology for calculating the effective source radiation patterns from the models. The numerical results show that, due to a combination of mode conversion and coupling with near-source hetero- geneity, shear wave energy on the order of 10% of the

  16. Seafloor surface processes and subsurface paleo-channel unconformities mapped using multi-channel seismic and multi-beam sonar data from the Galicia 3D seismic experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. C.; Shillington, D. J.; Sawyer, D. S.; Jordan, B.; Morgan, J. K.; Ranero, C.; Reston, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we use geophysical methods, stratigraphic relationships, and coring/drilling leg results to assess possible controls on deep-sea channel formation in order to further constrain paleo-channel (PC) and associated unconformity timing/source processes. A series of cut and fill PC are mapped in 3D multi-channel seismic (MCS) data and compared with multi-beam (MB) sonar bathymetry/backscatter data collected during the Galicia 3D survey with the R/V Marcus G. Langseth (2013). The MCS data were collected using four 6 km streamers spaced at 200 m resulting in 25 m x 25 m common mid-point bins within the ~67 km x 20 km 3D volume. The MB data were collected at an average depth of ~4900 m with a constrained swath width of 4.5 km resulting in 11.25x overlap while enabling 25-m bathymetry and 10-m backscatter grids. The PC lie below the mouth of a submarine canyon at the edge of the Galicia abyssal plain and cut pre/syn-rift sediments; they are bound by a rift block to the north and paleo-levees to the south (maximum height of ~180m). From drilling results, the most recent PC is late Miocene in age. In this study, four PC are traced into the basin as unconformities. Several of the PC/unconformities are tentatively correlated with previously interpreted Pyrenean orogeny/compressional Miocene/Oligocene tectonic events. However, one PC/unconformity within this interval has not been previously interpreted. In order test the hypothesis that the unconformities are the result of a significant change in base level indicated by a low shale/sand (SS) ratio, we use seismic surface attributes to calculate the SS ratio and trace the horizontal extent of the unconformities. Additionally, the MB/MCS seafloor morphology reveals sedimentary waves outboard of the canyon mouth. We use backscatter data to compare the extent of recent processes (e.g., Pleistocene glaciation/de-glaciation) with the unconformities by mapping the surface/shallow subsurface SS ratio (volume scattering).

  17. Near-surface, marine seismic-reflection data defines potential hydrogeologic confinement bypass in a tertiary carbonate aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Walker, Cameron; Westcott, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 210 km of near-surface, high-frequency, marine seismic-reflection data were acquired on the southeastern part of the Florida Platform between 2007 and 2011. Many high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles, interpretable to a depth of about 730 m, were collected on the shallow-marine shelf of southeastern Florida in water as shallow as 1 m. Landward of the present-day shelf-margin slope, these data image middle Eocene to Pleistocene strata and Paleocene to Pleistocene strata on the Miami Terrace. This high-resolution data set provides an opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that cut across confining units of the Paleocene to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that form the Floridan aquifer system.Seismic profiles image two structural systems, tectonic faults and karst collapse structures, which breach confining beds in the Floridan aquifer system. Both structural systems may serve as pathways for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability rocks in the Floridan aquifer system. The tectonic faults occur as normal and reverse faults, and collapse-related faults have normal throw. The most common fault occurrence delineated on the reflection profiles is associated with karst collapse structures. These high-frequency seismic data are providing high quality structural analogs to unprecedented depths on the southeastern Florida Platform. The analogs can be used for assessment of confinement of other carbonate aquifers and the sealing potential of deeper carbonate rocks associated with reservoirs around the world.

  18. CHANDRA Observations OF The Shock Heated Gas Around 3c 288 And 3c 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Kraft, R. P.; Evans, D. A.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Croston, J. H.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Lee, J. C.

    2010-03-01

    The inflation of radio bubbles in the hot gas atmospheres of clusters of galaxies plays an important role in the overall energy budget of the ICM. Regular gentle (i.e. subsonic) nuclear outbursts may be able to provide sufficient energy to the gas in the cool cores of clusters to offset radiative losses and regulate large cooling flows; and one method to supplement the total energy input into the gas is for the lobes to initially drive strong shocks into the gas. We present results from Chandra/ACIS-S observations of the hot gas atmospheres of two powerful, nearby radio galaxies in poor clusters: 3C 288 and 3C 449. We measure the total energy of the current outburst to be a few times 10^{59} ergs for 3C 288 (T = 2.8 keV, L_X = 1.4 × 10^{44} ergs) and ˜10^{58} ergs for 3C 449 (T = 1.5 keV, L_X = 2.0 × 10^{42} ergs). We find multiple surface brightness discontinuities in the gas, which are probably shocks and are indicative of supersonic heating by the inflation of the radio lobe. We do not find X-ray cavity in 3C 288, whereas cavities are associated with both the radio lobes in 3C 449.

  19. Integration of borehole geophysical properties into surface multichannel seismic data sets: First results from the SCOPSCO ICDP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindhorst, Katja; Krastel, Sebastian; Baumgarten, Henrike; Wonik, Thomas; Francke, Alexander; Wagner, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania), located on the Balkan Peninsula within the Dinaride-Hellenide-Albanide mountain belt is probably the oldest, continuously existing lake in Europe (2-5 Ma). Multidisciplinary studies at Lake Ohrid prove that it is an important archive to study the sedimentary and tectonic evolution of a graben system over a long time period. Within the frame of the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) a successful deep drilling campaign was carried out in spring 2013 with more than 2000 m of sediment cores at four sites. Downhole logging was realized at each site after coring, enabling us to integrate geophysical and sedimentological data into seismic cross sections in order to get a profound knowledge of climatic and environmental changes in the catchment area. The longest record (~569 m, site DEEP), recovered in the central part of lake Ohrid likely covers the entire lacustrine succession within Lake Ohrid Basin including several Interglacial and Glacial cycles. Sedimentological analyses are still ongoing; however, the upper 260 m of the DEEP reflecting the time period between Mid-Pleistocene Transition to present. An integration of borehole geophysical data into surface seismic lines shows that sediments, within the central part of Lake Ohrid, were deposited in a deep water environment over the last 600 ka. For the uppermost sediment cover, about 50 m of penetration, a very high resolution sediment echosounder data set allows us to identify major tephra layers and track them through the entire deep basin. Furthermore, a vertical seismic profile was carried out at site DEEP resulting in a conversion from two-way-travel-time into sediment depth. One major outcome is a corridor stack of the upgoing wave that clearly shows several reflectors linked to changes of sediment properties of cores and hence environmental and climate changes in the surrounding area of Lake Ohrid Basin. Several changes from Glacial to Interglacial, and vice versa

  20. Near-surface mapping using SH-wave and P-wave seismic land-streamer data acquisition in Illinois, U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pugin, Andre J.M.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; McBride, J.H.; Bexfield, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    SH-wave and P-wave high-resolution seismic reflection combined with land-streamer technology provide 3D regional maps of geologic formations that can be associated with aquifers and aquitards. Examples for three study areas are considered to demonstrate this. In these areas, reflection profiling detected near-surface faulting and mapped a buried glacial valley and its aquifers in two settings. The resulting seismic data can be used directly to constrain hydrogeologic modeling of shallow aquifers.

  1. Strike-slip fault network of the Huangshi structure, SW Qaidam Basin: Insights from surface fractures and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiang; Zhang, Qiquan; Yu, Xiangjiang; Du, Wei; Liu, Runchao; Bian, Qing; Wang, Zhendong; Zhang, Tuo; Guo, Zhaojie

    2017-01-01

    The Huangshi structure, as one of the NWW-trending S-shaped structures in the southwestern Qaidam Basin, holds important implications for unraveling the regional structural pattern. There are four dominant sets of surface strike-slip fractures at the core of the Huangshi structure. The fractures with orientations of N28°E, N47°E and N65°E correlate well with conjugate Riedel shears (R‧), tension fractures (T) and Riedel shears (R) in the Riedel shear model, respectively. Two conjugate strike-slip fracture sets occur at the surface of the Hongpan structure (secondary to the Huangshi structure) and the southwestern part of the Huangshi structure. In seismic sections, the Huangshi structure is present as a positive flower or Y-shaped structure governed by steeply dipping faults, whereas Hongpan and Xiaoshaping structures, located symmetrically to the Huangshi structure, are thrust-controlled anticlines. The Riedel shear pattern of surface strike-slip fractures, the positive flower or Y-shaped structure in seismic sections and the NW-trending secondary compressional anticlines consistently demonstrate that the Huangshi structure is dominated by left-lateral strike-slip faults which comprise a strike-slip fault network. Considering the similar S-shaped configuration and NWW trend of structures across the southwestern Qaidam Basin, it can be further speculated that these structures are also predominantly of left-lateral strike-slip types.

  2. Legacy seismic investigations of karst surfaces: Implications for heavy oil extraction from the Devonian Grosmont Formation, northeastern Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bown, Todd Dylan

    The Devonian Grosmont Formation in northeastern Alberta, Canada is the world's largest accumulation of heavy oil in carbonate rock with estimated bitumen in place of 64.5×109 m 3. At the studies location the eroded and buried surface of the Grosmont, referred here as the SubMannville uncoformity (SMU), was analyzed and interpret for a karsted surface. Results from legacy seismic data and available well log information were able to define the SMU as a mature karst surface within observable features such as dolines, karst valleys, karst plain and poljie and a ridge. The large scale topography of the ridge and poljie were geologically controlled by the underlying the Paleozoic rocks. Furthermore, the poljie was observed to contain the majority of the dolines in the area, noted to occur elsewhere. That said, dolines and karst valleys and other such dissolution features have the potential to erode the bitumen reservoir of the upper Grosmont members C and D. It is important for future oil prospectors to map and avoid areas such as the poljie, dolines and karst valley to increase certainty of reservoir presence. A preliminary rock-physics model was developed for the Grosmont reservoir of a bitumen-saturated dolomite. Results suggest that elastic properties of the Grosmont reservoir are temperature-frequency dispersive. This implies that there is a potential to use time-lapse seismic to map and monitor heating of the reservoir.

  3. Body and surface wave reconstruction from seismic noise correlations between arrays at Piton de la Fournaise volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Nori; Boué, Pierre; Brenguier, Florent; Roux, Philippe; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Campillo, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Body wave reconstruction from ambient seismic noise correlations is an important step toward improving volcano imaging and monitoring. Here we extract body and surface waves that propagate in Piton de la Fournaise volcano on La Réunion island using ambient noise cross correlation and array-processing techniques. Ambient noise was continuously recorded at three dense arrays, each comprising 49 geophones. To identify and enhance the Green's function from the ambient noise correlation, we apply a double beamforming (DBF) technique between the array pairs. The DBF allows us to separate surface and body waves, direct and reflected waves, and multipathing waves. Based on their azimuths and slownesses, we successfully extract body waves between all the combinations of arrays, including the wave that propagates through the active magmatic system of the volcano. Additionally, we identify the effects of uneven noise source distribution and interpret the surface wave reflections.

  4. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at

  5. Body and Surface Wave Modeling of Observed Seismic Events Part 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-13

    geology to underground nuclear testing, Nevada Test Site, in Nevada Test Site, GSA Memoir 110, E.B. Eckel, ed., pp. 11- 19, 1968. Hudson, J.A., SH...rock. Hard rock is a broad term used here to describe Mesozoic granitic rock and Paleozoic rocks, all of which have similar elastic properties...of the Seismic Waves L. and R. across Australia , Nature, vol. 180, pp. 495, 1957. -116- Bollinger, G. A., Attenuation of the L. Phases and

  6. Passive seismic experiment - A summary of current status. [Apollo-initiated lunar surface station data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The data set obtained from the four-station Apollo seismic network including signals from approximately 11,800 events, is surveyed. Some refinement of the lunar model will result, but its gross features remain the same. Attention is given to the question of a small, molten lunar core, the answer to which remains dependent on analysis of signals from a far side impact. Seventy three sources of repeating, deep moonquakes have been identified, thirty nine of which have been accurately located. Concentrated at depths from 800 to 1000 km, the periodicities of these events have led to the hypothesis that they are generated by tidal stresses. Lunar seismic data has also indicated that the meteoroid population is ten times lower than originally determined from earth based observations. Lunar seismic activity is much lower and mountainous masses show no sign of sinking, in contrast to earth, as a result of the lunar crust being four times thicker. While much work remains to be done, significant correlation between terrestrial and lunar observations can be seen.

  7. System and method for generating 3D images of non-linear properties of rock formation using surface seismic or surface to borehole seismic or both

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt Toshimi; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert A.; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2016-06-07

    A system and method of characterizing properties of a medium from a non-linear interaction are include generating, by first and second acoustic sources disposed on a surface of the medium on a first line, first and second acoustic waves. The first and second acoustic sources are controllable such that trajectories of the first and second acoustic waves intersect in a mixing zone within the medium. The method further includes receiving, by a receiver positioned in a plane containing the first and second acoustic sources, a third acoustic wave generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic waves in the mixing zone; and creating a first two-dimensional image of non-linear properties or a first ratio of compressional velocity and shear velocity, or both, of the medium in a first plane generally perpendicular to the surface and containing the first line, based on the received third acoustic wave.

  8. Wavefield Inversion of Surface Waves for Delineating Seismic Structure in Saline Permafrost: A Case History from the Barrow Peninsula, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Dreger, D. S.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic investigations of permafrost are essential in cold-region applications including static corrections for seismic exploration and site characterization for infrastructure development. Surface-wave methods are advantageous because their applicability does not require regular velocity gradients. But distinct challenges also exist: The irregular velocity variations in permafrost, combined with the marked velocity contrasts between frozen and unfrozen ground, often yield complicated dispersion spectra in which higher-order and leaky modes are dominant. Owing to the difficulties in retrieving dispersion curves from such spectra, dispersion-curved-based inversion methods become inapplicable. Here we present a case study of using wavefield inversion of surface waves to infer the permafrost structure on the Barrow Peninsula of the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain. In May of 2014, we conducted an active multichannel surface-wave survey along a 4300-m (2.7-mi) NE-SW trending transect that extended from the coastal to the interior areas of the peninsula. We acquired surface-wave supergathers—each covering a distance of 147 meters—from four nearly equidistantly distributed subsections of the transect. The dispersion spectra show dominant higher-order and leaky modes, as well as inversely dispersive trends (i.e., phase velocities increase with increasing frequencies). Preliminary results reveal a "sandwich" velocity structure, in which a pronounced low-velocity layer (with S-wave velocity reductions up to ~45%-60%; tens of meters thick; overlain by 3-4 m of high-velocity strata) is embedded within high-velocity strata, and the low-velocity layer itself contains irregular velocity gradients. Considering the low ground temperatures of -10 °C to -8 °C, this low-velocity feature is likely to be an embedded saline layer that is only partially frozen due to freezing-point depression of dissolved salts. Because saline permafrost is particularly sensitive to thermal

  9. Utilizing a single three-component geophone to detect near-surface seismic sources for military, exploration, and engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramnik, M. L.

    Locating a seismic source with an unknown origin time using one three-component (3C) geophone is examined in this study. A series of twelve shots (sledgehammer impacts) were made in a degree-marked, semi-circular pattern at distances of 10 and 20 m from a single three-component geophone. Arrival times and wave form data from these shots were placed into random filenames to ensure a "blind" test, and then examined to try and determine the source direction and distance from the recording sensor. Distances were calculated utilizing the difference in arrival time between the critically refracted P wave and the Rayleigh wave, and shot azimuths were found through the use of 1st quarter cycle hodographs (horizontal particle motion graphs). P- and Rayleigh-wave velocities were obtained using conventional refraction surveys and other calibration shots. Eleven of the twelve "distance-surveys" predicted source distances with 10% or less error, and eight of the ten "radial-surveys" predicted shot azimuths (sometimes called "backazimuths") within 7° or less error. The ability to acquire data through this method, potentially in real-time, creates many new possibilities for the use of three-component data acquisition and analysis in military applications, energy resource exploration, and engineering.

  10. Characterization of an earth-filled dam through the combined use of electrical resistivity tomography, P- and SH-wave seismic tomography and surface wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, E.; Cercato, M.; De Donno, G.

    2014-07-01

    The determination of the current state of buildings and infrastructures through non-invasive geophysical methods is a topic not yet covered by technical standards, since the application of high resolution geophysical investigations to structural targets is a relatively new technology. Earth-filled dam investigation is a typical engineering application of this type. We propose the integration of Electrical Resistivity Tomography and P- and SH-wave seismic measurements for imaging the geometry of the dam's body and the underlying soil foundations and to characterize the low strain elastic properties. Because S-wave velocity is closely tied to engineering properties such as shear strength, low-velocity zones in the S-wave velocity models are of particular interest. When acquiring seismic data on earth filled dams, it is not uncommon to encounter highly attenuative surface layers. If only lightweight seismic sources are available, the seismic data generally exhibit a narrow frequency bandwidth: the lack of high frequency components generally prevents from having good quality shallow reflections. If there is no possibility to increase the power as well as the frequency content of the seismic source, the integration of other seismic methods than reflection may be the only available way to achieve a reliable near surface seismic characterization. For these reasons, we combined P- and SH-wave tomography with Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves to image the internal and the underlying soil foundations of an earth filled dam located in Central Italy. In the presence of moderate velocity contrasts, tomographic methods have proven successful in imaging near surface variations along both the horizontal and vertical directions. On the other hand, body wave propagation is severely affected by attenuation under the previously described conditions, so that the quality of picked traveltimes dramatically decreases with offset and, consequently, the tomographic investigation

  11. Investigating seismic anisotropy beneath the Reykjanes Ridge using models of mantle flow, crystallographic evolution, and surface wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A.; Ito, G.; Dunn, R. A.

    2013-08-01

    Surface wave studies of the Reykjanes Ridge (RR) and the Iceland hotspot have imaged an unusual and enigmatic pattern of two zones of negative radial anisotropy on each side of the RR. We test previously posed and new hypotheses for the origin of this anisotropy, by considering lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of olivine A-type fabric in simple models with 1-D, layered structures, as well as in 2-D and 3-D geodynamic models with mantle flow and LPO evolution. Synthetic phase velocities of Love and Rayleigh waves traveling parallel to the ridge axis are produced and then inverted to mimic the previous seismic studies. Results of 1-D models show that strong negative radial anisotropy can be produced when olivine a axes are preferentially aligned not only vertically but also subhorizontally in the plane of wave propagation. Geodynamic models show that negative anisotropy on the sides of the RR can occur when plate spreading impels a corner flow, and in turn a subvertical alignment of olivine a axes, on the sides of the ridge axis. Mantle dehydration must be invoked to form a viscous upper layer that minimizes the disturbance of the corner flow by the Iceland mantle plume. While the results are promising, important discrepancies still exist between the observed seismic structure and the predictions of this model, as well as models of a variety of types of mantle flow associated with plume-ridge interaction. Thus, other factors that influence seismic anisotropy, but not considered in this study, such as power-law rheology, water, melt, or time-dependent mantle flow, are probably important beneath the Reykjanes Ridge.

  12. Investigation of Seismic Waves from Non-Natural Sources: A Case Study for Building Collapse and Surface Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houng, S.; Hong, T.

    2013-12-01

    The nature and excitation mechanism of incidents or non-natural events have been widely investigated using seismological techniques. With introduction of dense seismic networks, small-sized non-natural events such as building collapse and chemical explosions are well recorded. Two representative non-natural seismic sources are investigated. A 5-story building in South Korea, Sampoong department store, was collapsed in June 25, 1995, causing casualty of 1445. This accident is known to be the second deadliest non-terror-related building collapse in the world. The event was well recorded by a local station in ~ 9 km away. P and S waves were recorded weak, while monotonic Rayleigh waves were observed well. The origin time is determined using surface-wave arrival time. The magnitude of event is determined to be 1.2, which coincides with a theoretical estimate based on the mass and volume of building. Synthetic waveforms are modeled for various combinations of velocity structures and source time functions, which allow us to constrain the process of building collapse. It appears that the building was collapsed once within a couple of seconds. We also investigate a M2.1 chemical explosion at a fertilizer plant in Texas on April 18, 2013. It was reported that more than one hundred people were dead or injured by the explosion. Seismic waveforms for nearby stations are collected from Incorporated Research Institution of Seismology (IRIS). The event was well recorded at stations in ~500 km away from the source. Strong acoustic signals were observed at stations in a certain great-circle direction. This observation suggests preferential propagation of acoustic waves depending on atmospheric environment. Waveform cross-correlation, spectral analysis and waveform modeling are applied to understand the source physics. We discuss the nature of source and source excitation mechanism.

  13. High-resolution shear-wave seismic reflection as a tool to image near-surface subrosion structures - a case study in Bad Frankenhausen, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadas, Sonja H.; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2016-10-01

    Subrosion is the subsurface leaching of soluble rocks that results in the formation of depression and collapse structures. This global phenomenon is a geohazard in urban areas. To study near-surface subrosion structures, four shear-wave seismic reflection profiles, with a total length of ca. 332 m, were carried out around the famous leaning church tower of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany, which shows an inclination of 4.93° from the vertical. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by soluble Permian deposits, and the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault is assumed to be a main pathway for water to leach the evaporite. The seismic profiles were acquired with the horizontal micro-vibrator ELVIS, developed at Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG), and a 72 m long landstreamer equipped with 72 horizontal geophones. The high-resolution seismic sections show subrosion-induced structures to a depth of ca. 100 m and reveal five features associated with the leaching of Permian deposits: (1) lateral and vertical varying reflection patterns caused by strongly heterogeneous strata, (2) discontinuous reflectors, small offsets, and faults, which show the underground is heavily fractured, (3) formation of depression structures in the near-surface, (4) diffractions in the unmigrated seismic sections that indicate increased scattering of the seismic waves, and (5) varying seismic velocities and low-velocity zones that are presumably caused by fractures and upward-migrating cavities. A previously undiscovered southward-dipping listric normal fault was also found, to the north of the church. It probably serves as a pathway for water to leach the Permian formations below the church and causes the tilting of the church tower. This case study shows the potential of horizontal shear-wave seismic reflection to image near-surface subrosion structures in an urban environment with a horizontal resolution of less than 1 m in the uppermost 10

  14. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-31

    Determining Phase and Group Velocities of Surface Seismic Waves 21 B. Group-Velocity Measurements Across Eurasia from Mashad SRO 22 C. Group-Velocity...Albuquerque), MAIO ( Mashad ), GUMO (Guam), NWAO (Australia), SNZO (New Zealand), and TATO (Taiwan). Fairly extensive data are now a|ailable for the...include a new rapid algorithm for the determination of group and phase velocity, a series of observations of Rayleigh-wave dispersion at the Mashad

  15. Active normal faulting during the 1997 seismic sequence in Colfiorito, Umbria: Did slip propagate to the surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildon, Zoë K.; Roberts, Gerald P.; Faure Walker, Joanna P.; Wedmore, Luke N. J.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.

    2016-10-01

    In order to determine whether slip during an earthquake on the 26th September 1997 propagated to the surface, structural data have been collected along a bedrock fault scarp in Umbria, Italy. These collected data are used to investigate the relationship between the throw associated with a debated surface rupture (observed as a pale unweathered stripe at the base of the bedrock fault scarp) and the strike, dip and slip-vector. Previous studies have suggested that the surface rupture was produced either by primary surface slip or secondary compaction of hangingwall sediments. Some authors favour the latter because sparse surface fault dip measurements do not match nodal plane dips at depth. It is demonstrated herein that the strike, dip and height of the surface rupture, represented by a pale unweathered stripe at the base of the bedrock scarp, shows a systematic relationship with respect to the geometry and kinematics of faulting in the bedrock. The strike and dip co-vary and the throw is greatest where the strike is oblique to the slip-vector azimuth where the highest dip values are recorded. This implies that the throw values vary to accommodate spatial variation in the strike and dip of the fault across fault plane corrugations, a feature that is predicted by theory describing conservation of strain along faults, but not by compaction. Furthermore, published earthquake locations and reported fault dips are consistent with the analysed surface scarps when natural variation for surface dips and uncertainty for nodal plane dips at depth are taken into account. This implies that the fresh stripe is indeed a primary coseismic surface rupture whose slip is connected to the seismogenic fault at depth. We discuss how this knowledge of the locations and geometry of the active faults can be used as an input for seismic hazard assessment.

  16. Analysis of dispersion and attenuation of surface waves in poroelastic media in the exploration-seismic frequency band

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Xia, J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse dispersion and attenuation of surface waves at free surfaces of possible vacuum/poroelastic media: permeable-'open pore', impermeable-'closed pore' and partially permeable boundaries, which have not been previously reported in detail by researchers, under different surface-permeable, viscous-damping, elastic and fluid-flowing conditions. Our discussion is focused on their characteristics in the exploration-seismic frequency band (a few through 200 Hz) for near-surface applications. We find two surface-wave modes exist, R1 waves for all conditions, and R2 waves for closed-pore and partially permeable conditions. For R1 waves, velocities disperse most under partially permeable conditions and least under the open-pore condition. High-coupling damping coefficients move the main dispersion frequency range to high frequencies. There is an f1 frequency dependence as a constant-Q model for attenuation at high frequencies. R1 waves for the open pore are most sensitive to elastic modulus variation, but least sensitive to tortuosities variation. R1 waves for partially permeable surface radiate as non-physical waves (Im(k) < 0) at low frequencies. For R2 waves, velocities are slightly lower than the bulk slow P2 waves. At low frequencies, both velocity and attenuation are diffusive of f1/2 frequency dependence, as P2 waves. It is found that for partially permeable surfaces, the attenuation displays -f1 frequency dependence as frequency increasing. High surface permeability, low-coupling damping coefficients, low Poisson's ratios, and low tortuosities increase the slope of the -f1 dependence. When the attenuation coefficients reach 0, R2 waves for partially permeable surface begin to radiate as non-physical waves. ?? 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  17. Seismic ambient noise around the South China Sea: seasonal and spatial variations, and implications for its climate and surface circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Da; Yang, Ting

    2013-12-01

    With its strong seasonal variation in wave climate and various bathymetric features due to the complex tectonics, the South China Sea (SCS) provides a natural laboratory to study the microseism. We collected data from seismic stations around the SCS and calculated their noise spectra, through which seasonal and spatial variations of microseism, as well as the general feature of seismic ambient noise in this marginal sea were revealed. Microseism seasonal variations in general reflect influences of the East Asian monsoon in winter and the Indian monsoon in summer, respectively. The two microseism components, the single frequency microseism (SFM) and the double frequency microseism (DFM), show striking alternating variation patterns both seasonally and spatially. These variation patterns, along with the bathymetric feature near the stations, indicate SFM and DFM are generated through different physical mechanisms. More interestingly, seasonal and spatial variations of DFM appear to be consistent with the basin-scale surface circulation model of the SCS, in which the upper SCS experiences cyclonic in winter and anti-cyclonic in summer. These consistencies provide observational evidence for the hypothesis that the cyclonic depression is a favorable condition to generate DFM.

  18. Continental like crust beneath the Andaman Island through joint inversion of receiver function and surface wave from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sandeep; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Saha, Gokul

    2016-09-01

    We study shear wave velocity structure of the crust beneath the Andaman Island through joint inversion of the teleseismic receiver function and Rayleigh wave group velocity measurements from 10 broadband seismographs over the Island. The group velocities in the periods from 5 to 21 s are obtained using cross-correlation of six month's ambient seismic noise data recorded by these seismic stations. Joint inversion results show 2 to 6 km thick subsurface low shear velocity (Vs 1.3-2.5 km/s) layer followed by a 12-14 km thick layer of silicic material (average Vs 3.5 km/s). The lower crust is mapped as an 8-12 km thick mafic layer with Vs 4.0 km/s. Uppermost mantle shear wave velocity is 4.55 km/s. The near-surface low-velocity layer is interpreted as the Andaman flysch sediments. The crustal thickness beneath the Andaman Island varies from 24 km in the north to 32 km in the south. The shear wave velocity-depth results show that the crustal structure beneath the Andaman Island is akin to continental crust, possibly the Burma continental crust. The subducting Indian plate may lie down below this overriding plate.

  19. The Dependence of Q with Seismic-induced Strains and Frequencies for Surface Layers from Resonant Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmureanu, Gh.; Bratosin, D.; Cioflan, C. O.

    The gross effect of internal friction is summarized by the dimensionless quantity Q, defined in various ways. If a volume of soil is cycled in stress at a frequency ω, physically, the Q factor is equal to the ratio of energy dissipated per cycle to the total energy Q-1 = δE/(2πE). The authors used Hardin and Drnevich resonant columns to determine the damping capacity of cylindrical specimens from surface soil layers during torsional and longitudinal vibrations. The energy dissipated by the system is a measure of the damping capacity of the soil. The damping will be defined by the shear damping ratio for the soil D, analogous to the critical viscous damping ratio for a single degree of freedom c/c0. Values of damping determined in these resonant columns will correspond to the area of the hysteresis loop stress strain relation divided by 4π times the elastic strain energy stored in the specimen at maximum strain. Consequently, we can express D in the form of quality factor Q, that is Q=1/(2D), where Q is defined in terms of the fractional loss of energy per cycle of oscillation and D is a nonlinear function ω and γ. The nonlinear dependence of Q with seismic induced strains and frequencies for large deformations has an important influence on the propagation of the seismic waves in the hazard and microzonation studies.

  20. Correlations between seismic wave velocities and physical properties of near-surface geologic materials in the southern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, Thomas E.

    1978-01-01

    To identify geologic units with distinctly different seismic responses for the purposes of seismic zonation, compressional and shear wave velocities have been measured in boreholes at 59 sites in the San Francisco Bay region in a wide range of near-surface (0-30m) geologic materials. Several physical parameters, which can be readily determined in the field, were found to correlate with the shear wave velocities and were used to define seismically distinct groups. For the unconsolidated to semiconsolidated sediments, texture, standard penetration resistance and depth were used to define eight seismically distinct groups. For the bedrock materials, fracture spacing and hardness were used to differentiate ten distinct categories. The correlation obtained between shear wave velocity and the physical parameters were used to regroup the map units defined for the San Francisco Bay region into seismically distinct units. The map units for the younger unconsolidated sediments can be really differentiated seismically. In contrast, the older semiconsolidated sedimentary deposits and bedrock units, which have experienced significant variations in post-depositial changes, show wider and overlapping velocity ranges. The map units for the sedimentary deposits have been regrouped into eight seismically distinct geotechnical units. The bedrock map units have been broadly regrouped into five distinct categories. Compressional wave velocities were not found to be well correlated with the physical parameters dependent on the soil or rock structure. For materials above the water table, the wide velocity variations found for each geotechnical group can be attributed to differences in degree of saturation. The strong correlations observed between shear wave velocity and other readily determine physical properties suggest that geologic maps which incorporate these parameters are most useful for seismic zonation.

  1. Co-seismic surface ruptures produced by the 2014 Mw 6.2 Nagano earthquake, along the Itoigawa-Shizuoka tectonic line, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aiming; Sano, Mikako; Yan, Bing; Wang, Maomao

    2015-08-01

    Field investigations reveal that the Mj 6.8 (Mw 6.2) Nagano (Japan) earthquake of 22 November 2014 produced a 9.3-km-long co-seismic surface rupture zone. The slip occurred on the pre-existing active Kamishiro Fault, which developed along the Itoigawa-Shizuoka tectonic line, and is inferred as the boundary between the Eurasian and North American plates. The surface-rupturing earthquake produced dominant thrusting and subordinate strike-slip displacement. Structures that developed during the co-seismic surface rupture include thrust faults, fault scarps, en-echelon tension cracks, folding structures such as mole tracks and flexural folds, and sand-boils. The surface displacements measured in the field range from several centimeters to 1.5 m in the vertical (typically, 0.4-1 m), accompanied by a strike-slip component that reached 0.6 m along NNE trending ruptures. These observations indicate a thrust-dominated displacement along the seismogenic fault. Our results show that (i) the pre-existing Kamishiro Fault, which strikes NNE-SSW, controlled the spatial distribution of co-seismic surface ruptures and displacements; and (ii) the style and magnitude of thrust displacements indicate that the present-day shortening strain on the Eurasian-North American plate boundary in the study area is released mainly by seismic thrust displacements along the active Kamishiro Fault.

  2. A Fiber-Optic Borehole Seismic Vector Sensor System for Geothermal Site Characterization and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson, Bjorn N.P.; Thornburg, Jon A; He, Ruiqing

    2015-04-21

    Seismic techniques are the dominant geophysical techniques for the characterization of subsurface structures and stratigraphy. The seismic techniques also dominate the monitoring and mapping of reservoir injection and production processes. Borehole seismology, of all the seismic techniques, despite its current shortcomings, has been shown to provide the highest resolution characterization and most precise monitoring results because it generates higher signal to noise ratio and higher frequency data than surface seismic techniques. The operational environments for borehole seismic instruments are however much more demanding than for surface seismic instruments making both the instruments and the installation much more expensive. The current state-of-the-art borehole seismic instruments have not been robust enough for long term monitoring compounding the problems with expensive instruments and installations. Furthermore, they have also not been able to record the large bandwidth data available in boreholes or having the sensitivity allowing them to record small high frequency micro seismic events with high vector fidelity. To reliably achieve high resolution characterization and long term monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) sites a new generation of borehole seismic instruments must therefore be developed and deployed. To address the critical site characterization and monitoring needs for EGS programs, US Department of Energy (DOE) funded Paulsson, Inc. in 2010 to develop a fiber optic based ultra-large bandwidth clamped borehole seismic vector array capable of deploying up to one thousand 3C sensor pods suitable for deployment into ultra-high temperature and high pressure boreholes. Tests of the fiber optic seismic vector sensors developed on the DOE funding have shown that the new borehole seismic sensor technology is capable of generating outstanding high vector fidelity data with extremely large bandwidth: 0.01 – 6,000 Hz. Field tests have shown

  3. Acoustic waves generated from seismic surface waves: propagation properties determined from Doppler sounding observations and normal-mode modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Juliette; Farges, Thomas; Lognonné, Philippe

    2004-09-01

    Since 1960, experiments have shown that perturbations of the ionosphere can occur after earthquakes, by way of dynamic coupling between seismic surface waves and the atmosphere. The atmospheric wave is amplified exponentially while propagating upwards due to the decrease of density, and interaction with the ionospheric plasma leads to clearly identified signals on both ground-based or satellite ionospheric measurements. In 1999 and 2000, after an upgrade of the HF Doppler sounder, the Commisariat à l'Énergie Atomique systematically recorded these effects in the ionosphere with the Francourville (France) network, by measuring vertical oscillations of ionospheric layers with the Doppler technique. Normal-mode theory extended to a solid Earth with an atmosphere allows successful modelling of such signals, even if this 1-D approach is probably too crude, especially in the solid Earth, where 20 s surface waves see large lateral variations in the crust. The combination of observations and simulations provides a new tool to determine acoustic gravity wave propagation characteristics from the ground to ionospheric height. Observed velocity and amplification of the atmospheric waves show good agreement from the ground up to moderate sounding altitudes (140-150 km); however, at higher altitudes the propagation speed is found to be much smaller than predicted and attenuation is underestimated. This shows that the standard formalism of acoustic gravity waves in the atmosphere cannot efficiently describe propagation in the ionized atmosphere. Further work is needed to characterize the propagation of acoustic waves in this altitude range: we believe that seismic waves can provide a well-constrained source for such study.

  4. An optical study of 3C 31, 3C 66B, 3C 120, and their jets

    SciTech Connect

    Fraix-burnet, D.; Golombek, D.; Macchetto, F.D. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD )

    1991-08-01

    The paper presents the results of BVRI CCD photometry of the radio galaxies 3C 31, 3C 66B, and 3C 120, and V polarimetry of 3C 120. The photometry of the jet of 3C 66B definitively establishes the synchrotron nature of the optical emission. No optical counterpart of the radio counterjet in 3C 66B and of the radio jets in 3C 31 and 3C 120 is found. A rotating ring and an ionized region are present, respectively, in 3C 31 (NGC 383) and its companion galaxy NGC 382, but no isophotal distortions are found which could have revealed a gravitational interaction between the two galaxies as is the case in 3C 66B. The elliptical isophotes of 3C 120 show a slight off-centering, roughly in the direction of the radio jet, very much like 3C 66B. An upper limit of 20 percent is found for the polarization level of the condensations in 3C 120. 50 refs.

  5. Applications of elastic full waveform inversion to shallow seismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas; Forbriger, Thomas; Groos, Lisa; Schäfer, Martin; Metz, Tilman

    2015-04-01

    Shallow-seismic Rayleigh waves are attractive for geotechnical site investigations. They exhibit a high signal to noise ratio in field data recordings and have a high sensitivity to the S-wave velocity, an important lithological and geotechnical parameter to characterize the very shallow subsurface. Established inversion methods assume (local) 1-D subsurface models, and allow the reconstruction of the S-wave velocity as a function of depth by inverting the dispersion properties of the Rayleigh waves. These classical methods, however, fail if significant lateral variations of medium properties are present. Then the full waveform inversion (FWI) of the elastic wave field seems to be the only solution. Moreover, FWI may have the potential to recover multi-parameter models of seismic wave velocities, attenuation and eventually mass density. Our 2-D elastic FWI is a conjugate-gradient method where the gradient of the misfit function is calculated by the time-domain adjoint method. The viscoelastic forward modelling is performed with a classical staggered-grid 2-D finite-difference forward solver. Viscoelastic damping is implemented in the time-domain by a generalized standard linear solid. We use a multi-scale inversion approach by applying frequency filtering in the inversion. We start with the lowest frequency oft the field data and increase the upper corner frequency sequentially. Our modelling and FWI software is freely available under the terms of GNU GPL on www.opentoast.de. In recent years we studied the applicability of two-dimensional elastic FWI using numerous synthetic reconstruction tests and several field data examples. Important pre-processing steps for the application of 2-D elastic FWI to shallow-seismic field data are the 3D to 2D correction of geometrical spreading and the estimation of a priori Q-values that must be used as a passive medium parameter during the FWI. Furthermore, a source-wavelet correction filter should be applied during the FWI

  6. Estimation of seismic wave velocity at seafloor surface and sound source localization based on transmitted wave observation with an ocean bottom seismometer offshore of Kamaishi, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Ryoichi

    2016-07-01

    An in situ method of estimating the seismic wave velocity at the seafloor surface by observing the particle motion of a wave transmitted into the sediment is presented; this method uses a sound source whose location is known. Conversely, a sound source localization method using the obtained seismic velocities and involving particle motion observation is also presented. Although this method is applicable only when the sound source exists within the critical incidence angle range, it is expected to contribute to the tracing of vocalizing baleen whales, which are unknown around Japanese waters.

  7. Use of Seismic Reflection Data and Traveltime Tomography to Image the Near Surface Velocity Structure in the Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Magnani, M.; Waldron, B.; Powell, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Memphis aquifer represents one of the highest quality reservoirs of drinking water in the nation and it is separated from the shallow unconfined aquifer by the Upper Claiborne clay. Recent studies show that the confining unit might be discontinuous over the greater Memphis area exposing the Memphis aquifer to potential contamination. We present the results of a seismic reflection profile collected near Memphis, TN with the goal of imaging the structures and potential breaches in the Upper Claiborne confining clay. The imaged area is characterized by a highly heterogeneous shallow velocity structure and low P wave velocities in the ultrashallow unconsolidated materials. The data were collected using a shotgun source and a 1 m source spacing, 0.25 m receiver spacing and a 168-geophone spread for a max offset of 42 m. Raw seismic data show several reflected arrivals in the first 200ms, widespread ground roll, and air wave energy as well as consistent refracted phases across the 1 km - long profile. In addition to the reflection profile we present the preliminary results of first arrival travel time tomography performed along the profile to constrain the velocity field in the shallow portion of the profile. The velocity was then used to remove the effect of the near surface velocity variations. The main data processing steps included elevation statics and frequency and FK filtering. First arrival travel time modeling started with an initial estimate of the 2-layer velocity model using the slope/intercept method. We then modeled first-arrival picks on 1095 shot gathers using the Geo TOMO+ package. The algorithm computes travel times by tracing turning rays and is also able to handle raypaths through low-velocity zones (blind zones). The final resolution is estimated through a ray-information density map, which shows the cumulative contribution of the ray segments traversing different areas of the model. Synthetic models were generated and tested for the tomography

  8. Curtiss XSO3C-1 Seagull

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    Curtiss XSO3C-1 Seagull: Although drag reduction was very important to radial engined aircraft, it was no less important to aircraft such as this inline Ranger powered Curtiss XSO3C-1 Seagull. Here the Seagull is shown in the 30 x 60 Full Scale Tunnel in October of 1940. The XSO3C-1 was also undergoing study to improve engine cooling. Published in Aircraft; FST; Curtiss XSO3C-1 Seagull; Full Scale Tunnel; Nicklas

  9. Near-surface fault detection using high-resolution shear wave reflection seismics at the CO2CRC Otway Project site, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilecke, Thies; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Ziesch, Jennifer; Tanner, David C.

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution, near-surface, shear wave reflection seismic measurements were carried out in November 2013 at the CO2CRC Otway Project site, Victoria, Australia, with the aim to determine whether and, if so, where deeper faults reach the near subsurface. From a previous P wave 3-D reflection seismic data set that was concentrated on a reservoir at 2 km depth, we can only interpret faults up to 400 m below sea level. For the future monitoring in the overburden of the CO2 reservoir it is important to know whether and how the faults continue in the subsurface. We prove that two regional fault zones do in fact reach the surface instead of dying out at depth. Individual first-break signatures in the shot gathers along the profiles support this interpretation. However, this finding does not imply perforce communication between the reservoir and the surface in the framework of CO2 injection. The shear wave seismic sections are complementary to existing P wave volumes. They image with high resolution (better than 3 m vertically) different tectonic structures. Similar structures also outcrop on the southern coast of the Otway Basin. Both the seismic and the outcrops evidence the complex youngest structural history of the area.

  10. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  11. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  12. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  13. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  14. 18 CFR 3c.2 - Nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonpublic information. 3c.2 Section 3c.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.2 Nonpublic information. (a) Section 1264(d)...

  15. Surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and radon transform forward multiple modeling methods applied to 2D multi-channel seismic profiles from the Chukchi Shelf, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, I.; Coakley, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Chukchi Edges project was designed to establish the relationship between the Chukchi Shelf and Borderland and indirectly test theories of opening for the Canada Basin. During this cruise, ~5300 km of 2D multi-channel reflection seismic profiles and other geophysical data (swath bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, sonobuoy refraction seismic) were collected from the RV Marcus G. Langseth across the transition between the Chukchi Shelf and Chukchi Borderland, where the water depths vary from 30 m to over 3 km. Multiples occur when seismic energy is trapped in a layer and reflected from an acoustic interface more than once. Various kinds of multiples occur during seismic data acquisition. These depend on the ray-path the seismic energy follows through the layers. One of the most common multiples is the surface related multiple, which occurs due to strong acoustic impedance contrast between the air and water. The reflected seismic energy from the water surface is trapped within the water column, thus reflects from the seafloor multiple times. Multiples overprint the primary reflections and complicate data interpretation. Both surface related multiple elimination (SRME) and forward parabolic radon transform multiple modeling methods were necessary to attenuate the multiples. SRME is applied to shot gathers starting with the near offset interpolation, multiple estimation using water depths, and subtracting the model multiple from the shot gathers. This method attenuated surface related multiple energy, however, peg-leg multiples remained in the data. The parabolic radon transform method minimized the effect of these multiples. This method is applied to normal moveout (NMO) corrected common mid-point gathers (CMP). The CMP gathers are fitted or modeled with curves estimated from the reference offset, moveout range, moveout increment parameters. Then, the modeled multiples are subtracted from the data. Preliminary outputs of these two methods show that the surface related

  16. The Detection of Vertical Cracks in Asphalt Using Seismic Surface Wave Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iodice, M.; Muggleton, J.; Rustighi, E.

    2016-09-01

    Assessment of the location and of the extension of cracking in road surfaces is important for determining the potential level of deterioration in the road overall and the infrastructure buried beneath it. Damage in a pavement structure is usually initiated in the tarmac layers, making the Rayleigh wave ideally suited for the detection of shallow surface defects. This paper presents an investigation of two surface wave methods to detect and locate top-down cracks in asphalt layers. The aim of the study is to compare the results from the well- established Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) and the more recent Multiple Impact of Surface Waves (MISW) in the presence of a discontinuity and to suggest the best surface wave technique for evaluating the presence and the extension of vertical cracks in roads. The study is conducted through numerical simulations alongside experimental investigations and it considers the cases for which the cracking is internal and external to the deployment of sensors. MISW is found to enhance the visibility of the reflected waves in the frequency wavenumber (f-k) spectrum, helping with the detection of the discontinuity. In some cases, by looking at the f-k spectrum obtained with MISW it is possible to extract information regarding the location and the depth of the cracking.

  17. Application of seismic surface-waves in concrete bridge-deck evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetrat, Farhad

    Accurate and timely condition assessment of bridge decks is essential for economic management of aging highway bridges. The ability to evaluate concrete modulus profile in a bridge deck can help the detection of early signs of deterioration and optimize the bridge maintenance procedures. This study presents a new method for modulus profiling of concrete bridge decks. The stiffness matrix method is used to simulate wave propagation in a layered media. The results are compared to numerical finite element models. Dispersion analysis is done using the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and phase-shift methods. The characteristics of dispersion surface are analyzed and the effects of model parameters on dispersion surface are examined through a series of parametric studies. An inversion technique is proposed for a fast inversion of surface-wave data collected on bridge decks. This technique utilizes a database of pre-calculated dispersion surfaces and takes advantage of the observed patterns in the parametric study as a priori information for the inversion process.

  18. Analysis and models of pre-injection surface seismic array noise recorded at the Aquistore carbon storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnie, Claire; Chambers, Kit; Angus, Doug; Stork, Anna L.

    2016-08-01

    Noise is a persistent feature in seismic data and so poses challenges in extracting increased accuracy in seismic images and physical interpretation of the subsurface. In this paper, we analyse passive seismic data from the Aquistore carbon capture and storage pilot project permanent seismic array to characterise, classify and model seismic noise. We perform noise analysis for a three-month subset of passive seismic data from the array and provide conclusive evidence that the noise field is not white, stationary, or Gaussian; characteristics commonly yet erroneously assumed in most conventional noise models. We introduce a novel noise modelling method that provides a significantly more accurate characterisation of real seismic noise compared to conventional methods, which is quantified using the Mann-Whitney-White statistical test. This method is based on a statistical covariance modelling approach created through the modelling of individual noise signals. The identification of individual noise signals, broadly classified as stationary, pseudo-stationary and non-stationary, provides a basis on which to build an appropriate spatial and temporal noise field model. Furthermore, we have developed a workflow to incorporate realistic noise models within synthetic seismic data sets providing an opportunity to test and analyse detection and imaging algorithms under realistic noise conditions.

  19. Determination of the Seismic Moment Tensor Using Surface Waves Recorded by the IMS Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    project is to develop and integrate a Surface Waves Moment Tensor (SWMT) and moment magnitude Mw (Hanks and Kanamori , 1979) measurement in the IDC...Res. 102: (B4), 8137–8157. Hanks T.C. and H. Kanamori (1979). A moment magnitude scale. Journal of Geophysical Research 84 (B5): 2348–50. Stevens

  20. Surface Wave Dispersion Measurements and Tomography from Ambient Seismic Noise Correlation in China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    lithosphere in major basins surrounding the Tibetan Plateau (TP) (Tarim, Ordos, and Sichuan). These strong blocks thus seem to play an important...corresponding to the rapid change of the surface topography. In northwest TP. slow anomalies extend from shallow crust to mantle lithosphere (at...Moho depth variation, fast (strong) mid-lower crust and mantle lithosphere in major basins surrounding the Tibetan Plateau (TP) (Tarim, Ordos, and

  1. Blind test of methods for obtaining 2-D near-surface seismic velocity models from first-arrival traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Colin A.; Haines, Seth; Powers, Michael H.; Sheehan, Jacob; Rohdewald, Siegfried; Link, Curtis; Hayashi, Koichi; Zhao, Don; Zhou, Hua-wei; Burton, Bethany L.; Petersen, Uni K.; Bonal, Nedra D.; Doll, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic refraction methods are used in environmental and engineering studies to image the shallow subsurface. We present a blind test of inversion and tomographic refraction analysis methods using a synthetic first-arrival-time dataset that was made available to the community in 2010. The data are realistic in terms of the near-surface velocity model, shot-receiver geometry and the data's frequency and added noise. Fourteen estimated models were determined by ten participants using eight different inversion algorithms, with the true model unknown to the participants until it was revealed at a session at the 2011 SAGEEP meeting. The estimated models are generally consistent in terms of their large-scale features, demonstrating the robustness of refraction data inversion in general, and the eight inversion algorithms in particular. When compared to the true model, all of the estimated models contain a smooth expression of its two main features: a large offset in the bedrock and the top of a steeply dipping low-velocity fault zone. The estimated models do not contain a subtle low-velocity zone and other fine-scale features, in accord with conventional wisdom. Together, the results support confidence in the reliability and robustness of modern refraction inversion and tomographic methods.

  2. Seismic Tomography of the Continental United States from a Joint Inversion of Surface Waves and Body Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golos, E. M.; Yao, H.; Zhang, H.; Fang, H.; Burdick, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Vernon, F.; Lebedev, S.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present a model of seismic velocity anomalies for the entire continental United States—coast to coast, surface to lower mantle—using a joint body wave-surface wave inversion. This technique (Zhang et al., 2014), performed on a global adaptively-spaced grid, exploits the good vertical resolution at shallow depths of surface wave data, and the sampling of the deep mantle by teleseismic body (P and S) waves. The resultant model has better resolution at all depths than either method alone, enabling evaluation of interactions between lithospheric and mantle processes. We utilize the depth-dependence of surface wave sensitivity kernels to express surface wave phase velocity data directly in terms of spatial velocity structure (Fang et al., 2015). The data used are Rayleigh wave phase velocities from earthquakes and ambient noise (Schaeffer and Lebedev, 2013; Ekström, 2014) and S phase travel times from USArray, measured at the Array National Facility (ANF). We include a suite of synthetic tests to verify the performance of the inversion and compare it to results from traditional tomographic methods. We also use P arrivals and the influence of Vp on Rayleigh wave propagation speed to generate a preliminary model of Vp variations, independent from but consistent with the Vs model. Our model corroborates the well-established pattern of slow anomalies in the western US, especially in the Basin and Range and Rio Grande Rift regions. New details emerge in the eastern US, thanks to increasing data from the region. A distinction is observed between widespread fast lithospheric anomalies, associated with stable cratonic material, and deeper fast features, associated with the remnants of the Farallon Plate. It has been proposed that these fragments, near the mantle transition zones, still affect mantle dynamics (Forte et al., 2007), so better resolution of these anomalies is an important advancement. In addition, slower velocities are observed beneath the Appalachians and

  3. Surface seismic measurements of the Project GASBUGGY explosion at intermediate distance ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, David H.; Jackson, W.H.

    1968-01-01

    Project GASBUGGY was an experiment performed by the Atomic Energy Commission, the El Paso Natural Gas Company, and the Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, to determine the effectiveness of a method for increasing the recovery of natural gas by large-scale fracturing of a gas-bearing formation with an underground nuclear explosion. The Project GASBUGGY nuclear explosive of 26 kilotons design yield was detonated on Sunday, December 10, 1967, at 1230:00 Mountain Standard Time. Lawrence Radiation Laboratory reported that the explosive was emplaced at 4240 ft below the ground surface, 1770 ft from the west line and 1218 ft from the south line in Section 36 of Township 29 North, Range 4 West, in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, about 55 air miles east of the city of Farmington, New Mexico. The geodetic coordinates are: Latitude 36?40'40.4" North, and Longitude 107?12'30.3" West. The elevation of surface ground zero was 7204 ft above Mean Sea Level. The detonation occurred in the Lewis shale about 40 ft below its contact with the gas-bearing Pictured Cliffs sandstone. Early indications are that the explosive performed satisfactorily. This document is submitted as a preliminary data report. Additional analyses of the data will be prepared at a later time.

  4. Shallow structure and surface wave propagation characteristics of the Juan de Fuca plate from seismic ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shen, W.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Ambient noise cross-correlation analysis has been widely used to investigate the continental lithosphere, but the method has been applied much less to study the oceanic lithosphere due to the relative shortage of continuous ocean bottom seismic measurements. The Cascadia Initiative experiment possesses a total of 62 ocean bottom seismometers that spans much of the Juan de Fuca plate and provides data to investigate both the structure and evolution of the oceanic lithosphere near the Juan De Fuca ridge and the characteristics of surface waves and overtones propagating within the oceanic lithosphere. We produce ambient noise cross correlations for the first year of Cascadia OBS data for both the vertical and the horizontal components. The observed empirical Green's functions are first used to test the hypothesis that the near-ridge phase speeds can be described by a simple age-dependent formula, which we invert for an age-dependent shear wave speed model (Figure 1a). A shallow low shear velocity zone with a velocity minimum at about 20km depth is observed in Vsv and the lithosphere thickens with age faster than predicted by a half-space conductive cooling model (Figure 1b). To further understand the oceanic surface waves, we analyze the first higher mode Rayleigh waves that propagate within the Juan De Fuca plate and emerge on the North American continent and investigate the existence of radial anisotropy beneath the ridge by exploring the Rayleigh and Love wave Green's functions. The results of the study are summarized with the age-dependent shear velocity model along with some preliminary observations of both Love wave and higher mode Rayleigh waves.

  5. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  6. 3D Calculation of Seismic Wave Interaction with Topography and Near-surface Structures at the LSBB Underground Laboratory, Rustrel, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maufroy, E.; Gaffet, S.; Operto, S.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Senechal, G.; Dietrich, M.; Zeyen, H.; Sardou, O.; Boyer, D.

    2008-12-01

    The understanding of seismic wave interaction with both topography and geological structures is one of a principal focus of seismic risk characterization. Seasonal or artificial variations of water (or more generally fluid or gas) saturation in the medium revealed by local variations of rheological parameters (VP, VS, QP, QS, and density) may strongly impact the seismic and the hydro-mechanical site response. The problem addressed here is the characterization of these potential site effects, which are of great interest in the context of underground storage and effects of anthropogenic structures. With the foregoing in mind, a seismic experiment was carried out in 2006 at the LSBB Underground Laboratory (http://lsbb.unice.fr), Rustrel, France. A total of 189 seismometers (3D 0.1 Hz Agecodagis) were spread on the surface of the massif with a slope of 30%, 150 vertical geophones (14 Hz) distributed along the roof of the 800 m long tunnel at LSBB. A two-dimensional profile of 100 shots (150 g equiv. TNT) were used for imaging the rheological properties of the subterranean karstic medium. A 3D P-velocity model was obtained from the reflection and surface to depth transmission P-wave travel times featuring the foregoing 2D tomographic profile. Main faults and P-wave velocities correlate well with the two main lithological formations (Barremian and Bedoulian limestones) [S.S.B.S. program, 1965]. As a preliminary step, finite difference modelling [Shake3D, Cruz-Atienza et al., 2007] using fixed VP/VS ratio provided a means for topographic site effect assessment. With these parameters, deduced mean amplification factors reach values from 3 to 6. There are shadow regions with low ground motion. There are also seismic lenses where seismic energy focusing occurs. These depend on the topography shape and relative source location. In a more realistic medium deduced from full waveform inversion [Operto et al., 2004], variations of VP/VS ratio and quality factors QP, QS, are

  7. The high energy source 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonmontigny, Corinna

    1990-01-01

    The properties of 3C 273 are reviewed and an attempt is made to find an answer to the question why 3C 273 is the only extragalactic source so far, which was detected at energies greater than or equal to 50 MeV.

  8. The derivation of an anisotropic velocity model from combined surface and borehole seismic experiments at the COSC-1 borehole, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helge; Krauß, Felix; Hedin, Peter; Buske, Stefan; Giese, Rüdiger; Juhlin, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides provide a well preserved example of a Paleozoic continent-continent collision, where the surface geology in combination with geophysical data provide control of the geometry of parts of the Caledonian structure. The project COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides) investigates the structure and physical conditions of the orogen units and the underlying basement with two approximately 2.5 km deep fully cored boreholes in western Jämtland, central Sweden. In 2014 the COSC-1 borehole was successfully drilled through the Seve Nappe Complex. This unit, mainly consisting of gneisses, belongs to the so-called Middle Allochthons and has been ductilely deformed and transported during collisional orogeny. A major seismic survey was conducted in and around the COSC-1 borehole which comprised both seismic reflection and transmission experiments. Combined with core analysis and downhole logging, the survey will allow extrapolation of the structures away from the borehole. The survey consisted of three parts: 1) a high-resolution zero-offset Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP), 2) a multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP in combination with three long offset surface receiver lines, and 3) a limited 3D seismic survey. Data from the multi-azimuthal walkaway VSP experiment and the long offset surface lines were used to derive a detailed velocity model around the borehole from the inversion of first arrival traveltimes. The comparison of velocities from these tomography results with a velocity function calculated from the zero-offset VSP revealed clear differences in velocities for mainly horizontally and vertically traveling waves. Therefore, an anisotropic VTI model was constructed, using the P-wave velocity function from zero-offset VSP and the Thomson parameters ɛ and δ. The latter were partly derived from ultrasonic lab measurements on COSC-1 core samples. Traveltimes were calculated with an anisotropic eikonal solver and serve as the basis

  9. DEPSCoR FY 99: Use of Stochastic Modeling of Stratigraphic Relationships in High Resolution Seismic Reflection Data for Prediction of the Distribution of Acoustic and Geotechnical Property Variability in Near Surface Sediments on the East China Sea Continental Margin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    Distribution of Acoustic and Geotechnical Property Variability in Near Surface Sediments on the East China Sea Continental Margin Louis R. Bartek Department of...of vertical and horizontal distribution of seismic facies (and therefore geotechnical and acoustic properties) • Determine the minimum data required...Resolution Seismic Reflection Data for Prediction of the Distribution of Acoustic and Geotechnical Property Variability in Near Surface Sediments on the

  10. High-precision geologic mapping to evaluate the potential for seismic surface rupture at TA-55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.N.; Lavine, A.; Vaniman, D.; WoldeGabriel, G.

    1998-06-01

    In this report the authors document results of high-precision geologic mapping in the vicinity of TA-55 that has been done to identify parts of the southern portion of the Rendija Canyon Fault, or any other faults, with the potential for seismic surface rupture. To assess the potential for surface rupture at TA-55, an area of approximately 3 square miles that includes the Los Alamos County Landfill and Twomile, Mortandad, and Sandia Canyons has been mapped in detail. Map units are mostly cooling or flow units within the Tshirege Member (1.2 Ma) of the Bandelier Tuff. Stratigraphic markers that are useful for determining offsets in the map area include a distinct welding break at or near the cooling Unit 2-Unit 3 contact, and the Unit 3-Unit 4 contact. At the County Landfill the contact between the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff and overlying Quaternary alluvium has also been mapped. The mapping indicates that there is no faulting in the near-surface directly below TA-55, and that the closest fault is about 1500 feet west of the Plutonium Facility. Faulting is more abundant on the western edge of the map area, west of TA-48 in uppermost Mortandad Canyon, upper Sandia Canyon, and at the County Landfill. Measured vertical offsets on the faults range from 1 to 8 feet on mapped Bandelier Tuff contacts. Faulting exposed at the Los Alamos County Landfill has deformed a zone over 1000 feet wide, and has a net vertical down-to-the-west displacement of at least 15 feet in the Bandelier Tuff. Individual faults at the landfill have from less than 1 foot to greater than 15 feet of vertical offset on the Bandelier Tuff. Most faults in the landfill trend N-S, N20W, or N45E. Results of the mapping indicate that the Rendija Canyon Fault does not continue directly south to TA-55. At present, the authors have insufficient data to connect faulting they have mapped to areas of known faulting to the north or south of the study area.

  11. Effects of charge design features on parameters of acoustic and seismic waves and cratering, for SMR chemical surface explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.

    2012-04-01

    A series of experimental on-surface shots was designed and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR) in Negev desert, including two large calibration explosions: about 82 tons of strong IMI explosives in August 2009, and about 100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. It was a collaborative effort between Israel, CTBTO, USA and several European countries, with the main goal to provide fully controlled ground truth (GT0) infrasound sources in different weather/wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. Strong boosters and the upward charge detonation scheme were applied to provide a reduced energy release to the ground and an enlarged energy radiation to the atmosphere, producing enhanced infrasound signals, for better observation at far-regional stations. The following observations and results indicate on the required explosives energy partition for this charge design: 1) crater size and local seismic (duration) magnitudes were found smaller than expected for these large surface explosions; 2) small test shots of the same charge (1 ton) conducted at SMR with different detonation directions showed clearly lower seismic amplitudes/energy and smaller crater size for the upward detonation; 3) many infrasound stations at local and regional distances showed higher than expected peak amplitudes, even after application of a wind-correction procedure. For the large-scale explosions, high-pressure gauges were deployed at 100-600 m to record air-blast properties, evaluate the efficiency of the charge design and energy generation, and provide a reliable estimation of the charge yield. Empirical relations for air-blast parameters - peak pressure, impulse and the Secondary Shock (SS) time delay - depending on distance, were developed and analyzed. The parameters, scaled by the cubic root of estimated TNT equivalent charges, were found consistent for all analyzed explosions, except of SS

  12. Surface deformation associated with the 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake revealed by satellite-based geodetic observations and its implications for the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wanpeng; Samsonov, Sergey; Tian, Yunfeng; Qiu, Qiang; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yong; Deng, Zhiguo; Omari, Khalid

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we present inter-, co- and post-seismic displacements observed in the 2015 Illapel earthquake area by Global Positioning System (GPS) and Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR). RADARSAT-2, ALOS-2 and Sentinel-1A interferograms capture the co- and post-seismic displacements due to the Illapel earthquake. Based on a layered Earth structure, we modeled both co- and post-seismic faulting behaviors on the subduction interface of central Chile. The best-fit model shows that the coseismic rupture broke a 200 km × 200 km area with a maximum slip of 10 m at a depth of 20 km. Two distinct slip centers, likely controlled by local ramp-flat structure, are revealed. The total coseismic geodetic moment is 2.76 ×1021 N m, equivalent to a moment magnitude 8.3. The accumulated afterslip in the first two months after the mainshock is observed on both sides of the coseismic rupture zone with both ascending and descending Sentinel-1A interferograms. A limited overlap zone between co- and post-seismic slip models can be observed, suggesting partitioning of the frictional properties within the Illapel earthquake rupture zone. The total afterslip releases ∼ 5.0 ×1020 N m geodetic moment, which is equivalent to an earthquake of Mw 7.7. The 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake that occurred ∼400 km away from the Illapel earthquake epicenter could have exerted certain effects on the seismic cycle of the Illapel earthquake area. The seismic records from 2000 to 2015 imply that the rate of annual seismic moment release in the Illapel earthquake area dropped from 0.4 to 0.2 ×1019 N m /yr after the Maule earthquake. Based on the forward modeling with the best-fit slip models determined in this study, we reproduce the local surface displacements before, during and after the Illapel earthquake. A rough deformation cycle, 105 ± 29 yr, calculated by using the coseismic displacements and interseismic rate is basically identical with the revisit interval of M8 events in the

  13. Measurement of near-surface seismic compressional wave velocities using refraction tomography at a proposed construction site on the Presidio of Monterey, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is determining the feasibility of constructing a new barracks building on the U.S. Army Presidio of Monterey in Monterey, California. Due to the presence of an endangered orchid in the proposed area, invasive techniques such as exploratory drill holes are prohibited. To aid in determining the feasibility, budget, and design of this building, a compressional-wave seismic refraction survey was proposed by the U.S. Geological Survey as an alternative means of investigating the depth to competent bedrock. Two sub-parallel profiles were acquired along an existing foot path and a fence line to minimize impacts on the endangered flora. The compressional-wave seismic refraction tomography data for both profiles indicate that no competent rock classified as non-rippable or marginally rippable exists within the top 30 feet beneath the ground surface.

  14. Search for hydraulic connectivity between surface reservoirs and surrounding aquifers in the reservoir-triggered seismic environment (Koyna region, India) using hydrochemical and isotopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. V.; Nagabhushanam, P.

    2016-01-01

    Triggered seismicity is an accepted hypothesis in the present days. However, detailed hydrogeological investigations are lacking in the well-known reservoir-triggered seismic (RTS) zones. Here, we made an attempt to understand the direct linkage between the well-known Koyna-Warna reservoirs believed to be under the RTS zone (situated in the Deccan volcanic province (DVP), India) and the surrounding groundwater system up to 250 m deep from the ground surface. Seismic activity in the region started soon after the impoundment of water in the Koyna reservoir and being continued over the last four and a half decades. Though researchers have carried out numerous studies on the Koyna seismicity, no hydrogeological investigations were attempted. Hence, hydrogeological, hydrochemical, and isotopic investigations were carried out for 7 years on groundwaters from 15 deep bore wells (up to 250 m) and two surface reservoir waters to elucidate the direct hydraulic connectivity between them. No appreciable seasonal change was observed in piezometric heads of the artesian wells, but the semi-artesian wells did show fluctuation of ~2 to 12 m during different years, which did not have any relation with the reservoir water levels. No considerable seasonal change in hydrochemistry was observed in individual wells due to the confined nature of the aquifers. The hydrochemical and δ18O data of the studied deep groundwaters and reservoir waters, being different from each other, rule out the possibility of direct hydraulic connectivity between them and surrounding groundwater (up to 250 m), even though favorable topographic conditions exist for linkage. The radiocarbon ages, being incomparable between different well waters, support the inference drawn from hydrochemistry and stable isotope data.

  15. Coulomb stress, surface displacement, and seismic rate changes associated with ice mass fluctuations on seasonal, annual, and decadal time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauber, J. M.; Ruppert, N. A.; Luthcke, S. B.; Williams, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    Between Yakutat and Cordova in southern Alaska, large ice mass fluctuations occur in a region of upper crustal faulting and folding associated with collision and accretion of the Yakutat terrane. Following the Little Ice Age, glacial retreat in this area commenced in the late 19th century and the last great earthquakes occurred in 1899. Annual ablation rates of meters/year have been estimated over the last several decades from aircraft and satellite lidar and radar measurements. For the Chugach-St. Elias region, GRACE 1 deg x 1 deg mascon estimates indicate a general trend of annual ice mass loss (2003-2010) with large, variable seasonal mass fluctuations. The station position of a continuous GPS site near Cape Yakataga (Alaska EarthScope PBO site, AB35, pbo.unavco.org) shows large seasonal excursions in the detrended vertical and horizontal components consistent with snow loading in the late fall and winter. Surface displacements of the solid Earth associated with these annual and seasonal ice and snow changes were calculated using a layered elastic half-space model. For instance, during a warm period in 2002-2006 the predicted elastic displacement rates of the solid Earth due to average annual ice changes were up to 20 mm/yr for the vertical and 3 mm/yr for the horizontal. To empirically evaluate the influence of short-term ice fluctuations on fault stability, we compared the seismic rate (M>1.8) from a reference background time period against other time periods with variable ice or tectonic change characteristics. After probable icequakes were removed from the AEIC catalog, the seismic rate change for the time periods of 1993-1996 and 1997-2001 relative to 1988-1992 was not statistically significant and the tectonic events did not show a strong seasonal dependence. However, we found that the frequency of small earthquakes increased significantly in the 2002-2006 time interval relative to the reference time period of 1988-1992 and there was a significant increase

  16. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  17. Petrologically-constrained thermo-chemical modelling of cratonic upper mantle consistent with elevation, geoid, surface heat flow, seismic surface waves and MT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.; Afonso, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth comprises a single physio-chemical system that we interrogate from its surface and/or from space making observations related to various physical and chemical parameters. A change in one of those parameters affects many of the others; for example a change in velocity is almost always indicative of a concomitant change in density, which results in changes to elevation, gravity and geoid observations. Similarly, a change in oxide chemistry affects almost all physical parameters to a greater or lesser extent. We have now developed sophisticated tools to model/invert data in our individual disciplines to such an extent that we are obtaining high resolution, robust models from our datasets. However, in the vast majority of cases the different datasets are modelled/inverted independently of each other, and often even without considering other data in a qualitative sense. The LitMod framework of Afonso and colleagues presents integrated inversion of geoscientific data to yield thermo-chemical models that are petrologically consistent and constrained. Input data can comprise any combination of elevation, geoid, surface heat flow, seismic surface wave (Rayleigh and Love) data and receiver function data, and MT data. The basis of LitMod is characterization of the upper mantle in terms of five oxides in the CFMAS system and a thermal structure that is conductive to the LAB and convective along the adiabat below the LAB to the 410 km discontinuity. Candidate solutions are chosen from prior distributions of the oxides. For the crust, candidate solutions are chosen from distributions of crustal layering, velocity and density parameters. Those candidate solutions that fit the data within prescribed error limits are kept, and are used to establish broad posterior distributions from which new candidate solutions are chosen. Examples will be shown of application of this approach fitting data from the Kaapvaal Craton in South Africa and the Rae Craton in northern Canada. I

  18. One year after the Abruzzo 2009 earthquake: pre-, co- and post-seismic surface deformation investigation through advanced InSAR analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    On 6 April 2009, at 01:33 UTC, a magnitude (Mw) 6.3 earthquake struck central Italy, partially destroying L'Aquila, several surrounding villages, and causing hundreds of casualties. Immediately, the Italian Civil Protection and the scientific community started the work to mitigate the effects and analyze the causes of the natural catastrophe. At the same time almost all the existing spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems imaged the L'Aquila area revealing, through InSAR analyses, the undeniable scar produced by the seismic event on the Earth's surface. Moreover, some of these sensors continued to image the area affected by the seismic displacements, including the advanced SAR sensors of the COSMO/Skymed constellation of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). We present in this study the results achieved by the InSAR group of the IREA-CNR institute, through an extended InSAR-based analysis carried out on the displacements of the area affected by the seismic event. We show first the results achieved by applying the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002) to analyze the temporal evolution of the detected displacements retrieved through the data acquired, from ascending and descending orbits, by the C-band ENVISAT sensor of the European Space Agency (ESA) starting from 2002. This permitted us to investigate possible long term pre-seismic phenomena and provided several co-seismic deformation maps; the latter have been combined with the homologous co-seismic deformation maps retrieved by processing InSAR data pairs acquired by X-band (COSMO/Skymed and TERRASAR-X) and L-band (ALOS-PALSAR) SAR sensors. These co-seismic displacements have been jointly inverted in order to provide insights on the deformation source. The final results are focused on the exploitation of COSMO/SkyMed data acquired on both right ascending and descending orbits. The ascending dataset is composed by 32

  19. 3D modelling of the active normal fault network in the Apulian Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean Sea): Integration of seismic and bathymetric data with implicit surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Pellegrini, Caludio; Savini, Alessandra; Marchese, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Apulian ridge (North-eastern Ionian Sea, Mediterranean), interposed between the facing Apennines and Hellenides subduction zones (to the west and east respectively), is characterized by thick cretaceous carbonatic sequences and discontinuous tertiary deposits crosscut by a penetrative network of NNW-SSE normal faults. These are exposed onshore in Puglia, and are well represented offshore in a dataset composed of 2D seismics and wells collected by oil companies from the '60s to the '80s, more recent seismics collected during research projects in the '90s, recent very high resolution seismics (VHRS - Sparker and Chirp-sonar data), multibeam echosounder bathymetry, and sedimentological and geo-chronological analyses of sediment samples collected on the seabed. Faults are evident in 2D seismics at all scales, and their along-strike geometry and continuity can be characterized with multibeam bathymetric data, which show continuous fault scarps on the seabed (only partly reworked by currents and covered by landslides). Fault scarps also reveal the finite displacement accumulated in the Holocene-Pleistocene. We reconstructed a 3D model of the fault network and suitable geological boundaries (mainly unconformities due to the discontinuous distribution of quaternary and tertiary sediments) with implicit surface methods implemented in SKUA/GOCAD. This approach can be considered very effective and allowed reconstructing in details complex structures, like the frequent relay zones that are particularly well imaged by seafloor geomorphology. Mutual cross-cutting relationships have been recognized between fault scarps and submarine mass-wasting deposits (Holocene-Pleistocene), indicating that, at least in places, these features are coeval, hence the fault network should be considered active. At the regional scale, the 3D model allowed measuring the horizontal WSW-ENE stretching, which can be associated to the bending moment applied to the Apulian Plate by the combined effect

  20. Seismic attenuation in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, J.J.; Bartolini, T.J.; Lord, K.M.; Smith, D.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Seismic signals recorded by the expanded distribution of earthquake seismograph stations throughout Florida and data from a comprehensive review of record archives from stations GAI contribute to an initial seismic attenuation model for the Florida Plateau. Based on calculations of surface particle velocity, a pattern of attenuation exists that appears to deviate from that established for the remainder of the southeastern US. Most values suggest greater seismic attenuation within the Florida Plateau. However, a separate pattern may exist for those signals arising from the Gulf of Mexico. These results have important implications for seismic hazard assessments in Florida and may be indicative of the unique lithospheric identity of the Florida basement as an exotic terrane.

  1. NATO-3C/Delta launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NATO-3C, the third in a series of NATO defense-related communication satellites, is scheduled to be launched on a delta vehicle from the Eastern Test Range no earlier than November 15, 1978. NATO-3A and -3B were successfully launched by Delta vehicles in April 1976 and January 1977, respectively. The NATO-3C spacecraft will be capable of transmitting voice, data, facsimile, and telex messages among military ground stations. The launch vehicle for the NATO-3C mission will be the Delta 2914 configuration. The launch vehicle is to place the spacecraft in a synchronous transfer orbit. The spacecraft Apogee Kick motor is to be fired at fifth transfer orbit apogee to circularize its orbit at geosynchronous altitude of 35,900 km(22,260 miles) above the equator over the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between 45 and 50 degrees W longitude.

  2. EGRET observations of 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Montigny, C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The quasar 3C 273 was detected by COS-B in the 1970's. EGRET observations of this sky region in June and October 1991 revealed a flux from 3C 273 lower than that measured by COS-B. The flux observed by EGRET in the June period is approximately 3 x 10 exp -7/sq cm s for energies greater than 100 MeV. During the October observation it appears to be even lower. For the first observation a preliminary spectrum which has a photon index of 2.4 has been derived.

  3. EGRET observations of 3 C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonmontigny, C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The quasar 3C 273 was detected by the Compton Observatory Satellite (COS-B) in the 1970's. Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) observations of this sky region in Jun. and Oct. 1991 revealed a flux from 3C 273 lower than that measured by COS-B. The flux observed by EGRET in the June period is approximately 0.0000003/sq cm(exp -2) sec(exp -1) for energies greater than 100 MeV. During the Oct. observation it appears to be even lower. For the first observation a preliminary spectrum was derived which was a photon index of 2.4.

  4. Classification of near-surface anomalies in the seismic refraction method according to the shape of the time-distance graph: A theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelsfeld, Tihomir; Šumanovac, Franjo; Krstić, Vladimir

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we analyse the influence of near-surface anomalies on the first arrivals of seismic waves. The traveltimes of first arrivals are calculated using the eikonal equation and are depicted in the form of the time-distance ( t- x) graphs. We classify five simple geological models according to the shape of the t- x graphs and relate these results to more complex models one can find in the natural settings. All simple models are based on the two-layer model that is modified by a near-surface anomaly. We investigate the following cases: (i) a circular cavity impenetrable to seismic waves positioned in the upper layer, (ii) a circular object positioned in the upper layer, (iii) a part of the border between the layers is deformed into concave shape, (iv) a part of the border between the layers is deformed into convex shape, and (v) a vertical fractured zone positioned in the lower layer. The resulting t- x graphs are classified according to their shapes into three groups. The graphs in the first group are characterised by a peak point and the geological models (i) and (iii) belong to this group. The graphs in the second group are characterised by a depression in their shape and the geological models (ii) and (iv) belong to this group. The graph that corresponds to the model (v) differs from all other graphs and belongs to the third group. The seismic refraction method clearly distinguishes the models that belong to different groups, but the method cannot distinguish the models that belong to the same group because the shapes of their t- x graph are almost identical.

  5. Refinements to the method of epicentral location based on surface waves from ambient seismic noise: introducing Love waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levshin, Anatoli L.; Barmin, Mikhail P.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Mendoza, Carlos; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and test a modification to a previous method of regional seismic event location based on Empirical Green’s Functions (EGFs) produced from ambient seismic noise. Elastic EGFs between pairs of seismic stations are determined by cross-correlating long ambient noise time-series recorded at the two stations. The EGFs principally contain Rayleigh- and Love-wave energy on the vertical and transverse components, respectively, and we utilize these signals between about 5 and 12 s period. The previous method, based exclusively on Rayleigh waves, may yield biased epicentral locations for certain event types with hypocentral depths between 2 and 5 km. Here we present theoretical arguments that show how Love waves can be introduced to reduce or potentially eliminate the bias. We also present applications of Rayleigh- and Love-wave EGFs to locate 10 reference events in the western United States. The separate Rayleigh and Love epicentral locations and the joint locations using a combination of the two waves agree to within 1 km distance, on average, but confidence ellipses are smallest when both types of waves are used.

  6. Fault zones ruptured during the early 2014 Cephalonia Island (Ionian Sea, Western Greece) earthquakes (January 26 and February 3, Mw 6.0) based on the associated co-seismic surface ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekkas, Efthymios L.; Mavroulis, Spyridon D.

    2016-01-01

    The early 2014 Cephalonia Island (Ionian Sea, Western Greece) earthquake sequence comprised two main shocks with almost the same magnitude (moment magnitude (Mw) 6.0) occurring successively within a short time (January 26 and February 3) and space (Paliki peninsula in Western Cephalonia) interval. Εach earthquake was induced by the rupture of a different pre-existing onshore active fault zone and produced different co-seismic surface rupture zones. Co-seismic surface rupture structures were predominantly strike-slip-related structures including V-shaped conjugate surface ruptures, dextral and sinistral strike-slip surface ruptures, restraining and releasing bends, Riedel structures ( R, R', P, T), small-scale bookshelf faulting, and flower structures. An extensional component was present across surface rupture zones resulting in ground openings (sinkholes), small-scale grabens, and co-seismic dip-slip (normal) displacements. A compressional component was also present across surface rupture zones resulting in co-seismic dip-slip (reverse) displacements. From the comparison of our field geological observations with already published surface deformation measurements by DInSAR Interferometry, it is concluded that there is a strong correlation among the surface rupture zones, the ruptured active fault zones, and the detected displacement discontinuities in Paliki peninsula.

  7. A method and example of seismically imaging near‐surface fault zones in geologically complex areas using Vp, Vs, and their ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Goldman, Mark R.; Sickler, Robert R.; Criley, Coyn J.

    2014-01-01

    The determination of near‐surface (vadose zone and slightly below) fault locations and geometries is important because assessment of ground rupture, strong shaking, geologic slip rates, and rupture histories occurs at shallow depths. However, seismic imaging of fault zones at shallow depths can be difficult due to near‐surface complexities, such as weathering, groundwater saturation, massive (nonlayered) rocks, and vertically layered strata. Combined P‐ and S‐wave seismic‐refraction tomography data can overcome many of the near‐surface, fault‐zone seismic‐imaging problems because of differences in the responses of elastic (bulk and shear) moduli of P and S waves to shallow‐depth, fault‐zone properties. We show that high‐resolution refraction tomography images of P‐ to S‐wave velocity ratios (VP/VS) can reliably identify near‐surface faults. We demonstrate this method using tomography images of the San Andreas fault (SAF) surface‐rupture zone associated with the 18 April 1906 ∼M 7.9 San Francisco earthquake on the San Francisco peninsula in California. There, the SAF cuts through Franciscan mélange, which consists of an incoherent assemblage of greywacke, chert, greenstone, and serpentinite. A near‐vertical zone (∼75° northeast dip) of high P‐wave velocities (up to 3000  m/s), low S‐wave velocities (∼150–600  m/s), high VP/VS ratios (4–8.8), and high Poisson’s ratios (0.44–0.49) characterizes the main surface‐rupture zone to a depth of about 20 m and is consistent with nearby trench observations. We suggest that the combined VP/VSimaging approach can reliably identify most near‐surface fault zones in locations where many other seismic methods cannot be applied.

  8. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  9. Controllable seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrell, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2015-09-29

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  10. Controllable seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrel, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2014-08-19

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  11. In situ seismic measurements in claystone at Tournemire (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillmer, M.; Marthelot, J.-M.; Gélis, C.; Cabrera, J.; Druivenga, G.

    2014-12-01

    Compressional and shear wave seismic measurements were performed in an old railway tunnel and in galleries excavated in a 250-m-thick Toarcian claystone formation in the Tournemire experimental station (France). Three component (3C) geophones and three orthogonal orientations of the vibroseismic force source were used. Additionally, vertical seismic profiling (VSP) measurements were recorded with a 3C borehole geophone, a hydrophone and a microphone in a 159 m deep borehole (ID180) in the tunnel. The seismic data show that Toarcian claystone has strong transverse isotropy (TI) with a vertical symmetry axis. The qP, SH and qSV wave propagation velocities in horizontal directions-the plane of isotropy of the TI medium-are measured as 3550, 1850 and 1290 m s-1, respectively. The zero-offset VSP reveals that only one shear wave propagates in the vertical (depth) direction and the P- and S-wave velocities are 3100 and 1375 m s-1, respectively. Four elastic moduli of the TI medium are determined from the seismic velocities and from the bulk density of 2.53 g cm-3: c11 = 31.9 GPa, c33 = 24.3 GPa, c44 = 4.5 GPa and c66 = 8.7 GPa. A walkaway VSP with the borehole geophone at 50 m depth in borehole ID180 and shot points in the galleries leads to oblique seismic ray paths which allow us to determine the fifth elastic modulus of the TI medium to c13 = 16 GPa. The tube wave recorded by a hydrophone in the water filled lower part of the borehole propagates with 1350 m s-1, which confirms the estimate of the elastic constant c66. The analysis of body wave and surface wave data from a seismic experiment in Galerie Est shows reflections from several fracture zones in the gallery floor. The thickness of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) in the floor of Galerie Est is estimated to 0.7 m.

  12. Calculation of zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi-Ping, Liu

    1990-01-01

    Impulse responses including near-field terms have been obtained in closed form for the zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space. The method is based on the correspondence principle. Through transformation of variables, the Fourier transform of the elastic impulse response is put in a form such that the Fourier transform of the corresponding anelastic impulse response can be expressed as elementary functions and their definite integrals involving distance angular frequency, phase velocities, and attenuation factors. These results are used for accurate calculation of shear-wave arrival rise times of synthetic seismograms needed for data interpretation of anelastic-attenuation measurements in near-surface sediment. -Author

  13. Multifrequency observations of extended radio galaxies V - 3C 31, 3C 33.1, 3C 35, 3C 66B, 3C 129, 3C 130, 3C 223, 3C 310, 3C 390.3 and 4C 48.29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breugel, W.; Jagers, W.

    1982-08-01

    A sample of 3C radio sources of large angular size has been observed in total and polarized intensity at several wavelengths with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The sources were selected such that their largest angular size was greater than about 200 arcsec and their declination greater than about 25 degrees. Some additional sources with radio jets or peculiar morphology were also included. The name of each source, its structural type classification, wavelength of observation, and data references are given.

  14. Theoretical understanding of magnetic and electronic structures of Ti3C2 monolayer and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fang; Luo, Kang; Huang, Chengxi; Wu, Wenjuan; Meng, Peiwen; Liu, Yunfei; Kan, Erjun

    2015-11-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of Ti3C2 monolayer and its derivatives. We found that pristine Ti3C2 monolayer acts as a magnetic metal, and magnetic moments come from Ti2+ ions at two sides. Through doping nitrogen atoms, the spin moments is significantly reduced. On other hand, when two surfaces of Ti3C2 monolayer are saturated by external groups, the magnetism will be spontaneously annihilated. Even for the saturation of one side, we also found that the magnetism of Ti3C2Y (Y is O and OH) monolayer is removed because of the invalidation of stoner instability. More importantly, we explored that both doping and surface modification will reduce the Curie temperature of Ti3C2 monolayer. Therefore, our results shed a light on the way to get high-temperature magnetism in Ti3C2 monolayer.

  15. DOBRE-2000: Deep Reflection Seismic, Gravimetric and Surface Structural Controls Across a Devonian Failed Rift in the Southeastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Chowdhury, K.; Bayer, U.; Gajewski, D.; Huebscher, C.; Rabbel, W.; Saintot, A.; Starostenko, V. I.; Stephenson, R.; Stovba, S. M.; Tolkunov, A.; Thybo, H.

    2001-12-01

    Situated between the Ukrainian Shield and the Voronezh Masif, the Pripyat-Dniepr-Donets Basin (PDD) is a crustal-scale geodynamic feature associated with the Late Devonian rifting of the East European Craton. The Donbas Foldbelt (DF), comprising the eastern part of the PDD, includes pre- & syn-rift deposits below a large thickness of post-rift successions. Later, DF has been inverted (elevated, eroded, deformed). With 20+ km of sediments, it has a large economic potential, but its tectonic history - and the cause for its isolated evolution - is not well understood. Recently, 130+ km multi-channel reflection seismic profiling data has been acquired across the southern part of the DF in the framework of an international industry-academic collaboration. Coincident gravity data has been collected along the profile too, and extensive structural studies have been carried out to understand the spatio-temporal distribution of the stress-regime in the area. The high-resolution seismic images reveal an extensive stair-step like fragmentation of the basement including faults with upto 2km offset. The typical size of these "steps" are influenced by the ambient conditions at the time of their formation. Combined use of the different datasets is expected to shed light on several intriguing features associated with DF. The presence/extent of salt, causing localization and/or partition of strain both laterally and vertically, may be studied by using its seismic and gravitational reponses simultaneously. The interaction between the lower crust and the upper mantle may also be studied in the same manner, which should result in a lithological interpretation at depth favoring in turn one of the causative mechanisms.

  16. Optimal High-TC Superconductivity in Cs3C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshman, Dale; Fiory, Anthony

    The highest superconducting transition temperatures in the (A1-xBx)3C60 superconducting family are seen in the A15 and FCC structural phases of Cs3C60 (optimized under hydrostatic pressure), exhibiting measured values for near-stoichiometric samples of TC0 meas . = 37.8 K and 35.7 K, respectively. It is argued these two Cs-intercalated C60 compounds represent the optimal materials of their respective structures, with superconductivity originating from Coulombic e- h interactions between the C60 molecules, which host the n-type superconductivity, and mediating holes associated with the Cs cations. A variation of the interlayer Coulombic pairing model [Harshman and Fiory, J. Supercond. Nov. Magn. 28 ̲, 2967 (2015), and references therein] is introduced in which TC0 calc . ~ 1 / lζ , where l relates to the mean spacing between interacting charges on surfaces of the C60 molecules, and ζ is the average radial distance between the surface of the C60 molecules and the neighboring Cs cations. For stoichiometric Cs3C60, TC0 calc . = 38.08 K and 35.67 K for the A15 and FCC macrostructures, respectively; the dichotomy is attributable to differences in ζ.

  17. Fractal features of seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserta, A.; Consolini, G.; Michelis, P. De

    2003-04-01

    We present experimental observations and data analysis concerning the fractal features of seismic noise in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 40 Hz. In detail, we investigate the 3D average squared soil displacement and the distribution function of its fluctuations for different near-surface geological structures. We found that the seismic noise is consistent with a persistent fractal brownian motion characterized by a Hurst exponent grather than 1/2. Moreover, a clear dependence of the fractal nature of the seismic noise on the near-surface local geology has been found.

  18. ALMA Polarization Science Verification: 3C 286

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Paladino, R.; Moellenbrock, G.; Fomalont, E.; Amigano, A.; Vlahakis, C.; Remijan, A.; ALMA Polarization Team

    2015-12-01

    The ALMA polarization science verification results on 3C 286 are presented. The measured polarization percentage and polarization position angle of the continuum emission at 1.3 mm are about 16% and 39 degrees, respectively. They are quite similar to those at longer wavelength, but seem to increase slightly. Similar trends were also found in the previous measurement using the IRAM 30-m telescope (Agudo et al. 2012). The final image rms on the polarization image is better than 0.1% of the total intensity, demonstrating the very high polarization sensitivity of ALMA.

  19. Structure of the radio sources 3C 196 and 3C 280

    SciTech Connect

    Bovkun, V.; Zhuk, I.; Men', A.

    1981-05-01

    The structure of the quasar 3C 196 and the radio galaxy 3C 280 at 20- and 25-MHz frequency has been surveyed by the scintillation technique with the URAN-1 interferometer. Angular sizes are estimated for the scintillating components and the extended portions of each source. In 3C 196 these components have effective angular sizes of 2'' +- 1''.5 and 18'' x 25'', with the compact feature contributing 0.46 +- 0.20 of the total flux. Spectra of the various structural components of the source are compiled for the range 20--5000 MHz. In 3C 280 the effective angular size of the scintillating component is 1''.5 +- 1''.2; the extended region measures >10'' across. The compact feature contributes 0.35 +- 0.20 of the total flux.

  20. Elastic Wavespeed Images of Northern Chile Subduction Zone from the Joint Inversion of Body and Surface Waves: Structure of the Andean Forearc and the Double Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, D.; Carrizo, D.; Roecker, S. W.; Peyrat, S.; Arriaza, R.; Chi, R. K.; Baeza, S.

    2015-12-01

    Partly in anticipation of an imminent megathrust earthquake, a significant amount of seismic data has been collected over the past several years in northern Chile by local deployments of seismometers. In this study we generate elastic wavespeed images of the crust and upper mantle using a combination of body wave arrival times and surface wave dispersion curves. The body wave data set consists of 130000 P and 108000 S wave arrival times generated by 12000 earthquakes recorded locally over a period of 25 years by networks comprising about 360 stations. The surface wave data set consists of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves determined from ambient noise recorded by 60 broad band stations from three different networks over a period of three years. Transit time biases due to an uneven distribution of noise were estimated using a technique based on that of Yao and van der Hilst (2009) and found to be as high as 5% for some station pairs. We jointly invert the body and surface wave observations to both improve the overall resolution of the crustal images and reduce the trade-off between shallow and deep structures in the images of the subducted slab. Of particular interest in these images are three regions of anomalous Vp/Vs: (1) An extensive zone of low Vp/Vs (1.68) correlates with trench-parallel magmatic belts emplaced in the upper continental crust. In the region of the coast and continental slope, low Vp/Vs corresponds to batholithic structures in the Jurassic-Cretaceous magmatic arc. Between the central depression and Domeyko Cordillera, low Vp/Vs correlates with the distribution of magmatic arcs of Paleocene-Oligocene and Eocene-Oligocene age. Low Vp/Vs also correlates with the location of the Mejillones Peninsula. (2) A region of high Vp/Vs occurs in what is most likely the serpentinized wedge of the subduction zone. (3) An additional zone of low Vp/Vs is located in the middle of the double seismic zone at depths of 90-110 km. This region may exist all along the

  1. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-31

    for second-order Sturm - Liouville boundary-value problems, such a count of eigenvalues may be established in terms of the number of zero crossings of...will be operational during the next six months. Section 11 describes a series of activities in the development and imple- mentation of the seismic...element of seismic research. with emphasis on those areas directly related to tho operations of the SDC. Substantial progress has been made in the

  2. Seismic seiches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, Arthur; Gupta, Harsh K.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic seiche is a term first used by Kvale (1955) to discuss oscillations of lake levels in Norway and England caused by the Assam earthquake of August 15, 1950. This definition has since been generalized to apply to standing waves set up in closed, or partially closed, bodies of water including rivers, shipping channels, lakes, swimming pools and tanks due to the passage of seismic waves from an earthquake.

  3. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the Canadian Seismic Agreement'' between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The Canadian Seismic Agreement'' supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

  4. Rock mass response to strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events and blasting observed at the surface of the excavations in deep level gold mines in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, Alexander; Durrheim, Ray; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to extreme ground motion and derive the attenuation factors in near field. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of the ground motion was found to be proportional to the distance from the source following R^-1.1 & R^-1.7 for compact rock and R^-3.1 & R^-3.4 for more fractured rock close to the surface of the tunnel. In addition the ground motion was compared to the quasi-static deformations taking place around the underground excavations. The quasi-static deformations were measured by means of strain, tilt and closure. A good correspondence

  5. 2D Dynamic Models of Subduction: Links between Surface Plate Motion and Deformation in the Transition Zone from Observations of Deep Slab Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of seismicity and seismic tomography provide constraints on the geometry of slabs within mantle, while compression/tension axis derived from moment tensor solutions provide constraints on the internal deformation of slabs. However, since these observations provide only a somewhat blurred or incomplete snapshot of the slab in time, it is difficult to directly relate these observations to the evolution of the slab geometry and the forces acting on and within the slab. In contrast, plate tectonic reconstructions provide time-dependent constraints on the surface motion of plates and the trench at subduction zones, which are related to the dynamical evolution of the slab. We use 2D geodynamical simulations of subduction to explore the relationship between dynamical process within the deforming slab and the observations of surface plate motion and the state-of-stress in slabs. Specifically we utilize models that include the extended Boussinesq approximation (shear heating and latent heat terms in the energy equation), a layered lithosphere with pyrolite, harzburgite and basalt/eclogite, compositionally-dependent phase transitions, and a composite rheology with yielding. The models employ a weak crustal layer that decouples the overriding and subducting plates and allows for dynamically determined trench motion. Here we show that, 1) multiple phase transitions increase slab folding, 2) ridge push significantly increases trench retreat, and 3) strength of the weak crustal layer influences slab detachment. Compared to past studies a more realistic treatment of the phase transitions makes trench retreat more difficult to generate: a weaker plate may encourage slab retreat but detaches once the slab tip crosses into the transition zone due to the rapid increase in slab density. As suggested by previous studies, slab folding within the transition zone changes the direction of forces on the slab and causes periodic changes from trench retreat to trench advance. We

  6. Development of an Adaptive Multi-Method Algorithm for Automatic Picking of First Arrival Times: Application to Near Surface Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, A.; Camerlynck, C. M.; Schneider, A. C.; Florsch, N.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate picking of first arrival times plays an important role in many seismic studies, particularly in seismic tomography and reservoirs or aquifers monitoring. Many techniques have been developed for picking first arrivals automatically or semi-automatically, but most of them were developed for seismological purposes which does not attain the accuracy objectives due to the complexity of near surface structures, and to usual low signal-to-noise ratio. We propose a new adaptive algorithm for near surface data based on three picking methods, combining multi-nested windows (MNW), Higher Order Statistics (HOS), and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). They exploit the benefits of integrating many properties, which reveal the presence of first arrivals, to provide an efficient and robust first arrivals picking. This strategy mimics the human first-break picking, where at the beginning the global trend is defined. Then the exact first-breaks are searched in the vicinity of the now defined trend. In a multistage algorithm, three successive phases are launched, where each of them characterize a specific signal property. Within each phase, the potential picks and their error range are automatically estimated, and then used sequentially as leader in the following phase picking. The accuracy and robustness of the implemented algorithm are successfully validated on synthetic and real data which have special challenges for automatic pickers. The comparison of resulting P-wave arrival times with those picked manually, and other algorithms of automatic picking, demonstrated the reliable performance of the new scheme under different noisy conditions. All parameters of our multi-method algorithm are auto-adaptive thanks to the integration in series of each sub-algorithm results in the flow. Hence, it is nearly a parameter-free algorithm, which is straightforward to implement and demands low computational resources.

  7. CFD Growth of 3C-SiC on 4H/6H Mesas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Spry, David J.; Powell, J. Anthony; Du, Hui; Skowronski, Marek; Huang, XianRong; Dudley, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article describes growth and characterization of the highest quality reproducible 3C-SiC heteroepitaxial films ever reported. By properly nucleating 3C-SiC growth on top of perfectly on-axis (0001) 4H-SiC mesa surfaces completely free of atomic scale steps and extended defects, growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms completely free of extended crystal defects can be achieved. In contrast, nucleation and growth of 3C-SiC mesa heterofilms on top of 4H-SiC mesas with atomic-scale steps always results in numerous observable dislocations threading through the 3C-SiC epilayer. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements indicate non-trivial in-plane lattice mismatch between the 3C and 4H layers. This mismatch is somewhat relieved in the step-free mesa case via misfit dislocations confined to the 3C/4H interfacial region without dislocations threading into the overlying 3C-SiC layer. These results indicate that the presence or absence of steps at the 3C/4H heteroepitaxial interface critically impacts the quality, defect structure, and relaxation mechanisms of single-crystal heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films.

  8. Double Faraday rotation toward 3C 27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, S. J., Jr.; Reed, J. A.

    1984-08-01

    From observations of the integrated flux of 3C 27 with the NRAO 140 foot (43 m) telescope at 40 frequencies between 1250 and 1445 MHz, the authors deduce rotation measures of 165±15 and -104±4 rad m-2. Since the source (assumed to be a radio galaxy) has components 45arcsec apart, it is concluded that the net magnetic field reverses between these directions. One explanation is that a large magnetic field surrounding the central galaxy of the distant source covers one component but not the other. Another explanation is that our Galaxy contains a dipole field with a scale of order 1 pc. One component of the distant source is seen inside the current loop associated with the dipole field, while the other is seen outside the loop.

  9. Photometric reverberation mapping of 3C 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo Nuñez, F.; Ramolla, M.; Westhues, C.; Bruckmann, C.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Steenbrugge, K.; Murphy, M.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of a five month monitoring campaign of the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) 3C 120. Observations with a median sampling of two days were conducted with the robotic 15 cm telescope VYSOS-6 located near Cerro Armazones in Chile. Broad band (B, V) and narrow band (NB) filters were used in order to measure fluxes of the AGN and the Hβ broad line region (BLR) emission line. The NB flux is constituted by about 50% continuum and 50% Hβ emission line. To disentangle line and continuum flux, a synthetic Hβ light curve was created by subtracting a scaled V-band light curve from the NB light curve. Here we show that the Hβ emission line responds to continuum variations with a rest frame lag of 23.6 ± 1.69 days. We estimate a virial mass of the central black hole MBH = 57 ± 27 × 106 M⊙, by combining the obtained lag with the velocity dispersion of a single contemporaneous spectrum. Using the flux variation gradient method, we determined the host galaxy subtracted rest frame 5100 Å luminosity at the time of our monitoring campaign with an uncertainty of 10% (LAGN = (6.94 ± 0.71) × 1043 erg s-1). Compared with recent spectroscopic reverberation results, 3C 120 shifts in the RBLR - LAGN diagram remarkably close to the theoretically expected relation of R ∝ L0.5. Our results demonstrate the performance of photometric AGN reverberation mapping, in particular for efficiently determining the BLR size and the AGN luminosity. Table 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. FULL POLARIZATION SPECTRA OF 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, D. C.; Lister, M. L.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Wardle, J. F. C. E-mail: mlister@physics.purdue.edu E-mail: mfa@umich.edu

    2009-05-01

    We report the results of parsec-scale, multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array observations of the core region of 3C 279 in Stokes I, linear polarization, and circular polarization. These full polarization spectra are modeled by radiative transfer simulations to constrain the magnetic field and particle properties of the parsec-scale jet in 3C 279. We find that the polarization properties of the core region, including the amount of linear polarization, the amount and sign of Faraday rotation, and the amount and sign of circular polarization can be explained by a consistent physical picture. The base of the jet, component D, is modeled as an inhomogeneous Blandford-Koenigl style conical jet dominated by a vector-ordered poloidal magnetic field along the jet axis, and we estimate its net magnetic flux. This poloidal field is responsible for the linear and circular polarization from this inhomogeneous component. Farther down the jet, the magnetic field in two homogeneous features is dominated by local shocks and a smaller fraction of vector-ordered poloidal field remains along the jet axis. This remaining poloidal field provides internal Faraday rotation which drives Faraday conversion of linear polarization into circular polarization from these components. In this picture, we find the jet to be kinetically dominated by protons with the radiating particles being dominated by electrons at an approximate fraction of {approx}>75%, still allowing the potential for a significant admixture of positrons. Based on the amounts of Faraday conversion deduced for the homogeneous components, we find a plausible range for the lower cutoff in the relativistic particle energy spectrum to be 5 {approx}< {gamma} {sub l} {approx}< 35. The physical picture described here is not unique if the observed Faraday rotation and depolarization occur in screens external to the jet; however, we find the joint explanation of linear and circular polarization observations from a single set of

  11. 3C3D VSP Imaging of Salt Flanks Using Converted Waves in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Doherty, F.; Jackson, J.

    2005-05-01

    Locating salt boundary and imaging updip sediment structures flanking the salt domes are very important tasks for exploration in the Gulf of Mexico since major petroleum reserves are often trapped underneath overhangs of diapiric salt domes. Although the top of salt and less steep structures can be well imaged using current surface seismic methods, the steep sides of a salt dome with irregularly shapes are hard to image with adequate accuracy. Thus, Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) surveys with three-component (3C) receivers in wells are usually requested for improving images of subsurface structures. Conventional multi-offset VSP (OVSP) and refraction salt proximity (SP) surveys are widely applied in the Gulf of Mexico to improve images of slat interfaces, sub-salt and salt flank structures using P waves. In this paper, we will focus on using converted waves to image the steep salt-sediment boundary. A VSP dataset, including multi-OVSP and a SP survey, acquired in the Gulf of Mexico was used in this study. We analyzed 3C OVSP data to identify and separate converted waves, such as PS, P-SP, P-SS, generated at a salt boundary. Then both PP wave and converted waves were 3C3D depth migrated to generate images of the steep salt-sediment interface. Both transmitted P-P and P-S converted waves from the SP survey were used to calculate 3D salt exit points which delineate the steep salt face. The VSP results derived from both methods are abundant and a suitable 3D visualization tool is required for visual integration and interpretation. The image volumes and other available geophysical and geological data were integrated using a 3D visualization tool specially designed for VSP solutions. The migrated images using PP and converted waves provides a precise and complete definition of the steep salt face and reservoir sands flanking the salt dome. This study indicates that both reflection and reflection surveys can result in a consistent location of the steep salt flank

  12. High-Frequency Seismic Waves generated by Building-Shaking Experiments and Surface Wave Group Velocity Estimates from the Cross-Correlation of Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, T.; Okamoto, T.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling high-frequency (>1 Hz) seismic waves is known to be difficult but it is extremely important for earthquake hazard mitigation as many buildings have resonant frequencies above 1 Hz. In this study, we examine high-frequency waves at 1.64 Hz, generated by building-shaking experiments in California. The specific data we will examine are seismic data generated by shaking experiments of the Millikan Library between 2000 and 2002, located on the campus of California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. The excited wavefields were recorded by the broadband seismic network in the region (~150 stations), Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN). There were about 60 stations with good signal-to-noise ratios among SCSN stations. The maximum distance for signal detection was 323 km (station GRA). Based on numerical calculations for a regional seismic structure model (SCEC Community Velocity Model 11.9), we can show that the signals are dominated by surface waves (at 1.11 Hz and 1.64 Hz), whose energy is confined to shallow depths. The focus of this report will be on the cross-correlated signals between a station in the building (station MIK) and other stations. This cross-correlation may be viewed as a source deconvolution process and will let us focus on propagation in the medium. This cross-correlated phase can be expressed as a line integral of wavenumber along a propagation path for a direct (ballistic) phase, although it may contain complexity from the caustics (the Maslov index). Somewhat to our surprise, despite the fact that we are dealing with high frequency waves (1.64 Hz), we observe well-defined constant phase in many cross-correlated seismograms. If we knew the number of cycles between the source (Millikan) and a station, we could estimate phase velocity in principle but this is not possible and seems extremely hard because the number of cycles is about 50-100 or more. However, our signals do show frequency-dependence within a narrow (signal

  13. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-07-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  14. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-10-01

    One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

  15. Multiwavelength observations of giant radio galaxy 3C 35 and 3C 284

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sabyasachi; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Patra, Dusmanta; Konar, Chiranjib

    2016-07-01

    We report multi wavelength observations of large radio galaxy 3C35 and 3C284. The low frequency observations were done with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) starting from 150 MHz. The high frequency observations were done with Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA). Our main motivation for these observations is to estimate the spectral ages of these galaxies and to examine any proof of extended emission at low radio frequencies due to an earlier cycle of activity. The spectral age is measured by fitting the spectra with different spectral ageing models e.g. Kardashev-Pacholczyk (KP), Jaffe-Perola (JP) and Continuous Injection (CI).

  16. THE SUZAKU VIEW OF 3C 382

    SciTech Connect

    Sambruna, R. M.; Gliozzi, M.; Tombesi, F.; Braito, V.; Ballo, L.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2011-06-20

    We present a long (116 ks) Suzaku observation of the broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG) 3C 382 acquired in 2007 April. A Swift BAT spectrum in 15-200 keV from the 58 month survey is also analyzed, together with an archival XMM-Newton EPIC exposure of 20 ks obtained one year after Suzaku. Our main result is the finding with Suzaku of a broad Fe K line with a relativistic profile consistent with emission from an accretion disk at tens of gravitational radii from the central black hole. The XIS data indicate emission from highly ionized iron and allow us to set tight, albeit model-dependent, constraints on the inner and outer radii of the disk reflecting region, r{sub in} {approx_equal} 10 r{sub g} and r{sub out} {approx_equal} 20 r{sub g} , respectively, and on the disk inclination, i {approx_equal} 30{sup 0}. Two ionized reflection components are possibly observed, with similar contributions of {approx}10% to the total continuum-a highly ionized one, with log{xi} {approx_equal} 3 erg s{sup -1} cm, which successfully models the relativistic line, and a mildly ionized one, with log{xi} {approx_equal} 1.5 erg s{sup -1} cm, which models the narrow Fe K{alpha} and high energy hump. When both these components are included, there is no further requirement for an additional blackbody soft excess below 2 keV. The Suzaku data confirm the presence of a warm absorber previously known from grating studies. After accounting for all the spectral features, the intrinsic photon index of the X-ray continuum is {Gamma}{sub x} {approx_equal} 1.8 with a cutoff energy at {approx}200 keV, consistent with Comptonization models and excluding jet-related emission up to these energies. Comparison of the X-ray properties of 3C 382 and other BLRGs to Seyferts recently observed with Suzaku and BAT confirms the idea that the distinction between radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nucleus at X-rays is blurred. The two classes form a continuum distribution in terms of X-ray photon index

  17. Elastic-Wavefield Seismic Stratigraphy: A New Seismic Imaging Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bob A. Hardage; Milo M. Backus; Michael V. DeAngelo; Sergey Fomel; Khaled Fouad; Robert J. Graebner; Paul E. Murray; Randy Remington; Diana Sava

    2006-07-31

    The purpose of our research has been to develop and demonstrate a seismic technology that will provide the oil and gas industry a better methodology for understanding reservoir and seal architectures and for improving interpretations of hydrocarbon systems. Our research goal was to expand the valuable science of seismic stratigraphy beyond the constraints of compressional (P-P) seismic data by using all modes (P-P, P-SV, SH-SH, SV-SV, SV-P) of a seismic elastic wavefield to define depositional sequences and facies. Our objective was to demonstrate that one or more modes of an elastic wavefield may image stratal surfaces across some stratigraphic intervals that are not seen by companion wave modes and thus provide different, but equally valid, information regarding depositional sequences and sedimentary facies within that interval. We use the term elastic wavefield stratigraphy to describe the methodology we use to integrate seismic sequences and seismic facies from all modes of an elastic wavefield into a seismic interpretation. We interpreted both onshore and marine multicomponent seismic surveys to select the data examples that we use to document the principles of elastic wavefield stratigraphy. We have also used examples from published papers that illustrate some concepts better than did the multicomponent seismic data that were available for our analysis. In each interpretation study, we used rock physics modeling to explain how and why certain geological conditions caused differences in P and S reflectivities that resulted in P-wave seismic sequences and facies being different from depth-equivalent S-wave sequences and facies across the targets we studied.

  18. Downhole seismic logging for high-resolution reflection surveying in unconsolidated overburden

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.A.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.; Harris, J.B.; Pugin, A.; Skvortsov, A.; Goriainov, N.N.

    1998-07-01

    Downhole seismic velocity logging techniques have been developed and applied in support of high-resolution reflection seismic surveys. Data obtained from downhole seismic logging can provide accurate velocity-depth functions and directly correlate seismic reflections to depth. The methodologies described in this paper are designed for slimhole applications in plastic-cased boreholes (minimum ID of 50 mm) and with source and detector arrays that yield similar frequency ranges and vertical depth resolutions as the surface reflection surveys. Compressional- (P-) wave logging uses a multichannel hydrophone array with 0.5-m detector spacings in a fluid-filled borehole and a high-frequency, in-hole shotgun source at the surface. Overlapping array positions downhole results in redundant first-arrival data which can be processed to provide accurate interval velocities. The data also can be displayed as a record suite, showing reflections and directly correlating reflection events with depths. Example applications include identification of gas zones, lithological boundaries within unconsolidated sediments, and the overburden-bedrock interface. Shear- (S-) wave logging uses a slimhole, well-locked, three-component (3-C) geophone pod and a horizontally polarized, hammer-and-loaded-plate source at ground surface. In unconsolidated sediments, shear-wave velocity contrasts can be associated with changes in material density or dynamic shear modulus, which in turn can be related to consolidation. Example applications include identification of a lithological boundary for earthquake hazard applications and mapping massive ice within permafrost materials.

  19. Holocene surface faulting along the west flank of the Santa Rosa Range (Nevada-Oregon) and the possible northern extension of the Central Nevada Seismic Belt

    SciTech Connect

    Michetti, A.M. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV . Center for Neotectonic Studies); Wesnousky, S.G. . Center for Neotectonic Studies)

    1993-04-01

    The 130 km long Santa Rose Range fault system extends northward from a point about 70 km north of the 1915 Pleasant Valley earthquake fault ruptures to Blue Mountain Pass, Oregon. The authors have examined 1:12,000 low-sun-angle aerial photographs and conducted surveys of scarp morphology to investigate the neotectonic evolution and paleoseismicity of this possible northern extension of the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. Two adjoining segments of the fault zone are separated by a right step in the range-front and apparent absence of Holocene scarps. Each segment records evidence of a Holocene faulting event. The southern 31 km segment between Frey Ranch and the Willow Creek fan shows both small scarps (< 1 m) which cut Lahontan shorelines in the fluvio-lacustrine sediments of the Quinn River Valley and larger scarps which oversteepen the base of the adjacent range-front to slopes of 20[degree] to 24[degree]. The northern 42 km segment between Flat Creek and Oregon Canyon Creek shows a recent offset which rejuvenates older (pre-Lahontan) fault scarps and also cuts Holocene terraces along the base of the piedmont pediment. Based on preliminary morphometric data, the maximum vertical displacement (3--4 m) and age of the faulting (early Holocene) are similar in both segments but it is not known whether both segments ruptured contemporaneously. Except for the lack of large historical surface faulting the main neotectonic and geomorphic features of the Santa Rose Range fault zone are similar to that of the Dixie Valley and Pleasant Valley regions of the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. Hence, the occurrence of a large earthquake rupture along this range-front in the near future should not be viewed as a surprise.

  20. The resolved outflow from 3C 48

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, the mass is ∼6 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow.

  1. 3C 236: Radio Source, Interrupted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Baum, Stefi A.; Sparks, William B.; Martel, André R.; Allen, Mark G.; Macchetto, Ferdinando D.; Miley, George K.

    2001-04-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph MAMA near-UV images and archival Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) V- and R-band images that reveal the presence of four star-forming regions in an arc along the edge of the dust lane in the giant (4 Mpc) radio galaxy 3C 236. Two of the star-forming regions are relatively young, with ages of order ~107 yr, while the other two are older, with ages of order ~108-109 yr, which is comparable to the estimated age of the giant radio source. Based on dynamical and spectral aging arguments, we suggest that the fuel supply to the active galactic nucleus (AGN) was interrupted for ~107 yr and has now been restored, resulting in the formation of the inner 2 kpc-scale radio source. This timescale is similar to that of the age of the youngest of the star-forming regions. We suggest that the transport of gas in the disk is nonsteady and that this produces the multiple episodes of star formation in the disk, as well as the multiple epochs of radio source activity. If the inner radio source and the youngest star-forming region are related by the same event of gas transport, the gas must be transported from the hundreds of parsec scale to the subparsec scale on a timescale of ~107 yr, which is similar to the dynamical timescale of the gas on the hundreds of parsec scale.

  2. 3C236: Radio Source, Interrupted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, C. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Baum, S. A.; Sparks, W. B.

    We present highlights of the results of new HST STIS/MAMA near-UV images and archival WFPC2 V- and R-band images which reveal the presence of four apparently star forming regions in an arc along the edge of the dust lane in the giant (4 Mpc) radio galaxy 3C236. Two of the star forming regions are relatively young with ages of order ~107 yr, while the other two are older with ages of order ~108 -- 109 yr, which is comparable to the estimated age of the giant radio source. Based on dynamical and spectral aging arguments, we suggest that the fuel supply to the AGN was interrupted for ~107 yr and has now been restored, resulting in the formation of the inner 2 kpc scale radio source. This time scale is similar to that of the age of the youngest of the star forming regions. We suggest that the transport of gas in the disk is non-steady and that this produces both the multiple episodes of star formation in the disk as well as the multiple epochs of radio source activity. If the inner radio source and the youngest star forming region are related by the same event of gas transport, the gas must be transported from the hundreds of pc scale to the sub-parsec scale on a time scale of ~107 yr, which is similar to the dynamical timescale of the gas on the hundreds of pc scales.

  3. OSSE observations of 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. N.; Dermer, C. D.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Mcnaron-Brown, K.; Jourdain, E.; Jung, G. V.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Purcell, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    We report results of multiple observations of the quasar 3C 273 with the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. These observations span the period from 1991 June through 1993 January and represent the most sensitive observations to date in low-energy gamma rays. The source was detected at historically weak 100 keV fluxes compared with previous measurements. Variability by factors of approximately 3 on timescales of approximately equal 2 months was observed in the energy band 50-150 keV. The data are well described by a single power law with a proton number index Gamma = 1.7 +/- 0.1. No significant change of Gamma was observed during changes in intensity. Thermal models do not provide acceptable fits to the data. When the OSSE data are combined with contemporaneous measurements by COMPTEL and EGRET, the spectrum is seen to break at an energy of 1.0(+0.9, -0.4) MeV to a softer power law with Delta Gamma = 0.7(+0.06, -0.11), forming a power law with Gamma = 2.4 between approximately 1 MeV and several GeV.

  4. HST And VLA Polarimetry Of 3C 264 And 3C 66B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, C. Alexander; Perlman, E. S.; Georganopoulos, M.; O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Sparks, W. B.; Biretta, J. A.

    2006-09-01

    We present new VLA A- and B-array radio polarimetry at 22.5 GHz, and images at 8.4GHz of 3C 264, a low luminosity FR I in Abell 1367. We also present high resolution VLA A-array polarimetry of the jet of 3C 66B, both at 22.5 GHz and 43 GHz. This is the latest addition to an ongoing study of these objects, which includes optical polarimetry in several bands and multiband imaging with HST, and X-ray observations with Chandra. We find further evidence for the hypothesis that 3C 264 falls into the category of low luminosity BL Lac objects (Rector, Stocke & Perlman, 1999) in significant variability of the polarization position angle in the core of this object in only 4 years (Lara et al, 2003). This variability, together with our measured value of its optical spectral index of alpha = 0.77, and a previously derived viewing angle of < 50 degrees (Baum et al, 1997; Lara et al, 2003), puts a fairly strong constraint on the classification of 3C 264 as a low luminosity BL Lac. We also present matched resolution HST and VLA data for both of these objects, allowing for direct morphological comparisons to be made, as well as full resolution radio to optical spectral index maps.

  5. Low-frequency study of two giant radio galaxies: 3C 35 and 3C 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrù, E.; Murgia, M.; Feretti, L.; Govoni, F.; Giovannini, G.; Lane, W.; Kassim, N.; Paladino, R.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: Radio galaxies with a projected linear size ⪆1 Mpc are classified as giant radio sources. According to the current interpretation these are old sources which have evolved in a low-density ambient medium. Because radiative losses are negligible at low frequency, extending spectral aging studies in this frequency range will allow us to determine the zero-age electron spectrum injected and then to improve the estimate of the synchrotron age of the source. Methods: We present Very Large Array images at 74 MHz and 327 MHz of two giant radio sources: 3C 35 and 3C 223. We performed a spectral study using 74, 327, 608 and 1400 GHz images. The spectral shape is estimated in different positions along the source. Results: The radio spectrum follows a power-law in the hotspots, while in the inner region of the lobe the shape of the spectrum shows a curvature at high frequencies. This steepening agrees with synchrotron aging of the emitting relativistic electrons. In order to estimate the synchrotron age of the sources, the spectra were fitted with a synchrotron model of emission. They show that 3C 35 is an old source of 143 ± 20 Myr, while 3C 223 is a younger source of 72 ± 4 Myr.

  6. Dependence of near field co-seismic ionospheric perturbations on surface deformations: A case study based on the April, 25 2015 Gorkha Nepal earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, A. S.; Bagiya, Mala S.; Catherine, Joshi; Rolland, Lucie; Sharma, Nitin; Sunil, P. S.; Ramesh, D. S.

    2017-03-01

    Ionospheric response to the recent 25 April 2015 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake is studied in terms of Global Positioning System-Total Electron Content (GPS-TEC) from the viewpoints of source directivity, rupture propagation and associated surface deformations, over and near the fault plane. The azimuthal directivity of co-seismic ionospheric perturbations (CIP) amplitudes from near field exhibit excellent correlation with east-southeast propagation of earthquake rupture and associated surface deformations. In addition, the amplitude of CIP is observed to be very small in the opposite direction of the rupture movement. Conceptual explanations on the poleward directivity of CIP exist in literature, we show the observational evidences of additional equator ward directivity, interpreted in terms of rupture propagation direction. We also discuss the coupling between earthquake induced acoustic waves and local geomagnetic field and its effects on near field CIP amplitudes. We suggest that variability of near field CIP over and near the fault plane are the manifestations of the geomagnetic field-wave coupling in addition to crustal deformations that observed through GPS measurements and corroborated by Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data sets.

  7. Seismic site characterization of an urban dedimentary basin, Livermore Valley, California: Site tesponse, basin-edge-induced surface waves, and 3D simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, Stephen; Leeds, Alena L.; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo; Allen, James P.; Schmitt, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Thirty‐two accelerometers were deployed in the Livermore Valley, California, for approximately one year to study sedimentary basin effects. Many local and near‐regional earthquakes were recorded, including the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa, California, earthquake. The resulting ground‐motion data set is used to quantify the seismic response of the Livermore basin, a major structural depression in the California Coast Range Province bounded by active faults. Site response is calculated by two methods: the reference‐site spectral ratio method and a source‐site spectral inversion method. Longer‐period (≥1  s) amplification factors follow the same general pattern as Bouguer gravity anomaly contours. Site response spectra are inverted for shallow shear‐wave velocity profiles, which are consistent with independent information. Frequency–wavenumber analysis is used to analyze plane‐wave propagation across the Livermore Valley and to identify basin‐edge‐induced surface waves with back azimuths different from the source back azimuth. Finite‐element simulations in a 3D velocity model of the region illustrate the generation of basin‐edge‐induced surface waves and point out strips of elevated ground velocities along the margins of the basin.

  8. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-31

    dyn-cm. It can be seen that there is a wide range of the potential con- tribution of different seismic zones to excitation of the Chandler wobble ...Correction to the Excitation of the Chandler Wobble by Earthquakes," Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 32, 203-217 (1973). 22. S. C. Solomon, N. H. Sleep

  9. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  10. The Accelerating Jet of 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, S. D.; Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the proper motions of the subparsec scale jet of the quasar 3C 279 at 15 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array shows significant accelerations in four of nine superluminal features. Analysis of these motions is combined with the analysis of flux density light curves to constrain values of Lorentz factor and viewing angle (and their derivatives) for each component. The data for each of these components are consistent with significant changes to the Lorentz factor, viewing angle, and azimuthal angle, suggesting jet bending with changes in speed. We see that for these observed components Lorentz factors are in the range Γ = 10-41, viewing angles are in the range thetav = 0.°1-5.°0, and intrinsic (source frame) flux density is in the range, F ν, int = 1.5 × 10-9-1.5 × 10-5 Jy. Considering individual components, the Lorentz factors vary from Γ = 11-16 for C1, Γ = 31-41 for C5, Γ = 29-41 for C6, and Γ = 9-12 for C8, indicating that there is no single underlying flow speed to the jet and likely we are seeing pattern speeds from shocks in the jet. The viewing angles vary in time from 0.°6 to 1.°5 in the case of C1 (the least extreme example), from 0.°5 to 5.°0 in the case of C8, and from 0.°1 to 0.°9 for C5 (the last two being the most extreme examples). The intrinsic flux density varies by factors from 1.4 for C8 and 430 for C5. Theoretical analysis of the accelerations also indicates potential jet bending. In addition, for one component, C5, polarization measurements also set limits to the trajectory of the jet.

  11. Seismic Symphonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    The project started in 2008 as a sound installation, a collaboration between an artist, a barrel organ builder and a seismologist. The work differs from other attempts of sound transposition of seismic records. In this case seismic frequencies are not converted automatically into the "sound of the earthquake." However, it has been studied a musical translation system that, based on the organ tonal scale, generates a totally unexpected sequence of sounds which is intended to evoke the emotions aroused by the earthquake. The symphonies proposed in the project have somewhat peculiar origins: they in fact come to life from the translation of graphic tracks into a sound track. The graphic tracks in question are made up by copies of seismograms recorded during some earthquakes that have taken place around the world. Seismograms are translated into music by a sculpture-instrument, half a seismograph and half a barrel organ. The organ plays through holes practiced on paper. Adapting the documents to the instrument score, holes have been drilled on the waves' peaks. The organ covers about three tonal scales, starting from heavy and deep sounds it reaches up to high and jarring notes. The translation of the seismic records is based on a criterion that does match the highest sounds to larger amplitudes with lower ones to minors. Translating the seismogram in the organ score, the larger the amplitude of recorded waves, the more the seismogram covers the full tonal scale played by the barrel organ and the notes arouse an intense emotional response in the listener. Elisa Strinna's Seismic Symphonies installation becomes an unprecedented tool for emotional involvement, through which can be revived the memory of the greatest disasters of over a century of seismic history of the Earth. A bridge between art and science. Seismic Symphonies is also a symbolic inversion: the instrument of the organ is most commonly used in churches, and its sounds are derived from the heavens and

  12. Improved seismic profiling by minimally invasive multimodal surface wave method with standard penetration test source (MMSW-SPT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shibin; Ashlock, Jeramy C.

    2017-03-01

    Surface waves propagating in layered media inherently possess multimodal dispersion characteristics. However, traditional surface wave testing methods employing measurements at the free surface usually capture only a single apparent dispersion curve, especially when using short geophone arrays common to near surface and geotechnical-scale investigations. Such single-mode or fragmented multimode apparent dispersion curves contain only a fraction of the possible dispersion information, thus limiting the accuracy of inverted profiles. To enable more robust measurement of higher Rayleigh-wave modes, a recently developed hybrid minimally invasive multimodal surface wave method is combined herein with the widely used geotechnical standard penetration test (SPT), which is employed as a practical and ubiquitous downhole source. Upon superimposing surface wave dispersion data for a range of SPT impact depths within the soil, higher modes can be measured more consistently and reliably relative to traditional non-invasive testing methods. As a result, misidentification of multiple dispersion modes can be practically eliminated, significantly improving the accuracy and certainty of inversion results.

  13. Seismic Gradiometry using Ambient Seismic Noise in an Anisotropic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S. A. L.; Curtis, A.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a wavefield gradiometry technique to estimate both isotropic and anisotropic local medium characteristics from short recordings of seismic signals by inverting a wave equation. The method exploits the information in the spatial gradients of a seismic wavefield that are calculated using dense deployments of seismic arrays. The application of the method uses the surface wave energy in the ambient seismic field. To estimate isotropic and anisotropic medium properties we invert an elliptically anisotropic wave equation. The spatial derivatives of the recorded wavefield are evaluated by calculating finite differences over nearby recordings, which introduces a systematic anisotropic error. A two step approach corrects this error: finite difference stencils are first calibrated, then the output of the wave-equation inversion is corrected using the linearized impulse response to the inverted velocity anomaly. We test the procedure on ambient seismic noise recorded in a large and dense ocean bottom cable array installed over Ekofisk field. The estimated azimuthal anisotropy forms a circular geometry around the production-induced subsidence bowl. This conforms with results from studies employing controlled sources, and with interferometry correlating long records of seismic noise. Yet in this example, the results where obtained using only a few minutes of ambient seismic noise.

  14. Jet precession and its observational evidence: The cases of 3C 345 and 3C 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caproni, Anderson; Abraham, Zulema

    2004-11-01

    Several radio-loud objects exhibit a complex structure when observed at radio wavelengths: a stationary core, which is thought to harbour the central engine that powers the AGN phenomena, and a relativistic jet, formed by several superluminal components. In some cases, jet components are ejected with different apparent proper motions and directions on the plane of the sky. Moreover, these sources can also show signatures of long-term periodic variability in their historical optical light curve. In this work, we selected the objects 3C 120 and 3C 345, which exhibit both characteristics mentioned above, and interpret them in the framework of jet inlet precession. A brief discussion about what kind of mechanism could be responsible for jet precession is also presented.

  15. THE ACCELERATING JET OF 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, S. D.; Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the proper motions of the subparsec scale jet of the quasar 3C 279 at 15 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array shows significant accelerations in four of nine superluminal features. Analysis of these motions is combined with the analysis of flux density light curves to constrain values of Lorentz factor and viewing angle (and their derivatives) for each component. The data for each of these components are consistent with significant changes to the Lorentz factor, viewing angle, and azimuthal angle, suggesting jet bending with changes in speed. We see that for these observed components Lorentz factors are in the range {Gamma} = 10-41, viewing angles are in the range thetav = 0. Degree-Sign 1-5. Degree-Sign 0, and intrinsic (source frame) flux density is in the range, F{sub {nu},int} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Jy. Considering individual components, the Lorentz factors vary from {Gamma} = 11-16 for C1, {Gamma} = 31-41 for C5, {Gamma} = 29-41 for C6, and {Gamma} = 9-12 for C8, indicating that there is no single underlying flow speed to the jet and likely we are seeing pattern speeds from shocks in the jet. The viewing angles vary in time from 0. Degree-Sign 6 to 1. Degree-Sign 5 in the case of C1 (the least extreme example), from 0. Degree-Sign 5 to 5. Degree-Sign 0 in the case of C8, and from 0. Degree-Sign 1 to 0. Degree-Sign 9 for C5 (the last two being the most extreme examples). The intrinsic flux density varies by factors from 1.4 for C8 and 430 for C5. Theoretical analysis of the accelerations also indicates potential jet bending. In addition, for one component, C5, polarization measurements also set limits to the trajectory of the jet.

  16. The Resolved Outflow from 3C 48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 103-104 cm-3, the mass is ~6 × 106 M ⊙, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11574. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Some of the

  17. A Radio-Jet-Galaxy Interaction in 3C441

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Mark; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Ridgway, Susan E.

    1998-01-01

    Multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopy of the zeta = 0.708 radio galaxy 3C441 and a red aligned optical/infrared component are used to show that the most striking aspect of the radio-optical "alignment effect" in this object is due to the interaction of the radio jet with a companion galaxy in the same group or cluster. The stellar population of the red aligned continuum component is predominately old, but with a small post-starburst population superposed, and it is surrounded by a low surface- brightness halo, possibly a face-on spiral disc. The [OIII]500.7/[OII]372.7 emission line ratio changes dramatically from one side of the component to the other, with the low-ionisation material apparently having passed through the bow shock of the radio source and been compressed. A simple model for the interaction is used to explain the velocity shifts in the emission line gas, and to predict that the ISM of the interacting galaxy is likely to escape once the radio source bow shock has passed though. We also discuss another, much fainter, aligned component, and the sub-arcsecond scale alignment of the radio source host galaxy. Finally we comment on the implications of our explanation of 3C441 for theories of the alignment effect.

  18. Comparisons between gouge and bare surface friction of serpentinite at seismic slip velocities: Implications for dynamic weakening of gouge-bearing faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, B.; Mitchell, T. M.; Hirth, G.; Goldsby, D. L.; Di Toro, G.; Zorzi, F.

    2013-12-01

    High-velocity friction (HVF) experiments on bare rock surfaces have revealed various dynamic weakening processes (e.g., flash weakening, gel weakening, melt lubrication) that likely play a fundamental role in coseismic fault weakening. However, faults generally contain a thin layer of gouge separating the solid wallrocks, thus it is important to understand how the presence of gouge modifies the efficiency of these weakening processes at seismic slip rates. We explored the frictional behavior of bare surfaces and powdered samples of an antigorite-rich serpentinite (ARS) and a lizardite-rich serpentinite (LRS) at earthquake slip rates. HVF experiments were conducted with slip displacements ranging from ~0.5 to 2m, at velocities ranging from 0.002m/s to 6.5 m/s, and with normal stresses ranging from 2-22 MPa for gouge and 5-100MPa for bare surfaces. Our results demonstrate that the friction coefficient (μ) of powdered serpentine is significantly larger than that of bare surfaces under otherwise identical conditions. Bare surface friction decreases over a weakening distance of a few centimeters to a nominally steady-state value of ~0.1 at velocities greater than 0.1m/s. The nominal steady-state friction decreases non-linearly with increasing normal stress from 0.14 to 0.045 at 5 and ~100MPa respectfully at a slip velocity of 1m/s. Additionally, the recovery of frictional strength during deceleration depends on total displacement; samples slipped for ~50mm recover faster than samples slipped for ~0.5m. Microstructural analysis of bare surfaces deformed at the highest normal stresses revealed translucent glass-like material on the slip surfaces and XRD analysis of wear material revealed an increasing presence of olivine and enstatite with increasing normal stress. In contrast, gouge requires an order of magnitude higher velocity than bare surfaces to induce frictional weakening, has a larger weakening distance and higher steady state friction values for equivalent

  19. Seismic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, S.

    1981-10-01

    Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research programs in seismic testing to improve earthquake design guidelines lowers the safety-design costs of nuclear power plants. Explosive tests that simulate earthquakes help to determine how structures respond to ground motion and how these are related to soil and geologic conditions at a specific site. Explosive tests develop data for simulation using several computer codes. Photographs illustrate testing techniques. 6 references. (DCK)

  20. The planning of a passive seismic experiment: the Ketzin case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G.; Petronio, L.

    2009-04-01

    In the last years, it has been recognized the importance of using microseismic activity data to gain information on the state and dynamics of a reservoir, notwithstanding the difficulties of recording, localizing the events, interpret them correctly, in terms of developing fractures, or thermal effects. The increasing number of CO2 storage experiments, with the necessity of providing efficient, economic, and long-term monitoring methods, both in the injection and post-injection phases, further encourage the development and improvement of recording and processing techniques. Microseismic signals are typically recorded with downhole sensors. Monitoring with surface sensors is problematic due to increased noise levels and signal attenuation particularly in the near surface. The actual detection distance depends on background noise conditions, seismic attenuation and the microseismic source strength. In the frame of the European project Co2ReMoVe and of the European Network of Excellence Co2GeoNet, a passive seismic experiment was planned in the Ketzin site for geological storage of CO2, a former gas store near Potsdam, object of the CO2SINK European project and inserted also in the European project Co2ReMoVe. Aim of the survey is to complement the CO2-SINK active seismic downhole experiments, adding precious information on the microseismicity induced by stress field changes at the reservoir level and in the overburden, due to the CO2 injection. The baseline survey was done in May 2008 by the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale-OGS (Italy), with the support of the Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum-GFZ (Germany) and the collaboration of the Institut für Geowissenschaftliche Gemeinschaftsaufgaben-GGA (Germany), shortly before the starting of the CO2 injection (June 30th 2008). A continuous monitoring (about 5 days) was performed by 2 downhole 3C geophones, and 3 surface 3C geophones located around the wells. This paper, based on the analysis of

  1. Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Arrival Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Data for Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Structure Around SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.; Maceira, M.; Roux, P.

    2013-12-01

    The crust around the San Andreas Fault Observatory at depth (SAFOD) has been the subject of many geophysical studies aimed at characterizing in detail the fault zone structure and elucidating the lithologies and physical properties of the surrounding rocks. Seismic methods in particular have revealed the complex two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the crustal volume around SAFOD and the strong velocity reduction in the fault damage zone. In this study we conduct a joint inversion using body-wave arrival times and surface-wave dispersion data to image the P-and S-wave velocity structure of the upper crust surrounding SAFOD. The two data types have complementary strengths - the body-wave data have good resolution at depth, albeit only where there are crossing rays between sources and receivers, whereas the surface waves have very good near-surface resolution and are not dependent on the earthquake source distribution because they are derived from ambient noise. The body-wave data are from local earthquakes and explosions, comprising the dataset analyzed by Zhang et al. (2009). The surface-wave data are for Love waves from ambient noise correlations, and are from Roux et al. (2011). The joint inversion code is based on the regional-scale version of the double-difference (DD) tomography algorithm tomoDD. The surface-wave inversion code that is integrated into the joint inversion algorithm is from Maceira and Ammon (2009). The propagator matrix solver in the algorithm DISPER80 (Saito, 1988) is used for the forward calculation of dispersion curves from layered velocity models. We examined how the structural models vary as we vary the relative weighting of the fit to the two data sets and in comparison to the previous separate inversion results. The joint inversion with the 'optimal' weighting shows more clearly the U-shaped local structure from the Buzzard Canyon Fault on the west side of SAF to the Gold Hill Fault on the east side.

  2. Efficient femtosecond laser micromachining of bulk 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsari, M.; Filippidis, G.; Zoppel, S.; Reider, G. A.; Fotakis, C.

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate surface micromachining of bulk 3C silicon carbide (3C-SiC) wafers by employing tightly focused infrared femtosecond laser pulses of energy less than 10 nJ directly from a femtosecond laser oscillator, thus eliminating the need for an amplified system and increasing the micromachining speed by more than four orders of magnitude. In addition, we show that high aspect ratio through-tapered vias can be drilled in 400 µm thick wafers using an amplified femtosecond laser.

  3. Seismic sensitivity to sub-surface solar activity from 18 yr of GOLF/SoHO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Turck-Chièze, S.

    2015-06-01

    Solar activity has significantly changed over the last two Schwabe cycles. After a long and deep minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the weaker activity of Cycle 24 contrasts with the previous cycles. In this work, the response of the solar acoustic oscillations to solar activity is used in order to provide insights into the structural and magnetic changes in the sub-surface layers of the Sun during this on-going unusual period of low activity. We analyze 18 yr of continuous observations of the solar acoustic oscillations collected by the Sun-as-a-star GOLF instrument on board the SoHO spacecraft. From the fitted mode frequencies, the temporal variability of the frequency shifts of the radial, dipolar, and quadrupolar modes are studied for different frequency ranges that are sensitive to different layers in the solar sub-surface interior. The low-frequency modes show nearly unchanged frequency shifts between Cycles 23 and 24, with a time evolving signature of the quasi-biennial oscillation, which is particularly visible for the quadrupole component revealing the presence of a complex magnetic structure. The modes at higher frequencies show frequency shifts that are 30% smaller during Cycle 24, which is in agreement with the decrease observed in the surface activity between Cycles 23 and 24. The analysis of 18 yr of GOLF oscillations indicates that the structural and magnetic changes responsible for the frequency shifts remained comparable between Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 in the deeper sub-surface layers below 1400 km as revealed by the low-frequency modes. The frequency shifts of the higher-frequency modes, sensitive to shallower regions, show that Cycle 24 is magnetically weaker in the upper layers of Sun. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe following 68 GOLF frequency tables are available and Table A.1 is also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  4. Results of the application of seismic-reflection and electromagnetic techniques for near-surface hydrogeologic and environmental investigations at Fort Bragg, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, M.T.; Fine, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Facilities Investigations at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, selected geophysical techniques were evaluated for their usefulness as assessment tools for determining subsurface geology, delineating the areal extent of potentially contaminated landfill sites, and locating buried objects and debris of potential environmental concern. Two shallow seismic-reflection techniques (compression and shear wave) and two electromagnetic techniques (ground-penetrating radar and terrain conductivity) were evaluated at several sites at the U.S. Army Base. The electromagnetic techniques also were tested for tolerance to cultural noise, such as nearby fences, vehicles, and power lines. For the terrain conductivity tests, two instruments were used--the EM31 and EM34, which have variable depths of exploration. The shallowest reflection event was 70 feet below land surface observed in common-depth point, stacked compression-wave data from 24- and 12-fold shallow-seismic-reflection surveys. Several reflection events consistent with clay-sand interfaces between 70 and 120 feet below land surface, along with basement-saprolite surfaces, were imaged in the 24-fold, common- depth-point stacked data. 12-fold, common-depth-point stacked data set contained considerably more noise than the 24-fold, common-depth-point data, due to reduced shot-to-receiver redundancy. Coherent stacked reflection events were not observed in the 24-fold, common-depth-point stacked shear-wave data because of the partial decoupling of the shear- wave generator from the ground. At one site, ground-penetrating radar effectively delineated a shallow, 2- to 5-foot thick sand unit bounded by thin (less than 1 foot) clay layers. The radar signal was completely attenuated where the overlying and underlying clay units thickened and the sand unit thinned. The pene- tration depth of the radar signal was less than 10 feet below land surface. A slight

  5. Benchmarking Passive Seismic Methods of Imaging Surface Wave Velocity Interfaces Down to 300 m — Mapping Murray Basin Thickness in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatov, A.; Czarnota, K.

    2015-12-01

    In shallow passive seismology it is generally thought that the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method is more robust than the horizontal over vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method at resolving the depth to surface-wave velocity (Vs) interfaces. Here we present results of a field test of these two methods over ten drill sites in Victoria, Australia. The target interface is the base of Cenozoic unconsolidated to semi-consolidated clastic and/or carbonate sediments of the Murray Basin, which overlie Paleozoic crystalline rocks. Drilled depths of this interface are between 27 and 300 m. A three-arm spiral array, with a radius of 250 m, consisting of 13 Trillium compact broadband seismometers was deployed at each site for 7-21 hours. The Vs architecture beneath each site was determined through nonlinear inversion of HVSR and SPAC data using the neighborhood algorithm of Sambridge (1999) implemented in geopsy by Wathelet et al (2005). The HVSR technique yielded depth estimates, of the target interface (Vs > 1000 m/s), generally within 20% error. Successful estimates were even obtained at a site with an inverted velocity profile, where Quaternary basalts overlie Neogene sediments. Half of the SPAC estimates showed significantly higher errors than obtained using HVSR. Joint inversion provided the most reliable estimates but was unstable at three sites. We attribute the surprising success of HVSR over SPAC to a low content of transient signals within the seismic record caused by low degrees of anthropogenic noise at the benchmark sites. At a few sites SPAC curves showed clear overtones suggesting that more reliable SPAC estimates maybe obtained utilizing a multi modal inversion. Nevertheless, our study seems to indicate that reliable basin thickness estimates in remote Australia can be obtained utilizing HVSR data from a single seismometer, without a priori knowledge of the surface-wave velocity of the basin material, thereby negating the need to deploy cumbersome arrays.

  6. VLBA Monitoring of 3C 273 and 3C 279 During INTEGRAL Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savolainen, T.; Wiik, K.; Valtaoja, E.

    2004-10-01

    The gamma-ray blazars 3C 273 and 3C 279 were ob- served with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) over seven epochs during the year 2003 as a part of support- ing observations for two INTEGRAL campaigns targeted on these sources. The VLBA observations were carried out in a full multi-wavelength polarimetric mode yield- ing total and polarized intensity maps at six frequencies ranging from 5 to 86 GHz. The VLBA maps probe the emission of the parsec scale jets in the angular scales of 0.1 - 50 mas, providing information about the dynam- ical state of the jets close to the central engine. As the gamma-ray emission above 100 keV is likely to be jet related, the co-ordinated VLBA observations give a pos- sibility to correlate the gamma-ray flux variations with the structural changes in the jet and, furthermore, with the flux and spectral variations of the individual syn- chrotron emitting components. Possible correlations can help to pinpoint the region where the gamma-ray emis- sion originates, and also establish the source of seed pho- tons for the inverse Compton process. We describe here the VLBA observations and present the first fully cali- brated maps together with a preliminary analysis.

  7. CVD growth and properties of boron phosphide on 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padavala, Balabalaji; Frye, C. D.; Wang, Xuejing; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Edgar, J. H.

    2016-09-01

    Improving the crystalline quality of boron phosphide (BP) is essential for realizing its full potential in semiconductor device applications. In this study, 3C-SiC was tested as a substrate for BP epitaxy. BP films were grown on 3C-SiC(100)/Si, 3C-SiC(111)/Si, and 3C-SiC(111)/4H-SiC(0001) substrates in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Films were produced with good crystalline orientation and morphological features in the temperature range of 1000-1200 °C using a PH3+B2H6+H2 mixture. Rotational twinning was absent in the BP due to the crystal symmetry-matching with 3C-SiC. Confocal 3D Raman imaging of BP films revealed primarily uniform peak shift and peak widths across the scanned area, except at defects on the surface. Synchrotron white beam X-ray topography showed the epitaxial relationship between BP and 3C-SiC was (100) < 011 > BP||(100) < 011 > 3C-SiC and (111) < 11 2 ̅ > BP||(111) < 11 2 ̅ > 3C-SiC. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis indicated residual tensile strain in the films and improved crystalline quality at temperatures below 1200 °C. These results indicated that BP properties could be further enhanced by employing high quality bulk 3C-SiC or 3C-SiC epilayers on 4H-SiC substrates.

  8. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, "weight-drop" source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  9. Structural Geology of the Northwestern Portion of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico: Implications for Seismic Surface Rupture Potential from TA-3 to TA-55

    SciTech Connect

    Jamie N. Gardner: Alexis Lavine; Giday WoldeGabriel; Donathon Krier; David Vaniman; Florie Caporuscio; Claudia Lewis; Peggy Reneau; Emily Kluk; M. J. Snow

    1999-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory lies at the western boundary of the Rio Grande rift, a major tectonic feature of the North American Continent. Three major faults locally constitute the modem rift boundary, and each of these is potentially seismogenic. In this study we have gathered structural geologic data for the northwestern portion of Los Alamos National Laboratory through high-precision geologic mapping, conventional geologic mapping, stratigraphic studies, drilling, petrologic studies, and stereographic aerial photograph analyses. Our study area encompasses TA-55 and TA-3, where potential for seismic surface rupture is of interest, and is bounded on the north and south by the townsite of Los Alamos and Twomile Canyon, respectively. The study area includes parts of two of the potentially active rift boundary faults--the Pajarito and Rendija Canyon faults-that form a large graben that we name the Diamond Drive graben. The graben embraces the western part of the townsite of Los Alamos, and its southern end is in the TA-3 area where it is defined by east-southeast-trending cross faults. The cross faults are small, but they accommodate interactions between the two major fault zones and gentle tilting of structural blocks to the north into the graben. North of Los Alamos townsite, the Rendija Canyon fault is a large normal fault with about 120 feet of down-to-the-west displacement over the last 1.22 million years. South from Los Alamos townsite, the Rendija Canyon fault splays to the southwest into a broad zone of deformation. The zone of deformation is about 2,000 feet wide where it crosses Los Alamos Canyon and cuts through the Los Alamos County Landfill. Farther southwest, the fault zone is about 3,000 feet wide at the southeastern corner of TA-3 in upper Mortandad Canyon and about 5,000 feet wide in Twomile Canyon. Net down-to-the-west displacement across the entire fault zone over the last 1.22 million years decreases to the south as the fault zone broadens as

  10. Surface deformation and seismic signatures associated with the eruption cycle of Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, F. G.; Johnson, H. E., III; LeWinter, A. L.; Finnegan, D. C.; Sandvol, E. A.; Nayak, A.; Hurwitz, S.

    2014-12-01

    Geysers are important subjects for studying processes involved with multi-phase eruptions. As part of a larger field effort, this study applies imaging geodesy and seismology to study eruptive cycles of the Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park. Lone Star Geyser is an ideal candidate for such study, as it erupts with a nearly regular period of approximately 3 hours. The geyser includes a 5 m diameter cone that rises 2 meters above the sinter terrace, and the entire system can be viewed from a nearby hillside. Fieldwork was accomplished during April 2014. Ground-based interferometric radar (GBIR) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) were used to image possible surface deformations associated with Lone Star Geyer's eruption cycles. Additional observations were provided by global positioning system (GPS) measurements and six broad-band seismometers deployed in the immediate vicinity of the geyser. The GBIR and TLS were deployed approximately 65 meters from the sinter cone of the geyser. The GBIR involves a ku-band radar (1.7 cm wavelength) that is sensitive to approximately half-millimeter changes in the line-of-sight distance. Radar images were acquired every minute for 3 or more eruptions per day. Temporally redundant, overlapping interferograms were used to improve the sensitivity and interpolate a minute-wise time series of line-of-sight displacement, and efforts were made to account for possible path-delay effects resulting from water vapor around the geyser cone. Repeat (every minute) high-speed TLS scans were acquired for multiple eruption cycles over the course of two-days. Resulting measurement point spacing on the sinter cone was ~3cm. The TLS point-clouds were geo-referenced using static surveyed reflectors and scanner positions. In addition to measuring ground deformation, filtering and classification of the TLS point cloud was used to construct a mask that allows radar interferometry to exclude non-ground areas (vegetation, snow, sensors

  11. Collisions of slow polyatomic ions with surfaces: dissociation and chemical reactions of C2H2+*, C2H3+, C2H4+*, C2H5+, and their deuterated variants C2D2+* and C2D4+* on room-temperature and heated carbon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jasík, Juraj; Zabka, Jan; Feketeova, Linda; Ipolyi, Imre; Märk, Tilmann D; Herman, Zdenek

    2005-11-17

    Interaction of C2Hn+ (n = 2-5) hydrocarbon ions and some of their isotopic variants with room-temperature and heated (600 degrees C) highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces was investigated over the range of incident energies 11-46 eV and an incident angle of 60 degrees with respect to the surface normal. The work is an extension of our earlier research on surface interactions of CHn+ (n = 3-5) ions. Mass spectra, translational energy distributions, and angular distributions of product ions were measured. Collisions with the HOPG surface heated to 600 degrees C showed only partial or substantial dissociation of the projectile ions; translational energy distributions of the product ions peaked at about 50% of the incident energy. Interactions with the HOPG surface at room temperature showed both surface-induced dissociation of the projectiles and, in the case of radical cation projectiles C2H2+* and C2H4+*, chemical reactions with the hydrocarbons on the surface. These reactions were (i) H-atom transfer to the projectile, formation of protonated projectiles, and their subsequent fragmentation and (ii) formation of a carbon chain build-up product in reactions of the projectile ion with a terminal CH3-group of the surface hydrocarbons and subsequent fragmentation of the product ion to C3H3+. The product ions were formed in inelastic collisions in which the translational energy of the surface-excited projectile peaked at about 32% of the incident energy. Angular distributions of reaction products showed peaking at subspecular angles close to 68 degrees (heated surfaces) and 72 degrees (room-temperature surfaces). The absolute survival probability at the incident angle of 60 degrees was about 0.1% for C2H2+*, close to 1% for C2H4+* and C2H5+, and about 3-6% for C2H3+.

  12. Seismic Imager Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Coste, Keith; Cunningham, J.; Sievers,Michael W.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Polanco, Otto R.; Green, Joseph J.; Cameron, Bruce A.; Redding, David C.; Avouac, Jean Philippe; Ampuero, Jean Paul; Leprince, Sebastien; Michel, Remi

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a geostationary seismic imager (GSI), a space telescope in geostationary orbit above the Pacific coast of the Americas that would provide movies of many large earthquakes occurring in the area from Southern Chile to Southern Alaska. The GSI movies would cover a field of view as long as 300 km, at a spatial resolution of 3 to 15 m and a temporal resolution of 1 to 2 Hz, which is sufficient for accurate measurement of surface displacements and photometric changes induced by seismic waves. Computer processing of the movie images would exploit these dynamic changes to accurately measure the rapidly evolving surface waves and surface ruptures as they happen. These measurements would provide key information to advance the understanding of the mechanisms governing earthquake ruptures, and the propagation and arrest of damaging seismic waves. GSI operational strategy is to react to earthquakes detected by ground seismometers, slewing the satellite to point at the epicenters of earthquakes above a certain magnitude. Some of these earthquakes will be foreshocks of larger earthquakes; these will be observed, as the spacecraft would have been pointed in the right direction. This strategy was tested against the historical record for the Pacific coast of the Americas, from 1973 until the present. Based on the seismicity recorded during this time period, a GSI mission with a lifetime of 10 years could have been in position to observe at least 13 (22 on average) earthquakes of magnitude larger than 6, and at least one (2 on average) earthquake of magnitude larger than 7. A GSI would provide data unprecedented in its extent and temporal and spatial resolution. It would provide this data for some of the world's most seismically active regions, and do so better and at a lower cost than could be done with ground-based instrumentation. A GSI would revolutionize the understanding of earthquake dynamics, perhaps leading ultimately to effective warning

  13. Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynn R.; Wiggins, Graham C.

    1986-01-01

    Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (mb) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 ± 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest U.S. underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in mb for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada. PMID:16593645

  14. Seismic tracking of Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Wen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Very weak, narrow band seismic signals excited by Hurricane Sandy are detected in cross-correlations of continuous waveforms recorded by stations in eastern United States, at the end of October 2012. We analyze propagational properties of the signal and track the source locations using travel-time difference residual projection, from 26 October to 1 November 2012. We find that (1) the seismic signals driven by Hurricane Sandy are azimuthal dependent. Signals are correlated only within close azimuths from the source, (2) seismic signals propagate as Rayleigh surface wave with an average velocity of about 3.3 km/s, and (3) the inferred seismic source locations follow the path of Sandy before UTC 2012.10.30 12:00:00(about half a day after its landfall in New Jersey), but then deviate from the hurricane center and stay in the coastal area near New England for another 12 hours after the hurricane dissipated. Our research discovers the properties of seismic source excited by Hurricane Sandy and demonstrates the capability of using seismic data to real-time track a hurricane and estimate its direct impacts and the subsequent disasters after it dissipates.

  15. Multichannel analysis of surface-waves and integration of downhole acoustic televiewer imaging, ultrasonic Vs and Vp, and vertical seismic profiling in an NEHRP-standard classification, South of Concordia, Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raef, Abdelmoneam; Gad, Sabreen; Tucker-Kulesza, Stacey

    2015-10-01

    Seismic site characteristics, as pertaining to earthquake hazard reduction, are a function of the subsurface elastic moduli and the geologic structures. This study explores how multiscale (surface, downhole, and laboratory) datasets can be utilized to improve "constrained" average Vs30 (shear-wave velocity to a 30-meter depth). We integrate borehole, surface and laboratory measurements for a seismic site classification based on the standards of the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). The seismic shear-wave velocity (Vs30) was derived from a geophysical inversion workflow that utilized multichannel analysis of surface-waves (MASW) and downhole acoustic televiewer imaging (DATI). P-wave and S-wave velocities, based on laboratory measurements of arrival times of ultrasonic-frequency signals, supported the workflow by enabling us to calculate Poisson's ratio, which was incorporated in building an initial model for the geophysical inversion of MASW. Extraction of core samples from two boreholes provided lithology and thickness calibration of the amplitudes of the acoustic televiewer imaging for each layer. The MASW inversion, for calculating Vs sections, was constrained with both ultrasonic laboratory measurements (from first arrivals of Vs and Vp waveforms at simulated in situ overburden stress conditions) and the downhole acoustic televiewer (DATV) amplitude logs. The Vs30 calculations enabled categorizing the studied site as NEHRP-class "C" - very dense soil and soft rock. Unlike shallow fractured carbonates in the studied area, S-wave and P-wave velocities at ultrasonic frequency for the deeper intact shale core-samples from two boreholes were in better agreement with the corresponding velocities from both a zero-offset vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and inversion of Rayleigh-wave velocity dispersion curves.

  16. Seismic moulin tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeoesli, Claudia; Walter, Fabian; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Kissling, Edi

    2016-08-01

    Through glacial moulins, meltwater is routed from the glacier surface to its base. Moulins are a main feature feeding subglacial drainage systems and thus influencing basal motion and ice dynamics, but their geometry remains poorly known. Here we show that analysis of the seismic wavefield generated by water falling into a moulin can help constrain its geometry. We present modeling results of hour-long seimic tremors emitted from a vertical moulin shaft, observed with a seismometer array installed at the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The tremor was triggered when the moulin water level exceeded a certain height, which we associate with the threshold for the waterfall to hit directly the surface of the moulin water column. The amplitude of the tremor signal changed over each tremor episode, in close relation to the amount of inflowing water. The tremor spectrum features multiple prominent peaks, whose characteristic frequencies are distributed like the resonant modes of a semiopen organ pipe and were found to depend on the moulin water level, consistent with a source composed of resonant tube waves (water pressure waves coupled to elastic deformation of the moulin walls) along the water-filled moulin pipe. Analysis of surface particle motions lends further support to this interpretation. The seismic wavefield was modeled as a superposition of sustained wave radiation by pressure sources on the side walls and at the bottom of the moulin. The former was found to dominate the wave field at close distance and the latter at large distance to the moulin.

  17. Surface seismic refraction/reflection measurement determinations of potential site resonances and the areal uniformity of NEHRP site class D in Memphis, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Wood, S.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Meremonte, M.E.; Street, R.; Worley, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    We determined S-wave velocities (Vs) to about 40-m depth at 65 locations in the Memphis-Shelby County, Tennessee, area. The Vs measurements were made using high-resolution seismic refraction and reflection methods on the ground surface. We find a clear difference in the Vs profiles between sites located on the Mississippi River flood plain and those located to the east, mostly covered by loess, in the urban areas of Memphis. The average Vs to 30-m depth at 19 sites on the modern Mississippi River floodplain averages 197 m/s (?? 15 m/s) and places 17 of these sites at the low end of NEHRP soil profile category type D (average Vs 180-360 m/s). The two remaining sites are type E. Vs to 30-m depth at 46 sites in the urban areas east of the modern floodplain are more variable and generally higher than the floodplain sites, averaging about 262 m/s (??45 m/s), still within category D. We often observed the base of the loess as a prominent S-wave reflection and as an increase in Vs to about 500 m/s. Based on the two-way travel time of this reflection, during an earthquake the impedance boundary at the loess base may generate resonances in the 3- to 6-Hz range over many areas of Memphis. Amplitude spectra from four local earthquakes recorded at one site located on loess indicate consistent resonance peaks in the 4.5- to 6.5-Hz range.

  18. Seismic monitoring of torrential and fluvial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, Arnaud; Hovius, Niels; Turowski, Jens M.

    2016-04-01

    In seismology, the signal is usually analysed for earthquake data, but earthquakes represent less than 1 % of continuous recording. The remaining data are considered as seismic noise and were for a long time ignored. Over the past decades, the analysis of seismic noise has constantly increased in popularity, and this has led to the development of new approaches and applications in geophysics. The study of continuous seismic records is now open to other disciplines, like geomorphology. The motion of mass at the Earth's surface generates seismic waves that are recorded by nearby seismometers and can be used to monitor mass transfer throughout the landscape. Surface processes vary in nature, mechanism, magnitude, space and time, and this variability can be observed in the seismic signals. This contribution gives an overview of the development and current opportunities for the seismic monitoring of geomorphic processes. We first describe the common principles of seismic signal monitoring and introduce time-frequency analysis for the purpose of identification and differentiation of surface processes. Second, we present techniques to detect, locate and quantify geomorphic events. Third, we review the diverse layout of seismic arrays and highlight their advantages and limitations for specific processes, like slope or channel activity. Finally, we illustrate all these characteristics with the analysis of seismic data acquired in a small debris-flow catchment where geomorphic events show interactions and feedbacks. Further developments must aim to fully understand the richness of the continuous seismic signals, to better quantify the geomorphic activity and to improve the performance of warning systems. Seismic monitoring may ultimately allow the continuous survey of erosion and transfer of sediments in the landscape on the scales of external forcing.

  19. How Forgetful are Seismic Waves ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkereit, B.

    2005-05-01

    3D surface seismic and vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques can be employed to image crustal structures in complex geological settings. The effects of heterogeneities on seismic wave propagation can be described in terms of different propagation regimes (Wu, 1989): quasi-homogeneous for heterogeneities too small to be seen by seismic waves, Rayleigh scattering, Mie scattering and small-angle scattering. These scattering regimes cause characteristic amplitude, phase and travel time fluctuation, which can be used to obtain estimates of scale length. Horizontal resolution of exploration seismic data is often discussed in terms of Fresnel zone. For surface and VSP data, the Fresnel radius increases with increasing depth of investigation. In addition, the lateral resolution is limited by the effective frequency content of the seismic signal. Based on strong contrast in petrophysical data, crustal exploration targets (such as gas-hydrates, permafrost or massive sulfide ores) should make strong P-wave, S-wave and converted wave reflectors against most background velocity models. In the context of realistic geological models, 3D numerical simulations are required to better assess elastic wave interactions with high acoustic impedance targets. In addition, it is important to study the influence of composition and shape of high acoustic impedance targets on the full scattered wavefield through a series of numerical modeling experiments based on the 3D elastic finite-difference (FD) method. Massive sulfide ores consisting of the end-member sulfide minerals pyrite, sphalerite, and galena, which span the full range of observed P- and S- wave velocities and densities in ore rocks, as well as gabbro inclusions, are investigated for different shapes which represent the complex morphologies often observed for ore deposits. 3D FD modeling reveals that large ore deposits lead to a strong and complex scattering response that is often dominated by shear-wave events (Bohlen et al

  20. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation.

  1. New redshift determinations for three 3C radio sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaldi, V.

    2017-01-01

    I report the new redshift determinations of three radio sources 3C 196.1, 3C 268.2 and 3C 303.1 by using GMOS/Gemini North long-slit optical spectroscopy. The details of the observations are summarized in the following table (the B600 grating was used for the three observations): Object | RA(J2000) | DEC(J2000) | Date of obs. | width-slit(arcsec) | PA(deg) | Exp.Time(sec) 3C 196.1 | 8:15:27.8 | -03:08:27 | Mar 2012 | 0.5 | 50 | 2560 3C 268.2| |12:00:59.1 | 31:33:28 | Feb 2011 | 0.5 | 165 | 2576 3C 303.1 | 14:43:14.5 | 77:07:28 | Feb 2012 | 1 | 145 | 2560 The three of the sources have extended regions of ionized gas that do not obey a spherical distribution.

  2. Extended Optical Flaring of the Blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, C. S.; Miller, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    The blazar, 3C 279, was previously reported to be undergoing a major optical outburst (ATEL#10121 and ATEL#10161). We report optical observations of 3C 279 on March 19 when it was observed with the 24-inch telescope at Georgia State University's Hard Labor Creek Observatory with R=13.46+/-0.01 mag. These observations indicate that 3C 279 continues to be in an extremely bright state.

  3. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01

    One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now

  4. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  5. Atomic probe microscopy of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckl, A. J.; Roth, M. D.; Powell, J. A.; Larkin, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The surface of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates has been studied by atomic probe microscopy in air. Atomic-scale images of the 3C SiC surface have been obtained by STM which confirm the 111 line type orientation of the cubic 3C layer grown on the 0001 plane type surface of the hexagonal 6H substrate. The nearest-neighbor atomic spacing for the 3C layer has been measured to be 3.29 +/- 0.2 A, which is within 7 percent of the bulk value. Shallow terraces in the 3C layer have been observed by STM to separate regions of very smooth growth in the vicinity of the 3C nucleation point from considerably rougher 3C surface regions. These terraces are oriented at right angles to the growth direction. Atomic force microscopy has been used to study etch pits present on the 6H substrate due to high temperature HCl cleaning prior to CVD growth of the 3C layer. The etch pits have hexagonal symmetry and vary in depth from 50 nm to 1 micron.

  6. The use of a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) as a seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, Ingrid; Chwatal, Werner; Radinger, Alexander; Brückl, Ewald

    2014-05-01

    The Tunnel Seismic While Drilling (TSWD) method uses the Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) as the seismic source. The method has been developed to predict the geological situation from reflections ahead of the tunnel face without disturbing the tunneling. The vibrations of the TBM are continuously monitored near the drilling head (pilot signal) as well as the direct and reflected seismic wave field at borehole geophones (geophone signal) situated in the tunnel wall behind the TBM. During the processing these signals are correlated and result in excellent seismic traces comparable to conventional seismic methods. The interpretation of the reflections leads to a nearly daily prognosis about 100 m ahead of the TBM. This system was successfully implemented at three different construction sites in Austria and is currently operating at one further. The cutters on front of the TBM head are pressed against the tunnel face and split the rock during rotating which is called the chipping process. This cutting process generates seismic waves radiated into the rock mass and results also in vibrations of the TBM itself. On the one hand it is important to know the source mechanism of the TBM and the radiation pattern of the seismic waves in all directions. Until now this is not well understood. To investigate this 3C-geophones were installed at the surface above the tunnel axis at different construction sites. The obtained seismograms show the forward and backward radiated seismic wave field of the TBM, for the present without consideration of the influence of the free surface. We compare this data with modelled seismograms in which we use different possible source mechanism, like single force or force due to tensile cracks. First results are shown in the scope of this work. On the other hand it is essential to know how good the recorded pilot signal represents the entire chipping process. Due to technically reasons the pilot signal has been registered so far on the non-rotating part

  7. Seismic Holography of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The basic goal of the project was to extend holographic seismic imaging techniques developed under a previous NASA contract, and to incorporate phase diagnostics. Phase-sensitive imaging gives us a powerful probe of local thermal and Doppler perturbations in active region subphotospheres, allowing us to map thermal structure and flows associated with "acoustic moats" and "acoustic glories". These remarkable features were discovered during our work, by applying simple acoustic power holography to active regions. Included in the original project statement was an effort to obtain the first seismic images of active regions on the Sun's far surface.

  8. Lower-Crustal and Upper-Mantle Seismicity beneath Aleutian Arc Volcanoes: A Temporal Link for Magmatic Processes between the Lower-Crust and the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.; Ketner, D. M.; Haney, M. M.; Prejean, S. G.; Parker, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Since 1989 the Alaska Volcano Observatory has identified more than 1,200 seismic events at upper-mantle to mid-crustal depths beneath 27 active Aleutian arc volcanic centers. Epicenters typically scatter broadly around the volcanoes at distances of as much as 25 km from the closest volcanic vent. Hypocenters for these events range typically from 15 to 45 km and the average depth is 25.1 km (σ1 = 8.1 km). Magnitudes of located events range from -0.25 to 2.9 and the average magnitude is 1.22 (σ1 = 0.5). Seismicity at these depths is unusual as it is generally considered below the brittle-ductile transition and suggests the involvement of pressurized fluids. These events provide some of the only direct evidence of the time history of magmatic processes in the lower-crust and upper-mantle, a portion of the magma pathway that is traditionally difficult to observe. The waveforms of these events exhibit the full range in frequency content typically seen in volcanic environments from broad spectrum (1 to 15 Hz) brittle failure, volcano-tectonic earthquakes, to peaked spectra (1 to 4 Hz), fluid resonance or long-period events. Most of the events are long-period or low-frequency in character and often have extended codas. These events occur both as solitary events and in sequences lasting from 2 to 30 minutes containing 3 to 10 individual events. Within the sequences individual events are often separated by volcanic tremor that shares the same spectral character as the seismic events themselves. All Aleutian arc volcanoes with suitable instrumentation and long-term monitoring exhibit some level of mid-crustal to upper-mantle seismicity. Spurr, Westdahl, Aniakchak and Akutan have the highest rates of upper-mantle to mid-crustal seismicity. Recent eruptions at Redoubt (2009) and Shishaldin (1999) were preceded by increases in lower-crustal seismicity as were episodes of unrest at Mount Spurr (2005), Trident (2008) and Little Sitkin (2012). The 1992 eruption of Mount Spurr

  9. Romanian Educational Seismic Network Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataru, Dragos; Ionescu, Constantin; Zaharia, Bogdan; Grecu, Bogdan; Tibu, Speranta; Popa, Mihaela; Borleanu, Felix; Toma, Dragos; Brisan, Nicoleta; Georgescu, Emil-Sever; Dobre, Daniela; Dragomir, Claudiu-Sorin

    2013-04-01

    Romania is one of the most active seismic countries in Europe, with more than 500 earthquakes occurring every year. The seismic hazard of Romania is relatively high and thus understanding the earthquake phenomena and their effects at the earth surface represents an important step toward the education of population in earthquake affected regions of the country and aims to raise the awareness about the earthquake risk and possible mitigation actions. In this direction, the first national educational project in the field of seismology has recently started in Romania: the ROmanian EDUcational SEISmic NETwork (ROEDUSEIS-NET) project. It involves four partners: the National Institute for Earth Physics as coordinator, the National Institute for Research and Development in Construction, Urban Planning and Sustainable Spatial Development " URBAN - INCERC" Bucharest, the Babeş-Bolyai University (Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Engineering) and the software firm "BETA Software". The project has many educational, scientific and social goals. The main educational objectives are: training students and teachers in the analysis and interpretation of seismological data, preparing of several comprehensive educational materials, designing and testing didactic activities using informatics and web-oriented tools. The scientific objective is to introduce into schools the use of advanced instruments and experimental methods that are usually restricted to research laboratories, with the main product being the creation of an earthquake waveform archive. Thus a large amount of such data will be used by students and teachers for educational purposes. For the social objectives, the project represents an effective instrument for informing and creating an awareness of the seismic risk, for experimentation into the efficacy of scientific communication, and for an increase in the direct involvement of schools and the general public. A network of nine seismic stations with SEP seismometers

  10. Effluent sampling of Titan 3 C vehicle exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Storey, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Downwind in situ ground-level measurements of the exhaust from a Titan 3 C launch vehicle were made during a normal launch. The measurement activity was conducted as part of an overall program to obtain field data for comparison with the multilayer dispersion model currently being used to predict the behavior of rocket vehicle exhaust clouds. All measurements were confined to land, ranging from the launch pad to approximately 2 kilometers downwind from the pad. Measurement systems included detectors for hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon dioxide (CO2), and particulates (Al2O3). Airborne and ground-based optical systems were employed to monitor exhaust cloud rise, growth, and movement. These measurement systems, located along the ground track (45 deg azimuth from the launch pad) of the exhaust cloud, showed no effluents attributable to the launch. Some hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide were detected in the surface wind direction (15 deg azimuth) from the pad. Comparisons with the model were made in three areas: (1) assumption of cloud geometry at stabilization; (2) prediction of cloud stabilization altitude; and (3) prediction of the path of cloud travel. In addition, the importance of elemental analyses of the particulate samples is illustrated.

  11. Hydrocarbon Induced Seismicity in Northern Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dost, B.; Spetzler, J.; Kraaijpoel, D.; Caccavale, M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Netherlands has been regarded aseismic until the first earthquakes started in 1986, after more than 25 years of gas production from the one of the largest on-shore gas-fields in the World, the Groningen field, and accompanying smaller gas fields. Due to the shallow sources, at approximately 3 km depth, even small magnitude events cause considerable damage to buildings in the region. Since the largest recorded event in the Groningen field in 2012 with ML= 3,6, more than 30.000 damage claims were received by the mining company. Since 1995 a seismic monitoring network is operational in the region, consisting of 8 200m deep boreholes with 4 levels of 3C 4,5 Hz geophones. The network was designed for a location threshold of ML=1,5 over a 40x 80 km region. Average station separation was 20 km. At the end of 2014, 245 events have been recorded with ML ≥ 1,5, out of a total of 1100. Since 2003 a new mining law is in place in the Netherlands, which requires for each gas field in production a seismic risk analysis. Initially, due to the small number of events for specific fields, a general hazard (PSHA) was calculated for all gas-fields and a maximum magnitude was estimated at ML = 3,9. Since 2003 an increase in the activity rate is observed for the Groningen field, leading to the development of new models and a re-assessment of parameters like the maximum magnitude. More recently these models are extended to seismic risk, where also the fragility of the regional buildings is taken into account. Understanding the earthquake process is essential in taking mitigation measures. Continued research is focused on reducing the uncertainties in the hazard and risk models and is accompanied by an upgrade of the monitoring network. In 2014 a new dense network was designed to monitor the Groningen gas field in this region (30*40 km) with an average separation of 4 km. This allows an improved location threshold (M>0,5) and location accuracy (50-100m). A detailed P- and S

  12. A bump on the upper surface of the Philippine Sea plate beneath the Boso Peninsula, Japan inferred from seismic reflection surveys: A possible asperity of the 1703 Genroku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Noriko; Komada, Nozomi; Sano, Junpei; Kikuchi, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Shuji; Ito, Tanio; Sato, Toshinori; Miyauchi, Takahiro; Kawamura, Tomonori; Shishikura, Masanobu; Abe, Shintaro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kawanaka, Taku; Suda, Shigeyuki; Higashinaka, Motonori; Ikawa, Takeshi

    2009-07-01

    To reveal a subsurface structure beneath the southern part of the Boso Peninsula, Japan, where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting and great interplate earthquakes associated with the subduction occur repeatedly, we conducted a new seismic reflection survey from March to April 2005 (Boso05). We also reanalyzed old multi-channel seismic (MCS) survey data that had been collected off the Boso Peninsula in 1978 (SK78). We found clear strong reflectors beneath the southern coast of the Boso Peninsula. Since common mid points (CMPs) were distributed widely beneath the study area owing to the design of the receiver and shot lines of Boso05, we selected appropriate directions of stacking lines to get the best image of the dipping reflectors by optimum azimuth search (OAS) processing. We carefully checked the seismic profiles at the intersections of the survey lines to confirm the NNE-dipping configuration of the strong reflectors. These strong reflectors were interpreted as the upper surface of the subducting PHS plate from their locations and the estimated velocities beneath the reflectors. Furthermore, these reflectors revealed a topographic high (bump) beneath the southern coast of the Boso Peninsula where the source fault of the Genroku earthquake of 1703 is thought to be located.

  13. Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.

    2004-12-09

    This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could

  14. Vibrational properties of Ti3C2 and Ti3C2T2 (T = O, F, OH) monosheets by first-principles calculations: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Wang, Jiemin; Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Minmin; Wang, Xiaohui

    2015-04-21

    We present a comparative study on the static and dynamical properties of bare Ti3C2 and T-terminated Ti3C2T2 (T = O, F, OH) monosheets using density functional theory calculations. First, the crystal structures are optimized to be of trigonal configurations (P3[combining macron]m1), which are thermodynamically and dynamically stable. It is demonstrated that the terminations modulate the crystal structures through valence electron density redistribution of the atoms, particularly surface Ti (Ti2) in the monosheets. Second, lattice dynamical properties including phonon dispersion and partial density of states (PDOS) are investigated. Phonon PDOS analysis shows a clear collaborative feature in the vibrations, reflecting the covalent nature of corresponding bonds in the monosheets. In the bare Ti3C2 monosheet, there is a phonon band gap between 400 and 500 cm(-1), while it disappears in Ti3C2O2 and Ti3C2(OH)2 as the vibrations associated with the terminal atoms (O and OH) bridge the gap. Third, both Raman (Eg and A1g) and infrared-active (Eu and A2u) vibrational modes are predicted and conclusively assigned. A comparative study indicates that the terminal atoms remarkably influence the vibrational frequencies. Generally, the terminal atoms weaken the vibrations in which surface Ti atoms are involved while strengthening the out-of-plane vibration of C atoms. Temperature-dependent micro Raman measurements agree with the theoretical prediction if the complexity in the experimentally obtained lamellae for the Raman study is taken into account.

  15. Passive seismic imaging at reservoir depths using ambient seismic noise recorded at the Otway Co2 geological storage research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Nader A.; Lumley, David; Pevzner, Roman

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate rapid convergence (<60 min) of passive seismic images down to reservoir depths (∼2.0 km) at the CO2CRC Otway CO2 geological storage research facility, Australia, using ambient seismic noise recorded continuously with a buried geophone array. Our passive seismic images are created by applying seismic data processing and interferometry techniques, and show we can recover both surface and body waves from the ambient noise data. Using a recording time interval in which body waves dominate the ambient seismic noise, we generate passive seismic images that correlate well with the major reflectors imaged by conventional active-source 3D seismic data at the site. We present a mathematical model for image convergence, where the variance converges inversely proportional to recording time, and show for the first time an excellent agreement between a mathematical model and the observed convergence rate of interferometric images made from ambient seismic noise.

  16. Natural fracture characterization using passive seismic illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.

    2003-01-08

    The presence of natural fractures in reservoir rock can significantly enhance gas production, especially in tight gas formations. Any general knowledge of the existence, location, orientation, spatial density, and connectivity of natural fractures, as well as general reservoir structure, that can be obtained prior to active seismic acquisition and drilling can be exploited to identify key areas for subsequent higher resolution active seismic imaging. Current practices for estimating fracture properties before the acquisition of surface seismic data are usually based on the assumed geology and tectonics of the region, and empirical or fracture mechanics-based relationships between stratigraphic curvature and fracturing. The objective of this research is to investigate the potential of multicomponent surface sensor arrays, and passive seismic sources in the form of local earthquakes to identify and characterize potential fractured gas reservoirs located near seismically active regions. To assess the feasibility of passive seismic fracture detection and characterization, we have developed numerical codes for modeling elastic wave propagation in reservoir structures containing multiple, finite-length fractures. This article describes our efforts to determine the conditions for favorable excitation of fracture converted waves, and to develop an imaging method that can be used to locate and characterize fractures using multicomponent, passive seismic data recorded on a surface array.

  17. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, Michael A.; Cook, Neville G. W.; McEvilly, Thomas V.; Majer, Ernest L.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  18. A description of seismic amplitude techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadlow, James

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of seismic data is a non-invasive technique used for determining the sub surface geology. Changes in lithology and fluid fill affect the seismic wavelet. Analysing seismic data for direct hydrocarbon indicators (DHIs), such as full stack amplitude anomalies, or amplitude variation with offset (AVO), can help a seismic interpreter relate the geophysical response to real geology and, more importantly, to distinguish the presence of hydrocarbons. Inversion is another commonly used technique that attempts to tie the seismic data back to the geology. Much has been written about these techniques, and attempting to gain an understanding on the theory and application of them by reading through various journals can be quite daunting. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline DHI analysis, including full stack amplitude anomalies, AVO and inversion and show the relationship between all three. The equations presented have been included for completeness, but the reader can pass over the mathematical detail.

  19. 17 CFR 270.3c-6 - Certain transfers of interests in section 3(c)(1) and section 3(c)(7) funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF... gift or bequest or pursuant to an agreement relating to a legal separation or divorce. (2) The term Section 3(c)(1) Company means a company that would be an investment company but for the exclusion...

  20. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  1. Spatially Resolved Spectra of 3C Galaxy Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Baum, S. A.; Weistrop, D.; Nelson, C.; Kaiser, M. E.; Gelderman, R. F.

    1998-01-01

    We present and discuss visible-wavelength long-slit spectra of four low-redshift 3C galaxies obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The slit was aligned with near-nuclear jet-like structure seen in HST images of the galaxies, to give unprecedented spatial resolution of their inner regions. In 3C 135 and 3C 171, the spectra reveal clumpy emission-line structures that indicate outward motions of a few hundred kilometers per second within a centrally illuminated and ionized biconical region. There may also be some low-ionization, high-velocity material associated with 3C 135. In 3C 264 and 3C 78, the jets have blue featureless spectra consistent with their proposed synchrotron origin. There is weak associated line emission in the innermost part of the jets with mild outflow velocity. These jets are bright and highly collimated only within a circumnuclear region of lower galaxy luminosity, which is not dusty. We discuss the origins of these central regions and their connection with relativistic jets.

  2. Seismic slip deficit along Nepal Himalayas: implications for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, Laurent; Tapponnier, Paul; Nath Sapkota, Soma; Klinger, Yann

    2016-04-01

    In 1255, 1344 and 1408 AD, then again in 1833, 1934 and 2015, large earthquakes, devastated Kathmandu. The 1255 and 1934 surface ruptures have been identified east of the city, along comparable segments of the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT). Whether the other two pairs of events were similar, is unclear. Taking into account charcoal's "Inbuilt-ages", we revisit the timing of terrace offsets at key sites, to compare them with the seismic record since 1200 AD. The location, extent, and seismic moment of the 1833 and 2015 events imply that they released only a small part of the regional slip deficit, on a deep thrust segment that stopped north of the Siwaliks. By contrast, the 1344 or 1408 AD earthquake may have ruptured the MFT up to the surface in central Nepal between Kathmandu and Pokhara, East of the surface trace of the great 1505 AD earthquake which affected Western Nepal. If so, the whole megathrust system in Nepal ruptured during a sequence of earthquakes that lasted less than three centuries and propagated the rupture up to the surface from East to West. Today's situation in the himalayan seismic sequence might be close to that of the 14th century.

  3. Near-Surface Structure and Velocities of the Northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and the Western Santa Clara Valley, California, From Seismic Imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Gandhok, G.; Goldman, M.R.; Steedman, Clare

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Santa Clara Valley (SCV) is located in the southern San Francisco Bay area of California and is bounded by the Santa Cruz Mountains to the southwest, the Diablo Ranges to the northeast, and the San Francisco Bay to the north (Fig. 1). The SCV, which includes the City of San Jose, numerous smaller cities, and much of the high-technology manufacturing and research area commonly referred to as the Silicon Valley, has a population in excess of 1.7 million people (2000 U. S. Census;http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06085.html The SCV is situated between major active faults of the San Andreas Fault system, including the San Andreas Fault to the southwest and the Hayward and Calaveras faults to the northeast, and other faults inferred to lie beneath the alluvium of the SCV (CWDR, 1967; Bortugno et al., 1991). The importance of the SCV as a major industrial center, its large population, and its proximity to major earthquake faults are important considerations with respect to earthquake hazards and water-resource management. The fault-bounded alluvial aquifer system beneath the valley is the source of about one-third of the water supply for the metropolitan area (Hanson et al., 2004). To better address the earthquake hazards of the SCV, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has undertaken a program to evaluate potential seismic sources, the effects of strong ground shaking, and stratigraphy associated with the regional aquifer system. As part of that program and to better understand water resources of the valley, the USGS and the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) began joint studies to characterize the faults, stratigraphy, and structures beneath the SCV in the year 2000. Such features are important to both agencies because they directly influence the availability and management of groundwater resources in the valley, and they affect the severity and distribution of strong shaking from local and regional earthquakes sources that may affect

  4. Seismic Velocity Estimation in the Middle East from Multiple Waveform Functionals: P & S Receiver Functions, Waveform Fitting, and Surface Wave Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Dispersion Measurements for Lithospheric Structure Beneath Asia and North Africa, in Proceedings of the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear...Simultaneous Inversion of Receiver Functions, Multi-mode Dispersion, and Travel-time Tomography for Lithospheric Structure Beneath the Middle...teleseismic receiver functions: Implications for lithospheric structure of the Arabian Peninsula. J. Geophys. Res., 111(B11311): 10.1029/2005JB004130. Zhao

  5. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  6. Seismic intrusion detector system

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Hervey L.; Hawley, James G.; Portlock, John M.; Scheibner, James E.

    1976-01-01

    A system for monitoring man-associated seismic movements within a control area including a geophone for generating an electrical signal in response to seismic movement, a bandpass amplifier and threshold detector for eliminating unwanted signals, pulse counting system for counting and storing the number of seismic movements within the area, and a monitoring system operable on command having a variable frequency oscillator generating an audio frequency signal proportional to the number of said seismic movements.

  7. Fine Structure in 3C 120 and 3C 84. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ., 24 Aug. 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, L. K.

    1976-01-01

    Seven epochs of very long baseline radio interferometric observations of the Seyfert galaxies 3C 120 and 3C 84, at 3.8-cm wave length using stations at Westford, Massachusetts, Goldstone, California, Green Bank, West Virginia, and Onsala, Sweden, have been analyzed for source structure. An algorithm for reconstructing the brightness distribution of a spatially confined source from fringe amplitude and so called closure phase data has been developed and successfully applied to artificially generated test data and to data on the above mentioned sources. Over the two year time period of observation, 3C 120 was observed to consist of a double source showing apparent super relativistic expansion and separation velocities. The total flux changes comprising one outburst can be attributed to one of these components. 3C 84 showed much slower changes, evidently involving flux density changes in individual stationary components rather than relative motion.

  8. Capacitance of Ti3C2Tx MXene in ionic liquid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zifeng; Barbara, Daffos; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Van Aken, Katherine L.; Anasori, Babak; Gogotsi, Yury; Simon, Patrice

    2016-09-01

    Ti3C2Tx MXene, a two-dimensional (2D) early transition metal carbide, has shown an extremely high volumetric capacitance in aqueous electrolytes, but in a narrow voltage window (less than 1.23 V). The utilization of MXene materials in ionic liquid electrolytes with a large voltage window has never been addressed. Here, we report the preparation of the Ti3C2Tx MXene ionogel film by vacuum filtration for use as supercapacitor electrodes operating in 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI) neat ionic liquid electrolyte. Due to the disordered structure of the Ti3C2Tx hydrogel film and a stable spacing after vacuum drying, achieved through ionic liquid electrolyte immersion of the Ti3C2Tx hydrogel film, the Ti3C2Tx surface became accessible to EMI+ and TFSI- ions. A capacitance of 70 F g-1 together with a large voltage window of 3 V was obtained at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in neat EMI-TFSI electrolyte. The electrochemical signature indicates a capacitive behavior even at a high scan rate (500 mV s-1) and a high power performance. This work opens up the possibilities of using MXene materials with various ionic liquid electrolytes.

  9. Capacitance of Ti3C2Tx MXene in Ionic Liquid Electrolyte

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Zifeng; Barbara, Daffos; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; ...

    2016-04-14

    Ti3C2Tx MXene, a two-dimensional (2D) early transition metal carbide, has shown an extremely high volumetric capacitance in aqueous electrolytes, but in a narrow voltage window (less than 1.23 V). The utilization of MXene materials in ionic liquid electrolytes with a large voltage window has never been addressed. Here, we report the preparation of the Ti3C2Tx MXene ionogel film by vacuum filtration for use as supercapacitor electrodes operating in 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI) neat ionic liquid electrolyte. Due to the disordered structure of the Ti3C2Tx hydrogel film and a stable spacing after vacuum drying, achieved through ionic liquid electrolyte immersion of themore » Ti3C2Tx hydrogel film, the Ti3C2Tx surface became accessible to EMI+ and TFSI- ions. A capacitance of 70 F g-1 together with a large voltage window of 3 V was obtained at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in neat EMI-TFSI electrolyte. The electrochemical signature indicates a capacitive behavior even at a high scan rate (500 mV s-1) and a high power performance. This work opens up the possibilities of using MXene materials with various ionic liquid electrolytes.« less

  10. The lunar seismic tomography and internal heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, N.; Zhu, P.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.

    2012-12-01

    A seismic tomography is presented to show the internal lateral heterogeneities of moon. The lunar seismic tomography is made from the moonquake arrival-time data acquired by the Apollo program during 1971 to 1977. The seismic records obtained from the four seismic station of Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package on the moon. The research target covers the surround of Apollo-12, 14, 15 and 16 landing sites. A preliminary image of three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structures of lunar interior have been calculated using hundreds of arrival-times of moonquake events from surface to deep mantle. These results show that some evidences of lateral heterogeneities in the lunar mantle and crust, which implies the existence of complex structure inside the moon.

  11. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of hepatitis A virus 3C proteinase.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, B A; Lowe, C; Shechosky, S; McKay, R T; Yang, C C; Shah, V J; Simon, R J; Vederas, J C; Santi, D V

    1995-06-27

    Picornaviral 3C proteinases are a group of closely related thiol proteinases responsible for processing of the viral polyprotein into its component proteins. These proteinases adopt a chymotrypsin-like fold [Allaire et al. (1994) Nature 369, 72-77; Matthews et al. (1994) Cell 77, 761-771] and a display an active-site configuration like those of the serine proteinases. Peptide-aldehydes based on the preferred peptide substrates for hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C proteinase were synthesized by reduction of a thioester precursor. Acetyl-Leu-Ala-Ala-(N,N'-dimethylglutaminal) was found to be a reversible, slow-binding inhibitor for HAV 3C with a Ki* of (4.2 +/- 0.8) x 10(-8) M. This inhibitor showed 50-fold less activity against the highly homologous human rhinovirus (strain 14) 3C proteinase, whose peptide substrate specificity is slightly different, suggesting a high degree of selectivity. NMR spectrometry of the adduct of the 13C-labeled inhibitor with the HAV-3C proteinase indicate that a thiohemiacetal is formed between the enzyme and the aldehyde carbon as previously noted for peptide-aldehyde inhibitors of papain [Lewis & Wolfenden (1977) Biochemistry 16,4890-4894; Gamcsik et al. (1983) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 105, 6324-6325]. The adduct can also be observed by electrospray mass spectrometry.

  12. A Sema3C Mutant Resistant to Cleavage by Furin (FR-Sema3C) Inhibits Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Shira; Lu, Huayi; Palacio, Agustina; Ziv, Keren; Kessler, Ofra; Schaal, Shlomit; Neufeld, Gera; Barak, Yoreh

    2016-01-01

    In age-related macular degeneration (AMD), abnormal sub retinal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a major cause of blindness. FR-sema3C is a point mutated form of semaphorin-3C that is resistant to cleavage by furin like pro-protein convertases (FPPC). We have found in previous work that FR-sema3C functions as an anti-angiogenic factor. In this study we investigated the possible use of FR-sema3C as an inhibitor of CNV. FR-sema3C inhibits VEGF as well as PDGF-BB signal transduction in endothelial cells and to less extent bFGF induced signal transduction using a mechanism that does not depend upon the binding of VEGF like the drugs that are currently the mainstay treatment for AMD. CNV was induced in eyes of C57 black mice by laser photocoagulation. Intravitreal injection of FR-Sema3C or aflibercept (VEGF-trap) was then used to inhibit CNV formation. Invading choroidal vessels were visualized a week later by injection of FITC-dextran into the circulation, followed by the measurement of the area of the invading blood vessels. Injection of 0.1 μg FR-Sema3C inhibited CNV by 55% (P<0.01) and was as effective as 5 μg aflibercept. FR-sema3C did not display any adverse effects on retinal function following its injection into eyes of healthy mice as assessed by optokinetic reflex (OKR) and Electro-retinogram (ERG) criteria. Furthermore, FR-sema3C did not induce apoptosis in the retina as determined by TUNEL nor was there any discernable structural damage to the retina as assessed by several immuno-histochemical criteria. Our results suggest that FR-sema3C could perhaps be used for the treatment of AMD, and that it may perhaps be of benefit to patients that do not respond well to current treatments relying on VEGF sequestering agents. PMID:28036336

  13. 3D seismic image processing for interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinming

    Extracting fault, unconformity, and horizon surfaces from a seismic image is useful for interpretation of geologic structures and stratigraphic features. Although interpretation of these surfaces has been automated to some extent by others, significant manual effort is still required for extracting each type of these geologic surfaces. I propose methods to automatically extract all the fault, unconformity, and horizon surfaces from a 3D seismic image. To a large degree, these methods just involve image processing or array processing which is achieved by efficiently solving partial differential equations. For fault interpretation, I propose a linked data structure, which is simpler than triangle or quad meshes, to represent a fault surface. In this simple data structure, each sample of a fault corresponds to exactly one image sample. Using this linked data structure, I extract complete and intersecting fault surfaces without holes from 3D seismic images. I use the same structure in subsequent processing to estimate fault slip vectors. I further propose two methods, using precomputed fault surfaces and slips, to undo faulting in seismic images by simultaneously moving fault blocks and faults themselves. For unconformity interpretation, I first propose a new method to compute a unconformity likelihood image that highlights both the termination areas and the corresponding parallel unconformities and correlative conformities. I then extract unconformity surfaces from the likelihood image and use these surfaces as constraints to more accurately estimate seismic normal vectors that are discontinuous near the unconformities. Finally, I use the estimated normal vectors and use the unconformities as constraints to compute a flattened image, in which seismic reflectors are all flat and vertical gaps correspond to the unconformities. Horizon extraction is straightforward after computing a map of image flattening; we can first extract horizontal slices in the flattened space

  14. Central Anatolian Seismic Network: Initial Analysis of the Seismicity and Earth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arda Özacar, A.; Abgarmi, Bizhan; Delph, Jonathan; Beck, Susan L.; Sandvol, Eric; Türkelli, Niyazi; Kalafat, Doğan; Kahraman, Metin; Teoman, Uğur

    2015-04-01

    Anatolian Microplate provides many of the clues to understand the geodynamic processes leading to continental collision, plateau formation, slab tearing / break-off and development of escape tectonics. During last decades, the tectonic evolution and dynamics of Anatolia has been the prime target of numerous research efforts employing wide spectrum of disciplines. However the Anatolian interior which is characterized by large magnitude lateral and vertical displacements, widespread Neogene volcanism and a complex tectonic history, is still under much debate and require a joint multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mantle-to-surface dynamics. In order to identify the crust and mantle structure beneath Central Anatolia and related seismicity, a dense seismic array that consists of 70 broadband seismic stations was deployed temporarily in 2013 as a part of the Central Anatolian Tectonics (CAT) project on continental dynamics. A year of seismic record has been processed and part of it was analyzed using various seismic methods. Distribution of preliminary earthquake locations supports the presence of seismic activity partly localized along major tectonic structures across the region. According ambient noise tomography results, upper crustal seismic velocity variations correlate well with surface geology while slow shear wave velocities dominate the lower crust indicating a weaker crustal rheology at the bottom. Furthermore, analysis of teleseismic P wave receiver functions revealed the presence of crustal low velocity zones associated to Neogene volcanism and sharp Moho variations near tectonic sutures and faults. By combining this new dataset with seismic data recorded by previous seismic deployments and national networks, we will have a complete seismic coverage for the entire region allowing researchers to image beneath Anatolia from mantle to surface with high resolution.

  15. Single-step non-thermal plasma synthesis of 3C-SiC nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaukulkar, Rohan P.; de Peuter, Koen; Ghodes, Jacob A.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Cloud, Jacqueline E.; Yang, Yongan; Stradins, Paul; Agarwal, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    We present a scalable, single-step, non-thermal plasma synthesis technique for the growth of sub-5 nm, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) coated 3C-SiC nanoparticles (NPs). In a tubular flow reactor, we first nucleate and grow c-Si NPs upstream in a SiH4/Ar plasma. These c-Si NPs are then transported by gas flow to a downstream C2H2/Ar plasma, and carburized in-flight by carbon-containing radicals and ions to 3C-SiC NPs. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy indicate an NP size of ˜4 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirms that the c-Si NPs are completely carburized to 3C-SiC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows that the surface of the 3C-SiC NPs is coated with a-C:H with some alkenyl termination, which can facilitate further solution-based surface functionalization for biomedical applications.

  16. Are MXenes promising anode materials for Li ion batteries? Computational studies on electronic properties and Li storage capability of Ti3C2 and Ti3C2X2 (X = F, OH) monolayer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Panwen

    2012-10-10

    Density functional theory (DFT) computations were performed to investigate the electronic properties and Li storage capability of Ti(3)C(2), one representative MXene (M represents transition metals, and X is either C or/and N) material, and its fluorinated and hydroxylated derivatives. The Ti(3)C(2) monolayer acts as a magnetic metal, while its derived Ti(3)C(2)F(2) and Ti(3)C(2)(OH)(2) in their stable conformations are semiconductors with small band gaps. Li adsorption forms a strong Coulomb interaction with Ti(3)C(2)-based hosts but well preserves its structural integrity. The bare Ti(3)C(2) monolayer exhibits a low barrier for Li diffusion and high Li storage capacity (up to Ti(3)C(2)Li(2) stoichiometry). The surface functionalization of F and OH blocks Li transport and decreases Li storage capacity, which should be avoided in experiments. The exceptional properties, including good electronic conductivity, fast Li diffusion, low operating voltage, and high theoretical Li storage capacity, make Ti(3)C(2) MXene a promising anode material for Li ion batteries.

  17. Seismicity of California's north coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    At least three moment magnitude (M) 7 earthquakes occurred along California's north coast in the second half of the nineteenth century. The M 7.3 earthquake on 23 November 1873 occurred near the California-Oregon coast and likely was located on the Cascadia subduction zone or within the North American plate. The M 7.0 + earthquake on 9 May 1878 was located about 75 km offshore near the Mendocino fault. The surface-wave magnitude (M(s)) 7.0 earthquake on 16 April 1899 was located about 150 km offshore within the Gorda plate. There were at least three M 7 north-coast earthquakes in the 35 years before 1906, two M 7 earthquakes in the 20 years after 1906, no M 7 earthquakes from 1923 until 1980, and four M 7 earthquakes since 1980. The relative seismic quiescence after 1906 for M 7 earthquakes along California's north coast mimics the post-1906 seismic quiescence in the San Francisco Bay area for M 6 earthquakes. The post-1906 relative quiescence did not extend to lower magnitudes in either area. The 18 April 1906 earthquake apparently influenced the rate of occurrence of M 7 north-coast earthquakes as it apparently influenced the rate of M 6 earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay area. The relative seismic quiescence along the California north-coast region after 1906 should be taken into account when evaluating seismic hazards in northwest California.

  18. Seismic exploration in Raton basin

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, J.K.; Rose, P.R.

    1985-05-01

    Exploration in the Raton basin has delineated complex mountain-front structure in the asymmetric basin, and defined possible basin-centered gas. Exploration has included subsurface and surface geology, remote sensing, and seismic reflection. The Raton basin is a north-south-trending structural basin straddling the Colorado-New Mexico boundary. It is bounded on the west by the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, on the north and northeast by the Wet Mountains and Apishapa arch, and the Sierra Grande uplift on the south and southeast. The basin is asymmetric with transcurrent faulting and thrusting associated with the steeper western flank of the basin. Rocks range from Devonian-Mississippian overlying Precambrian basement to Miocene volcanics associated with the Spanish Peaks. Principal targets include the Entrada, Dakota, Codell, and Trinidad Sandstones and the Purgatoire and Raton Formations. Seismic data include explosive and Vibroseis data. Data quality is good in the basin center and is fair in the thrusted areas. Correlations are difficult from line to line. However, a strike line in the disturbed area would probably be more disrupted by out-of-the-plane reflections than the dip lines would be. Significant stratigraphic changes are seen in both the Trinidad and Dakota intervals. Integrated seismic and geological studies are keys to exploration in the basin. Subsequent work will rely heavily on improved seismic information.

  19. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  20. Viability of Stored Rabbit Erythrocytes Carrying Number C3c.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-31

    A-A165 440 VIABILITY OF STORED RABBIT ERYTHROCYTES CARRYING NUBR V no C3C(U) MASSACHUSETTS UNIV MEDICAL SCHOOL MORCESTER UNCLRSSIFI 0 SZYMANSKI 31...Carrying No C3c 0 Annual and Final Report Irma 0. Szymanski, M.D. Ln CD May 31, 1984 I Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND...Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland 21701-5012 Contract No. DAMD17-82-C-2150 .TICD ET University of Massachusetts Medical Center .EC, Worcester

  1. The Radio Spectral Index and Expansion of 3C 58

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-20

    it has often been described as morphologically similar to the Crab Nebula , the Crab being the prototype for this class. 3C 58 is at a similar distance...the Ðla- ments. This last situation does seem to obtain in the Crab Nebula , where strong circumstantial evidence points to the existence of such a...the surrounding material. We are then brought to a crucial di†erence between 3C 58 and the Crab Nebula : in the case of the Crab, the synchro- tron

  2. Three-dimensional structure of the greater Los Angeles basin: Insights from transects and models that integrate industry seismic reflection profiles, well logs, surface geology, and relocated earthquake catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Suess, M. P.; Rivero, C. A.

    2001-12-01

    We describe the geometry and activity of major, seismogenic fault systems in the Los Angeles basin and adjacent offshore areas using regional seismic reflection transects and three-dimensional structural and velocity models. The seismic transects, which integrates relocated earthquakes, focal mechanisms, and well control, image several active fault systems (Palos Verdes, Newport-Inglewood, Compton, Las Cienegas, Elysian Park, Puente Hills, Whittier, Oceanside, etc.) that threaten the Los Angeles metropolitan region. The models describe the three dimensional geometry and kinematic interaction of these faults systems, and incorporate 35,000 km of industry seismic reflection data, more than 1,000 well logs, surface geology, and re-located earthquake catalogs. The Los Angeles basin lies at the juncture of the Transverse and Peninsular Ranges, and thus contains fault systems that belong to both of these tectonic provinces. The southern basin and Inner California Borderlands are dominated by northwest-southeast trending strike-slip and blind-thrust systems, parallel to the grain of the Peninsular Ranges, that partition oblique convergence. Many of these structures are reactivated normal faults that formed during Neogene rifting of the southern California margin. In contrast, the northern Los Angeles basin is dominated by east-west trending thrust and strike-slip systems that accommodate north-south shortening. These faults are part of the Transverse Ranges province, and locally dissect older Peninsular Range trends that are carried northward by motion along the San Andreas and related strike-slip fault systems. We consider the implications of these tectonic models for regional earthquake hazards assessment.

  3. Determining the microseismic event source parameters from the surface seismic array data with strong correlated noise and complex focal mechanisms of the source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, A. F.; Varypaev, A. V.; Rozhkov, M. V.; Epiphansky, A. G.; Dricker, I.

    2014-05-01

    The world experience shows that hydraulic fracturing (fracking) is an efficient tool for increasing oil and gas production of low-permeable reservoirs in hydrocarbon fields. The fracking-induced fractures in the rock, which are hydrodynamically connected with the wells, significantly enhance the volumes of extracted hydrocarbons. Controlling the processes of fracture formation and propagation is a vital question in the oil and gas reservoir management. A key means to implement this control is provided by microseismic monitoring of fracking, which makes it possible to promptly reconstruct the geometry of the fractures from the data on seismic waves from the microearthquakes induced by the formation and propagation of fractures.

  4. Geological mounds and their seismic expression

    SciTech Connect

    Swarbrick, R.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Mound geometry (convex upward structure developed above a subhorizontal surface) is common in many geological environments and frequently observed in 2-dimensions on seismic sections. Seismic mounds are typically associated with deep-water clastic sediments, e.g. submarine fans and slumps, and with a variety of carbonate depositional settings, e.g., reefs and banks, but also exist in other depositional settings. Recognition will be dependent on mound dimension, velocity contrast, amplitude strength, and the resolution of the seismic data. Since mounds can represent an important exploration target and recognition of porous, hydrocarbon-bearing section is all-important, careful restitution of the original depositional morphology from the seismic data is required. Details of present velocity distribution are critical, along with a realistic concept of any post-depositional modification, such as compaction, which may have taken place during burial. Where differential compaction is taking place, for example between sand and shale, seismic expression of morphology will be continually modified during progressive burial. Analysis of structure at the top and base of the mound can provide support for lithological interpretation based on other criteria, such as seismic facies analysis based on internal and external reflections. Modeling, using parameters from mounds in a variety of known depositional settings, illustrates many of the interpretational problems associated with seismic mounds and provides some objective criteria for analysis of mound morphology. Comparison is made with real data, principally from northwest Europe and North America.

  5. Moon meteoritic seismic hum: Steady state prediction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lognonne, P.; Feuvre, M.L.; Johnson, C.L.; Weber, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    We use three different statistical models describing the frequency of meteoroid impacts on Earth to estimate the seismic background noise due to impacts on the lunar surface. Because of diffraction, seismic events on the Moon are typically characterized by long codas, lasting 1 h or more. We find that the small but frequent impacts generate seismic signals whose codas overlap in time, resulting in a permanent seismic noise that we term the "lunar hum" by analogy with the Earth's continuous seismic background seismic hum. We find that the Apollo era impact detection rates and amplitudes are well explained by a model that parameterizes (1) the net seismic impulse due to the impactor and resulting ejecta and (2) the effects of diffraction and attenuation. The formulation permits the calculation of a composite waveform at any point on the Moon due to simulated impacts at any epicentral distance. The root-mean-square amplitude of this waveform yields a background noise level that is about 100 times lower than the resolution of the Apollo long-period seismometers. At 2 s periods, this noise level is more than 1000 times lower than the low noise model prediction for Earth's microseismic noise. Sufficiently sensitive seismometers will allow the future detection of several impacts per day at body wave frequencies. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Engineering Seismic Base Layer for Defining Design Earthquake Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Nozomu

    2008-07-08

    Engineer's common sense that incident wave is common in a widespread area at the engineering seismic base layer is shown not to be correct. An exhibiting example is first shown, which indicates that earthquake motion at the ground surface evaluated by the analysis considering the ground from a seismic bedrock to a ground surface simultaneously (continuous analysis) is different from the one by the analysis in which the ground is separated at the engineering seismic base layer and analyzed separately (separate analysis). The reason is investigated by several approaches. Investigation based on eigen value problem indicates that the first predominant period in the continuous analysis cannot be found in the separate analysis, and predominant period at higher order does not match in the upper and lower ground in the separate analysis. The earthquake response analysis indicates that reflected wave at the engineering seismic base layer is not zero, which indicates that conventional engineering seismic base layer does not work as expected by the term 'base'. All these results indicate that wave that goes down to the deep depths after reflecting in the surface layer and again reflects at the seismic bedrock cannot be neglected in evaluating the response at the ground surface. In other words, interaction between the surface layer and/or layers between seismic bedrock and engineering seismic base layer cannot be neglected in evaluating the earthquake motion at the ground surface.

  7. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    . An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified

  8. 3C-SiC nanocrystals/TiO{sub 2} nanotube heterostructures with enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Liu, L. Z.; Yang, L.; Gan, Z. X.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-06-09

    p-type ultrathin 3C-SiC nanocrystals are coated on heat-treated n-type TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays formed by electrochemical etching of Ti sheets to produce heterostructured photocatalysts. Depending on the amounts of 3C-SiC nanocrystals on the TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, photocatalytic degradation of organic species can be enhanced. The intrinsic electric field induced by the heterojunction promotes separation of the photoexcited electrons-holes in both the TiO{sub 2} nanotubes and 3C-SiC nanocrystals. Hence, holes can more effectively travel to the surface of 3C-SiC nanocrystals and there are more electrons on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes consequently forming more {sup •}O{sub 2}{sup −} and {sup •}OH species to degrade organic molecules.

  9. Precipitation Retrievals in typhoon domain combining of FY3C MWHTS Observations and WRF Predicted Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jieying, HE; Shengwei, ZHANG; Na, LI

    2017-02-01

    A passive sub-millimeter precipitation retrievals algorithm is provided based on Microwave Humidity and Temperature Sounder (MWHTS) onboard the Chinese Feng Yun 3C (FY-3C) satellite. Using the validated global reference physical model NCEP/WRF/VDISORT), NCEP data per 6 hours are downloaded to run the Weather Research and Forecast model WRF, and derive the typical precipitation data from the whole world. The precipitation retrieval algorithm can operate either on land or on seawater for global. To simply the calculation procedure and save the training time, principle component analysis (PCA) was adapted to filter out the redundancy caused by scanning angle and surface effects, as well as system noise. According to the comparison and validation combing with other precipitation sources, it is demonstrated that the retrievals are reliable for surface precipitation rate higher than 0.1 mm/h at 15km resolution.

  10. Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Innocent Aluka

    2008-08-31

    Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more

  11. Exploring hydrocarbon-bearing shale formations with multi-component seismic technology and evaluating direct shear modes produced by vertical-force sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Engin

    It is essential to understand natural fracture systems embedded in shale-gas reservoirs and the stress fields that influence how induced fractures form in targeted shale units. Multicomponent seismic technology and elastic seismic stratigraphy allow geologic formations to be better images through analysis of different S-wave modes as well as the P-wave mode. Significant amounts of energy produced by P-wave sources radiate through the Earth as downgoing SV-wave energy. A vertical-force source is an effective source for direct SV radiation and provides a pure shear-wave mode (SV-SV) that should reveal crucial information about geologic surfaces located in anisotropic media. SV-SV shear wave modes should carry important information about petrophysical characteristics of hydrocarbon systems that cannot be obtained using other elastic-wave modes. Regardless of the difficulties of extracting good-quality SV-SV signal, direct shear waves as well as direct P and converted S energy should be accounted for in 3C seismic studies. Acquisition of full-azimuth seismic data and sampling data at small intervals over long offsets are required for detailed anisotropy analysis. If 3C3D data can be acquired with improved signal-to-noise ratio, more uniform illumination of targets, increased lateral resolution, more accurate amplitude attributes, and better multiple attenuation, such data will have strong interest by the industry. The objectives of this research are: (1) determine the feasibility of extracting direct SV-SV common-mid-point sections from 3-C seismic surveys, (2) improve the exploration for stratigraphic traps by developing systematic relationship between petrophysical properties and combinations of P and S wave modes, (3) create compelling examples illustrating how hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs in low-permeable rocks (particularly anisotropic shale formations) can be better characterized using different Swave modes (P-SV, SV-SV) in addition to the conventional P

  12. VLBI Observations of the Radio Jet in 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, S. C.; Davis, R. J.

    The authors present a new high dynamic range map of the quasar 3C 273, made from observations with a VLBI network of 12 telescopes. This new map at 18 cm wavelength has one of the highest dynamic ranges yet achieved with VLBI, and it shows the 'jet' extending to at least 180 milliarcsec, or 330 pc from the nucleus of the quasar.

  13. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  14. 223 GHz VLBI observations of 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padin, S.; Woody, D. P.; Hodges, M. W.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Emerson, D. T.; Jewell, P. R.; Lamb, J.; Perfetto, A.; Wright, M. C. H.

    1990-09-01

    In the first 1.4 mm wavelength VLBI test observations, fringes have been detected on the active nucleus of 3C 273 on a baseline from Owens Valley Radio Observatory to Kitt Peak. The observations are consistent with a source whose angular size is smaller than 0.5 mas.

  15. Connection Between X-Ray Emission and Relativistic Jets in the Radio Galaxies 3C 111 and 3C 120

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Margo F.

    2005-01-01

    This work represents a part of a longterm study of the X-ray flux variability in radio galaxies and its relation to flux and structural changes in the associated radio jet. The work described here included: 1) continued study of the emission properties of the FR I radio galaxy 3C 120 known to exhibit a jet/disk connection from our past work; and 2) the commencement of monitoring of a second radio galaxy, the FR I1 object 3C 111 which was selected because of similar radio and X-ray properties to 3C 120, including the presence of Fe K a emission. The association between X-ray dips and new superluminal components, suggesting a picture in which the radio jet is fed by accretion events near the black hole, was identified in 3C 120 using combined RXTE and radio flux monitoring data and bi-monthly to monthly imaging data from the VLBA at 43 GHz. Such data were also obtained for both targets during the period described here. Specific goals were to more broadly investigate the X-ray dip/superluminal connection in 3C 120, thereby determining the epochs of X-ray minima and superluminal ejections more accurately (and hence more precisely determining the distance between the accretion disk and the core of the radio jet), and to determine whether a similar pattern is present in the data for a second radio galaxy. In 3C 111 a different time scale (longer time delays between X-ray dips and superluminal ejections) was expected due to the higher black hole mass implied by its higher radio luminosity: no black hole mass is published for this object but one can be determined from a PDS analysis of the RXTE data. The addition of the second source to the study would identify whether a similar connection was present in other sources and, if found, would provide important information on how time scale (and hence size scale) of accretion disk/jet systems depends on black hole mass. The grant included funding for the reduction and analysis of data obtained during the time period of Rossi

  16. Angola Seismicity MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  17. Reconstruction of a 2D seismic wavefield by seismic gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-12-01

    We reconstructed a 2D seismic wavefield and obtained its propagation properties by using the seismic gradiometry method together with dense observations of the Hi-net seismograph network in Japan. The seismic gradiometry method estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients at any location from a discrete station record by using a Taylor series approximation. From the spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, the properties of a propagating wave packet, including the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading, and radiation pattern can be obtained. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary conditions, the 2D vector elastic wavefield can be decomposed into divergence and rotation components. First, as a feasibility test, we performed an analysis with a synthetic seismogram dataset computed by a numerical simulation for a realistic 3D medium and the actual Hi-net station layout. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives were very well-reproduced for period bands longer than 25 s. Applications to a real large earthquake showed that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield were well reconstructed, along with slowness vector. The slowness of the reconstructed wavefield showed a clear contrast between body and surface waves and regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation, possibly owing to scattering. Slowness vectors together with divergence and rotation decomposition are expected to be useful for determining constituents of observed wavefields in inhomogeneous media.

  18. Refined seismic stratigraphy in prograding carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomar, L. )

    1991-03-01

    Complete exposure of the upper Miocene Reef Complex in the sea cliffs of Mallorca (Spain) allows for a more refined interpretation of seismic lines with similar progradational patterns. A 6 km long high-resolution cross section in the direction of reef progradation displays four hierarchical orders of accretional units. Although all these units are of higher order, they all exhibit similar characteristics as a third order depositional sequence and can likewise be interpreted as the result of high order sea-level cycles. The accretional units are composed of lagoonal horizontal beds, reefal sigmoids and gently dipping slope deposits. They are bounded by erosion surfaces at the top and basinwards by their correlative conformities. These architectural patterns are similar to progradational sequences seen on seismic lines. On seismic lines, the progradational pattern often shows the following geometrical details: (1) discontinuous climbing high-energy reflectors, (2) truncation of clinoforms by these high-energy reflectors with seaward dips, (3) transparent areas intercalated between clinoforms. Based on facies distribution in the outcrops of Mallorca the high-energy reflectors are interpreted as sectors where the erosion surfaces truncated the reef wall and are overlain by lagoonal sediments deposited during the following sealevel rise. The more transparent zones seem to correspond with areas of superposition of undifferentiated lagoonal beds. Offlapping geometries can also be detected in highest quality seismic lines. The comparison between seismic and outcrop data provides a more accurate prediction of lithologies, facies distribution, and reservoir properties on seismic profiles.

  19. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  20. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-06-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a “seismic rainbow” effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context.

  1. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V

    2016-06-10

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a "seismic rainbow" effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context.

  2. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge

    PubMed Central

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-01-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a “seismic rainbow” effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context. PMID:27283587

  3. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  4. Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

    1999-10-17

    A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

  5. Pressure Balance between Thermal and Non-Thermal Plasmas in the 3C129 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, D. E.; Krawczynski, H.

    With new Chandra observations of the cluster containing the two radio galaxies 3C129 and 3C129.1, we have made a fit to the X-ray surface brightness to obtain thermal pressures. VLA data at 1.4 GHz have been obtained to complement previous maps at 0.33 GHz (Lane et al. 2002) and at 5 and 8 GHz (Taylor et al. 2001). From these radio data, we are able to derive the minimum non-thermal pressure of various emitting volumes along the tail of 3C129 and in the lobes of 3C129.1. Under the assumption that the non-thermal plasma excludes significant thermal plasma, we may expect pressure balance for most features since ram pressure should be important only close to the cores of the galaxies. Since we find that the minimum non-thermal pressures are generally only a factor of a few below estimates of the ambient thermal pressure, we conclude that it is unlikely that relativistic protons contribute significantly to the total pressure. Reasonable contributions from low energy electrons and filling factors in the range 0.1 to 1 suffice to achieve pressure balance. Although we do not find strong signatures for the exclusion of hot gas from the radio structures, we find soft features near the cores of both galaxies suggestive of cool gas stripping and hard features associated with radio jets and possibly a leading bow shock.

  6. Semipolar (202̅3) nitrides grown on 3C-SiC/(001) Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Duc V.; Presa, S.; Akhter, M.; Maaskant, P. P.; Corbett, B.; Parbrook, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Heteroepitaxial growth of GaN buffer layers on 3C-SiC/(001) Si templates (4°-offcut towards [110]) by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy has been investigated. High-temperature grown Al0.5Ga0.5N/AlN interlayers were employed to produce a single (202̅3) GaN surface orientation. Specular crack-free GaN layers showed undulations along [11̅0]{}3{{C}-{SiC}/{Si}} with a root mean square roughness of about 13.5 nm (50 × 50 μm2). The orientation relationship determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD) was found to be [1̅21̅0]GaN ∥[11̅0]{}3{{C}-{SiC}/{Si}} and [3̅034]GaN ∥[110]3C - SiC/Si . Low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) and XRD measurements showed the presence of basal-plane stacking faults in the layers. PL measurements of (202̅3) multiple-quantum-well and light-emitting diode structures showed uniform luminescence at about 500 nm emission wavelength. A small peak shift of about 3 nm was observed in the electroluminescence when the current was increased from 5 to 50 mA (25-250 A cm-2).

  7. New Madrid Seismic Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NEW MADRID SEISMIC ZONE BY COLONEL J.DAVID NORWOOD United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...mCTBB l USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT New Madrid Seismic Zone by J. David Norwood, COL, USA Michael A. Pearson, COL, USA Project Advisor The...ABSTRACT AUTHOR: J. David Norwood, Colonel, U.S. Army TITLE: New Madrid Seismic Zone FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 22 April 1998 . PAGES:

  8. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical modelling of African geodynamics: A reconciliation of deep-mantle convection with surface geophysical constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Quere, S; Moucha, R; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P; Mitrovica, J X; Rowley, D B

    2008-08-22

    Recent progress in seismic tomography provides the first complete 3-D images of the combined thermal and chemical anomalies that characterise the unique deep mantle structure below the African continent. With these latest tomography results we predict flow patterns under Africa that reveal a large-scale, active hot upwelling, or superplume, below the western margin of Africa under the Cape Verde Islands. The scale and dynamical intensity of this West African superplume (WASP) is comparable to that of the south African superplume (SASP) that has long been assumed to dominate the flow dynamics under Africa. On the basis of this new tomography model, we find the dynamics of the SASP is strongly controlled by chemical contributions to deep mantle buoyancy that significantly compensate its thermal buoyancy. In contrast, the WASP appears to be entirely dominated by thermal buoyancy. New calculations of mantle convection incorporating these two superplumes reveal that the plate-driving forces due to the flow generated by the WASP is as strong as that due to the SASP. We find that the chemical buoyancy of the SASP exerts a strong stabilising control on the pattern and amplitude of shallow mantle flow in the asthenosphere below the southern half of the African plate. The asthenospheric flow predictions provide the first high resolution maps of focussed upwellings that lie below the major centres of Late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Kenya domes and Hoggar massif that lies above a remnant plume head in the upper mantle. Inferences of sublithospheric deformation from seismic anisotropy data are shown to be sensitive to the contributions of chemical buoyancy in the SASP.

  9. Seismic Waveguide of Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Das, Mukunda P.

    We developed a new method of an earthquake-resistant design to support conventional aseismic system using acoustic metamaterials. The device is an attenuator of a seismic wave that reduces the amplitude of the wave exponentially. Constructing a cylindrical shell-type waveguide composed of many Helmholtz resonators that creates a stop-band for the seismic frequency range, we convert the seismic wave into an attenuated one without touching the building that we want to protect. It is a mechanical way to convert the seismic energy into sound and heat.

  10. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  11. HST Polarimetry of the 3C 273 Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clautice, Devon; Perlman, Eric S.; Sparks, William B.; Biretta, John A.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi Alison; Cheung, Chi C.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana M.; Martel, Andre; Urry, C. Megan; Stawarz, Lukasz; Coppi, Paolo S.; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Cara, Mihai; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary results using HST polarimetry of the jet of 3C 273. Polarization is a critical parameter for understanding jet flows, and has proven essential in characterizing the physics of FR I jets; high-quality HST polarimetry has been done for just two other FR II jets previously. Our recent work on two quasar jets, where we measured high optical polarization in the brightest X-ray knots, has favored the synchrotron emission model over the alternative IC/CMB model for their optical to X-ray emission. These new observations of 3C 273 allow for the determination of the magnetic field structure and confirmation of which emission mechanisms are operating to create its optical to X-ray emission, and will allow us to greatly advance modeling efforts for this jet and nail down its kinetic power, a key unknown parameter for understanding quasars and their cosmological effects.

  12. A decade of 3C technologies: insights into nuclear organization

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Elzo; de Laat, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the development of chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology and the subsequent genomic variants thereof have enabled the analysis of nuclear organization at an unprecedented resolution and throughput. The technology relies on the original and, in hindsight, remarkably simple idea that digestion and religation of fixed chromatin in cells, followed by the quantification of ligation junctions, allows for the determination of DNA contact frequencies and insight into chromosome topology. Here we evaluate and compare the current 3C-based methods (including 4C [chromosome conformation capture-on-chip], 5C [chromosome conformation capture carbon copy], HiC, and ChIA-PET), summarize their contribution to our current understanding of genome structure, and discuss how shape influences genome function. PMID:22215806

  13. Modernization of the Slovenian National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidrih, R.; Godec, M.; Gosar, A.; Sincic, P.; Tasic, I.; Zivcic, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, the Seismology Office is responsible for the fast and reliable information about earthquakes, originating in the area of Slovenia and nearby. In the year 2000 the project Modernization of the Slovenian National Seismic Network started. The purpose of a modernized seismic network is to enable fast and accurate automatic location of earthquakes, to determine earthquake parameters and to collect data of local, regional and global earthquakes. The modernized network will be finished in the year 2004 and will consist of 25 Q730 remote broadband data loggers based seismic station subsystems transmitting in real-time data to the Data Center in Ljubljana, where the Seismology Office is located. The remote broadband station subsystems include 16 surface broadband seismometers CMG-40T, 5 broadband seismometers CMG-40T with strong motion accelerographs EpiSensor, 4 borehole broadband seismometers CMG-40T, all with accurate timing provided by GPS receivers. The seismic network will cover the entire Slovenian territory, involving an area of 20,256 km2. The network is planned in this way; more seismic stations will be around bigger urban centres and in regions with greater vulnerability (NW Slovenia, Krsko Brezice region). By the end of the year 2002, three old seismic stations were modernized and ten new seismic stations were built. All seismic stations transmit data to UNIX-based computers running Antelope system software. The data is transmitted in real time using TCP/IP protocols over the Goverment Wide Area Network . Real-time data is also exchanged with seismic networks in the neighbouring countries, where the data are collected from the seismic stations, close to the Slovenian border. A typical seismic station consists of the seismic shaft with the sensor and the data acquisition system and, the service shaft with communication equipment (modem, router) and power supply with a battery box. which provides energy in case

  14. Man-caused seismicity of Kuzbass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, Alexandr; Emanov, Alexey; Leskova, Ekaterina; Fateyev, Alexandr

    2010-05-01

    A natural seismicity of Kuznetsk Basin is confined in the main to mountain frame of Kuznetsk hollow. In this paper materials of experimental work with local station networks within sediment basin are presented. Two types of seismicity display within Kuznetsk hollow have been understood: first, man-caused seismic processes, confined to mine working and concentrated on depths up to one and a half of km; secondly, seismic activations on depths of 2-56 km, not coordinated in plan with coal mines. Every of studied seismic activations consists of large quantity of earthquakes of small powers (Ms=1-3). From one to first tens of earthquakes were recorded in a day. The earthquakes near mine working shift in space along with mine working, and seismic process become stronger at the instant a coal-plough machine is operated, and slacken at the instant the preventive works are executed. The seismic processes near three lavas in Kuznetsk Basin have been studied in detail. Uplift is the most typical focal mechanism. Activated zone near mine working reach in diameter 1-1,5 km. Seismic activations not linked with mine working testify that the subsoil of Kuznetsk hollow remain in stress state in whole. The most probable causes of man-caused action on hollow are processes, coupled with change of physical state of rocks at loss of methane from large volume or change by mine working of rock watering in large volume. In this case condensed rocks, lost gas and water, can press out upwards, realizing the reverse fault mechanism of earthquakes. A combination of stress state of hollow with man-caused action at deep mining may account for incipient activations in Kuznetsk Basin. Today earthquakes happen mainly under mine workings, though damages of workings themselves do not happen, but intensive shaking on surface calls for intent study of so dangerous phenomena. In 2009 replicates of the experiment on research of seismic activations in area of before investigated lavas have been conducted

  15. Enhancing superconductivity in A3C60 fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjae; Nomura, Yusuke; Ferrero, Michel; Seth, Priyanka; Parcollet, Olivier; Georges, Antoine

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental report of a possible light-induced superconductivity in K3C60 at high temperature [Mitrano et al., Nature 530, 451 (2016), 10.1038/nature16522], we investigate theoretical mechanisms for enhanced superconductivity in A3C60 fullerenes. We find that an "interaction imbalance" corresponding to a smaller value of the Coulomb matrix element for two of the molecular orbitals in comparison to the third one, efficiently enhances superconductivity. Furthermore, we perform first-principle calculations of the changes in the electronic structure and in the screened Coulomb matrix elements of K3C60 , brought in by the deformation associated with the pumped T1 u intramolecular mode. We find that an interaction imbalance is indeed induced, with a favorable sign and magnitude for superconductivity enhancement. The physical mechanism responsible for this enhancement consists of a stabilization of the intramolecular states containing a singlet pair, while preserving the orbital fluctuations allowing for a coherent interorbital delocalization of the pair. Other perturbations have also been considered and found to be detrimental to superconductivity. The light-induced deformation and ensuing interaction imbalance is shown to bring superconductivity further into the strong-coupling regime.

  16. The Trails of Superluminal Jet Components in 3C 111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadler, M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Homan, D. C.; Agudo, I.; Kellermann, K. I.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Lister, M. L.; Zensus, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The parsec-scale radio jet of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 111 has been monitored since 1995 as part of the 2cm Survey and MOJAVE monitoring observations conducted with the VLBA. Here, we present results from 18 epochs of VLBA observations of 3C 111 and from 18 years of radio flux density monitoring observations conducted at the University of Michigan. A major radio flux-density outburst of 3C 111 occurred in 1996 and was followed by a particularly bright plasma ejection associated with a superluminal jet component. This major event allows us to study a variety of processes associated with outbursts of radio-loud AGN in much greater detail than possible in other cases: the primary perturbation gives rise to the formation of a forward and a backward-shock, which both evolve in characteristically different ways and allow us to draw conclusions about the workflow of jet-production events; the expansion, acceleration and recollimation of the ejected jet plasma in an environment with steep pressure and density gradients are revealed; trailing components are formed in the wake of the primary perturbation as a result of Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities from the interaction of the jet with the external medium. The jet-medium interaction is further scrutinized by the linear-polarization signature of jet components traveling along the jet and passing a region of steep pressure/density gradients.

  17. Variability studies of 3C 371. [extragalactic radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The compact extragalactic radio source, 3C 371, was observed with the X-ray detectors of the EXOSAT satellite for 19.5 hours in 2 observing periods separated by 18 days. This resulted in the discovery of X-ray variability of the source on time scales between 8 hours and about 25 minutes and the confirmation of earlier reports of variability on longer time scales. The short time scale variability agrees remarkably well with earlier predictions based on fitting multifrequency data from the source to a relativistically beamed inhomogeneous synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) jet model. This SSC model is frequently applied to BL Lac objects and related sources, such as 3C 371. However, the number of free parameters in model fits tends to be large, and so independent support such as from this work is important. The X-ray spectral results for 3C 371 also may provide qualitative support for the SSC model in that the spectrum probably consists of two components, with the steeper one at low photon energies. In terms of the model, the low-energy spectrum would be dominated by synchrotron emission extending down to radio energies, whereas the higher energy X-rays would be dominated by Compton radiation.

  18. Hydrodynamical Simulations of Colliding Jets: Modeling 3C 75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Schive, H.-Y.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiueh, T.; Musoke, G.; Young, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Radio observations suggest that 3C 75, located in the dumbbell shaped galaxy NGC 1128 at the center of Abell 400, hosts two colliding jets. Motivated by this source, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations using a modified version of the GPU-accelerated Adaptive-MEsh-Refinement hydrodynamical parallel code (GAMER) to study colliding extragalactic jets. We find that colliding jets can be cast into two categories: (1) bouncing jets, in which case the jets bounce off each other keeping their identities, and (2) merging jets, when only one jet emerges from the collision. Under some conditions the interaction causes the jets to break up into oscillating filaments of opposite helicity, with consequences for their downstream stability. When one jet is significantly faster than the other and the impact parameter is small, the jets merge; the faster jet takes over the slower one. In the case of merging jets, the oscillations of the filaments, in projection, may show a feature that resembles a double helix, similar to the radio image of 3C 75. Thus we interpret the morphology of 3C 75 as a consequence of the collision of two jets with distinctly different speeds at a small impact parameter, with the faster jet breaking up into two oscillating filaments.

  19. Infrared spectrophotometry of three Seyfert galaxies and 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Puetter, R. C.; Rudy, R. J.; Willner, S. P.; Aitken, D. K.; Jones, B.; Merrill, K. M.; Roche, P. F.; Russell, R. W.; Soifer, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    Spectrophotometry in the range 2.1-4.0 microns is presented for the Seyfert galaxies NGC 1068, NGC 4151 and Mrk 231 and the quasar 3C 273, together with broadband and narrowband observations of the Seyfert galaxies in the range 8-13 microns. The spectra of NGC 1068 and NGC 4151 are found to contain a significant component due to starlight, especially at shorter wavelengths. The nonstellar component in NGC 1068 is observed to fall off rapidly at wavelengths shorter than 4 microns, consistent with the interpretation of the excess beyond 5 microns as thermal reradiation by dust. Observations confirm the variability of NGC 4151, and indicate the presence of two components of the flux other than starlight: a nonthermal variable component predominant at shorter wavelengths and a constant, probably thermal component at wavelengths greater than 3 microns. Mrk 231 and 3C 273 exhibit no discernable stellar component and were not observed to vary by more than 10%. Evidence is obtained for a broad minimum in the 8 to 13 micron spectrum of Mrk 231, as well as possible structure between rest wavelengths of 2.8 and 2.9 microns, and the spectrum is not a power law. The spectrum of 3C 273 is consistent with a power law from 1.2 to 10 microns, with small but significant deviations.

  20. The milliarcsecond structure of 3C 273 at 22 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Zensus, J.A.; Biretta, J.A.; Unwin, S.C.; Cohen, M.H. Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-12-01

    The first VLBI images at 22 GHz of the jet in the quasar 3C 273 are presented. In addition to the compact core region, two emission regions can be identified with features seen at lower frequencies; they separate from the core with constant speeds of 0.65 + or - 0.09 and 0.92 + or - 0.11 mas/yr, corresponding to apparent superluminal motion of 4.3 + or - 0.3c and 6.1 + or - 0.3c (for Ho = 100 km/s Mpc, qo = 0.5). The core region brightened at about the estimated epoch of zero separation for the latest superluminal component, suggesting a causal relationship. The curved ridge line of the jet smoothly extends inward towards the core, although no pronounced bends in the range of core distance 0.5-2.5 mas are seen. No significant evidence is found against a common path of subsequent superluminal features. An apparent frequency dependence in the position of one superluminal feature tentatively suggests that opacity effects across the jet direction are present. The results are consistent with an interpretation of the superluminal features as shocks in an underlying relativistic flow, although alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. 43 refs.

  1. Jet-induced star formation in 3C 285 and Minkowski's Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, Q.; Salomé, P.; Combes, F.

    2015-02-01

    How efficiently star formation proceeds in galaxies is still an open question. Recent studies suggest that active galactic nucleus (AGN) can regulate the gas accretion and thus slow down star formation (negative feedback). However, evidence of AGN positive feedback has also been observed in a few radio galaxies (e.g. Centaurus A, Minkowski's Object, 3C 285, and the higher redshift 4C 41.17). Here we present CO observations of 3C 285 and Minkowski's Object, which are examples of jet-induced star formation. A spot (named 3C 285/09.6 in the present paper) aligned with the 3C 285 radio jet at a projected distance of ~70 kpc from the galaxy centre shows star formation that is detected in optical emission. Minkowski's Object is located along the jet of NGC 541 and also shows star formation. Knowing the distribution of molecular gas along the jets is a way to study the physical processes at play in the AGN interaction with the intergalactic medium. We observed CO lines in 3C 285, NGC 541, 3C 285/09.6, and Minkowski's Object with the IRAM 30 m telescope. In the central galaxies, the spectra present a double-horn profile, typical of a rotation pattern, from which we are able to estimate the molecular gas density profile of the galaxy. The molecular gas appears to be in a compact reservoir, which could be evidence of an early phase of the gas accretion after a recent merger event in 3C 285. No kinematic signature of a molecular outflow is detected by the 30 m telescope. Interestingly, 3C 285/09.6 and Minkowski's Object are not detected in CO. The cold gas mass upper limits are consistent with a star formation induced by the compression of dense ambient material by the jet. The depletion time scales in 3C 285/09.6 and Minkowski's Object are of the order of and even shorter than what is found in 3C 285, NGC 541, and local spiral galaxies (109 yr). The upper limit of the molecular gas surface density in 3C 285/09.6 at least follows a Schmidt-Kennicutt law if the emitting region

  2. The critical angle in seismic interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Wijk, K.; Calvert, A.; Haney, M.; Mikesell, D.; Snieder, R.

    2008-01-01

    Limitations with respect to the characteristics and distribution of sources are inherent to any field seismic experiment, but in seismic interferometry these lead to spurious waves. Instead of trying to eliminate, filter or otherwise suppress spurious waves, crosscorrelation of receivers in a refraction experiment indicate we can take advantage of spurious events for near-surface parameter extraction for static corrections or near-surface imaging. We illustrate this with numerical examples and a field experiment from the CSM/Boise State University Geophysics Field Camp.

  3. High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Brawley Seismic Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Sickler, R. R.; Criley, C.; Rosa, C.

    2011-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired a series of high-resolution P-wave seismic reflection and refraction data sets across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities within the BSZ. One dataset was 3.4 km long trending east-west, and consisted of 334 shots recorded by a 2.4 km spread of 40 hz geophones placed every 10 meters. The spread was initially laid out from the first station at the eastern end of the profile to roughly 2/3 into the profile. After about half the shots, the spread was shifted from roughly 1/3 into the profile to the last station at the western end of the profile. P-waves were generated by Betsy-Seisgun 'shots' spaced every 10 meters. Initial analysis of first breaks indicate near-surface velocities of ~500-600 meters/sec, and deeper velocities of around 2000 meters/sec. Preliminary investigation of shot gathers indicate a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on a projection of the Kalin fault from about 40 m to the south, and broke the surface down to the west with an approximately north-south strike during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The dataset is part of the combined Obsidian Creep data set, and provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

  4. Seismic spatial wavefield gradient and rotational rate measurements as new observables in land seismic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzbach, Cedric; Sollberger, David; Van Renterghem, Cédéric; Häusler, Mauro; Robertsson, Johan; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    application of wavefield gradients is the removal of the free-surface effect on land-seismic recordings to obtain true amplitude and phase information of the desired upcoming wavefield from the recorded superposition of upcoming waves with downgoing reflected and downgoing mode-converted waves.

  5. Mass Wasting on the Moon: Implications for Seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. C.; Nahm, A. L.; Yanites, B.; Schmerr, N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Seismicity estimates play an important role in creating regional geological characterizations, which are useful for understanding a planet's formation and evolution, and of key importance to site selection for landed missions. Here we investigate the regional effects of lunar seismicity with the goal of determining whether surface features such as landslides and boulder trails on the Moon are triggered by fault motion.

  6. Mass Wasting on the Moon: Implications for Seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee; Nahm, Amanda; Schmerr, Nick; Yanites, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Seismicity estimates play an important role in creating regional geological characterizations, which are useful for understanding a planet's formation and evolution, and are of key importance to site selection for landed missions. Here we investigate the regional effects of seismicity in planetary environments with the goal of determining whether such surface features on the Moon, could be triggered by fault motion.

  7. Mass Wasting in Planetary Environments: Implications for Seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee; Nahm, Amanda; Schmerr, Nick

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, mass wasting events such as rock falls and landslides are well known consequences of seismic activity. Here we investigate the regional effects of seismicity in planetary environments with the goal of determining whether such surface features on the Moon, Mars, and Mercury could be triggered by fault motion.

  8. An Overview of the 3C-STAR project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Over the past three decades, city clusters have played a leading role in the economic growth of China, owing to their collective economic capacity and interdependency. However, pollution prevention lags behind the economic boom, led to a general decline in air quality in city clusters. As a result, industrial emissions and traffic exhausts together contribute to high levels of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution problems ranging from urban to regional scale. Such high levels of both primary and secondary airborne pollutants lead to the development of a (perhaps typically Chinese) "air pollution complex" concept. Air pollution complex is particularly true and significant in Beijing-Tianjin area, Pearl River Delta (PRD) and Yangtze River Delta. The concurrent high concentrations of O3 and PM2.5 in PRD as well as in other China city clusters have led to rather unique pollution characteristics due to interactions between primary emissions and photochemical processes, between gaseous compounds and aerosol phase species, and between local and regional scale processes. The knowledge and experience needed to find solutions to the unique pollution complex in China are still lacking. Starting from 2007, we launch a major project "Synthesized Prevention Techniques for Air Pollution Complex and Integrated Demonstration in Key City-Cluster Region" (3C-STAR) to address those problems scientifically and technically. The purpose of the project is to build up the capacity of regional air pollution control and to establish regional coordination mechanism for joint implementation of pollution control. The project includes a number of key components technically: regional air quality monitoring network and super-sites, regional dynamic emission inventory of multi-pollutants, regional ensemble air quality forecasting model system, and regional management system supported by decision making platform. The 3C-STAR project selected PRD as a core area to have technical

  9. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    The destructive earthquake occurred on January 10, 2010 in Haiti, highlighted the lack of preparedness of the country to address seismic phenomena. At the moment of the earthquake, there was no seismic network operating in the country, and only a partial control of the past seismicity was possible, due to the absence of a national catalogue. After the 2010 earthquake, some advances began towards the installation of a national network and the elaboration of a seismic catalogue providing the necessary input for seismic Hazard Studies. This paper presents the state of the works carried out covering both aspects. First, a seismic catalogue has been built, compiling data of historical and instrumental events occurred in the Hispaniola Island and surroundings, in the frame of the SISMO-HAITI project, supported by the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) and Developed in cooperation with the Observatoire National de l'Environnement et de la Vulnérabilité of Haiti (ONEV). Data from different agencies all over the world were gathered, being relevant the role of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico seismological services which provides local data of their national networks. Almost 30000 events recorded in the area from 1551 till 2011 were compiled in a first catalogue, among them 7700 events with Mw ranges between 4.0 and 8.3. Since different magnitude scale were given by the different agencies (Ms, mb, MD, ML), this first catalogue was affected by important heterogeneity in the size parameter. Then it was homogenized to moment magnitude Mw using the empirical equations developed by Bonzoni et al (2011) for the eastern Caribbean. At present, this is the most exhaustive catalogue of the country, although it is difficult to assess its degree of completeness. Regarding the seismic network, 3 stations were installed just after the 2010 earthquake by the Canadian Government. The data were sent by telemetry thought the Canadian System CARINA. In 2012, the Spanish IGN together

  10. Seismic structure of the moon - A summary of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A seismic model of the moon, refined from previous models with the aid of new data and analyses for seismic events recorded by four Apollo lunar seismic stations and a gravimeter, is outlined. The current model has five zones. The crust is 55-60 km thick. The surface is covered by regolith of varying thicknesses and low seismic velocity. The seismic Q's are extremely high. The upper mantle, 250 km thick, is characterized by seismic velocities close to those of the earth's upper mantle, and shear wave Q of about 4000. Tidally controlled deep moonquakes are concentrated near the boundary of the middle mantle, 600-700 km thick. A lower mantle extending to an undetermined depth is characterized by high attenuation of shear waves. The existence of a low-velocity core is only tentatively proposed.

  11. Seismic Velocity Measurements at Expanded Seismic Network Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Woolery, Edward W; Wang, Zhenming

    2005-01-01

    Structures at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), as well as at other locations in the northern Jackson Purchase of western Kentucky may be subjected to large far-field earthquake ground motions from the New Madrid seismic zone, as well as those from small and moderate-sized local events. The resultant ground motion a particular structure is exposed from such event will be a consequence of the earthquake magnitude, the structures' proximity to the event, and the dynamic and geometrical characteristics of the thick soils upon which they are, of necessity, constructed. This investigation evaluated the latter. Downhole and surface (i.e., refraction and reflection) seismic velocity data were collected at the Kentucky Seismic and Strong-Motion Network expansion sites in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to define the dynamic properties of the deep sediment overburden that can produce modifying effects on earthquake waves. These effects are manifested as modifications of the earthquake waves' amplitude, frequency, and duration. Each of these three ground motion manifestations is also fundamental to the assessment of secondary earthquake engineering hazards such as liquefaction.

  12. Multiwavelength and polarimetric analysis of the flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 273 and 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sunil Anthony

    This dissertation presents results of multiwavelength analyses of 3C 273 and 3C 279. The main goals were to identify the gamma-ray emission region and dominant high-energy emission processes. Our methodology consisted of analyzing light curves from radio to gamma-rays over 6 - 8 years and polarimetric, spectral and line emission behavior. In 3C 279, we found that the emission from millimeter to ultraviolet was simultaneous and therefore co-spatial. We identified two active states where different high-energy emission processes were dominant. We found multiwavelength flaring events consistent with component ejections and shocks. We proposed that the gamma-ray emission region changed over time based on observations of both simultaneous and delayed gamma-rays emission with respect to low-energy emission during different time-frames. In 3C 273, we identified a non-thermal flare related to a component ejection and a thermal flare related to accretion. From reverberation mapping we found that the broad line region dynamical behavior over time possibly affects the derived supermassive black hole mass. In both objects we found that the gamma-ray spectral index was variable, and a trend of harder spectral index with higher gamma-ray luminosity. From the identification of different dominant high-energy emission processes, we concluded that the dominant high-energy emission mechanism changes with time. Overall, we concluded that similar results from both objects points to behavior that is potentially common to flat spectrum radio quasars. Increasing the sample size of objects analyzed with similar methodologies will provide more results to confirm or refine our conclusions.

  13. Multiwavelength and Polarimetric Analysis of the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars 3C 273 and 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sunil; Patiño-Álvarez, Victor; Chavushyan, Vahram; Schlegel, Eric M.; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; León-Tavares, Jonathan; Carrasco, Luis; Valdés, José; Carramiñana, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    This poster presents results of multiwavelength analyses of 3C 273 and 3C 279. The main goals were to identify the gamma-ray emission region and dominant high-energy emission processes. Our methodology consisted of analyzing light curves from radio to gamma-rays over 6 - 8 years and polarimetric, spectral and line emission behavior.In 3C 279, we found that the emission from millimeter to ultraviolet was simultaneous and therefore co-spatial. We identified two active states where different high-energy emission processes were dominant. We found multiwavelength flaring events consistent with component ejections and shocks. We proposed that the gamma-ray emission region changed over time based on observations of both simultaneous and delayed gamma-rays emission with respect to low-energy emission during different time-frames.In 3C 273, we identified a non-thermal flare related to a component ejection and a thermal flare related to accretion. From reverberation mapping we found that the broad line region dynamical behavior over time possibly affects the derived supermassive black hole mass.In both objects we found that the gamma-ray spectral index was variable, and a trend of harder spectral index with higher gamma-ray luminosity. From the identification of different dominant high-energy emission processes, we concluded that the dominant high-energy emission mechanism changes with time. Overall, we concluded that similar results from both objects points to behavior that is potentially common to flat spectrum radio quasars. Increasing the sample size of objects analyzed with similar methodologies will provide more results to confirm or refine our conclusions.

  14. Seismic activation of tectonic stresses by mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcak, Henryk; Mutke, Grzegorz

    2013-10-01

    Hard coal mining in the area of the Bytom Syncline (Upper Silesia Coal Basin, Poland) has been associated with the occurrence of high-energy seismic events (up to 109 J; local magnitude up to 4.0), which have been recorded by the local mining seismological network and regional seismological network. It has been noticed that the strongest seismic events occur when the mine longwall alignments coincide with the syncline axis. Data recorded by the improved local seismic network in the Bobrek Mine allow the estimation of the depths of the events’ hypocentres during excavation of longwall panel 3 as it approached the syncline axis. The recorded data were also used to estimate the location of the rupture surface and stress distribution in the seismic focus region. It was concluded that tectonic stresses, particularly horizontal stress components, are essential in the distribution of seismic tremors resulting from reverse faulting. The stresses induced by mining activity are only triggering tectonic deformations. The hypocentres of the strongest seismic events during mining of longwall panel 3/503 were located 300-800 m deeper than the level of coal seam 503.

  15. Multidimensional seismic data reconstruction using tensor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreimer, Nadia

    Exploration seismology utilizes the seismic wavefield for prospecting oil and gas. The seismic reflection experiment consists on deploying sources and receivers in the surface of an area of interest. When the sources are activated, the receivers measure the wavefield that is reflected from different subsurface interfaces and store the information as time-series called traces or seismograms. The seismic data depend on two source coordinates, two receiver coordinates and time (a 5D volume). Obstacles in the field, logistical and economical factors constrain seismic data acquisition. Therefore, the wavefield sampling is incomplete in the four spatial dimensions. Seismic data undergoes different processes. In particular, the reconstruction process is responsible for correcting sampling irregularities of the seismic wavefield. This thesis focuses on the development of new methodologies for the reconstruction of multidimensional seismic data. This thesis examines techniques based on tensor algebra and proposes three methods that exploit the tensor nature of the seismic data. The fully sampled volume is low-rank in the frequency-space domain. The rank increases when we have missing traces and/or noise. The methods proposed perform rank reduction on frequency slices of the 4D spatial volume. The first method employs the Higher-Order Singular Value Decomposition (HOSVD) immersed in an iterative algorithm that reinserts weighted observations. The second method uses a sequential truncated SVD on the unfoldings of the tensor slices (SEQ-SVD). The third method formulates the rank reduction problem as a convex optimization problem. The measure of the rank is replaced by the nuclear norm of the tensor and the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) minimizes the cost function. All three methods have the interesting property that they are robust to curvature of the reflections, unlike many reconstruction methods. Finally, we present a comparison between the methods

  16. Man-caused seismicity of Kuzbas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, Dr.; Emanov, A. A.; Leskova, E. V.; Fateyev, A. V.

    2009-04-01

    A natural seismicity of Kuznetsk Basin is confined in the main to mountain frame of Kuznetsk hollow. In this paper materials of experimental work with local station networks within sediment basin are presented. Two types of seismicity display within Kuznetsk hollow have been understood: first, man-caused seismic processes, confined to mine working and concentrated on depths up to one and a half of km; secondly, seismic activations on depths of 2-56 km, not coordinated in plan with coal mines. Every of studied seismic activations consists of large quantity of earthquakes of small powers (Ms=1-3). From one to first tens of earthquakes were recorded in a day. The earthquakes near mine working shift in space along with mine working, and seismic process become stronger at the instant a coal-plough machine is operated, and slacken at the instant the preventive works are executed. The seismic processes near three lavas in Kuznetsk Basin have been studied in detail. Uplift is the most typical focal mechanism. Activated zone near mine working reach in diameter 1-1,5 km. Seismic activations not linked with mine working testify that the subsoil of Kuznetsk hollow remain in stress state in whole. The most probable causes of man-caused action on hollow are processes, coupled with change of physical state of rocks at loss of methane from large volume or change by mine working of rock watering in large volume. In this case condensed rocks, lost gas and water, can press out upwards, realizing the reverse fault mechanism of earthquakes. A combination of stress state of hollow with man-caused action at deep mining account for activations nascent in Kuznetsk Basin. Today earthquakes happen mainly under mine workings, and damages of workings themselves do not register, but intensive shaking felt on surface calls for intent study of so dangerous phenomena.

  17. Modifying Moveout-Based Anisotropic Spreading Correction for Borehole Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamimi, N.

    2015-12-01

    The higher signal-to-noise ratio of borehole seismic data compared to surface seismic data makes them suitable for amplitude-related analyses and reflection seismic imaging. However, sometimes removing undesirable effects from the amplitude information is necessary. Energy decay due to wavefront spreading (called geometrical spreading) is one of the effects that should be removed before amplitude analysis and imaging in exploration seismic, and it needs special considerations, where the subsurface medium is highly anisotropic. One of the successful surface seismic techniques to compensate for energy decay or amplitude distortion due to geometrical spreading is MASC (Moveout-Based Anisotropic Spreading Correction). However, this technique cannot be used for borehole seismic data easily and needs some modifications. Here, we modified this valuable technique for borehole seismic and applied it to a real field case study. The results show that the modified MASC technique can be applied to borehole seismic data easily with minimum subsurface velocity information.

  18. Repeat Measurements of Seismic Noise at the Waiotapu Geothermal Area, North Island, NZ

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteford, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    The amplitudes of seismic ground noise were remeasured at 66 sites in the Waiotapu and Reporoa geothermal areas in 1995 to determine whether amplitudes had changed since the first survey in 1970. In both 1995 and 1970 high levels of seismic noise occurred in two localities, one at Waiotapu and one at Reporoa. The elevated levels of seismic noise at most sites are thought to be caused by surface or near-surface geothermal activity. At seven sites in the Waiotapu area seismic noise levels were almost the same in 1995 as in 1970, indicating no change in the intensity of the source of the geothermal seismic noise. At most other sites the 1995 seismic noise levels were different to those measured in 1970, although at sites with high levels of seismic noise the differences were usually less than at sites with low levels of seismic noise.

  19. Effect of Synthesis on Quality, Electronic Properties and Environmental Stability of Individual monolayer Ti3C2 MXene Flakes

    DOE PAGES

    Lipatov, A.; Alhabeb, M.; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; ...

    2016-01-01

    2D transition metal carbide Ti3C2Tx (T stands for surface termination), the most widely studied MXene, has shown outstanding electrochemical properties and promise for a number of bulk applications. However, electronic properties of individual MXene flakes, which are important for understanding the potential of these materials, remain largely unexplored. Herein, a modified synthetic method is reported for producing high-quality monolayer Ti3C2Tx flakes. Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on monolayer Ti3C2Tx flakes are fabricated and their electronic properties are measured. Individual Ti3C2Tx flakes exhibit a high conductivity of 4600 ± 1100 S cm-1 and field-effect electron mobility of 2.6 ± 0.7 cm2 V-1more » s-1. The resistivity of multilayer Ti3C2Tx films is only one order of magnitude higher than the resistivity of individual flakes, which indicates a surprisingly good electron transport through the surface terminations of different flakes, unlike in many other 2D materials. Finally, the fabricated FETs are used to investigate the environmental stability and kinetics of oxidation of Ti3C2Tx flakes in humid air. The high-quality Ti3C2Tx flakes are reasonably stable and remain highly conductive even after their exposure to air for more than 24 h. It is demonstrated that after the initial exponential decay the conductivity of Ti3C2Tx flakes linearly decreases with time, which is consistent with their edge oxidation.« less

  20. Optical seismic sensor systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, A. Craig; Cummings, Malcolm E.; Zavriyev, Anton; Christensen, Caleb A.; Lee, Keun

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed is an optical seismic sensor system for measuring seismic events in a geological formation, including a surface unit for generating and processing an optical signal, and a sensor device optically connected to the surface unit for receiving the optical signal over an optical conduit. The sensor device includes at least one sensor head for sensing a seismic disturbance from at least one direction during a deployment of the sensor device within a borehole of the geological formation. The sensor head includes a frame and a reference mass attached to the frame via at least one flexure, such that movement of the reference mass relative to the frame is constrained to a single predetermined path.

  1. Multiwavelength Observations of 3C 66A in 2003 -- 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, M.

    2006-07-01

    The BL Lac object 3C 66A was the target of an extensive multiwavelength campaign from July 2003 through April 2004. Radio, infrared, and optical observations were carried out by the WEBT-ENIGMA collaboration. At higher energies, 3C 66A was observed in X-rays (RXTE), and at very-high-energy (VHE) γ-rays (STACEE, VERITAS). In addition, the source has been observed with the VLBA at 9 epochs throughout the period September 2003 -- December 2004, including 3 epochs contemporaneous with the core campaign. The source was in an optically bright state, with several bright flares on time scales of several days and microvariability with flux changes of ˜ 5 % on time scales as short as ˜ 2 hr. Spectral variability indicating a softening throughout both the rising and decaying phases of flares, has been found. The spectral energy distribution (SED) indicates a ν Fν peak in the optical regime. The 3 -- 10 keV X-ray flux of 3C 66A during the core campaign was historically high and its spectrum very soft, indicating that the low-frequency component of the broadband SED extends beyond ˜ 10 keV. No significant X-ray flux and/or spectral variability was detected. STACEE and Whipple observations provided upper flux limits at > 150 GeV and > 390 GeV, respectively. The 22 and 43 GHz VLBA data indicate a rather smooth jet with only moderate internal structure. Evidence for superluminal motion (8.5 ± 5.6 h-1 c) was found in only one out of 6 components, while all other components are consistent with 0 proper motion. The radial brightness profile suggests a magnetic field decay ∝ r-1 and, thus, a predominantly perpendicular magnetic field orientation.

  2. SOAR Telescope seismic performance II: seismic mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Jonathan H.; Muñoz, Freddy; Warner, Michael; Rivera, Rossano; Martínez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    We describe design modifications to the SOAR telescope intended to reduce the impact of future major earthquakes, based on the facility's experience during recent events, most notably the September 2015 Illapel earthquake. Specific modifications include a redesign of the encoder systems for both azimuth and elevation, seismic trigger for the emergency stop system, and additional protections for the telescope secondary mirror system. The secondary mirror protection may combine measures to reduce amplification of seismic vibration and "fail-safe" components within the assembly. The status of these upgrades is presented.

  3. Optical flare of the Quasar 3C279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, Svetlana; Savchenko, Sergey

    2017-02-01

    The quasar 3C279 shows significant activity at optical wavelengths. According to our observations at the Perkins telescope of Lowell Obs. (Flagstaff, AZ) on February 23 R band magnitude of the quasar reached 14.088+-0.004 with the degree of polarization P=8.82+-0.11%, while observations at the AZT-8 telescope of Crimean Astrophysical Obs. show that the source was more than 1 mag fainter on February 20, R=15.237+-0.005, with P=6.45+0.88%.

  4. Discovery of an optical synchrotron jet in 3C 264

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, P.; Peletier, R.; Baxter, D.; Sparks, W. B.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Observations with the Faint Object Camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed a new optical jet in the core of the elliptical galaxy NGC 3862 (3C 264). Morphologically, this jet is similar to the synchrotron jets seen in other galaxies, as it shows knots and bifurcations. The optical spectral index is also similar to that found in other jets. Thus, the nucleus of NGC 3862 appears to contain the fifth known example of an optical synchrotron jet. Since NGC 3862 is a typical radio-loud elliptical galaxy, it seems likely that many nonthermal jets found in the radio continuum may also have optical counterparts.

  5. Seismic azimuthal anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere from broadband surface wave analysis of OBS array records at 60 Ma seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Kawakatsu, H.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Sugioka, H.; Ito, A.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed seismic ambient noise and teleseismic waveforms of nine broadband ocean bottom seismometers deployed at a 60 Ma seafloor in the southeastward of Tahiti island, the South Pacific, by the Tomographic Investigation by seafloor ARray Experiment for the Society hotspot project. We first obtained one-dimensional shear wave velocity model beneath the array from average phase velocities of Rayleigh waves at a broadband period range of 5-200 s. The obtained model shows a large velocity reduction at depths between 40 and 80 km, where the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary might exist. We then estimated shear wave azimuthal anisotropy at depths of 20-100 km by measuring azimuthal dependence of phase velocities of Rayleigh waves. The obtained model shows peak-to-peak intensity of the azimuthal anisotropy of 2%-4% with the fastest azimuth of NW-SE direction both in the lithosphere and asthenosphere. This result suggests that the ancient flow frozen in the lithosphere is not perpendicular to the strike of the ancient mid-ocean ridge but is roughly parallel to the ancient plate motion at depths of 20-60 km. The fastest azimuths in the current asthenosphere are subparallel to current plate motion at depths of 60-100 km. Additional shear wave splitting analysis revealed possible perturbations of flow in the mantle by the hot spot activities and implied the presence of azimuthal anisotropy in the asthenosphere down to a depth of 190-210 km.

  6. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR and Kinematic Structural Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Teplow, William J.; Warren, Ian

    2015-08-12

    The DOE cost-share program applied innovative and cutting edge seismic surveying and processing, permanent scatter interferometry-synthetic aperture radar (PSInSAR) and structural kinematics to the exploration problem of locating and mapping largeaperture fractures (LAFs) for the purpose of targeting geothermal production wells. The San Emidio geothermal resource area, which is under lease to USG, contains production wells that have encountered and currently produce from LAFs in the southern half of the resource area (Figure 2). The USG lease block, incorporating the northern extension of the San Emidio geothermal resource, extends 3 miles north of the operating wellfield. The northern lease block was known to contain shallow thermal waters but was previously unexplored by deep drilling. Results of the Phase 1 exploration program are described in detail in the Phase 1 Final Report (Teplow et al., 2011). The DOE cost shared program was completed as planned on September 30, 2014. This report summarizes results from all of Phase 1 and 2 activities.

  7. Utilizing a Single Three-Component Geophone to Detect Near-Surface Seismic Sources for Military, Energy Exploration, and Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramnik, M.

    2012-12-01

    Locating a seismic source with an unknown origin time using one 3-component geophone is examined in this study. A series of twenty shots (sledgehammer impacts) were made in a degree-marked, semi-circular pattern at distances of 10 and 20 m from a single 3-component geophone. The data from these shots were placed into random filenames to ensure a "blind" test and then examined to try and determine the source direction and distance from the recording sensor. Distances were calculated utilizing the difference in arrival time between the critically refracted P wave and the Rayleigh wave, and shot azimuths were found through the use of 1st quarter cycle hodographs (horizontal particle motion graphs). P- and Rayleigh-wave velocities were obtained using conventional refraction surveys and other calibration shots. Nine of the ten "distancesurveys" predicted source distances with 10% or less error, and eight of the ten "radialsurveys" predicted shot azimuths (sometimes called "backazimuths") within 10° or less error. The ability to acquire data through this method, potentially in real-time, creates many new possibilities for the use of 3-component data acquisition and analysis in military applications, energy exploration, and engineering.

  8. Spatial Distributed Seismicity Model of Seismic Hazard Mapping in the North-China Region: A Comparison with the GSHAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Q.; Shi, B.; Meng, L.

    2010-12-01

    The North China is one of the most seismically active regions in the mainland China. The moderate to large earthquakes have occurred here throughout history, resulting in huge losses of human life and properties. With the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) approach, we investigate the influence of different seismic environments, incorporating both near surface soil properties and distributed historical and modern seismicity. A simplified seismic source model, derived with the consideration of regional active fault distributions, is presented for the North China region. The spatial distributed seismicity model of PSHA is used to calculate the level of ground motion likely to be exceeded in a given time period. Following Frankel (1995) approach of circular Gaussian smoothing procedure, in the PSHA’s calculation, we proposed the fault-rupture-oriented elliptical Gaussian smoothing with the assumptions that earthquakes occur on faults or fault zones of past earthquakes to delineate the potential seismic zones (Lapajine et al., 2003). This is combined with regional active fault strike directions and the seismicity distribution patterns. Next Generation Attenuation model ((NGA), Boore et al., 2007) is used in generating hazard map for PGA with 2%, 5%, and 10 % probability of being exceeded in 50 years, and the resultant hazard map is compared with the result given by Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Project (GSHAP). There is general agreement for PGA distribution patterns between the results of this study and the GSHAP map that used the same seismic source zones. However, peak ground accelerations predicted in this study are typically 10-20% less than those of the GSHAP, and the seismic source models, such as fault distributions and regional seismicity used in the GSHAP seem to be oversimplified. We believe this study represents an improvement on prior seismic hazard evaluations for the region. In addition to the updated input data, we believe that, by

  9. GRAIL Refinements to Lunar Seismic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.; Schmerr, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    Joint interpretation of disparate geophysical datasets helps to reduce drawbacks that can result from analyzing them individually. The Apollo seismic network was situated on the lunar nearside surface in a roughly equilateral triangle having sides approximately 1000 km long, with stations 12/14 nearly co-located at one corner. Due to this limited geographical extent, near-surface ray coverage from moonquakes is low, but increases with depth. In comparison, gravity surveys and their resulting gravity anomaly maps have traditionally offered optimal resolution at crustal depths. Gravimetric maps and seismic data sets are therefore well suited to joint inversion, since the complementary information reduces inherent model ambiguity. Previous joint inversions of the Apollo seismic data (seismic phase arrival times) and Clementine- or Lunar Prospector-derived gravity data (mass and moment of inertia) attempted to recover the subsurface structure of the Moon by focusing on hypothetical lunar compositions that explore the density/velocity relationship. These efforts typically search for the best fitting thermodynamically calculated velocity/density model, allowing variables like core size, velocity, and/or composition to vary freely. Seismic velocity profiles previously derived from the Apollo seismic data through inversion of travel times vary both in the depth of the crust and mantle layers, and the seismic velocities and densities assigned to those layers. The lunar mass and moment of inertia likewise only constrain gross variations in the density profile beyond that of a uniform density sphere. As a result, composition and structure models previously obtained by jointly inverting these data retain the original uncertainties inherent in the input data sets. We will perform a joint inversion of Apollo seismic delay times and gravity data collected by the GRAIL lunar gravity mission, in order to recover seismic velocities and density as a function of latitude, longitude

  10. GRAIL Refinements to Lunar Seismic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.; Schmerr, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Joint interpretation of disparate geophysical datasets helps reduce drawbacks that can result from analyzing them individually. The Apollo seismic network was situated on the lunar nearside surface in a roughly equilateral triangle having sides approximately 1000 km long, with stations 12/14 nearly co-located at one corner. Due to this limited geographical extent, near-surface ray coverage from moonquakes is low, but increases with depth. In comparison, gravity surveys and their resulting gravity anomaly maps have traditionally offered optimal resolution at crustal depths. Gravimetric maps and seismic data sets are therefore well suited to joint inversion, since the complementary information reduces inherent model ambiguity. Previous joint inversions of the Apollo seismic data (seismic phase arrival times) and Clementine- or Lunar Prospector-derived gravity data (mass and moment of inertia) attempted to recover the subsurface structure of the Moon by focusing on hypothetical lunar compositions that explored the density/velocity relationship. These efforts typically searched for the best fitting thermodynamically calculated velocity/density model, and allowed variables like core size, velocity, and/or composition to vary freely. Seismic velocity profiles derived from the Apollo seismic data through travel time inversion vary both in the depth of the crust and mantle layers, and the seismic velocities and densities assigned to those layers. The lunar mass and moment of inertia likewise only constrain gross variations in the density profile beyond that of a uniform density sphere. As a result, composition and structure models previously obtained by jointly inverting these data retain the original uncertainties inherent in the input data sets. We perform a joint inversion of Apollo seismic delay times and gravity data collected by the GRAIL lunar gravity mission, in order to recover seismic velocity and density as a function of latitude, longitude, and depth within the

  11. GRAIL Refinements to Lunar Seismic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. C.; Schmerr, N. C.

    2013-12-01

    Joint interpretation of disparate geophysical datasets helps to reduce drawbacks that can result from analyzing them individually. The Apollo seismic network was situated on the lunar nearside surface in a roughly equilateral triangle having sides approximately 1000 km long, with stations 12/14 nearly co-located at one corner. Due to this limited geographical extent, near-surface ray coverage from moonquakes is low, but increases with depth. In comparison, gravity surveys and their resulting gravity anomaly maps have traditionally offered optimal resolution at crustal depths. Gravimetric maps and seismic data sets are therefore well suited to joint inversion, since the complementary information reduces inherent model ambiguity. Previous joint inversions of the Apollo seismic data (seismic phase arrival times) and Clementine- or Lunar Prospector-derived gravity data (mass and moment of inertia) attempted to recover the subsurface structure of the Moon by focusing on hypothetical lunar compositions that explored the density/velocity relationship. These efforts typically searched for the best fitting thermodynamically calculated velocity/density model, and allowed variables like core size, velocity, and/or composition to vary freely. Seismic velocity profiles previously derived from the Apollo seismic data through inversion of travel times vary both in the depth of the crust and mantle layers, and the seismic velocities and densities assigned to those layers. The lunar mass and moment of inertia likewise only constrain gross variations in the density profile beyond that of a uniform density sphere. As a result, composition and structure models previously obtained by jointly inverting these data retain the original uncertainties inherent in the input data sets. We will perform a joint inversion of Apollo seismic delay times and gravity data collected by the GRAIL lunar gravity mission, in order to recover seismic velocities and density as a function of latitude

  12. Seismic Imaging of Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, Henri-Claude

    The mantle plume hypothesis was proposed thirty years ago by Jason Morgan to explain hotspot volcanoes such as Hawaii. A thermal diapir (or plume) rises from the thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and produces a chain of volcanoes as a plate moves on top of it. The idea is very attractive, but direct evidence for actual plumes is weak, and many questions remain unanswered. With the great improvement of seismic imagery in the past ten years, new prospects have arisen. Mantle plumes are expected to be rather narrow, and their detection by seismic techniques requires specific developments as well as dedicated field experiments. Regional travel-time tomography has provided good evidence for plumes in the upper mantle beneath a few hotspots (Yellowstone, Massif Central, Iceland). Beneath Hawaii and Iceland, the plume can be detected in the transition zone because it deflects the seismic discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depths. In the lower mantle, plumes are very difficult to detect, so specific methods have been worked out for this purpose. There are hints of a plume beneath the weak Bowie hotspot, as well as intriguing observations for Hawaii. Beneath Iceland, high-resolution tomography has just revealed a wide and meandering plume-like structure extending from the core-mantle boundary up to the surface. Among the many phenomena that seem to take place in the lowermost mantle (or D''), there are also signs there of the presence of plumes. In this article I review the main results obtained so far from these studies and discuss their implications for plume dynamics. Seismic imaging of mantle plumes is still in its infancy but should soon become a turbulent teenager.

  13. GRAIL Refinements to Lunar Seismic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.; Schmerr, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    Joint interpretation of disparate geophysical datasets helps reduce drawbacks that can result from analyzing them individually. The Apollo seismic network was situated on the lunar nearside surface in a roughly equilateral triangle having sides approximately 1000 km long, with stations 12/14 nearly co-located at one corner. Due to this limited geographical extent, near-surface ray coverage from moonquakes is low, but increase with depth. In comparison, gravity surveys and their resulting gravity anomaly maps have traditionally offered optimal resolution at crustal depths. Gravimetric maps and seismic data sets are therefor well suited to joint inversion, since the complementary information reduces inherent model ambiguity. We will perform a joint inversion of Apollo seismic delay times and gravity data collected by GRAIL lunar gravity mission, in order to recover seismic velocity and density as a function of latitude, longitude and depth within the Moon. We will relate density (rho) to seismic velocity (v) using a linear relationship that is allowed to be depth-dependent. The corresponding coefficient (B) can reflect a variety of material properties that vary with depth, including temperature and composition. The inversion seeks to recover the set of rho, v, and B perturbations that minimize (in a least-squares sense) the difference between the observed and calculated data.

  14. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  15. Multiwavelength variability analysis of the FSRQ 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.; León-Tavares, J.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Fernandes, S.; Schlegel, E. M.; López-Rodríguez, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present a multifrequency analysis of the variability in the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 from 2008 to 2014. Our multiwavelength dataset includes gamma-ray data from Fermi/LAT (Abdo et al. 2009), observations in 1mm from SMA (Gurwell et al. 2007), Near Infrared from OAGH (Carramiñana & Carrasco 2009) and SMARTS (Bonning et al. 2012); optical V band from the Steward Observatory (Smith et al. 2009) and SMARTS; optical spectra from OAGH (Patiño-Álvarez et al. 2013) and the Steward Observatory; and polarization spectra from the Steward Observatory. The light curves are shown in Fig. 1. Six out of seven optical activity periods identified within our dataset show clear counterparts in mm, NIR and gamma-rays, however, the late 2011 - early 2012 optical flare does not have a counterpart in the GeV regime. In this contribution, we discuss the flaring evolution of 3C 279 and speculate about the production of the anomalous activity period.

  16. The Warped Nuclear Disk of Radio Galaxy 3C 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, G. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Floyd, D. J. E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Baum, S. A.; Axon, D. J.; O'Dea, C. P.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, F. D.; Sparks, W. B.; Miley, G. K.; Capetti, A.; Madrid, J. P.; Perlman, E.

    2005-12-01

    Among radio galaxies containing nuclear dust disks, the bipolar jet axis is generally expected to be perpendicular to the disk major axis. However, the FR I radio source 3C 449, possessing a nearly parallel jet/disk orientation on the sky, is an extreme example of a system that does not conform to this expectation. We examine the 600 pc dusty disk in this galaxy with images from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that a colormap of the disk exhibits a twist in its isocolor contours (isochromes). We model the colormap by integrating galactic starlight through an absorptive disk, and find that the anomalous twist in the isochromes can be reproduced in the model with a vertically thin, warped disk. The model predicts that the disk is nearly perpendicular to the jet axis within 100 pc of the nucleus. We discuss physical mechanisms capable of causing such a warp. We show that a torque on the disk arising from a possible binary black hole in the AGN or radiation pressure from the AGN causes precession on a timescale that is too long to generate such a warp. However, we estimate that the pressure in the X-ray emitting interstellar medium is large enough to perturb the disk. The warped disk in 3C 449 may be a new manifestation of feedback from an active galactic nucleus.

  17. FLASH_TISA_Terra+Aqua_Version3C

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-21

    ... Cloud Particle Phase Cloud Infrared Emissivity Cloud Base Pressure Surface (Radiative) Flux TOA Flux Surface Types Albedo LW Flux Order Data:  Earthdata Search:  Order Data Guide Documents:  ...

  18. Seismo-volcano source localization with triaxial broad-band seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inza, L. A.; Mars, J. I.; Métaxian, J. P.; O'Brien, G. S.; Macedo, O.

    2011-10-01

    Seismo-volcano source localization is essential to improve our understanding of eruptive dynamics and of magmatic systems. The lack of clear seismic wave phases prohibits the use of classical location methods. Seismic antennas composed of one-component (1C) seismometers provide a good estimate of the backazimuth of the wavefield. The depth estimation, on the other hand, is difficult or impossible to determine. As in classical seismology, the use of three-component (3C) seismometers is now common in volcano studies. To determine the source location parameters (backazimuth and depth), we extend the 1C seismic antenna approach to 3Cs. This paper discusses a high-resolution location method using a 3C array survey (3C-MUSIC algorithm) with data from two seismic antennas installed on an andesitic volcano in Peru (Ubinas volcano). One of the main scientific questions related to the eruptive process of Ubinas volcano is the relationship between the magmatic explosions and long-period (LP) swarms. After introducing the 3C array theory, we evaluate the robustness of the location method on a full wavefield 3-D synthetic data set generated using a digital elevation model of Ubinas volcano and an homogeneous velocity model. Results show that the backazimuth determined using the 3C array has a smaller error than a 1C array. Only the 3C method allows the recovery of the source depths. Finally, we applied the 3C approach to two seismic events recorded in 2009. Crossing the estimated backazimuth and incidence angles, we find sources located 1000 ± 660 m and 3000 ± 730 m below the bottom of the active crater for the explosion and the LP event, respectively. Therefore, extending 1C arrays to 3C arrays in volcano monitoring allows a more accurate determination of the source epicentre and now an estimate for the depth.

  19. Apollo 14 active seismic experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, J. S.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Explosion seismic refraction data indicate that the lunar near-surface rocks at the Apollo 14 site consist of a regolith 8.5 meters thick and characterized by a compressional wave velocity of 104 meters per second. The regolith is underlain by a layer with a compressional wave velocity of 299 meters per second. The thickness of this layer, which we interpret to be the Fra Mauro Formation, is between 16 and 76 meters. The layer immediately beneath this has a velocity greater than 370 meters per second. We found no evidence of permafrost.

  20. Detection capability of the IMS seismic network based on ambient seismic noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    All nuclear explosions - on the Earth's surface, underground, underwater or in the atmosphere - are banned by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). As part of this treaty, a verification regime was put into place to detect, locate and characterize nuclear explosion testings at any time, by anyone and everywhere on the Earth. The International Monitoring System (IMS) plays a key role in the verification regime of the CTBT. Out of the different monitoring techniques used in the IMS, the seismic waveform approach is the most effective technology for monitoring nuclear underground testing and to identify and characterize potential nuclear events. This study introduces a method of seismic threshold monitoring to assess an upper magnitude limit of a potential seismic event in a certain given geographical region. The method is based on ambient seismic background noise measurements at the individual IMS seismic stations as well as on global distance correction terms for body wave magnitudes, which are calculated using the seismic reflectivity method. From our investigations we conclude that a global detection threshold of around mb 4.0 can be achieved using only stations from the primary seismic network, a clear latitudinal dependence for the detection threshold can be observed between northern and southern hemisphere. Including the seismic stations being part of the auxiliary seismic IMS network results in a slight improvement of global detection capability. However, including wave arrivals from distances greater than 120 degrees, mainly PKP-wave arrivals, leads to a significant improvement in average global detection capability. In special this leads to an improvement of the detection threshold on the southern hemisphere. We further investigate the dependence of the detection capability on spatial (latitude and longitude) and temporal (time) parameters, as well as on parameters such as source type and percentage of operational IMS stations.

  1. Deep structures and surface boundaries among Proto-Tethyan micro-blocks: Constraints from seismic tomography and aeromagnetic anomalies in the Central China Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjun; Li, Sanzhong; Liu, Xin; Santosh, M.; Zhao, Shujuan; Guo, Lingli; Cao, Huahua; Yu, Shan; Dai, Liming; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The Qinling-Qilian orogen preserves the records of Early Paleozoic convergence among the Proto-Tethyan micro-blocks. In this study, we analyze the seismic velocity structure and the aeromagnetic anomalies in the Qinling-Qilian orogen and its adjacent areas, showing that the northernmost boundaries of these Proto-Tethyan micro-blocks are defined by the Guyuan-Longshoushan Fault in the Qilian orogen and by the Luonan-Luanchuan Fault in the Qinling orogen, respectively. The lithosphere north of the Qinling-Qilian orogen subducted southward under the Qinling-Qilian orogen. The boundaries of the micro-blocks in the Qinling-Qilian orogen of the Proto-Tethys domain are mostly EW- or NE-trending. Combined with Early Paleozoic geological records, our results indicate that the south-dipping low-velocity anomaly under the Alxa block and the south-dipping high-velocity ones under the North Qilian orogen and the North China block might indicate that the Alxa block, the North Qilian Oceanic slab and the North China block subducted southward. The south-dipping high-velocity anomaly under the North Qilian orogen is interpreted as the remnant of the Proto-Tethys Ocean in that area. However, the north-dipping low-velocity anomaly under the South Qinling and the North Qinling orogens, the Qaidam block and the north-dipping high-velocity one under the Yangtze and the Bikou blocks suggest that the South Qinling and the North Qinling orogens, the Qaidam, the Yangtze and the Bikou blocks subducted northward. The present spatial framework of the Qinling-Qilian orogen is related to Early Paleozoic convergence among the Proto-Tethyan micro-blocks.

  2. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2001-01-01

    The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

  3. Seismic Forecasting of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Douglas; Lindsey, Charles

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and improved helioseismic imaging techniques of the far-side of the Sun as part of a synoptic monitor of solar activity. In collaboration with the MIDI team at Stanford University we are routinely applying our analysis to images within 24 hours of their acquisition by SOHO. For the first time, real-time seismic maps of large active regions on the Sun's far surface are publicly available. The synoptic images show examples of active regions persisting for one or more solar rotations, as well as those initially detected forming on the solar far side. Until recently, imaging the far surface of the Sun has been essentially blind to active regions more than about 50 degrees from the antipode of disk center. In a paper recently accepted for publication, we have demonstrated how acoustic travel-time perturbations may be mapped over the entire hemisphere of the Sun facing away from the Earth, including the polar regions. In addition to offering significant improvements to ongoing space weather forecasting efforts, the procedure offers the possibility of local seismic monitoring of both the temporal and spatial variations in the acoustic properties of the Sun over the entire far surface.

  4. Observation of equipartition of seismic waves.

    PubMed

    Hennino, R; Trégourès, N; Shapiro, N M; Margerin, L; Campillo, M; van Tiggelen, B A; Weaver, R L

    2001-04-09

    Equipartition is a first principle in wave transport, based on the tendency of multiple scattering to homogenize phase space. We report observations of this principle for seismic waves created by earthquakes in Mexico. We find qualitative agreement with an equipartition model that accounts for mode conversions at the Earth's surface.

  5. A seismic risk for the lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberst, Juergen; Nakamura, Yosio

    1992-01-01

    Shallow moonquakes, which were discovered during observations following the Apollo lunar landing missions, may pose a threat to lunar surface operations. The nature of these moonquakes is similar to that of intraplate earthquakes, which include infrequent but destructive events. Therefore, there is a need for detailed study to assess the possible seismic risk before establishing a lunar base.

  6. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-10-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The surface geochemistry sampling at the original Bear Lake demonstration site was updated several months after the prospect was confirmed and production begun. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir.

  7. A Study of Near-Surface Seismic Methods on Terrain Susceptible to Landslides in the City of Campos do Jordão, State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    This study seeks to prove the usefulness of near-surface seismic methods as complementary data to conventional geotechnical and geological data in the characterization of areas of landslide risk. The setting is located in a low income housing neighborhood in the city of Campos do Jordão, state of São Paulo, Brazil. The area was devastated by numerous landslides between December 1999 to January 2000 after heavy rainfall in the area. Currently the area is being monitored by the National Center for Monitoring and Warning of Natural Disasters (CEMADEN). The landslides in this area are known to be shallow. The survey line passes within a couple feet of the CEMADEN monitoring station which measures soil temperature, soil moisture, rainfall intensity, and rainfall accumulation (Mendes et. al 2015). Refraction and Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) surveys were performed. In order to better identify the fundamental mode of the Rayleigh wave, separate surveys isolating the vertical and radial components of the Rayleigh wave were performed. By comparing the obtained Shear wave (Vs) and Compressional wave (Vp) profiles with the already known geotechnical data provided by CEMADEN and geological data from a previous study (Ahrendt 2005) of the site a better understanding of the geological interfaces that constitute the landslide prone area is obtained.

  8. Crystalline Ni3C as both carbon source and catalyst for graphene nucleation: a QM/MD study

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Menggai; Li, Kai; Guan, Wei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Page, Alister; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nucleation from crystalline Ni3C has been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulations based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. It was observed that the lattice of Ni3C was quickly relaxed upon thermal annealing at high temperature, resulting in an amorphous Ni3C catalyst structure. With the aid of the mobile nickel atoms, inner layer carbon atoms precipitated rapidly out of the surface and then formed polyyne chains and Y-junctions. The frequent sinusoidal-like vibration of the branched carbon configurations led to the formation of nascent graphene precursors. In light of the rapid decomposition of the crystalline Ni3C, it is proposed that the crystalline Ni3C is unlikely to be a reaction intermediate in the CVD-growth of graphene at high temperatures. However, results present here indicate that Ni3C films can be employed as precursors in the synthesis of graphene with exciting possibility. PMID:26169042

  9. Breakthroughs in Seismic and Borehole Characterization of Basalt Sequestration Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E. C.; Hardage, Bob A.; McGrail, B. Peter; Davis, Klarissa N.

    2011-04-01

    Mafic continental flood basalts form a globally important, but under-characterized CO2 sequestration target. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the northwestern U.S. is up to 5 km thick and covers over 168,000 km2. In India, flood basalts are 3 km thick and cover greater than 500,000 km2. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the CRBG and other basalts react with formation water and super critical (sc) CO2 to precipitate carbonates, thus adding a potential mineral trapping mechanism to the standard trapping mechanisms of most other types of CO2 sequestration reservoirs. Brecciated tops of individual basalt flows in the CRBG form regional aquifers that locally have greater than 30% porosity and three Darcies of permeability. Porous flow tops are potential sites for sequestration of gigatons of scCO2 in areas where the basalts contain unpotable water and are at depths greater than 800 m. In this paper we report on the U.S. DOE Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership surface seismic and borehole geophysical characterization that supports a field test of capacity, integrity, and geochemical reactivity of CRBG reservoirs in eastern Washington, U.S.A. Traditional surface seismic methods have had little success in imaging basalt features in on-shore areas where the basalt is thinly covered by sediment. Processing of the experimental 6.5 km, 5 line 3C seismic swath included constructing an elastic wavefield model, identifying and separating seismic wave modes, and processing the swath as a single 2D line. Important findings include: (1) a wide variety of shear wave energy modes swamp the P-wave seismic records; (2) except at very short geophone offsets, ground roll overprints P-wave signal; and (3) because of extreme velocity contrasts, P-wave events are refracted at incidence angles greater than 7-15 degrees. Subsequent removal of S-wave and other noise during processing resulted in tremendous improvement in image quality. The application of wireline

  10. Seismic Forecasting of Eruptions at Dormant StratoVolcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic monitoring data provide important constraints on tracking magmatic ascent and eruption. Based on direct experience with over 25 and review of over 10 additional eruption sequences at 24 volcanoes, we have identified 4 phases of precursory seismicity. 1) Deep (>20 km) low frequency (DLF) earthquakes occur near the base of the crust as magma rises toward crustal reservoirs. This seismicity is the most difficult to observe, owing to generally small magnitudes (M<2.5) the significant depth. 2) Distal volcano-tectonic (DVT) earthquakes occur on tectonic faults from a 2 to 30+ km distance laterally from (not beneath) the eventual eruption site as magma intrudes into and rises out of upper crustal reservoirs to depths of 2-3 km. A survey of 111 eruptions of 83 previously dormant volcanoes, (including all eruptions of VEI >4 since 1955) shows they were all preceded by significant DVT seismicity, usually felt. This DVT seismicity is easily observed owing to magnitudes generally reaching M>3.5. The cumulative DVT energy correlates to the intruding magma volume. 3) Low frequency (LF) earthquakes, LF tremor and contained explosions occur as magma interacts with the shallow hydrothermal system (<2 km depth), while the distal seismicity dies off.4) Shortly after this, repetitive self-similar proximal seismicity may occur and may dominate the seismic records as magma rises to the surface. We present some examples of this seismic progression to demonstrate that data from a single short-period vertical station are often sufficient to forecast eruption onsets.

  11. Multifrequency seismic detectability of seasonal thermoclines assessed from ARGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, S.; Le Gonidec, Y.; Marié, L.

    2016-08-01

    Seismic oceanography is a developing research topic where new acoustic methods allow high-resolution teledetection of the thermohaline structure of the ocean. First implementations to study the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer have recently been achieved but remain very challenging due to the weakness and shallowness of such seismic reflectors. In this article, we develop a multifrequency seismic analysis of hydrographic data sets collected in a seasonally stratified midlatitude shelf by ARGO network floats to assess the detectability issue of shallow thermoclines. This analysis, for which sensitivity to the data reduction scheme used by ARGO floats for the transmission of the profiles is discussed, allows characterizing both the depth location and the frequency dependency of the dominant reflective feature of such complex structures. This approach provides the first statistical distribution of the range of variability of the frequency-dependent seismic reflection amplitude of the midlatitude seasonal thermoclines. We introduce a new parameter to quantify the overall capability of a multichannel seismic setup, including the source strength, the fold, and the ambient noise level, to detect shallow thermoclines. Seismic source signals are approximated by Ricker wavelets, providing quantitative guidelines to help in the design of seismic experiments targeting such oceanic reflectors. For shallow midlatitude seasonal thermoclines, we show that the detectability is optimal for seismic peak frequencies between 200 and 400 Hz: this means that airgun and Sparker sources are not well suited and that significant improvements of source devices will be necessary before seismic imaging of OSBL structures can be reliably attempted.

  12. Earthquake source studies and seismic imaging in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, C.; Silwal, V.

    2015-12-01

    Alaska is one of the world's most seismically and tectonically active regions. Its enhanced seismicity, including slab seismicity down to 180 km, provides opportunities (1) to characterize pervasive crustal faulting and slab deformation through the estimation of moment tensors and (2) to image subsurface structures to help understand the tectonic evolution of Alaska. Most previous studies of earthquakes and seismic imaging in Alaska have emphasized earthquake locations and body-wave travel-time tomography. In the past decade, catalogs of seismic moment tensors have been established, while seismic surface waves, active-source data, and potential field data have been used to improve models of seismic structure. We have developed moment tensor catalogs in the regions of two of the largest sedimentary basins in Alaska: Cook Inlet forearc basin, west of Anchorage, and Nenana basin, west of Fairbanks. Our moment tensor solutions near Nenana basin suggest a transtensional tectonic setting, with the basin developing in a stepover of a left-lateral strike-slip fault system. We explore the effects of seismic wave propagation from point-source and finite-source earthquake models by performing three-dimensional wavefield simulations using seismic velocity models that include major sedimentary basins. We will use our catalog of moment tensors within an adjoint-based, iterative inversion to improve the three-dimensional tomographic model of Alaska.

  13. 17 CFR 270.3c-4 - Definition of “common trust fund” as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1940 § 270.3c-4 Definition of “common trust fund” as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act. The term common trust fund as used in section 3(c)(3) of the Act (15 U.S.C. 80a-3(c)(3)) shall include a common...; Provided, That: (a) The common trust fund is operated in compliance with the same State and...

  14. Angular Structure of FrII Radio Sources 3C169.1 and 3C263 at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchishin, R. V.; Shepelev, V. A.; Lozinskyy, A. B.; Lytvynenko, O. A.

    The radio galaxy 3C169.1 and the quasar 3C263, located at nearly the same distance with red shift z>0.6, have similar morphological and spectral characteristics. The maps of the sources obtained at decimeter and centimeter wavelengths have shown they are FRII radio sources with steep spectra and approximately equal angular sizes. The very first investigation of the sources structure at decameter wavelengths is presented in the report. Observations were made using a network of the URAN decameter interferometers with baselines 42 to 950 km and with maximum angular resolution of arcsec order of magnitude. The models of the image of these sources based on visibility functions measured have been obtained at frequencies of 20 and 25 MHz. They were composed of elliptical components with Gaussian brightness distribution. To facilitate the comparison of these lowfrequency models with high-frequency radio images, the latter were converted to the similar models by fitting the Gaussian components to lobes and hot spots selected at the maps. Comparison of the models revealed changes in a structure of the sources caused by the frequency decrease.

  15. Recent Impacts on Mars: Cluster Properties and Seismic Signal Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justine Daubar, Ingrid; Schmerr, Nicholas; Banks, Maria; Marusiak, Angela; Golombek, Matthew P.

    2016-10-01

    Impacts are a key source of seismic waves that are a primary constraint on the formation, evolution, and dynamics of planetary objects. Geophysical missions such as InSight (Banerdt et al., 2013) will monitor seismic signals from internal and external sources. New martian craters have been identified in orbital images (Malin et al., 2006; Daubar et al., 2013). Seismically detecting such impacts and subsequently imaging the resulting craters will provide extremely accurate epicenters and source crater sizes, enabling calibration of seismic velocities, the efficiency of impact-seismic coupling, and retrieval of detailed regional and local internal structure.To investigate recent impact-induced seismicity on Mars, we have assessed ~100 new, dated impact sites. In approximately half of new impacts, the bolide partially disintegrates in the atmosphere, forming multiple craters in a cluster. We incorporate the resulting, more complex, seismic effects in our model. To characterize the variation between sites, we focus on clustered impacts. We report statistics of craters within clusters: diameters, morphometry indicating subsurface layering, strewn-field azimuths indicating impact direction, and dispersion within clusters indicating combined effects of bolide strength and elevation of breakup.Measured parameters are converted to seismic predictions for impact sources using a scaling law relating crater diameter to the momentum and source duration, calibrated for impacts recorded by Apollo (Lognonne et al., 2009). We use plausible ranges for target properties, bolide densities, and impact velocities to bound the seismic moment. The expected seismic sources are modeled in the near field using a 3-D wave propagation code (Petersson et al., 2010) and in the far field using a 1-D wave propagation code (Friederich et al., 1995), for a martian seismic model. Thus we calculate the amplitudes of seismic phases at varying distances, which can be used to evaluate the detectability

  16. The Galactic Magnetic Field in the Quasar 3C 216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, T.; Taylor, G. B.

    1999-11-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric observations made with the Very Long Baseline Array of the quasar 3C 216 reveal the presence of Faraday rotation measures (RMs) in excess of 2000 rad m-2 in the source rest frame in the arc of emission located at ~140 mas from the core. Rotation measures in the range -300 to +300 rad m-2 are detected in the inner 5 mas (~30 pc). While the rotation measure near the core can be explained as being caused by a magnetic field in the narrow-line region, we favor the interpretation for the high RM in the arc that it is caused by a ``local'' Faraday screen produced in a shock where the jet is deflected by the interstellar medium of the host galaxy. Our results indicate that a galactic magnetic field of the order of ~50 μG on a scale greater than 100 pc must be present in the ambient medium.

  17. 3C 279 - The case for 'superluminal' expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. D.; Counselman, C. C., III; Geller, R. B.; Shapiro, I. I.; Wittels, J. J.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    The compact extragalactic radio source 3C 279 was observed with the Haystack-Goldstone interferometer (wavelength approximately 3.8 cm) during six separate sessions spread between October 1970 and April 1972. The fringe amplitudes from each of these observation sessions were consistent with a two-component model of the brightness distribution of the source. The position angle of the line joining the components remained at 38 + or - 2 deg, while the angular separation between the components increased nearly linearly at the rate of 0.5 + or 0.1 milliarcsec/yr during this period. The corresponding apparent expansion speed is (21 + or - 4)c, for H = 50 km/s per Mpc and q = 0.05

  18. Multifrequency observations of the superluminal quasar 3C 345

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.; Roellig, T. P. L.; Bregman, J. D.; Witteborn, F. C.; Lester, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the continuum properties of the superluminal quasar 3C 345, on the basis of radio, optical, IR, and X-ray frequency monitorings, as well as by means of simultaneous multifrequency spectra extending from the radio through the X-ray bands. Radio outbursts, which appear to follow IR-optical outbursts by about one year, first occur at the highest frequencies, as expected from optical depth effects; the peak flux is nevertheless often reached at several frequencies at once. The beginning of outbursts, as defined by mm-measurements, corresponds to the appearance of the three known 'superluminal' components. An increase in the X-ray flux during 1979-1980 corresponds to increased radio flux, while the IR flux changes in the opposite sense.

  19. Extended Ly-alpha emission associated with 3C 294

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.; Spinrad, Hyron; Dickinson, Mark; Van Breugel, Wil; Liebert, James; Djorgovski, S.; Eisenhardt, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Optical, IR, and radio observations of the powerful radio source 3C 294, which is surrounded by a large cloud of ionized gas, are presented. The galaxy is faint in the rest-frame UV, yet has a near-IR luminosity that is typical of radio galaxies at redshifts of order two. In contrast to the large extent of the ionized gas, the K-band image is quite compact. The emission-line cloud is closely aligned with the radio source axis and has an ionization state indicative of ionization by a nonstellar source. The velocity field of the gas has both large ordered motions and large turbulent components. The total mass required to keep the gas bound to the system is comparable to present-day massive galaxies and their halos. The velocity fields of the high-ionization lines are systematically different from Ly-alpha in a manner that is not easily understood.

  20. Trisodium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7)

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tris­odium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7), has been solved and refined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional theory (DFT). There are two independent five-coordinate Na+ and one six-coordinate Na+ cations in the asymmetric unit. The [NaO5] and [NaO6] polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework. There are channels parallel to the a and b axes in which the remainder of the citrate anions reside. The only hydrogen bonds are an intra­molecular one between the hy­droxy group and one of the terminal carboxyl­ate O atoms and an intermolecular one between a methylene group and the hydroxyl O atom. PMID:27308044

  1. NIR Flaring of the Quasar 3C454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Carramiñana, A.; Recillas, E.; Escobedo, G.; Porras, A.; Mayya, Y. D.; Valdes, J. R.

    2010-10-01

    We report the ongoing NIR flare of the quasar 3C454.3, also known as [HB89]2251+158. It is likely associated with a gamma ray source CGRaBSJ2253+1608 and the radio source WMAP055. It is an intermediate redshift FRSQSO Z=0.859 (RA=22:53:57.75, Dec=+16:08:53.6(J2000). On October 31th,2010 (JD 2455500.781451), we determined the NIR flux from this object to correspond to H = 11.190 +/- 0.03, 0.63mag brighter than it was two days earlier(JD 2455498.821166) when we determined it to have H = 11.820 +/- 0.03.

  2. Extended component in the quasar 3C 380

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megn, A. V.; Rashkovskiĭ, S. L.; Shepelev, V. A.; Inyutin, G. A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Bulatsen, V. G.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Koshevoĭ, V. V.; Lozinskiĭ, A. B.; Kassim, N. E.

    2006-09-01

    Results of radio interferometric observations of the quasar 3C 380 carried out on the URAN interferometers at decameter wavelengths and on the aperture synthesis radio telescope VLA at meter wavelengths are reported. The spectral index of an extended lobe about 10″ in size is considerably lower than at decimeter wavelengths. Below ˜ 100 MHz, the ratio of the emission from the compact components associated with hot spots in the radio lobe to the total flux of the source decreases due to synchrotron self-absorption at hot spots, whose flux density at 20 MHz does not exceed 65 Jy. A halo with a full width at a half-maximum of about 40″ was detected, whose angular extent considerably exceeds the total source size measured at shorter wavelengths.

  3. Structural Variability of 3C 111 on Parsec Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossberger, C.; Kadler, M.; Wilms, J.; Muller, C.; Beuchert, T.; Ros, E.; Ojha, R.; Aller, M.; Aller, H.; Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Nestoras, I.; Schmidt, R.; Zensus, J. A.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.; Riquelme, D.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the parsec-scale structural variability of the extragalactic jet 3C 111 related to a major radio flux density outburst in 2007, The data analyzed were taken within the scope of the MOJAVE, UMRAO, and F-GAMMA programs, which monitor a large sample of the radio brightest compact extragalactic jets with the VLBA, the University of Michigan 26 m, the Effelsberg 100 m, and the IRAM 30 m radio telescopes. The analysis of the VLBA data is performed by fitting Gaussian model components in the visibility domain, We associate the ejection of bright features in the radio jet with a major flux-density outburst in 2007, The evolution of these features suggests the formation of a leading component and multiple trailing components

  4. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOEpatents

    Ober, Curtis C.; Romero, Louis A.; Ghiglia, Dennis C.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  5. Ischia Island: Historical Seismicity and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlino, S.; Cubellis, E.; Iannuzzi, R.; Luongo, G.; Obrizzo, F.

    2003-04-01

    The seismic energy release in volcanic areas is a complex process and the island of Ischia provides a significant scenario of historical seismicity. This is characterized by the occurence of earthquakes with low energy and high intensity. Information on the seismicity of the island spans about eight centuries, starting from 1228. With regard to effects, the most recent earthquake of 1883 is extensively documented both in the literature and unpublished sources. The earthquake caused 2333 deaths and the destruction of the historical and environmental heritage of some areas of the island. The most severe damage occurred in Casamicciola. This event, which was the first great catastrophe after the unification of Italy in the 1860s (Imax = XI degree MCS), represents an important date in the prevention of natural disasters, in that it was after this earthquake that the first Seismic Safety Act in Italy was passed by which lower risk zones were identified for new settlements. Thanks to such detailed analysis, reliable modelling of the seismic source was also obtained. The historical data onwards makes it possible to identify the area of the epicenter of all known earthquakes as the northern slope of Monte Epomeo, while analysis of the effects of earthquakes and the geological structures allows us to evaluate the stress fields that generate the earthquakes. In a volcanic area, interpretation of the mechanisms of release and propagation of seismic energy is made even more complex as the stress field that acts at a regional level is compounded by that generated from migration of magmatic masses towards the surface, as well as the rheologic properties of the rocks dependent on the high geothermic gradient. Such structural and dynamic conditions make the island of Ischia a seismic area of considerable interest. It would appear necessary to evaluate the expected damage caused by a new event linked to the renewal of dynamics of the island, where high population density and the

  6. Three-component borehole wall-locking seismic detector

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    A seismic detector for boreholes is described that has an accelerometer sensor block for sensing vibrations in geologic formations of the earth. The density of the seismic detector is approximately matched to the density of the formations in which the detector is utilized. A simple compass is used to orient the seismic detector. A large surface area shoe having a radius approximately equal to the radius of the borehole in which the seismic detector is located may be pushed against the side of the borehole by actuating cylinders contained in the seismic detector. Hydraulic drive of the cylinders is provided external to the detector. By using the large surface area wall-locking shoe, force holding the seismic detector in place is distributed over a larger area of the borehole wall thereby eliminating concentrated stresses. Borehole wall-locking forces up to ten times the weight of the seismic detector can be applied thereby ensuring maximum detection frequency response up to 2,000 hertz using accelerometer sensors in a triaxial array within the seismic detector.

  7. Three-component borehole wall-locking seismic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, T.E.

    1994-04-12

    A seismic detector for boreholes is described that has an accelerometer sensor block for sensing vibrations in geologic formations of the earth. The density of the seismic detector is approximately matched to the density of the formations in which the detector is utilized. A simple compass is used to orient the seismic detector. A large surface area shoe having a radius approximately equal to the radius of the borehole in which the seismic detector is located may be pushed against the side of the borehole by actuating cylinders contained in the seismic detector. Hydraulic drive of the cylinders is provided external to the detector. By using the large surface area wall-locking shoe, force holding the seismic detector in place is distributed over a larger area of the borehole wall thereby eliminating concentrated stresses. Borehole wall-locking forces up to ten times the weight of the seismic detector can be applied thereby ensuring maximum detection frequency response up to 2,000 hertz using accelerometer sensors in a triaxial array within the seismic detector. 5 figures.

  8. The seismic design handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Naeim, F. )

    1989-01-01

    This book contains papers on the planning, analysis, and design of earthquake resistant building structures. Theories and concepts of earthquake resistant design and their implementation in seismic design practice are presented.

  9. BUILDING 341 Seismic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Halle, J.

    2015-06-15

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3.

  10. Deepwater seismic acquisition technology

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.

    1996-09-01

    Although truly new technology is not required for successful acquisition of seismic data in deep Gulf of Mexico waters, it is helpful to review some basic aspects of these seismic surveys. Additionally, such surveys are likely to see early use of some emerging new technology which can improve data quality. Because such items as depth imaging, borehole seismic, 4-D and marine 3-component recording were mentioned in the May 1996 issue of World Oil, they are not discussed again here. However, these technologies will also play some role in the deepwater seismic activities. What is covered in this paper are some new considerations for: (1) longer data records needed in deeper water, (2) some pros and cons of very long steamer use, and (3) two new commercial systems for quantifying data quality.

  11. Seismic Research and High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayers, J.

    2004-12-01

    Through a series of summer workshops, seismologists at Indiana University have trained secondary physics and earth science teachers in fundamentals of seismology and basic concepts in seismic research. Teachers and students then gain hands on experience in science research through operation of a research quality seismic station sited at the local schools. Physics and earth science students have operated the Northview High School Seismic Station since 1998. Data from the Northview seismometer are stored locally and also transmitted over the Internet to a database at Indiana University. Students have access to local data as well as seismic databases accessible through the Internet to use for research projects. In this presentation, I will describe how these projects have been incorporated into the physics and earth science programs at Northview High School. I will discuss how our teachers and students have benefited from the opportunity to take part in hands-on collaborative scientific research under the guidance of university faculty. In particular, I will describe our participation in a regional seismic network through seismic data acquisition, data analysis using seismological software, and students' experiences in a university-based student research symposium. I reflect on the some of the successes, such as increased student and community interest, resulting from our work with the seismic station. I comment on some of the barriers, such as time constraints and unintended interference from school personnel, to high-school teachers' and students' involvement in scientific research programs. I conclude with a discussion of a successful student seismology project, an examination of blasts from local surface coal mines, that was a finalist in the 2003 INTEL International Science and Engineering Fair

  12. Seismic exploration for water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Thornton

    1987-01-01

    It is proposed to soft-land three seismometers in the Utopia-Elysium region and three or more radio controlled explosive charges at nearby sites that can be accurately located by an orbiter. Seismic signatures of timed explosions, to be telemetered to the orbiter, will be used to detect present surface layers, including those saturated by volatiles such as water and/or ice. The Viking Landers included seismometers that showed that at present Mars is seismically quiet, and that the mean crustal thickness at the site is about 14 to 18 km. The new seismic landers must be designed to minimize wind vibration noise, and the landing sites selected so that each is well formed on the regolith, not on rock outcrops or in craters. The explosive charges might be mounted on penetrators aimed at nearby smooth areas. They must be equipped with radio emitters for accurate location and radio receivers for timed detonation.

  13. Seismic refraction analysis: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Zelt, Colin; Doll, William

    2012-01-01

    Seismic Refraction Methods: Unleashing the Potential and Understanding the Limitations; Tucson, Arizona, 29 March 2012 A workshop focused on seismic refraction methods took place on 29 May 2012, associated with the 2012 Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems. This workshop was convened to assess the current state of the science and discuss paths forward, with a primary focus on near-surface problems but with an eye on all applications. The agenda included talks on these topics from a number of experts interspersed with discussion and a dedicated discussion period to finish the day. Discussion proved lively at times, and workshop participants delved into many topics central to seismic refraction work.

  14. Seismic offset balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Beale, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to successfully predict lithology and fluid content from reflection seismic records using AVO techniques is contingent upon accurate pre-analysis conditioning of the seismic data. However, all too often, residual amplitude effects remain after the many offset-dependent processing steps are completed. Residual amplitude effects often represent a significant error when compared to the amplitude variation with offset (AVO) response that the authors are attempting to quantify. They propose a model-based, offset-dependent amplitude balancing method that attempts to correct for these residuals and other errors due to sub-optimal processing. Seismic offset balancing attempts to quantify the relationship between the offset response of back-ground seismic reflections and corresponding theoretical predictions for average lithologic interfaces thought t