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Sample records for 3d antiferromagnetic ordering

  1. 3D Ordering in 2D Quantum Heisenberg Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landee, C. P.; Woodward, F. M.; Giantsidis, J.; Turnbull, M. M.

    2000-03-01

    The family of 2D quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnets (5-ZAP)_2CuX4 consists of CuX_4^2- dianions packed together in magnetically square layers, interacting through X\\cdotsX contacts (X = Cl, Br). The strength of both the intralayer interaction J and interlayer interaction J^' are controlled by the substituent Z in the 5-position of 5-Z, 2-aminopyridine. The 3D critical temperature TN is a function of the J^'/J ratio and consequently is also subject to control by the Z-substituent. Previously we have reported on the compounds with Z = Cl (5-CAP), and Z = methyl (5-MAP). We have now prepared the isomorphous 5-bromo analogue (5-BAP)_2CuX4 and will discuss the T_N/J ratios for all three compounds in terms of the structural parameters.

  2. Antiferromagnetic spin chain behavior and a transition to 3D magnetic order in Cu(D,L-alanine)2: Roles of H-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Rafael; Sartoris, Rosana P.; Calvo, Hernán L.; Chagas, Edson F.; Rapp, Raul E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the spin chain behavior, a transition to 3D magnetic order and the magnitudes of the exchange interactions for the metal-amino acid complex Cu(D,L-alanine)2•H2O, a model compound to investigate exchange couplings supported by chemical paths characteristic of biomolecules. Thermal and magnetic data were obtained as a function of temperature (T) and magnetic field (B0). The magnetic contribution to the specific heat, measured between 0.48 and 30 K, displays above 1.8 K a 1D spin-chain behavior that can be fitted with an intrachain antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.12±0.08) cm-1 (defined as ℋex(i,i+1) = -2J0SiṡSi+1), between neighbor coppers at 4.49 Å along chains connected by non-covalent and H-bonds. We also observe a narrow specific heat peak at 0.89 K indicating a phase transition to a 3D magnetically ordered phase. Magnetization curves at fixed T = 2, 4 and 7 K with B0 between 0 and 9 T, and at T between 2 and 300 K with several fixed values of B0 were globally fitted by an intrachain AFM exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.27±0.02) cm-1 and g = 2.091±0.005. Interchain interactions J1 between coppers in neighbor chains connected through long chemical paths with total length of 9.51 Å cannot be estimated from magnetization curves. However, observation of the phase transition in the specific heat data allows estimating the range 0.1≤|2J1|≤0.4 cm-1, covering the predictions of various approximations. We analyze the magnitudes of 2J0 and 2J1 in terms of the structure of the corresponding chemical paths. The main contribution in supporting the intrachain interaction is assigned to H-bonds while the interchain interactions are supported by paths containing H-bonds and carboxylate bridges, with the role of the H-bonds being predominant. We compare the obtained intrachain coupling with studies of compounds showing similar behavior and discuss the validity of the approximations allowing to calculate the interchain

  3. Enhanced ordering temperatures in antiferromagnetic manganite superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    May, Stephen J.; Robertson, Lee; Ryan, P J; Kim, J.-W.; Santos, Tiffany S.; Karapetrova, Evgenia; Zarestky, Jerel L.; Zhai, X.; Te velthuis, Suzanne G.; Eckstein, James N.; Bader, S. D.; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2009-01-01

    The disorder inherent to doping by cation substitution in the complex oxides can have profound effects on collective ordered states. Here, we demonstrate that cation-site ordering achieved via digital synthesis techniques can dramatically enhance the antiferromagnetic ordering temperatures of manganite films. Cation-ordered (LaMnO3)m/(SrMnO3)2m superlattices exhibit N el temperatures (TN) that are the highest of any La1-xSrxMnO3 compound, ~70 K greater than compositionally equivalent randomly doped La1/3Sr2/3MnO3. The antiferromagnetic order is A-type, consisting of in-plane double-exchange-mediated ferromagnetic sheets coupled antiferromagnetically along the out-of-plane direction. Via synchrotron x-ray scattering, we have discovered an in-plane structural modulation that reduces the charge itinerancy and hence the ordering temperature within the ferromagnetic sheets, thereby limiting TN. This modulation is mitigated and driven to long wavelengths by cation ordering, enabling the higher TN values of the superlattices. These results provide insight into how cation-site ordering can enhance cooperative behavior in oxides through subtle structural phenomena.

  4. Magnetic and Thermal Properties of λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 System ---Fe 3d Spin in Antiferromagnetic Insulating Phase---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiba, Hiroshi; Nobori, Kento; Shimada, Kazuo; Nishio, Yutaka; Kajita, Koji; Zhou, Biao; Kobayashi, Akiko; Kobayashi, Hayao

    2011-06-01

    A quasi-two-dimensional organic conductor λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 [BETS = bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene] exhibits a new type of phase transition from a paramagnetic metal (PM) to an antiferromagnetic insulator (AFI) at a transition temperature (TMI) of 8.3 K under zero magnetic field. We studied its thermodynamic properties and found a six-level Schottky hump in its specific heat and a broad shoulder in its magnetic susceptibility below TMI. These anomalies are explained by a new model in which the 3d spin maintains the paramagnetic states against the antiferromagnetic ordering of the π spin.

  5. Hidden order to antiferromagnetic transition in URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jesse; Movassagh, Mahsa Rahimi; Wilson, Murray; Luke, Graeme; Kanchanavatee, Noravee; Huang, Kevin; Janoschek, Marc; Maple, M. Brian; Timusk, Tom

    The second-order phase transition in the heavy fermion compound URu2Si2 continues to confound efforts to reveal its true nature, and bears the moniker ''hidden order'' with good reason. While the order parameter remains mysterious, antiferromagnetism is easily induced with modest chemical substitution. The proximity of these two phases offers tantalizing clues about the nature of the hidden order phase. We present data on the antiferromagnetic phase, revealing the similarities and the differences between the two phases, including evidence for effects above the transition temperature. The implications of these findings for the hidden order parameter will be discussed. Alternate affiliation: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

  6. Higher Order Lagrange Finite Elements In M3D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Chen; H.R. Strauss; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; L.E. Sugiyama; G. Fu; J. Breslau

    2004-12-17

    The M3D code has been using linear finite elements to represent multilevel MHD on 2-D poloidal planes. Triangular higher order elements, up to third order, are constructed here in order to provide M3D the capability to solve highly anisotropic transport problems. It is found that higher order elements are essential to resolve the thin transition layer characteristic of the anisotropic transport equation, particularly when the strong anisotropic direction is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinates. The transition layer is measured by the profile width, which is zero for infinite anisotropy. It is shown that only higher order schemes have the ability to make this layer converge towards zero when the anisotropy gets stronger and stronger. Two cases are considered. One has the strong transport direction partially aligned with one of the element edges, the other doesn't have any alignment. Both cases have the strong transport direction misaligned with the grid line by some angles.

  7. Culturing Cells in 3D Ordered Cellular Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Hui; Lin, Wang-Jung; Lin, Jing-Ying

    2011-03-01

    Constructing a well-defined 3D microenvironment for cell growth is a key step for tissue engineering and mechanobiology. We demonstrate high-throughput fabrication of gelatin-based ordered cellular solids with tunable pore size and solid fraction. This process involves generating monodisperse liquid foam with a cross-flow microfluidic device. The monodisperse liquid foam was further processed into open-cell solid foam, which was used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture. Three distinct cell types were cultured under these conditions and displayed appropriate physiological, morphological, and functional characteristics. Epithelial cells formed cyst-like structures and were polarized inside pores, myoblasts adopted a tubular structure and fused into myotubes, and fibroblasts exhibited wide varieties of morphologies depending on their location inside the scaffolds. These ordered cellular solids therefore make possible the study of pore-size effects on cells.

  8. A Highly-Ordered 3D Covalent Fullerene Framework**

    PubMed Central

    Minar, Norma K; Hou, Kun; Westermeier, Christian; Döblinger, Markus; Schuster, Jörg; Hanusch, Fabian C; Nickel, Bert; Ozin, Geoffrey A; Bein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A highly-ordered 3D covalent fullerene framework is presented with a structure based on octahedrally functionalized fullerene building blocks in which every fullerene is separated from the next by six functional groups and whose mesoporosity is controlled by cooperative self-assembly with a liquid-crystalline block copolymer. The new fullerene-framework material was obtained in the form of supported films by spin coating the synthesis solution directly on glass or silicon substrates, followed by a heat treatment. The fullerene building blocks coassemble with a liquid-crystalline block copolymer to produce a highly ordered covalent fullerene framework with orthorhombic Fmmm symmetry, accessible 7.5 nm pores, and high surface area, as revealed by gas adsorption, NMR spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and TEM. We also note that the 3D covalent fullerene framework exhibits a dielectric constant significantly lower than that of the nonporous precursor material. PMID:25958846

  9. Polar antiferromagnets produced with orbital order.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Naoki; Ogimoto, Yasushi; Ida, Yoshiaki; Nomura, Yusuke; Arita, Ryotaro; Miyano, Kenjiro

    2012-04-13

    Polar states are realized in pseudocubic manganite films fabricated on high-index substrates, in which a Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion remains an active variable. Several types of orbital orders (OOs) were found to develop large optical second harmonics, signaling broken-inversion symmetry distinct from their bulk forms and films on (100) substrates. The observed symmetry lifting and first-principles calculation both indicate that the modified JT q2 mode drives Mn-site off centering, which can be controlled by a magnetic-field-induced phase transition via a coupling of OO and spin orders.

  10. Magnetic ordering in digital alloys of group-IV semiconductors with 3d-transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Otrokov, M. M.; Tugushev, V. V.; Ernst, A.; Ostanin, S. A.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2011-04-15

    The ab initio investigation of the magnetic ordering in digital alloys consisting of monolayers of 3d-transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni introduced into the Si, Ge, and Si{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5} semiconductor hosts is reported. The calculations of the parameters of the exchange interactions and total-energy calculations indicate that the ferromagnetic order appears only in the manganese monolayers, whereas the antiferromagnetic order is more probable in V, Cr, and Fe monolayers, and Ti, Co, and Ni monolayers are nonmagnetic. The stability of the ferromagnetic phase in digital alloys containing manganese monolayers has been analyzed using the calculations of magnon spectra.

  11. Competing Orders in a Nearly Antiferromagnetic Metal.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Yoni; Gerlach, Max H; Trebst, Simon; Berg, Erez

    2016-08-26

    We study the onset of spin-density wave order in itinerant electron systems via a two-dimensional lattice model amenable to numerically exact, sign-problem-free determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The finite-temperature phase diagram of the model reveals a dome-shaped d-wave superconducting phase near the magnetic quantum phase transition. Above the critical superconducting temperature, an extended fluctuation regime manifests itself in the opening of a gap in the electronic density of states and an enhanced diamagnetic response. While charge density wave fluctuations are moderately enhanced in the proximity of the magnetic quantum phase transition, they remain short ranged. The striking similarity of our results to the phenomenology of many unconventional superconductors points a way to a microscopic understanding of such strongly coupled systems in a controlled manner. PMID:27610877

  12. Competing Orders in a Nearly Antiferromagnetic Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattner, Yoni; Gerlach, Max H.; Trebst, Simon; Berg, Erez

    2016-08-01

    We study the onset of spin-density wave order in itinerant electron systems via a two-dimensional lattice model amenable to numerically exact, sign-problem-free determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The finite-temperature phase diagram of the model reveals a dome-shaped d -wave superconducting phase near the magnetic quantum phase transition. Above the critical superconducting temperature, an extended fluctuation regime manifests itself in the opening of a gap in the electronic density of states and an enhanced diamagnetic response. While charge density wave fluctuations are moderately enhanced in the proximity of the magnetic quantum phase transition, they remain short ranged. The striking similarity of our results to the phenomenology of many unconventional superconductors points a way to a microscopic understanding of such strongly coupled systems in a controlled manner.

  13. Superconductivity in the vicinity of antiferromagnetic order in CrAs and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jianlin

    2015-03-01

    Transition-metal oxides or pnictides are in rich of novel and intriguing electronic behaviors due to multiple quantum orders and competing phenomena. Among the different electronic states, the emergence of superconductivity in the vicinity of other quantum orders is at the heart of the rich physics. Superconductivity has been observed in a majority of 3d transition-metal compounds except for the Cr- and Mn- based compounds. It is thus of high interest in exploring possible superconductivity in those systems. In this talk, I will present the discovery of superconductivity on the verge of antiferromagnetic order in CrAs via the application of external high pressure. Bulk superconductivity with Tc ~ 2 K emerges at the critical pressure Pc ~ 8 kbar, where the first-order antiferromagnetic transition at TN ~ 265 K under ambient pressure is completely suppressed. In addition, quantum criticality and non-Fermi liquid behavior are observed near Pc, which we interpret as originating from a nearly second-order magnetic quantum phase transition that is concomitant with a first-order structural transition. The present finding opens a new avenue for searching novel superconductors in the Cr and other 3d transitional-metal based systems. In collaboration with Wei Wu, Jinguang Cheng, Kazuyuki Matsubayashi, Panpan Kong, Fukun Lin, Changqing Jin, Nanlin Wang, Yoshiya Uwatoko, Rong Yi, and Qimiao Si.

  14. Topological order in an exactly solvable 3D spin model

    SciTech Connect

    Bravyi, Sergey; Leemhuis, Bernhard; Terhal, Barbara M.

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: RHtriangle We study exactly solvable spin model with six-qubit nearest neighbor interactions on a 3D face centered cubic lattice. RHtriangle The ground space of the model exhibits topological quantum order. RHtriangle Elementary excitations can be geometrically described as the corners of rectangular-shaped membranes. RHtriangle The ground space can encode 4g qubits where g is the greatest common divisor of the lattice dimensions. RHtriangle Logical operators acting on the encoded qubits are described in terms of closed strings and closed membranes. - Abstract: We study a 3D generalization of the toric code model introduced recently by Chamon. This is an exactly solvable spin model with six-qubit nearest-neighbor interactions on an FCC lattice whose ground space exhibits topological quantum order. The elementary excitations of this model which we call monopoles can be geometrically described as the corners of rectangular-shaped membranes. We prove that the creation of an isolated monopole separated from other monopoles by a distance R requires an operator acting on {Omega}(R{sup 2}) qubits. Composite particles that consist of two monopoles (dipoles) and four monopoles (quadrupoles) can be described as end-points of strings. The peculiar feature of the model is that dipole-type strings are rigid, that is, such strings must be aligned with face-diagonals of the lattice. For periodic boundary conditions the ground space can encode 4g qubits where g is the greatest common divisor of the lattice dimensions. We describe a complete set of logical operators acting on the encoded qubits in terms of closed strings and closed membranes.

  15. Quantum Spin Liquid Emerging from Antiferromagnetic Order by Introducing Disorder.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, T; Miyagawa, K; Itou, T; Ito, M; Taniguchi, H; Saito, M; Iguchi, S; Sasaki, T; Kanoda, K

    2015-08-14

    Quantum spin liquids, which are spin versions of quantum matter, have been sought after in systems with geometrical frustration. We show that disorder drives a classical magnet into a quantum spin liquid through conducting NMR experiments on an organic Mott insulator, κ-(ET)_{2}Cu[N(CN)_{2}]Cl. Antiferromagnetic ordering in the pristine crystal, when irradiated by x rays, disappears. Spin freezing, spin gap, and critical slowing down are not observed, but gapless spin excitations emerge, suggesting a novel role of disorder that brings forth a quantum spin liquid from a classical ordered state. PMID:26317741

  16. The role of 3d electrons in the appearance of ferromagnetism in the antiferromagnetic Ru2MnGe Heusler compound: a magnetic Compton scattering study.

    PubMed

    Mizusaki, S; Ohnishi, T; Douzono, A; Hirose, M; Nagata, Y; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y; Ozawa, T C; Samata, H; Noro, Y

    2012-06-27

    The antiferromagnetism in Ru(2)MnGe can be suppressed by the substitution of V by Mn and ferromagnetism appears. Synchrotron-based magnetic Compton scattering experiments are used in order to investigates the role of 3d electrons in the indirect/direct exchange interactions for the appearance of ferromagnetism. A small spin moment for the itinerant electron part on the magnetic Compton profile indicates that the metallic ferromagnet Ru(2)Mn(0.5)V(0.5)Ge has a weak indirect exchange interaction between the d-like and sp-like (itinerant) electrons. This suggests that the appearance of ferromagnetism is caused by the enhancement of the direct exchange interactions between d-d electrons in the Ru(2)MnGe Heusler compound. These findings indicate that the indirect exchange interaction between itinerant electrons and localized electrons is a significant key point for the appearance of ferromagnetism in this system.

  17. Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Symmetry Breaking in Multiple Planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, A. G.; Canright, G. S.

    We present a multiplane model for the anyon problem. Anyons on different planes are coupled via a Coulomb-type interaction. We solve exactly finite clusters and show that the "antiferromagnetic" order of the chirality is favored for both attractive and repulsive interplane coupling. We also discuss a simple model that can be treated analytically and that has the same qualitative behavior as the exact results. Our results apply to the low density limit, in which finite currents exist in each plane. These currents also occur in the high temperature (nonsuperfluid) phase of the anyon system, and so our results should apply also to that regime.

  18. Interplay between 3d-3d and 3d-4f interactions at the origin of the magnetic ordering in the Ba2LnFeO5 oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Asish K.; Hardy, Vincent; Caignaert, Vincent; Raveau, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    A new family of oxides in which 3d-3d and 3d-4f interactions are of comparable strength has been synthesized and characterized both from structural and physical viewpoints. These compounds of formulation Ba2LnFeO5 (Ln  =  Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) are isotypic to the perovskite derivative Ba2YFeO5. They exhibit an original structure consisting of isolated FeO4 tetrahedra linked via LnO6 (or YO6) octahedra. Magnetic and calorimetric measurements show that all these compounds exhibit a unique, antiferromagnetic transition involving both the 3d and 4f ions. The antiferromagnetic properties of the Ln  =  Y phase (non-magnetic Y3+) and of the Ln  =  Eu (non-magnetic ground state multiplet of Eu3+) are ascribed to super-super exchange Fe-O-O-Fe interactions, leading to the lowest T N (5.5 K for Y and 4.6 K for Eu). The introduction of a magnetic lanthanide, i.e. Ln  =  Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, in the octahedral sites, leads to larger T N values (up to 9.8 K for Ln  =  Yb). It is found that several mechanisms must be taken into account to explain the complex evolution of the magnetic properties along the Ba2LnFeO5 series. In particular, the super-exchange Ln-O-Fe, as well as the on-site Ln3+ magnetocrystalline anisotropy, are suggested to play crucial roles. This Ba2LnFeO5 series offers a rare opportunity to investigate experimentally a situation where the 3d-3d and 3d-4f interactions co-operate on an equal footing to trigger a unique long-range magnetic ordering in insulating oxides.

  19. Doubly ordered superconducting state in a doped antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyavskii, V. I. Kopaev, Yu. V.; Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc

    2007-10-15

    In a weakly doped quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet with a Fermi contour in the form of small pockets, the Coulomb repulsion gives rise to a doubly ordered superconducting state of coexisting condensates with a large pair momentum and a zero one. The pairing with the large momentum determines the superconducting transition temperature, below which the order with zero momentum coexists as an induced order until the temperature corresponding to the initiation of the phonon pairing mechanism is reached. The superconductivity-induced orbital current density wave eliminates the pairing-repulsion-caused zero points from the two-gap quasiparticle spectrum and leads to a deviation of the relative phase of the superconducting order parameter components from {pi}.

  20. Antiferromagnetic order in MnO spherical nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cuihuan; Baker, Sheila N; Lumsden, Mark D; Nagler, Stephen E; Heller, William T; Baker, Gary A; Deen, P P; Cranswick, Lachlan M.D.; Su, Y.; Christianson, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    We have performed unpolarized and polarized neutron diffraction experiments on monodisperse 8- and 13-nm antiferromagnetic MnO nanoparticles. For the 8-nm sample, the antiferromagnetic transition temperature T{sub N} (114 K) is suppressed compared to that in the bulk material (119 K), while for the 13-nm sample T{sub N} (120 K) is comparable to that in the bulk. The neutron diffraction data of the nanoparticles is well described using the bulk MnO magnetic structure but with a substantially reduced average magnetic moment of 4.2 {+-} 0.3 {micro}{sub B}/Mn for the 8-nm sample and 3.9 {+-} 0.2 {micro}{sub B}/Mn for the 13-nm sample. An analysis of the polarized neutron data on both samples shows that in an individual MnO nanoparticle about 80% of Mn ions order. These results can be explained by a structure in which the monodisperse nanoparticles studied here have a core that behaves similar to the bulk with a surface layer which does not contribute significantly to the magnetic order.

  1. Magnetic Orders and Fluctuations in the Dipolar Pyrochlore Antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepas, Olivier; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2005-03-01

    While the classical Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the pyrochlore lattice does not order, we will discuss, from a theoretical standpoint, possible magnetic phases induced by the dipole-dipole interactions. Such interactions play a role in systems such as Gd2Ti2O7 or Gd2Sn2O7 in stabilizing exotic forms of magnetic order, a subject of current debate. We will also argue that the external magnetic field induces multiple transitions, one of which is associated with no obvious broken symmetry, but can be characterized by a disorder parameter. Finally, Monte-Carlo simulations and Landau-Ginzburg expansion show that the dipolar Heisenberg model exhibits a fluctuation-induced first-order transition, thanks to the frustration and a continuous set of soft modes.

  2. Charge dynamics of the antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing-Jie; Liu, Yu; Liu, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Xin; Chen, Jing; Liao, Hai-Jun; Xie, Zhi-Yuan; Normand, B.; Xiang, Tao

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a slave-fermion formulation in which to study the charge dynamics of the half-filled Hubbard model on the square lattice. In this description, the charge degrees of freedom are represented by fermionic holons and doublons and the Mott-insulating characteristics of the ground state are the consequence of holon–doublon bound-state formation. The bosonic spin degrees of freedom are described by the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model, yielding long-ranged (Néel) magnetic order at zero temperature. Within this framework and in the self-consistent Born approximation, we perform systematic calculations of the average double occupancy, the electronic density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. Qualitatively, our method reproduces the lower and upper Hubbard bands, the spectral-weight transfer into a coherent quasiparticle band at their lower edges and the renormalisation of the Mott gap, which is associated with holon–doublon binding, due to the interactions of both quasiparticle species with the magnons. The zeros of the Green function at the chemical potential give the Luttinger volume, the poles of the self-energy reflect the underlying quasiparticle dispersion with a spin-renormalised hopping parameter and the optical gap is directly related to the Mott gap. Quantitatively, the square-lattice Hubbard model is one of the best-characterised problems in correlated condensed matter and many numerical calculations, all with different strengths and weaknesses, exist with which to benchmark our approach. From the semi-quantitative accuracy of our results for all but the weakest interaction strengths, we conclude that a self-consistent treatment of the spin-fluctuation effects on the charge degrees of freedom captures all the essential physics of the antiferromagnetic Mott–Hubbard insulator. We remark in addition that an analytical approximation with these properties serves a vital function in developing a full understanding of

  3. Kinetically Inhibited Order in a Diamond-Lattice Antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, Gregory J; Gout, Delphine J; Zarestky, Jerel L; Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; McGuire, Michael A; Mandrus, David; Nagler, Stephen E

    2011-01-01

    Frustrated magnetic systems exhibit highly degenerate ground states and strong fluctuations, often leading to new physics. An intriguing example of current interest is the antiferromagnet on a diamond lattice, realized physically in the A-site spinel materials. This is a prototypical system in three dimensions where frustration arises from competing interactions rather than purely geometric constraints, and theory suggests the possibility of novel order at low temperature. Here we present a comprehensive single crystal neutron scattering study CoAl2O4, a highly frustrated A-site spinel. We observe strong diffuse scattering that peaks at wavevectors associated with Neel ordering. Below the temperature T*=6.5K, there is a dramatic change in elastic scattering lineshape accompanied by the emergence of well-defined spin-wave excitations. T* had previously been associated with the onset of glassy behavior. Our new results suggest instead that in fact T* signifies a first-order phase transition, but with true long-range order inhibited by the kinetic freezing of domain walls. This scenario might be expected to occur widely in frustrated systems containing first-order phase transitions and is a natural explanation for existing reports of anomalous glassy behavior in other materials.

  4. Order by virtual crystal field fluctuations in pyrochlore XY antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Petit, Sylvain; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-05-01

    Conclusive evidence of order by disorder is scarce in real materials. Perhaps one of the strongest cases presented has been for the pyrochlore XY antiferromagnet Er2Ti2O7 , with the ground state selection proceeding by order by disorder induced through the effects of quantum fluctuations. This identification assumes the smallness of the effect of virtual crystal field fluctuations that could provide an alternative route to picking the ground state. Here we show that this order by virtual crystal field fluctuations is not only significant, but competitive with the effects of quantum fluctuations. Further, we argue that higher-multipolar interactions that are generically present in rare-earth magnets can dramatically enhance this effect. From a simplified bilinear-biquadratic model of these multipolar interactions, we show how the virtual crystal field fluctuations manifest in Er2Ti2O7 using a combination of strong-coupling perturbation theory and the random-phase approximation. We find that the experimentally observed ψ2 state is indeed selected and the experimentally measured excitation gap can be reproduced when the bilinear and biquadratic couplings are comparable while maintaining agreement with the entire experimental spin-wave excitation spectrum. Finally, we comment on possible tests of this scenario and discuss implications for other order-by-disorder candidates in rare-earth magnets.

  5. Ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order in bacterial vortex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wioland, Hugo; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2016-04-01

    Despite their inherently non-equilibrium nature, living systems can self-organize in highly ordered collective states that share striking similarities with the thermodynamic equilibrium phases of conventional condensed-matter and fluid systems. Examples range from the liquid-crystal-like arrangements of bacterial colonies, microbial suspensions and tissues to the coherent macro-scale dynamics in schools of fish and flocks of birds. Yet, the generic mathematical principles that govern the emergence of structure in such artificial and biological systems are elusive. It is not clear when, or even whether, well-established theoretical concepts describing universal thermostatistics of equilibrium systems can capture and classify ordered states of living matter. Here, we connect these two previously disparate regimes: through microfluidic experiments and mathematical modelling, we demonstrate that lattices of hydrodynamically coupled bacterial vortices can spontaneously organize into distinct patterns characterized by ferro- and antiferromagnetic order. The coupling between adjacent vortices can be controlled by tuning the inter-cavity gap widths. The emergence of opposing order regimes is tightly linked to the existence of geometry-induced edge currents, reminiscent of those in quantum systems. Our experimental observations can be rationalized in terms of a generic lattice field theory, suggesting that bacterial spin networks belong to the same universality class as a wide range of equilibrium systems.

  6. Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Mn(III)F(salen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, M. W.; Wang, Tong; Brown, S. E.; Botko, M.; Čižmár, E.; Risset, O. N.; Talham, D. R.

    2014-03-01

    Due to a report suggesting Mn(III)F(salen), salen = H14C16N2O2, is an S = 2 Haldane system with J /kB = 50 K and no long-range order down to 2 K based on standard magnetometry studies,[2] specific heat and NMR measurements were performed. Using small single crystals, specific heat studies revealed the presence of an anomaly near 23 K, and this response was robust in fields up to 9 T. The 1H NMR results performed on a single crystal in 1 T revealed a sharp transition characteristic of antiferromagnetic ordering at 22.5 K. Measuring the magnetic response of the same single crystal in a commercial magnetometer reveals the presence of a subtle feature, near 23 K, that is not resolved with as-grown, randomlly oriented microcrystalline samples. These findings provide insight into the results obtained in torque magnetometry, EPR, and neutron scattering data.[3] Supported by NSF via DMR-1202033 (MWM), DMR-1105531 (SEB), DMR-1005581 (DRT), and DMR-1157490 (NHMFL), by the Slovak Agency for Research and Development via APVV-0132-11 (EČ), and by the Fulbright Commission of the Slovak Republic (MWM).

  7. Antiferromagnetic half metallicity in codoped chalcopyrite semiconductors Cu(Al 1 - 2 xAxBx)Se2 (A and B are 3d transition-metal atoms)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahjahan, M.; Oguchi, T.

    2016-06-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic properties of group I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite-type compounds Cu(Al 1 - 2 xAxBx)Se2 are calculated using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's function method, where A (Ti, V, Cr, Mn) and B (Fe, Co, Ni) are 3d transition metal atoms, and x is atomic concentration. We found that codoping of Cr-Co and V-Ni pairs at Al site of host CuAlSe2 exhibit antiferromagnetic (AF) half metallicity with low Curie temperature (TC). The AF half metallic property is supported by nullified net magnetic moment and compensated density of states in the minority spin direction. On the other hand, codoping of Cr-Ni, Mn-Co, V-Co, and Ti-Co pairs at Al site of host CuAlSe2 manifest ferrimagnetic half metallicity with a small net magnetization and keeping antiparallel local spin moments. In Mn-Co case TC is close to room temperature. Besides, Cr-Fe, V-Fe, and Ti-Ni codoping cases lead to an instable magnetic ordering and therefore obtain a disordered local moment (spin-glass like) state.

  8. 78 FR 76377 - Makism3D Corp.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... COMMISSION Makism3D Corp.; Order of Suspension of Trading December 13, 2013. It appears to the Securities and... trading in the securities of Makism3D Corp. (``Makism3D'') because of concerns regarding the accuracy and... protection of investors require a suspension of trading in the securities of the above-listed...

  9. Long-range order for the spin-1 Heisenberg model with a small antiferromagnetic interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, Benjamin

    2014-09-15

    We look at the general SU(2) invariant spin-1 Heisenberg model. This family includes the well-known Heisenberg ferromagnet and antiferromagnet as well as the interesting nematic (biquadratic) and the largely mysterious staggered-nematic interaction. Long range order is proved using the method of reflection positivity and infrared bounds on a purely nematic interaction. This is achieved through the use of a type of matrix representation of the interaction making clear several identities that would not otherwise be noticed. Using the reflection positivity of the antiferromagnetic interaction one can then show that the result is maintained if we also include an antiferromagnetic interaction that is sufficiently small.

  10. Detection of antiferromagnetic order by cooling atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Teles, Rafael; Hazzard, Kaden; Hulet, Randall; Rice University Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We have realized the Fermi-Hubbard model with fermionic 6 Li atoms in a three-dimensional compensated optical lattice. The compensated optical lattice has provided low enough temperatures to produce short-range antiferromagnetic (AF) spin correlations, which we detect via Bragg scattering of light. Previously, we reached temperatures down to 1.4 times that of the AFM phase transition, more than a factor of 2 below temperatures obtained previously in 3D optical lattices with fermions. In order to further reduce the entropy in the compensated lattice, we implement an entropy conduit - which is a single blue detuned laser beam with a waist size smaller than the overall atomic sample size. This repulsive narrow potential provides a conductive metallic path between the low entropy core and the edges of the atomic sample where atoms may be evaporated. In addition, the entropy conduit may store entropy, thus further lowering the entropy in the core. We will report on the status of these efforts to further cool atoms in the optical lattice. Work supported by ARO MURI Grant, NSF and The Welch Foundation.

  11. Theoretical study of the role of charge ordering in antiferromagnetically ordered manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Saswati; Kar, J. K.; Rout, G. C.

    2016-09-01

    We address the interplay of charge and magnetic orderings in colossal magnetoresistive material manganese oxides. We propose here on-site double exchange spin-spin interaction in the presence of Heisenberg-type spin-spin interaction in localized t 2g core electrons. We consider charge-density wave (CDW) interaction in the crystal lattice as an extra mechanism in the itinerant e g band, to take into account of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in the system. We calculate electron Green’s functions by Zubarev’s Green’s function technique and hence calculate the charge-ordering gap and magnetic gap in the conduction band as well as core electron states. These orders are solved self-consistently for different model parameters of the system. We observe that the induced magnetic gap in the conduction band exists near the antiferromagnetic Néel temperature, which accounts for the CMR in the system. For all values of temperature, the CDW coupling lies in the range of g = 0.04 to 0.06, where the induced magnetic gap exists. The temperature-dependent specific heat exhibits anomalous jumps near charge-ordering and magnetic-ordering temperatures. The e g electron density of states exhibits a two-gap structure which explains tunneling conductance spectra measurements.

  12. Antiferromagnetic spintronics.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, T; Marti, X; Wadley, P; Wunderlich, J

    2016-03-01

    Antiferromagnetic materials are internally magnetic, but the direction of their ordered microscopic moments alternates between individual atomic sites. The resulting zero net magnetic moment makes magnetism in antiferromagnets externally invisible. This implies that information stored in antiferromagnetic moments would be invisible to common magnetic probes, insensitive to disturbing magnetic fields, and the antiferromagnetic element would not magnetically affect its neighbours, regardless of how densely the elements are arranged in the device. The intrinsic high frequencies of antiferromagnetic dynamics represent another property that makes antiferromagnets distinct from ferromagnets. Among the outstanding questions is how to manipulate and detect the magnetic state of an antiferromagnet efficiently. In this Review we focus on recent works that have addressed this question. The field of antiferromagnetic spintronics can also be viewed from the general perspectives of spin transport, magnetic textures and dynamics, and materials research. We briefly mention this broader context, together with an outlook of future research and applications of antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  13. Generation of arbitrary order Bessel beams via 3D printed axicons at the terahertz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuli; Liu, Changming; Niu, Liting; Zhang, Zhongqi; Wang, Kejia; Yang, Zhengang; Liu, Jinsong

    2015-12-20

    We present the generation of arbitrary order Bessel beams at 0.3 THz through the implementation of suitably designed axicons based on 3D printing technology. The helical axicons, which possess thickness gradients in both radial and azimuthal directions, can convert the incident Gaussian beam into a high-order Bessel beam with spiral phase structure. The evolution of the generated Bessel beams are characterized experimentally with a three-dimensional field scanner. Moreover, the topological charges carried by the high-order Bessel beams are determined by the fork-like interferograms. This 3D-printing-based Bessel beam generation technique is useful not only for THz imaging systems with zero-order Bessel beams but also for future orbital-angular-momentum-based THz free-space communication with higher-order Bessel beams. PMID:26837031

  14. Relativistic Néel-order fields induced by electrical current in antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Železný, J; Gao, H; Výborný, K; Zemen, J; Mašek, J; Manchon, Aurélien; Wunderlich, J; Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, T

    2014-10-10

    We predict that a lateral electrical current in antiferromagnets can induce nonequilibrium Néel-order fields, i.e., fields whose sign alternates between the spin sublattices, which can trigger ultrafast spin-axis reorientation. Based on microscopic transport theory calculations we identify staggered current-induced fields analogous to the intraband and to the intrinsic interband spin-orbit fields previously reported in ferromagnets with a broken inversion-symmetry crystal. To illustrate their rich physics and utility, we consider bulk Mn(2)Au with the two spin sublattices forming inversion partners, and a 2D square-lattice antiferromagnet with broken structural inversion symmetry modeled by a Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We propose an antiferromagnetic memory device with electrical writing and reading.

  15. Superconductivity in the vicinity of antiferromagnetic order in CrAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Cheng, Jinguang; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Kong, Panpan; Lin, Fukun; Jin, Changqing; Wang, Nanlin; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Luo, Jianlin

    2014-11-01

    One of the common features of unconventional superconducting systems such as the heavy-fermion, high transition-temperature cuprate and iron-pnictide superconductors is that the superconductivity emerges in the vicinity of long-range antiferromagnetically ordered state. In addition to doping charge carriers, the application of external pressure is an effective and clean approach to induce unconventional superconductivity near a magnetic quantum critical point. Here we report on the discovery of superconductivity on the verge of antiferromagnetic order in CrAs via the application of external pressure. Bulk superconductivity with Tc≈2 K emerges at the critical pressure Pc≈8 kbar, where the first-order antiferromagnetic transition at TN≈265 K under ambient pressure is completely suppressed. The close proximity of superconductivity to an antiferromagnetic order suggests an unconventional pairing mechanism for CrAs. The present finding opens a new avenue for searching novel superconductors in the Cr and other transition metal-based systems.

  16. Superconductivity in the vicinity of antiferromagnetic order in CrAs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Cheng, Jinguang; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Kong, Panpan; Lin, Fukun; Jin, Changqing; Wang, Nanlin; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Luo, Jianlin

    2014-11-19

    One of the common features of unconventional superconducting systems such as the heavy-fermion, high transition-temperature cuprate and iron-pnictide superconductors is that the superconductivity emerges in the vicinity of long-range antiferromagnetically ordered state. In addition to doping charge carriers, the application of external pressure is an effective and clean approach to induce unconventional superconductivity near a magnetic quantum critical point. Here we report on the discovery of superconductivity on the verge of antiferromagnetic order in CrAs via the application of external pressure. Bulk superconductivity with Tc≈2 K emerges at the critical pressure Pc≈8 kbar, where the first-order antiferromagnetic transition at T(N)≈265 K under ambient pressure is completely suppressed. The close proximity of superconductivity to an antiferromagnetic order suggests an unconventional pairing mechanism for CrAs. The present finding opens a new avenue for searching novel superconductors in the Cr and other transition metal-based systems.

  17. Synthesis on structure and properties of zinc nanocrystal in high ordered 3D nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Sathyaseelan, B.; Manigandan, A.; Anbarasu, V.; Sivakumar, K.

    2015-06-24

    The wet impregnation method was employed to prepare ZnO encapsulated in mesoporous silica (ZnO/KIT-6). The prepared ZnO/KIT-6 samples have been studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm. The low angle powder XRD patterns of Calcined ZnO/KIT-6 materials showed a phase that can be indexed to cubic Ia3d. Tem images revealed well ordered cubic 3D nanoporous chennels. The ZnO encapsulated in KIT-6 can be used as light-emitting diodes and ultraviolet nanolasers.

  18. Development of Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models Using the FUN3D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent significant improvements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic reduced-order models (ROMs) are implemented into the FUN3D unstructured flow solver. These improvements include the simultaneous excitation of the structural modes of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system via a single CFD solution, minimization of the error between the full CFD and the ROM unsteady aero- dynamic solution, and computation of a root locus plot of the aeroelastic ROM. Results are presented for a viscous version of the two-dimensional Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model and an inviscid version of the AGARD 445.6 aeroelastic wing using the FUN3D code.

  19. Transition from the Z2 spin liquid to antiferromagnetic order: Spectrum on the torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitsitt, Seth; Sachdev, Subir

    2016-08-01

    We describe the finite-size spectrum in the vicinity of the quantum critical point between a Z2 spin liquid and a coplanar antiferromagnet on the torus. We obtain the universal evolution of all low-lying states in an antiferromagnet with global SU(2) spin rotation symmetry, as it moves from the fourfold topological degeneracy in a gapped Z2 spin liquid to the Anderson "tower-of-states" in the ordered antiferromagnet. Due to the existence of nontrivial order on either side of this transition, this critical point cannot be described in a conventional Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson framework. Instead, it is described by a theory involving fractionalized degrees of freedom known as the O (4) * model, whose spectrum is altered in a significant way by its proximity to a topologically ordered phase. We compute the spectrum by relating it to the spectrum of the O (4 ) Wilson-Fisher fixed point on the torus, modified with a selection rule on the states, and with nontrivial boundary conditions corresponding to topological sectors in the spin liquid. The spectrum of the critical O (2 N ) model is calculated directly at N =∞ , which then allows a reconstruction of the full spectrum of the O (2N ) * model at leading order in 1 /N . This spectrum is a unique characteristic of the vicinity of a fractionalized quantum critical point, as well as a universal signature of the existence of proximate Z2 topological and antiferromagnetically ordered phases, and can be compared with numerical computations on quantum antiferromagnets on two-dimensional lattices.

  20. Mapping electronic ordering in chromium in 3D with x-ray microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruqing

    2015-03-01

    In the antiferromagnetic state of chromium, electrons form spin-density waves and charge-density waves with wave vector along one of the lattice cubic axes; the spontaneous ordering of the electrons breaks the lattice symmetry and creates domains within a single crystal. We report the first 3-dimentional mapping of charge-density wave domains in bulk polycrystalline chromium samples using differential-aperture x-ray microdiffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. This research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357

  1. Influence of a Magnetic Field on the Antiferromagnetic Order in UPt_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Benoit; Taillefer, Louis; Buyers, William J. L.; Mason, Thom E.; Petersen, Thom

    1996-03-01

    A neutron diffraction experiment was performed to investigate the effect of a magnetic field in the basal plane on the antiferromagnetic order in the heavy fermion superconductor UPt_3. Our results show that a field of 3.2 T, higher than H_c2(0), has no effect : it can neither select a domain nor rotate the moment. This has a direct impact on current theories for the superconducting phase diagram based on a coupling to the magnetic order.

  2. Octacyanoniobate(IV)-based molecular magnets revealing 3D long-range order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pełka, R.; Pinkowicz, D.; Drath, O.; Bałanda, M.; Rams, M.; Majcher, A.; Nitek, W.; Sieklucka, B.

    2011-07-01

    Isostructural series of chemical formula {[MII(pirazol)4]2[NbIV(CN)8]· 4H2O}n (MII = Mn (1), Fe (2), Co (3), Ni (4)) has been obtained by the self-assembly technique. Its unique crystallographic structure consists in the formation of a 3D extended network of magnetic centers braced by geometrically identical cyanido bridges. Magnetic measurements reveal the transitions to the 3D order at temperatures 23.7, 8.3, 5.9, 13.4 K for 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The character of order is demonstrated to be ferrimagnetic for 1 and 2 and ferromagnetic for 3 and 4. The mean-field approach is used to determine the corresponding exchange coupling constants. The observed interactions are discussed within the magnetic orbital model.

  3. 3D Ordered Mesoporous Bifunctional Oxygen Catalyst for Electrically Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Gyu; Lee, Dong Un; Seo, Min Ho; Cano, Zachary Paul; Chen, Zhongwei

    2016-05-01

    To enhance energy efficiency and durability, a highly active and durable 3D ordered mesoporous cobalt oxide framework has been developed for rechargeable zinc-air batteries. The bifunctional air electrode consisting of 3DOM Co3 O4 having high active surface area and robust structure, results in superior charge and discharge battery voltages, and durable performance for electrically rechargeable zinc-air batteries. PMID:27043451

  4. Antiferromagnetic order in the Cd6R (R = rare earth) quasicrystal approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Alan; Kim, Min Gyu; Beutier, Guillaume; Kreyssig, Andreas; Hiroto, Takanobu; Yamada, Tsunetomo; Kim, Jong Woo; de Boissieu, Marc; Tamura, Ryuji

    2013-03-01

    Many theoretical treatments of spins on aperiodic lattices support the notion of long-range antiferromagnetic order. However, to date, there has been no experimental confirmation of long-range magnetic order in quasicrystalline systems. The absence of long-range magnetic order extends to crystalline approximant phases of the icosahedral structures as well. Surprisingly, the 1/1 approximant to the Cd-Mg-R icosahedral phases, Cd6 R , appears to be an exception to the rule. Here, we report on the results of x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements on Cd6 R approximants which show that long range antiferromagnetic order is, indeed, realized. For R = Tb and Ho, viewing the structure as a body-centered cubic packing of Tsai clusters, we find that the R ions associated with the icosahedral cluster at the corner of the unit cell are antiferromagnetically correlated with the R ions associated with the icosahedral cluster at the body-center of the unit cell. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. Work at the Tokyo University of Science was supported by KAKENHI (Grant No. 20045017)

  5. Second order superintegrable systems in conformally flat spaces. IV. The classical 3D Staeckel transform and 3D classification theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, E.G.; Kress, J.M.; Miller, W. Jr.

    2006-04-15

    This article is one of a series that lays the groundwork for a structure and classification theory of second order superintegrable systems, both classical and quantum, in conformally flat spaces. In the first part of the article we study the Staeckel transform (or coupling constant metamorphosis) as an invertible mapping between classical superintegrable systems on different three-dimensional spaces. We show first that all superintegrable systems with nondegenerate potentials are multiseparable and then that each such system on any conformally flat space is Staeckel equivalent to a system on a constant curvature space. In the second part of the article we classify all the superintegrable systems that admit separation in generic coordinates. We find that there are eight families of these systems.

  6. Probing the antiferromagnetic long-range order with Glauber spin states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, Guillermo G.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that the ground state of low-dimensional antiferromagnets deviates from Neel states due to strong quantum fluctuations. Even in the presence of long-range order, those fluctuations produce a substantial reduction of the magnetic moment from its saturation value. Numerical simulations in anisotropic antiferromagnetic chains suggest that quantum fluctuations over Neel order appear in the form of localized reversal of pairs of neighboring spins. In this paper, we propose a coherent state representation for the ground state to describe the above situation. In the one-dimensional case, our wave function corresponds to a two-mode Glauber state, when the Neel state is used as a reference, while the boson fields are associated to coherent flip of spin pairs. The coherence manifests itself through the antiferromagnetic long-range order that survives the action of quantum fluctuations. The present representation is different from the standard zero-point spin wave state, and is asymptotically exact in the limit of strong anisotropy. The fermionic version of the theory, obtained through the Jordan-Wigner transformation, is also investigated.

  7. Antiferromagnetic order induced by gadolinium substitution in Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. W.; Jung, M. H.; Vrtnik, S.; Dolinšek, J.

    2015-06-22

    Magnetic topological insulators can serve as a fundamental platform for various spin-based device applications. We report the antiferromagnetic order induced by the magnetic impurity dopants of Gd in Gd{sub x}Bi{sub 2−x}Se{sub 3} and the systematic results with varying the Gd concentration x ( = 0.14, 0.20, 0.30, and 0.40). The antiferromagnetic order is demonstrated by the magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, and specific heat measurements. The anomaly observed at T{sub N} = 6 K for x ≥ 0.30 shifts towards lower temperature with increasing the magnetic field, indicative of antiferromagnetic ground state. The Gd substitution into Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} enables not only tuning the magnetism from paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic for high x (≥ 0.30) but also giving a promising candidate for antiferromagnetic topological insulators.

  8. Simplified Deformation Analysis of 3D-body by First Order Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Khan, Md. Shawkut; Yamazaki, Koetsu; Oda, Kosuke; Hirooka, Kazuhiko

    This paper proposes a simplified analysis model of complex solid structure for three-dimensional bodies (3D-bodies) in the First Order Analysis (FOA). A simplified finite element composed of the beam elements is suggested for the deformation analysis of 3D-bodies by extending concept of conforming beam element for the finite element method (FEM). When a complex solid structure is simplified to an assemblage of simple elements applied element forces such as axial forces, shear forces, bending moments as well as twisting moments, the total stiffness equation for the FOA of the solid structure is constructed approximately and solved for the given boundary and loading conditions by the usual manner of the FEM. Then, the total deformation of the complex structure is estimated by the simplified model and the element forces are calculated in the element level. It is found that the finite element analysis via developed simplified element analysis can estimate deformations of complex 3D-bodies in a rational precision, and the results of the analysis are useful for considering the load transmitting path of the structure and for designing a better structure by changing the stiffness of structural components.

  9. Higher-Order Neural Networks Applied to 2D and 3D Object Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Reid, Max B.

    1994-01-01

    A Higher-Order Neural Network (HONN) can be designed to be invariant to geometric transformations such as scale, translation, and in-plane rotation. Invariances are built directly into the architecture of a HONN and do not need to be learned. Thus, for 2D object recognition, the network needs to be trained on just one view of each object class, not numerous scaled, translated, and rotated views. Because the 2D object recognition task is a component of the 3D object recognition task, built-in 2D invariance also decreases the size of the training set required for 3D object recognition. We present results for 2D object recognition both in simulation and within a robotic vision experiment and for 3D object recognition in simulation. We also compare our method to other approaches and show that HONNs have distinct advantages for position, scale, and rotation-invariant object recognition. The major drawback of HONNs is that the size of the input field is limited due to the memory required for the large number of interconnections in a fully connected network. We present partial connectivity strategies and a coarse-coding technique for overcoming this limitation and increasing the input field to that required by practical object recognition problems.

  10. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-24

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2,1/2,1/2) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed. PMID:27391746

  11. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-01

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2 ,1/2 ,1/2 ) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  12. First order error propagation of the procrustes method for 3D attitude estimation.

    PubMed

    Dorst, Leo

    2005-02-01

    The well-known Procrustes method determines the optimal rigid body motion that registers two point clouds by minimizing the square distances of the residuals. In this paper, we perform the first order error analysis of this method for the 3D case, fully specifying how directional noise in the point clouds affects the estimated parameters of the rigid body motion. These results are much more specific than the error bounds which have been established in numerical analysis. We provide an intuitive understanding of the outcome to facilitate direct use in applications.

  13. Antiferromagnetic order in uranium nickel(0.39) rhodium (0.61) aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khatib, S.; Alsmadi, A. K.; Nakotte, H.; Andreev, A.V.; Lacerda, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    As the archetype magnetic intermetallic compounds IJNiAI (antiferromagnet, TN = 19K) and URhAI (ferromagnet, TC = 27K) [1] ., iJNi0.39Rh0.61A1 crystallizes in the hexagonal ZrNiAI-type structure . UNi0 .39Rh0.61A1 undergoes antiferromagnetic (AF) at TN = 13K . Here, we report on resistance and magnetoresistance studies on single-crystalline UNi0 .39Rh0.61A1 in magnetic field up to 18T applied along and perpendicular to the c-axis. 20-Tesla National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) at Los Alamos has been used to investigate such magnetic properties . This compound is found to exhibit highly anisotropic properties with the easy magnetization axis along the c-axis . While for fields applied along c-axis, 3T completely suppresses the AF ordering, antiferromagnetism persists up to the highest field of 18T applied perpendicular to the c-axis, see Fig.(1) which shows R(ohm) vs B (T) . The results are discussed in terms of variation of the 5f-ligand hybridization compared to the one of its parent compounds.

  14. An efficient flexible-order model for 3D nonlinear water waves

    SciTech Connect

    Engsig-Karup, A.P. Bingham, H.B.; Lindberg, O.

    2009-04-01

    The flexible-order, finite difference based fully nonlinear potential flow model described in [H.B. Bingham, H. Zhang, On the accuracy of finite difference solutions for nonlinear water waves, J. Eng. Math. 58 (2007) 211-228] is extended to three dimensions (3D). In order to obtain an optimal scaling of the solution effort multigrid is employed to precondition a GMRES iterative solution of the discretized Laplace problem. A robust multigrid method based on Gauss-Seidel smoothing is found to require special treatment of the boundary conditions along solid boundaries, and in particular on the sea bottom. A new discretization scheme using one layer of grid points outside the fluid domain is presented and shown to provide convergent solutions over the full physical and discrete parameter space of interest. Linear analysis of the fundamental properties of the scheme with respect to accuracy, robustness and energy conservation are presented together with demonstrations of grid independent iteration count and optimal scaling of the solution effort. Calculations are made for 3D nonlinear wave problems for steep nonlinear waves and a shoaling problem which show good agreement with experimental measurements and other calculations from the literature.

  15. Influence of a magnetic field on the antiferromagnetic order in UPt3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, B.; Taillefer, L.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Mason, T. E.; Petersen, T.

    1996-09-01

    A neutron-diffraction experiment was performed to investigate the effect of a magnetic field on the antiferromagnetic order in the heavy-fermion superconductor UPt3. Our results show that a field in the basal plane of up to 3.2 T, higher than Hc2(0), has no effect: it can neither select a domain nor rotate the moment. This has a direct impact on current theories for the superconducting phase diagram based on a coupling to the magnetic order.

  16. Quantum selection of order in an XXZ antiferromagnet on a Kagome lattice.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, A L; Zhitomirsky, M E

    2014-12-01

    Selection of the ground state of the kagome-lattice XXZ antiferromagnet by quantum fluctuations is investigated by combining nonlinear spin-wave and real-space perturbation theories. The two methods unanimously favor q=0 over sqrt[3]×sqrt[3] magnetic order in a wide range of the anisotropy parameter 0≤Δ≲0.72. Both approaches are also in accord on the magnitude of the quantum order-by-disorder effect generated by topologically nontrivial, looplike spin-flip processes. A tentative S-Δ phase diagram of the model is proposed. PMID:25526152

  17. 3D Higher Order Modeling in the BEM/FEM Hybrid Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, P. W.; Wilton, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    Higher order divergence- and curl-conforming bases have been shown to provide significant benefits, in both convergence rate and accuracy, in the 2D hybrid finite element/boundary element formulation (P. Fink and D. Wilton, National Radio Science Meeting, Boulder, CO, Jan. 2000). A critical issue in achieving the potential for accuracy of the approach is the accurate evaluation of all matrix elements. These involve products of high order polynomials and, in some instances, singular Green's functions. In the 2D formulation, the use of a generalized Gaussian quadrature method was found to greatly facilitate the computation and to improve the accuracy of the boundary integral equation self-terms. In this paper, a 3D, hybrid electric field formulation employing higher order bases and higher order elements is presented. The improvements in convergence rate and accuracy, compared to those resulting from lower order modeling, are established. Techniques developed to facilitate the computation of the boundary integral self-terms are also shown to improve the accuracy of these terms. Finally, simple preconditioning techniques are used in conjunction with iterative solution procedures to solve the resulting linear system efficiently. In order to handle the boundary integral singularities in the 3D formulation, the parent element- either a triangle or rectangle-is subdivided into a set of sub-triangles with a common vertex at the singularity. The contribution to the integral from each of the sub-triangles is computed using the Duffy transformation to remove the singularity. This method is shown to greatly facilitate t'pe self-term computation when the bases are of higher order. In addition, the sub-triangles can be further divided to achieve near arbitrary accuracy in the self-term computation. An efficient method for subdividing the parent element is presented. The accuracy obtained using higher order bases is compared to that obtained using lower order bases when the number

  18. Reduced integral order 3D scalar wave integral equation Derivation and BEM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, HyunSuk

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is a numerical method to solve partial differential equations (PDEs), which is derived from the integral equation (IE) that can be developed from certain PDEs. Among IEs, the 3D transient wave integral equation has a very special property which makes it distinguished from other integral equations; Dirac-delta and its derivative delta‧ appear in the fundamental-solution (or kernel-function). These delta and delta‧ generalized functions have continuity C-2 and C-3, respectively, and become a major hurdle for BEM implementation, because many numerical methods including BEM are based on the idea of continuity. More specifically, the integrands (kernel - shape function products) in the 3D transient wave IE become discontinuous (C-2 and C-3) and make numerical integration difficult. There are several existing approaches to overcome the delta difficulty, but none use the character of the Dirac-delta to cancel the integral. In this dissertation, a new method called the "Reduced order wave integral equation (Reduced IE)" is developed to deal with the difficulty in the 3D transient wave problem. In this approach, the sifting properties of delta and delta‧ are used to cancel an integration. As a result, smooth integrands are derived and the integral orders are reduced by one. Smooth integrands result in the more efficient and accurate numerical integration. In addition, there is no more coupling between the space-element size and time-step size. Non-zero initial condition (IC) can be considered also. Furthermore, space integrals need to be performed once, not per time-step. All of this reduces dramatically the computational requirement. As a result, the computation order for both time and space are reduced by 1 and one obtains an O(M N2) method, where M is the number of time steps and N is the number of spatial nodes on the boundary of the problem domain. A numerical approach to deal with the reduced IE is also suggested, and a simple

  19. Magnetic ordering of the buckled honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet Ba2NiTeO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Shinichiro; Soda, Minoru; Kasatani, Kazuhiro; Ono, Toshio; Avdeev, Maxim; Masuda, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic order of the buckled honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet Ba2NiTeO6 and its related antiferromagnet Ba3NiTa2O9 by neutron diffraction measurements. We observe magnetic Bragg peaks below the transition temperatures, and identify propagation vectors for these oxides. A combination of representation analysis and Rietveld refinement leads to a collinear magnetic order for Ba2NiTeO6 and a 120∘ structure for Ba3NiTa2O9 . We find that the spin model of the bilayer triangular lattice is equivalent to that of the two-dimensional buckled honeycomb lattice having magnetic frustration. We discuss the magnetic interactions and single-ion anisotropy of Ni+2 ions for Ba2NiTeO6 in order to clarify the origin of the collinear magnetic structures. Our calculation suggests that the collinear magnetic order of Ba2NiTeO6 is induced by the magnetic frustration and easy-axis anisotropy.

  20. Order by disorder in the antiferromagnetic Ising model on an elastic triangular lattice

    PubMed Central

    Shokef, Yair; Souslov, Anton; Lubensky, T. C.

    2011-01-01

    Geometrically frustrated materials have a ground-state degeneracy that may be lifted by subtle effects, such as higher-order interactions causing small energetic preferences for ordered structures. Alternatively, ordering may result from entropic differences between configurations in an effect termed order by disorder. Motivated by recent experiments in a frustrated colloidal system in which ordering is suspected to result from entropy, we consider in this paper the antiferromagnetic Ising model on a deformable triangular lattice. We calculate the displacements exactly at the microscopic level and, contrary to previous studies, find a partially disordered ground state of randomly zigzagging stripes. Each such configuration is deformed differently and thus has a unique phonon spectrum with distinct entropy, lifting the degeneracy at finite temperature. Nonetheless, due to the free-energy barriers between the ground-state configurations, the system falls into a disordered glassy state. PMID:21730164

  1. Roton Minimum as a Fingerprint of Magnon-Higgs Scattering in Ordered Quantum Antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Powalski, M; Uhrig, G S; Schmidt, K P

    2015-11-13

    A quantitative description of magnons in long-range ordered quantum antiferromagnets is presented which is consistent from low to high energies. It is illustrated for the generic S=1/2 Heisenberg model on the square lattice. The approach is based on a continuous similarity transformation in momentum space using the scaling dimension as the truncation criterion. Evidence is found for significant magnon-magnon attraction inducing a Higgs resonance. The high-energy roton minimum in the magnon dispersion appears to be induced by strong magnon-Higgs scattering.

  2. Long-Range Order and Low-Energy Spectrum of Diluted 2D Quantum Antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshev, A. L.; Chen, Y. C.; Castro Neto, A. H.

    2001-08-06

    The problem of a diluted two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet on a square lattice is studied using spin-wave theory. The influence of impurities on static and dynamic properties is investigated and a good agreement with experiments and Monte Carlo data is found. The hydrodynamic description of spin waves breaks down at characteristic wavelengths {Lambda}{approx}>exp(const/x) , x being an impurity concentration, while the order parameter is free from anomalies. We argue that this dichotomy originates from strong scattering of the low-energy excitations in two dimensions.

  3. Coupling between the ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic orders in YMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.J.; Cao, Y.; Sun, Y.Y.; Xue, Y.Y.; Chu, C.W.

    1997-08-01

    Anomalies in the dielectric constant and loss tangent have been observed in the ferroelectromagnet YMnO{sub 3} near its N{acute e}el temperature of {approximately}80 K and below its ferroelectric Curie temperature of {approximately}914 K. These anomalies are indicative of coupling between the ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic orders in this compound. A small but distinct magnetoelectric effect and a magnetoresistive effect up to {approximately}15{percent} were also detected in a magnetic field at 5 T. The results will be contrasted with previous theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Order-by-disorder effects in antiferromagnets on face-centered cubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalov, L. A.; Syromyatnikov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the role of quantum fluctuations in Heisenberg antiferromagnets on face-centered cubic lattice with small dipolar interaction in which the next-nearest-neighbor exchange coupling dominates over the nearest-neighbor one. It is well known that a collinear magnetic structure which contains (111) ferromagnetic planes arranged antiferromagnetically along one of the space diagonals of the cube is stabilized in this model via order-by-disorder mechanism. On the mean-field level, the dipolar interaction forces spin to lie within (111) planes. By considering 1 / S corrections to the ground state energy, we demonstrate that quantum fluctuations lead to an anisotropy within (111) planes favoring three equivalent directions for the staggered magnetization (e.g., [ 11 2 bar ], [ 1 2 bar 1 ], and [ 2 bar 11 ] directions for (111) plane). Such in-plane anisotropy was obtained experimentally in related materials MnO, α-MnS, α-MnSe, EuTe, and EuSe. We find that the order-by-disorder mechanism can contribute significantly to the value of the in-plane anisotropy in EuTe. Magnon spectrum is also derived in the first order in 1 / S.

  5. Charge order and antiferromagnetism in epitaxial ultrathin films of EuNiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, D.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Liu, Jian; Kim, J. W.; Shafer, P.; Ryan, P. J.; Chakhalian, J.

    2015-12-01

    On a road towards applications and devices based on functional oxides with correlated electrons, the crucial element is uncovering the effects of the reduced dimensionality on the electronic phase transition into a multiordered ground state. Towards this goal, we present a study of reduced dimensionality on charge and antiferromagnetic orderings in ultrathin EuNiO3 films on NdGaO3 substrates using hard and soft resonant x-ray scattering to investigate the presence of electronic and magnetic orderings. Despite the ultrathin nature of the films, they exhibit the bulklike order parameters up to room temperature, suggesting that the spontaneously coherent Mott ground state in the highly distorted rare-earth nickelates can be successfully sustained even when constrained towards two-dimensionality. The presence of charge ordering at room temperature and below opens prospects for their use in novel electric-field-controlled devices.

  6. 2D and 3D ordered arrays of Co magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Prida, V. M.; Vega, V.; Rosa, W. O.; Caballero-Flores, R.; Iglesias, L.; Hernando, B.

    2015-06-01

    Cobalt nanowire arrays spatially distributed in 2D and 3D arrangements have been performed by pulsed electrodeposition into the pores of planar and cylindrical nanoporous anodic alumina membranes, respectively. Morphological characterization points out the good filling factor reached by electroplated Co nanowires in both kinds of alumina membranes exhibiting hexagonally self-ordered porous structures. Co nanowires grown in both kinds of alumina templates exhibit the same crystalline phases. DC magnetometry and First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) analysis were carried out in order to determine the overall magnetic behavior for both nanowire array geometries. It is found that when the Co nanowires of two kinds of arrays are perpendicularly magnetized, both hysteresis loops are identical, suggesting that neither the intrinsic magnetic behavior of the nanowires nor the collective one depend on the arrays geometry. FORC analysis performed along the radial direction of the Co nanowire arrays embedded in the cylindrical alumina template reveals that the contribution of each nanowire to the magnetization reversal process involves its specific orientation with respect to the applied field direction. Furthermore, the comparison between the magnetic properties for both kinds of Co nanowire arrays allows discussing about the effect of the cylindrical geometry of the template on the magnetostatic interaction among nanowires.

  7. Second order Method for Solving 3D Elasticity Equations with Complex Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Elastic materials are ubiquitous in nature and indispensable components in man-made devices and equipments. When a device or equipment involves composite or multiple elastic materials, elasticity interface problems come into play. The solution of three dimensional (3D) elasticity interface problems is significantly more difficult than that of elliptic counterparts due to the coupled vector components and cross derivatives in the governing elasticity equation. This work introduces the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for solving 3D elasticity interface problems. The proposed MIB elasticity interface scheme utilizes fictitious values on irregular grid points near the material interface to replace function values in the discretization so that the elasticity equation can be discretized using the standard finite difference schemes as if there were no material interface. The interface jump conditions are rigorously enforced on the intersecting points between the interface and the mesh lines. Such an enforcement determines the fictitious values. A number of new techniques has been developed to construct efficient MIB elasticity interface schemes for dealing with cross derivative in coupled governing equations. The proposed method is extensively validated over both weak and strong discontinuity of the solution, both piecewise constant and position-dependent material parameters, both smooth and nonsmooth interface geometries, and both small and large contrasts in the Poisson’s ratio and shear modulus across the interface. Numerical experiments indicate that the present MIB method is of second order convergence in both L∞ and L2 error norms for handling arbitrarily complex interfaces, including biomolecular surfaces. To our best knowledge, this is the first elasticity interface method that is able to deliver the second convergence for the molecular surfaces of proteins.. PMID:25914422

  8. Edge-Imposed Domain Ordering in Antiferromagnetic LaFeO3 Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grepstad, J. K.; Folven, E.; Tybell, T.; Scholl, A.; Young, A.; Retterer, S. T.; Takamura, Y.

    2011-03-01

    The antiferromagnetic (AFM) domain structure of submicron-sized LaFe O3 nanostructures was imaged with photoemission electron microscopy in combination with x-ray magnetic linear dichroism. These nanostructures were defined in epitaxial LaFe O3 thin films using e-beam lithography and Ar + ion implantation to locally destroy the magnetic order in the surrounding matrix. Extended domains were found to form along the perimeter of rectangular-shaped islands, when their edges were aligned with the in-plane < 100 > axes of the cubic SrTiO substrate. The AFM spin axis of these domains was confined to lie within the film plane, aligned with the edges of the nanostructures. This domain configuration predominated for nanoislands scaled down to 500x500 nm . However, no edge-imposed domain ordering was observed for rectangular islands rotated by 45 with respect to the in-plane crystalline axes, suggesting a magnetocrystalline origin of the extended edge-bound AFM domains. These findings may prove important to spintronic devices relying on exchange-biased nanostructures, where domain engineering in antiferromagnets remains relatively unexplored and has the potential to provide new device opportunities. This work was sponsored by the DoE BES and the Div. of Scientific User Facilities, US DoE, and by the Research Council of Norway.

  9. Order and excitations in large-S kagome-lattice antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, A. L.; Zhitomirsky, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    We systematically investigate the ground-state and the spectral properties of antiferromagnets on a kagomé lattice with several common types of the planar anisotropy: X X Z , single-ion, and out-of-plane Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya. Our main focus is on the role of nonlinear, anharmonic terms, which are responsible for the quantum order-by-disorder effect and for the corresponding selection of the ground-state spin structure in many of these models. The X X Z and the single-ion anisotropy models exhibit a quantum phase transition between the q =0 and the √{3 }×√{3 } states as a function of the anisotropy parameter, offering a rare example of the quantum order-by-disorder fluctuations favoring a ground state which is different from the one selected by thermal fluctuations. The nonlinear terms are also shown to be crucial for a very strong near-resonant decay phenomenon leading to the quasiparticle breakdown in the kagomé-lattice antiferromagnets whose spectra are featuring flat or weakly dispersive modes. The effect is shown to persist even in the limit of large spin values and should be common to other frustrated magnets with flat branches of excitations. Model calculations of the spectrum of the S =5 /2 Fe-jarosite with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya anisotropy provide a convincing and detailed characterization of the proposed scenario.

  10. Anisotropic intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in ordered 3dPt alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2011-07-01

    By performing first-principles calculations, we investigate the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) and its anisotropy in ordered L10 FePt, CoPt, and NiPt ferromagnets and their intermediate alloys. We demonstrate that the AHC in this family of compounds depends strongly on the direction of the magnetization M in the crystal. We predict that such pronounced orientational dependence in combination with the general decreasing trend of the AHC when going from FePt to NiPt leads to a sign change of the AHC upon rotating the magnetization direction in the crystal of CoPt alloy. We also suggest that, for a range of concentration x in CoxNi1-xPt and FexCo1-xPt alloys, it is possible to achieve a complete quenching of the anomalous Hall current for a certain direction of the magnetization in the crystal. By analyzing the spin-resolved AHC in 3dPt alloys, we endeavor to relate the overall trend of the AHC in these compounds to the changes in their densities of d states around the Fermi energy upon varying the atomic number. Moreover, we show the generality of the phenomenon of anisotropic anomalous Hall effect by demonstrating its occurrence within the three-band tight-binding model.

  11. The study of the coupling mechanism between antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric ordering and thermodynamic properties in ferroelectromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chong Gui; Jiang, Qing

    2002-09-01

    We study the coupling mechanism between antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric ordering that coexist spontaneously at low temperatures. According to the results of experiment and previous theoretical considerations, we propose a possible coupling form related to a combination of electric polar and spin correlation and use it to calculate the thermodynamic properties of a ferroelectromagnetic system, including its magnetization m, polarization p, magnetization susceptibility χm, magnetoelectric susceptibility χme and polarization susceptibility χp, in the case of magnetization m perpendicular to polarization p. It is found that the relationship between m, χm and χme is in agreement with that of phenomenological theory, and polarization induced by magnetic coupling leads to an anomaly of χp at low temperature, which is consistent qualitatively with experimental results.

  12. Antiferromagnetism and hidden order in isoelectronic doping of URu2Si2

    DOE PAGES

    Wilson, Murray N.; Williams, Travis J.; Cai, Yipeng; Hallas, Alannah M.; Medina, Teresa; Munsie, Timothy J.; Cheung, Sky C.; Frandsen, Benjamin A.; Liu, Lian; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; et al

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present muon spin rotation (mu SR) and susceptibility measurements on single crystals of isoelectronically doped URu2-xTxSi2 (T = Fe, Os) for doping levels up to 50%. Zero field (ZF) μ SR measurements show long-lived oscillations demonstrating that an antiferromagnetic state exists down to low doping levels for both Os and Fe dopants. The measurements further show an increase in the internal field with doping for both Fe and Os. Comparison of the local moment-hybridization crossover temperature from susceptibility measurements and our magnetic transition temperature shows that changes in hybridization, rather than solely chemical pressure, are importantmore » in driving the evolution of magnetic order with doping.« less

  13. Dimensional modulation of spontaneous magnetic order in quasi-two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Shunsuke C.; Dupont, Maxime; Capponi, Sylvain; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking is deeply related to the dimensionality of a system. The Néel order going with spontaneous breaking of U (1 ) symmetry is safely allowed at any temperature for three-dimensional systems but allowed only at zero temperature for purely two-dimensional systems. We closely investigate how smoothly the ordering process of the three-dimensional system is modulated into that of the two-dimensional one with reduction of dimensionality, considering spatially anisotropic quantum antiferromagnets. We first show that the Néel temperature is kept finite even in the two-dimensional limit although the Néel order is greatly suppressed for low dimensionality. This feature of the Néel temperature is highly nontrivial, which dictates how the order parameter is squashed under the reduction of dimensionality. Next, we investigate this dimensional modulation of the order parameter. We develop our argument taking as an example a coupled spin-ladder system relevant for experimental studies. The ordering process is investigated multidirectionally using theoretical techniques of a mean-field method combined with analytical (exact solutions of quantum field theories) or numerical (density-matrix renormalization-group) methods, a variational method, a renormalization-group study, linear spin-wave theory, and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We show that these methods independent of each other lead to the same conclusion about the dimensional modulation.

  14. Antiferromagnetic ground state with pair-checkerboard order in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Yuan; Chen, Shiyou; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xin-Gao

    2015-01-01

    A monolayer FeSe thin film grown on SrTiO3(001) (STO) shows the sign of Tc>77 K , which is higher than the Tc record of 56 K for bulk FeAs-based superconductors. However, little is known about the magnetic ground state of FeSe, which should be closely related to its unusual superconductivity. Previous studies presume the collinear stripe antiferromagnetic (AFM) state as the ground state of FeSe, the same as that in FeAs superconductors. Here we find a magnetic order named the "pair-checkerboard AFM" as the magnetic ground state of tetragonal FeSe. The pair-checkerboard order results from the interplay between the nearest-, next-nearest, and unnegligible next-next-nearest neighbor magnetic exchange couplings of Fe atoms. The monolayer FeSe in pair-checkerboard order shows an unexpected insulating behavior with a Dirac-cone-like band structure related to the specific orbital order of the dx z and dy z characters of Fe atoms, which could explain the recently observed insulator-superconductor transition. The present results cast insights on the magnetic ordering in FeSe monolayer and its derived superconductors.

  15. Spatially Inhomogeneous Development of Antiferromagnetic Ordering on URu_2Si2 Observed by High Pressure NMR*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohara, Takao; Matsuda, K.; Kohori, Y.; Kuwahara, K.; Amitsuka, H.

    2002-03-01

    In order to identify the nature of unconventional antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering with a "tiny staggered moment" below T_0=17.5 K in URu_2Si_2, ^29Si NMR has been performed under pressure up to 17.5 kbar. In the pressure range 3.0 kbar to 15 kbar of P_c, we have observed new ^29Si NMR signal arising from the AF region besides the previously reported ^29Si NMR signal, which corresponds to the paramagnetic (PM) region. The AF region increases in volume at the expense of the PM region on cooling, which shows a coexistence of the AF and the PM regions below T_0. The volume fraction is enhanced by applied pressure, whereas the value of internal field (910 Oe) remains constant up to 15 kbar. This gives definite evidence for spatially inhomogeneous development of AF ordering below T_0. Our Si NMR results have shown that the weakness of Bragg peak observed by neutron diffraction originates not from an extremely reduced moment (0.03 μ _B/U) but from the smallness of AF region with an ordered moment of 0.4 μ _B/U in the sample. The temperature dependence of nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates for both signal is also now measured under pressure. * Supported by a Grand-in -Aid from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  16. 24-th Order high temperature expansion for the 3-d Ising model

    SciTech Connect

    Glaessner, U.; Schilling, K.; Bhanot, G.; Creutz, M.

    1994-12-01

    The authors present the series for the free energy and their estimate for the critical exponent {alpha}, as computed by a recursive bookkeeping algorithm on the CM5. They begin with a discussion of the algorithm to compute the High-Temperature expansion on finite 3-D Ising lattices.

  17. Observation of antiferromagnetic order collapse in the pressurized insulator LaMnPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Simonson, Jack; Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi; Guo, Peiwen; Zhang, Chao; Gu, Dachun; Kotliar, Gabriel; Aronson, Meigan; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2014-03-01

    The emergence of superconductivity in the iron pnictide or cuprate high temperature superconductors usually accompanies the suppression of a long-ranged antiferromagnetic (AFM) order state in a corresponding parent compound by doping or pressurizing. A great deal of effort by doping has been made to find superconductivity in Mn-based compounds, which are thought to bridge the gap between the two families of high temperature superconductors, but the AFM order was not successfully suppressed. Here we report the first observations of the pressure-induced elimination of long-ranged AFM order at ~ 34 GPa and a crossover from an AFM insulating to an AFM metallic state at ~ 20 GPa in LaMnPO single crystals that are iso-structural to the LaFeAsO superconductor by in-situ high pressure resistance and ac susceptibility measurements. These findings are of importance to explore potential superconductivity in Mn-based compounds and to shed new light on the underlying mechanism of high temperature superconductivity.

  18. Observation of antiferromagnetic order collapse in the pressurized insulator LaMnPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Simonson, J. W.; Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi; Gao, Peiwen; Zhang, Chao; Gu, Dachun; Kotliar, Gabriel; Aronson, Meigan; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2013-08-01

    The emergence of superconductivity in the iron pnictide or cuprate high temperature superconductors usually accompanies the suppression of a long-ranged antiferromagnetic (AFM) order state in a corresponding parent compound by doping or pressurizing. A great deal of effort by doping has been made to find superconductivity in Mn-based compounds, which are thought to bridge the gap between the two families of high temperature superconductors, but the AFM order was not successfully suppressed. Here we report the first observations of the pressure-induced elimination of long-ranged AFM order at ~ 34 GPa and a crossover from an AFM insulating to an AFM metallic state at ~ 20 GPa in LaMnPO single crystals that are iso-structural to the LaFeAsO superconductor by in-situ high pressure resistance and ac susceptibility measurements. These findings are of importance to explore potential superconductivity in Mn-based compounds and to shed new light on the underlying mechanism of high temperature superconductivity.

  19. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Magnetic ordering in Gd2Sn2O7: the archetypal Heisenberg pyrochlore antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, A. S.; Zhitomirsky, M. E.; Canals, B.; Sanchez, J. P.; Bonville, P.; Dalmas de Réotier, P.; Yaouanc, A.

    2006-01-01

    Low-temperature powder neutron diffraction measurements are performed in the ordered magnetic state of the pyrochlore antiferromagnet Gd2Sn2O7. Symmetry analysis of the diffraction data indicates that this compound has the ground state predicted theoretically for a Heisenberg pyrochlore antiferromagnet with dipolar interactions. The difference in the magnetic structure of Gd2Sn2O7 andof nominally analogous Gd2Ti2O7 is found to be determined by a specific type of third-neighbour superexchange interaction on the pyrochlore lattice between spins across empty hexagons.

  20. First Order Phase Transition of Plaquette Ordering in SU(4) Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anup; Ma, Michael; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2002-03-01

    Spin systems with orbital degeneracy may have an ideal limit with SU(4) degeneracy(Phys. Rev. Lett 81,3527 (1998)). Based on MFT and variational calculations, it was proposed that the ground state of the SU(4) system in 2D is a spin and orbital liquid. Finite-sized numerical calculations on square lattice further support this proposition(Eur. Phys. J. B17,367 (2000)). The numerical work also suggests the ground state to be 4-fold degenerate. We propose that the 4-fold degeneracy is due to spontaneous formation of plaquettes with alternating plaquettes of strong and weak correlations. Using fermion MFT on square and triangular lattice, we find at zero temperature that the ground state is a state of disconnected plaquettes. The discrete symmetry of plaquette ordering allows for a finite temperature phase transition from the disordered phase to the ordered phase even in 2D. Within MFT, the transition is found to be first order for both the square and triangular lattice. Nevertheless, there are important differences between the transitions on the two lattices.

  1. Characterizing interstate vibrational coherent dynamics of surface adsorbed catalysts by fourth-order 3D SFG spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingmin; Wang, Jiaxi; Clark, Melissa L.; Kubiak, Clifford P.; Xiong, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We report the first fourth-order 3D SFG spectroscopy of a monolayer of the catalyst Re(diCN-bpy)(CO)3Cl on a gold surface. Besides measuring the vibrational coherences of single vibrational modes, the fourth-order 3D SFG spectrum also measures the dynamics of interstate coherences and vibrational coherences states between two vibrational modes. By comparing the 3D SFG to the corresponding 2D and third-order 3D IR spectroscopy of the same molecules in solution, we found that the interstate coherences exist in both liquid and surface systems, suggesting that the interstate coherence is not disrupted by surface interactions. However, by analyzing the 3D spectral lineshape, we found that the interstate coherences also experience non-negligible homogenous dephasing dynamics that originate from surface interactions. This unique ability of determining interstate vibrational coherence dynamics of the molecular monolayer can help in understanding of how energy flows within surface catalysts and other molecular monolayers.

  2. Antiferromagnetic dipolar ordering in [Co{sub 2}MnGe/V]{sub N} multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, A.; Grabis, J.; Zabel, H.; Westerholt, K.; Toperverg, B.P.; Leiner, V.; Wolff, M.

    2005-12-01

    We have studied [Co{sub 2}MnGe/V]{sub N} multilayers with a thickness of the V layers t{sub V} between 1.5 and 10 nm and a fixed thickness of the Heusler layer t{sub Co{sub 2}}{sub MnGe}=3 nm by x-ray scattering, neutron reflectivity, and magnetization measurements. In the thickness range t{sub V}{<=}3 nm neutron reflectivity results provide clear evidence for an antiferromagnetic (af) interlayer long-range order below a Neel temperature T{sub N}. The interlayer long range order does not show an oscillating character and is stabilized by a weak af coupling field H{sub af}{approx_equal}100 Oe. We attribute the af coupling to magnetic dipolar stray fields originating from magnetically rough surfaces of a granular Co{sub 2}MnGe microstructure. In the thickness range t{sub V}{>=}4 nm the multilayers undergo a cluster glass transition at T{sub f}{approx_equal}150 K. At high temperatures above T{sub N} or T{sub f} the mutilayers are superparamagnetic with a huge cluster magnetic moment {mu}{sub c}{>=}10{sup 5}{mu}{sub B}.

  3. Antiferromagnetic Ordering in the Single-Component Molecular Conductor [Pd(tmdt)2].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Satomi; Idobata, Yuki; Zhou, Biao; Kobayashi, Akiko; Takagi, Rina; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Kanoda, Kazushi; Kasai, Hidetaka; Nishibori, Eiji; Satoko, Chikatoshi; Delley, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Crystals of [Pd(tmdt)2] (tmdt = trimethylenetetrathiafulvalenedithiolate) were prepared in order to investigate their physical properties. The electrical resistivity of [Pd(tmdt)2] was measured on single crystals using two-probe methods and showed that the room-temperature conductivity was 100 S·cm(-1). The resistivity behaviors implied that [Pd(tmdt)2] was a semimetal at approximately room temperature and became narrow-gap semiconducting as the temperature was decreased to the lowest temperature. X-ray structural studies on small single crystals of [Pd(tmdt)2] at temperatures of 20-300 K performed using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8 showed no distinct structural change over this temperature region. However, small anomalies were observed at approximately 100 K. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra were measured over the temperature range of 2.7-301 K. The ESR intensity increased as the temperature decreased to 100 K and then decreased linearly as the temperature was further decreased to 50 K, where an abrupt decrease in the intensity was observed. To investigate the magnetic state, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were performed in the temperature range of 2.5-271 K, revealing broadening below 100 K. The NMR relaxation rate gradually increased below 100 K and formed a broad peak at approximately 50 K, followed by a gradual decrease down to the lowest temperature. These results suggest that most of the sample undergoes the antiferromagnetic transition at approximately 50 K with the magnetic ordering temperatures distributed over a wide range up to 100 K. These electric and magnetic properties of [Pd(tmdt)2] are quite different from those of the single-component molecular (semi)metals [Ni(tmdt)2] and [Pt(tmdt)2], which retain their stable metallic states down to extremely low temperatures. The experimental results and the band structure calculations at the density functional theory level showed that [Pd(tmdt)2] may be an antiferromagnetic Mott

  4. The "Pure Marriage" between 3D Printing and Well-Ordered Nanoarrays by Using PEALD Assisted Hydrothermal Surface Engineering.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaowen; Shi, Xiaotong; Fang, Xuan; Tao, Haiyan; Zhu, Hui; Yu, Fen; Ding, Xingwei; Liu, Miaoxing; Fang, Fang; Yang, Fan; Wei, Zhipeng; Chen, Tingtao; Wang, Zongliang; Wang, Guoping; Cheng, Xigao; Wei, Junchao; Lin, Yingjie; Deng, Keyu; Wang, Xiaolei; Xin, Hongbo

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, homogeneous and well-ordered functional nanoarrays were grown densely on the complex structured three-dimensional (3D) printing frameworks through a general plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) assisted hydrothermal surface engineering process. The entire process was free from toxic additives or harmful residues and, therefore, can meet the critical requirements of high-purity products. As a practical example, 3D customized earplugs were precisely manufactured according to the model of ear canals at the 0.1 mm level. Meanwhile, well-ordered ZnO nanoarrays, formed on the surfaces of these 3D printed earplugs, could effectively prevent the growth of five main pathogens derived from the patients with otitis media and exhibited excellent wear resistance as well. On the basis of both animal experiments and volunteers' investigations, the 3D customized earplugs showed sound insulation capabilities superior to those of traditional earplugs. Further animal experiments demonstrated the potential of as-modified implant scaffolds in practical clinical applications. This work, exemplified with earplugs and implant scaffolds, oriented the development direction of 3D printing in biomedical devices, which precisely integrated customized architecture and tailored surface performance.

  5. The "Pure Marriage" between 3D Printing and Well-Ordered Nanoarrays by Using PEALD Assisted Hydrothermal Surface Engineering.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaowen; Shi, Xiaotong; Fang, Xuan; Tao, Haiyan; Zhu, Hui; Yu, Fen; Ding, Xingwei; Liu, Miaoxing; Fang, Fang; Yang, Fan; Wei, Zhipeng; Chen, Tingtao; Wang, Zongliang; Wang, Guoping; Cheng, Xigao; Wei, Junchao; Lin, Yingjie; Deng, Keyu; Wang, Xiaolei; Xin, Hongbo

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, homogeneous and well-ordered functional nanoarrays were grown densely on the complex structured three-dimensional (3D) printing frameworks through a general plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) assisted hydrothermal surface engineering process. The entire process was free from toxic additives or harmful residues and, therefore, can meet the critical requirements of high-purity products. As a practical example, 3D customized earplugs were precisely manufactured according to the model of ear canals at the 0.1 mm level. Meanwhile, well-ordered ZnO nanoarrays, formed on the surfaces of these 3D printed earplugs, could effectively prevent the growth of five main pathogens derived from the patients with otitis media and exhibited excellent wear resistance as well. On the basis of both animal experiments and volunteers' investigations, the 3D customized earplugs showed sound insulation capabilities superior to those of traditional earplugs. Further animal experiments demonstrated the potential of as-modified implant scaffolds in practical clinical applications. This work, exemplified with earplugs and implant scaffolds, oriented the development direction of 3D printing in biomedical devices, which precisely integrated customized architecture and tailored surface performance. PMID:26974545

  6. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features.

  7. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features. PMID:27409976

  8. Dissipative preparation of antiferromagnetic order in the Fermi-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarczyk, J.; Weimer, H.; Lemeshko, M.

    2016-09-01

    The Fermi-Hubbard model is one of the key models of condensed matter physics, which holds a potential for explaining the mystery of high-temperature superconductivity. Recent progress in ultracold atoms in optical lattices has paved the way to studying the model’s phase diagram using the tools of quantum simulation, which emerged as a promising alternative to the numerical calculations plagued by the infamous sign problem. However, the temperatures achieved using elaborate laser cooling protocols so far have been too high to show the appearance of antiferromagnetic (AF) and superconducting quantum phases directly. In this work, we demonstrate that using the machinery of dissipative quantum state engineering, one can observe the emergence of the AF order in the Fermi-Hubbard model with fermions in optical lattices. The core of the approach is to add incoherent laser scattering in such a way that the AF state emerges as the dark state of the driven-dissipative dynamics. The proposed controlled dissipation channels described in this work are straightforward to add to already existing experimental setups.

  9. Design of novel 3D gene activated PEG scaffolds with ordered pore structure.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Silvia; Guarnieri, Daniela; Netti, Paolo A

    2010-03-01

    The ability to genetically modify cells seeded inside synthetic hydrogel scaffolds offers a suitable approach to induce and control tissue repair and regeneration guiding cell fate. In fact the transfected cells can act as local in vivo bioreactor, secreting plasmid encoded proteins that augment tissue regeneration processes. We have realized a DNA bioactivated high porous poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) matrix by polyethyleneimine (PEI)/DNA complexes adsorption. As the design of the microarchitectural features of a scaffold also contributes to promote and influence cell fate, we appropriately designed the inner structure of gene activated PEG hydrogels by gelatine microparticles templating. Microarchitectural properties of the scaffold were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. 3D cell migration and transfection were monitored through time-lapse videomicroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  10. Spin Liquid State in the 3D Frustrated Antiferromagnet PbCuTe_{2}O_{6}: NMR and Muon Spin Relaxation Studies.

    PubMed

    Khuntia, P; Bert, F; Mendels, P; Koteswararao, B; Mahajan, A V; Baenitz, M; Chou, F C; Baines, C; Amato, A; Furukawa, Y

    2016-03-11

    PbCuTe_{2}O_{6} is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu^{2+} ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneous magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T) evolution of the 1/T_{1} NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation. PMID:27015508

  11. Spin liquid state in the 3D frustrated antiferromagnet PbCuTe2O6: NMR and muon spin relaxation studies

    DOE PAGES

    Khuntia, P.; Bert, F.; Mendels, P.; Koteswararao, B.; Mahajan, A. V.; Baenitz, M.; Chou, F. C.; Baines, C.; Amato, A.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-03-11

    In this study, PbCuTe2O6 is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu2+ ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneousmore » magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T) evolution of the 1/T1 NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation.« less

  12. Spin Liquid State in the 3D Frustrated Antiferromagnet PbCuTe_{2}O_{6}: NMR and Muon Spin Relaxation Studies.

    PubMed

    Khuntia, P; Bert, F; Mendels, P; Koteswararao, B; Mahajan, A V; Baenitz, M; Chou, F C; Baines, C; Amato, A; Furukawa, Y

    2016-03-11

    PbCuTe_{2}O_{6} is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu^{2+} ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneous magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T) evolution of the 1/T_{1} NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation.

  13. Helical antiferromagnetic ordering in Lu1-xScxMnSi

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, Ryan J; Anand, V K; Johnston, David C

    2014-08-01

    Polycrystalline samples of Lu1-xScxMnSi (x=0, 0.25, 0.5) are studied using powder x-ray diffraction, heat capacity Cp, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility χ, and electrical resistivity ρ measurements versus temperature T and magnetic field H. This system crystallizes in the primitive orthorhombic TiNiSi-type structure (space group Pnma) as previously reported. The ρ(T) data indicate metallic behavior. The Cp(T), χ(T), and ρ(T) measurements consistently indicate long-range antiferromagnetic (AF) transitions with AF ordering temperatures TN=246, 215, and 188 K for x=0, 0.25, and 0.5, respectively. A second transition is observed at somewhat lower T for each sample from the χ(T) and ρ(T) measurements, which we speculate are due to spin reorientation transitions; these second transitions are completely suppressed in H=5.5 T. The Cp data below 10 K for each composition indicate an enhanced Sommerfeld electronic heat capacity coefficient for the series in the range γ=24–29 mJ/mol K2. The χ(T) measurements up to 1000 K were fitted by local-moment Curie-Weiss behaviors which indicate a low Mn spin S~1. The χ data below TN are analyzed using the Weiss molecular field theory for a planar noncollinear cycloidal AF structure with a composition-dependent pitch, following the previous neutron diffraction work of Venturini et al. [J. Alloys Compd. 256, 65 (1997)]. Within this model, the fits indicate a turn angle between Mn ordered moments along the cycloid axis of ~100° or ~145°, either of which indicate dominant AF interactions between the Mn spins in the Lu1-xScxMnSi series of compounds.

  14. Band-Renormalization Effects and Predominant Antiferromagnetic Order in Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryo; Yokoyama, Hisatoshi

    2016-07-01

    Band renormalization effects (BRE) are comprehensively studied for a mixed state of dx2 - y2-wave superconducting (d-SC) and antiferromagnetic (AF) orders, in addition to simple d-SC, AF, and normal (paramagnetic) states, by applying a variational Monte Carlo method to a two-dimensional Hubbard (t-t'-U) model. In a weakly correlated regime (U/t ≲ 6), BRE are negligible on all the states studied. As previously shown, the effective band of d-SC is greatly renormalized but the modifications of physical quantities, including energy improvement, are negligible. In contrast, BRE on the AF state considerably affects various features of the system. Because the energy is markedly improved for t'/t < 0, the AF state occupies almost the whole underdoped regime in phase diagrams. A doped metallic AF state undergoes a kind of Lifshitz transition at t' = t'{L} ˜ - 0.05t as t'/t varies, irrespective of the values of U/t and δ (doping rate). Pocket Fermi surfaces arise around (π ,0) [(π /2,π /2)] for t' > t'{L} [t' < t'{L}], which corresponds to the electron-hole asymmetry observed in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) spectra. The coexistent state of the two orders is possible basically for t' > t'{L}, because the existence of Fermi surfaces near (π ,0) is a requisite for the electron scattering of {q} = (π ,π ). Actually, the coexistent state appears mainly for t'{L}/t < t'/t ≲ 0.2 in the mixed state. Nevertheless, the AF and coexisting states become unstable toward phase separation for - 0.05 ≲ t'/t ≲ 0.2 but become stable at other values of t'/t owing to the energy reduction by the diagonal hopping of doped holes. We show that this instability does not directly correlate with the strength of d-SC.

  15. Long-range antiferromagnetic interactions in Ni-Co-Mn-Ga metamagnetic Heusler alloys: A two-step ordering studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, F.; Fabbrici, S.; Albertini, F.; Manuel, P.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Righi, L.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the experimental observation of a long-range antiferromagnetic structure in the metamagnetic Ni-Co-Mn-Ga Heusler alloys. The accurate magnetic symmetry analysis based on experimental neutron diffraction data, exploiting the Shubnikov theory, allows the determination of the correct magnetic space group of the system. A two-step process, featuring the ordering of the Ni and Mn sublattices at different temperatures, leads to the antiferromagnetic structure in martensite. A perfect, constrained by the symmetry, antiferromagnetic ordering of the Ni sublattice in the "paramagnetic gap" is observed, followed by the ordering of the Mn sublattice at lower temperatures. The observation of such antiferromagnetic structure clarifies the current debate on the presence of antiferromagnetic interactions in the (Ni,Co)-Mn-X (X =Ga , Sn, Sb, and In) ferromagnetic shape memory alloys and yields new insights in understanding the magnetostructural properties of this relevant class of materials.

  16. Glass-like recovery of antiferromagnetic spin ordering in a photo-excited manganite Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, S.Y.; Langner, M.C.; Zhu, Y.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Rini, M.; Glover, T.E.; Hertlein, M.P.; Gonzalez, A.G. Cruz; Tahir, N.; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Hussain, Z.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2014-01-16

    Electronic orderings of charges, orbitals and spins are observed in many strongly correlated electron materials, and revealing their dynamics is a critical step toward understanding the underlying physics of important emergent phenomena. Here we use time-resolved resonant soft x-ray scattering spectroscopy to probe the dynamics of antiferromagnetic spin ordering in the manganite Pr0:7Ca0:3MnO3 following ultrafast photo-exitation. Our studies reveal a glass-like recovery of the spin ordering and a crossover in the dimensionality of the restoring interaction from quasi-1D at low pump fluence to 3D at high pump fluence. This behavior arises from the metastable state created by photo-excitation, a state characterized by spin disordered metallic droplets within the larger charge- and spin-ordered insulating domains. Comparison with time-resolved resistivity measurements suggests that the collapse of spin ordering is correlated with the insulator-to-metal transition, but the recovery of the insulating phase does not depend on the re-establishment of the spin ordering.

  17. Pressure-Induced Oriented Attachment Growth of Large-Size Crystals for Constructing 3D Ordered Superstructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Lian, Gang; Si, Haibin; Wang, Qilong; Cui, Deliang; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-26

    Oriented attachment (OA), a nonclassical crystal growth mechanism, provides a powerful bottom-up approach to obtain ordered superstructures, which also demonstrate exciting charge transmission characteristic. However, there is little work observably pronouncing the achievement of 3D OA growth of crystallites with large size (e.g., submicrometer crystals). Here, we report that SnO2 3D ordered superstructures can be synthesized by means of a self-limited assembly assisted by OA in a designed high-pressure solvothermal system. The size of primary building blocks is 200-250 nm, which is significantly larger than that in previous results (normally <10 nm). High pressure plays the key role in the formation of 3D configuration and fusion of adjacent crystals. Furthermore, this high-pressure strategy can be readily expanded to additional materials. We anticipate that the welded structures will constitute an ideal system with relevance to applications in optical responses, lithium ion battery, solar cells, and chemical sensing.

  18. Increasing 3D Supramolecular Order by Decreasing Molecular Order. A Comparative Study of Helical Assemblies of Dendronized Nonchlorinated and Tetrachlorinated Perylene Bisimides.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Benjamin E; Leowanawat, Pawaret; Aqad, Emad; Imam, Mohammad R; Sun, Hao-Jan; Peterca, Mihai; Heiney, Paul A; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Percec, Virgil

    2015-04-22

    A nonplanar, twisted, and flexible tetrachlorinated perylene bisimide (Cl4PBI) was functionalized with two AB3 minidendrons containing hydrogenated or semifluorinated dodecyl groups. The hydrogenated dendron was attached to the imide groups of Cl4PBI via m = 0, 1, and 2 methylenic units, whereas the dendron containing semifluorinated groups was attached via m = 3 or a di(ethylene oxide) linker (m = 2EO). The supramolecular structures of these compounds, determined by a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR, were compared with those of nonchlorinated planar and rigid PBI reported previously, which demonstrated the thermodynamically controlled formation of 2D periodic arrays at high temperatures and 3D arrays at low temperatures. The molecularly less ordered Cl4PBI containing hydrogenated dendrons self-organize into exclusively 3D crystalline periodic arrays under thermodynamic control for m = 0 and 2, while the more highly molecularly ordered PBI produced less stable and ordered 3D crystals and also 2D assemblies. This induction of a higher degree of 3D order in supramolecular assemblies of the less well-ordered molecular building blocks was unanticipated. The semifluorinated dendronized Cl4PBI with m = 3 formed a 2D columnar hexagonal array under kinetic control, whereas the compound with m = 2EO formed an unusual 2D honeycomb-like hexagonal phase under thermodynamic control. These Cl4PBI compounds provide a new route to stable crystalline assemblies via thermodynamic control at lower temperatures than previously obtained with PBI, thus generating 3D order in an accessible range of temperature of interest for structural analysis and for technological applications. PMID:25830346

  19. Study of the structure of 3D-ordered macroporous GaN-ZnS:Mn nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdyukov, D. A. Shishkin, I. I.; Grudinkin, S. A.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.; Golubev, V. G.

    2015-05-15

    A film-type 3D-ordered macroporous GaN-ZnS:Mn nanocomposite with the structure of an inverted opal is fabricated. Structural studies of the nanocomposite are performed, and it is shown that GaN and ZnS:Mn introduced into the pores of the silica opal are nanocrystallites misoriented with respect to each other. It is shown that the nanocomposite is a structurally perfect 3D photonic crystal. The efficiency of using a buffer of GaN crystallites to preclude interaction between the surface of the spherical a-SiO{sub 2} particles forming the opal matrix and chemically active substances introduced into the pores is demonstrated.

  20. An overset mesh approach for 3D mixed element high-order discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazell, Michael J.; Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2016-10-01

    A parallel high-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is used to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in an overset mesh framework. The DG solver has many capabilities including: hp-adaption, curved cells, support for hybrid, mixed-element meshes, and moving meshes. Combining these capabilities with overset grids allows the DG solver to be used in problems with bodies in relative motion and in a near-body off-body solver strategy. The overset implementation is constructed to preserve the design accuracy of the baseline DG discretization. Multiple simulations are carried out to validate the accuracy and performance of the overset DG solver. These simulations demonstrate the capability of the high-order DG solver to handle complex geometry and large scale parallel simulations in an overset framework.

  1. Plaquette-triplon analysis of magnetic disorder and order in a trimerized spin-1 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pratyay; Verma, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-01-01

    A spin-1 Heisenberg model on trimerized kagome lattice is studied by doing a low-energy bosonic theory in terms of plaquette triplons defined on its triangular unit cells. The model considered has an intratriangle antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J (set to 1) and two intertriangle couplings J'>0 (nearest neighbor) and J″ (next nearest neighbor; of both signs). The triplon analysis performed on this model investigates the stability of the trimerized singlet ground state (which is exact in the absence of intertriangle couplings) in the J'-J″ plane. It gives a quantum phase diagram that has two gapless antiferromagnetically ordered phases separated by the spin-gapped trimerized singlet phase. The trimerized singlet ground state is found to be stable on J″=0 line (the nearest-neighbor case), and on both sides of it for J″≠0 , in an extended region bounded by the critical lines of transition to the gapless antiferromagnetic phases. The gapless phase in the negative J″ region has a coplanar 120∘ antiferromagnetic order with √{3 }×√{3 } structure. In this phase, all the magnetic moments are of equal length, and the angle between any two of them on a triangle is exactly 120∘. The magnetic lattice in this case has a unit cell consisting of three triangles. The other gapless phase, in the positive J″ region, is found to exhibit a different coplanar antiferromagnetic order with ordering wave vector q =(0 ,0 ) . Here, two magnetic moments in a triangle are of the same magnitude, but shorter than the third. While the angle between two short moments is 120∘-2 δ , it is 120∘+δ between a short and the long one. Only when J″=J' , their magnitudes become equal and the relative angles 120∘. The magnetic lattice in this q =(0 ,0 ) phase has the translational symmetry of the kagome lattice with triangular unit cells of reduced (isosceles) symmetry. This reduction in the point-group symmetry is found to show up as a difference in the intensities of

  2. Ordering Single Cells and Single Embryos in 3D Confinement: A New Device for High Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Wollrab, Viktoria; Caballero, David; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Riveline, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological cells are usually observed on flat (2D) surfaces. This condition is not physiological, and phenotypes and shapes are highly variable. Screening based on cells in such environments have therefore serious limitations: cell organelles show extreme phenotypes, cell morphologies and sizes are heterogeneous and/or specific cell organelles cannot be properly visualized. In addition, cells in vivo are located in a 3D environment; in this situation, cells show different phenotypes mainly because of their interaction with the surrounding extracellular matrix of the tissue. In order to standardize and generate order of single cells in a physiologically-relevant 3D environment for cell-based assays, we report here the microfabrication and applications of a device for in vitro 3D cell culture. This device consists of a 2D array of microcavities (typically 10(5) cavities/cm(2)), each filled with single cells or embryos. Cell position, shape, polarity and internal cell organization become then normalized showing a 3D architecture. We used replica molding to pattern an array of microcavities, 'eggcups', onto a thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer adhered on a coverslip. Cavities were covered with fibronectin to facilitate adhesion. Cells were inserted by centrifugation. Filling percentage was optimized for each system allowing up to 80%. Cells and embryos viability was confirmed. We applied this methodology for the visualization of cellular organelles, such as nucleus and Golgi apparatus, and to study active processes, such as the closure of the cytokinetic ring during cell mitosis. This device allowed the identification of new features, such as periodic accumulations and inhomogeneities of myosin and actin during the cytokinetic ring closure and compacted phenotypes for Golgi and nucleus alignment. We characterized the method for mammalian cells, fission yeast, budding yeast, C. elegans with specific adaptation in each case. Finally, the characteristics of this

  3. Antiferromagnetic order in single crystals of the S =2 quasi-one-dimensional chain MnCl3(bpy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Shin-ichi; Okutani, Akira; Yoshizawa, Daichi; Kida, Takanori; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Shoji; Risset, Olivia N.; Talham, Daniel R.; Meisel, Mark W.; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    A suite of experimental tools, including high-field magnetization and electron spin resonance (ESR) studies in magnetic fields of up to 50 T and heat capacity studies up to 9 T, have revealed antiferromagnetic order in single crystals of the Heisenberg S =2 chain compound MnCl3(bpy), where bpy is 2 ,2'-bipyridine . The Néel temperature, which depends on the strength of the applied magnetic field and its orientation with respect to the crystalline axes that was revealed by heat capacity measurements, is near 11.5 K in zero field. The spin-flop transition is identified in the magnetization curve acquired at 1.7 K and at μoHSFc=24 T along the c axis. The transition field HSF is lower than that expected from the previous antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) studies on a powder sample. The identification of the long-range antiferromagnetic order resolves an earlier report by Granroth et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1616 (1996)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.1616 that identified MnCl3(bpy) as an S =2 Haldane system down to 40 mK. The ESR studies identify a wide range of antiferromagnetic resonance modes that provide additional microscopic information about the g values (ga*=2.09 , gb=1.92 , and gc=2.07 ), the zero-field splitting constants, D /kB=-1.5 K and E /kB=-0.17 K when the nearest-neighbor spin interaction J /kB=31.2 K, which is evaluated from fitting the susceptibility, and the anisotropy of this compound (easy axis is the c axis, the second easy-axis is the b axis, and the hard axis is the a* axis), when using a standard (two-sublattice) AFMR analysis that does not quantitatively reproduce the observed HSFc value. The observed resonance mode indicates the frequency minimum at HSFc.

  4. A novel high-order, entropy stable, 3D AMR MHD solver with guaranteed positive pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derigs, Dominik; Winters, Andrew R.; Gassner, Gregor J.; Walch, Stefanie

    2016-07-01

    We describe a high-order numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solver built upon a novel non-linear entropy stable numerical flux function that supports eight travelling wave solutions. By construction the solver conserves mass, momentum, and energy and is entropy stable. The method is designed to treat the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field in a similar fashion to a hyperbolic divergence cleaning technique. The solver described herein is especially well-suited for flows involving strong discontinuities. Furthermore, we present a new formulation to guarantee positivity of the pressure. We present the underlying theory and implementation of the new solver into the multi-physics, multi-scale adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation code FLASH (http://flash.uchicago.edu)

  5. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H.; Wells, Kym L.; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-07-01

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems.

  6. A 3D High-Order Unstructured Finite-Volume Algorithm for Solving Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-volume algorithm based on arbitrary basis functions for time-dependent problems on general unstructured grids is developed. The method is applied to the time-domain Maxwell equations. Discrete unknowns are volume integrals or cell averages of the electric and magnetic field variables. Spatial terms are converted to surface integrals using the Gauss curl theorem. Polynomial basis functions are introduced in constructing local representations of the fields and evaluating the volume and surface integrals. Electric and magnetic fields are approximated by linear combinations of these basis functions. Unlike other unstructured formulations used in Computational Fluid Dynamics, the new formulation actually does not reconstruct the field variables at each time step. Instead, the spatial terms are calculated in terms of unknowns by precomputing weights at the beginning of the computation as functions of cell geometry and basis functions to retain efficiency. Since no assumption is made for cell geometry, this new formulation is suitable for arbitrarily defined grids, either smooth or unsmooth. However, to facilitate the volume and surface integrations, arbitrary polyhedral cells with polygonal faces are used in constructing grids. Both centered and upwind schemes are formulated. It is shown that conventional schemes (second order in Cartesian grids) are equivalent to the new schemes using first degree polynomials as the basis functions and the midpoint quadrature for the integrations. In the new formulation, higher orders of accuracy are achieved by using higher degree polynomial basis functions. Furthermore, all the surface and volume integrations are carried out exactly. Several model electromagnetic scattering problems are calculated and compared with analytical solutions. Examples are given for cases based on 0th to 3rd degree polynomial basis functions. In all calculations, a centered scheme is applied in the interior, while an upwind

  7. Propagation of 3D nonlinear waves over complex bathymetry using a High-Order Spectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouin, Maïté; Ducrozet, Guillaume; Ferrant, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Scattering of regular and irregular surface gravity waves propagating over a region of arbitrary three-dimensional varying bathymetry is considered here. The three-dimensional High-Order Spectral method (HOS) with an extension to account for a variable bathymetry is used. The efficiency of the model has been proved to be conserved even with this extension. The method is first applied to a bathymetry consisting of an elliptical lens, as used in the Vincent and Briggs (1989) experiment. Incident waves passing across the lens are transformed and a strong convergence region is observed after the elliptical mound. The wave amplification depends on the incident wave. Numerical results for regular and irregular waves are analysed and compared with other methods and experimental data demonstrating the efficiency and practical applicability of the present approach. Then the method is used to model waves propagating over a real bathymetry: the canyons of Scripps/La Jolla in California. The implementation of this complex bathymetry in the model is presented, as well as the first results achieved. They will be compared to the ones obtained with another numerical model.

  8. Competition between antiferromagnetic order and spin-liquid behavior in the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model at half filling

    SciTech Connect

    Vekic, M.; Cannon, J.W.; Scalapino, D.J.; Scalettar, R.T.; Sugar, R.L. Physics Department, Centenary College, 2911 Centenary Boulevard, Shreveport, Louisiana 71104 Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 )

    1995-03-20

    We study the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model at half filling using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques. The ground state undergoes a magnetic order-disorder transition as a function of the effective exchange coupling between the conduction and localized bands. Low-lying spin and charge excitations are determined using the maximum entropy method to analytically continue the QMC data. At finite temperature we find a competition between the Kondo effect and antiferromagnetic order which develops in the localized band through Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions.

  9. An itinerant antiferromagnetic metal without magnetic constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Svanidze, E.; Wang, Jiakui K.; Besara, T.; Liu, L.; Huang, Q.; Siegrist, T.; Frandsen, B.; Lynn, J. W.; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.; Gamża, Monika B.; Aronson, M. C.; Uemura, Y. J.; Morosan, E.

    2015-07-13

    The origin of magnetism in metals has been traditionally discussed in two diametrically opposite limits: itinerant and local moments. Surprisingly, there are very few known examples of materials that are close to the itinerant limit, and their properties are not universally understood. In the case of the two such examples discovered several decades ago, the itinerant ferromagnets ZrZn2 and Sc3In, the understanding of their magnetic ground states draws on the existence of 3d electrons subject to strong spin fluctuations. Similarly, in Cr, an elemental itinerant antiferromagnet with a spin density wave ground state, its 3d electron character has been deemed crucial to it being magnetic. Here, we report evidence for an itinerant antiferromagnetic metal with no magnetic constituents: TiAu. Antiferromagnetic order occurs below a Néel temperature of 36 K, about an order of magnitude smaller than in Cr, rendering the spin fluctuations in TiAu more important at low temperatures. In conclusion, this itinerant antiferromagnet challenges the currently limited understanding of weak itinerant antiferromagnetism, while providing insights into the effects of spin fluctuations in itinerant–electron systems.

  10. An itinerant antiferromagnetic metal without magnetic constituents

    DOE PAGES

    Svanidze, E.; Wang, Jiakui K.; Besara, T.; Liu, L.; Huang, Q.; Siegrist, T.; Frandsen, B.; Lynn, J. W.; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.; Gamża, Monika B.; et al

    2015-07-13

    The origin of magnetism in metals has been traditionally discussed in two diametrically opposite limits: itinerant and local moments. Surprisingly, there are very few known examples of materials that are close to the itinerant limit, and their properties are not universally understood. In the case of the two such examples discovered several decades ago, the itinerant ferromagnets ZrZn2 and Sc3In, the understanding of their magnetic ground states draws on the existence of 3d electrons subject to strong spin fluctuations. Similarly, in Cr, an elemental itinerant antiferromagnet with a spin density wave ground state, its 3d electron character has been deemedmore » crucial to it being magnetic. Here, we report evidence for an itinerant antiferromagnetic metal with no magnetic constituents: TiAu. Antiferromagnetic order occurs below a Néel temperature of 36 K, about an order of magnitude smaller than in Cr, rendering the spin fluctuations in TiAu more important at low temperatures. In conclusion, this itinerant antiferromagnet challenges the currently limited understanding of weak itinerant antiferromagnetism, while providing insights into the effects of spin fluctuations in itinerant–electron systems.« less

  11. 2D to 3D crossover of the magnetic properties in ordered arrays of iron oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Faure, Bertrand; Wetterskog, Erik; Gunnarsson, Klas; Josten, Elisabeth; Hermann, Raphaël P; Brückel, Thomas; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel; Meneau, Florian; Meyer, Mathias; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Bergström, Lennart; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Svedlindh, Peter

    2013-02-01

    The magnetic 2D to 3D crossover behavior of well-ordered arrays of monodomain γ-Fe(2)O(3) spherical nanoparticles with different thicknesses has been investigated by magnetometry and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Using the structural information of the arrays obtained from grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy together with the experimentally determined values for the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy of the nanoparticles, we show that MC simulations can reproduce the thickness-dependent magnetic behavior. The magnetic dipolar particle interactions induce a ferromagnetic coupling that increases in strength with decreasing thickness of the array. The 2D to 3D transition in the magnetic properties is mainly driven by a change in the orientation of the magnetic vortex states with increasing thickness, becoming more isotropic as the thickness of the array increases. Magnetic anisotropy prevents long-range ferromagnetic order from being established at low temperature and the nanoparticle magnetic moments instead freeze along directions defined by the distribution of easy magnetization directions.

  12. Magnetic order and spin excitations in layered Heisenberg antiferromagnets with compass-model anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, A. A.; Ihle, D.; Plakida, N. M.

    2015-02-01

    The spin-wave excitation spectrum, magnetization, and Néel temperature for the quasi-two-dimensional spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model with the compass-model interaction in the plane proposed for iridates are calculated in the random phase approximation. The spin-wave spectrum agrees well with data of Lanczos diagonalization. We find that the Néel temperature is enhanced by the compass-model interaction and is close to the experimental value for Ba2IrO4.

  13. Thickness-Dependent and Magnetic-Field-Driven Suppression of Antiferromagnetic Order in Thin V5S8 Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Will J; Yuan, Jiangtan; Guo, Hua; Zhou, Panpan; Lou, Jun; Natelson, Douglas

    2016-06-28

    With materials approaching the 2D limit yielding many exciting systems with intriguing physical properties and promising technological functionalities, understanding and engineering magnetic order in nanoscale, layered materials is generating keen interest. One such material is V5S8, a metal with an antiferromagnetic ground state below the Néel temperature TN ∼ 32 K and a prominent spin-flop signature in the magnetoresistance (MR) when H∥c ∼ 4.2 T. Here we study nanoscale-thickness single crystals of V5S8, focusing on temperatures close to TN and the evolution of material properties in response to systematic reduction in crystal thickness. Transport measurements just below TN reveal magnetic hysteresis that we ascribe to a metamagnetic transition, the first-order magnetic-field-driven breakdown of the ordered state. The reduction of crystal thickness to ∼10 nm coincides with systematic changes in the magnetic response: TN falls, implying that antiferromagnetism is suppressed; and while the spin-flop signature remains, the hysteresis disappears, implying that the metamagnetic transition becomes second order as the thickness approaches the 2D limit. This work demonstrates that single crystals of magnetic materials with nanometer thicknesses are promising systems for future studies of magnetism in reduced dimensionality and quantum phase transitions.

  14. Highly ordered large-scale neuronal networks of individual cells - toward single cell to 3D nanowire intracellular interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kwiat, Moria; Elnathan, Roey; Pevzner, Alexander; Peretz, Asher; Barak, Boaz; Peretz, Hagit; Ducobni, Tamir; Stein, Daniel; Mittelman, Leonid; Ashery, Uri; Patolsky, Fernando

    2012-07-25

    The use of artificial, prepatterned neuronal networks in vitro is a promising approach for studying the development and dynamics of small neural systems in order to understand the basic functionality of neurons and later on of the brain. The present work presents a high fidelity and robust procedure for controlling neuronal growth on substrates such as silicon wafers and glass, enabling us to obtain mature and durable neural networks of individual cells at designed geometries. It offers several advantages compared to other related techniques that have been reported in recent years mainly because of its high yield and reproducibility. The procedure is based on surface chemistry that allows the formation of functional, tailormade neural architectures with a micrometer high-resolution partition, that has the ability to promote or repel cells attachment. The main achievements of this work are deemed to be the creation of a large scale neuronal network at low density down to individual cells, that develop intact typical neurites and synapses without any glia-supportive cells straight from the plating stage and with a relatively long term survival rate, up to 4 weeks. An important application of this method is its use on 3D nanopillars and 3D nanowire-device arrays, enabling not only the cell bodies, but also their neurites to be positioned directly on electrical devices and grow with registration to the recording elements underneath.

  15. Multi-scale 3D characterization of long period stacking ordered structure in Mg-Zn-Gd cast alloys.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Satoru; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Matsumura, Syo

    2014-11-01

    Magnesium alloys containing rare earth elements are attractive as lightweight structural materials due to their low density, high-specific strength and recycling efficiency. Mg-Zn-Gd system is one of promising systems because of their high creep-resistant property[1]. It is reported that the coherent precipitation formation of the 14H long period stacking ordered structure (LPSO) in Mg-Zn-Gd system at temperatures higher than 623 K[2,3]. In this study, the 14H LPSO phase formed in Mg-Zn-Gd alloys were investigated by multi-scale characterization with X-ray computer tomography (X-CT), focused ion beam (FIB) tomography and aberration-corrected STEM observation for further understanding of the LPSO formation mechanism.The Mg89.5 Zn4.5 Gd6 alloy ingots were cast using high-frequency induction heating in argon atmosphere. The specimens were aged at 753 K for 24 h in air. The aged specimen were cut and polished mechanically for microstructural analysis. The micrometer resolution X-CT observation was performed by conventional scaner (Bruker SKY- SCAN1172) at 80 kV. The FIB tomography and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were carried out by a dual beam FIB-SEM system (Hitachi MI-4000L) with silicon drift detector (SDD) (Oxford X-Max(N)). The electron acceleration voltages were used with 3 kV for SEM observation and 10 kV for EDX spectroscopy. The 3D reconstruction from image series was performed by Avizo Fire 8.0 software (FEI). TEM/STEM observations were also performed by transmission electron microscopes (JEOL JEM 2100, JEM-ARM 200F) at the acceleration voltage of 200 keV.The LPSO phase was observed clearly in SEM image of the Mg89.5Zn4.5Gd6 alloy at 753 K for 2h (Fig.1 (a)). The atomic structure of LPSO phase observed as white gray region of SEM image was also confirmed as 14H LPSO structure by using selected electron diffraction patterns and high-resolution STEM observations. The elemental composition of LPSO phase was determined as Mg97Zn1Gd2 by EDS analyses

  16. Antiferromagnetic three-dimensional order induced by carboxylate bridges in a two-dimensional network of [Cu3(dcp)2(H2O)4] trimers.

    PubMed

    King, Philippa; Clérac, Rodolphe; Anson, Christopher E; Coulon, Claude; Powell, Annie K

    2003-06-01

    A new Cu(II) complex, [Cu(3)(dcp)(2)(H(2)O)(4)](n), with the ligand 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid monohydrate (H(3)dcp) has been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and it crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with a = 11.633(2) A, b = 9.6005(14) A, c = 6.9230(17) A, beta = 106.01(2) degrees, and Z = 2. In the solid state structure of [Cu(3)(dcp)(2)(H(2)O)(4)](n), trinuclear [Cu(3)(dcp)(2)(H(2)O)(4)] repeating units in which two dcp(3-) ligands chelate the three Cu(II) ions with the central Cu(II) ion, Cu(1) (on an inversion center), link to form infinite 2D sheets via syn-anti equatorial-equatorial carboxylate bridges between Cu(2) atoms in adjacent trimers. These layers are further linked by syn-anti axial-equatorial carboxylate bridging between Cu(1) atoms in adjacent sheets resulting in the formation of a crystallographic 3D network. A detailed analysis of the magnetic properties of [Cu(3)(dcp)(2)(H(2)O)(4)](n) reveals that the dcp(3-) ligand acts to link Cu(II) centers in three different ways with coupling constants orders of magnitude apart in value. In the high temperature region above 50 K, the dominant interaction is strongly antiferromagnetic (J/k(B) = -32 K) within the trimer units mediated by the pyrazolate bridges. Below 20 K, the trimer motif can be modeled as an S = 1/2 unit. These units are coupled to their neighbors by a ferromagnetic interaction mediated by the syn-anti equatorial-equatorial carboxylate bridge. This interaction has been estimated at J(2D)/k(B) = +2.8 K on the basis of a 2D square lattice Heisenberg model. Finally, below 3.2 K a weak antiferromagnetic coupling (J(3D)/k(B) = -0.1 K) which is mediated by the syn-anti axial-equatorial carboxylate bridges between the 2D layers becomes relevant to describe the magnetic (T, H) phase diagram of this material.

  17. Absence of Néel order in Heisenberg chains: Long-range antiferromagnetic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacobahyba, J. T.; Nunes, Wagner; de Sousa, J. Ricardo

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the Heisenberg chain with long-range antiferromagnetic interactions proportional to (-1)n/np (n=1,2,…,∞) by the method of a double-time-temperature Green’s function within Tyablikov’s decoupling approximation. Using the two-sublattice approach developed by Hewson and ter Haar, and solving the equation of motion for the Green’s function, we obtain the Néel temperature TN as a function of p. We have conjectured that for all p>1 the present approach predicts orientational disorder at all finite temperatures (i.e., TN=0). Our results are in accordance with spin-wave arguments and disagreement with renormalization group that predicts a phase transition at p≃1.85 at T=0.

  18. Antiferromagnetic order in a semiconductor quantum well with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, D. C.

    2015-05-01

    An argument is made on the existence of a low-temperature itinerant antiferromagnetic (AF) spin alignment, rather than persistent helical (PH), in the ground state of a two dimensional electron gas in a semiconductor quantum well with linear spin-orbit Rashba-Dresselhaus interaction at equal coupling strengths, α. This result is obtained on account of the opposite-spin single-particle state degeneracy at k = 0 that makes the spin instability possible. A theory of the resulting magnetic phase is formulated within the Hartree-Fock approximation of the Coulomb interaction. In the AF state the direction of the fractional polarization is obtained to be aligned along the displacement vector of the single-particle states.

  19. Electron transfer through ordered metallic chains in LiNbO 3 : (Mg, Zn) : Me(3d)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitina, L. G.; Shanina, B. D.; Corradi, G.; Polgar, K.

    1998-04-01

    In crystal and ceramic LiNbO 3 double doped with Mg or Zn above the threshold concentration ( CMg,Zn⩾4-6 mol%) and with transition metals of the 3d group (Cr, Fe, Mn) non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) dependent on the magnetic field was studied. Peak-like dependencies of the NRMA signal intensity on the concentration of dopants and stoichiometry of lithium niobate were found. The EPR line of mobile electrons (Δ B=30 mT) with g=2.0023 was detected. The interaction energy between the substitutional impurities of Mg and Cr was calculated. It was concluded, that in LiNbO 3 : (Mg, Zn) : (Cr, Fe, Mn) ordered metallic chains exist with electron conductivity.

  20. Multitasking 3-D forward modeling using high-order finite difference methods on the Cray X-MP/416

    SciTech Connect

    Terki-Hassaine, O.; Leiss, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    The CRAY X-MP/416 was used to multitask 3-D forward modeling by the high-order finite difference method. Flowtrace analysis reveals that the most expensive operation in the unitasked program is a matrix vector multiplication. The in-core and out-of-core versions of a reentrant subroutine can perform any fraction of the matrix vector multiplication independently, a pattern compatible with multitasking. The matrix vector multiplication routine can be distributed over two to four processors. The rest of the program utilizes the microtasking feature that lets the system treat independent iterations of DO-loops as subtasks to be performed by any available processor. The availability of the Solid-State Storage Device (SSD) meant the I/O wait time was virtually zero. A performance study determined a theoretical speedup, taking into account the multitasking overhead. Multitasking programs utilizing both macrotasking and microtasking features obtained actual speedups that were approximately 80% of the ideal speedup.

  1. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  2. Magnetic Ordering of Antiferromagnetic Trimer System 2b·3CuCl2·2H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanda, M.; Kubo, K.; Asano, T.; Morodomi, H.; Inagaki, Y.; Kawae, T.; Wang, J.; Matsuo, A.; Kindo, K.; Sato, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present the magnetic properties of 2b·3CuCl2·2H2O (b = betaine, C5H11NO2). 2b·3CuCl2·2H2O is the first model substance for a two-dimensional S = 1/2 orthogonal antiferromagnetic trimer system. We have performed magnetic susceptibility, magnetization curve, and specific heat under extreme conditions: low temperatures and high magnetic fields in this system. The experimental results indicate that this substance is a magnetically S = 1/2 antiferromagnetic trimer system. The magnetization also shows one-third of the saturation value (MS ~ 3.2μB/f.u.) between 5 and 14T The specific heat in a zero field shows a sharp peak at 1.38K corresponding to a long-range magnetic ordering, TN. As the magnetic field increases, the TN shifts remarkably to a lower temperature and is suppressed. Above 5T, the specific heat has no anomaly down to 150mK In the plateau region with an energy gap, the magnetic ordering seems to be disappeared.

  3. Optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Han, B.; Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate an optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling. An anti-lumped mass strategy is incorporated to minimize the numerical dispersion. The optimal finite-difference coefficients and the mass weighting coefficients are obtained by minimizing the misfit between the normalized phase velocities and the unity. An iterative damped least-squares method, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, is utilized for the optimization. Dispersion analysis shows that the optimal fourth-order scheme presents less grid dispersion and anisotropy than the conventional fourth-order scheme with respect to different Poisson's ratios. Moreover, only 3.7 grid-points per minimum shear wavelength are required to keep the error of the group velocities below 1%. The memory cost is then greatly reduced due to a coarser sampling. A parallel iterative method named CARP-CG is used to solve the large ill-conditioned linear system for the frequency-domain modeling. Validations are conducted with respect to both the analytic viscoacoustic and viscoelastic solutions. Compared with the conventional fourth-order scheme, the optimal scheme generates wavefields having smaller error under the same discretization setups. Profiles of the wavefields are presented to confirm better agreement between the optimal results and the analytic solutions.

  4. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  5. Crystal structure and antiferromagnetic ordering of quasi-2D [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]TaF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine).

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; McDonald, R. D.; Singleton, J.; Materials Science Division; Eastern Washington Univ.; LANL

    2010-04-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound was determined by X-ray diffraction at 90 and 295 K. Copper(II) ions are coordinated to four bridging pyz ligands to form square layers in the ab-plane. Bridging HF{sub 2}{sup -} ligands join the layers together along the c-axis to afford a tetragonal, three-dimensional (3D) framework that contains Taf{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every cavity. At 295 K, the pyz rings lie exactly perpendicular to the layers and cooling to 90 K induces a canting of those rings. Magnetically, the compound exhibits 2D antiferromagnetic correlations within the 2D layers with an exchange interaction of -13.1(1) K. Weak interlayer interactions, as mediated by Cu-F-H-F-Cu, leads to long-range magnetic order below 4.2 K. Pulsed-field magnetization data at 0.5 K show a concave curvature with increasing B and reveal a saturation magnetization at 35.4 T.

  6. Long-range antiferromagnetic order in epitaxial Mn2GaC thin films from neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingason, A. S.; Pálsson, G. K.; Dahlqvist, M.; Rosen, J.

    2016-07-01

    The nature of the magnetic structure in magnetic so-called MAX phases is a topic of some controversy. Here we present unpolarized neutron-diffraction data between 3.4 and 290.0 K and momentum transfer between Q =0.0 and1.1 Å-1, as well as complementary x-ray-diffraction data on epitaxial thin films of the MAX phase material Mn2GaC . This inherently layered material exhibits neutron-diffraction peaks consistent with long-ranged antiferromagnetic order with a periodicity of two structural unit cells. The magnetic structure is present throughout the measured temperature range. The results are in agreement with first-principles calculations of antiferromagnetic structures for this material where the Mn-C-Mn atomic trilayers are found to be ferromagnetically coupled internally but spin flipped or rotated across the Ga layers. The present findings have significant bearing on the discussion regarding the nature of the magnetic structure in magnetic MAX phases.

  7. Na ordering and Co magnetism in a metallic antiferromagnet Na0.825CoO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ben-Li; Chu, P.-Y.; Juang, J. Y.; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.

    2014-03-01

    Sodium cobaltate, NaxCoO2, originally known as a battery material, has shown other prominent features such as thermoelectricity, magnetism, and superconductivity. For certain Na contents, the Na vacancies are not randomly distributed so that a superlattice structure is formed. We investigated the Na ordering and the Co magnetism in the x = 0.825 phase of a metallic antiferromagnet, by nuclear magnetic-resonance (NMR) techniques. We successfully derived the three-dimensional superstructure of the Na ordering, and found additional magnetic susceptibility component emerging at 60 K. In addition, a magnetic field-induced glassy behavior near a metamagnetic transition was discovered. This work was supported by NSC Grants No. 98-2112-M-009-016-MY3 and No. 101-2112-M-009-015-MY2 and by the MOE ATU Program operated at NCTU.

  8. Quantum measurement-induced antiferromagnetic order and density modulations in ultracold Fermi gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2016-08-01

    Ultracold atomic systems offer a unique tool for understanding behavior of matter in the quantum degenerate regime, promising studies of a vast range of phenomena covering many disciplines from condensed matter to quantum information and particle physics. Coupling these systems to quantized light fields opens further possibilities of observing delicate effects typical of quantum optics in the context of strongly correlated systems. Measurement backaction is one of the most funda- mental manifestations of quantum mechanics and it is at the core of many famous quantum optics experiments. Here we show that quantum backaction of weak measurement can be used for tailoring long-range correlations of ultracold fermions, realizing quantum states with spatial modulations of the density and magnetization, thus overcoming usual requirement for a strong interatomic interactions. We propose detection schemes for implementing antiferromagnetic states and density waves. We demonstrate that such long-range correlations cannot be realized with local addressing, and they are a consequence of the competition between global but spatially structured backaction of weak quantum measurement and unitary dynamics of fermions.

  9. Quantum measurement-induced antiferromagnetic order and density modulations in ultracold Fermi gases in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    Ultracold atomic systems offer a unique tool for understanding behavior of matter in the quantum degenerate regime, promising studies of a vast range of phenomena covering many disciplines from condensed matter to quantum information and particle physics. Coupling these systems to quantized light fields opens further possibilities of observing delicate effects typical of quantum optics in the context of strongly correlated systems. Measurement backaction is one of the most funda- mental manifestations of quantum mechanics and it is at the core of many famous quantum optics experiments. Here we show that quantum backaction of weak measurement can be used for tailoring long-range correlations of ultracold fermions, realizing quantum states with spatial modulations of the density and magnetization, thus overcoming usual requirement for a strong interatomic interactions. We propose detection schemes for implementing antiferromagnetic states and density waves. We demonstrate that such long-range correlations cannot be realized with local addressing, and they are a consequence of the competition between global but spatially structured backaction of weak quantum measurement and unitary dynamics of fermions. PMID:27510369

  10. Quantum measurement-induced antiferromagnetic order and density modulations in ultracold Fermi gases in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F; Mekhov, Igor B

    2016-01-01

    Ultracold atomic systems offer a unique tool for understanding behavior of matter in the quantum degenerate regime, promising studies of a vast range of phenomena covering many disciplines from condensed matter to quantum information and particle physics. Coupling these systems to quantized light fields opens further possibilities of observing delicate effects typical of quantum optics in the context of strongly correlated systems. Measurement backaction is one of the most funda- mental manifestations of quantum mechanics and it is at the core of many famous quantum optics experiments. Here we show that quantum backaction of weak measurement can be used for tailoring long-range correlations of ultracold fermions, realizing quantum states with spatial modulations of the density and magnetization, thus overcoming usual requirement for a strong interatomic interactions. We propose detection schemes for implementing antiferromagnetic states and density waves. We demonstrate that such long-range correlations cannot be realized with local addressing, and they are a consequence of the competition between global but spatially structured backaction of weak quantum measurement and unitary dynamics of fermions. PMID:27510369

  11. Quantum measurement-induced antiferromagnetic order and density modulations in ultracold Fermi gases in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F; Mekhov, Igor B

    2016-08-11

    Ultracold atomic systems offer a unique tool for understanding behavior of matter in the quantum degenerate regime, promising studies of a vast range of phenomena covering many disciplines from condensed matter to quantum information and particle physics. Coupling these systems to quantized light fields opens further possibilities of observing delicate effects typical of quantum optics in the context of strongly correlated systems. Measurement backaction is one of the most funda- mental manifestations of quantum mechanics and it is at the core of many famous quantum optics experiments. Here we show that quantum backaction of weak measurement can be used for tailoring long-range correlations of ultracold fermions, realizing quantum states with spatial modulations of the density and magnetization, thus overcoming usual requirement for a strong interatomic interactions. We propose detection schemes for implementing antiferromagnetic states and density waves. We demonstrate that such long-range correlations cannot be realized with local addressing, and they are a consequence of the competition between global but spatially structured backaction of weak quantum measurement and unitary dynamics of fermions.

  12. An efficient compact fourth order FD method for simulating 3-D mantle convection at high Rayleigh number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    , 533, 1984. Isosurfaces of the temperature field from a 3-D mantle convection simulation at Rayleigh number 10**7 during the transition from a purely conductive state to a double-layer convection state. Simulation was performed using the compact fourth order finite difference scheme at a resolution of 200-by-200-by-100 (length-by-width-by-height).

  13. 3D finite element analysis of a metallic sphere scatterer comparison of first and second order vector absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanellopoulos, V. N.; Webb, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    A 3D vector analysis of plane wave scattering by a metallic sphere using finite elements and Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) is presented. The ABCs are applied on the outer surface that truncates the infinitely extending domain. Mixed order curvilinear covariantprojection elements are used to avoid spurious corruptions. The second order ABC is superior to the first at no extra computational cost. The errors due to incomplete absorption decrease as the outer surface is moved further away from the scatterer. An error of about 1% in near-field values was obtained with the second order ABC, when the outer surface was less than half a wavelength from the scatterer. Une analyse tridimensionnelle vectorielle de la diffusion d'onde plane sur une sphère métallique utilisant des éléments finis et des Conditions aux Limites Absorbantes (CLA) est présentée. Les CLA sont appliquées sur la surface exteme tronquant le domaine s'étendant à l'infini. Des éléments curvilignes mixtes utilisant des projections covariantes sont utilisés pour éviter des solutions parasites. La CLA de second ordre est supérieure à celle de premier ordre sans effort de calcul additionnel. Les erreurs dues à l'absorption incomplète décroissent à mesure que l'on déplace la surface externe à une distance croissante du diffuseur. Un taux d'erreur d'environ 1 % dans les valeurs du champ proche a été obtenu avec les CLA de second ordre lorsque la surface externe était placée à une distance inférieure à une demi-longueur de la source de diffusion.

  14. Evidence for antiferromagnetic order in La2-xCexCuO4 from angular magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, K.; Zhang, X. H.; Bach, P.; Greene, R. L.

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the in-plane angular magnetoresistance (AMR) of T' -phase La2-xCexCuO4 thin films (x=0.06-0.15) fabricated by a pulsed laser deposition technique. The in-plane AMR with H∥ab shows a twofold symmetry instead of the fourfold behavior found in other electron-doped cuprates such as Pr2-xCexCuO4 and Nd2-xCexCuO4 . The twofold AMR disappears above a certain temperature, TD . The TD(x) is well above Tc(x) for x=0.06 (˜110K) , and decreases with increasing doping until it is no longer observed above Tc(x) at x=0.15 . This twofold AMR below TD(x) is suggested to originate from an antiferromagnetic or spin-density-wave order.

  15. Microdefects and 3 d electrons in ordered B2-FeAl alloys investigated by positron annihilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyang, Huang; Yanqiong, Lu; Yanyan, Zhu; Yuxia, Li; Wen, Deng

    2009-09-01

    Microdefects and 3d electrons in B2-FeAl alloys with different chemical composition, single crystal of Fe and cold-rolled Fe has been studied by positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy. The coincidence Doppler broadening spectrum of the single crystal of Fe shows the highest 3d electron signal in the spectra of all tested samples. The 3d electron signal in the spectrum of Fe50Al50 alloy is much lower than that of the cold-rolled Fe. This indicates that some of the 3d electrons of Fe atoms and 3p electrons of Al atoms in B2-FeAl alloy are localized to form strong covalent bonds, thus decreasing the probability of positron annihilation with 3d electrons of Fe atoms. With the increase of Al content in B2-FeAl alloys, the 3d electron signal in the spectrum of the alloy decreases, while the open volume of defect increases.

  16. Hidden landscapes in thin film topological insulators: between order and disorder, 2D and 3D, normal and topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seongshik

    Topological insulator (TI) is one of the rare systems in the history of condensed matter physics that is initiated by theories and followed by experiments. Although this theory-driven advance helped move the field quite fast despite its short history, apparently there exist significant gaps between theories and experiments. Many of these discrepancies originate from the very fact that the worlds readily accessible to theories are often far from the real worlds that are available in experiments. For example, the very paradigm of topological protection of the surface states on Z2 TIs such as Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3, etc, is in fact valid only if the sample size is infinite and the crystal momentum is well-defined in all three dimensions. On the other hand, many widely studied forms of TIs such as thin films and nano-wires have significant confinement in one or more of the dimensions with varying level of disorders. In other words, many of the real world topological systems have some important parameters that are not readily captured by theories, and thus it is often questionable how far the topological theories are valid to real systems. Interestingly, it turns out that this very uncertainty of the theories provides additional control knobs that allow us to explore hidden topological territories. In this talk, I will discuss how these additional knobs in thin film topological insulators reveal surprising, at times beautiful, landscapes at the boundaries between order and disorder, 2D and 3D, normal and topological phases. This work is supported by Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative (GBMF4418).

  17. High-pressure polymorph of LuFe2O4 with room-temperature antiferromagnetic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damay, F.; Poienar, M.; Hervieu, M.; Guesdon, A.; Bourgeois, J.; Hansen, T.; Elkaïm, E.; Haines, J.; Hermet, P.; Konczewicz, L.; Hammouda, T.; Rouquette, J.; Martin, C.

    2015-06-01

    Branded for its potential electronic ferroelectricity, charge-ordered LuF e2O4 has a layered Fe triangular framework, whose topology is a source of degeneracy, both at the charge and spin levels. Here we present an in-depth characterization of LuF e2O4-h p , the high-pressure (h p ) polymorph of LuF e2O4 , using electron, x-ray, and neutron diffraction, combined with transport and magnetization measurements. We show that LuF e2O4-h p is characterized by a misfit-related monoclinic structure, accommodating a buckled triangular [Lu] ∞ layer and two shifted adjacent rectangular [Fe] ∞ planes belonging to a distorted rock salt-type layer. The release of the geometric frustration of the Fe magnetic lattice in the h p form leads to collinear antiferromagnetic ordering at TN=380 K . Possible coexistence of charge and magnetic orders in this material opens research pathways for the design of tunable multifunctional devices using high-pressure techniques.

  18. Kinetic arrest induced antiferromagnetic order in hexagonal FeMnP{sub 0.75}Si{sub 0.25} alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guijiang Li, Wei; Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Delczeg-Czirjak, Erna K.; Kvashnin, Yaroslav O.; Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2014-12-29

    The magnetic state of the FeMnP{sub 0.75}Si{sub 0.25} alloy was investigated by first principles calculations. The coexistence of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases in FeMnP{sub 0.75}Si{sub 0.25} with the same hexagonal crystal structure was revealed. It was found that kinetic arrest during the transition from the high temperature disordered paramagnetic phase to the low temperature ordered ferromagnetic phase results in the intermediate metastable and partially disordered antiferromagnetic phase. We propose that the ratio of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases in the FeMnP{sub 0.75}Si{sub 0.25} sample can be tuned by adjusting the kinetic process of atomic diffusion. The investigations suggest that careful control of the kinetic diffusion process provides another tuning parameter to design candidate magnetocaloric materials.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of antiferromagnetic ordered states of π -d interacting systems of κ -(BETS) 2Fe X4(X =Br ,Cl )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Shuhei; Yamashita, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Fujiwara, Hideki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takahashi, Kazuko

    2016-06-01

    The results are presented for systematic heat capacity measurements of π-d interacting systems of κ -(BETS) 2Fe Br4 and κ -(BETS) 2FeC l4 [BETS = bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene] performed under in-plane magnetic fields. We observed sharp thermal anomalies at 2.47 K for κ -(BETS) 2FeB r4 and at 0.47 K for κ -(BETS) 2FeC l4 at 0 T that are associated with antiferromagnetic transitions of the 3 d electrons in the anion layers. From analyses of the magnetic heat capacity data, we indicate that the two compounds show unconventional thermodynamic behaviors inherent in the π-d interacting layered system. In the case of κ -(BETS) 2FeB r4 , a small hump structure was observed in the magnetic heat capacity below the transition temperature when a magnetic field was applied parallel to the a axis. In the case of κ -(BETS) 2FeC l4 , a similar hump structure was observed at 0 T that remained in the data with magnetic fields applied parallel to the a axis. We demonstrate that the temperature dependencies of the magnetic heat capacities scale well by normalizing the temperatures with dominant one-dimensional direct interactions (Jdd/kB) of each compound. The field dependencies of the transition temperatures and the hump structures are elucidated in one simple magnetic field vs temperature (H -T ) phase diagram. These results indicate that the thermodynamic features of both κ-type BETS salts are essentially equivalent, and the observed hump structures are derived from the one-dimensional Jdd interaction characters, which are still influential for magnetic features even in the long-range magnetic ordered states.

  20. Elastic instabilities in an antiferromagnetically ordered phase of the orbitally frustrated spinel GeCo2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tadataka; Hara, Shigeo; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Tomiyasu, Keisuke

    2011-07-01

    Ultrasound velocity measurements of the orbitally frustrated spinel GeCo2O4 reveal unique elastic anomalies within the antiferromagnetic phase. Temperature dependence of shear moduli exhibits a minimum within the antiferromagnetic phase, suggesting the coupling of shear acoustic phonons to molecular spin-orbit excitations. Magnetic-field dependence of elastic moduli exhibits diplike anomalies, being interpreted as magnetic-field-induced metamagnetic and structural transitions. These elastic anomalies suggest that the survival of geometrical frustration, and the interplay of spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom evoke a set of phenomena in the antiferromagnetic phase.

  1. Cycloid manipulation by electric field in BiFeO3 films: Coupling between polarization, octahedral rotation, and antiferromagnetic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkov, A. F.; Kulagin, N. E.; Soloviov, S. V.; Sukmanova, K. S.; Gareeva, Z. V.; Zvezdin, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    The room temperature multiferroic BiFeO3, by far the most studied experimentally, exhibits outstanding ferroelectric properties with a cycloidal magnetic order in the bulk and many unexpected advantages for possible applications in spintronics, sensor techniques, and photovoltaics. To consider ferroelectric and magnetic phase transitions in multiferroic BiFeO3 under electric field, we suggest the Ginsburg-Landau-like approach based on the symmetry and P -ω -L coupling, where the order parameters are: P is the electric polarization, ω is the axial vector of antidistorsion (describing a rotation of the oxygen octahedrons), and L is the antiferromagnetic vector. The theoretical model is consistent with experiment and ab initio calculations data. We give the complete set of numerical coefficients of the model and explore the behavior of P and ω vectors in strong electric field. The proposed approach is particularly promising for the analysis of magnetoelectric phenomena whose length scale is significantly larger than the length of the cell used in ab initio calculations. The considered cycloid problem is the clear example of such a system. Electric field-induced transformations of cycloid are exemplified on an epitaxial BiFeO3 film grown on the (001)-oriented substrate. We show that the jump of vectors P and ω in the field E =6 MV/m is accompanied by a jump of a cycloid spin rotation plane. This effect is of particular interest for spintronics and nanoelectronics.

  2. Magnetic and orbital orders coupled to negative thermal expansion in Mott insulators, Ca2Ru1--xM xO4 (M = 3d transition metal ion)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Tongfei

    Ca2RuO4 is a structurally-driven Mott insulator with a metal-insulator (MI) transition at TMI = 357K, followed by a well-separated antiferromagnetic order at T N = 110 K. Slightly substituting Ru with a 3d transition metal ion M effectively shifts TMI and induces exotic magnetic behavior below TN. Moreover, M doping for Ru produces negative thermal expansion in Ca2Ru1-- xMxO4 (M = Cr, Mn, Fe or Cu); the lattice volume expands on cooling with a total volume expansion ratio, DeltaV/V, reaching as high as 1%. The onset of the negative thermal expansion closely tracks TMI and TN, sharply contrasting classic negative thermal expansion that shows no relevance to electronic properties. In addition, the observed negative thermal expansion occurs near room temperature and extends over a wide temperature interval. These findings underscores new physics driven by a complex interplay between orbital, spin and lattice degrees of freedom. These materials constitute a new class of Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE) materials with novel electronic and magnetic functions. KEYWORDS: Transition Metal Oxide, Ruthenate, Negative Thermal Expansion, Single crystal XRD, Invar Effect, Orbital Ordering, Magnetic Ordering, Jahn-Teller Effect.

  3. Magnetic order, magnetic correlations, and spin dynamics in the pyrochlore antiferromagnet Er2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmas de Réotier, P.; Yaouanc, A.; Chapuis, Y.; Curnoe, S. H.; Grenier, B.; Ressouche, E.; Marin, C.; Lago, J.; Baines, C.; Giblin, S. R.

    2012-09-01

    Er2Ti2O7 is believed to be a realization of an XY antiferromagnet on a frustrated lattice of corner-sharing regular tetrahedra. It is presented as an example of the order-by-disorder mechanism in which fluctuations lift the degeneracy of the ground state, leading to an ordered state. Here we report detailed measurements of the low-temperature magnetic properties of Er2Ti2O7, which displays a second-order phase transition at TN≃1.2 K with coexisting short- and long-range orders. Magnetic susceptibility studies show that there is no spin-glass-like irreversible effect. Heat capacity measurements reveal that the paramagnetic critical exponent is typical of a 3-dimensional XY magnet while the low-temperature specific heat sets an upper limit on the possible spin-gap value and provides an estimate for the spin-wave velocity. Muon spin relaxation measurements show the presence of spin dynamics in the nanosecond time scale down to 21 mK. This time range is intermediate between the shorter time characterizing the spin dynamics in Tb2Sn2O7, which also displays long- and short-range magnetic order, and the time scale typical of conventional magnets. Hence the ground state is characterized by exotic spin dynamics. We determine the parameters of a symmetry-dictated Hamiltonian restricted to the spins in a tetrahedron, by fitting the paramagnetic diffuse neutron scattering intensity for two reciprocal lattice planes. These data are recorded in a temperature region where the assumption that the correlations are limited to nearest neighbors is fair.

  4. Theory of the interplay between the superconductivity and the blocked antiferromagnetic order in A(y)Fe(2-x)Se2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong-Min

    2012-09-26

    Based on an effective two-orbital tight-binding model, we examine the possible superconducting states in iron-vacancy-ordered A(y)Fe(2-x)Se(2). In the presence of ordered vacancies and blocked antiferromagnetic order, it is shown that the emergent SC pairing is the nodeless next-nearest-neighbor (NNN)-pairing due to the dominant antiferromagnetic (AFM) interaction between the inter-block NNN sites. In particular, we show that due to the ordered vacancies and the associated blocked AFM order, the interplay between the superconducting and AFM states results in three distinct states in the phase diagram as doping is varied. The divergent experimental observations can be accounted for by considering the different charge carrier concentrations in their respective compounds. PMID:22945016

  5. Application of Novel Molecular Field Theory to Helical Antiferromagnetic Ordering in EuCo2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, D. C.; Sangeetha, N. S.

    A formulation of Weiss molecular field theory (MFT) was recently advanced for antiferromagnetic (AFM) systems of identical crystallographically-equivalent local moments interacting by Heisenberg exchange that does not utilize the concept of magnetic sublattices.1 This formulation has the attractive feature that the magnetic and thermal properties in magnetic fields H --> 0 depend only on the interactions of a representative spin with its neighbors, and thus allows the properties of collinear and coplanar noncollinear AFM structures to be understood and modeled on the same footing. Neutron diffraction measurements showed that EuCo2P2 with the bct ThCr2Si2 -type structure undergoes an AFM transition to a coplanar noncollinear c-axis helical AFM structure below the ordering temperature TN = 66 . 5 K.2 Here we report the properties and apply our MFT to model the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility of single-crystal EuCo2P2 below TN. Research supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  6. Antiferromagnetic ordering with an anisotropy reversal in USn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, V.H. . E-mail: V.H.Tran@int.pan.wroc.pl; Bukowski, Z.; Stepien-Damm, J.; Troc, R.

    2006-05-15

    We report on single crystal growth, crystal structure refinements and on the measurements of low-temperature magnetic properties of a novel uranium intermetallic USn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}. Single crystals were grown by means of the antimony flux technique. The crystal structure, refined from single crystal X-ray data, appears to be similar to that of USb{sub 2}, i.e., the tetragonal, anti-Cu{sub 2}Sb type unit cell with space group P4/nmm. Magnetisation and electrical resistivity measurements revealed that this compound orders antiferromagnetically below T{sub N}=177(1)K. A large magnetocrystalline anisotropy observed in the magnetic properties of USn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5} changes dramatically with decreasing temperature, switching from an easy magnetisation c-axis to an easy ab-plane at 163K. Due to the opening a superzone gap, the electrical resistivity in-plane shows a small hump just below T{sub N} in a manner resembling the formation of spin-density wave or/and charge-density wave.

  7. Long-range antiferromagnetic order and possible field induced spin-flop transition in BiMnVO5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowki, S.; Kumar, R.; Mohapatra, N.; Mahajan, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    We report the bulk magnetic characterization of a dimeric chain material, BiMnVO5, by means of magnetic susceptibility, magnetization and heat capacity measurements. Our results provide compelling evidence of an antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition at (T N) ~ 11.5 K. Moreover, the magnetic entropy change in zero field saturates to 14.6 J mol-1 K-1 which is close to the total spin entropy of Mn2+. The development of long-range magnetic order in this chain material demonstrates the interplay of strong intra-chain and inter-chain interactions between the dimers, in addition to the intra-dimer interaction. Low-temperature (T  <  T N) heat capacity data indicate the presence of a gap (Δ/k B  ≈  5 K) in the spin excitations. Furthermore, the isothermal magnetization below T N shows an anomaly in the slope between 30 and 40 kOe which is suggestive of a spin-flop transition. Such a low-field spin-flop transition and gapped spin wave excitations may be attributed to the presence of (weak) magnetic anisotropy in this material. We attempt to construct a phase diagram in the magnetic field-temperature plane by extracting data from in-field heat capacity and isothermal magnetization measurements.

  8. Impurity induced antiferromagnetic order in Haldane gap compound SrNi2-xMgxV2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahari, B.; Ghoshray, K.; Ghoshray, A.; Samanta, T.; Das, I.

    2007-05-01

    The effect of nonmagnetic Mg doping in SrNi2V2O8, a Haldane gap system with a disordered ground state, was investigated using DC magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements in polycrystalline samples of SrNi2-xMgxV2O8 with x=0.03, 0.05, 0.07, 0.1 and 0.14. The results clearly reveal that the substitution of Ni(S=1) ion by Mg(S=0) ion induces a magnetic phase transition with the ordering temperatures lying in the range 3.4-4.3 K, for the samples with lowest and highest value of x. The intrachain exchange constant (J/kB) and the Haldane gap (Δ) for all the compounds were estimated to be ∼98±2 and 25 K, respectively, which are close to that of the undoped compound. The magnetization data further suggest that the compounds exhibit metamagnetic behavior below TN, supporting a picture of antiferromagnet with significant magnetic anisotropy and competing intrachain and interchain interactions.

  9. Lattice distortion and stripelike antiferromagnetic order in Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkota, Aashish; Tucker, Gregory S; Ramazanoglu, Mehmet; Tian, Wei; Ni, N; Cava, R J; McQueeney, Robert J; Goldman, Alan I; Kreyssig, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5 is the parent compound for a class of Fe-based high-temperature superconductors where superconductivity with transition temperatures up to 30 K can be introduced by partial element substitution. We present a combined high-resolution high-energy x-ray diffraction and elastic neutron scattering study on a Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5 single crystal. This study reveals the microscopic nature of two distinct and continuous phase transitions to be very similar to other Fe-based high-temperature superconductors: an orthorhombic distortion of the high-temperature tetragonal Fe-As lattice below TS=110(2) K followed by stripelike antiferromagnetic ordering of the Fe moments below TN=96(2) K. These findings demonstrate that major features of the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors are very robust against variations in chemical constitution as well as structural imperfection of the layers separating the Fe-As layers from each other and confirms that the Fe-As layers primarily determine the physics in this class of material.

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo analysis of a charge ordered insulating antiferromagnet: The Ti4O7 Magneli phase

    DOE PAGES

    Benali, Anouar; Shulenburger, Luke; Krogel, Jaron T.; Zhong, Xiaoling; Kent, Paul R. C.; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-06-07

    The Magneli phase Ti4O7 is an important transition metal oxide with a wide range of applications because of its interplay between charge, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom. At low temperatures, it has non-trivial magnetic states very close in energy, driven by electronic exchange and correlation interactions. We have examined three low- lying states, one ferromagnetic and two antiferromagnetic, and calculated their energies as well as Ti spin moment distributions using highly accurate Quantum Monte Carlo methods. We compare our results to those obtained from density functional theory- based methods that include approximate corrections for exchange and correlation. Our resultsmore » confirm the nature of the states and their ordering in energy, as compared with density-functional theory methods. However, the energy differences and spin distributions differ. Here, a detailed analysis suggests that non-local exchange-correlation functionals, in addition to other approximations such as LDA+U to account for correlations, are needed to simultaneously obtain better estimates for spin moments, distributions, energy differences and energy gaps.« less

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo analysis of a charge ordered insulating antiferromagnet: the Ti4O7 Magnéli phase.

    PubMed

    Benali, Anouar; Shulenburger, Luke; Krogel, Jaron T; Zhong, Xiaoliang; Kent, Paul R C; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-07-21

    The Magnéli phase Ti4O7 is an important transition metal oxide with a wide range of applications because of its interplay between charge, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom. At low temperatures, it has non-trivial magnetic states very close in energy, driven by electronic exchange and correlation interactions. We have examined three low-lying states, one ferromagnetic and two antiferromagnetic, and calculated their energies as well as Ti spin moment distributions using highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo methods. We compare our results to those obtained from density functional theory-based methods that include approximate corrections for exchange and correlation. Our results confirm the nature of the states and their ordering in energy, as compared with density-functional theory methods. However, the energy differences and spin distributions differ. A detailed analysis suggests that non-local exchange-correlation functionals, in addition to other approximations such as LDA+U to account for correlations, are needed to simultaneously obtain better estimates for spin moments, distributions, energy differences and energy gaps. PMID:27334262

  12. A theoretical study of the extinction of antiferromagnetic order by holes and dilution in LaSrCuZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricardo de Sousa, J.; Pacobahyba, J. T. M.; Singh, M.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the quasi-two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model to explain the extinction of long-range order by holes and dilution in LaSrCuZnO. An analytical expression is obtained for the Néel temperature TN(x,z) by using the Green's-function formalism with random phase approximation (RPA). The expression for the Néel temperature TN(x,z) is a function of concentration of holes x and dilution z. To treat the dilution effect in CuO 2 plane (XY), we use three different approximations for percolation. The frustration effect is induced by interplane coupling which depends linearly on the doping concentration x. We have explained qualitatively the non-monotonic and reentrant behavior of TN(x,z) which was observed experimentally by Hücker [M. Hücker, V. Kataev, J. Pommer, J. Harass, A. Hosni, C. Pflitsch, R. Gross, B. Buchner, Phys. Rev. B 59 (1999) R725].

  13. Spintronics in antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, Yeong-Ah; Kummamuru, Ravi K.

    2012-05-10

    Magnetic domains and the walls between are the subject of great interest because of the role they play in determining the electrical properties of ferromagnetic materials and as a means of manipulating electron spin in spintronic devices. However, much less attention has been paid to these effects in antiferromagnets, primarily because there is less awareness of their existence in antiferromagnets, and in addition they are hard to probe since they exhibit no net magnetic moment. In this paper, we discuss the electrical properties of chromium, which is the only elemental antiferromagnet and how they depend on the subtle arrangement of the antiferromagnetically ordered spins. X-ray measurement of the modulation wavevector Q of the incommensurate antiferromagnetic spin-density wave shows thermal hysteresis, with the corresponding wavelength being larger during cooling than during warming. The thermal hysteresis in the Q vector is accompanied with a thermal hysteresis in both the longitudinal and Hall resistivity. During cooling, we measure a larger longitudinal and Hall resistivity compared with when warming, which indicates that a larger wavelength at a given temperature corresponds to a smaller carrier density or equivalently a larger antiferromagnetic ordering parameter compared to a smaller wavelength. This shows that the arrangement of the antiferromagnetic spins directly influences the transport properties. In thin films, the sign of the thermal hysteresis for Q is the same as in thick films, but a distinct aspect is that Q is quantized.

  14. Spintronics in antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Soh, Yeong-Ah; Kummamuru, Ravi K

    2011-09-28

    Magnetic domains and the walls between are the subject of great interest because of the role they play in determining the electrical properties of ferromagnetic materials and as a means of manipulating electron spin in spintronic devices. However, much less attention has been paid to these effects in antiferromagnets, primarily because there is less awareness of their existence in antiferromagnets, and in addition they are hard to probe since they exhibit no net magnetic moment. In this paper, we discuss the electrical properties of chromium, which is the only elemental antiferromagnet and how they depend on the subtle arrangement of the antiferromagnetically ordered spins. X-ray measurement of the modulation wavevector Q of the incommensurate antiferromagnetic spin-density wave shows thermal hysteresis, with the corresponding wavelength being larger during cooling than during warming. The thermal hysteresis in the Q vector is accompanied with a thermal hysteresis in both the longitudinal and Hall resistivity. During cooling, we measure a larger longitudinal and Hall resistivity compared with when warming, which indicates that a larger wavelength at a given temperature corresponds to a smaller carrier density or equivalently a larger antiferromagnetic ordering parameter compared to a smaller wavelength. This shows that the arrangement of the antiferromagnetic spins directly influences the transport properties. In thin films, the sign of the thermal hysteresis for Q is the same as in thick films, but a distinct aspect is that Q is quantized.

  15. Magneto-elastic coupling across the first-order transition in the distorted kagome lattice antiferromagnet Dy3Ru4Al12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, M. S.; Gorbunov, D. I.; Kriegner, D.; Vališka, M.; Andreev, A. V.; Matěj, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Structural changes through the first-order paramagnetic-antiferromagnetic phase transition of Dy3Ru4Al12 at 7 K have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction and thermal expansion measurements. The compound crystallizes in a hexagonal crystal structure of Gd3Ru4Al12 type (P63/mmc space group), and no structural phase transition has been found in the temperature interval between 2.5 and 300 K. Nevertheless, due to the spin-lattice coupling the crystal volume undergoes a small orthorhombic distortion of the order of 2×10-5 as the compound enters the antiferromagnetic state. We propose that the first-order phase transition is not driven by the structural changes but rather by the exchange interactions present in the system.

  16. First-order antiferromagnetic and structural transition in Sr-rich Pr{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnik, S.; Dabrowski, B.; Chmaissem, O.; Bukowski, Z.; Mais, J.

    2001-06-01

    We present magnetization and resistivity data on polycrystalline samples of Pr{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (0.58{le}x{le}1.00). All the samples are antiferromagnetic insulators at low temperatures. For 0.78{lt}x{lt}0.90, and for x=0.58, both resistivity and magnetization show a clear hysteresis which indicates the first-order nature of the antiferromagnetic transition. Neutron diffraction data show that the paramagnetic-to-antiferromagnetic transition is accompanied by a cubic-to-tetragonal structural transition for 0.78{lt}x{lt}0.90, and tetragonal-to-orthorombic transition for x=0.58. The other samples exhibit continuous transitions to the antiferromagnetic state. Our results show that the structural transitions are the origin of the discontinuous magnetic and resistive transitions. A moderate magnetoresistance effect can be observed for a lower Sr content possibly due to ferromagnetic fluctuations. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Stabilization of Long-Range Order by Additional Anisotropic Spins in Two-Dimensional Isotropic Heisenberg Antiferromagnets —A Possible Model of an Organic Compound with Magnetic Anions—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimahara, Hiroshi; Ito, Kazuhiro

    2014-11-01

    We examine a two-dimensional (2D) coupled antiferromagnetic (AF) Heisenberg model that consists of two subsystems: an isotropic S = 1/2 spin subsystem with strong AF exchange interactions (main system), and a uniaxial S = 5/2 spin subsystem with weak exchange interactions. This model is an example in which additional semiclassical degrees of freedom affect a quantum system; it also describes a possible stabilization mechanism of AF long-range order (LRO) in the 2D organic compound λ-(BETS)2FeCl4, where BETS stands for bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene. Previous experimental studies have revealed that 3d spins on FeCl4 anions passively follow the AF LRO of the π-electron system in the BETS layers, although the AF LRO is stabilized by the 3d spins themselves. To explain this paradoxical behavior, we examine a scenario in which the uniaxial anisotropy of the 3d spins stabilizes the AF LRO on an isotropic 2D π-spin system. We extend Green's function theory, called the Tyablikov approximation, to the present system, which describes spin-wave excitations and is consistent with the Mermin-Wagner theorem. It is shown that even extremely weak interactions with the uniaxial subsystem efficiently stabilize the AF LRO in the main system, even in the absence of AF exchange interactions in the uniaxial subsystem. The AF LRO is triggered by the uniaxial subsystem, but the sublattice magnetization remains smaller than that of the main system in the high-temperature region. These results are consistent with experimental data for λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 and λ-(BETS)2GaCl4; the latter does not have the 3d spins and does not exhibit the AF LRO.

  18. Elucidating the higher-order structure of biopolymers by structural probing and mass spectrometry: MS3D

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, Daniele; Yu, Eizadora T.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical probing represents a very versatile alternative for studying the structure and dynamics of substrates that are intractable by established high-resolution techniques. The implementation of MS-based strategies for the characterization of probing products has not only extended the range of applicability to virtually all types of biopolymers, but has also paved the way for the introduction of new reagents that would not have been viable with traditional analytical platforms. As the availability of probing data is steadily increasing on the wings of the development of dedicated interpretation aids, powerful computational approaches have been explored to enable the effective utilization of such information to generate valid molecular models. This combination of factors has contributed to making the possibility of obtaining actual 3D structures by MS-based technologies (MS3D) a reality. Although approaches for achieving structure determination of unknown substrates or assessing the dynamics of known structures may share similar reagents and development trajectories, they clearly involve distinctive experimental strategies, analytical concerns, and interpretation paradigms. This Perspective offers a commentary on methods aimed at obtaining distance constraints for the modeling of full-fledged structures, while highlighting common elements, salient distinctions, and complementary capabilities exhibited by methods employed in dynamics studies. We discuss critical factors to be addressed for completing effective structural determinations and expose possible pitfalls of chemical methods. We survey programs developed for facilitating the interpretation of experimental data and discuss possible computational strategies for translating sparse spatial constraints into all-atom models. Examples are provided to illustrate how the concerted application of very diverse probing techniques can lead to the solution of actual biological substrates. PMID:20648672

  19. Local structural distortion induced by antiferromagnetic ordering in Bi2Fe4O9 studied by using a neutron total scattering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, I.-K.; Hur, N.

    2016-07-01

    To unravel the origin of the dielectric anomaly at the antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetoelectric Bi2Fe4O9, we performed neutron powder diffraction measurements at temperatures across the Néel temperature, T N. Both local structures and long-range symmetry were studied by using the complementary analyses of atomic pair distribution function (PDF) and Rietveld methods at temperatures of 300 K, 250 K, and 200 K. We found that the PDF peaks that reflected local atomic arrangements exhibited a noticeable variation at temperature below T N without long-range symmetry change. The implication of the PDF evolution is discussed in view of a local structural distortion at the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering.

  20. A Two Colorable Fourth Order Compact Difference Scheme and Parallel Iterative Solution of the 3D Convection Diffusion Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ge, Lixin; Kouatchou, Jules

    2000-01-01

    A new fourth order compact difference scheme for the three dimensional convection diffusion equation with variable coefficients is presented. The novelty of this new difference scheme is that it Only requires 15 grid points and that it can be decoupled with two colors. The entire computational grid can be updated in two parallel subsweeps with the Gauss-Seidel type iterative method. This is compared with the known 19 point fourth order compact differenCe scheme which requires four colors to decouple the computational grid. Numerical results, with multigrid methods implemented on a shared memory parallel computer, are presented to compare the 15 point and the 19 point fourth order compact schemes.

  1. Ising-like chain magnetism, Arrhenius magnetic relaxation, and case against 3D magnetic ordering in β-manganese phthalocyanine (C₃₂H₁₆MnN₈).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjun; Seehra, Mohindar S

    2016-04-01

    Previous magnetic studies in the organic semiconductor β-manganese phthalocyanine (β-MnPc) have reported it to be a canted ferromagnet below T(C)  ≈  8.6 K. However, the recent result of the lack of a λ-type anomaly in the specific heat versus temperature data near the quoted T(C) has questioned the presence of long-range 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic ordering in this system. In this paper, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature (2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities in a powder sample of β-MnPc leads us to conclude that 3D long-range magnetic ordering is absent in this material. This is supported by the Arrott plots and the lack of a peak in the ac susceptibilities, χ' and χ″, near the quoted T(C). Instead, the system can be best described as an Ising-like chain magnet with Arrhenius relaxation of the magnetization governed by an intra-layer ferromagnetic exchange constant J/k(B)  =  2.6 K and the single ion anisotropy energy parameter |D|/k(B)  =  8.3 K. The absence of 3D long range order is consistent with the measured |D|/  >  J. PMID:26954989

  2. Order parameter re-mapping algorithm for 3D phase field model of grain growth using FEM

    DOE PAGES

    Permann, Cody J.; Tonks, Michael R.; Fromm, Bradley; Gaston, Derek R.

    2016-01-14

    Phase field modeling (PFM) is a well-known technique for simulating microstructural evolution. To model grain growth using PFM, typically each grain is assigned a unique non-conserved order parameter and each order parameter field is evolved in time. Traditional approaches using a one-to-one mapping of grains to order parameters present a challenge when modeling large numbers of grains due to the computational expense of using many order parameters. This problem is exacerbated when using an implicit finite element method (FEM), as the global matrix size is proportional to the number of order parameters. While previous work has developed methods to reducemore » the number of required variables and thus computational complexity and run time, none of the existing approaches can be applied for an implicit FEM implementation of PFM. Here, we present a modular, dynamic, scalable reassignment algorithm suitable for use in such a system. Polycrystal modeling with grain growth and stress require careful tracking of each grain’s position and orientation which is lost when using a reduced order parameter set. In conclusion, the method presented in this paper maintains a unique ID for each grain even after reassignment, to allow the PFM to be tightly coupled to calculations of the stress throughout the polycrystal. Implementation details and comparative results of our approach are presented.« less

  3. A high order Discontinuous Galerkin - Fourier incompressible 3D Navier-Stokes solver with rotating sliding meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Esteban; Willden, Richard H. J.

    2012-08-01

    We present the development of a sliding mesh capability for an unsteady high order (order ⩾ 3) h/p Discontinuous Galerkin solver for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. A high order sliding mesh method is developed and implemented for flow simulation with relative rotational motion of an inner mesh with respect to an outer static mesh, through the use of curved boundary elements and mixed triangular-quadrilateral meshes. A second order stiffly stable method is used to discretise in time the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian form of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Spatial discretisation is provided by the Symmetric Interior Penalty Galerkin formulation with modal basis functions in the x-y plane, allowing hanging nodes and sliding meshes without the requirement to use mortar type techniques. Spatial discretisation in the z-direction is provided by a purely spectral method that uses Fourier series and allows computation of spanwise periodic three-dimensional flows. The developed solver is shown to provide high order solutions, second order in time convergence rates and spectral convergence when solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on meshes where fixed and rotating elements coexist. In addition, an exact implementation of the no-slip boundary condition is included for curved edges; circular arcs and NACA 4-digit airfoils, where analytic expressions for the geometry are used to compute the required metrics. The solver capabilities are tested for a number of two dimensional problems governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on static and rotating meshes: the Taylor vortex problem, a static and rotating symmetric NACA0015 airfoil and flows through three bladed cross-flow turbines. In addition, three dimensional flow solutions are demonstrated for a three bladed cross-flow turbine and a circular cylinder shadowed by a pitching NACA0012 airfoil.

  4. Aerogels with 3D ordered nanofiber skeletons of liquid-crystalline nanocellulose derivatives as tough and transparent insulators.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2014-09-22

    Aerogels of high porosity and with a large internal surface area exhibit outstanding performances as thermal, acoustic, or electrical insulators. However, most aerogels are mechanically brittle and optically opaque, and the structural and physical properties of aerogels strongly depend on their densities. The unfavorable characteristics of aerogels are intrinsic to their skeletal structures consisting of randomly interconnected spherical nanoparticles. A structurally new type of aerogel with a three-dimensionally ordered nanofiber skeleton of liquid-crystalline nanocellulose (LC-NCell) is now reported. This LC-NCell material is composed of mechanically strong, surface-carboxylated cellulose nanofibers dispersed in a nematic LC order. The LC-NCell aerogels are transparent and combine mechanical toughness and good insulation properties. These properties of the LC-NCell aerogels could also be readily controlled.

  5. Second-Order Inelastic Dynamic Analysis of 3D Semi-Rigid Steel Frames Under Earthquake Loads with Three Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ozakgul, Kadir

    2008-07-08

    In this study, it has been presented an algorithm for second-order elastoplastic dynamic time-history analysis of three dimensional frames that have steel members with semirigid joints. The proposed analysis accounts for material, geometric and connection nonlinearities. Material nonlinearity have been modeled by the Ramberg-Osgood relation. While the geometric nonlinearity caused by axial force has been described by the use of the geometric stiffness matrix, the nonlinearity caused by the interaction between the axial force and bending moment has been also described by the use of the stability functions. The independent hardening model has been used to describe the nonlinear behaviour of semi-rigid connections. Dynamic equation of motion has been solved by Newmark's constant acceleration method in time history domain.

  6. Determination of the optimal first-order gradient moment for flow-sensitive dephasing magnetization-prepared 3D noncontrast MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Bi, Xiaoming; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Carr, James C; Li, Debiao

    2011-04-01

    Flow-sensitive dephasing (FSD) magnetization preparation has been developed for black-blood vessel wall MRI and noncontrast MR angiography. The first-order gradient moment, m(1) , is a measure of the flow-sensitization imparted by an FSD preparative module. Determination of the optimal m(1) for each individual is highly desirable for FSD-prepared MR angiography. This work developed a 2D m(1)-scouting method that evaluates a range of m(1) values for their effectiveness in blood signal suppression in a single scan. The feasibility of using the 2D method to predict blood signal suppression in 3D FSD-prepared imaging was validated on a flow phantom and the popliteal arteries of 5 healthy volunteers. Excellent correlation of the blood signal measurements between the 2D scouting and 3D FSD imaging was obtained. Therefore, the optimal m(1) determined from the 2D m(1)-scouting scan may be directly translated to 3D FSD-prepared imaging. In vivo studies of additional 10 healthy volunteers and 2 patients have demonstrated the proposed method can help significantly improve the signal performance of FSD MR angiography, indicating its potential to enhance diagnostic confidence. Further systematic studies in patients are warranted to evaluate its clinical value.

  7. Antiferromagnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Barker, Joseph

    Skyrmions are topologically protected entities in magnetic materials which have the potential to be used in spintronics for information storage and processing. However, skyrmions in ferromagnets have some intrinsic difficulties which must be overcome to use them for spintronic applications, such as the inability to move straight along current. We show that skyrmions can also be stabilized and manipulated in antiferromagnetic materials. An antiferromagnetic skyrmion is a compound topological object with a similar but of opposite sign spin texture on each sublattice, which e.g. results in a complete cancelation of the Magnus force. We find that the composite nature of antiferromagnetic skyrmions gives rise to different dynamical behavior, both due to an applied current and temperature effects. O.A.T. and J.B. acknowledge support by the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Nos. 25800184, 25247056, 25220910 and 15H01009) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and SpinNet.

  8. Highly-Ordered 3D Vertical Resistive Switching Memory Arrays with Ultralow Power Consumption and Ultrahigh Density.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Ahmed; Wang, Chengliang; Qi, Haoyuan; Grote, Fabian; Wen, Liaoyong; Bernhard, Jörg; Vellacheri, Ranjith; Tarish, Samar; Nabi, Ghulam; Kaiser, Ute; Lei, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Resistive switching random access memories (RRAM) have attracted great scientific and industrial attention for next generation data storage because of their advantages of nonvolatile properties, high density, low power consumption, fast writing/erasing speed, good endurance, and simple and small operation system. Here, by using a template-assisted technique, we demonstrate a three-dimensional highly ordered vertical RRAM device array with density as high as that of the nanopores of the template (10(8)-10(9) cm(-2)), which can also be fabricated in large area. The high crystallinity of the materials, the large contact area and the intimate semiconductor/electrode interface (3 nm interfacial layer) make the ultralow voltage operation (millivolt magnitude) and ultralow power consumption (picowatt) possible. Our procedure for fabrication of the nanodevice arrays in large area can be used for producing many other different materials and such three-dimensional electronic device arrays with the capability to adjust the device densities can be extended to other applications of the next generation nanodevice technology. PMID:27525738

  9. Field-induced transition of the magnetic ground state from A-type antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic order in CsCo2Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rohr, Fabian; Krzton-Maziopa, Anna; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Grundmann, Henrik; Guguchia, Zurab; Schnick, Wolfgang; Schilling, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of CsCo2Se2 with ThCr2Si2 structure, which we have characterized through a series of magnetization and neutron diffraction measurements. We find that CsCo2Se2 undergoes a phase transition to an antiferromagnetically ordered state with a Néel temperature of {{T}\\text{N}}≈ 66 K. The nearest neighbour interactions are ferromagnetic as observed by the positive Curie-Weiss temperature of \\Theta≈ 51.0 K. We find that the magnetic structure of CsCo2Se2 consists of ferromagnetic sheets, which are stacked antiferromagnetically along the tetragonal c-axis, generally referred to as A-type antiferromagnetic order. The observed magnitude of the ordered magnetic moment at T  =  1.5 K is found to be only 0.20(1){μ\\text{Bohr}}  / Co. Already in comparably small magnetic fields of {μ0}H{{}\\text{MM}}(5~K)≈ 0.3 T, we observe a metamagnetic transition that can be attributed to spin-rearrangements of CsCo2Se2, with the moments fully ferromagnetically saturated in a magnetic field of {μ0}{{H}\\text{FM}}(5~K)≈ 6.4 T. We discuss the entire experimentally deduced magnetic phase diagram for CsCo2Se2 with respect to its unconventionally weak magnetic coupling. Our study characterizes CsCo2Se2, which is chemically and electronically posed closely to the A x Fe2-y Se2 superconductors, as a host of versatile magnetic interactions.

  10. Questioning Antiferromagnetic Ordering in the Expanded Metal, Li(NH3)4: A Lack of Evidence from μSR.

    PubMed

    Seel, Andrew G; Baker, Peter J; Cottrell, Stephen P; Howard, Christopher A; Skipper, Neal T; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of a muon spin relaxation study of the solid phases of the expanded metal, Li(NH3)4. No discernible change in muon depolarization dynamics is witnessed in the lowest temperature phase (≤25 K) of Li(NH3)4, thus suggesting that the prevailing view of antiferromagnetic ordering is incorrect. This is consistent with the most recent neutron diffraction data. Discernible differences in muon behavior are reported for the highest temperature phase of Li(NH3)4 (82-89 K), attributed to the onset of structural dynamics prior to melting. PMID:26722900

  11. Spin frustration and magnetic ordering in triangular lattice antiferromagnet Ca3CoNb2O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jia; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Peng-Shuai; Pang, Fei; Munsie, Tim J.; Luke, Graeme M.; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yu, Wei-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    We synthesized a quasi-two-dimensional distorted triangular lattice antiferromagnet Ca3CoNb2O9, in which the effective spin of Co2+ is 1/2 at low temperatures, whose magnetic properties were studied by dc susceptibility and magnetization techniques. The x-ray diffraction confirms the quality of our powder samples. The large Weiss constant θCW˜ -55 K and the low Neel temperature TN˜ 1.45 K give a frustration factor f = | θCW/TN | ≈ 38, suggesting that Ca3CoNb2O9 resides in strong frustration regime. Slightly below TN, deviation between the susceptibility data under zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) is observed. A new magnetic state with 1/3 of the saturate magnetization Ms is suggested in the magnetization curve at 0.46 K. Our study indicates that Ca3CoNb2O9 is an interesting material to investigate magnetism in triangular lattice antiferromagnets with weak anisotropy. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374364 and 11222433), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00112). Research at McMaster University supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. Work at North China Electric Power University supported by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  12. Electrical switching of an antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Wadley, P; Howells, B; Železný, J; Andrews, C; Hills, V; Campion, R P; Novák, V; Olejník, K; Maccherozzi, F; Dhesi, S S; Martin, S Y; Wagner, T; Wunderlich, J; Freimuth, F; Mokrousov, Y; Kuneš, J; Chauhan, J S; Grzybowski, M J; Rushforth, A W; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Jungwirth, T

    2016-02-01

    Antiferromagnets are hard to control by external magnetic fields because of the alternating directions of magnetic moments on individual atoms and the resulting zero net magnetization. However, relativistic quantum mechanics allows for generating current-induced internal fields whose sign alternates with the periodicity of the antiferromagnetic lattice. Using these fields, which couple strongly to the antiferromagnetic order, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical switching between stable configurations in antiferromagnetic CuMnAs thin-film devices by applied current with magnitudes of order 10(6) ampere per square centimeter. Electrical writing is combined in our solid-state memory with electrical readout and the stored magnetic state is insensitive to and produces no external magnetic field perturbations, which illustrates the unique merits of antiferromagnets for spintronics. PMID:26841431

  13. Electrical switching of an antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Wadley, P; Howells, B; Železný, J; Andrews, C; Hills, V; Campion, R P; Novák, V; Olejník, K; Maccherozzi, F; Dhesi, S S; Martin, S Y; Wagner, T; Wunderlich, J; Freimuth, F; Mokrousov, Y; Kuneš, J; Chauhan, J S; Grzybowski, M J; Rushforth, A W; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Jungwirth, T

    2016-02-01

    Antiferromagnets are hard to control by external magnetic fields because of the alternating directions of magnetic moments on individual atoms and the resulting zero net magnetization. However, relativistic quantum mechanics allows for generating current-induced internal fields whose sign alternates with the periodicity of the antiferromagnetic lattice. Using these fields, which couple strongly to the antiferromagnetic order, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical switching between stable configurations in antiferromagnetic CuMnAs thin-film devices by applied current with magnitudes of order 10(6) ampere per square centimeter. Electrical writing is combined in our solid-state memory with electrical readout and the stored magnetic state is insensitive to and produces no external magnetic field perturbations, which illustrates the unique merits of antiferromagnets for spintronics.

  14. Electrical switching of an antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadley, P.; Howells, B.; Železný, J.; Andrews, C.; Hills, V.; Campion, R. P.; Novák, V.; Olejník, K.; Maccherozzi, F.; Dhesi, S. S.; Martin, S. Y.; Wagner, T.; Wunderlich, J.; Freimuth, F.; Mokrousov, Y.; Kuneš, J.; Chauhan, J. S.; Grzybowski, M. J.; Rushforth, A. W.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-02-01

    Antiferromagnets are hard to control by external magnetic fields because of the alternating directions of magnetic moments on individual atoms and the resulting zero net magnetization. However, relativistic quantum mechanics allows for generating current-induced internal fields whose sign alternates with the periodicity of the antiferromagnetic lattice. Using these fields, which couple strongly to the antiferromagnetic order, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical switching between stable configurations in antiferromagnetic CuMnAs thin-film devices by applied current with magnitudes of order 106 ampere per square centimeter. Electrical writing is combined in our solid-state memory with electrical readout and the stored magnetic state is insensitive to and produces no external magnetic field perturbations, which illustrates the unique merits of antiferromagnets for spintronics.

  15. Electronic, magnetic, and optical characteristics of half-semiconductor double perovskite oxide Sr2CrOsO6 governed by 3d (t2g3)-5d (t2g3) antiferromagnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.-E., M. Musa Saad

    2016-07-01

    In this study, motivated by observations of the remarkable magnetic insulating nature and high Curie temperature (TC=725 K) of double perovskite oxide Sr2CrOsO6, the electronic, magnetic, and optical characteristics of Sr2CrOsO6 were determined using the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital method according to density functional theory. The spin-orbit coupling contribution was included in the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). In addition, the Coulomb repulsion (U) and Hund's exchange (J) energies were considered in both methods (LSDA+U and GGA+U). Full structural optimization confirmed that the ground state of Sr2CrOsO6 is face-centered cubic (Fm-3m symmetry). Calculations predicted that Sr2CrOsO6 is ferrimagnetic half-semiconductive (HSC) due to the vertical hopping of t2g electrons via antiferromagnetic coupling [Cr3+ (t2g3↑)-O (2pπ)-Os5+ (t2g3↓)], which agreed with the experimental results. The HSC energy-gaps originate from the splitting of three partially occupied Os5+ (5d) bands into two fully filled bands and one empty spin-down band. The real ε1 (ω) and imaginary ε2 (ω) parts of the dielectric function ε (ω) and energy-loss spectrum L (ω) were calculated, analyzed, and compared with the electronic results.

  16. Crystalline Electric Field as a Probe for Long-Range Antiferromagnetic Order and Superconducting State of CeFeAsO1-xFx

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Songxue; Adroja, D. T.; GUIDI, T.; Bewley, Robert I.; Li, Shiliang; Zhao, Jun; Lynn, J. W.; Brown, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Chen, G. F,; Luo, J. L.; Wang, N. L.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2008-01-01

    We use inelastic neutron scattering to study the crystalline electric field (CEF) excitations of Ce{sup 3+} in CeFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} (x=0, 0.16). For nonsuperconducting CeFeAsO, the Ce CEF levels have three magnetic doublets in the paramagnetic state, but these doublets split into six singlets when the Fe ions order antiferromagnetically. For superconducting CeFeAsO{sub 0.84}F{sub 0.16} (T{sub c} = 41 K), where the static antiferromagnetic order is suppressed, the Ce CEF levels have three magnetic doublets at {h_bar}{sub {omega}} = 0, 18.7, 58.4 meV at all temperatures. Careful measurements of the intrinsic linewidth {Lambda} and the peak position of the 18.7 meV mode reveal a clear anomaly at T{sub c}, consistent with a strong enhancement of local magnetic susceptibility {chi}{double_prime}({h_bar}{sub {omega}}) below T{sub c}. These results suggest that CEF excitations in the rare-earth oxypnictides can be used as a probe of spin dynamics in the nearby FeAs planes.

  17. Bicollinear Antiferromagnetic Order, Monoclinic Distortion, and Reversed Resistivity Anisotropy in FeTe as a Result of Spin-Lattice Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Christopher B.; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio

    2016-09-01

    The bicollinear antiferromagnetic order experimentally observed in FeTe is shown to be stabilized by the coupling g˜ 12 between monoclinic lattice distortions and the spin-nematic order parameter with B2 g symmetry, within a three-orbital spin-fermion model studied with Monte Carlo techniques. A finite but small value of g˜12 is required, with a concomitant lattice distortion compatible with experiments, and a tetragonal-monoclinic transition strongly first order. Remarkably, the bicollinear state found here displays a planar resistivity with the "reversed" puzzling anisotropy discovered in transport experiments. Orthorhombic distortions are also incorporated, and phase diagrams interpolating between pnictides and chalcogenides are presented. We conclude that the spin-lattice coupling we introduce is sufficient to explain the challenging properties of FeTe.

  18. Bicollinear Antiferromagnetic Order, Monoclinic Distortion, and Reversed Resistivity Anisotropy in FeTe as a Result of Spin-Lattice Coupling.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christopher B; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio

    2016-09-01

    The bicollinear antiferromagnetic order experimentally observed in FeTe is shown to be stabilized by the coupling g[over ˜]_{12} between monoclinic lattice distortions and the spin-nematic order parameter with B_{2g} symmetry, within a three-orbital spin-fermion model studied with Monte Carlo techniques. A finite but small value of g[over ˜]_{12} is required, with a concomitant lattice distortion compatible with experiments, and a tetragonal-monoclinic transition strongly first order. Remarkably, the bicollinear state found here displays a planar resistivity with the "reversed" puzzling anisotropy discovered in transport experiments. Orthorhombic distortions are also incorporated, and phase diagrams interpolating between pnictides and chalcogenides are presented. We conclude that the spin-lattice coupling we introduce is sufficient to explain the challenging properties of FeTe. PMID:27661717

  19. The f-spin physics of rare-earth iron pnictides: influence of d-electron antiferromagnetic order on heavy fermion phase diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jian-xin; Dai, Jianhui; Si, Qimiao

    2009-01-01

    Some of the high {Tc} iron pnictides contain rare-earth elements, raising the question of how the existence and tunability of a d-electron antiferromagnetic order influences the heavy fermion behavior of the f-moments. With CeOFeP and CeOFeAs in mind as prototypes, we derive an extended Anderson lattice model appropriate for these quaternary systems. We show that the Kondo screening of the f-moments are efficiently suppressed by the d-electron ordering. We also argue that, inside the d-electron ordered state (as in CeOFeAs), the f-moments provide a rare realization of a quantum frustrated magnet with competing J{sub 1}-J{sub 2}-J{sub 3} interactions in an effective square lattice. Implications ofr the heavy fermion physics in broader contexts are also discussed.

  20. Bicollinear antiferromagnetic order, monoclinic distortion, and reversed resistivity anisotropy in FeTe as a result of spin-lattice coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Bishop, Christopher B.; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio

    2016-09-08

    The bicollinear antiferromagnetic order experimentally observed in FeTe is shown to be stabilized by the coupling g~12 between monoclinic lattice distortions and the spin-nematic order parameter with B2g symmetry, within a three-orbital spin-fermion model studied with Monte Carlo techniques. A finite but small value of g~12 is required, with a concomitant lattice distortion compatible with experiments, and a tetragonal-monoclinic transition strongly first order. Remarkably, the bicollinear state found here displays a planar resistivity with the reversed puzzling anisotropy discovered in transport experiments. Orthorhombic distortions are also incorporated, and phase diagrams interpolating between pnictides and chalcogenides are presented. Here, we concludemore » that the spin-lattice coupling we introduce is sufficient to explain the challenging properties of FeTe.« less

  1. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  2. Antiferromagnetic and xy ferro-orbital order in insulating SrRuO3 thin films with SrO termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autieri, C.

    2016-10-01

    By means of first-principles calculations we study the structural, magnetic and electronic properties of SrRuO3 surface for the SrO termination. We find that the RuO6 octahedra and the structure of the SrO layers at the surface are strongly modified as well as the Ru-O-Ru bond angles. We find in the thin films a d xy ferro-orbital order. The d xy orbital becomes the lowest in energy as in other quasitwodimensional ruthenates. Such structural rearrangement, together with a band reduction, leads to a modification of the magnetic properties. We compare the Jahn-Teller effect between the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. We show that an insulating G-type antiferromagnetic phase takes place in SrRuO3 thin films, substituting the metallic phase experimentally found in every bulk Sr-ruthenates. The single layer SrRuO3 presents many similarities with the Ca2RuO4 low temperature phase, these similarities disappear with a larger number of layers. A study of the ground state of the as function of the number of layers is presented, the competition between bandwidth and Coulomb repulsion determines the ground state. We propose the disorder as responsible for the exchange bias effect observed.

  3. Antiferromagnetic and xy ferro-orbital order in insulating SrRuO3 thin films with SrO termination.

    PubMed

    Autieri, C

    2016-10-26

    By means of first-principles calculations we study the structural, magnetic and electronic properties of SrRuO3 surface for the SrO termination. We find that the RuO6 octahedra and the structure of the SrO layers at the surface are strongly modified as well as the Ru-O-Ru bond angles. We find in the thin films a d xy ferro-orbital order. The d xy orbital becomes the lowest in energy as in other quasitwodimensional ruthenates. Such structural rearrangement, together with a band reduction, leads to a modification of the magnetic properties. We compare the Jahn-Teller effect between the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. We show that an insulating G-type antiferromagnetic phase takes place in SrRuO3 thin films, substituting the metallic phase experimentally found in every bulk Sr-ruthenates. The single layer SrRuO3 presents many similarities with the Ca2RuO4 low temperature phase, these similarities disappear with a larger number of layers. A study of the ground state of the as function of the number of layers is presented, the competition between bandwidth and Coulomb repulsion determines the ground state. We propose the disorder as responsible for the exchange bias effect observed. PMID:27588503

  4. Antiferromagnetism in chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    I present two experimental studies of the spin density wave antiferromagnetic order in elemental Chromium. The first addresses the response of the magnetic ground state to applied pressure. The spin and charge order parameters are probed at high pressure and low temperature in a diamond anvil cell using monochromatic X-ray diffraction. We find that the magnetism is suppressed exponentially with pressure, providing a canonical example of a weak-coupling, mean-field ground state, before terminating at a quantum phase transition. We confirm the harmonic relationship between the spin and charge degrees of freedom in the low temperature regime, and we identify the microscopic coupling between pressure and magnetism. The discovery of the long-sought-after quantum critical regime sets the stage for a complete study of antiferromagnetic quantum criticality in this clean model system. The second study addresses the thermodynamics and transport properties of antiferromagnetic domain structure. We find a robust thermal hysteresis in the longitudinal and Hall resistivities of sub-mm bulk Cr samples. The temperature limits of the hysteresis are correlated with domain wall fluctuations and freezing. The persistent sign of the hysteresis and the macroscopic return point memory warrant a new understanding of domain wall energetics. By combining electrical transport and X-ray microdiffraction measurements we are able to pinpoint the effects of antiferromagnetic domain walls on electron transport.

  5. Coexistence of Haldane-gap excitations and long-range antiferromagnetic order in mixed-spin nickelates R{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S.; Zheludev, A.

    1998-01-01

    The spin dynamics of the S=1 Ni chains in mixed-spin antiferromagnets Pr{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} and Nd{sub x}Y{sub 2{minus}x}BaNiO{sub 5} is described in terms of a simple Ginzburg-Landau Lagrangian coupled to the sublattice of rare-earth ions. Within this framework we obtain a theoretical explanation for the experimentally observed coexistence of Haldane-gap excitations and long-range magnetic order, as well as for the increase of the Haldane-gap energy below the N{acute e}el point. We also predict that the degeneracy of the Haldane triplet is lifted in the magnetically ordered phase. The growth of both gaps are shown to follow from the magnon repulsion. The theoretical results are consistent with the available experimental data. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. MIMO radar 3D imaging based on combined amplitude and total variation cost function with sequential order one negative exponential form.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changzheng; Yeo, Tat Soon; Zhao, Yongbo; Feng, Junjie

    2014-05-01

    In inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, a target is usually regarded as consist of a few strong (specular) scatterers and the distribution of these strong scatterers is sparse in the imaging volume. In this paper, we propose to incorporate the sparse signal recovery method in 3D multiple-input multiple-output radar imaging algorithm. Sequential order one negative exponential (SOONE) function, which forms homotopy between 1 and 0 norms, is proposed to measure the sparsity. Gradient projection is used to solve a constrained nonconvex SOONE function minimization problem and recover the sparse signal. However, while the gradient projection method is computationally simple, it is not robust when a matrix in the algorithm is ill conditioned. We thus further propose using diagonal loading and singular value decomposition methods to improve the robustness of the algorithm. In order to handle targets with large flat surfaces, a combined amplitude and total-variation objective function is also proposed to regularize the shapes of the flat surfaces. Simulation results show that the proposed gradient projection of SOONE function method is better than orthogonal matching pursuit, CoSaMp, l1-magic, Bayesian method with Laplace prior, smoothed l0 method, and l1-ls in high SNR cases for recovery of ± 1 random spikes sparse signal. The quality of the simulated 3D images and real data ISAR images obtained using the new method is better than that of the conventional correlation method and minimum l2 norm method, and competitive to the aforementioned sparse signal recovery algorithms.

  7. Antiferromagnetic order competing with topological state in Ce{sub x}Bi{sub 2−x}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. S.; Kim, J.; Jung, M. H.; Lee, K.; Jelen, A.; Vrtnik, S.; Jagličić, Z.; Dolinšek, J.

    2015-11-02

    The topological surface states in three-dimensional topological insulators are easily tuned by chemical doping, especially by magnetic impurities. We prepared single crystals of Ce{sub x}Bi{sub 2−x}Te{sub 3} with various x (=0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12). The obtained crystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The magnetic susceptibility data revealed that the Ce atoms are well substituted for Bi into Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. From the Curie-Weiss fits, we observed that the effective magnetic moments μ{sub eff} are close to 2.54 μ{sub B} for free Ce ion, and the paramagnetic Curie-Weiss temperatures θ{sub p} are negatively increased from 2.87 K to −59.3 K with increasing x. The magnetization data clearly showed antiferromagnetic orders around T{sub N} = 4.1 K for x ≥ 0.08, where θ{sub p} suddenly increases, and the electrical resistivity is simply metallic and the magnetoresistance is parabolic. Only for x = 0.06, exotic physical properties arising from the topological states were observed such as non-metallic behavior in the electrical resistivity and linear dependence of the magnetoresistance. Moreover, the carrier concentration of x = 0.06 is one order lower than that of x ≥ 0.08. These observations propose that the antiferromagnetic order is strongly competing with the topological state in Ce{sub x}Bi{sub 2−x}Te{sub 3}.

  8. Impurity-induced antiferromagnetic order in Pauli-limited nodal superconductors: Application to heavy-fermion CeCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiny, Johannes H. J.; Gastiasoro, Maria N.; Vekhter, I.; Andersen, Brian M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the properties of the coexistence phase of itinerant antiferromagnetism and nodal d -wave superconductivity (Q phase) discovered in heavy-fermion CeCoIn5 under applied magnetic field. We solve the minimal model that includes d -wave superconductivity and underlying magnetic correlations in real space to elucidate the structure of the Q phase in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field. We further focus on the role of magnetic impurities, and show that they nucleate the Q phase at lower magnetic fields. Our most crucial finding is that, even at zero applied field, dilute magnetic impurities cooperate via RKKY-like exchange interactions to generate a long-range ordered coexistence state identical to the Q phase. This result is in agreement with recent neutron scattering measurements [S. Raymond et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 83, 013707 (2014), 10.7566/JPSJ.83.013707].

  9. Antiferromagnetic ordering in spin-chain multiferroic Gd{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} studied by electronic spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y. M.; Ruan, M. Y.; Cheng, J. J.; Sun, Y. C.; Ouyang, Z. W. Xia, Z. C.; Rao, G. H.

    2015-06-14

    High-field electron spin resonance (ESR) has been employed to study the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering state (T < T{sub N} = 55 K) of spin-chain multiferroic Gd{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5}. The spin reorientation at T{sub SR} = 24 K is well characterized by the temperature-dependent ESR spectra. The magnetization data evidence a field-induced spin-flop transition at 2 K. The frequency-field relationship of the ESR data can be explained by conventional AFM resonance theory with uniaxial anisotropy, in good agreement with magnetization data. Related discussion on zero-field spin gap is presented.

  10. Melt-rock reaction in the asthenospheric mantle: Perspectives from high-order accurate numerical simulations in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirupathi, S.; Schiemenz, A. R.; Liang, Y.; Parmentier, E.; Hesthaven, J.

    2013-12-01

    The style and mode of melt migration in the mantle are important to the interpretation of basalts erupted on the surface. Both grain-scale diffuse porous flow and channelized melt migration have been proposed. To better understand the mechanisms and consequences of melt migration in a heterogeneous mantle, we have undertaken a numerical study of reactive dissolution in an upwelling and viscously deformable mantle where solubility of pyroxene increases upwards. Our setup is similar to that described in [1], except we use a larger domain size in 2D and 3D and a new numerical method. To enable efficient simulations in 3D through parallel computing, we developed a high-order accurate numerical method for the magma dynamics problem using discontinuous Galerkin methods and constructed the problem using the numerical library deal.II [2]. Linear stability analyses of the reactive dissolution problem reveal three dynamically distinct regimes [3] and the simulations reported in this study were run in the stable regime and the unstable wave regime where small perturbations in porosity grows periodically. The wave regime is more relevant to melt migration beneath the mid-ocean ridges but computationally more challenging. Extending the 2D simulations in the stable regime in [1] to 3D using various combinations of sustained perturbations in porosity at the base of the upwelling column (which may result from a viened mantle), we show the geometry and distribution of dunite channel and high-porosity melt channels are highly correlated with inflow perturbation through superposition. Strong nonlinear interactions among compaction, dissolution, and upwelling give rise to porosity waves and high-porosity melt channels in the wave regime. These compaction-dissolution waves have well organized but time-dependent structures in the lower part of the simulation domain. High-porosity melt channels nucleate along nodal lines of the porosity waves, growing downwards. The wavelength scales

  11. Beyond Textbook Illustrations: Hand-Held Models of Ordered DNA and Protein Structures as 3D Supplements to Enhance Student Learning of Helical Biopolymers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2010-01-01

    Textbook illustrations of 3D biopolymers on printed paper, regardless of how detailed and colorful, suffer from its two-dimensionality. For beginners, computer screen display of skeletal models of biopolymers and their animation usually does not provide the at-a-glance 3D perception and details, which can be done by good hand-held models. Here, we…

  12. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  13. Studies of the magnetic structure at the ferromagnet - antiferromagnet interface

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, A.; Nolting, F.; Stohr, J.; Luning, J.; Seo, J.W.; Locquet, J.-P.; Anders, S.; Ohldag, H.; Padmore, H.A.

    2001-01-02

    Antiferromagnetic layers are a scientifically challenging component in magneto-electronic devices such as magnetic sensors in hard disk heads, or magnetic RAM elements. In this paper we show that photo-electron emission microscopy (PEEM) is capable of determining the magnetic structure at the interface of ferromagnets and antiferromagnets with high spatial resolution (down to 20 nm). Dichroism effects at the L edges of the magnetic 3d transition metals, using circularly or linearly polarized soft x-rays from a synchrotron source, give rise to a magnetic image contrast. Images, acquired with the PEEM2 experiment at the Advanced Light Source, show magnetic contrast for antiferromagnetic LaFeO{sub 3}, microscopically resolving the magnetic domain structure in an antiferromagnetically ordered thin film for the first time. Magnetic coupling between LaFeO{sub 3} and an adjacent Co layer results in a complete correlation of their magnetic domain structures. From field dependent measurements a unidirectional anisotropy resulting in a local exchange bias of up to 30 Oe in single domains could be deduced. The elemental specificity and the quantitative magnetic sensitivity render PEEM a perfect tool to study magnetic coupling effects in multi-layered thin film samples.

  14. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  15. Smoothing of geoelectrical resistivity profiles in order to build a 3D model: A case study from an outcropping limestone block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Krisztina; Kovács, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    Geoelectrical imaging is one of the most common survey methods in the field of shallow geophysics. In order to get information from the subsurface electric current is induced into the ground. In our summer camp organized by the Department of Geophysics and Space Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University we have carried out resistivity surveys to get more accurate information about the lithology of the Dorog basin located in the Transdanubian range, Middle Hungary. This study focused on the outcropping limestone block located next to the village Leányvár in the Dorog basin. The main aim of the research is the impoundment of the subsurface continuation of the limestone outcrop. Cable problems occurred during field survey therefore the dataset obtained by the measurement have become very noisy thus we had to gain smoothed data with the appropriate editing steps. The goal was to produce an optimized model to demonstrate the reality beneath the subsurface. In order to achieve better results from the noisy dataset we changed some parameters based on the description of the program. Whereas cable problems occurred we exterminated the bad datum points visually and statistically as well. Because of the noisiness we increased the value of the so called damping factor which is a variable parameter in the equation used by the inversion routine responsible for smoothing the data. The limitation of the range of model resistivity values based on our knowledge about geological environment was also necessary in order to avoid physically unrealistic results. The purpose of the modification was to obtain smoothed and more interpretable geoelectric profiles. The geological background combined with the explanation of the profiles gave us the approximate location of the block. In the final step of the research we created a 3D model with proper location and smoothed resistivity data included. This study was supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA NK83400) and was realized

  16. Low Energy Dynamics in Spin-Liquid and Ordered Phases of S=1/2 Antiferromagnet Cs2CuCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. I.; Povarov, K. Yu; Starykh, O. A.; Shapiro, A. Ya; Petrov, S. V.

    2012-12-01

    Cs2CuCl4 realizes spin-1/2 quantum antiferromagnet on a distorted triangular lattice. It remains in a quantum spin-liquid state far below Curie-Weiss temperature 4 K and exhibits an incommensurate spin ordering at TN=0.6 K. We studied Cs2CuCl4 by means of electron spin resonance (ESR) at temperatures down to 0.05 K in the frequency range 960 GHz, we observe that the above spinon-type ESR survives deep in the ordered phase. These novel phenomena are consequences of fractionalized spinon excitations of spin chains, which are effectively decoupled in Cs2CuCl4 due to strong geometric frustration.

  17. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  18. Effect of L1{sub 2} ordering in antiferromagnetic Ir-Mn epitaxial layer on exchange bias of FePd films

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. C.; Duh, J. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Hsiao, S. N. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Liu, S. H.; Su, S. H.; Chiu, K. F.; Hsieh, W. C.; Chen, S. K.; Lin, Y. G. E-mail: lin.yg@nsrrc.org.tw; Lee, H. Y.; Sung, C. K.

    2015-05-07

    Two series of samples of single-layer IrMn and IrMn/FePd bilayer films, deposited on a single-crystal MgO substrate at different IrMn deposition temperatures (T{sub s} = 300–700 °C), were investigated using magnetron sputtering. L1{sub 2} ordering was revealed for the 30 nm-thick IrMn epitaxial (001) films with T{sub s} ≥ 400 °C, determined by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffractometry (XRD). XRD results also provide evidence of the epitaxial growth of the IrMn films on MgO substrate. Increasing T{sub s} from 400 to 700 °C monotonically increases the ordering parameter of L1{sub 2} phases from 0.17 to 0.81. An in-plane exchange bias field (H{sub eb}) of 22 Oe is obtained in a 10 nm-thick FePd film that is deposited on the disordered IrMn films. As the L1{sub 2} ordering of the IrMn layers increases, the H{sub eb} gradually decreases to 0 Oe, meaning that the exchange bias behavior vanishes. The increased surface roughness, revealed by atomic force microscopy, of the epitaxial IrMn layers with increasing T{sub s} cannot be the main cause of the decrease in H{sub eb} due to the compensated surface spins regardless of the disordered and ordered (001) IrMn layers. The change of antiferromagnetic structure from the A1 to the L1{sub 2} phase was correlated with the evolution of H{sub eb}.

  19. Paramagnetic molecule induced strong antiferromagnetic exchange coupling on a magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics device.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pawan; Baker, Collin; D'Angelo, Christopher

    2015-07-31

    This paper reports our Monte Carlo (MC) studies aiming to explain the experimentally observed paramagnetic molecule induced antiferromagnetic coupling between ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes. Recently developed magnetic tunnel junction based molecular spintronics devices (MTJMSDs) were prepared by chemically bonding the paramagnetic molecules between the FM electrodes along the tunnel junction's perimeter. These MTJMSDs exhibited molecule-induced strong antiferromagnetic coupling. We simulated the 3D atomic model analogous to the MTJMSD and studied the effect of molecule's magnetic couplings with the two FM electrodes. Simulations show that when a molecule established ferromagnetic coupling with one electrode and antiferromagnetic coupling with the other electrode, then theoretical results effectively explained the experimental findings. Our studies suggest that in order to align MTJMSDs' electrodes antiparallel to each other, the exchange coupling strength between a molecule and FM electrodes should be ∼50% of the interatomic exchange coupling for the FM electrodes.

  20. Optical study of the antiferromagnetic ordered state in electron-overdoped Ca0.77Nd0.23FeAs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Run; Xu, Bing; Dai, Yaomin; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jinyun; Qiu, Ziyang; Qiu, Xianggang

    2016-06-01

    In Ca1 -xRxFeAs2 (R =rare earth), an antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase as well as a structural transition have been reported, even in the electron-overdoped regime. Here, we investigated the temperature-dependent in-plane optical spectroscopy of overdoped Ca0.77Nd0.23FeAs2 . Upon entering the AFM state, we found an abrupt reduction of low-frequency (500-2000 cm-1) spectral weight in the optical conductivity. In sharp contrast to the parent compounds of the 122 system, where spin-density-wave gaps have been clearly observed in the AFM state, a gap signature is absent in Ca0.77Nd0.23FeAs2 . This may be a consequence of the poor nesting condition between the hole and electron pockets. However, a spectral weight analysis shows that the reduced spectral weight at low frequency is transferred to the high-frequency range (≳4000 cm-1), pointing to a localization effect. These observations suggest that the AFM order in Ca0.77Nd0.23FeAs2 is most likely to originate from a localized nature rather than Fermi-surface nesting.

  1. First-order phase transition from an antiferromagnetic ferroelectric to a cycloidal multiferroic with weak ferromagnetism during the joint action of applied magnetic and electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, S. A. Lyubutin, I. S.

    2013-09-15

    The thermodynamics of the phase transition in a perovskite-like multiferroic, in which an antiferromagnetic ferroelectric transforms into a new magnetic state where a spiral spin structure and weak ferromagnetism can coexist in applied magnetic field H, is described. This state forms as a result of a first-order phase transition at a certain temperature (below Neel temperature T{sub N}), where a helicoidal magnetic structure appears due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya effect. In this case, the axes of electric polarization and the helicoid of magnetic moments are mutually perpendicular and lie in the ab plane, which is normal to principal axis c. Additional electric polarization p, which decreases the total polarization of the ferroelectric P, appears in the ab plane. The effect of applied magnetic and electric fields on the properties of a multiferroic with a helicoidal magnetic structure is described. An alternating electric field is shown to cause a field-linear change in magnetic moment m, whose sign is opposite to the sign of the change of electric field E. The detected hysteretic phenomena that determine the temperature ranges of overheating and supercooling of each phase are explained. A comparison with the experimental data is performed.

  2. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  4. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  5. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  6. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  7. Crystal fields, disorder, and antiferromagnetic short-range order in (Yb{sub 0.24}Sn{sub 0.76})Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczuk, T; Wang, C H; Lawrence, J M; Xu, Q; Durakiewicz, T; Ronning, F; Llobet, A; Trouw, F; Kurita, N; Tokiwa, Y; Lee, Han-oh; Booth, C H; Gardner, J S; Bauer, E D; Joyce, J J; Zandbergen, H W; Movshovich, R; Cava, R J; Thompson, J D

    2011-07-18

    We report extensive measurements on a new compound (Yb{sub 0.24}Sn{sub 0.76})Ru that crystallizes in the cubic CsCl structure. Valence band photoemission and L{sub 3} x-ray absorption show no divalent component in the 4f configuration of Yb. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) indicates that the eight-fold degenerate J-multiplet of Yb{sup 3+} is split by the crystalline electric field (CEF) into a Γ{sub 7} doublet ground state and a Γ{sub 8} quartet at an excitation energy 20 meV. The magnetic susceptibility can be fit very well by this CEF scheme under the assumption that a Γ{sub 6} excited state resides at 32 meV; however, the Γ{sub 8}/Γ{sub 6} transition expected at 12 meV was not observed in the INS. The resistivity follows a Bloch-Grüneisen law shunted by a parallel resistor, as is typical of systems subject to phonon scattering with no apparent magnetic scattering. All of these properties can be understood as representing simple local moment behavior of the trivalent Yb ion. At 1 K, there is a peak in specific heat that is too broad to represent a magnetic phase transition, consistent with absence of magnetic reflections in neutron diffraction. On the other hand, this peak also is too narrow to represent the Kondo effect in the Γ{sub 7} ground state doublet. On the basis of the field-dependence of the specific heat, we argue that antiferromagnetic shortrange order (possibly co-existing with Kondo physics) occurs at low temperatures. The long-range magnetic order is suppressed because the Yb site occupancy is below the percolation threshold for this disordered compound.

  8. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  9. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  10. Evidence of low-dimensional antiferromagnetic ordering and crystal structure in the R sub 2 BaNiO sub 5 ( R =Y,Er) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, J.; Gutierrez-Puebla, E.; Monge, M.A.; Rasines, I.; Ruriaaz-Valero, C. ); Fernandez, F.; Saez-Puche, R. ); Campa, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Crystals of {ital R}{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} ({ital R}=Y,Er) have been grown, and their structures have been established by single-crystal x-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize in the Nd{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} structure type, with one-dimensional chains of vertex-sharing NiO{sub 6} octahedra in the direction of the {bold a} axis. These octahedra show an unusual twofold distortion: The Ni-O distances to the two axial oxygen atoms are considerably shorter, 0.3 A, than those to the four equatorial oxygens, and these oxygens are distorted from the right angles of a regular octahedron to 79.0(2){degree} or 77.7(6){degree}, respectively. As a result of this, Ni-O(axial)-Ni distances are very short, 3.76 and 3.75 A for {ital R}=Y and Er, respectively. X-ray powder diffraction data and the results of magnetic measurements for both oxides are given. The structural features mentioned elucidate why Ni{sup 2+} ions in polycrystalline Y{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} behave as a monodimensional system in which they become antiferromagnetically ordered below 300 K. Besides that, the ferromagnetic interactions that operate below 40 K can be due to tridimensional interchain interactions and/or the presence of ferromagnetic impurities. The estimated Neel temperature for Y{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5}, higher than that reported for Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5}, is explained by the promotion of the superexchange Ni-O-Ni interactions along the chains of flattened NiO{sub 6} octahedra sharing corners. In Er{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} both effects are masked by the strong paramagnetic signal of Er{sup 3+}, and a maximum observed at 15.6 K for the susceptibility is attributed to tridimensional ordering of the Er{sup 3+} cations.

  11. Influence of disorder on ageing and memory effects in non-equilibrium critical dynamics of 3D Ising model relaxing from an ordered state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, Vladimir V.; Prudnikov, Pavel V.; Pospelov, Evgeny A.

    2016-04-01

    We have performed a numerical investigation of the influence of disorder on the dynamical non-equilibrium evolution of a 3D site-diluted Ising model from a low-temperature initial state with magnetization m 0  =  1. It is shown that two-time dependences of the autocorrelation and integrated response functions for systems with spin concentrations p  =  1.0, 0.95, 0.8, 0.6 and 0.5 demonstrate ageing properties with anomalous slowing-down relaxation and violation of the fluctuation-dissipation ratio. It was revealed that during non-equilibrium critical dynamics in the long-time regime t-{{t}\\text{w}}\\gg {{t}\\text{w}}\\gg 1 the autocorrelation functions for diluted systems are extremely slow due to the pinning of domain walls on impurity sites. We have found that the fluctuation-dissipation ratio {{X}∞}=0 for diluted systems with spin concentration p  <  1 while the pure system is characterized by {{X}∞}=0.784(7) . The autocorrelation function power-law delay becomes the same as for the time dependence of the magnetization in the critical point and is characterized by exponent -β /zν . Also, for diluted systems we reveal memory effects for critical evolution in the ageing regime with realization of cyclic temperature change and quenching at T<{{T}\\text{c}} .

  12. Strong magnetoelastic coupling at the transition from harmonic to anharmonic order in NaFe(WO 4)2 with 3 d5 configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbein, S.; Ackermann, M.; Chapon, L.; Steffens, P.; Gukasov, A.; Sazonov, A.; Breunig, O.; Sanders, Y.; Becker, P.; Bohatý, L.; Lorenz, T.; Braden, M.

    2016-09-01

    The crystal structure of the double tungstate NaFe (WO4)2 arises from that of the spin-driven multiferroic MnWO4 by inserting nonmagnetic Na layers. NaFe (WO4)2 exhibits a three-dimensional incommensurate spin-spiral structure at low temperature and zero magnetic field, which, however, competes with commensurate order induced by magnetic field. The incommensurate zero-field phase corresponds to the condensation of a single irreducible representation but it does not imply ferroelectric polarization because spirals with opposite chirality coexist. Sizable anharmonic modulations emerge in this incommensurate structure, which are accompanied by large magnetoelastic anomalies, while the onset of the harmonic order is invisible in the thermal-expansion coefficient. In magnetic fields applied along the monoclinic axis, we observe a first-order transition to a commensurate structure that again is accompanied by large magnetoelastic effects. The large magnetoelastic coupling, a reduction of the b lattice parameter, is thus associated only with the commensurate order. Upon releasing the field at low temperature, the magnetic order transforms to another commensurate structure that considerably differs from the incommensurate low-temperature phase emerging upon zero-field cooling. The latter phase, which exhibits a reduced ordered moment, seems to be metastable.

  13. Higher-order in time "quasi-unconditionally stable" ADI solvers for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in 2D and 3D curvilinear domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Oscar P.; Cubillos, Max

    2016-02-01

    This paper introduces alternating-direction implicit (ADI) solvers of higher order of time-accuracy (orders two to six) for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in two- and three-dimensional curvilinear domains. The higher-order accuracy in time results from 1) An application of the backward differentiation formulae time-stepping algorithm (BDF) in conjunction with 2) A BDF-like extrapolation technique for certain components of the nonlinear terms (which makes use of nonlinear solves unnecessary), as well as 3) A novel application of the Douglas-Gunn splitting (which greatly facilitates handling of boundary conditions while preserving higher-order accuracy in time). As suggested by our theoretical analysis of the algorithms for a variety of special cases, an extensive set of numerical experiments clearly indicate that all of the BDF-based ADI algorithms proposed in this paper are "quasi-unconditionally stable" in the following sense: each algorithm is stable for all couples (h , Δt)of spatial and temporal mesh sizes in a problem-dependent rectangular neighborhood of the form (0 ,Mh) × (0 ,Mt). In other words, for each fixed value of Δt below a certain threshold, the Navier-Stokes solvers presented in this paper are stable for arbitrarily small spatial mesh-sizes. The second-order formulation has further been rigorously shown to be unconditionally stable for linear hyperbolic and parabolic equations in two-dimensional space. Although implicit ADI solvers for the Navier-Stokes equations with nominal second-order of temporal accuracy have been proposed in the past, the algorithms presented in this paper are the first ADI-based Navier-Stokes solvers for which second-order or better accuracy has been verified in practice under non-trivial (non-periodic) boundary conditions.

  14. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  15. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  16. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  17. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  18. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  19. Novel morphology changes from 3D ordered macroporous structure to V2O5 nanofiber grassland and its application in electrochromism

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhongqiu; Lv, Haiming; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Haowei; Tian, Yanlong; Li, Na; Zhao, Jiupeng; Li, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Because vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) is the only oxide that shows both anodic and cathodic coloration electrochromism, the reversible lithium ion insertion/extraction processes in V2O5 lead to not only reversible optical parameter changes but also multicolor changes for esthetics. Because of the outstanding electrochemical properties of V2O5 nanofibers, they show great potential to enhance V2O5 electrochromism. However, the development and practical application of V2O5 nanofibers are still lacking, because traditional preparation approaches have several drawbacks, such as multiple processing steps, unsatisfactory electrical contact with the substrate, expensive equipment, and rigorous experimental conditions. Herein, we first report a novel and convenient strategy to prepare grass-like nanofiber-stacked V2O5 films by a simple annealing treatment of an amorphous, three-dimensionally ordered macroporous vanadia film. The V2O5 nanofiber grassland exhibits promising transmittance modulation, fast switching responses, and high color contrast because of the outstanding electrochemical properties of V2O5 nanofibers as well as the high Li-ion diffusion coefficients and good electrical contact with the substrate. Moreover, the morphology transformation mechanism is investigated in detail. PMID:26578383

  20. Self-assembled synthesis of 3D Cu(In1 - xGax)Se2 nanoarrays by one-step electroless deposition into ordered AAO template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhou, Tao; Zheng, Maojun; Xiong, Zuzhou; Zhu, Changqing; Li, Hong; Wang, Faze; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2014-07-01

    Quaternary nanostructured Cu(In1 - xGax)Se2 (CIGS) arrays were successfully fabricated via a novel and simple solution-based protocol on the electroless deposition method, using a flexible, highly ordered anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) substrate. This method does not require electric power, complicated sensitization processes, or complexing agents, but provides nearly 100% pore fill factor to AAO templates. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images show that we obtained uniformly three-dimensional nanostructured CIGS arrays, and we can tailor the diameter and wall thicknesses of the nanostructure by adjusting the pore diameter of the AAO and metal Mo layer. Their chemical composition was determined by energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis, which is very close to the stoichiometric value. The Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) further confirm the formation of nanostructured CIGS with prominent chalcopyrite structure. The nanostructured CIGS arrays can support the design of low-cost, highlight-trapping, and enhanced carrier collection nanostructured solar cells.

  1. Novel morphology changes from 3D ordered macroporous structure to V2O5 nanofiber grassland and its application in electrochromism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Zhongqiu; Lv, Haiming; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Haowei; Tian, Yanlong; Li, Na; Zhao, Jiupeng; Li, Yao

    2015-11-01

    Because vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) is the only oxide that shows both anodic and cathodic coloration electrochromism, the reversible lithium ion insertion/extraction processes in V2O5 lead to not only reversible optical parameter changes but also multicolor changes for esthetics. Because of the outstanding electrochemical properties of V2O5 nanofibers, they show great potential to enhance V2O5 electrochromism. However, the development and practical application of V2O5 nanofibers are still lacking, because traditional preparation approaches have several drawbacks, such as multiple processing steps, unsatisfactory electrical contact with the substrate, expensive equipment, and rigorous experimental conditions. Herein, we first report a novel and convenient strategy to prepare grass-like nanofiber-stacked V2O5 films by a simple annealing treatment of an amorphous, three-dimensionally ordered macroporous vanadia film. The V2O5 nanofiber grassland exhibits promising transmittance modulation, fast switching responses, and high color contrast because of the outstanding electrochemical properties of V2O5 nanofibers as well as the high Li-ion diffusion coefficients and good electrical contact with the substrate. Moreover, the morphology transformation mechanism is investigated in detail.

  2. Higher-order compositional modeling of three-phase flow in 3D fractured porous media based on cross-flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Moortgat, Joachim Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase compositional flow in fractured porous media, when all the species can transfer between the phases, is a real challenge. Despite the broad applications in hydrocarbon reservoir engineering and hydrology, a compositional numerical simulator for three-phase flow in fractured media has not appeared in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. In this work, we present a three-phase fully compositional simulator for fractured media, based on higher-order finite element methods. To achieve computational efficiency, we invoke the cross-flow equilibrium (CFE) concept between discrete fractures and a small neighborhood in the matrix blocks. We adopt the mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to approximate convective Darcy fluxes and the pressure equation. This approach is the most natural choice for flow in fractured media. The mass balance equations are discretized by the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, which is perhaps the most efficient approach to capture physical discontinuities in phase properties at the matrix-fracture interfaces and at phase boundaries. In this work, we account for gravity and Fickian diffusion. The modeling of capillary effects is discussed in a separate paper. We present the mathematical framework, using the implicit-pressure-explicit-composition (IMPEC) scheme, which facilitates rigorous thermodynamic stability analyses and the computation of phase behavior effects to account for transfer of species between the phases. A deceptively simple CFL condition is implemented to improve numerical stability and accuracy. We provide six numerical examples at both small and larger scales and in two and three dimensions, to demonstrate powerful features of the formulation.

  3. Solitonlike magnetization textures in noncollinear antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulloa, Camilo; Nunez, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    We show that proper control of magnetization textures can be achieved in noncollinear antiferromagnets. This opens the versatile toolbox of domain-wall manipulation in the context of a different family of materials. In this way, we show that noncollinear antiferromagnets are a good prospect for applications in the context of antiferromagnetic spintronics. As in many noncollinear antiferromagnets, the order parameter field takes values in SO(3). By performing a gradient expansion in the energy functional we derive an effective theory that accounts for the physics of the magnetization of long-wavelength excitations. We apply our formalism to static and dynamic textures such as domain walls and localized oscillations, and identify topologically protected textures that are spatially localized. Our results are applicable to the exchange-bias materials Mn3X , with X =Ir,Rh,Pt .

  4. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  5. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  6. Phase Diagram of a Three-Dimensional Antiferromagnet with Random Magnetic Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Felio A.; Borisov, Pavel; Johnson, Trent A.; Stanescu, Tudor D.; Trappen, Robbyn; Holcomb, Mikel B.; Lederman, David; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Aczel, Adam A.; Hong, Tao

    2015-03-04

    Three-dimensional (3D) antiferromagnets with random magnetic anisotropy (RMA) that were experimentally studied to date have competing two-dimensional and three-dimensional exchange interactions which can obscure the authentic effects of RMA. The magnetic phase diagram of FexNi1-xF2 epitaxial thin films with true random single-ion anisotropy was deduced from magnetometry and neutron scattering measurements and analyzed using mean field theory. Regions with uniaxial, oblique and easy plane anisotropies were identified. A RMA-induced glass region was discovered where a Griffiths-like breakdown of long-range spin order occurs.

  7. Phase Diagram of a Three-Dimensional Antiferromagnet with Random Magnetic Anisotropy

    DOE PAGES

    Perez, Felio A.; Borisov, Pavel; Johnson, Trent A.; Stanescu, Tudor D.; Trappen, Robbyn; Holcomb, Mikel B.; Lederman, David; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Aczel, Adam A.; Hong, Tao

    2015-03-04

    Three-dimensional (3D) antiferromagnets with random magnetic anisotropy (RMA) that were experimentally studied to date have competing two-dimensional and three-dimensional exchange interactions which can obscure the authentic effects of RMA. The magnetic phase diagram of FexNi1-xF2 epitaxial thin films with true random single-ion anisotropy was deduced from magnetometry and neutron scattering measurements and analyzed using mean field theory. Regions with uniaxial, oblique and easy plane anisotropies were identified. A RMA-induced glass region was discovered where a Griffiths-like breakdown of long-range spin order occurs.

  8. Tunable negative thermal expansion related with the gradual evolution of antiferromagnetic ordering in antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag1-xNMn3+x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. C.; Tong, P.; Tong, W.; Lin, S.; Wang, B. S.; Song, W. H.; Zou, Y. M.; Sun, Y. P.

    2015-02-01

    The thermal expansion and magnetic properties of antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag1-xNMn3+x were reported. The substitution of Mn for Ag effectively broadens the temperature range of negative thermal expansion and drives it to cryogenic temperatures. As x increases, the paramagnetic (PM) to antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition temperature decreases. At x ˜ 0.2, the PM-AFM transition overlaps with the AFM to glass-like state transition. Above x = 0.2, two new distinct magnetic transitions were observed: One occurs above room temperature from PM to ferromagnetic (FM), and the other one evolves at a lower temperature (T*) below which both AFM and FM orderings are involved. Further, electron spin resonance measurement suggests that the broadened volume change near T* is closely related with the evolution of Γ5g AFM ordering.

  9. Tunable negative thermal expansion related with the gradual evolution of antiferromagnetic ordering in antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag{sub 1−x}NMn{sub 3+x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J. C.; Tong, P. Lin, S.; Wang, B. S.; Song, W. H.; Tong, W.; Zou, Y. M.; Sun, Y. P.

    2015-02-23

    The thermal expansion and magnetic properties of antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag{sub 1−x}NMn{sub 3+x} were reported. The substitution of Mn for Ag effectively broadens the temperature range of negative thermal expansion and drives it to cryogenic temperatures. As x increases, the paramagnetic (PM) to antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition temperature decreases. At x ∼ 0.2, the PM-AFM transition overlaps with the AFM to glass-like state transition. Above x = 0.2, two new distinct magnetic transitions were observed: One occurs above room temperature from PM to ferromagnetic (FM), and the other one evolves at a lower temperature (T{sup *}) below which both AFM and FM orderings are involved. Further, electron spin resonance measurement suggests that the broadened volume change near T{sup *} is closely related with the evolution of Γ{sup 5g} AFM ordering.

  10. Twofold enhancement of the hidden-order/large-moment antiferromagnetic phase boundary in the URu2-xFexSi₂ system

    SciTech Connect

    Kanchanavatee, N.; Janoschek, M.; Baumbach, R. E.; Hamlin, J. J.; Zocco, D. A.; Huang, K.; Maple, M. B.

    2011-12-16

    Electrical resistivity, specific heat, and magnetization measurements on URu2-xFexSi₂ reveal a twofold enhancement of the “hidden-order” (HO)/large-moment antiferromagnetic (LMAFM) phase boundary T₀(x). The T₀(Pch) curve, obtained by converting x to “chemical pressure” Pch, is strikingly similar to the T₀(P) curve, where P is applied pressure, for URu₂Si₂ both exhibit a “kink” at 1.5 GPa and a maximum at ~7 GPa. This similarity suggests that the HO-LMAFM transition at 1.5 GPa in URu₂Si₂ occurs at x ≈ 0.2 (Pch≈1.5 GPa) in URu2-xFexSi₂. URu2-xFexSi₂ provides an opportunity for studying the HO and LMAFM phases with methods that probe the electronic structure [e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and point-contact spectroscopy (PCS)] but cannot be used under pressure.

  11. Twofold enhancement of the hidden-order/large-moment antiferromagnetic phase boundary in the URu2-xFexSi₂ system

    DOE PAGES

    Kanchanavatee, N.; Janoschek, M.; Baumbach, R. E.; Hamlin, J. J.; Zocco, D. A.; Huang, K.; Maple, M. B.

    2011-12-16

    Electrical resistivity, specific heat, and magnetization measurements on URu2-xFexSi₂ reveal a twofold enhancement of the “hidden-order” (HO)/large-moment antiferromagnetic (LMAFM) phase boundary T₀(x). The T₀(Pch) curve, obtained by converting x to “chemical pressure” Pch, is strikingly similar to the T₀(P) curve, where P is applied pressure, for URu₂Si₂ both exhibit a “kink” at 1.5 GPa and a maximum at ~7 GPa. This similarity suggests that the HO-LMAFM transition at 1.5 GPa in URu₂Si₂ occurs at x ≈ 0.2 (Pch≈1.5 GPa) in URu2-xFexSi₂. URu2-xFexSi₂ provides an opportunity for studying the HO and LMAFM phases with methods that probe the electronic structure [e.g.,more » scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and point-contact spectroscopy (PCS)] but cannot be used under pressure.« less

  12. Microscopic magnetic nature of K2NiF4-type 3d transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, J.; Nozaki, H.; Umegaki, I.; Higemoto, W.; Ansaldo, E. J.; Brewer, J. H.; Sakurai, H.; Kao, T.-H.; Yang, H.-D.; Månsson, M.

    2014-12-01

    In order to elucidate the magnetic nature of K2NiF4-type 3d transition metal oxides, we have measured μ+SR spectra for Sr2VO4, LaSrVO4, and Sr2CrO4 using powder samples. ZF- and wTF-μ+SR measurements propose that Sr2VO4 enters into the static antiferromagnetic (AF) order phase below 8 K. In addition, TF-μ+SR measurements evidence that the transition at 105 K is not magnetic but structural and/or electronic in origin. For LaSrVO4, static long-range order has not been observed down to 20 K, while, as T decreases from 145 K, wTF asymmetry starts to decrease below 60 K, suggesting the appearance and evolution of localized magnetic moments below 60 K. For Sr2CrO4, by contrast, both ZF- and wTF-μ+SR have confirmed the presence of antiferromagnetic order below 117 K, as predicted in the χ(T) curve.

  13. Lattice-distortion Induced Magnetic Transition from Low-temperature Antiferromagnetism to High-temperature Ferrimagnetism in Double Perovskites A2FeOsO6 (A = Ca, Sr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y. S.; Xiang, H. J.; Gong, X. G.

    2015-08-01

    High-temperature insulating ferrimagnetism is investigated in order to further reveal its physical mechanisms, as well as identify potentially important scientific and practical applications relative to spintronics. For example, double perovskites such as Sr2FeOsO6 and Ca2FeOsO6 are shown to have puzzling magnetic properties. The former is a low-temperature antiferromagnet while the latter is a high-temperature insulating ferrimagnet. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms, we have investigated the frustrated magnetism of A2FeOsO6 by employing density functional theory and maximally-localized Wannier functions. We find lattice distortion enhances the antiferromagnetic nearest-neighboring Fe-O-Os interaction, however weakens the antiferromagnetic interactions via the Os-O-O-Os and Fe-O-Os-O-Fe paths, so is therefore responsible for the magnetic transition from the low-temperature antiferromagnetism to the high-temperature ferrimagnetism as the decrease of the A2+ ion radii. Also discussed is the 5d3-3d5 superexchange. We propose that such superexchange is intrinsically antiferromagnetic instead of ferromagnetic as previously thought. Our work clearly illustrates the magnetic frustration can be effectively relieved by lattice distortion, thus paving the way for tuning of complex magnetism in yet other 3d-5d (4d) double perovskites.

  14. Low-cost 3D rangefinder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bor-Tow; Lou, Wen-Shiou; Chen, Chia-Chen; Lin, Hsien-Chang

    1998-06-01

    Nowadays, 3D data are popularly performed in computer, and 3D browsers manipulate 3D model in the virtual world. Yet, till now, 3D digitizer is still a high-cost product and not a familiar equipment. In order to meet the requirement of 3D fancy world, in this paper, the concept of a low-cost 3D digitizer system is proposed to catch 3D range data from objects. The specified optical design of the 3D extraction is effective to depress the size, and the processing software of the system is compatible with PC to promote its portable capability. Both features contribute a low-cost system in PC environment in contrast to a large system bundled in an expensive workstation platform. In the structure of 3D extraction, laser beam and CCD camera are adopted to construct a 3D sensor. Instead of 2 CCD cameras for capturing laser lines twice before, a 2-in-1 system is proposed to merge 2 images in one CCD which still retains the information of two fields of views to inhibit occlusion problems. Besides, optical paths of two camera views are reflected by mirror in order that the volume of the system can be minified with one rotary axis only. It makes a portable system be more possible to work. Combined with the processing software executable in PC windows system, the proposed system not only saves hardware cost but also processing time of software. The system performance achieves 0.05 mm accuracy. It shows that a low- cost system is more possible to be high-performance.

  15. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  17. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. Antiferromagnetic metal spintronics.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A H; Tsoi, M

    2011-08-13

    In this brief review, we explain the theoretical basis for the notion that spin-transfer torques (STTs) and giant-magnetoresistance effects can, in principle, occur in circuits containing only normal and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials, and for the notion that antiferromagnets can play a role in STT phenomena in circuits containing both ferromagnetic and AFM elements. We review the experimental literature that provides partial evidence for these AFM spintronic effects but demonstrates that, like exchange-bias effects, they are sensitive to details of interface structure that are not always under experimental control. Finally, we speculate briefly on some strategies that might advance progress.

  19. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

  20. Investigations in massive 3D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Accioly, Antonio; Helayeel-Neto, Jose; Morais, Jefferson; Turcati, Rodrigo; Scatena, Eslley

    2011-05-15

    Some interesting gravitational properties of the Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend model (massive 3D gravity), such as the presence of a short-range gravitational force in the nonrelativistic limit and the existence of an impact-parameter-dependent gravitational deflection angle, are studied. Interestingly enough, these phenomena have no counterpart in the usual Einstein 3D gravity. In order to better understand the two aforementioned gravitational properties, they are also analyzed in the framework of 3D higher-derivative gravity with the Einstein-Hilbert term with the 'wrong sign'.

  1. An Improved Version of TOPAZ 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    An improved version of the TOPAZ 3D gun code is presented as a powerful tool for beam optics simulation. In contrast to the previous version of TOPAZ 3D, the geometry of the device under test is introduced into TOPAZ 3D directly from a CAD program, such as Solid Edge or AutoCAD. In order to have this new feature, an interface was developed, using the GiD software package as a meshing code. The article describes this method with two models to illustrate the results.

  2. Mean Field Theory of a Coupled Heisenberg Model and Its Application to an Organic Antiferromagnet with Magnetic Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kazuhiro; Shimahara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    We examine the mean field theory of a uniaxial coupled Heisenberg antiferromagnet with two subsystems, one of which consists of strongly interacting small spins and the other consists of weakly interacting large spins. We reanalyze the experimental data of specific heat and magnetic susceptibility obtained by previous authors for the organic compound λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 at low temperatures, where BETS stands for bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene. The model parameters for this compound are evaluated, where the applicability of the theory is checked. As a result, it is found that J1 ≫ J12 ≫ J2, where J1, J2, and J12 denote the exchange coupling constant between π spins, that between 3d spins, and that between π and 3d spins, respectively. At the low-temperature limit, both sublattice magnetizations of the 3d and π spins are saturated, and the present model is reduced to the Schottky model, which successfully explains experimental observations in previous studies. As temperature increases, fluctuations of 3d spins increase, while π spins remain almost saturated. Near the critical temperature, both spins fluctuate significantly, and thus the mean field approximation breaks down. It is revealed that the magnetic anisotropy, which may be crucial to the antiferromagnetic long-range order, originates from J12 rather than from J2 and that the angle between the magnetic easy-axis and the crystal c-axis is approximately 26-27° in the present effective model.

  3. 3D palmprint data fast acquisition and recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Huang, Shujun; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Zonghua

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a fast 3D (Three-Dimension) palmprint capturing system and develops an efficient 3D palmprint feature extraction and recognition method. In order to fast acquire accurate 3D shape and texture of palmprint, a DLP projector triggers a CCD camera to realize synchronization. By generating and projecting green fringe pattern images onto the measured palm surface, 3D palmprint data are calculated from the fringe pattern images. The periodic feature vector can be derived from the calculated 3D palmprint data, so undistorted 3D biometrics is obtained. Using the obtained 3D palmprint data, feature matching test have been carried out by Gabor filter, competition rules and the mean curvature. Experimental results on capturing 3D palmprint show that the proposed acquisition method can fast get 3D shape information of palmprint. Some initial experiments on recognition show the proposed method is efficient by using 3D palmprint data.

  4. 3D whiteboard: collaborative sketching with 3D-tracked smart phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, James; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2014-02-01

    We present the results of our investigation of the feasibility of a new approach for collaborative drawing in 3D, based on Android smart phones. Our approach utilizes a number of fiduciary markers, placed in the working area where they can be seen by the smart phones' cameras, in order to estimate the pose of each phone in the room. Our prototype allows two users to draw 3D objects with their smart phones by moving their phones around in 3D space. For example, 3D lines are drawn by recording the path of the phone as it is moved around in 3D space, drawing line segments on the screen along the way. Each user can see the virtual drawing space on their smart phones' displays, as if the display was a window into this space. Besides lines, our prototype application also supports 3D geometry creation, geometry transformation operations, and it shows the location of the other user's phone.

  5. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  6. Spinon dynamics in quantum integrable antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlijm, R.; Caux, J.-S.

    2016-05-01

    The excitations of the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic spin chain in zero field are known as spinons. As pairwise-created fractionalized excitations, spinons are important in the understanding of inelastic neutron scattering experiments in (quasi-)one-dimensional materials. In the present paper, we consider the real space-time dynamics of spinons originating from a local spin flip on the antiferromagnetic ground state of the (an)isotropic Heisenberg spin-1/2 model and the Babujan-Takhtajan spin-1 model. By utilizing algebraic Bethe ansatz methods at finite system size to compute the expectation value of the local magnetization and spin-spin correlations, spinons are visualized as propagating domain walls in the antiferromagnetic spin ordering with anisotropy dependent behavior. The spin-spin correlation after the spin flip displays a light cone, satisfying the Lieb-Robinson bound for the propagation of correlations at the spinon velocity.

  7. Control of antiferromagnetic domain distribution via polarization-dependent optical annealing

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Takuya; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The absence of net magnetization inside antiferromagnetic domains has made the control of their spatial distribution quite challenging. Here we experimentally demonstrate an optical method for controlling antiferromagnetic domain distributions in MnF2. Reduced crystalline symmetry can couple an order parameter with non-conjugate external stimuli. In the case of MnF2, time-reversal symmetry is macroscopically broken reflecting the different orientations of the two magnetic sublattices. Thus, it exhibits different absorption coefficients between two orthogonal linear polarizations below its antiferromagnetic transition temperature under an external magnetic field. Illumination with linearly polarized laser light under this condition selectively destructs the formation of a particular antiferromagnetic order via heating. As a result, the other antiferromagnetic order is favoured inside the laser spot, achieving spatially localized selection of an antiferromagnetic order. Applications to control of interface states at antiferromagnetic domain boundaries, exchange bias and control of spin currents are expected. PMID:26911337

  8. Recent developments in DFD (depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyama, Shiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    We will report our recent developments in DFD (Depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display, both of which have smooth movement parallax. Firstly, fatigueless DFD display, composed of only two layered displays with a gap, has continuous perceived depth by changing luminance ratio between two images. Two new methods, called "Edge-based DFD display" and "Deep DFD display", have been proposed in order to solve two severe problems of viewing angle and perceived depth limitations. Edge-based DFD display, layered by original 2D image and its edge part with a gap, can expand the DFD viewing angle limitation both in 2D and 3D perception. Deep DFD display can enlarge the DFD image depth by modulating spatial frequencies of front and rear images. Secondly, Arc 3D display can provide floating 3D images behind or in front of the display by illuminating many arc-shaped directional scattering sources, for example, arcshaped scratches on a flat board. Curved Arc 3D display, composed of many directional scattering sources on a curved surface, can provide a peculiar 3D image, for example, a floating image in the cylindrical bottle. The new active device has been proposed for switching arc 3D images by using the tips of dual-frequency liquid-crystal prisms as directional scattering sources. Directional scattering can be switched on/off by changing liquid-crystal refractive index, resulting in switching of arc 3D image.

  9. A pseudo-3D approach based on electron backscatter diffraction and backscatter electron imaging to study the character of phase boundaries between Mg and long period stacking ordered phase in a Mg–2Y–Zn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Afshar, Mehran Zaefferer, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    In Mg–2 at.% Y–1 at.% Zn alloys, the LPSO (Long Period Stacking Ordered) phase is important to improve mechanical properties of the material. The aim of this paper is to present a study on the phase boundary character in these two-phase alloys. Using EBSD pattern analysis it was found that the 24R structure is the dominant LPSO phase structure in the current alloy. The phase boundary character between the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase was investigated using an improved pseudo-3D EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) technique in combination with BSE or SE (backscatter or secondary electron) imaging. A large amount of very low-angle phase boundaries was detected. The (0 0 0 2) plane in the Mg matrix which is parallel to the (0 0 0 24) plane in the LPSO phase was found to be the most frequent plane for these phase boundaries. This plane is supposed to be the habit plane of the eutectic co-solidification of the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase. - Highlights: • It is shown that for the investigated alloy the LPSO phase has mainly 24R crystal structure. • A new method is presented which allows accurate determination of the 5-parameter grain or phase boundary character. • It is found that the low-angle phase boundaries appearing in the alloy all have basal phase boundary planes.

  10. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  11. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  12. Quantum phase transition between disordered and ordered states in the spin-1/2 kagome lattice antiferromagnet (Rb1-xCsx) 2Cu3SnF12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Kazuya; Kurita, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-06-01

    We have systematically investigated the variation of the exchange parameters and the ground state in the S =1/2 kagome-lattice antiferromagnet (Rb1 -xCsx )2Cu3SnF12 via magnetic measurements using single crystals. One of the parent compounds, Rb2Cu3SnF12 , which has a distorted kagome lattice accompanied by four sorts of nearest-neighbor exchange interaction, has a disordered ground state described by a pinwheel valence-bond-solid state. The other parent compound, Cs2Cu3SnF12 , which has a uniform kagome lattice at room temperature, has an ordered ground state with the q =0 spin structure. The analysis of magnetic susceptibilities shows that with increasing cesium concentration x , the exchange parameters increase with the tendency to be uniform. It was found that the ground state is disordered for x <0.53 and ordered for x >0.53 . The pseudogap observed for x <0.53 and the Néel temperature for x >0.53 approach zero at xc≃0.53 . This is indicative of the occurrence of a quantum phase transition at xc.

  13. Theoretical and experimental studies of surface physics: Theory of surface electromigration wind force felt by a sodium adatom on stepped sodium(110) surfaces; and magnetic order-disorder phase transition of antiferromagnetic nickel oxide thin films on silver(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jason Yu-Lin

    This dissertation is composed of theoretical and experimental work in surface physics. I have performed calculations of electromigration wind forces felt by a Na adatom on Na (110) stepped metal surfaces. Electromigration is a process which impurities are induced to drift in a particular direction when an electric field is applied across the sample. I find that the electromigration wind force felt by an adatom is changed due to the presence of step edge on the surface. My experimental work explores the magnetic order-disorder phase transition of antiferromagnetic nickel oxide thin films. I find that the Neel temperature is different for nickel oxide thin films and bulk samples. In my theoretical calculations I have applied multiple scattering theory to explore the variation of the electromigration wind force experienced by a Na adatom on Na (110) stepped metal surfaces. I find that the electromigration wind force felt by a migrating adatom is strongly perturbed as the adatom approaches a step edge. This is a result of multiple scattering of the carriers between the adatom and step which alters the local current density. In addition, the electromigration wind force felt by a Na adatom in the lower and the upper step regions is asymmetric. The implications of this inhomogeneity in the electromigration driving force for current-induced changes in surface morphology are discussed. In my experimental work, antiferromagnetic nickel oxide (NiO) thin films were grown on single crystal Ag (100) by means of electron beam deposition. My low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) results indicate that the magnetic order in NiO may be dependent upon the oxygen stoichiometry in the thin film. I show that in thin films approximately 13 monolayers thick, the Neel temperature, TN, of NiO is 631 K which is higher than the bulk value of TN = 523 K. Furthermore, I find that as the film thickness is increased, the Neel temperature decreases towards the

  14. Emergent antiferromagnetism out of the "hidden-order" state in URu2Si2: high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance to 40 T.

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Tokunaga, Y; Kambe, S; Urbano, R R; Suzuki, M-T; Kuhns, P L; Reyes, A P; Tobash, P H; Ronning, F; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D

    2014-06-13

    Very high field (29)Si-NMR measurements using a fully (29)Si-enriched URu(2)Si(2) single crystal were carried out in order to microscopically investigate the "hidden order" (HO) state and adjacent magnetic phases in the high field limit. At the lowest measured temperature of 0.4 K, a clear anomaly reflecting a Fermi surface instability near 22 T inside the HO state is detected by the (29)Si shift, (29)K(c). Moreover, a strong enhancement of (29)K(c) develops near a critical field H(c) ≃ 35.6 T, and the ^{29}Si-NMR signal disappears suddenly at H(c), indicating the total suppression of the HO state. Nevertheless, a weak and shifted (29)Si-NMR signal reappears for fields higher than H(c) at 4.2 K, providing evidence for a magnetic structure within the magnetic phase caused by the Ising-type anisotropy of the uranium ordered moments.

  15. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  16. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  17. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  18. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  19. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  20. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  1. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  2. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  3. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  4. Unconventional magnetic order in the frustrated diamond-lattice antiferromagnet CoAl2O4 studied by neutron diffraction and classical Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharko, O.; Tóth, S.; Sendetskyi, O.; Cervellino, A.; Wolter-Giraud, A.; Dey, T.; Maljuk, A.; Tsurkan, V.

    2014-10-01

    CoAl2O4 spinel with magnetic Co2+ ions on the diamond lattice is known to be magnetically frustrated. We compare neutron single-crystal diffraction patterns measured in zero and applied magnetic fields with the ones obtained from classical Monte Carlo models. In simulations we test the influence of various parameters on diffraction patterns: the ratio of nearest-, J1, and next-nearest-, J2, neighbor interactions, magnetic field applied along the principal crystallographic directions, and random disorder on the A (Co2+) and B (Al3+) sites. We conclude that the models considered so far explain the broadening of magnetic Bragg peaks in zero magnetic field and their anisotropic response to applied magnetic field only partly. As bulk properties of our single crystal are isotropic, we suggest that its microstructure, specifically <111>-twin boundaries, could be a reason for the nonconventional magnetic order in CoAl2O4.

  5. Paramagnetic Metal--Antiferromagnetic Insulator Transition of λ-BETS2FexGa1-xCl4 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiba, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Hiroki; Nobori, Kento; Shimada, Kazuo; Tajima, Naoya; Nishio, Yutaka; Kajita, Koji; Zhou, Biao; Kobayashi, Akiko; Kobayashi, Hayao

    2012-05-01

    The quasi-two-dimensional organic conductor λ-BETS2FeCl4 [BETS = bis(ethylenedithio) tetraselenafulvalene] transforms from a paramagnetic metal (PM) to an antiferromagnetic insulator (AFI) at a transition temperature TMI of 8.3 K under a zero magnetic field. To investigate the mechanism of this PM--AFI phase transition, we studied the Fe 3d spin content dependence of the AFI ground state by measuring the specific heat of the mixed crystal λ-BETS2 FexGa1-xCl4 at temperatures as low as 0.2 K. The increasing Fe 3d spin density enhances the internal magnetic field caused by π spin antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering. It was confirmed that the Fe 3d spin provides favorable conditions for this mysterious PM--AFI phase transition. We propose that this phase transition originates from the magnetic anisotropy introduced by the π--d interaction, which suppresses the low-dimensional fluctuation in the π spin system.

  6. Spin reorientation via antiferromagnetic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, M.; Sbiaa, R.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.; Piramanayagam, S. N.

    2014-05-07

    Spin reorientation in antiferromagnetically coupled (AFC) Co/Pd multilayers, wherein the thickness of the constituent Co layers was varied, was studied. AFC-Co/Pd multilayers were observed to have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy even for a Co sublayer thickness of 1 nm, much larger than what is usually observed in systems without antiferromagnetic coupling. When similar multilayer structures were prepared without antiferromagnetic coupling, this effect was not observed. The results indicate that the additional anisotropy energy contribution arising from the antiferromagnetic coupling, which is estimated to be around 6 × 10{sup 6} ergs/cm{sup 3}, induces the spin-reorientation.

  7. How to See Shadows in 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikesit, Gea O. F.

    2014-01-01

    Shadows can be found easily everywhere around us, so that we rarely find it interesting to reflect on how they work. In order to raise curiosity among students on the optics of shadows, we can display the shadows in 3D, particularly using a stereoscopic set-up. In this paper we describe the optics of stereoscopic shadows using simple schematic…

  8. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  9. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  10. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  11. Superplastic forming using NIKE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M.

    1996-12-04

    The superplastic forming process requires careful control of strain rates in order to avoid strain localizations. A load scheduler was developed and implemented into the nonlinear finite element code NIKE3D to provide strain rate control during forming simulation and process schedule output. Often the sheets being formed in SPF are very thin such that less expensive membrane elements can be used as opposed to shell elements. A large strain membrane element was implemented into NIKE3D to assist in SPF process modeling.

  12. Lattice-distortion Induced Magnetic Transition from Low-temperature Antiferromagnetism to High-temperature Ferrimagnetism in Double Perovskites A2FeOsO6 (A = Ca, Sr)

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Y. S.; Xiang, H. J.; Gong, X. G.

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature insulating ferrimagnetism is investigated in order to further reveal its physical mechanisms, as well as identify potentially important scientific and practical applications relative to spintronics. For example, double perovskites such as Sr2FeOsO6 and Ca2FeOsO6 are shown to have puzzling magnetic properties. The former is a low-temperature antiferromagnet while the latter is a high-temperature insulating ferrimagnet. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms, we have investigated the frustrated magnetism of A2FeOsO6 by employing density functional theory and maximally-localized Wannier functions. We find lattice distortion enhances the antiferromagnetic nearest-neighboring Fe-O-Os interaction, however weakens the antiferromagnetic interactions via the Os-O-O-Os and Fe-O-Os-O-Fe paths, so is therefore responsible for the magnetic transition from the low-temperature antiferromagnetism to the high-temperature ferrimagnetism as the decrease of the A2+ ion radii. Also discussed is the 5d3-3d5 superexchange. We propose that such superexchange is intrinsically antiferromagnetic instead of ferromagnetic as previously thought. Our work clearly illustrates the magnetic frustration can be effectively relieved by lattice distortion, thus paving the way for tuning of complex magnetism in yet other 3d–5d (4d) double perovskites. PMID:26289139

  13. 3D Simulation: Microgravity Environments and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Estes, Samantha; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most, if not all, 3-D and Virtual Reality (VR) software programs are designed for one-G gravity applications. Space environments simulations require gravity effects of one one-thousandth to one one-million of that of the Earth's surface (10(exp -3) - 10(exp -6) G), thus one must be able to generate simulations that replicate those microgravity effects upon simulated astronauts. Unfortunately, the software programs utilized by the National Aeronautical and Space Administration does not have the ability to readily neutralize the one-G gravity effect. This pre-programmed situation causes the engineer or analysis difficulty during micro-gravity simulations. Therefore, microgravity simulations require special techniques or additional code in order to apply the power of 3D graphic simulation to space related applications. This paper discusses the problem and possible solutions to allow microgravity 3-D/VR simulations to be completed successfully without program code modifications.

  14. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  15. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  16. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  17. Scale-free antiferromagnetic fluctuations in the s = 1/2 kagome antiferromagnet herbertsmithite.

    PubMed

    de Vries, M A; Stewart, J R; Deen, P P; Piatek, J O; Nilsen, G J; Rønnow, H M; Harrison, A

    2009-12-01

    Neutron spectroscopy and diffuse neutron scattering on herbertsmithite [ZnCu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2)], a near-ideal realization of the s=1/2 kagome antiferromagnet, reveal the hallmark property of a quantum spin liquid: instantaneous short-ranged antiferromagnetic correlations in the absence of a time-averaged ordered moment. These dynamic antiferromagnetic correlations are weakly dependent of neutron-energy transfer and temperature, and persist up to 25 meV and 120 K. At low energy transfers a shift of the magnetic scattering to low Q is observed with increasing temperature, providing evidence of gapless spinons. It is argued that these observations provide important evidence in favor of resonating-valence-bond theories of (doped) Mott insulators.

  18. Full-color holographic 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masami; Shigeta, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Susumu; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Iwata, Fujio

    2003-05-01

    A holographic 3D printer is a system that produces a direct hologram with full-parallax information using the 3-dimensional data of a subject from a computer. In this paper, we present a proposal for the reproduction of full-color images with the holographic 3D printer. In order to realize the 3-dimensional color image, we selected the 3 laser wavelength colors of red (λ=633nm), green (λ=533nm), and blue (λ=442nm), and we built a one-step optical system using a projection system and a liquid crystal display. The 3-dimensional color image is obtained by synthesizing in a 2D array the multiple exposure with these 3 wavelengths made on each 250mm elementary hologram, and moving recording medium on a x-y stage. For the natural color reproduction in the holographic 3D printer, we take the approach of the digital processing technique based on the color management technology. The matching between the input and output colors is performed by investigating first, the relation between the gray level transmittance of the LCD and the diffraction efficiency of the hologram and second, by measuring the color displayed by the hologram to establish a correlation. In our first experimental results a non-linear functional relation for single and multiple exposure of the three components were found. These results are the first step in the realization of a natural color 3D image produced by the holographic color 3D printer.

  19. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  20. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  1. STAR3D: a stack-based RNA 3D structural alignment tool

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Ping; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-01-01

    The various roles of versatile non-coding RNAs typically require the attainment of complex high-order structures. Therefore, comparing the 3D structures of RNA molecules can yield in-depth understanding of their functional conservation and evolutionary history. Recently, many powerful tools have been developed to align RNA 3D structures. Although some methods rely on both backbone conformations and base pairing interactions, none of them consider the entire hierarchical formation of the RNA secondary structure. One of the major issues is that directly applying the algorithms of matching 2D structures to the 3D coordinates is particularly time-consuming. In this article, we propose a novel RNA 3D structural alignment tool, STAR3D, to take into full account the 2D relations between stacks without the complicated comparison of secondary structures. First, the 3D conserved stacks in the inputs are identified and then combined into a tree-like consensus. Afterward, the loop regions are compared one-to-one in accordance with their relative positions in the consensus tree. The experimental results show that the prediction of STAR3D is more accurate for both non-homologous and homologous RNAs than other state-of-the-art tools with shorter running time. PMID:26184875

  2. Superplot3d: an open source GUI tool for 3d trajectory visualisation and elementary processing.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Luke J; Hawkes, Frances M; Dublon, Ian An

    2013-09-30

    When acquiring simple three-dimensional (3d) trajectory data it is common to accumulate large coordinate data sets. In order to examine integrity and consistency of object tracking, it is often necessary to rapidly visualise these data. Ordinarily, to achieve this the user must either execute 3d plotting functions in a numerical computing environment or manually inspect data in two dimensions, plotting each individual axis.Superplot3d is an open source MATLAB script which takes tab delineated Cartesian data points in the form x, y, z and time and generates an instant visualization of the object's trajectory in free-rotational three dimensions. Whole trajectories may be instantly presented, allowing for rapid inspection. Executable from the MATLAB command line (or deployable as a compiled standalone application) superplot3d also provides simple GUI controls to obtain rudimentary trajectory information, allow specific visualization of trajectory sections and perform elementary processing.Superplot3d thus provides a framework for non-programmers and programmers alike, to recreate recently acquired 3d object trajectories in rotatable 3d space. It is intended, via the use of a preference driven menu to be flexible and work with output from multiple tracking software systems. Source code and accompanying GUIDE .fig files are provided for deployment and further development.

  3. Superplot3d: an open source GUI tool for 3d trajectory visualisation and elementary processing.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Luke J; Hawkes, Frances M; Dublon, Ian An

    2013-01-01

    When acquiring simple three-dimensional (3d) trajectory data it is common to accumulate large coordinate data sets. In order to examine integrity and consistency of object tracking, it is often necessary to rapidly visualise these data. Ordinarily, to achieve this the user must either execute 3d plotting functions in a numerical computing environment or manually inspect data in two dimensions, plotting each individual axis.Superplot3d is an open source MATLAB script which takes tab delineated Cartesian data points in the form x, y, z and time and generates an instant visualization of the object's trajectory in free-rotational three dimensions. Whole trajectories may be instantly presented, allowing for rapid inspection. Executable from the MATLAB command line (or deployable as a compiled standalone application) superplot3d also provides simple GUI controls to obtain rudimentary trajectory information, allow specific visualization of trajectory sections and perform elementary processing.Superplot3d thus provides a framework for non-programmers and programmers alike, to recreate recently acquired 3d object trajectories in rotatable 3d space. It is intended, via the use of a preference driven menu to be flexible and work with output from multiple tracking software systems. Source code and accompanying GUIDE .fig files are provided for deployment and further development. PMID:24079529

  4. Dimensional Reduction in Quantum Dipolar Antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Babkevich, P; Jeong, M; Matsumoto, Y; Kovacevic, I; Finco, A; Toft-Petersen, R; Ritter, C; Månsson, M; Nakatsuji, S; Rønnow, H M

    2016-05-13

    We report ac susceptibility, specific heat, and neutron scattering measurements on a dipolar-coupled antiferromagnet LiYbF_{4}. For the thermal transition, the order-parameter critical exponent is found to be 0.20(1) and the specific-heat critical exponent -0.25(1). The exponents agree with the 2D XY/h_{4} universality class despite the lack of apparent two-dimensionality in the structure. The order-parameter exponent for the quantum phase transitions is found to be 0.35(1) corresponding to (2+1)D. These results are in line with those found for LiErF_{4} which has the same crystal structure, but largely different T_{N}, crystal field environment and hyperfine interactions. Our results therefore experimentally establish that the dimensional reduction is universal to quantum dipolar antiferromagnets on a distorted diamond lattice. PMID:27232040

  5. Dimensional Reduction in Quantum Dipolar Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkevich, P.; Jeong, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kovacevic, I.; Finco, A.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Ritter, C.; Mânsson, M.; Nakatsuji, S.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2016-05-01

    We report ac susceptibility, specific heat, and neutron scattering measurements on a dipolar-coupled antiferromagnet LiYbF4 . For the thermal transition, the order-parameter critical exponent is found to be 0.20(1) and the specific-heat critical exponent -0.25 (1 ) . The exponents agree with the 2D X Y /h4 universality class despite the lack of apparent two-dimensionality in the structure. The order-parameter exponent for the quantum phase transitions is found to be 0.35(1) corresponding to (2 +1 )D . These results are in line with those found for LiErF4 which has the same crystal structure, but largely different TN, crystal field environment and hyperfine interactions. Our results therefore experimentally establish that the dimensional reduction is universal to quantum dipolar antiferromagnets on a distorted diamond lattice.

  6. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  7. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  8. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The VAX/VMS/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The VAX/VMS/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  10. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  11. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  12. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  13. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The UNIX/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  14. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The UNIX/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  15. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia.

  16. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  17. Field-driven phase transitions in a quasi-two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M. B.; Broholm, C.; Reich, D. H.; Schiffer, P.; Tchernyshyov, O.; Vorderwisch, P.; Harrison, N.

    2007-02-01

    We report magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, and neutron scattering measurements as a function of applied magnetic field and temperature to characterize the S = 1/2 quasi-two-dimensional (2D) frustrated magnet piperazinium hexachlorodicuprate (PHCC). The experiments reveal four distinct phases. At low temperatures and fields the material forms a quantum paramagnet with a 1 meV singlet triplet gap and a magnon bandwidth of 1.7 meV. The singlet state involves multiple spin pairs some of which have negative ground state bond energies. Increasing the field at low temperatures induces 3D long-range antiferromagnetic order at 7.5 Tesla through a continuous phase transition that can be described as magnon Bose Einstein condensation. The phase transition to a fully polarized ferromagnetic state occurs at 37 Tesla. The ordered antiferromagnetic phase is surrounded by a renormalized classical region. The crossover to this phase from the quantum paramagnet is marked by a distinct anomaly in the magnetic susceptibility which coincides with closure of the finite temperature singlet triplet pseudo gap. The phase boundary between the quantum paramagnet and the Bose Einstein condensate features a finite temperature minimum at T = 0.2 K, which may be associated with coupling to nuclear spin or lattice degrees of freedom close to quantum criticality.

  18. Structure and magnetism in the Kagome antiferromagnet RBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7}.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J. F.; Zheng, H.; Huq, A.; Chapon, L. C.; Radaelli, P. G.; Stephens, P. W.; Materials Science Division; ORNL; Rutherford Appleton Lab.; State Univ. of New York at Stonybrook

    2007-01-01

    The mixed-valent compound RBaCo4O7 (R=Rare earth, Y), hereafter abbreviated as R-114, is built up of Kagome sheets of CoO4 tetrahedra, linked in the third dimension by a triangular layer of CoO4 tetrahedra in an analogous fashion to that found in the known geometrically frustrated magnets such as pyrochlores and SrCr9xGa12-9xO19 (SCGO). We have undertaken a study of the structural and magnetic properties of the Y-114 and Yb-114 compound using combined high resolution powder neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Both compounds undergo a first order trigonal {yields} orthorhombic phase transition that breaks the trigonal symmetry of the structure. We show from Bond Valence Sum arguments that this transition occurs as a response to a markedly underbonded Ba2+ site in the high-temperature phase. The symmetry-lowering transition relieves the geometric frustration of the structure, and a long-range ordered 3-D antiferromagnetic state develops at low temperature. The magnetic structure of the Y compound has been solved and shows a compromise between the well-known 120o structure of the Kagome net and a collinear antiferromagnet in the third dimension.

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  1. CuF{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (pyz = pyrazine) : long-range magnetic ordering in a pseudo-cubic coordination polymer comprised of bridging HF{sub 2}{sup -} pyrazine ligands.

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J. L.; Connor, M. M.; Schlueter, J. A.; McConnell, A. C.; Southerland, H. I.; Malfant, I.; Lancaster, T.; Blundell, S. J.; Brooks, M. L.; Pratt, F. L.; Materials Science Division; Maitre de Conferences de l'Univ. Paul Sabatier; Oxford Univ.; Rutherford Appleton Lab.

    2006-01-01

    [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]BF{sub 4} consists of rare {mu}{sub 1,3} bridging HF{sub 2}{sup -} anions and {mu}-pyrazine ligands leading to a 3D pseudo-cubic framework that antiferromagnetically orders below 1.54(1) K.

  2. Antiferromagnetic inclusions in lunar glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Briggs, Charles; Alexander, Corrine

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 fines and two specimens of a relatively large glass spherical shell were studied as a function of temperature from room temperature to liquid helium temperatures. All but one specimen showed the presence of antiferromagnetic inclusions. Closely spaced temperature measurements of the magnetic susceptibility below 77 K on five of the specimens showed antiferromagnetic temperature transitions (Ne??el transitions). With the exception of ilmenite in one specimen, these transitions did not correspond to any transitions in known antiferromagnetic compounds. ?? 1974.

  3. What is 3D good for? A review of human performance on stereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, John P.; Havig, Paul R.; Geiselman, Eric E.

    2012-06-01

    This work reviews the human factors-related literature on the task performance implications of stereoscopic 3D displays, in order to point out the specific performance benefits (or lack thereof) one might reasonably expect to observe when utilizing these displays. What exactly is 3D good for? Relative to traditional 2D displays, stereoscopic displays have been shown to enhance performance on a variety of depth-related tasks. These tasks include judging absolute and relative distances, finding and identifying objects (by breaking camouflage and eliciting perceptual "pop-out"), performing spatial manipulations of objects (object positioning, orienting, and tracking), and navigating. More cognitively, stereoscopic displays can improve the spatial understanding of 3D scenes or objects, improve memory/recall of scenes or objects, and improve learning of spatial relationships and environments. However, for tasks that are relatively simple, that do not strictly require depth information for good performance, where other strong cues to depth can be utilized, or for depth tasks that lie outside the effective viewing volume of the display, the purported performance benefits of 3D may be small or altogether absent. Stereoscopic 3D displays come with a host of unique human factors problems including the simulator-sickness-type symptoms of eyestrain, headache, fatigue, disorientation, nausea, and malaise, which appear to effect large numbers of viewers (perhaps as many as 25% to 50% of the general population). Thus, 3D technology should be wielded delicately and applied carefully; and perhaps used only as is necessary to ensure good performance.

  4. Weyl magnons in breathing pyrochlore antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Ye; Li, Yao-Dong; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon; Yu, Yue; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Frustrated quantum magnets not only provide exotic ground states and unusual magnetic structures, but also support unconventional excitations in many cases. Using a physically relevant spin model for a breathing pyrochlore lattice, we discuss the presence of topological linear band crossings of magnons in antiferromagnets. These are the analogues of Weyl fermions in electronic systems, which we dub Weyl magnons. The bulk Weyl magnon implies the presence of chiral magnon surface states forming arcs at finite energy. We argue that such antiferromagnets present a unique example, in which Weyl points can be manipulated in situ in the laboratory by applied fields. We discuss their appearance specifically in the breathing pyrochlore lattice, and give some general discussion of conditions to find Weyl magnons, and how they may be probed experimentally. Our work may inspire a re-examination of the magnetic excitations in many magnetically ordered systems. PMID:27650053

  5. Weyl magnons in breathing pyrochlore antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei-Ye; Li, Yao-Dong; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon; Yu, Yue; Chen, Gang

    2016-09-01

    Frustrated quantum magnets not only provide exotic ground states and unusual magnetic structures, but also support unconventional excitations in many cases. Using a physically relevant spin model for a breathing pyrochlore lattice, we discuss the presence of topological linear band crossings of magnons in antiferromagnets. These are the analogues of Weyl fermions in electronic systems, which we dub Weyl magnons. The bulk Weyl magnon implies the presence of chiral magnon surface states forming arcs at finite energy. We argue that such antiferromagnets present a unique example, in which Weyl points can be manipulated in situ in the laboratory by applied fields. We discuss their appearance specifically in the breathing pyrochlore lattice, and give some general discussion of conditions to find Weyl magnons, and how they may be probed experimentally. Our work may inspire a re-examination of the magnetic excitations in many magnetically ordered systems.

  6. Antiferromagnetic domains in UPdSn

    SciTech Connect

    Nakotte, H.; Brueck, E.; de Boer, F.R. ); Svoboda, P.; Tuan, N.C.; Havela, L.; Sechovsky, V. ); Robinson, R.A. )

    1993-05-15

    The magnetization of a single crystal of the hexagonal antiferromagnet UPdSn has been studied in fields up to 5 T in order to examine the energetics associated with antiferromagnetic domains. The magnetic unit cell is orthorhombic, so there are three possible domain orientations within the parent lattice. The low-temperature magnetization reflects both spin-flop transition and domain-depopulation effects. Although the interpretation of our results is complicated by the coexistence of these two phenomena, we can conclude that the domain occupancies are history dependent below the spin-reorientation transition which lies at 25 K, but history independent between this transition and [ital T][sub [ital N

  7. Terahertz Antiferromagnetic Spin Hall Nano-Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Xiao, Di; Brataas, Arne

    2016-05-01

    We consider the current-induced dynamics of insulating antiferromagnets in a spin Hall geometry. Sufficiently large in-plane currents perpendicular to the Néel order trigger spontaneous oscillations at frequencies between the acoustic and the optical eigenmodes. The direction of the driving current determines the chirality of the excitation. When the current exceeds a threshold, the combined effect of spin pumping and current-induced torques introduces a dynamic feedback that sustains steady-state oscillations with amplitudes controllable via the applied current. The ac voltage output is calculated numerically as a function of the dc current input for different feedback strengths. Our findings open a route towards terahertz antiferromagnetic spin-torque oscillators.

  8. Weyl magnons in breathing pyrochlore antiferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei-Ye; Li, Yao-Dong; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon; Yu, Yue; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Frustrated quantum magnets not only provide exotic ground states and unusual magnetic structures, but also support unconventional excitations in many cases. Using a physically relevant spin model for a breathing pyrochlore lattice, we discuss the presence of topological linear band crossings of magnons in antiferromagnets. These are the analogues of Weyl fermions in electronic systems, which we dub Weyl magnons. The bulk Weyl magnon implies the presence of chiral magnon surface states forming arcs at finite energy. We argue that such antiferromagnets present a unique example, in which Weyl points can be manipulated in situ in the laboratory by applied fields. We discuss their appearance specifically in the breathing pyrochlore lattice, and give some general discussion of conditions to find Weyl magnons, and how they may be probed experimentally. Our work may inspire a re-examination of the magnetic excitations in many magnetically ordered systems. PMID:27650053

  9. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  10. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  11. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  12. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  13. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  14. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  15. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  16. 3-D Force-balanced Magnetospheric Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Sorin Zaharia; C.Z. Cheng; K. Maezawa

    2003-02-10

    The knowledge of plasma pressure is essential for many physics applications in the magnetosphere, such as computing magnetospheric currents and deriving magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. A thorough knowledge of the 3-D pressure distribution has however eluded the community, as most in-situ pressure observations are either in the ionosphere or the equatorial region of the magnetosphere. With the assumption of pressure isotropy there have been attempts to obtain the pressure at different locations by either (a) mapping observed data (e.g., in the ionosphere) along the field lines of an empirical magnetospheric field model or (b) computing a pressure profile in the equatorial plane (in 2-D) or along the Sun-Earth axis (in 1-D) that is in force balance with the magnetic stresses of an empirical model. However, the pressure distributions obtained through these methods are not in force balance with the empirical magnetic field at all locations. In order to find a global 3-D plasma pressure distribution in force balance with the magnetospheric magnetic field, we have developed the MAG-3D code, that solves the 3-D force balance equation J x B = (upside-down delta) P computationally. Our calculation is performed in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials as B = (upside-down delta) psi x (upside-down delta) alpha. The pressure distribution, P = P(psi,alpha), is prescribed in the equatorial plane and is based on satellite measurements. In addition, computational boundary conditions for y surfaces are imposed using empirical field models. Our results provide 3-D distributions of magnetic field and plasma pressure as well as parallel and transverse currents for both quiet-time and disturbed magnetospheric conditions.

  17. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  18. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  19. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-08

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  20. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  1. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  2. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  3. Characterization of the Antiferromagnetism in Ag(pyz)2(S2O8) with a Two-Dimensional Square Lattice of 4d9 Ag2+ Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J.; Stone, K; Southerland, H; Lancaster, T; Steele, A; Warter, M; Blundell, S; Pratt, F; Baker, P; et al,

    2009-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements show that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) consists of 2D square nets of Ag{sup 2+} ions resulting from the corner-sharing of axially elongated AgN{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedra and exhibits characteristic 2D antiferromagnetism. Nevertheless, {mu}{sup +}SR measurements indicate that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) undergoes 3D magnetic ordering below 7.8(3) K.

  4. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  5. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  6. 3D joint dynamics analysis of healthy children's gait.

    PubMed

    Samson, William; Desroches, Guillaume; Cheze, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2009-11-13

    The 3D joint moments and 2D joint powers have been largely explored in the literature of healthy children's gait, in particular to compare them with pathologic subjects' gait. However, no study reported on 3D joint power in children which could be due to the difficulties in interpreting the results. Recently, the analysis of the 3D angle between the joint moment and the joint angular velocity vectors has been proposed in order to help 3D joint power interpretation. Our hypothesis is that this 3D angle may help in characterizing the level of gait maturation. The present study explores 3D joint moments, 3D joint power and the proposed 3D angle for both children's and adults' gaits to highlight differences in the strategies used. The results seem to confirm that children have an alternative strategy of mainly ankle stabilization and hip propulsion compared to the adults' strategy of mainly ankle resistance and propulsion and hip stabilization. In the future, the same 3D angle analysis should be applied to different age groups for better describing the evolution of the 3D joint dynamic strategies during the growth.

  7. 3D Geo: An Alternative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgopoulos, A.

    2016-10-01

    The expression GEO is mostly used to denote relation to the earth. However it should not be confined to what is related to the earth's surface, as other objects also need three dimensional representation and documentation, like cultural heritage objects. They include both tangible and intangible ones. In this paper the 3D data acquisition and 3D modelling of cultural heritage assets are briefly described and their significance is also highlighted. Moreover the organization of such information, related to monuments and artefacts, into relational data bases and its use for various purposes, other than just geometric documentation is also described and presented. In order to help the reader understand the above, several characteristic examples are presented and their methodology explained and their results evaluated.

  8. Internal structure of hole quasiparticles in antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, B. D.; Gunn, J. M. F.

    1990-04-01

    Holes in an Ising antiferromagnet give rise to quasiparticles with an internal structure associated with the distortion of the spin ordering. We show that the spectrum of excited states (of this internal structure) commences at a lower energy than previously thought, at an energy of the order of the exchange constant. The character of the corresponding states differ from those previously discussed in that the phases associated with the various spin configurations with the same number of spin flips differ. Moreover, these excited states dominate the optical absorption and may explain the experimental results of Thomas et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1313 (1988)].

  9. DYNA3D. Explicit 3-d Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Englemann, B.E. )

    1993-11-30

    DYNA3D is an explicit, three-dimensional, finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. DYNA3D contains 30 material models and 10 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, Blatz-Ko rubber, high explosive burn, hydrodynamic without deviatoric stresses, elastoplastic hydrodynamic, temperature-dependent elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic with failure, soil and crushable foam with failure, Johnson/Cook plasticity model, pseudo TENSOR geological model, elastoplastic with fracture, power law isotropic plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity, rigid, thermal orthotropic, composite damage model, thermal orthotropic with 12 curves, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, inviscid two invariant geologic cap, orthotropic crushable model, Moonsy-Rivlin rubber, resultant plasticity, closed form update shell plasticity, and Frazer-Nash rubber model. The hydrodynamic material models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 10 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, tabulated, and TENSOR pore collapse. DYNA3D generates three binary output databases. One contains information for complete states at infrequent intervals; 50 to 100 states is typical. The second contains information for a subset of nodes and elements at frequent intervals; 1,000 to 10,000 states is typical. The last contains interface data for contact surfaces.

  10. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  11. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  12. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  13. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  14. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  15. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  16. INCORPORATING DYNAMIC 3D SIMULATION INTO PRA

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Prescott; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    provide superior results and insights. We also couple the state model with the dynamic 3D simulation analysis representing events (such as flooding) to determine which (if any) components fail. Not only does the simulation take into account any failed items from the state model, but any failures caused by the simulation are incorporated back into the state model and factored into the overall results. Using this method we incorporate accurate 3D simulation results, eliminate static-based PRA issues, and have time ordered failure information.

  17. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  18. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  19. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  20. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  1. [Computer-assisted 3D phonetography].

    PubMed

    Neuschaefer-Rube, C; Klajman, S

    1996-10-01

    Profiles of fundamental frequency sound pressure levels and voice duration are measured separately in clinical practice. It was the aim of the present study to combine the two examinations, in order to estimate the relationship between pitch, sound pressure level and voice duration and to develop a new computer-assisted graph. A three-dimensional (3D) wireframe phonogram was constructed based on SPL profiles to obtain a general view of the parameters recorded. We have termed this "phonetography". Variable further projections were selected for the analysis of different aspects of parametric relationships. The results in 21 healthy volunteers and 4 patients with hyperfunctional dysphonias demonstrated that there were three typical figures of the 3D phonograms produced, depending on the relationship between voice duration when soft ("piano") compared to loud ("forte"). In one-third of the healthy volunteers, the values of the piano voice duration were greater than those of forte for almost all pitches examined. In two-thirds of the healthy subjects the values of forte voice duration were partly greater, as were those of piano voice duration. All of the patients showed voice duration values greater for forte than for piano. The results of the study demonstrate that the 3D phonogram is a useful tool for obtaining new insights into various relationships of voice parameters.

  2. 3D stochastic inversion of magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipour, Pejman; Chouteau, Michel; Marcotte, Denis

    2011-04-01

    A stochastic inversion method based on a geostatistical approach is presented to recover 3D susceptibility models from magnetic data. The aim of applying geostatistics is to provide quantitative descriptions of natural variables distributed in space or in time and space. Cokriging, the method which is used in this paper, is a method of estimation that minimizes the theoretical estimation error variance by using auto- and cross-correlations of several variables. The covariances for total field, susceptibility and total field-susceptibility are estimated using the observed data. Then, the susceptibility is cokriged or simulated as the primary variable. In order to avoid the natural tendency of the estimated structure to lay near the surface, depth weighting is included in the cokriging system. The algorithm assumes there is no remanent magnetization and the observation data represent only induced magnetization effects. The method is applied on different synthetic models to demonstrate its suitability for 3D inversion of magnetic data. A case study using ground measurements of total field at the Perseverance mine (Quebec, Canada) is presented. The recovered 3D susceptibility model provides beneficial information that can be used to analyze the geology of massive sulfide for the domain under study.

  3. DRACO development for 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, Milad; Moses, Gregory

    2006-10-01

    The DRACO (r-z) lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics laser fusion simulation code is being extended to model 3D hydrodynamics in (x-y-z) coordinates with hexahedral cells on a structured grid. The equation of motion is solved with a lagrangian update with optional rezoning. The fluid equations are solved using an explicit scheme based on (Schulz, 1964) while the SALE-3D algorithm (Amsden, 1981) is used as a template for computing cell volumes and other quantities. A second order rezoner has been added which uses linear interpolation of the underlying continuous functions to preserve accuracy (Van Leer, 1976). Artificial restoring force terms and smoothing algorithms are used to avoid grid distortion in high aspect ratio cells. These include alternate node couplers along with a rotational restoring force based on the Tensor Code (Maenchen, 1964). Electron and ion thermal conduction is modeled using an extension of Kershaw's method (Kershaw, 1981) to 3D geometry. Test problem simulations will be presented to demonstrate the applicability of this new version of DRACO to the study of fluid instabilities in three dimensions.

  4. Electrical switching of an antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungwirth, Tomas

    Louis Néel pointed out in his Nobel lecture that while abundant and interesting from theoretical viewpoint, antiferromagnets did not seem to have any applications. Indeed, the alternating directions of magnetic moments on individual atoms and the resulting zero net magnetization make antiferromagnets hard to control by tools common in ferromagnets. Strong coupling would be achieved if the externally generated field had a sign alternating on the scale of a lattice constant at which moments alternate in AFMs. However, generating such a field has been regarded unfeasible, hindering the research and applications of these abundant magnetic materials. We have recently predicted that relativistic quantum mechanics may offer staggered current induced fields with the sign alternating within the magnetic unit cell which can facilitate a reversible switching of an antiferromagnet by applying electrical currents with comparable efficiency to ferromagnets. Among suitable materials is a high Néel temperature antiferromagnet, tetragonal-phase CuMnAs, which we have recently synthesized in the form of single-crystal epilayers structurally compatible with common semiconductors. We demonstrate electrical writing and read-out, combined with the insensitivity to magnetic field perturbations, in a proof-of-concept antiferromagnetic memory device. We acknowledge support from European Research Council Advanced Grant No. 268066.

  5. Teat Morphology Characterization With 3D Imaging.

    PubMed

    Vesterinen, Heidi M; Corfe, Ian J; Sinkkonen, Ville; Iivanainen, Antti; Jernvall, Jukka; Laakkonen, Juha

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to visualize, in a novel way, the morphological characteristics of bovine teats to gain a better understanding of the detailed teat morphology. We applied silicone casting and 3D digital imaging in order to obtain a more detailed image of the teat structures than that seen in previous studies. Teat samples from 65 dairy cows over 12 months of age were obtained from cows slaughtered at an abattoir. The teats were classified according to the teat condition scoring used in Finland and the lengths of the teat canals were measured. Silicone molds were made from the external teat surface surrounding the teat orifice and from the internal surface of the teat consisting of the papillary duct, Fürstenberg's rosette, and distal part of the teat cistern. The external and internal surface molds of 35 cows were scanned with a 3D laser scanner. The molds and the digital 3D models were used to evaluate internal and external teat surface morphology. A number of measurements were taken from the silicone molds. The 3D models reproduced the morphology of the teats accurately with high repeatability. Breed didn't correlate with the teat classification score. The rosette was found to have significant variation in its size and number of mucosal folds. The internal surface morphology of the rosette did not correlate with the external surface morphology of the teat implying that it is relatively independent of milking parameters that may impact the teat canal and the external surface of the teat. PMID:25382725

  6. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  7. Reversible optical switching of antiferromagnetism in TbMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manz, Sebastian; Matsubara, Masakazu; Lottermoser, Thomas; Büchi, Jonathan; Iyama, Ayato; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Meier, Dennis; Fiebig, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    Lasers can be used to control the magnetization of a ferromagnet via optically driven thermal and electronic excitation. Transfer of this concept to antiferromagnets is appealing because of the increasing technological interest in antiferromagnetism. Controlling spin structures in antiferromagnets is challenging, however, because of their zero magnetization. In a proof-of-principle experiment we demonstrate that optical control of antiferromagnetic domains is nevertheless possible. We reverse the antiferromagnetic order parameter in multiferroic TbMnO3 repeatedly, using light pulses of two different colours. Switching depends on a unique relation between the wavelength of the light, its optical absorption and the electric polarization field induced by the antiferromagnetic order of TbMnO3. We then demonstrate sequential laser-controlled writing and erasure of antiferromagnetic domains. The universality of reversible optical antiferromagnetic switching is derived by Monte Carlo simulations. Opto-magnetism is thus complemented by an important degree of freedom, namely local control of antiferromagnetism by means of light.

  8. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  9. Gravitation in 3D Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubenstein, John; Cockream, Kandi

    2009-05-01

    3D spacetime was developed by the IWPD Scale Metrics (SM) team using a coordinate system that translates n dimensions to n-1. 4-vectors are expressed in 3D along with a scaling factor representing time. Time is not orthogonal to the three spatial dimensions, but rather in alignment with an object's axis-of-motion. We have defined this effect as the object's ``orientation'' (X). The SM orientation (X) is equivalent to the orientation of the 4-velocity vector positioned tangent to its worldline, where X-1=θ+1 and θ is the angle of the 4-vector relative to the axis-of -motion. Both 4-vectors and SM appear to represent valid conceptualizations of the relationship between space and time. Why entertain SM? Scale Metrics gravity is quantized and may suggest a path for the full unification of gravitation with quantum theory. SM has been tested against current observation and is in agreement with the age of the universe, suggests a physical relationship between dark energy and dark matter, is in agreement with the accelerating expansion rate of the universe, contributes to the understanding of the fine-structure constant and provides a physical explanation of relativistic effects.

  10. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  11. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  12. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  13. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  14. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  15. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  16. Ferro- and antiferro-magnetism in (Np, Pu)BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimczuk, T.; Shick, A. B.; Kozub, A. L.; Griveau, J.-C.; Colineau, E.; Falmbigl, M.; Wastin, F.; Rogl, P.

    2015-04-01

    Two new transuranium metal boron carbides, NpBC and PuBC, have been synthesized. Rietveld refinements of powder XRD patterns of {Np,Pu}BC confirmed in both cases isotypism with the structure type of UBC. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility data reveal antiferromagnetic ordering for PuBC below TN = 44 K, whereas ferromagnetic ordering was found for NpBC below TC = 61 K. Heat capacity measurements prove the bulk character of the observed magnetic transition for both compounds. The total energy electronic band structure calculations support formation of the ferromagnetic ground state for NpBC and the antiferromagnetic ground state for PuBC.

  17. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  18. Ising antiferromagnet on the 2-uniform lattices.

    PubMed

    Yu, Unjong

    2016-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising model is investigated on the twenty 2-uniform lattices using the Monte Carlo method based on the Wang-Landau algorithm and the Metropolis algorithm to study the geometric frustration effect systematically. Based on the specific heat, the residual entropy, and the Edwards-Anderson freezing order parameter, the ground states of them were determined. In addition to the long-range-ordered phase and the spin ice phase found in the Archimedean lattices, two more phases were found. The partial long-range order is long-range order with exceptional disordered sites, which give extensive residual entropy. In the partial spin ice phase, the partial freezing phenomenon appears: A majority of sites are frozen without long-range order, but the other sites are fluctuating even at zero temperature. The spin liquid ground state was not found in the 2-uniform lattices. PMID:27627251

  19. Ising antiferromagnet on the 2-uniform lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2016-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising model is investigated on the twenty 2-uniform lattices using the Monte Carlo method based on the Wang-Landau algorithm and the Metropolis algorithm to study the geometric frustration effect systematically. Based on the specific heat, the residual entropy, and the Edwards-Anderson freezing order parameter, the ground states of them were determined. In addition to the long-range-ordered phase and the spin ice phase found in the Archimedean lattices, two more phases were found. The partial long-range order is long-range order with exceptional disordered sites, which give extensive residual entropy. In the partial spin ice phase, the partial freezing phenomenon appears: A majority of sites are frozen without long-range order, but the other sites are fluctuating even at zero temperature. The spin liquid ground state was not found in the 2-uniform lattices.

  20. Thermophoresis of an antiferromagnetic soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-07-01

    We study the dynamics of an antiferromagnetic soliton under a temperature gradient. To this end, we start by phenomenologically constructing the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for an antiferromagnet with the aid of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We then derive the Langevin equation for the soliton's center of mass by the collective coordinate approach. An antiferromagentic soliton behaves as a classical massive particle immersed in a viscous medium. By considering a thermodynamic ensemble of solitons, we obtain the Fokker-Planck equation, from which we extract the average drift velocity of a soliton. The diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to a small damping constant α , which can yield a drift velocity of tens of m/s under a temperature gradient of 1 K/mm for a domain wall in an easy-axis antiferromagnetic wire with α ˜10-4 .

  1. 3D model-based still image object categorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Raluca-Diana; Zaharia, Titus

    2011-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel recognition scheme algorithm for semantic labeling of 2D object present in still images. The principle consists of matching unknown 2D objects with categorized 3D models in order to infer the semantics of the 3D object to the image. We tested our new recognition framework by using the MPEG-7 and Princeton 3D model databases in order to label unknown images randomly selected from the web. Results obtained show promising performances, with recognition rate up to 84%, which opens interesting perspectives in terms of semantic metadata extraction from still images/videos.

  2. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  3. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  4. Met.3D - a new open-source tool for interactive 3D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Kern, Michael; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    We introduce Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output -- 3D visualisation, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3D context. It implements methods that address the issue of spatial perception in the 3D view as well as approaches to using the ensemble in order to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to the Met.3D approach. The tool uses modern graphics hardware technology to achieve interactive visualization of present-day numerical weather prediction datasets on standard consumer hardware. Met.3D supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and operates directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the software --illustrated with short video examples--, and give information on its availability.

  5. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  6. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Castillo-León, Jaime; Emnéus, Jenny; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements. PMID:22163508

  7. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  8. Improving 3d Spatial Queries Search: Newfangled Technique of Space Filling Curves in 3d City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uznir, U.; Anton, F.; Suhaibah, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Mioc, D.

    2013-09-01

    The advantages of three dimensional (3D) city models can be seen in various applications including photogrammetry, urban and regional planning, computer games, etc.. They expand the visualization and analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems on cities, and they can be developed using web standards. However, these 3D city models consume much more storage compared to two dimensional (2D) spatial data. They involve extra geometrical and topological information together with semantic data. Without a proper spatial data clustering method and its corresponding spatial data access method, retrieving portions of and especially searching these 3D city models, will not be done optimally. Even though current developments are based on an open data model allotted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) called CityGML, its XML-based structure makes it challenging to cluster the 3D urban objects. In this research, we propose an opponent data constellation technique of space-filling curves (3D Hilbert curves) for 3D city model data representation. Unlike previous methods, that try to project 3D or n-dimensional data down to 2D or 3D using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Hilbert mappings, in this research, we extend the Hilbert space-filling curve to one higher dimension for 3D city model data implementations. The query performance was tested using a CityGML dataset of 1,000 building blocks and the results are presented in this paper. The advantages of implementing space-filling curves in 3D city modeling will improve data retrieval time by means of optimized 3D adjacency, nearest neighbor information and 3D indexing. The Hilbert mapping, which maps a subinterval of the [0, 1] interval to the corresponding portion of the d-dimensional Hilbert's curve, preserves the Lebesgue measure and is Lipschitz continuous. Depending on the applications, several alternatives are possible in order to cluster spatial data together in the third dimension compared to its

  9. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  10. Enhanced antiferromagnetic coupling in dual-synthetic antiferromagnet with Co2FeAl electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D. L.; Xu, X. G.; Wu, Y.; Li, X. Q.; Miao, J.; Jiang, Y.

    2012-05-01

    We study dual-synthetic antiferromagnets (DSyAFs) using Co2FeAl (CFA) Heusler electrodes with a stack structure of Ta/CFA/Ru/CFA/Ru/CFA/Ta. When the thicknesses of the two Ru layers are 0.45 nm, 0.65 nm or 0.45 nm, 1.00 nm, the CFA-based DSyAF has a strong antiferromagnetic coupling between adjacent CFA layers at room temperature with a saturation magnetic field of ∼11,000 Oe, a saturation magnetization of ∼710 emu/cm3 and a coercivity of ∼2.0 Oe. Moreover, the DSyAF has a good thermal stability up to 400 °C, at which CFA films show B2-ordered structure. Therefore, the CFA-based DSyAFs are favorable for applications in future spintronic devices.

  11. Mechanism of Basal-Plane Antiferromagnetism in the Spin-Orbit Driven Iridate Ba2IrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katukuri, Vamshi M.; Yushankhai, Viktor; Siurakshina, Liudmila; van den Brink, Jeroen; Hozoi, Liviu; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis

    2014-04-01

    By ab initio many-body quantum chemistry calculations, we determine the strength of the symmetric anisotropy in the 5d5 j≈1/2 layered material Ba2IrO4. While the calculated anisotropic couplings come out in the range of a few meV, orders of magnitude stronger than in analogous 3d transition-metal compounds, the Heisenberg superexchange still defines the largest energy scale. The ab initio results reveal that individual layers of Ba2IrO4 provide a close realization of the quantum spin-1/2 Heisenberg-compass model on the square lattice. We show that the experimentally observed basal-plane antiferromagnetism can be accounted for by including additional interlayer interactions and the associated order-by-disorder quantum-mechanical effects, in analogy to undoped layered cuprates.

  12. The PRISM3D paleoenvironmental reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.; Robinson, M.; Haywood, A.M.; Salzmann, U.; Hill, Daniel; Sohl, L.E.; Chandler, M.; Williams, Mark; Foley, K.; Stoll, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    The Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) paleoenvironmental reconstruction is an internally consistent and comprehensive global synthesis of a past interval of relatively warm and stable climate. It is regularly used in model studies that aim to better understand Pliocene climate, to improve model performance in future climate scenarios, and to distinguish model-dependent climate effects. The PRISM reconstruction is constantly evolving in order to incorporate additional geographic sites and environmental parameters, and is continuously refined by independent research findings. The new PRISM three dimensional (3D) reconstruction differs from previous PRISM reconstructions in that it includes a subsurface ocean temperature reconstruction, integrates geochemical sea surface temperature proxies to supplement the faunal-based temperature estimates, and uses numerical models for the first time to augment fossil data. Here we describe the components of PRISM3D and describe new findings specific to the new reconstruction. Highlights of the new PRISM3D reconstruction include removal of Hudson Bay and the Great Lakes and creation of open waterways in locations where the current bedrock elevation is less than 25m above modern sea level, due to the removal of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and the reduction of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The mid-Piacenzian oceans were characterized by a reduced east-west temperature gradient in the equatorial Pacific, but PRISM3D data do not imply permanent El Niño conditions. The reduced equator-to-pole temperature gradient that characterized previous PRISM reconstructions is supported by significant displacement of vegetation belts toward the poles, is extended into the Arctic Ocean, and is confirmed by multiple proxies in PRISM3D. Arctic warmth coupled with increased dryness suggests the formation of warm and salty paleo North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and a more vigorous thermohaline circulation system that may

  13. Needle segmentation using 3D Hough transform in 3D TRUS guided prostate transperineal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Wu; Yuchi Ming; Ding Mingyue; Tessier, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Prostate adenocarcinoma is the most common noncutaneous malignancy in American men with over 200 000 new cases diagnosed each year. Prostate interventional therapy, such as cryotherapy and brachytherapy, is an effective treatment for prostate cancer. Its success relies on the correct needle implant position. This paper proposes a robust and efficient needle segmentation method, which acts as an aid to localize the needle in three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate therapy. Methods: The procedure of locating the needle in a 3D TRUS image is a three-step process. First, the original 3D ultrasound image containing a needle is cropped; the cropped image is then converted to a binary format based on its histogram. Second, a 3D Hough transform based needle segmentation method is applied to the 3D binary image in order to locate the needle axis. The position of the needle endpoint is finally determined by an optimal threshold based analysis of the intensity probability distribution. The overall efficiency is improved through implementing a coarse-fine searching strategy. The proposed method was validated in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms, chicken breast phantoms, and 3D TRUS patient images from prostate brachytherapy and cryotherapy procedures by comparison to the manual segmentation. The robustness of the proposed approach was tested by means of varying parameters such as needle insertion angle, needle insertion length, binarization threshold level, and cropping size. Results: The validation results indicate that the proposed Hough transform based method is accurate and robust, with an achieved endpoint localization accuracy of 0.5 mm for agar phantom images, 0.7 mm for chicken breast phantom images, and 1 mm for in vivo patient cryotherapy and brachytherapy images. The mean execution time of needle segmentation algorithm was 2 s for a 3D TRUS image with size of 264 Multiplication-Sign 376 Multiplication-Sign 630 voxels. Conclusions

  14. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications. PMID:25902277

  15. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  16. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B; Golobic, Alexandra M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Worsley, Marcus A

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  17. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  18. Adapting 3D Equilibrium Reconstruction to Reconstruct Weakly 3D H-mode Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianciosa, M. R.; Hirshman, S. P.; Seal, S. K.; Unterberg, E. A.; Wilcox, R. S.; Wingen, A.; Hanson, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    The application of resonant magnetic perturbations for edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation breaks the toroidal symmetry of tokamaks. In these scenarios, the axisymmetric assumptions of the Grad-Shafranov equation no longer apply. By extension, equilibrium reconstruction tools, built around these axisymmetric assumptions, are insufficient to fully reconstruct a 3D perturbed equilibrium. 3D reconstruction tools typically work on systems where the 3D components of signals are a significant component of the input signals. In nominally axisymmetric systems, applied field perturbations can be on the order of 1% of the main field or less. To reconstruct these equilibria, the 3D component of signals must be isolated from the axisymmetric portions to provide the necessary information for reconstruction. This presentation will report on the adaptation to V3FIT for application on DIII-D H-mode discharges with applied resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). Newly implemented motional stark effect signals and modeling of electric field effects will also be discussed. Work supported under U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  20. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  2. Lattice Boltzmann Method for 3-D Flows with Curved Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Shyy, Wei; Yu, Dazhi; Luo, Li-Shi

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we investigate two issues that are important to computational efficiency and reliability in fluid dynamics applications of the lattice, Boltzmann equation (LBE): (1) Computational stability and accuracy of different lattice Boltzmann models and (2) the treatment of the boundary conditions on curved solid boundaries and their 3-D implementations. Three athermal 3-D LBE models (D3QI5, D3Ql9, and D3Q27) are studied and compared in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and robustness. The boundary treatment recently developed by Filippova and Hanel and Met et al. in 2-D is extended to and implemented for 3-D. The convergence, stability, and computational efficiency of the 3-D LBE models with the boundary treatment for curved boundaries were tested in simulations of four 3-D flows: (1) Fully developed flows in a square duct, (2) flow in a 3-D lid-driven cavity, (3) fully developed flows in a circular pipe, and (4) a uniform flow over a sphere. We found that while the fifteen-velocity 3-D (D3Ql5) model is more prone to numerical instability and the D3Q27 is more computationally intensive, the 63Q19 model provides a balance between computational reliability and efficiency. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrated that the boundary treatment for 3-D arbitrary curved geometry has second-order accuracy and possesses satisfactory stability characteristics.

  3. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  4. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    PubMed Central

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; López-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.-W.; Park, B.-G.; Balcells, Ll.; Martí, X.; Jungwirth, T.; Martínez, B.

    2016-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature. PMID:27762278

  5. 3D-Pathology: a real-time system for quantitative diagnostic pathology and visualisation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottrup, Christian; Beckett, Mark G.; Hager, Henrik; Locht, Peter

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents the results of the 3D-Pathology project conducted under the European EC Framework 5. The aim of the project was, through the application of 3D image reconstruction and visualization techniques, to improve the diagnostic and prognostic capabilities of medical personnel when analyzing pathological specimens using transmitted light microscopy. A fully automated, computer-controlled microscope system has been developed to capture 3D images of specimen content. 3D image reconstruction algorithms have been implemented and applied to the acquired volume data in order to facilitate the subsequent 3D visualization of the specimen. Three potential application fields, immunohistology, cromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and cytology, have been tested using the prototype system. For both immunohistology and CISH, use of the system furnished significant additional information to the pathologist.

  6. 3D Multigroup Sn Neutron Transport Code

    2001-02-14

    ATTILA is a 3D multigroup transport code with arbitrary order ansotropic scatter. The transport equation is solved in first order form using a tri-linear discontinuous spatial differencing on an arbitrary tetrahedral mesh. The overall solution technique is source iteration with DSA acceleration of the scattering source. Anisotropic boundary and internal sources may be entered in the form of spherical harmonics moments. Alpha and k eigenvalue problems are allowed, as well as fixed source problems. Forwardmore » and adjoint solutions are available. Reflective, vacumn, and source boundary conditions are available. ATTILA can perform charged particle transport calculations using slowing down (CSD) terms. ATTILA can also be used to peform infra-red steady-state calculations for radiative transfer purposes.« less

  7. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  8. Locomotive wheel 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xin; Luo, Zhisheng; Gao, Xiaorong; Wu, Jianle

    2010-08-01

    In the article, a system, which is used to reconstruct locomotive wheels, is described, helping workers detect the condition of a wheel through a direct view. The system consists of a line laser, a 2D camera, and a computer. We use 2D camera to capture the line-laser light reflected by the object, a wheel, and then compute the final coordinates of the structured light. Finally, using Matlab programming language, we transform the coordinate of points to a smooth surface and illustrate the 3D view of the wheel. The article also proposes the system structure, processing steps and methods, and sets up an experimental platform to verify the design proposal. We verify the feasibility of the whole process, and analyze the results comparing to standard date. The test results show that this system can work well, and has a high accuracy on the reconstruction. And because there is still no such application working in railway industries, so that it has practical value in railway inspection system.

  9. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  10. Orientational transitions in antiferromagnetic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Petrov, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The orientational phases in an antiferromagnetic liquid crystal (ferronematic) based on the nematic liquid crystal with the negative anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility are studied in the framework of the continuum theory. The ferronematic was assumed to be compensated; i.e., in zero field, impurity ferroparticles with the magnetic moments directed parallel and antiparallel to the director are equiprobably distributed in it. It is established that under the action of a magnetic field the ferronematic undergoes orientational transitions compensated (antiferromagnetic) phase-non-uniform phase-saturation (ferrimagnetic) phase. The analytical expressions for threshold fields of the transitions as functions of material parameters are obtained. It is shown that with increasing magnetic impurity segregation parameter, the threshold fields of the transitions significantly decrease. The bifurcation diagram of the ferronematic orientational phases is built in terms of the energy of anchoring of magnetic particles with the liquid-crystal matrix and magnetic field. It is established that the Freedericksz transition is the second-order phase transition, while the transition to the saturation state can be second- or first-order. In the latter case, the suspension exhibits orientational bistability. The orientational and magnetooptical properties of the ferronematic in different applied magnetic fields are studied.

  11. Glnemo2: Interactive Visualization 3D Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles

    2011-10-01

    Glnemo2 is an interactive 3D visualization program developed in C++ using the OpenGL library and Nokia QT 4.X API. It displays in 3D the particles positions of the different components of an nbody snapshot. It quickly gives a lot of information about the data (shape, density area, formation of structures such as spirals, bars, or peanuts). It allows for in/out zooms, rotations, changes of scale, translations, selection of different groups of particles and plots in different blending colors. It can color particles according to their density or temperature, play with the density threshold, trace orbits, display different time steps, take automatic screenshots to make movies, select particles using the mouse, and fly over a simulation using a given camera path. All these features are accessible from a very intuitive graphic user interface. Glnemo2 supports a wide range of input file formats (Nemo, Gadget 1 and 2, phiGrape, Ramses, list of files, realtime gyrfalcON simulation) which are automatically detected at loading time without user intervention. Glnemo2 uses a plugin mechanism to load the data, so that it is easy to add a new file reader. It's powered by a 3D engine which uses the latest OpenGL technology, such as shaders (glsl), vertex buffer object, frame buffer object, and takes in account the power of the graphic card used in order to accelerate the rendering. With a fast GPU, millions of particles can be rendered in real time. Glnemo2 runs on Linux, Windows (using minGW compiler), and MaxOSX, thanks to the QT4API.

  12. Antiferromagnetism in 2D arrays of superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidović, D.; Kumar, S.; Reich, D. H.; Siegel, J.; Field, S. B.; Tiberio, R. C.; Hey, R.; Ploog, K.

    1996-03-01

    An array of isolated superconducting rings at Φ_0/2 applied flux is equivalent to a 2D random field Ising antiferromagnet. The quantized magnetic moments of the rings play the role of Ising spins, and small variations in the rings' areas lead to a Gaussian random field. Using SQUID magnetometry and scanning Hall probe microscopy, we studied the dynamics and antiferromagnetic correlations of arrays of micron-size Al rings, arranged on square, honeycomb, triangular, and kagomé lattices. All the arrays exhibit short range antiferromagnetic order. Spin freezing at low temperatures and the random field prevent the development of long range correlations on bipartite lattices. Effects of geometrical frustration on the triangular and kagomé lattices were also observed.

  13. Spin dynamics simulations for a nanoscale Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhuofei; Landau, D. P.; Brown, G.; Stocks, G. M.

    2010-03-01

    Thermoinduced magnetization(TiM) is a novel response which was predicted to occur in nanoscale antiferromagnetic materials. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations footnotetextG. Brown, A. Janotti, M. Eisenbach, and G. M. Stocks, Phys.Rev.B 72, 140405(2005) have shown that TiM is an intrinsic property of the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model below the Neel temperature. To obtain a fundamental understanding of TiM, spin dynamics(SD) simulations are performed to study the spin wave behavior, which seems to be the cause of TiM. A classical Heisenberg model with an antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor exchange interaction and uniaxial single-site anisotropy is studied. Simple-cubic lattices with free boundary conditions are used. We employed the fast spin dynamics algorithms with fourth-order Suzuki-Trotter decompositions of the exponential operator. Additional small excitation peaks due to surface effects are found in transverse S(q,w).

  14. ECG gated tomographic reconstruction for 3-D rotational coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yining; Xie, Lizhe; Nunes, Jean Claude; Bellanger, Jean Jacques; Bedossa, Marc; Toumoulin, Christine

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for 3-D reconstruction of coronary from a limited number of projections in rotational angiography. A Bayesian maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation is applied with a Poisson distributed projection to reconstruct the 3D coronary tree at a given instant of the cardiac cycle. Several regularizers are investigated L0-norm, L1 and L2 -norm in order to take into account the sparsity of the data. Evaluations are reported on simulated data obtained from a 3D dynamic sequence acquired on a 64-slice GE LightSpeed CT scan. A performance study is conducted to evaluate the quality of the reconstruction of the structures. PMID:21096844

  15. Designing Virtual Museum Using Web3D Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianghai

    VRT was born to have the potentiality of constructing an effective learning environment due to its 3I characteristics: Interaction, Immersion and Imagination. It is now applied in education in a more profound way along with the development of VRT. Virtual Museum is one of the applications. The Virtual Museum is based on the WEB3D technology and extensibility is the most important factor. Considering the advantage and disadvantage of each WEB3D technology, VRML, CULT3D AND VIEWPOINT technologies are chosen. A web chatroom based on flash and ASP technology is also been created in order to make the Virtual Museum an interactive learning environment.

  16. Suitability for 3D Printed Parts for Laboratory Use

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicker, Andrew P.; Bloom, Josh; Albertson, Robert; Gershman, Sophia

    2014-08-01

    3D printing has become popular for a variety of users, from industrial to the home hobbyist, to scientists and engineers interested in producing their own laboratory equipment. In order to determine the suitability of 3D printed parts for our plasma physics laboratory, we measured the accuracy, strength, vacuum compatibility, and electrical properties of pieces printed in plastic. The flexibility of rapidly creating custom parts has led to the 3D printer becoming an invaluable resource in our laboratory and is equally suitable for producing equipment for advanced undergraduate laboratories.

  17. An unusual 3D interdigitated architecture assembled from Keggin polyoxometalates and dinuclear copper(II) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Haijun; Yang, Ming; Kang, Lu; Ma, Huiyuan; Liu, Bo; Li, Shaobin; Liu, Heng

    2013-02-15

    A novel organic-inorganic hybrid compound, [Cu{sub 2}(bipy){sub 3}({mu}{sub 1}-H{sub 2}O){sub 2}({mu}{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH)(H{sub 2}BW{sub 12}O{sub 40})]{center_dot}4 H{sub 2}O (1) (bipy=4,4 Prime -bipy), has been synthesized in hydrothermal condition and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectrum, TG analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 possesses poly-pendant layered motifs composed of 12-tungstoborates and dinuclear copper(II) complexes, in which the mono-coordinated bipy molecules are orderly appended to both sides of the layer, respectively. Adjacent layers mutually engage in a zipper-like pattern to result in a novel 3D interdigitated architecture. The variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility of 1 showed that there existed weak antiferromagnetic interaction in 1. Toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, 1 has good electrocatalytic activity and remarkable stability. - A new compound has been obtained, which represents the first interdigitated architecture assembled by POMs and dinuclear copper(II) complexes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first example of interdigitated architecture assembled by POMs and dinuclear copper(II) complexes is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zipper-like pattern is observed in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The IR, TG, XRPD, magnetism and electrochemical property of the title compound were studied.

  18. Forward ramp in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's forward rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This ramp was not used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. When this image was taken, Sojourner was still latched to one of the lander's petals, waiting for the command sequence that would execute its descent off of the lander's petal.

    The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine whether to deploy the rover using the forward or backward ramps and the nature of the first rover traverse. The metallic object at the lower left of the image is the lander's low-gain antenna. The square at the end of the ramp is one of the spacecraft's magnetic targets. Dust that accumulates on the magnetic targets will later be examined by Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer instrument for chemical analysis. At right, a lander petal is visible.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  19. 3D grain boundary migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. K.; Bons, P. D.

    2009-04-01

    Microstructures of rocks play an important role in determining rheological properties and help to reveal the processes that lead to their formation. Some of these processes change the microstructure significantly and may thus have the opposite effect in obliterating any fabrics indicative of the previous history of the rocks. One of these processes is grain boundary migration (GBM). During static recrystallisation, GBM may produce a foam texture that completely overprints a pre-existing grain boundary network and GBM actively influences the rheology of a rock, via its influence on grain size and lattice defect concentration. We here present a new numerical simulation software that is capable of simulating a whole range of processes on the grain scale (it is not limited to grain boundary migration). The software is polyhedron-based, meaning that each grain (or phase) is represented by a polyhedron that has discrete boundaries. The boundary (the shell) of the polyhedron is defined by a set of facets which in turn is defined by a set of vertices. Each structural entity (polyhedron, facets and vertices) can have an unlimited number of parameters (depending on the process to be modeled) such as surface energy, concentration, etc. which can be used to calculate changes of the microstructre. We use the processes of grain boundary migration of a "regular" and a partially molten rock to demonstrate the software. Since this software is 3D, the formation of melt networks in a partially molten rock can also be studied. The interconnected melt network is of fundamental importance for melt segregation and migration in the crust and mantle and can help to understand the core-mantle differentiation of large terrestrial planets.

  20. Validation of 3D multimodality roadmapping in interventional neuroradiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruijters, Daniel; Homan, Robert; Mielekamp, Peter; van de Haar, Peter; Babic, Drazenko

    2011-08-01

    Three-dimensional multimodality roadmapping is entering clinical routine utilization for neuro-vascular treatment. Its purpose is to navigate intra-arterial and intra-venous endovascular devices through complex vascular anatomy by fusing pre-operative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) with the live fluoroscopy image. The fused image presents the real-time position of the intra-vascular devices together with the patient's 3D vascular morphology and its soft-tissue context. This paper investigates the effectiveness, accuracy, robustness and computation times of the described methods in order to assess their suitability for the intended clinical purpose: accurate interventional navigation. The mutual information-based 3D-3D registration proved to be of sub-voxel accuracy and yielded an average registration error of 0.515 mm and the live machine-based 2D-3D registration delivered an average error of less than 0.2 mm. The capture range of the image-based 3D-3D registration was investigated to characterize its robustness, and yielded an extent of 35 mm and 25° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) with CT, and 15 mm and 20° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3DRA with MR data. The image-based 3D-3D registration could be computed within 8 s, while applying the machine-based 2D-3D registration only took 1.5 µs, which makes them very suitable for interventional use.

  1. Validation of 3D multimodality roadmapping in interventional neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Ruijters, Daniel; Homan, Robert; Mielekamp, Peter; van de Haar, Peter; Babic, Drazenko

    2011-08-21

    Three-dimensional multimodality roadmapping is entering clinical routine utilization for neuro-vascular treatment. Its purpose is to navigate intra-arterial and intra-venous endovascular devices through complex vascular anatomy by fusing pre-operative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) with the live fluoroscopy image. The fused image presents the real-time position of the intra-vascular devices together with the patient's 3D vascular morphology and its soft-tissue context. This paper investigates the effectiveness, accuracy, robustness and computation times of the described methods in order to assess their suitability for the intended clinical purpose: accurate interventional navigation. The mutual information-based 3D-3D registration proved to be of sub-voxel accuracy and yielded an average registration error of 0.515 mm and the live machine-based 2D-3D registration delivered an average error of less than 0.2 mm. The capture range of the image-based 3D-3D registration was investigated to characterize its robustness, and yielded an extent of 35 mm and 25° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) with CT, and 15 mm and 20° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3DRA with MR data. The image-based 3D-3D registration could be computed within 8 s, while applying the machine-based 2D-3D registration only took 1.5 µs, which makes them very suitable for interventional use. PMID:21799235

  2. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiuqing; Yi, Xin; Xiao, Kang; Li, Shunbo; Kodzius, Rimantas; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2010-10-01

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes. The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  3. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  4. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  5. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology.

  6. Beowulf 3D: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Rob

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the creative and technical challenges encountered during the production of "Beowulf 3D," director Robert Zemeckis' adaptation of the Old English epic poem and the first film to be simultaneously released in IMAX 3D and digital 3D formats.

  7. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  8. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  9. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  10. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  11. A Mean Field Analysis of the Exchange Coupling (J) For 2- and 3-D Structured Tetracyanoethylenide (TCNE -)-based Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Amber C.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Miller, Joel S.

    2012-01-01

    Mean field expressions based on the simple Heisenberg model were derived to correlate the inter- and intralayer exchange coupling to the critical temperatures, Tc, for several TCNE (tetracyanoethylene) based magnets with extended 2- and 3-D structure types. These expressions were used to estimate the exchange coupling, J, for 2-D ferrimagnetic [MII(TCNE)(NCMe)2]+ (M = Mn, Fe), 3-D antiferromagnetic MnII(TCNE)[C4(CN)8]1/2, and 3-D ferrimagnetic MnII(TCNE)3/2(I3)1/2. The sign and magnitude of the exchange coupling are in accord with previously reported magnetic data.

  12. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  13. EuNiGe₃, an anisotropic antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Maurya, A; Bonville, P; Thamizhavel, A; Dhar, S K

    2014-05-28

    Single crystals of EuNiGe3, crystallizing in the non-centrosymmetric BaNiSn3-type structure, were grown using In flux, enabling us to explore the anisotropic magnetic properties, which was not possible with previously reported polycrystalline samples. The EuNiGe3 single crystalline sample is found to order antiferromagnetically at 13.2 K, as revealed from the magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity and electrical resistivity data. The low temperature magnetization M (H) is distinctly different for the field parallel to the ab-plane and c-axis; the ab-plane magnetization varies almost linearly with the field before the occurrence of an induced ferromagnetic (FM) phase (spin-flip) at 6.2 Tesla. On the other hand M (H) along the c-axis is accompanied by two metamagnetic transitions followed by a spin-flip at 4.1 T. A model including anisotropic exchange and dipole-dipole interactions reproduces the main features of magnetization plots but falls short of full representation. (H,T) phase diagrams have been constructed for the field applied along the principal directions. From the (151)Eu Mössbauer spectra, we determine that the 13.2 K transition leads to an incommensurate antiferromagnetic (AFM) intermediate phase followed by a transition near 10.5 K to a commensurate AFM configuration. PMID:24787717

  14. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  15. RELAP5-3D User Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Riemke, Richard Allan

    2002-09-01

    The Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program with 3D capability1 (RELAP5-3D) is a reactor system analysis code that has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The 3D capability in RELAP5-3D includes 3D hydrodynamics2 and 3D neutron kinetics3,4. Assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability in RELAP5-3D is discussed in the literature5,6,7,8,9,10. Additional assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability of RELAP5-3D will be presented in other papers in this users seminar. As with any software, user problems occur. User problems usually fall into the categories of input processing failure, code execution failure, restart/renodalization failure, unphysical result, and installation. This presentation will discuss some of the more generic user problems that have been reported on RELAP5-3D as well as their resolution.

  16. Real-time depth map manipulation for 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideses, Ianir; Fishbain, Barak; Yaroslavsky, Leonid

    2009-02-01

    One of the key aspects of 3D visualization is computation of depth maps. Depth maps enables synthesis of 3D video from 2D video and use of multi-view displays. Depth maps can be acquired in several ways. One method is to measure the real 3D properties of the scene objects. Other methods rely on using two cameras and computing the correspondence for each pixel. Once a depth map is acquired for every frame, it can be used to construct its artificial stereo pair. There are many known methods for computing the optical flow between adjacent video frames. The drawback of these methods is that they require extensive computation power and are not very well suited to high quality real-time 3D rendering. One efficient method for computing depth maps is extraction of motion vector information from standard video encoders. In this paper we present methods to improve the 3D visualization quality acquired from compression CODECS by spatial/temporal and logical operations and manipulations. We show how an efficient real time implementation of spatial-temporal local order statistics such as median and local adaptive filtering in 3D-DCT domain can substantially improve the quality of depth maps and consequently 3D video while retaining real-time rendering. Real-time performance is achived by utilizing multi-core technology using standard parallelization algorithms and libraries (OpenMP, IPP).

  17. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-15

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  18. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breakinga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  19. Fast iterative image reconstruction of 3D PET data

    SciTech Connect

    Kinahan, P.E.; Townsend, D.W.; Michel, C.

    1996-12-31

    For count-limited PET imaging protocols, two different approaches to reducing statistical noise are volume, or 3D, imaging to increase sensitivity, and statistical reconstruction methods to reduce noise propagation. These two approaches have largely been developed independently, likely due to the perception of the large computational demands of iterative 3D reconstruction methods. We present results of combining the sensitivity of 3D PET imaging with the noise reduction and reconstruction speed of 2D iterative image reconstruction methods. This combination is made possible by using the recently-developed Fourier rebinning technique (FORE), which accurately and noiselessly rebins 3D PET data into a 2D data set. The resulting 2D sinograms are then reconstructed independently by the ordered-subset EM (OSEM) iterative reconstruction method, although any other 2D reconstruction algorithm could be used. We demonstrate significant improvements in image quality for whole-body 3D PET scans by using the FORE+OSEM approach compared with the standard 3D Reprojection (3DRP) algorithm. In addition, the FORE+OSEM approach involves only 2D reconstruction and it therefore requires considerably less reconstruction time than the 3DRP algorithm, or any fully 3D statistical reconstruction algorithm.

  20. Ising antiferromagnet on the Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2015-06-01

    Geometric frustration effects were studied systematically with the Ising antiferromagnet on the 11 Archimedean lattices using the Monte Carlo methods. The Wang-Landau algorithm for static properties (specific heat and residual entropy) and the Metropolis algorithm for a freezing order parameter were adopted. The exact residual entropy was also found. Based on the degree of frustration and dynamic properties, ground states of them were determined. The Shastry-Sutherland lattice and the trellis lattice are weakly frustrated and have two- and one-dimensional long-range-ordered ground states, respectively. The bounce, maple-leaf, and star lattices have the spin ice phase. The spin liquid phase appears in the triangular and kagome lattices.

  1. Probing the evolution of antiferromagnetism in multiferroics

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, M.; Martin, L.; Scholl, A.; He, Q.; Yu, P.; Yang, C.-H.; Yang, S.; Glans, P.-A.; Valvidares, M.; Huijben, M.; Kortright, J.; Guo,, J.; Chu, Y.-H.; Ramesh, R.

    2010-06-09

    This study delineates the evolution of magnetic order in epitaxial films of the room-temperature multiferroic BiFeO3 system. Using angle- and temperature-dependent dichroic measurements and spectromicroscopy, we have observed that the antiferromagnetic order in the model multiferroic BiFeO3 evolves systematically as a function of thickness and strain. Lattice-mismatch-induced strain is found to break the easy-plane magnetic symmetry of the bulk and leads to an easy axis of magnetization which can be controlled through strain. Understanding the evolution of magnetic structure and how to manipulate the magnetism in this model multiferroic has significant implications for utilization of such magnetoelectric materials in future applications.

  2. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  3. Fermions in Optical Lattices: Cooling Protocol to Observe Anti-ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Nandini

    2011-03-01

    Experiments on ultracold atoms in optical lattices have the potential of probing the complex phase diagrams arising from simple Hamiltonians. One of the most challenging problems for an optical lattice emulator is that of cooling fermions to observe interesting broken symmetry phases. In this talk I will discuss recent theoretical progress on this question for the simplest model of interacting fermions: the Hubbard model. We determine the equation of state, the density ρ (μ , T , U / t) , and the entropy of the 3D repulsive Hubbard model using exact determinental Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations. Using the local density approximation (LDA), we calculate the spatial variation of density, entropy density, double-occupancy, local compressibility and local spin correlations for different trap curvatures and interaction strengths U / t . In contrast to a homogeneous system, we show that in a trap we can locally squeeze out the entropy from certain regions and observe antiferromagnetic order, even though the total entropy per particle in the cloud is quite high. We show that significant cooling due to entropy redistribution in the trap can be achieved by two mechanisms: (a) by increasing the lattice depth, and (b) by decompressing the cloud. Our calculations can be an important guide in the race to observe antiferromagnetic order in optical lattices. In collaboration with: Thereza Paiva (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Mohit Randeria (Ohio State), and Richard Scalettar (UC Davis). We acknowledge support from ARO W911NF-08-1-0338 and NSF-DMR 0706203 and the use of computational facilities at the Ohio Sup.

  4. Characterization of the antiferromagnetism in Ag(pyz)2(S2O8) with a two-dimensional square lattice of Ag 2+ ions (Ag=silver, Pyz-pyrdzine, S2O8=sulfate)

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Mc Donald, R; Sengupta, P; Cox, S; Manson, J; Southerland, H; Warter, M; Stone, K; Stephens, P; Lancaster, T; Steele, A; Blundell, S; Baker, P; Pratt, F; Lee, C; Whangbo, M

    2009-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements show that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) consists of 2D square nets of Ag{sup 2+} ions resulting from the corner-sharing of axially elongated AgN{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedra and exhibits characteristic 2D antiferromagnetism. Nevertheless, {mu}{sup +}Sr measurements indicate that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) undergoes 3D magnetic ordering below 7.8(3) K.

  5. a Fast Method for Measuring the Similarity Between 3d Model and 3d Point Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Li, Jonathan; Li, Xin; Lin, Yangbin; Zhang, Shanxin; Wang, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a fast method for measuring the partial Similarity between 3D Model and 3D point Cloud (SimMC). It is crucial to measure SimMC for many point cloud-related applications such as 3D object retrieval and inverse procedural modelling. In our proposed method, the surface area of model and the Distance from Model to point Cloud (DistMC) are exploited as measurements to calculate SimMC. Here, DistMC is defined as the weighted distance of the distances between points sampled from model and point cloud. Similarly, Distance from point Cloud to Model (DistCM) is defined as the average distance of the distances between points in point cloud and model. In order to reduce huge computational burdens brought by calculation of DistCM in some traditional methods, we define SimMC as the ratio of weighted surface area of model to DistMC. Compared to those traditional SimMC measuring methods that are only able to measure global similarity, our method is capable of measuring partial similarity by employing distance-weighted strategy. Moreover, our method is able to be faster than other partial similarity assessment methods. We demonstrate the superiority of our method both on synthetic data and laser scanning data.

  6. Understanding Crystal Populations; Looking Towards 3D Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand volcanic systems, the potential record held within crystal populations needs to be revealed. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that the crystal populations that arrive at the surface in volcanic eruptions are commonly mixtures of crystals, which may be representative of simple crystallization, recycling of crystals and incorporation of alien crystals. If we can quantify the true 3D population within a sample then we will be able to separate crystals with different histories and begin to interrogate the true and complex plumbing within the volcanic system. Modeling crystal populations is one area where we can investigate the best methodologies to use when dealing with sections through 3D populations. By producing known 3D shapes and sizes with virtual textures and looking at the statistics of shape and size when such populations are sectioned, we are able to gain confidence about what our 2D information is telling us about the population. We can also use this approach to test the size of population we need to analyze. 3D imaging through serial sectioning or x-ray CT, provides a complete 3D quantification of a rocks texture. Individual phases can be identified and in principle the true 3D statistics of the population can be interrogated. In practice we need to develop strategies (as with 2D-3D transformations), that enable a true characterization of the 3D data, and an understanding of the errors and pitfalls that exist. Ultimately, the reproduction of true 3D textures and the wealth of information they hold, is now within our reach.

  7. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  8. Co-Rotating Vortex Merger in 2- and 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Jd

    2000-11-01

    The interaction and merger of a co-rotating vortex pair is investigated experimentally in 2- and 3-D. A soap film membrane serves as the 2-D medium while a water tank serves as the 3-D facility. In both cases, pitching plates rotating in opposite directions are used to create co-rotating starting vortices. In both experiments, the motion of the vortices is observed while PIV is used to extract the velocity fields. In particular, the merger dynamics of the pair of co-rotating vortices with Re_Γ on the order of 10^2 - 10^5 is investigated. The differences between the 2- and 3-D cases are analyzed with emphasis on the details of the merger physics. Comparisons are made with computational analyses and the application of 2-D simulations to study 3-D vortex behavior is discussed.

  9. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  10. Automated 3D vascular segmentation in CT hepatic venography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Lucidarme, Olivier; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-08-01

    In the framework of preoperative evaluation of the hepatic venous anatomy in living-donor liver transplantation or oncologic rejections, this paper proposes an automated approach for the 3D segmentation of the liver vascular structure from 3D CT hepatic venography data. The developed segmentation approach takes into account the specificities of anatomical structures in terms of spatial location, connectivity and morphometric properties. It implements basic and advanced morphological operators (closing, geodesic dilation, gray-level reconstruction, sup-constrained connection cost) in mono- and multi-resolution filtering schemes in order to achieve an automated 3D reconstruction of the opacified hepatic vessels. A thorough investigation of the venous anatomy including morphometric parameter estimation is then possible via computer-vision 3D rendering, interaction and navigation capabilities.

  11. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  12. Automatic 3D video format detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Zhe; Zhai, Jiefu; Doyen, Didier

    2011-03-01

    Many 3D formats exist and will probably co-exist for a long time even if 3D standards are today under definition. The support for multiple 3D formats will be important for bringing 3D into home. In this paper, we propose a novel and effective method to detect whether a video is a 3D video or not, and to further identify the exact 3D format. First, we present how to detect those 3D formats that encode a pair of stereo images into a single image. The proposed method detects features and establishes correspondences between features in the left and right view images, and applies the statistics from the distribution of the positional differences between corresponding features to detect the existence of a 3D format and to identify the format. Second, we present how to detect the frame sequential 3D format. In the frame sequential 3D format, the feature points are oscillating from frame to frame. Similarly, the proposed method tracks feature points over consecutive frames, computes the positional differences between features, and makes a detection decision based on whether the features are oscillating. Experiments show the effectiveness of our method.

  13. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  14. Effective field theory for Sp(N) antiferromagnets and their phase structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Hattori, Shinya; Ichinose, Ikuo

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we study quantum Sp(N) antiferromagnetic (AF) Heisenberg models by using the Schwinger-boson representation and the path-integral methods. We consider both the two-dimensional (2D) system at vanishing temperature and the 3D system at finite temperature (T). An effective field theory, which is an extension of the CP{sup N-1} model in 3D, is derived and its phase structure is studied with the 1/N expansion. We also introduce a lattice gauge theoretical model of CP{sup N-1} bosons, which is a counterpart of the effective field theory in the continuum, and study its phase structure by means of Monte Carlo simulations. For SU(N) AF magnets on the 2D square lattice, which is a specific case of the Sp(N) model, we introduce a spatial anisotropy in the exchange couplings and show that a phase transition from the ordered Neel state to the paramagnetic phase takes place as the anisotropy is increased. On the other hand for the 3D Sp(N) system at finite T, we clarify the global phase structure. As a parameter that controls explicit breaking of the SU(N) symmetry is increased, a new phase, which is similar to the spiral-spin phase in frustrated SU(2) spin systems, appears. It is shown that at that phase transition point, a local SU(2) gauge symmetry with composite SU(2) gauge field appears in the low-energy sector. This is another example of the symmetry-enhancement phenomenon at low energies. As it is expected that the Sp(4) AF magnets are realized by cold spin-3/2 fermions in an optical lattice, the above results might be verified by experiments in the near future.

  15. Structural and property studies on metal–organic compounds with 3-D supramolecular network

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi-Ying; Ma, Ke-Fang; Xiao, Hong-Ping; Li, Xin-Hua; Shi, Qian

    2014-07-01

    Two carboxylato-bridged allomeric compounds, ([Cu{sub 2}(dbsa){sub 2}(hmt) (H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{sub 1/2}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Ni(dbsa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 1/2}[Ni(dbsa)(hmt)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 1/2}·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2) (H{sub 2}dbsa=meso-2,3-dibromosuccinic acid, hmt=hexamethylenetetramine) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray structral analyses. The metal ions have two kinds of coordination fashion in one unit, and bridged by carboxylate and hmt ligands along with weak interactions existing in the solid structure, forming a 3-D supramolecular network. Variable-temperature magnetic property studies reveal the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions in 1 and 2 with g=2.2, J{sub 1}=−3.5 cm{sup −1}, J{sub 2}=−2.8 cm{sup −1} for 1, and g=2.1, J=−3.5 cm{sup −1} for 2. - Graphical abstract: Variable-temperature magnetic property studies of two 3-D supramolecular compounds reveal the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions between the metal ions, through the effective super-exchange media. - Highlights: • Two 3-D allomeric Cu(II) and Ni(II) metal–organic compounds have been prepared. • The 3-D networks were constructed by coordination bonds, weak interactions and hydrogen bond interactions. • There are antiferromagnetic super-exchange interactions between the metal ions.

  16. 3D Stratigraphic Modeling of Central Aachen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, M.; Neukum, C.; Azzam, R.; Hu, H.

    2010-05-01

    , -y, -z coordinates, down-hole depth, and stratigraphic information are available. 4) We grouped stratigraphic units into four main layers based on analysis of geological settings of the modeling area. The stratigraphic units extend from Quaternary, Cretaceous, Carboniferous to Devonian. In order to facilitate the determination of each unit boundaries, a series of standard code was used to integrate data with different descriptive attributes. 5) The Quaternary and Cretaceous units are characterized by subhorizontal layers. Kriging interpolation was processed to the borehole data in order to estimate data distribution and surface relief for the layers. 6) The Carboniferous and Devonian units are folded. The lack of software support, concerning simulating folds and the shallow depth of boreholes and cross sections constrained the determination of geological boundaries. A strategy of digitalizing the fold surfaces from cross sections and establishing them as inclined strata was followed. The modeling was simply subdivided into two steps. The first step consisted of importing data into the modeling software. The second step involved the construction of subhorizontal layers and folds, which were constrained by geological maps, cross sections and outcrops. The construction of the 3D stratigraphic model is of high relevance to further simulation and application, such as 1) lithological modeling; 2) answering simple questions such as "At which unit is the water table?" and calculating volume of groundwater storage during assessment of aquifer vulnerability to contamination; and 3) assigned by geotechnical properties in grids and providing them for user required application. Acknowledgements: Borehole data is kindly provided by the Municipality of Aachen. References: 1. Janet T. Watt, Jonathan M.G. Glen, David A. John and David A. Ponce (2007) Three-dimensional geologic model of the northern Nevada rift and the Beowawe geothermal system, north-central Nevada. Geosphere, v. 3

  17. Antiferromagnetism and Kondo screening on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Hong-Shuai, Tao; Guo, Wen-Xiang; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic adatoms in the honeycomb lattice have received tremendous attention due to the interplay between Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction and Kondo coupling leading to very rich physics. Here we study the competition between the antiferromagnetism and Kondo screening of local moments by the conduction electrons on the honeycomb lattice using the determinant quantum Monte Carlo method. While changing the interband hybridization V, we systematically investigate the antiferromagnetic-order state and the Kondo singlet state transition, which is characterized by the behavior of the local moment, antiferromagnetic structure factor, and the short range spin-spin correlation. The evolution of the single particle spectrum are also calculated as a function of hybridization V, we find that the system presents a small gap in the antiferromagnetic-order region and a large gap in the Kondo singlet region in the Fermi level. We also find that the localized and itinerant electrons coupling leads to the midgap states in the conduction band in the Fermi level at very small V. Moreover, the formation of antiferromagnetic order and Kondo singlet are studied as on-site interaction U or temperature T increasing, we have derived the phase diagrams at on-site interaction U (or temperature T) and hybridization V plane. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Special Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 2011CB921502 and 2012CB821305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 61227902, 61378017, and 11434015), the State Key Laboratory for Quantum Optics and Quantum Optical Devices, China (Grant No. KF201403).

  18. Adaptive interrogation for 3D-PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Matteo; Ianiro, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2013-02-01

    A method to adapt the shape and orientation of interrogation volumes for 3D-PIV motion analysis is introduced, aimed to increase the local spatial resolution. The main application of this approach is the detailed analysis of complex 3D and vortex-dominated flows that exhibit high vorticity in confined regions like shear layers and vortex filaments. The adaptive criterion is based on the analysis of the components of the local velocity gradient tensor, which returns the level of anisotropy of velocity spatial fluctuations. The principle to increase the local spatial resolution is based on the deformation of spherical isotropic interrogation regions, obtained by means of Gaussian weighting, into ellipsoids, with free choice of the principal axes and their directions. The interrogation region is contracted in the direction of the maximum velocity variation and elongated in the minimum one in order to maintain a constant interrogation volume. The adaptivity technique for three-dimensional PIV data takes advantage of the 3D topology of the flow, allowing increasing the spatial resolution not only in the case of shear layers, but also for vortex filaments, which is not possible for two-dimensional measurement in the plane normal to the vortex axis. The definition of the ellipsoidal interrogation region semi-axes is based on the singular values and singular directions of the local velocity gradient tensor as obtained by the singular values decomposition technique (SVD). The working principle is verified making use of numerical simulations of a shear layer and of a vortex filament. The application of the technique to data from a Tomo-PIV experiment conducted on a round jet, shows that the resolution of the shear layer at the jet exit can be considerably improved and an increase of about 25% in the vorticity peak is attained when the adaptive approach is applied. On the other hand, the peak vorticity description in the core of vortex rings is only slightly improved with

  19. Anisotropic magnetoresistance in an antiferromagnetic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Fina, I; Marti, X; Yi, D; Liu, J; Chu, J H; Rayan-Serrao, C; Suresha, S; Shick, A B; Zelezný, J; Jungwirth, T; Fontcuberta, J; Ramesh, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in devices comprising metal antiferromagnets have demonstrated the feasibility of a novel spintronic concept in which spin-dependent phenomena are governed by an antiferromagnet instead of a ferromagnet. Here we report experimental observation of the anisotropic magnetoresistance in an antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr2IrO4. Based on ab initio calculations, we associate the origin of the phenomenon with large anisotropies in the relativistic electronic structure. The antiferromagnet film is exchange coupled to a ferromagnet, which allows us to reorient the antiferromagnet spin-axis in applied magnetic fields via the exchange spring effect. We demonstrate that the semiconducting nature of our AFM electrode allows us to perform anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements in the current-perpendicular-to-plane geometry without introducing a tunnel barrier into the stack. Temperature-dependent measurements of the resistance and anisotropic magnetoresistance highlight the large, entangled tunabilities of the ordinary charge and spin-dependent transport in a spintronic device utilizing the antiferromagnet semiconductor.

  20. Pipe3D, a pipeline to analyze Integral Field Spectroscopy Data: I. New fitting philosophy of FIT3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; González, J. J.; Rosález-Ortega, F. F.; Cano-Dí az, M.; López-Cobá, C.; Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Mollá, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Ascasibar, Y.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present an improved version of FIT3D, a fitting tool for the analysis of the spectroscopic properties of the stellar populations and the ionized gas derived from moderate resolution spectra of galaxies. This tool was developed to analyze integral field spectroscopy data and it is the basis of Pipe3D, a pipeline used in the analysis of CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI data. We describe the philosophy and each step of the fitting procedure. We present an extensive set of simulations in order to estimate the precision and accuracy of the derived parameters for the stellar populations and the ionized gas. We report on the results of those simulations. Finally, we compare the results of the analysis using FIT3D with those provided by other widely used packages, and we find that the parameters derived by FIT3D are fully compatible with those derived using these other tools.

  1. Structural and Magnetic Properties of the Kagome Antiferromagnet YbBaCo4O7

    SciTech Connect

    Huq,A.; Mitchell, J.; Zheng, H.; Chapon, L.; Radaelli, P.; Knight, K.; Stephens, P.

    2006-01-01

    The mixed-valent compound YbBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7} is built up of Kagom{acute e} sheets of CoO{sub 4} tetrahedra, linked in the third dimension by a triangular layer of CoO{sub 4} tetrahedra in an analogous fashion to that found in the known geometrically frustrated magnets such as pyrochlores and SrCr{sub 9x}Ga{sub 12-9x}O{sub 19} (SCGO). We have undertaken a study of the structural and magnetic properties of this compound using combined high-resolution powder neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. YbBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7} undergoes a first-order trigonal{yields}orthorhombic phase transition at 175 K. We show that this transition occurs as a response to a markedly underbonded Ba{sup 2+} site in the high-temperature phase and does not appear to involve charge ordering of Co{sup 2+}/Co{sup 3+} ions in the tetrahedra. The symmetry lowering relieves the geometric frustration of the structure, and a long-range-ordered 3-D antiferromagnetic state develops below 80 K.

  2. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  3. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-03-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The current paper describes the modern stereo 3-D technologies that are applicable to various tasks in teaching physics in schools, colleges, and universities. Examples of stereo 3-D simulations developed by the author can be observed on online.

  4. Software for 3D radiotherapy dosimetry. Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr; Karwowski, Andrzej C.

    2014-08-01

    The subject of this work is polyGeVero® software (GeVero Co., Poland), which has been developed to fill the requirements of fast calculations of 3D dosimetry data with the emphasis on polymer gel dosimetry for radiotherapy. This software comprises four workspaces that have been prepared for: (i) calculating calibration curves and calibration equations, (ii) storing the calibration characteristics of the 3D dosimeters, (iii) calculating 3D dose distributions in irradiated 3D dosimeters, and (iv) comparing 3D dose distributions obtained from measurements with the aid of 3D dosimeters and calculated with the aid of treatment planning systems (TPSs). The main features and functions of the software are described in this work. Moreover, the core algorithms were validated and the results are presented. The validation was performed using the data of the new PABIGnx polymer gel dosimeter. The polyGeVero® software simplifies and greatly accelerates the calculations of raw 3D dosimetry data. It is an effective tool for fast verification of TPS-generated plans for tumor irradiation when combined with a 3D dosimeter. Consequently, the software may facilitate calculations by the 3D dosimetry community. In this work, the calibration characteristics of the PABIGnx obtained through four calibration methods: multi vial, cross beam, depth dose, and brachytherapy, are discussed as well.

  5. [3D reconstructions in radiotherapy planning].

    PubMed

    Schlegel, W

    1991-10-01

    3D Reconstructions from tomographic images are used in the planning of radiation therapy to study important anatomical structures such as the body surface, target volumes, and organs at risk. The reconstructed anatomical models are used to define the geometry of the radiation beams. In addition, 3D voxel models are used for the calculation of the 3D dose distributions with an accuracy, previously impossible to achieve. Further uses of 3D reconstructions are in the display and evaluation of 3D therapy plans, and in the transfer of treatment planning parameters to the irradiation situation with the help of digitally reconstructed radiographs. 3D tomographic imaging with subsequent 3D reconstruction must be regarded as a completely new basis for the planning of radiation therapy, enabling tumor-tailored radiation therapy of localized target volumes with increased radiation doses and improved sparing of organs at risk. 3D treatment planning is currently being evaluated in clinical trials in connection with the new treatment techniques of conformation radiotherapy. Early experience with 3D treatment planning shows that its clinical importance in radiotherapy is growing, but will only become a standard radiotherapy tool when volumetric CT scanning, reliable and user-friendly treatment planning software, and faster and cheaper PACS-integrated medical work stations are accessible to radiotherapists.

  6. Landau model for the multiferroic delafossite antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L.; Perez-Mato, J. M.; Vieira, L. G.

    2016-10-01

    A symmetry based framework is used to describe the complex phase diagrams observed in the multiferroic delafossite compounds. A free energy Landau functional is derived from the analysis of the transformation properties of the most general incommensurate magnetic spin order parameter. A principle of maximal symmetry is invoked and the stability of each of the different higher symmetry phases considered. The competition between different potential ground states is analysed within the scope of a simplified model, which emphasizes the role of the symmetry allowed phase dependent biquadratic couplings. The cross-over between the different competing states is also discussed. The results show that the diverse set of phase diagrams that are experimentally observed in this class of triangular lattice antiferromagnets and, in particular, the stabilization of magnetically induced ferroelectric states, can be well interpreted and described within this integrated phenomenological approximation.

  7. Anomalous Magnetothermopower in a Metallic Frustrated Antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Arsenijević, Stevan; Ok, Jong Mok; Robinson, Peter; Ghannadzadeh, Saman; Katsnelson, Mikhail I; Kim, Jun Sung; Hussey, Nigel E

    2016-02-26

    We report the temperature T and magnetic field H dependence of the thermopower S of an itinerant triangular antiferromagnet PdCrO_{2} in high magnetic fields up to 32 T. In the paramagnetic phase, the zero-field thermopower is positive with a value typical of good metals with a high carrier density. In marked contrast to typical metals, however, S decreases rapidly with increasing magnetic field, approaching zero at the maximum field scale for T>70  K. We argue here that this profound change in the thermoelectric response derives from the strong interaction of the 4d correlated electrons of the Pd ions with the short-range spin correlations of the Cr^{3+} spins that persist beyond the Néel ordering temperature due to the combined effects of geometrical frustration and low dimensionality. PMID:26967440

  8. Spin dynamics in geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. S.; Ehlers, G.; Bramwell, S. T.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the spin dynamics of several antiferromagnetic pyrochlore oxides. These magnets are geometrically frustrated and only reach their ground states at temperatures much lower than that expected from mean field theory. Here we present data on the magnetic nature, especially the spin dynamics of Tb2Ti2O7, Gd2Ti2O7 and Y2Mo2O7. In these systems the ground states are found to be very different. Y2Mo2O7 freezes completely into a spin glass-like state, Tb2Ti2O7 is a cooperative paramagnetic and remains dynamic down to 15 mK and Gd2Ti2O7 enters a unique partially ordered state at {\\sim }1 K.

  9. Electric voltage generation by antiferromagnetic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Yuta; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically demonstrate dc and ac electric voltage generation due to spin motive forces originating from domain wall motion and magnetic resonance, respectively, in two-sublattice antiferromagnets. Our theory accounts for the canting between the sublattice magnetizations, the nonadiabatic electron spin dynamics, and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling, with the intersublattice electron dynamics treated as a perturbation. This work suggests a way to observe and explore the dynamics of antiferromagnetic textures by electrical means, an important aspect in the emerging field of antiferromagnetic spintronics, where both manipulation and detection of antiferromagnets are needed.

  10. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  11. 3D Printing in Instructional Settings: Identifying a Curricular Hierarchy of Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Abbie

    2015-01-01

    A report of a year-long study in which the author engaged in 3D printing activity in order to determine how to facilitate and support skill building, concept attainment, and increased confidence with its use among teachers. Use of 3D printing tools and their applications in instructional settings are discussed. A hierarchy of 3D printing…

  12. Antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in the half-Heusler semimetal HoPdBi.

    PubMed

    Pavlosiuk, Orest; Kaczorowski, Dariusz; Fabreges, Xavier; Gukasov, Arsen; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2016-01-05

    We observed the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order in the single-crystalline ternary pnictide HoPdBi, a plausible topological semimetal. The compound orders antiferromagnetically at TN = 1.9 K and exhibits superconductivity below Tc = 0.7 K, which was confirmed by magnetic, electrical transport and specific heat measurements. The specific heat shows anomalies corresponding to antiferromagnetic ordering transition and crystalline field effect, but not to superconducting transition. Single-crystal neutron diffraction indicates that the antiferromagnetic structure is characterized by the propagation vector. Temperature variation of the electrical resistivity reveals two parallel conducting channels of semiconducting and metallic character. In weak magnetic fields, the magnetoresistance exhibits weak antilocalization effect, while in strong fields and temperatures below 50 K it is large and negative. At temperatures below 7 K Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations with two frequencies appear in the resistivity. These oscillations have non-trivial Berry phase, which is a distinguished feature of Dirac fermions.

  13. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  14. Thermal 3D modeling system based on 3-view geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel thermal three-dimensional (3D) modeling system that includes 3D shape, visual, and thermal infrared information and solves a registration problem among these three types of information. The proposed system consists of a projector, a visual camera and, a thermal camera (PVT). To generate 3D shape information, we use a structured light technique, which consists of a visual camera and a projector. A thermal camera is added to the structured light system in order to provide thermal information. To solve the correspondence problem between the three sensors, we use three-view geometry. Finally, we obtain registered PVT data, which includes visual, thermal, and 3D shape information. Among various potential applications such as industrial measurements, biological experiments, military usage, and so on, we have adapted the proposed method to biometrics, particularly for face recognition. With the proposed method, we obtain multi-modal 3D face data that includes not only textural information but also data regarding head pose, 3D shape, and thermal information. Experimental results show that the performance of the proposed face recognition system is not limited by head pose variation which is a serious problem in face recognition.

  15. The Feasibility of 3d Point Cloud Generation from Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsubaie, N.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new technique for increasing the accuracy of direct geo-referenced image-based 3D point cloud generated from low-cost sensors in smartphones. The smartphone's motion sensors are used to directly acquire the Exterior Orientation Parameters (EOPs) of the captured images. These EOPs, along with the Interior Orientation Parameters (IOPs) of the camera/ phone, are used to reconstruct the image-based 3D point cloud. However, because smartphone motion sensors suffer from poor GPS accuracy, accumulated drift and high signal noise, inaccurate 3D mapping solutions often result. Therefore, horizontal and vertical linear features, visible in each image, are extracted and used as constraints in the bundle adjustment procedure. These constraints correct the relative position and orientation of the 3D mapping solution. Once the enhanced EOPs are estimated, the semi-global matching algorithm (SGM) is used to generate the image-based dense 3D point cloud. Statistical analysis and assessment are implemented herein, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D point cloud generation from the consumer-grade sensors in smartphones.

  16. Phase Sensitive Cueing for 3D Objects in Overhead Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D

    2005-02-04

    Locating specific 3D objects in overhead images is an important problem in many remote sensing applications. 3D objects may contain either one connected component or multiple disconnected components. Solutions must accommodate images acquired with diverse sensors at various times of the day, in various seasons of the year, or under various weather conditions. Moreover, the physical manifestation of a 3D object with fixed physical dimensions in an overhead image is highly dependent on object physical dimensions, object position/orientation, image spatial resolution, and imaging geometry (e.g., obliqueness). This paper describes a two-stage computer-assisted approach for locating 3D objects in overhead images. In the matching stage, the computer matches models of 3D objects to overhead images. The strongest degree of match over all object orientations is computed at each pixel. Unambiguous local maxima in the degree of match as a function of pixel location are then found. In the cueing stage, the computer sorts image thumbnails in descending order of figure-of-merit and presents them to human analysts for visual inspection and interpretation. The figure-of-merit associated with an image thumbnail is computed from the degrees of match to a 3D object model associated with unambiguous local maxima that lie within the thumbnail. This form of computer assistance is invaluable when most of the relevant thumbnails are highly ranked, and the amount of inspection time needed is much less for the highly ranked thumbnails than for images as a whole.

  17. 3D holography: from discretum to continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Dittrich, Bianca

    2016-03-01

    We study the one-loop partition function of 3D gravity without cosmological constant on the solid torus with arbitrary metric fluctuations on the boundary. To this end we employ the discrete approach of (quantum) Regge calculus. In contrast with similar calculations performed directly in the continuum, we work with a boundary at finite distance from the torus axis. We show that after taking the continuum limit on the boundary — but still keeping finite distance from the torus axis — the one-loop correction is the same as the one recently found in the continuum in Barnich et al. for an asymptotically flat boundary. The discrete approach taken here allows to identify the boundary degrees of freedom which are responsible for the non-trivial structure of the one-loop correction. We therefore calculate also the Hamilton-Jacobi function to quadratic order in the boundary fluctuations both in the discrete set-up and directly in the continuum theory. We identify a dual boundary field theory with a Liouville type coupling to the boundary metric. The discrete set-up allows again to identify the dual field with degrees of freedom associated to radial bulk edges attached to the boundary. Integrating out this dual field reproduces the (boundary diffeomorphism invariant part of the) quadratic order of the Hamilton-Jacobi functional. The considerations here show that bulk boundary dualities might also emerge at finite boundaries and moreover that discrete approaches are helpful in identifying such dualities.

  18. D3-D research operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, R. J.

    1994-05-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. In doing so, the DIII-D program provides physics and technology R&D outputs to aid the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY93 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics. The major goals of the Divertor and Boundary Physics studies are the control of impurities, efficient heat removal and understanding the strong role that the edge plasma plays in the global energy confinement of the plasma. The advanced tokamak studies initiated the investigation into new techniques for improving energy confinement, controlling particle fueling and increasing plasma beta. The major goal of the Tokamak Physics Studies is the understanding of energy and particle transport in a reactor relevant plasma.

  19. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  20. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  1. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  2. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  3. 3D toroidal physics: testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Don

    2014-10-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to lead to a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D ELM-suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. There is considerable interest in the development of unified physics models for the full range of 3D effects. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. Fortunately, significant progress is underway in theory, computation and plasma diagnostics on many issues such as magnetic surface quality, plasma screening vs. amplification of 3D perturbations, 3D transport, influence on edge pedestal structures, MHD stability effects, modification of fast ion-driven instabilities, prediction of energetic particle heat loads on plasma-facing materials, effects of 3D fields on turbulence, and magnetic coil design. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with future fusion reactors. The development of models to address 3D physics and progress in these areas will be described. This work is supported both by the US Department of Energy under Contract DE

  4. Wow! 3D Content Awakens the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2010-01-01

    From her first encounter with stereoscopic 3D technology designed for classroom instruction, Megan Timme, principal at Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet School in Dallas, sensed it could be transformative. Last spring, when she began pilot-testing 3D content in her third-, fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, Timme wasn't disappointed. Students…

  5. 3D, or Not to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, Keith

    2012-01-01

    It may be too soon for students to be showing up for class with popcorn and gummy bears, but technology similar to that behind the 3D blockbuster movie "Avatar" is slowly finding its way into college classrooms. 3D classroom projectors are taking students on fantastic voyages inside the human body, to the ruins of ancient Greece--even to faraway…

  6. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  7. Immersive 3D Geovisualization in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how immersive 3D geovisualization can be used in higher education. Based on MacEachren and Kraak's geovisualization cube, we examine the usage of immersive 3D geovisualization and its usefulness in a research-based learning module on flood risk, called GEOSimulator. Results of a survey among participating students…

  8. 3D elastic control for mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Hachet, Martin; Pouderoux, Joachim; Guitton, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    To increase the input space of mobile devices, the authors developed a proof-of-concept 3D elastic controller that easily adapts to mobile devices. This embedded device improves the completion of high-level interaction tasks such as visualization of large documents and navigation in 3D environments. It also opens new directions for tomorrow's mobile applications.

  9. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  10. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  11. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  12. A 3D Geostatistical Mapping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, W. W.; Stevenson, Graig; Patel, Ketan; Wang, Jun

    1999-02-09

    This software provides accurate 3D reservoir modeling tools and high quality 3D graphics for PC platforms enabling engineers and geologists to better comprehend reservoirs and consequently improve their decisions. The mapping algorithms are fractals, kriging, sequential guassian simulation, and three nearest neighbor methods.

  13. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D…

  14. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  15. Ultrafast spin dynamics and switching via spin transfer torque in antiferromagnets with weak ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Heon; Grünberg, Peter; Han, Song Hee; Cho, Beongki

    2016-10-01

    The spin-torque driven dynamics of antiferromagnets with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) were investigated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation with antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order parameters (l and m, respectively). We demonstrate that antiferromagnets including DMI can be described by a 2-dimensional pendulum model of l. Because m is coupled with l, together with DMI and exchange energy, close examination of m provides fundamental understanding of its dynamics in linear and nonlinear regimes. Furthermore, we discuss magnetization reversal as a function of DMI and anisotropy energy induced by a spin current pulse.

  16. Ultrafast spin dynamics and switching via spin transfer torque in antiferromagnets with weak ferromagnetism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Heon; Grünberg, Peter; Han, Song Hee; Cho, Beongki

    2016-01-01

    The spin-torque driven dynamics of antiferromagnets with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) were investigated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation with antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order parameters (l and m, respectively). We demonstrate that antiferromagnets including DMI can be described by a 2-dimensional pendulum model of l. Because m is coupled with l, together with DMI and exchange energy, close examination of m provides fundamental understanding of its dynamics in linear and nonlinear regimes. Furthermore, we discuss magnetization reversal as a function of DMI and anisotropy energy induced by a spin current pulse. PMID:27713522

  17. Impact of orthogonal exchange coupling on magnetic anisotropy in antiferromagnetic oxides/ferromagnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuświk, Piotr; Lana Gastelois, Pedro; Głowiński, Hubert; Przybylski, Marek; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    The influence of interface exchange coupling on magnetic anisotropy in the antiferromagnetic oxide/Ni system is investigated. We show how interfacial exchange coupling can be employed not only to pin the magnetization of the ferromagnetic layer but also to support magnetic anisotropy to orient the easy magnetization axis perpendicular to the film plane. The fact that this effect is only observed below the Néel temperature of all investigated antiferromagnetic oxides with significantly different magnetocrystalline anisotropies gives evidence that antiferromagnetic ordering is a source of the additional contribution to the perpendicular effective magnetic anisotropy.

  18. Impact of orthogonal exchange coupling on magnetic anisotropy in antiferromagnetic oxides/ferromagnetic systems.

    PubMed

    Kuświk, Piotr; Gastelois, Pedro Lana; Głowiński, Hubert; Przybylski, Marek; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2016-10-26

    The influence of interface exchange coupling on magnetic anisotropy in the antiferromagnetic oxide/Ni system is investigated. We show how interfacial exchange coupling can be employed not only to pin the magnetization of the ferromagnetic layer but also to support magnetic anisotropy to orient the easy magnetization axis perpendicular to the film plane. The fact that this effect is only observed below the Néel temperature of all investigated antiferromagnetic oxides with significantly different magnetocrystalline anisotropies gives evidence that antiferromagnetic ordering is a source of the additional contribution to the perpendicular effective magnetic anisotropy. PMID:27589202

  19. Antiferromagnet-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo-Yao; Lin, Po-Han; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Shih, Chun-Wei; Lee, Meng-Ju; Huang, Chun-Wei; Jih, Nae-Yeou; Wei, Der-Hsin

    2016-08-01

    This study demonstrates the effect of antiferromagnet-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) on ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic (FM/AFM/FM) trilayers and reveals its interplay with a long-range interlayer coupling between separated FM layers. In epitaxially grown 12 monolayer (ML) Ni/Co/Mn/5 ML Co/Cu(001) films, magnetic hysteresis loops and element-resolved magnetic domain imaging showed that the magnetization direction of the top layers of 12 ML Ni/Co films could be changed from the in-plane direction to the perpendicular direction, when the thickness of the Mn films (tMn) was greater than a critical value close to the thickness threshold associated with the onset of AFM ordering (tMn=3.5 ML). The top FM layers exhibited a significantly enhanced PMA when tMn increased further, and this enhancement can be attributed to a strengthened AFM ordering of the volume moments of the Mn films, as evidenced by the presence of induced domain frustration. By contrast, the long-range interlayer coupling presented clear effects only when tMn was at a lower coverage.

  20. Clinical applications of 3-D dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    Both 3-D gels and radiochromic plastic dosimeters, in conjunction with dose image readout systems (MRI or optical-CT), have been employed to measure 3-D dose distributions in many clinical applications. The 3-D dose maps obtained from these systems can provide a useful tool for clinical dose verification for complex treatment techniques such as IMRT, SRS/SBRT, brachytherapy, and proton beam therapy. These complex treatments present high dose gradient regions in the boundaries between the target and surrounding critical organs. Dose accuracy in these areas can be critical, and may affect treatment outcome. In this review, applications of 3-D gels and PRESAGE dosimeter are reviewed and evaluated in terms of their performance in providing information on clinical dose verification as well as commissioning of various treatment modalities. Future interests and clinical needs on studies of 3-D dosimetry are also discussed.

  1. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  2. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  3. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  4. The psychology of the 3D experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicke, Sophie H.; Ellis, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    With 3D televisions expected to reach 50% home saturation as early as 2016, understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the user response to 3D technology is critical for content providers, educators and academics. Unfortunately, research examining the effects of 3D technology has not kept pace with the technology's rapid adoption, resulting in large-scale use of a technology about which very little is actually known. Recognizing this need for new research, we conducted a series of studies measuring and comparing many of the variables and processes underlying both 2D and 3D media experiences. In our first study, we found narratives within primetime dramas had the power to shift viewer attitudes in both 2D and 3D settings. However, we found no difference in persuasive power between 2D and 3D content. We contend this lack of effect was the result of poor conversion quality and the unique demands of 3D production. In our second study, we found 3D technology significantly increased enjoyment when viewing sports content, yet offered no added enjoyment when viewing a movie trailer. The enhanced enjoyment of the sports content was shown to be the result of heightened emotional arousal and attention in the 3D condition. We believe the lack of effect found for the movie trailer may be genre-related. In our final study, we found 3D technology significantly enhanced enjoyment of two video games from different genres. The added enjoyment was found to be the result of an increased sense of presence.

  5. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  6. Coexistence of superconductivity, ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism in iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Raminder

    2016-05-01

    Coexistence of Superconductivity and magnetism have always been the fascinating area of interest for condensed-matter physicists. A variety of systems, such as cuprates, heavy fermions, and iron pnictides showed superconductivity in a narrow region near the border to antiferromagnetism (AFM)as a function of pressure or doping. However, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism (FM) has seen in URhGe, UGe2, ErRh4B4 and many compounds. Here, we present a third situation where superconductivity coexists with FM and AFM. The recent experimental finding of interplay of ferromagnetism,antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in EuFe2(As1-xPx)2 impressed us to discuss this problem in detail. Ironpnictides are high Tc magnetic superconductors and could be very useful in finding many new superconductorswith high Tc probably near to room temperature. In this paper, we have theoretically calculated the superconducting order parameter of EuFe2(As1-xPx)2 where magnetic ordering is due to Eu+ moments and superconductivity is due to Fe3+ moments. The Eu ions order antiferromagnetically for x≤0.13, while a crossover is observed for x≥0.22 whereupon the Eu ions order ferromagnetically.

  7. Tetragonal phase of epitaxial room-temperature antiferromagnet CuMnAs.

    PubMed

    Wadley, P; Novák, V; Campion, R P; Rinaldi, C; Martí, X; Reichlová, H; Zelezný, J; Gazquez, J; Roldan, M A; Varela, M; Khalyavin, D; Langridge, S; Kriegner, D; Máca, F; Mašek, J; Bertacco, R; Holý, V; Rushforth, A W; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Foxon, C T; Wunderlich, J; Jungwirth, T

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antiferromagnets as the active component in spintronic devices. This is in contrast to their current passive role as pinning layers in hard disk read heads and magnetic memories. Here we report the epitaxial growth of a new high-temperature antiferromagnetic material, tetragonal CuMnAs, which exhibits excellent crystal quality, chemical order and compatibility with existing semiconductor technologies. We demonstrate its growth on the III-V semiconductors GaAs and GaP, and show that the structure is also lattice matched to Si. Neutron diffraction shows collinear antiferromagnetic order with a high Néel temperature. Combined with our demonstration of room-temperature-exchange coupling in a CuMnAs/Fe bilayer, we conclude that tetragonal CuMnAs films are suitable candidate materials for antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  8. Tetragonal phase of epitaxial room-temperature antiferromagnet CuMnAs.

    PubMed

    Wadley, P; Novák, V; Campion, R P; Rinaldi, C; Martí, X; Reichlová, H; Zelezný, J; Gazquez, J; Roldan, M A; Varela, M; Khalyavin, D; Langridge, S; Kriegner, D; Máca, F; Mašek, J; Bertacco, R; Holý, V; Rushforth, A W; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Foxon, C T; Wunderlich, J; Jungwirth, T

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antiferromagnets as the active component in spintronic devices. This is in contrast to their current passive role as pinning layers in hard disk read heads and magnetic memories. Here we report the epitaxial growth of a new high-temperature antiferromagnetic material, tetragonal CuMnAs, which exhibits excellent crystal quality, chemical order and compatibility with existing semiconductor technologies. We demonstrate its growth on the III-V semiconductors GaAs and GaP, and show that the structure is also lattice matched to Si. Neutron diffraction shows collinear antiferromagnetic order with a high Néel temperature. Combined with our demonstration of room-temperature-exchange coupling in a CuMnAs/Fe bilayer, we conclude that tetragonal CuMnAs films are suitable candidate materials for antiferromagnetic spintronics. PMID:23959149

  9. 3D stereophotogrammetric image superimposition onto 3D CT scan images: the future of orthognathic surgery. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Khambay, Balvinder; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Bowman, Janet; Walker, Fraser; Hadley, Donald M; Ayoub, Ashraf

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to register and assess the accuracy of the superimposition method of a 3-dimensional (3D) soft tissue stereophotogrammetric image (C3D image) and a 3D image of the underlying skeletal tissue acquired by 3D spiral computerized tomography (CT). The study was conducted on a model head, in which an intact human skull was embedded with an overlying latex mask that reproduced anatomic features of a human face. Ten artificial radiopaque landmarks were secured to the surface of the latex mask. A stereophotogrammetric image of the mask and a 3D spiral CT image of the model head were captured. The C3D image and the CT images were registered for superimposition by 3 different methods: Procrustes superimposition using artificial landmarks, Procrustes analysis using anatomic landmarks, and partial Procrustes analysis using anatomic landmarks and then registration completion by HICP (a modified Iterative Closest Point algorithm) using a specified region of both images. The results showed that Procrustes superimposition using the artificial landmarks produced an error of superimposition on the order of 10 mm. Procrustes analysis using anatomic landmarks produced an error in the order of 2 mm. Partial Procrustes analysis using anatomic landmarks followed by HICP produced a superimposition accuracy of between 1.25 and 1.5 mm. It was concluded that a stereophotogrammetric and a 3D spiral CT scan image can be superimposed with an accuracy of between 1.25 and 1.5 mm using partial Procrustes analysis based on anatomic landmarks and then registration completion by HICP.

  10. Assessment of 3D Models Used in Contours Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, F. J. Ayala; Parra, E. B. Blazquez; Tubio, F. Montes

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental research focusing on the view of first year students. The aim is to check the quality of implementing 3D models integrated in the curriculum. We search to determine students' preference between the various means facilitated in order to understand the given subject. Students have been respondents to prove the…

  11. Antiferromagnetic Ground States in Some Commonly Known Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayri, Ali

    1997-01-01

    Antiferromagnetism is a very interesting behaviours in some real materials and their alloys. It is important in high Tc materials as well. The main reasons for antiferromagnetism are the kinetic exchange[1,2]. In this study, I will consider commonly known lattices in two or three dimensions. Using the Heisenberg model I will show that there are two systems: Frustrated and unfrustrated. In unfrustrated case the spin structure is unique and it involves ferromagnetism as well. However, in frustrated case the spin structure is not unique and it gives more than one spin orderings. This behaviours is very interesting since it causes a first order magnetic phase transition[3,4]. Finally, I will summarize that the simplier lattice (the square, the S.C. and B.C.C.) are unfrustrated and the complicated lattices (triangular, F.C.C. and H.C.P.) are frustrated.

  12. Ferro- and antiferro-magnetism in (Np, Pu)BC

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczuk, T.; Kozub, A. L.; Griveau, J.-C.; Colineau, E.; Wastin, F.; Falmbigl, M.; Rogl, P.

    2015-04-01

    Two new transuranium metal boron carbides, NpBC and PuBC, have been synthesized. Rietveld refinements of powder XRD patterns of (Np,Pu)BC confirmed in both cases isotypism with the structure type of UBC. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility data reveal antiferromagnetic ordering for PuBC below T{sub N} = 44 K, whereas ferromagnetic ordering was found for NpBC below T{sub C} = 61 K. Heat capacity measurements prove the bulk character of the observed magnetic transition for both compounds. The total energy electronic band structure calculations support formation of the ferromagnetic ground state for NpBC and the antiferromagnetic ground state for PuBC.

  13. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. 3D facial expression modeling for recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoguang; Jain, Anil K.; Dass, Sarat C.

    2005-03-01

    Current two-dimensional image based face recognition systems encounter difficulties with large variations in facial appearance due to the pose, illumination and expression changes. Utilizing 3D information of human faces is promising for handling the pose and lighting variations. While the 3D shape of a face does not change due to head pose (rigid) and lighting changes, it is not invariant to the non-rigid facial movement and evolution, such as expressions and aging effect. We propose a facial surface matching framework to match multiview facial scans to a 3D face model, where the (non-rigid) expression deformation is explicitly modeled for each subject, resulting in a person-specific deformation model. The thin plate spline (TPS) is applied to model the deformation based on the facial landmarks. The deformation is applied to the 3D neutral expression face model to synthesize the corresponding expression. Both the neutral and the synthesized 3D surface models are used to match a test scan. The surface registration and matching between a test scan and a 3D model are achieved by a modified Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the proposed expression modeling and recognition-by-synthesis schemes improve the 3D matching accuracy.

  15. Digital relief generation from 3D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meili; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Hongming; Qian, Kun; Chang, Jian; He, Dongjian

    2016-09-01

    It is difficult to extend image-based relief generation to high-relief generation, as the images contain insufficient height information. To generate reliefs from three-dimensional (3D) models, it is necessary to extract the height fields from the model, but this can only generate bas-reliefs. To overcome this problem, an efficient method is proposed to generate bas-reliefs and high-reliefs directly from 3D meshes. To produce relief features that are visually appropriate, the 3D meshes are first scaled. 3D unsharp masking is used to enhance the visual features in the 3D mesh, and average smoothing and Laplacian smoothing are implemented to achieve better smoothing results. A nonlinear variable scaling scheme is then employed to generate the final bas-reliefs and high-reliefs. Using the proposed method, relief models can be generated from arbitrary viewing positions with different gestures and combinations of multiple 3D models. The generated relief models can be printed by 3D printers. The proposed method provides a means of generating both high-reliefs and bas-reliefs in an efficient and effective way under the appropriate scaling factors.

  16. NUBEAM developments and 3d halo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkova, M. V.; Medley, S. S.; Kaye, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments related to the 3D halo model in NUBEAM code are described. To have a reliable halo neutral source for diagnostic simulation, the TRANSP/NUBEAM code has been enhanced with full implementation of ADAS atomic physic ground state and excited state data for hydrogenic beams and mixed species plasma targets. The ADAS codes and database provide the density and temperature dependence of the atomic data, and the collective nature of the state excitation process. To be able to populate 3D halo output with sufficient statistical resolution, the capability to control the statistics of fast ion CX modeling and for thermal halo launch has been added to NUBEAM. The 3D halo neutral model is based on modification and extension of the ``beam in box'' aligned 3d Cartesian grid that includes the neutral beam itself, 3D fast neutral densities due to CX of partially slowed down fast ions in the beam halo region, 3D thermal neutral densities due to CX deposition and fast neutral recapture source. More details on the 3D halo simulation design will be presented.

  17. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26562233

  18. Perception of detail in 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heynderickx, Ingrid; Kaptein, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    A lot of current 3D displays suffer from the fact that their spatial resolution is lower compared to their 2D counterparts. One reason for this is that the multiple views needed to generate 3D are often spatially multiplexed. Besides this, imperfect separation of the left- and right-eye view leads to blurring or ghosting, and therefore to a decrease in perceived sharpness. However, people watching stereoscopic videos have reported that the 3D scene contained more details, compared to the 2D scene with identical spatial resolution. This is an interesting notion, that has never been tested in a systematic and quantitative way. To investigate this effect, we had people compare the amount of detail ("detailedness") in pairs of 2D and 3D images. A blur filter was applied to one of the two images, and the blur level was varied using an adaptive staircase procedure. In this way, the blur threshold for which the 2D and 3D image contained perceptually the same amount of detail could be found. Our results show that the 3D image needed to be blurred more than the 2D image. This confirms the earlier qualitative findings that 3D images contain perceptually more details than 2D images with the same spatial resolution.

  19. 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:25093879

  20. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B.; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26562233